WorldWideScience

Sample records for science applications hierda

  1. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Added, N [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rizzutto, M A [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curado, J F [GFAA, Depto de Fisica Nuclear, IFUSP, University of Sao Paulo, Travessa R da rua do Matao 187, Cidade Universitaria, Caixa Postal 66318, CEP 05508-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Francci, C [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Markarian, R [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mori, M [School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-08-15

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a {sup 35}Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  2. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Added, N.; Rizzutto, M.A.; Curado, J.F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.; Mori, M.

    2006-01-01

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35 Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy

  3. Trace elementary concentration in enamel after dental bleaching using HI-ERDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Added, N.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Curado, J. F.; Francci, C.; Markarian, R.; Mori, M.

    2006-08-01

    Changes of elementary concentrations in dental enamel after a bleaching treatment with different products, is presented, with special focus on the oxygen contribution. Concentrations for Ca, P, O and C and some other trace elements were obtained for enamel of bovine incisor teeth by HI-ERDA measurements using a 35Cl incident beam and an ionization chamber. Five groups of teeth with five samples each were treated with a different bleaching agents. Each tooth had its crown sectioned in two halves, one for bleaching test and one the other used as a control. Average values of C/Ca, O/Ca, F/Ca enrichment factors were found. The comparison between bleached and non-bleached halves indicates that bleaching treatment did not affect the mineral structure when low-concentration whitening systems were used. The almost constant oxygen concentration in enamel, suggests little changes due to whitening therapy.

  4. Applications of Nuclear Science for Stewardship Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizewski, Jolie A

    2013-01-01

    Stewardship science is research important to national security interests that include stockpile stewardship science, homeland security, nuclear forensics, and non-proliferation. To help address challenges in stewardship science and workforce development, the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) was inaugurated ten years ago by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The goal was to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper presents an overview of recent research in low-energy nuclear science supported by the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances and the applications of this research to stewardship science.

  5. Information science and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings volume provides a snapshot of the latest issues encountered in technical convergence and convergences of security technology.  It explores how information science is core to most current research, industrial and commercial activities and consists of contributions covering topics including Ubiquitous Computing, Networks and Information Systems, Multimedia and Visualization, Middleware and Operating Systems, Security and Privacy, Data Mining and Artificial Intelligence, Software Engineering, and Web Technology.   The proceedings introduce the most recent information technology and ideas, applications and problems related to technology convergence, illustrated through case studies, and reviews converging existing security techniques.  Through this volume, readers will gain an understanding of the current state-of-the-art in information strategies and technologies of convergence security. The intended readership are researchers in academia, industry, and other research institutes focusing on ...

  6. Increasing Robotic Science Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The principal objectives are to demonstrate robotic-based scientific investigations and resource prospecting, and develop and demonstrate modular science instrument...

  7. Vacuum science, technology, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Naik, Pramod K

    2018-01-01

    Vacuum plays an important role in science and technology. The study of interaction of charged particles, neutrals and radiation with each other and with solid surfaces requires a vacuum environment for reliable investigations. Vacuum has contributed immensely to advancements made in nuclear science, space, metallurgy, electrical/electronic technology, chemical engineering, transportation, robotics and many other fields. This book is intended to assist students, scientists, technicians and engineers to understand the basics of vacuum science and technology for application in their projects. The fundamental theories, concepts, devices, applications, and key inventions are discussed.

  8. Nanofins science and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Navdeep

    2014-01-01

    Nanofins Science and Technology describes the heat transfer effectiveness of polymer coolants and their fundamental interactions with carbon nanotube coatings that act as nanofins. Heat transfer at micro/nano-scales has attracted significant attention in contemporary literature. This has been primarily driven by industrial requirements where significant decrease in the size of electronic devices/chips with concomitant enhancement in the heat flux have caused challenging needs for cooling of these platforms. With quantum effects kicking in, traditional cooling techniques need to be replaced with more effective technologies. A promising technique is to enhance heat transfer by surface texturing using nanoparticle coatings or engineered nanostructures. These nanostructures are termed as nanofins because they augment heat transfer by a combination of surface area enhancement as well as liquid-solid interactions at the molecular scale.

  9. Nuclear applications in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uenak, P.

    2009-01-01

    Radioactivity has revolutionized life sciences during the last century, and it is still an indispensable tool. Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics, Nutrition and Environmental Problems Relevant Health are significant application fields of Nuclear Sciences. Nuclear medicine today is a well established branch of medicine. Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play a key role both in diagnostic investigations and therapy-Both cyclotron and reactor produced radionuclides find application, the former more in diagnostic studies and the latter in therapy. New therapy applications such as bor neutron therapy are increasing by time together with the technological improvements in imaging systems such as PET and SPECT. Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play important role in both therapy and imaging. However cyclotron produced radionuclides have been using generally in imaging purposes while reactor produced radionuclides have also therapeutic applications. With the advent of emission tomography, new vistas for probing biochemistry in vivo have been opened. The radio chemist faces an ever-increasing challenge of designing new tracers for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Rapid, efficient and automated methods of radionuclide and precursor production, labeling of biomolecules, and quality control need to be developed. The purpose of this article is a short interface from Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Applications of Nuclear Sciences.

  10. Advanced in Computer Science and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, Neil; Park, James; CSA 2013

    2014-01-01

    The theme of CSA is focused on the various aspects of computer science and its applications for advances in computer science and its applications and provides an opportunity for academic and industry professionals to discuss the latest issues and progress in the area of computer science and its applications. Therefore this book will be include the various theories and practical applications in computer science and its applications.

  11. Connecting NASA science and engineering with earth science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Research Council (NRC) recently highlighted the dual role of NASA to support both science and applications in planning Earth observations. This Editorial reports the efforts of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission to integrate applications with science and engineering i...

  12. Phase change materials science and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Raoux, Simone

    2009-01-01

    ""Phase Change Materials: Science and Applications"" provides a unique introduction of this rapidly developing field. This clearly written volume describes the material science of these fascinating materials from a theoretical and experimental perspective.

  13. Grid for Earth Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitdidier, Monique; Schwichtenberg, Horst

    2013-04-01

    The civil society at large has addressed to the Earth Science community many strong requirements related in particular to natural and industrial risks, climate changes, new energies. The main critical point is that on one hand the civil society and all public ask for certainties i.e. precise values with small error range as it concerns prediction at short, medium and long term in all domains; on the other hand Science can mainly answer only in terms of probability of occurrence. To improve the answer or/and decrease the uncertainties, (1) new observational networks have been deployed in order to have a better geographical coverage and more accurate measurements have been carried out in key locations and aboard satellites. Following the OECD recommendations on the openness of research and public sector data, more and more data are available for Academic organisation and SMEs; (2) New algorithms and methodologies have been developed to face the huge data processing and assimilation into simulations using new technologies and compute resources. Finally, our total knowledge about the complex Earth system is contained in models and measurements, how we put them together has to be managed cleverly. The technical challenge is to put together databases and computing resources to answer the ES challenges. However all the applications are very intensive computing. Different compute solutions are available and depend on the characteristics of the applications. One of them is Grid especially efficient for independent or embarrassingly parallel jobs related to statistical and parametric studies. Numerous applications in atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, seismology, hydrology, pollution, climate and biodiversity have been deployed successfully on Grid. In order to fulfill requirements of risk management, several prototype applications have been deployed using OGC (Open geospatial Consortium) components with Grid middleware. The Grid has permitted via a huge number of runs to

  14. Radiological Protection Science and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssens, Augustin; ); Mossman, Ken; Morgan, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of radiation at the end of the 19. century, the health effects of exposure to radiation have been studied more than almost any other factor with potential effects on human health. The NEA has long been involved in discussions on the effects of radiation exposure, releasing two reports in 1994 and 2007 on radiological protection science. This report is the third in this state-of-the-art series, examining recent advances in the understanding of radiation risks and effects, particularly at low doses. It focuses on radiobiology and epidemiology, and also addresses the social science aspects of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making. The report summarises the status of, and issues arising from, the application of the International System of Radiological Protection to different types of prevailing circumstances. Reports published by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) in 1998 and 2007 provided an overview of the scientific knowledge available at that time, as well as the expected results from further research. They also discussed the policy implications that these results could have for the radiological protection system. The 2007 report highlighted challenges posed by developments in relation to medical exposure and by intentions to include the environment (i.e. non-human species), within the scope of the radiological protection system. It also addressed the need to be able to respond to a radiological terrorist attack. This report picks up on where the 1998 and 2007 reports left off, and addresses the state of the art in radiological prevention science and application today. It is divided into five chapters. Firstly, following broadly the structural topics from the 1998 and 2007 reports, the more purely scientific aspects of radiological protection are presented. These include cancer risk of low dose and dose rates, non-cancer effects and individual sensitivity. In view of the increasing

  15. Microgravity science and applications projects and payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of work conducted by the Microgravity Science and Applications Division of NASA is presented. The goals of the program are the development and implementation of a reduced-gravity research, science and applications program, exploitation of space for human benefits, and the application of reduced gravity research for the development of advanced technologies. Space research of fluid dynamics and mass transport phenomena is discussed and the facilities available for reduced gravity experiments are presented. A program for improving communication with the science and applications communities and the potential use of the Space Station for microgravity research are also examined.

  16. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Computer Science and Its Application ... Cloud model construct for transaction-based cooperative systems · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT ... The evaluation of tertiary institution service quality using HiEdQUAL and fuzzy ...

  17. Application in agriculture, forestry and environmental science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Holmes, J.W.; Williams, B. G.; Winkworth, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This consideration of the applications of the neutron method in forestry, agriculture and environmental science, focusses on the analyses of the data which can be obtained with the neutron method and draws attention to problem situations associated with its use

  18. Fuzzy logic applications in engineering science

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, J

    2006-01-01

    Fuzzy logic is a relatively new concept in science applications. Hitherto, fuzzy logic has been a conceptual process applied in the field of risk management. Its potential applicability is much wider than that, however, and its particular suitability for expanding our understanding of processes and information in science and engineering in our post-modern world is only just beginning to be appreciated. Written as a companion text to the author's earlier volume "An Introduction to Fuzzy Logic Applications", the book is aimed at professional engineers and students and those with an interest in exploring the potential of fuzzy logic as an information processing kit with a wide variety of practical applications in the field of engineering science and develops themes and topics introduced in the author's earlier text.

  19. Nanotechnology research: applications in nutritional sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Pothur R; Philbert, Martin; Vu, Tania Q; Huang, Qingrong; Kokini, Josef L; Saltos, Etta; Saos, Etta; Chen, Hongda; Peterson, Charles M; Friedl, Karl E; McDade-Ngutter, Crystal; Hubbard, Van; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Miller, Nancy; Betz, Joseph M; Dwyer, Johanna; Milner, John; Ross, Sharon A

    2010-01-01

    The tantalizing potential of nanotechnology is to fabricate and combine nanoscale approaches and building blocks to make useful tools and, ultimately, interventions for medical science, including nutritional science, at the scale of approximately 1-100 nm. In the past few years, tools and techniques that facilitate studies and interventions in the nanoscale range have become widely available and have drawn widespread attention. Recently, investigators in the food and nutrition sciences have been applying the tools of nanotechnology in their research. The Experimental Biology 2009 symposium entitled "Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences" was organized to highlight emerging applications of nanotechnology to the food and nutrition sciences, as well as to suggest ways for further integration of these emerging technologies into nutrition research. Speakers focused on topics that included the problems and possibilities of introducing nanoparticles in clinical or nutrition settings, nanotechnology applications for increasing bioavailability of bioactive food components in new food products, nanotechnology opportunities in food science, as well as emerging safety and regulatory issues in this area, and the basic research applications such as the use of quantum dots to visualize cellular processes and protein-protein interactions. The session highlighted several emerging areas of potential utility in nutrition research. Nutrition scientists are encouraged to leverage ongoing efforts in nanomedicine through collaborations. These efforts could facilitate exploration of previously inaccessible cellular compartments and intracellular pathways and thus uncover strategies for new prevention and therapeutic modalities.

  20. [Applications of synthetic biology in materials science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianxin; Zhong, Chao

    2017-03-25

    Materials are the basis for human being survival and social development. To keep abreast with the increasing needs from all aspects of human society, there are huge needs in the development of advanced materials as well as high-efficiency but low-cost manufacturing strategies that are both sustainable and tunable. Synthetic biology, a new engineering principle taking gene regulation and engineering design as the core, greatly promotes the development of life sciences. This discipline has also contributed to the development of material sciences and will continuously bring new ideas to future new material design. In this paper, we review recent advances in applications of synthetic biology in material sciences, with the focus on how synthetic biology could enable synthesis of new polymeric biomaterials and inorganic materials, phage display and directed evolution of proteins relevant to materials development, living functional materials, engineered bacteria-regulated artificial photosynthesis system as well as applications of gene circuits for material sciences.

  1. Cloud computing with e-science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Terzo, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The amount of data in everyday life has been exploding. This data increase has been especially significant in scientific fields, where substantial amounts of data must be captured, communicated, aggregated, stored, and analyzed. Cloud Computing with e-Science Applications explains how cloud computing can improve data management in data-heavy fields such as bioinformatics, earth science, and computer science. The book begins with an overview of cloud models supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and then:Discusses the challenges imposed by big data on scientific

  2. Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Pothur R.; Philbert, Martin; Vu, Tania Q.; Huang, Qingrong; Kokini, Josef L.; Saos, Etta; Chen, Hongda; Peterson, Charles M.; Friedl, Karl E.; McDade-Ngutter, Crystal; Hubbard, Van; Starke-Reed, Pamela; Miller, Nancy; Betz, Joseph M.; Dwyer, Johanna; Milner, John; Ross, Sharon A.

    2010-01-01

    The tantalizing potential of nanotechnology is to fabricate and combine nanoscale approaches and building blocks to make useful tools and, ultimately, interventions for medical science, including nutritional science, at the scale of ∼1–100 nm. In the past few years, tools and techniques that facilitate studies and interventions in the nanoscale range have become widely available and have drawn widespread attention. Recently, investigators in the food and nutrition sciences have been applying the tools of nanotechnology in their research. The Experimental Biology 2009 symposium entitled “Nanotechnology Research: Applications in Nutritional Sciences” was organized to highlight emerging applications of nanotechnology to the food and nutrition sciences, as well as to suggest ways for further integration of these emerging technologies into nutrition research. Speakers focused on topics that included the problems and possibilities of introducing nanoparticles in clinical or nutrition settings, nanotechnology applications for increasing bioavailability of bioactive food components in new food products, nanotechnology opportunities in food science, as well as emerging safety and regulatory issues in this area, and the basic research applications such as the use of quantum dots to visualize cellular processes and protein-protein interactions. The session highlighted several emerging areas of potential utility in nutrition research. Nutrition scientists are encouraged to leverage ongoing efforts in nanomedicine through collaborations. These efforts could facilitate exploration of previously inaccessible cellular compartments and intracellular pathways and thus uncover strategies for new prevention and therapeutic modalities. PMID:19939997

  3. Molecular Imprinting Applications in Forensic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Erkut; Garipcan, Bora; Patra, Hirak K; Uzun, Lokman

    2017-03-28

    Producing molecular imprinting-based materials has received increasing attention due to recognition selectivity, stability, cast effectiveness, and ease of production in various forms for a wide range of applications. The molecular imprinting technique has a variety of applications in the areas of the food industry, environmental monitoring, and medicine for diverse purposes like sample pretreatment, sensing, and separation/purification. A versatile usage, stability and recognition capabilities also make them perfect candidates for use in forensic sciences. Forensic science is a demanding area and there is a growing interest in molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in this field. In this review, recent molecular imprinting applications in the related areas of forensic sciences are discussed while considering the literature of last two decades. Not only direct forensic applications but also studies of possible forensic value were taken into account like illicit drugs, banned sport drugs, effective toxins and chemical warfare agents in a review of over 100 articles. The literature was classified according to targets, material shapes, production strategies, detection method, and instrumentation. We aimed to summarize the current applications of MIPs in forensic science and put forth a projection of their potential uses as promising alternatives for benchmark competitors.

  4. Solar energy sciences and engineering applications

    CERN Document Server

    Enteria, Napoleon

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is available all over the world in different intensities. Theoretically, the solar energy available on the surface of the earth is enough to support the energy requirements of the entire planet. However, in reality, progress and development of solar science and technology depends to a large extent on human desires and needs. This is due to the various barriers to overcome and to deal with the economics of practical utilization of solar energy.This book will introduce the rapid development and progress in the field of solar energy applications for science and technology: the advanc

  5. Progress in photon science basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book features chapters based on lectures presented by world-leading researchers of photon science from Russia and Japan at the first “STEPS Symposium on Photon Science” held in Tokyo in March 2015. It describes recent progress in the field of photon science, covering a wide range of interest to experts in the field, including laser-plasma interaction, filamentation and its applications, laser assisted electron scattering, exotic properties of light, ultrafast imaging, molecules and clusters in intense laser fields, photochemistry and spectroscopy of novel materials, laser-assisted material synthesis, and photon technology.

  6. International Conference on Information Science and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Joukov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    This book contains selected papers from the 7th International Conference on Information Science and Applications (ICISA 2016) and provides a snapshot of the latest issues encountered in technical convergence and convergences of security technology. It explores how information science is core to most current research, industrial and commercial activities and consists of contributions covering topics including Ubiquitous Computing, Networks and Information Systems, Multimedia and Visualization, Middleware and Operating Systems, Security and Privacy, Data Mining and Artificial Intelligence, Software Engineering, and Web Technology. The contributions describe the most recent developments in information technology and ideas, applications and problems related to technology convergence, illustrated through case studies, and reviews converging existing security techniques. Through this volume, readers will gain an understanding of the current state-of-the-art information strategies and technologies of convergence sec...

  7. Archives: Journal of Computer Science and Its Application

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 9 of 9 ... Archives: Journal of Computer Science and Its Application. Journal Home > Archives: Journal of Computer Science and Its Application. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: About this journal. Journal Home > Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Technology thrusts for future Earth science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2001-02-01

    This paper presents NASA's recent direction to invest in the critical science instrument and platform technologies in order to realize more reliable, frequent and versatile missions for future Earth Science measurements. Historically, NASA's Earth Science Enterprise has developed and flown science missions that have been large in size, mass and volume. These missions have taken much longer to implement due to technology development time, and have carried a large suite of instruments on a large spacecraft. NASA is now facing an era where the budget for the future years is more or less flat and the possibility for any major new start does not vividly appear on the horizon. Unfortunately, the scientific measurement needs for remote sensing have not shrunk to commensurate with the budget constraints. In fact, the challenges and scientific appetite in search of answers to a score of outstanding questions have been gradually expanding. With these factors in mind, for the last three years NASA has been changing its focus to concentrate on how to take advantage of smaller missions by relying on industry, and minimizing the overall mission life cycle by developing technologies that are independent of the mission implementation cycle. The major redirection of early investment in the critical technologies should eventually have its rewards and significantly reduce the mission development period. Needless to say, in the long run this approach should save money, minimize risk, promote or encourage partnering, allow for a rapid response to measurement needs, and enable frequent missions making a wider variety of earth science measurements. This paper gives an overview of some of the identified crucial technologies and their intended applications for meeting the future Earth Science challenges.

  12. Technology Thrust for Future Earth Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents NASA's recent direction to invest in the critical science instrument and platform technologies in order to realize more reliable, frequent and versatile missions for future Earth Science measurements. Traditionally, NASA's Earth Science Enterprise has developed and flown science missions that have been large in size, weight and volume. These missions have taken much longer implementation due to technology development time and have carried a large suite of instruments on a large-size spacecraft. NASA is also facing an era where the budget for the future years is more or less flat and the possibility for any major new start does not vividly appear on the horizon. Unfortunately, the scientific goals have not shrunk to commensurate with the budget constraints. In fact, the challenges and scientific appetite in search of answers to a score of outstanding questions have been gradually expanding. With these factors in mind, for the last three years NASA has been changing its focus to concentrate on how to take advantage of smaller missions by relying on industry, and minimizing the overall life cycle by infusing technologies that are being developed independently of any planned mission's implementation cycle. The major redirection of early investment in the critical technologies should have its rewards and significantly reduce the mission development period. Needless to say, in the long run this approach should save money, minimize risk, promote or encourage partnering, and allow for more frequent missions or earth science measurements to occur. This paper gives an overview of some of the identified crucial technologies and their intended applications for meeting the future Earth Science challenges.

  13. Applications of ISES for the atmospheric sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The proposed Information Sciences Experiment System (ISES) will offer the opportunity for real-time access to measurements acquired aboard the Earth Observation System (Eos) satellite. These measurements can then be transmitted to remotely located ground based stations. The application of such measurements to issues related to atmospheric science which was presented to a workshop convened to review possible application of the ISES in earth sciences is summarized. The proposed protocol for Eos instruments requires that measurement results be available in a central data archive within 72 hours of acquiring data. Such a turnaround of raw satellite data to the final product will clearly enhance the timeliness of the results. Compared to the time that results from many current satellite programs, the 72 hour turnaround may be considered real time. Examples are discussed showing how real-time measurements from one or more of the proposed Eos instruments could have been applied to the study of certain issues important to global atmospheric chemistry. Each of the examples discussed is based upon a field mission conducted during the past five years. Each of these examples will emphasize how real-time data could have been used to alter the course of a field experiment, thereby enhancing the scientific output. For the examples, brief overviews of the scientific rationale and objectives, the region of operation, the measurements aboard the aircraft, and finally how one or more of the proposed Eos instruments could have provided data to enhance the productivity of the mission are discussed.

  14. Remote sensing science - new concepts and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstl, S.A.; Cooke, B.J.; Henderson, B.G.; Love, S.P.; Zardecki, A.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The science and technology of satellite remote sensing is an emerging interdisciplinary field that is growing rapidly with many global and regional applications requiring quantitative sensing of earth`s surface features as well as its atmosphere from space. It is possible today to resolve structures on the earth`s surface as small as one meter from space. If this high spatial resolution is coupled with high spectral resolution, instant object identification can also be achieved. To interpret these spectral signatures correctly, it is necessary to perform a computational correction on the satellite imagery that removes the distorting effects of the atmosphere. This project studied such new concepts and applied innovative new approaches in remote sensing science.

  15. Accelerators for Discovery Science and Security applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, A.M.M., E-mail: alan_todd@mail.aesys.net; Bluem, H.P.; Jarvis, J.D.; Park, J.H.; Rathke, J.W.; Schultheiss, T.J.

    2015-05-01

    Several Advanced Energy Systems (AES) accelerator projects that span applications in Discovery Science and Security are described. The design and performance of the IR and THz free electron laser (FEL) at the Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin that is now an operating user facility for physical chemistry research in molecular and cluster spectroscopy as well as surface science, is highlighted. The device was designed to meet challenging specifications, including a final energy adjustable in the range of 15–50 MeV, low longitudinal emittance (<50 keV-psec) and transverse emittance (<20 π mm-mrad), at more than 200 pC bunch charge with a micropulse repetition rate of 1 GHz and a macropulse length of up to 15 μs. Secondly, we will describe an ongoing effort to develop an ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) source that is scheduled for completion in 2015 with prototype testing taking place at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). This tabletop X-band system will find application in time-resolved chemical imaging and as a resource for drug–cell interaction analysis. A third active area at AES is accelerators for security applications where we will cover some top-level aspects of THz and X-ray systems that are under development and in testing for stand-off and portal detection.

  16. Accelerators for Discovery Science and Security applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, A.M.M.; Bluem, H.P.; Jarvis, J.D.; Park, J.H.; Rathke, J.W.; Schultheiss, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Several Advanced Energy Systems (AES) accelerator projects that span applications in Discovery Science and Security are described. The design and performance of the IR and THz free electron laser (FEL) at the Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin that is now an operating user facility for physical chemistry research in molecular and cluster spectroscopy as well as surface science, is highlighted. The device was designed to meet challenging specifications, including a final energy adjustable in the range of 15–50 MeV, low longitudinal emittance (<50 keV-psec) and transverse emittance (<20 π mm-mrad), at more than 200 pC bunch charge with a micropulse repetition rate of 1 GHz and a macropulse length of up to 15 μs. Secondly, we will describe an ongoing effort to develop an ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) source that is scheduled for completion in 2015 with prototype testing taking place at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). This tabletop X-band system will find application in time-resolved chemical imaging and as a resource for drug–cell interaction analysis. A third active area at AES is accelerators for security applications where we will cover some top-level aspects of THz and X-ray systems that are under development and in testing for stand-off and portal detection

  17. Application of cluster computing in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmin, A.

    2006-01-01

    Solution of many problems in materials science requires that high performance computing (HPC) be used. Therefore, a cluster computer, Latvian Super-cluster (LASC), was constructed at the Institute of Solid State Physics of the University of Latvia in 2002. The LASC is used for advanced research in the fields of quantum chemistry, solid state physics and nano materials. In this work we overview currently available computational technologies and exemplify their application by interpretation of x-ray absorption spectra for nano-sized ZnO. (author)

  18. Application of positron annihilation in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, R.W.; Fluss, M.J.; Smedskjaer, L.C.

    1984-05-01

    Owing to the ability of the positron to annihilate from a variety of defect-trapped states, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) has been applied increasingly to the characterization and study of defects in materials in recent years. In metals particularly, it has been demonstrated that PAS can yield defect-specific information which, by itself or in conjunction with more traditional experimental techniques, has already made a significant impact upon the determination of atomic-defect properties and the monitoring and characterization of vacancy-like microstructure development, as occurs during post-irradiation annealing. The applications of PAS are now actively expanding to the study of more complex defect-related phenomena in irradiated or deformed metals and alloys, phase transformations and structural disorder, surfaces and near-surface defect characterization. A number of these applications in materials science are reviewed and discussed with respect to profitable future directions

  19. Application of infrared to biomedical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Etehadtavakol, Mahnaz

    2017-01-01

    The book covers the latest updates in the application of infrared to biomedical sciences, a non-invasive, contactless, safe and easy approach imaging of skin and tissue temperatures. Its diagnostic procedure allows practitioners to identify the locations of abnormal chemical and blood vessel activity such as angiogenesis in body tissue. Its non-invasive approach works by applying the technology of the infrared camera and state-of-the-art software, where high-resolution digital infrared imaging technology benefits highly from enhanced image production, standardized image interpretation protocols, computerized comparison and storage, and sophisticated image enhancement and analysis. The book contains contributions from global prominent scientists in the area of infrared applications in biomedical studies. The target audience includes academics, practitioners, clinicians and students working in the area of infrared imaging in biomedicine.

  20. 42. Science week: Laser Science and applications, Aleppo (SY), 2-4 Nov 2002, Book three: Laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This publication includes the papers presented at the 42nd science week of the Supreme Council of Sciences, held in Aleppo (Syria) from 2-4 November 2002. This proceedings is published in three books covering laser science and applications and in particular on material studies and medical uses. Part two covers medical applications, Part three on applications of laser in material sciences, while Part one is for contents and the proceedings program

  1. Mechanical Self-Assembly Science and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical Self-Assembly: Science and Applications introduces a novel category of self-assembly driven by mechanical forces. This book discusses self-assembly in various types of small material structures including thin films, surfaces, and micro- and nano-wires, as well as the practice's potential application in micro and nanoelectronics, MEMS/NEMS, and biomedical engineering. The mechanical self-assembly process is inherently quick, simple, and cost-effective, as well as accessible to a large number of materials, such as curved surfaces for forming three-dimensional small structures. Mechanical self-assembly is complementary to, and sometimes offer advantages over, the traditional micro- and nano-fabrication. This book also: Presents a highly original aspect of the science of self-assembly Describes the novel methods of mechanical assembly used to fabricate a variety of new three-dimensional material structures in simple and cost-effective ways Provides simple insights to a number of biological systems and ...

  2. Translating Behavioral Science into Practice: A Framework to Determine Science Quality and Applicability for Police Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Kimberley A; McGuire, Katherine L; Chapan, Denis M

    2018-05-07

    Policy on officer-involved shootings is critically reviewed and errors in applying scientific knowledge identified. Identifying and evaluating the most relevant science to a field-based problem is challenging. Law enforcement administrators with a clear understanding of valid science and application are in a better position to utilize scientific knowledge for the benefit of their organizations and officers. A recommended framework is proposed for considering the validity of science and its application. Valid science emerges via hypothesis testing, replication, extension and marked by peer review, known error rates, and general acceptance in its field of origin. Valid application of behavioral science requires an understanding of the methodology employed, measures used, and participants recruited to determine whether the science is ready for application. Fostering a science-practitioner partnership and an organizational culture that embraces quality, empirically based policy, and practices improves science-to-practice translation. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. FTIR spectroscopy applications in forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, C.; Maynard, P.; Dawson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy, and especially Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, is a well-established technique in analytical chemistry and finds widespread application in qualitative and quantitative analyses. Infrared spectra depend on the nature of the functional groups present in the analyte, and are generally complex with numerous maxima and minima. These features are useful for comparison purposes and, in most cases, the infrared spectrum of an organic compound is considered as a unique functional print of this compound (i e the infrared spectrum constitutes the chemical signature or fingerprint of an organic compound). Many inorganic substances may also be uniquely identified using infrared spectroscopy. Until recently, infrared spectroscopy was of only limited utility in forensic science, despite its high selectivity. This is because infrared spectroscopy suffered from a lack of sensitivity in its early forms. However, with the advance of modern technology this is no longer the case. The widespread use of microscope attachments, along with numerous new sampling accessories, has overcome most of the previous limitations. For example, with an infrared microscope, it is possible to focus the infrared beam, and therefore select relevant areas of the sample as small as 10 x 10 μm and achieve a measurement in situ. Such a configuration enables the rapid generation of high-resolution spectra from samples of 10 ng. Typical forensic applications include the analysis of single textile fibres, minute paint chips or smears, drugs, laser printer and photocopy toners, polymers and miscellaneous unknown substances. Here we will broadly review the most common applications of infrared spectroscopy in forensic science

  4. Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period April 1, 1983 through September 30, 1983 is summarized.

  5. Nuclear science in the 20th century. Nuclear technology applications in material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Junchen; Xu Furong; Zheng Chunkai

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear technology to material science has led to a new cross subject, nuclear material science (also named nuclear solid physics) which covers material analysis, material modification and new material synthesis. This paper reviews the development of nuclear technical applications in material science and the basic physics involved

  6. Magnetoresistive magnetometer for space science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P; Beek, T; Carr, C; O’Brien, H; Cupido, E; Oddy, T; Horbury, T S

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the in situ dc magnetic field on space science missions is most commonly achieved using instruments based on fluxgate sensors. Fluxgates are robust, reliable and have considerable space heritage; however, their mass and volume are not optimized for deployment on nano or picosats. We describe a new magnetometer design demonstrating science measurement capability featuring significantly lower mass, volume and to a lesser extent power than a typical fluxgate. The instrument employs a sensor based on anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) achieving a noise floor of less than 50 pT Hz −1/2 above 1 Hz on a 5 V bridge bias. The instrument range is scalable up to ±50 000 nT and the three-axis sensor mass and volume are less than 10 g and 10 cm 3 , respectively. The ability to switch the polarization of the sensor's easy axis and apply magnetic feedback is used to build a driven first harmonic closed loop system featuring improved linearity, gain stability and compensation of the sensor offset. A number of potential geospace applications based on the initial instrument results are discussed including attitude control systems and scientific measurement of waves and structures in the terrestrial magnetosphere. A flight version of the AMR magnetometer will fly on the TRIO-CINEMA mission due to be launched in 2012. (paper)

  7. Evolutionary equations with applications in natural sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhtar-Kharroubi, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    With the unifying theme of abstract evolutionary equations, both linear and nonlinear, in a complex environment, the book presents a multidisciplinary blend of topics, spanning the fields of theoretical and applied functional analysis, partial differential equations, probability theory and numerical analysis applied to various models coming from theoretical physics, biology, engineering and complexity theory. The unique features of the book are: the first simultaneous presentation of two complementary approaches to fragmentation and coagulation problems, by weak compactness methods and by using semigroup techniques, comprehensive exposition of probabilistic methods of analysis of long term dynamics of dynamical systems, semigroup analysis of biological problems and cutting edge pattern formation theory. The book will appeal to postgraduate students and researchers specializing in applications of mathematics to problems arising in natural sciences and engineering.

  8. Nuclear methods: applications to Earth sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, N.

    1994-01-01

    The discovery of radioactivity phenomenon occurred almost 100 years ago, in 1896, and constituted the base for new perspectives in many disciplines, including the Earth sciences. The initial works in this field, during the first quarter of the Century, established that the series of radioactive decay of long lifetime Uranium 238, Uranium 235 and Thorium 232 present radioactive isotopes of several elements which are physically and chemically different. The chemical differentiation of the Earth during its evolution has concentrated in the crust the major part of the radioactive materials. The application of radioactive in balance which occur as a consequence of chemical and physical differences, has evolve quickly, and the utilization of natural radioactive isotopes can be detach in two major headings: geologic clocks and tracers. The applications cover a wide spectra of geological, oceanographical, volcanic, hydrological, paleoclimatic and archaeological problems. In this paper, a description of radioactive phenomenon is presented, as well as the chemical and physical properties of the natural radioactive elements, the measurement methods and, finally, some examples of the uses in chronology and as radioactive tracers will be presented, doing an emphasis of some results obtained in Mexico. (Author)

  9. 42. Science week: Laser Science and applications, Aleppo (SY), 2-4 Nov 2002, Book two: Laser science and medical laser applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This publication includes the papers presented at the 42nd science week of the Supreme Council of Sciences, held in Aleppo (Syria) from 2-4 November 2002. This proceedings is published in three books covering laser science and applications and in particular on material studies and medical uses. Part two covers medical applications, Part three on applications of laser in material sciences, while Part one is for contents and the proceedings program

  10. Transitioning Unmanned Technologies for Earth Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardell, L. J.; Douglas, J.

    2008-12-01

    Development of small unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has progressed dramatically in recent years along with miniaturization of sensor technology. This confluence of development paths has resulted in greater capability in smaller, less expensive platforms allowing research to be performed where manned airborne platforms are impractical or dangerous. Recent applications include small UAS for studies involving hurricanes, volcanic activity, sea ice changes, glacier melt, biological monitoring of land and sea species, wildfire monitoring, and others. However, the majority of UAS employed in these investigations were originally developed for non-civilian applications and many of the required interfaces are locked behind proprietary specifications, requiring expensive customization by the manufacturer to transform a military UAS into one suitable for civilian work. A small UAS for scientific research should be standards-based, low-cost, user friendly, field serviceable, and be designed to accept a range of payloads. The AV8R UAS is one example of an unmanned system that has been developed for specific application to earth observation missions. This system is designed to be operated by the user with difficult environmental conditions and field logistics in mind. Numerous features and innovations that advance this technology as a research tool as well as its planned science missions will be presented. Most importantly, all interfaces to the system required for successful design and integration of various payloads will be openly available. The environment of open, standards based development allow the small technologies companies that serve as the backbone for much of the technology development to participate in the rapid development of industry capabilities. This is particularly true with UAS technologies. Programs within the USA such as the STTR foster collaborations with small businesses and university researchers. Other innovations related to autonomous unmanned systems

  11. Accelerator beam application in science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, M.

    1996-01-01

    Various accelerator beams are being used widely in science and industry. The area of their applications is so wide and rapidly expanding. This paper focuses on recent efforts made in the field of radiation chemistry, especially in materials development using electron and ion beams. Concerning the applications of electron beams, synthesis of SiC fibers, improvement of radiation resistance of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and preparation of an adsorbent for uranium recovery from sea water were described. In the synthesis of SiC, the electron beams were used effectively to cross-link precursor fibers to prevent their deformation upon heating for their pyrolysis to SiC fibers. The improvement of radiation resistance of PTFE was resulted successfully by its crosslinking. As to the preparation of the adsorbent for uranium recovery, chelating resins containing amidoxime groups were shown to work as a good adsorbent of uranium from sea water. The Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI completed the accelerator facility named TIARA for R and D of ion beam applications three years ago. Some results were presented on the studies about radiation effects on solar cells and LSIs for space use and synthesis of functional materials. Radiation resistance of solar cells was tested with both electron and proton beams using a beam scanning technique for the irradiation to a wide area, and ultra-fast transient current induced by heavy ion microbeam was measured for studies on mechanisms of single event upset (SEU) in LSIs. In the synthesis of organic functional materials, a temperature responsive particle track membrane was developed. Techniques for RBS and NRA using heavy ion beams were established for analyzing structures of multi-layered materials. Single crystalline thin film of diamond was successfully formed on Si substrate under the deposition of mass separated C-12 ions of 100 eV. (author)

  12. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Multiomic Applications in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and epigenetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics and data analysis. Applications are invited from teachers with experience in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Life Sciences, Agriculture and Technology. Applications from highly motivated Research. Scholars will also be considered.

  13. NT10: recent advances in carbon nanotube science and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2010-08-24

    A review of recent advances in carbon nanotube science and applications is presented in terms of what was learned at the NT10 11th International Conference on the Science and Application of Nanotubes held in Montreal, Canada, June 29-July 2, 2010.

  14. APPLICATION OF FORENSIC SCIENCE TECHNIQUES IN CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri.S*

    2018-01-01

    Forensic Science means the application of science to those criminal and civil laws that are enforced by the police agencies in a criminal justice system .Forensic Science plays a vital role in the criminal justice system by providing scientifically based information through the analysis of physical evidence. It involves the use of multiple disciplines such as physics, chemistry, biology, computer science and engineering for evidence analysis. In this paper I would like to analysis how...

  15. GIS and the Social Sciences : Theory and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballas, Dimitris; Clarke, Graham; Franklin, Rachel S.; Newing, Andy

    2017-01-01

    GIS and the Social Sciences offers a uniquely social science approach on the theory and application of GIS with a range of modern examples. It explores how human geography can engage with a variety of important policy issues through linking together GIS and spatial analysis, and demonstrates the

  16. Data science, learning, and applications to biomedical and health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nabil R; Wieder, Robert; Ghosh, Debopriya

    2017-01-01

    The last decade has seen an unprecedented increase in the volume and variety of electronic data related to research and development, health records, and patient self-tracking, collectively referred to as Big Data. Properly harnessed, Big Data can provide insights and drive discovery that will accelerate biomedical advances, improve patient outcomes, and reduce costs. However, the considerable potential of Big Data remains unrealized owing to obstacles including a limited ability to standardize and consolidate data and challenges in sharing data, among a variety of sources, providers, and facilities. Here, we discuss some of these challenges and potential solutions, as well as initiatives that are already underway to take advantage of Big Data. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy analytical, biophysical and life science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Schlücker, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Covering everything from the basic theoretical and practical knowledge to new exciting developments in the field with a focus on analytical and life science applications, this monograph shows how to apply surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for solving real world problems. From the contents: * Theory and practice of SERS * Analytical applications * SERS combined with other analytical techniques * Biophysical applications * Life science applications including various microscopies Aimed at analytical, surface and medicinal chemists, spectroscopists, biophysicists and materials scientists. Includes a Foreword by the renowned Raman spectroscopist Professor Wolfgang Kiefer, the former Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy.

  18. NASA Applied Sciences Program. Overview Presentation; Discovering and Demonstrating Innovative and Practical Applications of Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Goal 1: Enhance Applications Research Advance the use of NASA Earth science in policy making, resource management and planning, and disaster response. Key Actions: Identify priority needs, conduct applied research to generate innovative applications, and support projects that demonstrate uses of NASA Earth science. Goal 2: Increase Collaboration Establish a flexible program structure to meet diverse partner needs and applications objectives. Key Actions: Pursue partnerships to leverage resources and risks and extend the program s reach and impact. Goal 3:Accelerate Applications Ensure that NASA s flight missions plan for and support applications goals in conjunction with their science goals, starting with mission planning and extending through the mission life cycle. Key Actions: Enable identification of applications early in satellite mission lifecycle and facilitate effective ways to integrate end-user needs into satellite mission planning

  19. Parallel science and engineering applications the Charm++ approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Laxmikant V

    2016-01-01

    Developed in the context of science and engineering applications, with each abstraction motivated by and further honed by specific application needs, Charm++ is a production-quality system that runs on almost all parallel computers available. Parallel Science and Engineering Applications: The Charm++ Approach surveys a diverse and scalable collection of science and engineering applications, most of which are used regularly on supercomputers by scientists to further their research. After a brief introduction to Charm++, the book presents several parallel CSE codes written in the Charm++ model, along with their underlying scientific and numerical formulations, explaining their parallelization strategies and parallel performance. These chapters demonstrate the versatility of Charm++ and its utility for a wide variety of applications, including molecular dynamics, cosmology, quantum chemistry, fracture simulations, agent-based simulations, and weather modeling. The book is intended for a wide audience of people i...

  20. Advances in Computer Science, Engineering & Applications : Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Computer Science, Engineering & Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zizka, Jan; Nagamalai, Dhinaharan

    2012-01-01

    The International conference series on Computer Science, Engineering & Applications (ICCSEA) aims to bring together researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to focus on understanding computer science, engineering and applications and to establish new collaborations in these areas. The Second International Conference on Computer Science, Engineering & Applications (ICCSEA-2012), held in Delhi, India, during May 25-27, 2012 attracted many local and international delegates, presenting a balanced mixture of  intellect and research both from the East and from the West. Upon a strenuous peer-review process the best submissions were selected leading to an exciting, rich and a high quality technical conference program, which featured high-impact presentations in the latest developments of various areas of computer science, engineering and applications research.  

  1. Advances in Computer Science, Engineering & Applications : Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Computer Science, Engineering & Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zizka, Jan; Nagamalai, Dhinaharan

    2012-01-01

    The International conference series on Computer Science, Engineering & Applications (ICCSEA) aims to bring together researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to focus on understanding computer science, engineering and applications and to establish new collaborations in these areas. The Second International Conference on Computer Science, Engineering & Applications (ICCSEA-2012), held in Delhi, India, during May 25-27, 2012 attracted many local and international delegates, presenting a balanced mixture of  intellect and research both from the East and from the West. Upon a strenuous peer-review process the best submissions were selected leading to an exciting, rich and a high quality technical conference program, which featured high-impact presentations in the latest developments of various areas of computer science, engineering and applications research.

  2. Phase change materials: science and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raoux, Simone; Wuttig, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    ... are the Ovonic threshold switch, the multi-state Ovonic Universal Memory (OUM), and the Ovonic cognitive device which emulates the biological neurons with its plasticity and synaptic activity. The field of amorphous and disordered materials created not only a basic new area of science, but also important new technologies. It should be kept in mind that...

  3. Applications of neural networks in training science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Mark; Hohmann, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Training science views itself as an integrated and applied science, developing practical measures founded on scientific method. Therefore, it demands consideration of a wide spectrum of approaches and methods. Especially in the field of competitive sports, research questions are usually located in complex environments, so that mainly field studies are drawn upon to obtain broad external validity. Here, the interrelations between different variables or variable sets are mostly of a nonlinear character. In these cases, methods like neural networks, e.g., the pattern recognizing methods of Self-Organizing Kohonen Feature Maps or similar instruments to identify interactions might be successfully applied to analyze data. Following on from a classification of data analysis methods in training-science research, the aim of the contribution is to give examples of varied sports in which network approaches can be effectually used in training science. First, two examples are given in which neural networks are employed for pattern recognition. While one investigation deals with the detection of sporting talent in swimming, the other is located in game sports research, identifying tactical patterns in team handball. The third and last example shows how an artificial neural network can be used to predict competitive performance in swimming. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Models in Science Education: Applications of Models in Learning and Teaching Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornek, Funda

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss different types of models in science education and applications of them in learning and teaching science, in particular physics. Based on the literature, I categorize models as conceptual and mental models according to their characteristics. In addition to these models, there is another model called "physics model" by the…

  5. Applications of Nanomaterials in Dental Science: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Jitendra; Singh, Shivani; Lale, Shantanu V; Mishra, Monu; Koul, Veena; Kharbanda, P

    2017-04-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized health care industry in a large scale and its applications are a boon to modern medicine and dental science. It is expected to pervade and further revolutionize the art and science of dentistry and may well have important applications spanning all the aspects of oral diseases, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Materials science in dentistry has embraced the technology to produce nanomaterials that are being used in caries inhibitors, antimicrobial resins, hard tissue remineralizing agents, targeted drug delivery, scaffolds, bio-membranes, nanocrystalline hydroxyl apatite, restorative cements, adhesion promoters and boosters, bioactive glass, tissue conditioners, reinforced methacrylate resins, root canal disinfectants, friction free orthodontic arch wires and nano composites life. These upcoming technologies have potential to bring about significant benefits in the form of improvement in dental science and to society. The present review presents the latest recent developments in this interdisciplinary field bridging nanotechnology and dental science.

  6. Application of accelerator mass spectrometry in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaobo; Hu Jinjun; Wang Huijuan; Guan Yongjing; Wang Wei

    2013-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a promising method to provide extreme sensitivity measurements of the production yields of long-lived radioisotopes, which cannot be detected by other methods. AMS technique plays an important role in the research of nuclear physics, as well as the application field of AMS covered nuclear science and technology, life science, earth science, environmental science, archaeology etc. The newest AMS field is that of actinide, particularly U and Pu, isotopic assay with expanding applications in nuclear safeguards and monitoring, and as a modern bomb-fallout tracer for atmospheric transport and surface sediment movement. This paper reviews the applications of AMS in the research of nuclear energy and nuclear security including the research of half life of radionuclides, cross section of nuclear reaction. (authors)

  7. Applications of Deontic Logic in Computer Science: A Concise Overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, J.-J.Ch.; Meyer, John-Jules Ch.; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    1993-01-01

    Deontic logic is the logic that deals with actual as well as ideal behavior of systems. In this paper, we survey a number of applications of deontic logic in computer science that have arisen in the eighties, and give a systematic framework in which these applications can be classified. Many

  8. 6th International Conference on Computer Science and its Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stojmenovic, Ivan; Jeong, Hwa; Yi, Gangman

    2015-01-01

    The 6th FTRA International Conference on Computer Science and its Applications (CSA-14) will be held in Guam, USA, Dec. 17 - 19, 2014. CSA-14 presents a comprehensive conference focused on the various aspects of advances in engineering systems in computer science, and applications, including ubiquitous computing, U-Health care system, Big Data, UI/UX for human-centric computing, Computing Service, Bioinformatics and Bio-Inspired Computing and will show recent advances on various aspects of computing technology, Ubiquitous Computing Services and its application.

  9. Globus Platform-as-a-Service for Collaborative Science Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Rachana; Chard, Kyle; Foster, Ian; Tuecke, Steven

    2015-02-01

    Globus, developed as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) for research data management, also provides APIs that constitute a flexible and powerful Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) to which developers can outsource data management activities such as transfer and sharing, as well as identity, profile and group management. By providing these frequently important but always challenging capabilities as a service, accessible over the network, Globus PaaS streamlines web application development and makes it easy for individuals, teams, and institutions to create collaborative applications such as science gateways for science communities. We introduce the capabilities of this platform and review representative applications.

  10. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions. PMID:22573992

  11. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Zhou

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions.

  12. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  13. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions.

  14. Recent Challenges Facing US Government Climate Science Access and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, G. T.; Carter, J. M.; Licker, R.

    2017-12-01

    Climate scientists have long faced politicization of their work, especially those working within the US federal government. However, political interference in federal government climate change science has escalated in the current political era with efforts by political actors to undermine and disrupt infrastructure supporting climate science. This has included funding changes, decreased access to climate science information on federal agency websites, restrictions on media access to scientific experts within the government, and rolling back of science-based policies designed to incorporate and respond to climate science findings. What are the impacts of such changes for both the climate science community and the broader public? What can be done to ensure that access to and application of climate change-related research to policy decisions continues? We will summarize and analyze the state of climate change research and application in the US government. The impacts of political interference in climate change science as well as opportunities the scientific community has to support climate science in the US government, will be discussed.

  15. Advances in brazing science, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Brazing processes offer enhanced control, adaptability and cost-efficiency in the joining of materials. Unsurprisingly, this has lead to great interest and investment in the area. Drawing on important research in the field, Advances in brazing provides a clear guide to the principles, materials, methods and key applications of brazing. Part one introduces the fundamentals of brazing, including molten metal wetting processes, strength and margins of safety of brazed joints, and modeling of associated physical phenomena. Part two goes on to consider specific materials, such as super alloys, filler metals for high temperature brazing, diamonds and cubic boron nitride, and varied ceramics and intermetallics. The brazing of carbon-carbon (C/C) composites to metals is also explored before applications of brazing and brazed materials are discussed in part three. Brazing of cutting materials, use of coating techniques, and metal-nonmetal brazing for electrical, packaging and structural applications are reviewed, alon...

  16. Science during crisis: the application of social science during major environmental crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machlis, Gary; Ludwig, Kris; Manfredo, Michael J.; Vaske, Jerry J.; Rechkemmer, Andreas; Duke, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Historical and contemporary experience suggests that science plays an increasingly critical role in governmental and institutional responses to major environmental crises. Recent examples include major western wildfires (2009), the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), the Fukushima nuclear accident (2011), and Hurricane Sandy (2012). The application of science during such crises has several distinctive characteristics, as well as essential requirements if it is to be useful to decision makers. these include scope conditions that include coupled natural/human systems, clear statement of uncertainties and limitations, description of cascading consequences, accurate sense of place, estimates of magnitude of impacts, identification of beneficiaries and those adversely affected, clarity and conciseness, compelling visualization and presentation, capacity to speak "truth to power", and direct access to decision makers. In this chapter, we explore the role and significance of science – including all relevant disciplines and focusing attention on the social sciences – in responding to major environmental crises. We explore several important questions: How is science during crisis distinctive? What social science is most useful during crises? What distinctive characteristics are necessary for social science to make meaningful contributions to emergency response and recovery? How might the social sciences be integrated into the strategic science needed to respond to future crises? The authors, both members of the Department of the Interior's innovative Strategic Sciences Group, describe broad principles of engagement as well as specific examples drawn from history, contemporary efforts (such as during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill), and predictions of environmental crises still to be confronted.

  17. Macro photography with a tablet: applications on Science Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira, Leonardo Pereira; Lara, Vitor de Oliveira Moraes

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a simple way to get Macro photography (enlarged photographs) using a tablet or phone. We initially discuss the technique, which is essentially the accommodation of a drop of water on the camera lens. Next, we explore some applications to science teaching in primary and secondary levels. As discussed in the text, the simplicity and power of the technique may make it a good teaching tool for use in various disciplines such as Science, Biology and Physics.

  18. Logic, mathematics, and computer science modern foundations with practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nievergelt, Yves

    2015-01-01

    This text for the first or second year undergraduate in mathematics, logic, computer science, or social sciences, introduces the reader to logic, proofs, sets, and number theory. It also serves as an excellent independent study reference and resource for instructors. Adapted from Foundations of Logic and Mathematics: Applications to Science and Cryptography © 2002 Birkhӓuser, this second edition provides a modern introduction to the foundations of logic, mathematics, and computers science, developing the theory that demonstrates construction of all mathematics and theoretical computer science from logic and set theory.  The focus is on foundations, with specific statements of all the associated axioms and rules of logic and set theory, and  provides complete details and derivations of formal proofs. Copious references to literature that document historical development is also provided. Answers are found to many questions that usually remain unanswered: Why is the truth table for logical implication so uni...

  19. Surface science principles and current applications

    CERN Document Server

    Taglauer, E; Wandelt, K

    1996-01-01

    Modern technologies increasingly rely on low-dimensional physics at interfaces and in thin-films and nano-structures. Surface science holds a key position in providing the experimental methods and theoretical models for a basic understanding of these effects. This book includes case studies and status reports about research topics such as: surface structure determination by tensor-LEED and surface X-ray diffraction; the preparation and detection of low-dimensional electronic surface states; quantitative surface compositional analysis; the dynamics of adsorption and reaction of adsorbates, e.g. kinetic oscillations; the characterization and control of thin-film and multilayer growth including the influence of surfactants; a critical assessment of the surface physics approach to heterogeneous catalysis.

  20. The Application of Comics in Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutníková Marta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study presents the results of a year-long project focused on analysis and reflection on working with comics by students in the preschool teacher training programme. Methods: This study presents the use of comics to help pre-literacy children understand certain physical phenomena. The study is based on observations of changing perception of phenomena by children as a result of the use of comics accompanied by concept maps. Results: Comics are proven to be a modern pedagogical strategy, which is starting to gain its popularity in teaching about nature study. It is used in research-oriented teaching within the psycho-didactic concept of instruction. Conclusions: Comics can be very helpful in making science concepts interesting and comprehensible for a preschool child.

  1. International Conference on Quantum Science and Applications (ICQSA-2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algin, A.; Arik, M.; Gavrilik, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    This special volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series is dedicated to the proceedings of “International Conference on Quantum Science and Applications (ICQSA-2016)”. The conference was organized by the Centre for Quantum Research and Applications at Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey. It was held in Eskisehir Osmangazi University Congress and Culture Centre during May 25-27, 2016 http://icqsa2016.ogu.edu.tr. It gathered actively 143 participants from different disciplines in natural and applied sciences coming from 16 different countries from all over the word. It was the first international conference in its content on the scientific research fields of quantum science and applications in Turkey. It also consisted of 12 plenary lectures and 119 contributed oral presentations covering interdisciplinary fields of research. The ICQSA-2016 conference focused on recent modern theoretical and experimental developments of quantum science in multi-disciplinary aspects of areas of mathematics, physics, statistics, chemistry, biology, computer science, electronics, informatics, medicine, education, etc. It served as an interaction platform for students, researchers, public, and private sector delegates for sharing new scientific and technological ideas on quantum applications in science and technology. The topics of the conference were: Quantum theory and quantum computing, quantum information theory and its applications, quantum statistics and its applications, quantum thermodynamics, quantum cryptography, classical and quantum symmetries, quantum calculus in science, engineering, medicine, education, etc., classical and quantum integrable systems, modeling and numerical methods in quantum systems, other modern mathematical methods in science and technology. Each of the submitted papers for this special volume of the proceedings of ICQSA-2016 has been reviewed by external referees. There are 36 accepted papers. Besides, it is worth pointing out

  2. The application of science communication modes in China's nuclear and radiation safety science popularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yali; Wang Erqi; Wang Xiaofeng; Zhang Ying

    2014-01-01

    The studies of the application of science communication theory in the nuclear and radiation safety will help to enhance the level of science popularization work in the field of nuclear and radiation safety. This paper firstly describes the definition and the evolvement process of science communication models, then analyzes the current status of the nuclear and radiation safety science popularization, finally discusses on the suitability of science communication mode of its application in the field of nuclear and radiation safety. (authors)

  3. International Conference on Recent Trends in Materials Science and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book gathers the proceedings of the plenary sessions, invited lectures, and papers presented at the International Conference on Recent Trends in Materials Science and Applications (ICRTMSA-2016). It also features revealing presentations on various aspects of Materials Science, such as nanomaterials, photonic crystal fibers, quantum dots, thin film techniques, crystal growth, spectroscopic procedures, fabrication and characterisation of new materials / compounds with enhanced features, and potential applications in nonlinear optical and electro-optic devices, solar cell device, chemical sensing, biomedical imaging, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, energy storage device etc. This book will be of great interest to beginning and seasoned researchers alike.

  4. Generalized Linear Models with Applications in Engineering and the Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Raymond H; Vining, G Geoffrey; Robinson, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "The obvious enthusiasm of Myers, Montgomery, and Vining and their reliance on their many examples as a major focus of their pedagogy make Generalized Linear Models a joy to read. Every statistician working in any area of applied science should buy it and experience the excitement of these new approaches to familiar activities."-Technometrics Generalized Linear Models: With Applications in Engineering and the Sciences, Second Edition continues to provide a clear introduction to the theoretical foundations and key applications of generalized linear models (GLMs). Ma

  5. VLSI micro- and nanophotonics science, technology, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, El-Hang; Razeghi, Manijeh; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the growing demand for larger capacity in information technology, VLSI Micro- and Nanophotonics: Science, Technology, and Applications explores issues of science and technology of micro/nano-scale photonics and integration for broad-scale and chip-scale Very Large Scale Integration photonics. This book is a game-changer in the sense that it is quite possibly the first to focus on ""VLSI Photonics"". Very little effort has been made to develop integration technologies for micro/nanoscale photonic devices and applications, so this reference is an important and necessary early-stage pe

  6. Zeta potential in colloid science principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Robert J; Rowell, R L

    2013-01-01

    Zeta Potential in Colloid Science: Principles and Applications covers the concept of the zeta potential in colloid chemical theory. The book discusses the charge and potential distribution at interfaces; the calculation of the zeta potential; and the experimental techniques used in the measurement of electrokinetic parameters. The text also describes the electroviscous and viscoelectric effects; applications of the zeta potential to areas of colloid science; and the influence of simple inorganic ions or more complex adsorbates on zeta potential. Physical chemists and people involved in the stu

  7. Application of Microrheology in Food Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nan; Lv, Ruihe; Jia, Junji; Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2017-02-28

    Microrheology provides a technique to probe the local viscoelastic properties and dynamics of soft materials at the microscopic level by observing the motion of tracer particles embedded within them. It is divided into passive and active microrheology according to the force exerted on the embedded particles. Particles are driven by thermal fluctuations in passive microrheology, and the linear viscoelasticity of samples can be obtained on the basis of the generalized Stokes-Einstein equation. In active microrheology, tracer particles are controlled by external forces, and measurements can be extended to the nonlinear regime. Microrheology techniques have many advantages such as the need for only small sample amounts and a wider measurable frequency range. In particular, microrheology is able to examine the spatial heterogeneity of samples at the microlevel, which is not possible using traditional rheology. Therefore, microrheology has considerable potential for studying the local mechanical properties and dynamics of soft matter, particularly complex fluids, including solutions, dispersions, and other colloidal systems. Food products such as emulsions, foams, or gels are complex fluids with multiple ingredients and phases. Their macroscopic properties, such as stability and texture, are closely related to the structure and mechanical properties at the microlevel. In this article, the basic principles and methods of microrheology are reviewed, and the latest developments and achievements of microrheology in the field of food science are presented.

  8. Python in the NERSC Exascale Science Applications Program for Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaghi, Zahra; Thomas, Rollin; Deslippe, Jack; Bailey, Stephen; Gursoy, Doga; Kisner, Theodore; Keskitalo, Reijo; Borrill, Julian

    2017-11-12

    We describe a new effort at the National Energy Re- search Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) in performance analysis and optimization of scientific Python applications targeting the Intel Xeon Phi (Knights Landing, KNL) many- core architecture. The Python-centered work outlined here is part of a larger effort called the NERSC Exascale Science Applications Program (NESAP) for Data. NESAP for Data focuses on applications that process and analyze high-volume, high-velocity data sets from experimental/observational science (EOS) facilities supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Science. We present three case study applications from NESAP for Data that use Python. These codes vary in terms of “Python purity” from applications developed in pure Python to ones that use Python mainly as a convenience layer for scientists without expertise in lower level programming lan- guages like C, C++ or Fortran. The science case, requirements, constraints, algorithms, and initial performance optimizations for each code are discussed. Our goal with this paper is to contribute to the larger conversation around the role of Python in high-performance computing today and tomorrow, highlighting areas for future work and emerging best practices

  9. Pervasive haptics science, design, and application

    CERN Document Server

    Saga, Satoshi; Konyo, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the state of the art in diverse areas of haptics (touch)-related research, including the psychophysics and neurophysiology of haptics, development of haptics displays and sensors, and applications to a wide variety of fields such as industry, education, therapy, medicine, and welfare for the visually impaired. It also discusses the potential of future haptics interaction, such as haptics for emotional control and remote haptics communication. The book offers a valuable resource not only for haptics and human interface researchers, but also for developers and designers at manufacturing corporations and in the entertainment industries.

  10. Thermoluminescence: Potential Applications in Forensic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, J. D.; Lawson, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    In crime laboratories one of the most difficult operations is to determine unequivocally whether or not two samples of evidence of the same type were originally part of the same thing or were from the same source. It has been found that high temperature thermoluminescence (room temperature to 723 K) can be used for comparisons of this type, although work to date indicates that there is generally a finite probability for coincidental matching of glass or soil samples. Further work is required to determine and attempt to minimize these probabilities for different types of materials, and to define more clearly the scope of applicability of thermoluminescence to actual forensic situations.

  11. Applications of voltammetry in environmental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, D.H.S.

    1985-01-01

    The wide-ranging applications of voltammetry to the analysis of trace metals and other ions of interest to environmental scientists are reviewed. It is concluded that the availability of modern microprocessor controlled instrumentation, capable of performing both anodic stripping and square wave voltammetry, provides a flexible and powerful technique to aid in solving analytical problems and carrying out routine analyses. The recent identification of many sensitizing agents which reduce detection limits to part per thousand million level, or below, is a further exciting development in this field.

  12. Management applications of discontinuity theory | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    1.Human impacts on the environment are multifaceted and can occur across distinct spatiotemporal scales. Ecological responses to environmental change are therefore difficult to predict, and entail large degrees of uncertainty. Such uncertainty requires robust tools for management to sustain ecosystem goods and services and maintain resilient ecosystems. 2.We propose an approach based on discontinuity theory that accounts for patterns and processes at distinct spatial and temporal scales, an inherent property of ecological systems. Discontinuity theory has not been applied in natural resource management and could therefore improve ecosystem management because it explicitly accounts for ecological complexity. 3.Synthesis and applications. We highlight the application of discontinuity approaches for meeting management goals. Specifically, discontinuity approaches have significant potential to measure and thus understand the resilience of ecosystems, to objectively identify critical scales of space and time in ecological systems at which human impact might be most severe, to provide warning indicators of regime change, to help predict and understand biological invasions and extinctions and to focus monitoring efforts. Discontinuity theory can complement current approaches, providing a broader paradigm for ecological management and conservation This manuscript provides insight on using discontinuity approaches to aid in managing complex ecological systems. In part

  13. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  14. OTOLITHS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN FISHERY SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rodriguez Mendoza

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Otoliths are structures located in the inner ear cavity of all teleost fish and serve as a balance organ and also aid in hearing. They have been used traditionally to obtain information about the taxon, age and size of fishes. This is very important because age, growth rate, and mortality rate are three of the most influential life history characteristics controlling the productivity of fish populations. Besides age and growth determination, otoliths have been the object of study in many different fields, such as fish biology (hearing and balance in fishes, larval fish ecology, species identification, fish stock identification and environmental reconstruction of the fish habitat. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the traditional and current applications of the otoliths. Also, a short description of the traditional methods for age determination is included.

  15. Application of infrared thermography in sports science

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the application of infrared thermography in sports, examining the main benefits of this non-invasive, non-radiating and low-cost technique. Aspects covered include the detection of injuries in sports medicine, the assessment of sports performance due to the existing link between physical fitness and thermoregulation and the analysis of heat transfer for sports garments and sports equipment. Although infrared thermography is broadly considered to be a fast and easy-to-use tool, the ability to deliver accurate and repeatable measurements is an important consideration. Furthermore, it is important to be familiar with the latest sports studies published on this technique to understand its potential and limitations. Accordingly, this book establishes a vital link between laboratory tests and the sports field. .

  16. Proceedings of the Eighth Conference of Nuclear Sciences and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-02-01

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for researching dealing with radioisotope production during work with Human needs of Nuclear Science and applications. The book consists of the following chapters: chemistry; radioisotope production, trace analysis; environment monitoring; environmental effect; waste management; physics; reactors; nuclear safety and safeguards; materials; radiation protection ; agriculture; hydrology; nuclear medicine; medical applications; radiation chemistry; environmental studies; biological effects of ionizing radiation on agriculture;

  17. Applications of Green's functions in science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Concise and highly regarded, this treatment of Green's functions and their applications in science and engineering is geared toward undergraduate and graduate students with only a moderate background in ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations. The text also includes a wealth of information of a more general nature on boundary value problems, generalized functions, eigenfunction expansions, partial differential equations, and acoustics. The two-part treatment begins with an overview of applications to ordinary differential equations. Topics include the adjoint operato

  18. Challenges for Transitioning Science Research to Space Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James

    2013-01-01

    Effectively transitioning science knowledge to useful applications relevant to space weather has become important. The effort to transition scientific knowledge to a useful application is not a research nor is it operations, but an activity that connects two. Successful transitioning must be an intentional effort with a clear goal and measureable outcome. This talk will present proven methodologies that have been demonstrated to be effective, and how in the current environment those can be applied to space weather transition efforts.

  19. Applications of ionic liquids in polymer science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the latest knowledge in the science and technology of ionic liquids and polymers in different areas. Ionic liquids (IL) are actively being investigated in polymer science and technology for a number of different applications. In the first part of the book the authors present the particular properties of ionic liquids as speciality solvents. The state-of-the art in the use of ionic liquids in polymer synthesis and modification reactions including polymer recycling is outlined. The second part focuses on the use of ionic liquids as speciality additives such as plasticizers or antistatic agents.  The third part examines the use of ionic liquids in the design of functional polymers (usually called polymeric ionic liquids (PIL) or poly(ionic liquids)). Many important applications in diverse scientific and industrial areas rely on these polymers, like polymer electrolytes in electrochemical devices, building blocks in materials science, nanocomposites, gas membranes, innovative anion sensitive...

  20. Application of geo-information science methods in ecotourism exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Suocheng; Hou, Xiaoli

    2004-11-01

    Application of geo-information science methods in ecotourism development was discussed in the article. Since 1990s, geo-information science methods, which take the 3S (Geographic Information System, Global Positioning System, and Remote Sensing) as core techniques, has played an important role in resources reconnaissance, data management, environment monitoring, and regional planning. Geo-information science methods can easily analyze and convert geographic spatial data. The application of 3S methods is helpful to sustainable development in tourism. Various assignments are involved in the development of ecotourism, such as reconnaissance of ecotourism resources, drawing of tourism maps, dealing with mass data, and also tourism information inquire, employee management, quality management of products. The utilization of geo-information methods in ecotourism can make the development more efficient by promoting the sustainable development of tourism and the protection of eco-environment.

  1. Application of automatic image analysis in wood science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles W. McMillin

    1982-01-01

    In this paper I describe an image analysis system and illustrate with examples the application of automatic quantitative measurement to wood science. Automatic image analysis, a powerful and relatively new technology, uses optical, video, electronic, and computer components to rapidly derive information from images with minimal operator interaction. Such instruments...

  2. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The Journal of Computer Science and Its Applications welcomes submission of complete and original research manuscripts, which are not under review in any other conference or journal. The topics covered by the journal include but are not limited to Artificial Intelligence, Bioinformatics, Computational ...

  3. Radioanalytical techniques and their application in forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, N.

    1998-01-01

    Neutron techniques mainly in the form of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is suitable for determination of very low amounts of many elements and can be effectively applied in crime investigation. Trace element analysis plays a significant role in forensic science. Different aspects of radioanalytical techniques, role of a few typical elements and their forensic application in different types of samples are discussed

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods and Their Applications in Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalewski Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As defined by the National Institutes of Health: “Biomedical engineering integrates physical, chemical, mathematical, and computational sciences and engineering principles to study biology, medicine, behavior, and health”. Many issues in this area are closely related to fluid dynamics. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts concerning Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications in medicine.

  5. Recent developments and applications in mathematics and computer science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churchhouse, R.F.; Tahir Shah, K.; Zanella, P.

    1991-01-01

    The book contains 8 invited lectures and 4 short seminars presented at the College on Recent Developments and Applications in Mathematics and Computer Science held in Trieste from 7 May to 1 June 1990. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. Sandia technology: Engineering and science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydew, M. C.; Parrot, H.; Dale, B. C.; Floyd, H. L.; Leonard, J. A.; Parrot, L.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses: protecting environment, safety, and health; Sandia's quality initiative; Sandia vigorously pursues technology transfer; scientific and technical education support programs; nuclear weapons development; recognizing battlefield targets with trained artificial neural networks; battlefield robotics: warfare at a distance; a spinning shell sizes up the enemy; thwarting would-be nuclear terrorists; unattended video surveillance system for nuclear facilities; making the skies safer for travelers; onboard instrumentation system to evaluate performance of stockpile bombs; keeping track with lasers; extended-life lithium batteries; a remote digital video link acquires images securely; guiding high-performance missiles with laser gyroscopes; nonvolatile memory chips for space applications; initiating weapon explosives with lasers; next-generation optoelectronics and microelectronics technology developments; chemometrics: new methods for improving chemical analysis; research team focuses ion beam to record-breaking intensities; standardizing the volt to quantum accuracy; new techniques improve robotic software development productivity; a practical laser plasma source for generating soft x-rays; exploring metal grain boundaries; massively parallel computing; modeling the amount of desiccant needed for moisture control; attacking pollution with sunshine; designing fuel-conversion catalysts with computers; extending a nuclear power plant's useful life; plasma-facing components for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

  7. Hybrid cloud and cluster computing paradigms for life science applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Judy; Ekanayake, Jaliya; Gunarathne, Thilina; Choi, Jong Youl; Bae, Seung-Hee; Li, Hui; Zhang, Bingjing; Wu, Tak-Lon; Ruan, Yang; Ekanayake, Saliya; Hughes, Adam; Fox, Geoffrey

    2010-12-21

    Clouds and MapReduce have shown themselves to be a broadly useful approach to scientific computing especially for parallel data intensive applications. However they have limited applicability to some areas such as data mining because MapReduce has poor performance on problems with an iterative structure present in the linear algebra that underlies much data analysis. Such problems can be run efficiently on clusters using MPI leading to a hybrid cloud and cluster environment. This motivates the design and implementation of an open source Iterative MapReduce system Twister. Comparisons of Amazon, Azure, and traditional Linux and Windows environments on common applications have shown encouraging performance and usability comparisons in several important non iterative cases. These are linked to MPI applications for final stages of the data analysis. Further we have released the open source Twister Iterative MapReduce and benchmarked it against basic MapReduce (Hadoop) and MPI in information retrieval and life sciences applications. The hybrid cloud (MapReduce) and cluster (MPI) approach offers an attractive production environment while Twister promises a uniform programming environment for many Life Sciences applications. We used commercial clouds Amazon and Azure and the NSF resource FutureGrid to perform detailed comparisons and evaluations of different approaches to data intensive computing. Several applications were developed in MPI, MapReduce and Twister in these different environments.

  8. Science and the applications of science from Louis Pasteur to Jacques Monod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Maxime

    2015-06-01

    Jacques Monod's ideas on the applications of science came within the scope of a long tradition at the Institut Pasteur. Louis Pasteur, whose scientific career was characterized by a permanent come and go between science and its applications, long opposed the idea of getting any income from his research, until the financial needs of the Institut Pasteur made him change his mind. As for Jacques Monod, he remained a fervent supporter of basic science during his whole scientific career. However, once he became director of the Institut Pasteur, he realized that the applications of research had to be developed to support the institute from a financial point of view. Thus, he reorganized the valorization of research in the institute, through an incitation of scientists to develop projects with possible applications, and by creating a company, Institut Pasteur Production, for which he had a factory built, and which was in charge of producing and commercializing the vaccines and reagents stemming from the research at the Institut Pasteur. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Framework for Processing Citizens Science Data for Applications to NASA Earth Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, William; Albayrak, Arif

    2017-01-01

    Citizen science (or crowdsourcing) has drawn much high-level recent and ongoing interest and support. It is poised to be applied, beyond the by-now fairly familiar use of, e.g., Twitter for natural hazards monitoring, to science research, such as augmenting the validation of NASA earth science mission data. This interest and support is seen in the 2014 National Plan for Civil Earth Observations, the 2015 White House forum on citizen science and crowdsourcing, the ongoing Senate Bill 2013 (Crowdsourcing and Citizen Science Act of 2015), the recent (August 2016) Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) call for public participation in its newly-established Citizen Science Domain Working Group, and NASA's initiation of a new Citizen Science for Earth Systems Program (along with its first citizen science-focused solicitation for proposals). Over the past several years, we have been exploring the feasibility of extracting from the Twitter data stream useful information for application to NASA precipitation research, with both "passive" and "active" participation by the twitterers. The Twitter database, which recently passed its tenth anniversary, is potentially a rich source of real-time and historical global information for science applications. The time-varying set of "precipitation" tweets can be thought of as an organic network of rain gauges, potentially providing a widespread view of precipitation occurrence. The validation of satellite precipitation estimates is challenging, because many regions lack data or access to data, especially outside of the U.S. and in remote and developing areas. Mining the Twitter stream could augment these validation programs and, potentially, help tune existing algorithms. Our ongoing work, though exploratory, has resulted in key components for processing and managing tweets, including the capabilities to filter the Twitter stream in real time, to extract location information, to filter for exact phrases, and to plot tweet distributions. The

  10. Multifarious applications of atomic force microscopy in forensic science investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Tharmavaram, Maithri; Rawtani, Deepak; Kumar, Sumit; Agrawal, Y

    2017-04-01

    Forensic science is a wide field comprising of several subspecialties and uses methods derived from natural sciences for finding criminals and other evidence valid in a legal court. A relatively new area; Nano-forensics brings a new era of investigation in forensic science in which instantaneous results can be produced that determine various agents such as explosive gasses, biological agents and residues in different crime scenes and terrorist activity investigations. This can be achieved by applying Nanotechnology and its associated characterization techniques in forensic sciences. Several characterization techniques exist in Nanotechnology and nano-analysis is one such technique that is used in forensic science which includes Electron microscopes (EM) like Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM), Raman microscopy (Micro -Raman) and Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) like Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Atomic force microscopy enables surface characterization of different materials by examining their morphology and mechanical properties. Materials that are immeasurable such as hair, body fluids, textile fibers, documents, polymers, pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), etc. are often encountered during forensic investigations. This review article will mainly focus on the use of AFM in the examination of different evidence such as blood stains, forged documents, human hair samples, ammunitions, explosives, and other such applications in the field of Forensic Science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry and its applications in environmental science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kexin; Li Kun; Ma Hongji; Guo Zhiyu

    2001-01-01

    Some important work worldwide in environmental science, like urban air pollution, discharges of radioactive wastes from nuclear plants, and global climate change were introduced. Based on the improvements of facility and studies on 14 C dating method, a precision better than 0.5% has been reached for the PKUAMS. A large number of samples have been measured for the Xia-Shang-Zhou Chronology project. 14 C data of PKUAMS have made important contributions to creation of more reliable chronological table of Xia, Shang and Zhou dynasties. The improvements of PKUAMS are of benefit to the applications in environmental science in the future

  12. Quantum mechanics with applications to nanotechnology and information science

    CERN Document Server

    Band, Yehuda B

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics transcends and supplants classical mechanics at the atomic and subatomic levels. It provides the underlying framework for many subfields of physics, chemistry and materials science, including condensed matter physics, atomic physics, molecular physics, quantum chemistry, particle physics, and nuclear physics. It is the only way we can understand the structure of materials, from the semiconductors in our computers to the metal in our automobiles. It is also the scaffolding supporting much of nanoscience and nanotechnology. The purpose of this book is to present the fundamentals of quantum theory within a modern perspective, with emphasis on applications to nanoscience and nanotechnology, and information-technology. As the frontiers of science have advanced, the sort of curriculum adequate for students in the sciences and engineering twenty years ago is no longer satisfactory today. Hence, the emphasis on new topics that are not included in older reference texts, such as quantum information th...

  13. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  14. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  15. Earth Science Markup Language: Transitioning From Design to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Karen; Graves, Sara; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2002-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed Earth Science Markup Language (ESML) research is to transition from design to application. The resulting schema and prototype software will foster community acceptance for the "define once, use anywhere" concept central to ESML. Supporting goals include: 1. Refinement of the ESML schema and software libraries in cooperation with the user community. 2. Application of the ESML schema and software libraries to a variety of Earth science data sets and analysis tools. 3. Development of supporting prototype software for enhanced ease of use. 4. Cooperation with standards bodies in order to assure ESML is aligned with related metadata standards as appropriate. 5. Widespread publication of the ESML approach, schema, and software.

  16. 8th International Conference on Information Science and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Joukov, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    This book contains selected papers from the 8th International Conference on Information Science and Applications (ICISA 2017) and provides a snapshot of the latest issues encountered in technical convergence and convergences of security technology. It explores how information science is core to most current research, industrial and commercial activities and consists of contributions covering topics including Ubiquitous Computing, Networks and Information Systems, Multimedia and Visualization, Middleware and Operating Systems, Security and Privacy, Data Mining and Artificial Intelligence, Software Engineering, and Web Technology. The proceedings introduce the most recent information technology and ideas, applications and problems related to technology convergence, illustrated through case studies, and reviews converging existing security techniques. Through this volume, readers will gain an understanding of the current state-of-the-art information strategies and technologies of convergence security.The intende...

  17. The application of ion beams to corrosion science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, V.; Grant, W.A.; Proctor, R.P.M.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly, the paper provides some basic information on the use of ion beams for surface alloying and surface analysis. After a brief historical review of those fields in which the techniques are already widely applied the important features of typical ion beam machines are described. The basic processes that occur when an ion beam strikes a solid are then considered. Selected ion beam analysis techniques are then discussed. Attention is drawn, wherever possible, to applications in corrosion science and engineering. (author)

  18. Applications of nuclear technique in environmental and medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xianfeng; Shen Hao; Liu Bo; Sun Minde; Yao Huiying; Zhou Shijun; Mi Yong

    2001-01-01

    The serious environmental pollution problem and application of the nuclear technique in environmental and medical sciences were discussed. The analysed results of the elemental distribution of particles in automobile exhaust, the aerosol particle of different size and the effect of Rare Earth on cells were reported. The authors can obtain some information related to element concentration. It offers a convenient method in inspecting the environmental pollution

  19. Sport science relevance and application: perceptions of UK coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Russell; Nash, Christine

    2013-01-01

    While sport science can have significant and positive impact on coaches and athletes, there is still a general consensus that the transfer of sport science knowledge to coaching is poor. Given this apparent dilemma, this study investigated the perceptions of sport science from coaches across four different sports (football, rugby league, curling and judo) across three different levels (elite, developmental and novice). Specifically, 58 coaches (19 football; 21 rugby league; 9 curling; 9 judo) drawn evenly from novice, developmental and elite groups agreed to take part and were interviewed. Three key features emerged from the analysis 1) Practical application and relevance 2) Integration and access, 3) Language. In short, there was significant variability in the extent to which sport science was considered relevant and to whom, although interestingly this was not strongly related to coaching level. This inconsistency of understanding was a barrier to sport science engagement in some instances, as was the challenge of operationalising information for specific contexts. Furthermore, availability of opportunities and resources were often left to chance, while overuse of jargon and inability for research and practitioners to consider sport specific needs were also considered barriers to engagement. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  20. Successfully Transitioning Science Research to Space Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James

    2012-01-01

    The awareness of potentially significant impacts of space weather on spaceand ground ]based technological systems has generated a strong desire in many sectors of government and industry to effectively transform knowledge and understanding of the variable space environment into useful tools and applications for use by those entities responsible for systems that may be vulnerable to space weather impacts. Essentially, effectively transitioning science knowledge to useful applications relevant to space weather has become important. This talk will present proven methodologies that have been demonstrated to be effective, and how in the current environment those can be applied to space weather transition efforts.

  1. 75 FR 78238 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and Its Identified Subcontractors..., Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of San Diego, CA, and Its Identified Subcontractors... Control Act (TSCA). Some of the information may be claimed or determined to be Confidential Business...

  2. SSNTD applications in science and technology - A brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.A.; Qureshi, I.E.

    1999-01-01

    The technique of Solid State Nuclear Track Detection (SSNTD) has matured since long as a viable method of charged particle detection. The usage of this method has been successfully extended to neutron detection and gamma dose measurements as well. The etch-track mechanism has been further exploited to generate a major application area of nuclear track filters. In spite of the remarkable diversity of SSNTD applications that have emerged over the years in different fields, its potential is by no means saturated. In this article, a brief review of SSNTD applications is presented with reference to contemporary interests in science and technology. For convenience, the coverage of topics is organized under broad categories of Nuclear Physics, Materials Research, Geology, Environmental Science and allied technologies. While identifying high interest areas, those with limited but innovative applications are also mentioned. In some cases, the important results are quoted for the purpose of illustrating the strength of track detection method. In general, the presentation is aimed at providing a broad perspective of current SSNTD uses instead of detailed description of individual applications. The coverage is selective rather than exhaustive and portrays authors' preferences. Some comments related to the adoption of this technique as a mainstream method of detection are also given

  3. Developing cloud applications using the e-Science Central platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiden, Hugo; Woodman, Simon; Watson, Paul; Cala, Jacek

    2013-01-28

    This paper describes the e-Science Central (e-SC) cloud data processing system and its application to a number of e-Science projects. e-SC provides both software as a service (SaaS) and platform as a service for scientific data management, analysis and collaboration. It is a portable system and can be deployed on both private (e.g. Eucalyptus) and public clouds (Amazon AWS and Microsoft Windows Azure). The SaaS application allows scientists to upload data, edit and run workflows and share results in the cloud, using only a Web browser. It is underpinned by a scalable cloud platform consisting of a set of components designed to support the needs of scientists. The platform is exposed to developers so that they can easily upload their own analysis services into the system and make these available to other users. A representational state transfer-based application programming interface (API) is also provided so that external applications can leverage the platform's functionality, making it easier to build scalable, secure cloud-based applications. This paper describes the design of e-SC, its API and its use in three different case studies: spectral data visualization, medical data capture and analysis, and chemical property prediction.

  4. Proceedings of conference on AI applications in physical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A Conference cum workshop on AI applications in Physical Sciences was organised by the Indian Physics Association at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay during January 15-17, 1992. It was held in memory of Late Shri S.N. Seshadri, who was the moving spirit behind self reliance in instrumentation development for research and industry. The two day conference which was followed by one day workshop covered the following broad spectrum of topics in Artificial Intelligence: AI Tools and Techniques, Neural Networks, Robotics and Machine Vision, Fuzzy Control and Applications, Natural Language and Speech Processing, Knowledge based Systems, and AI and Allied applications. The conference dealt with recent advances and achievements in AI. It provided a forum for the exchange of valuable information and expertise in this fast emerging field. Over 200 scientists, engineers and computer professionals from various universities, R and D institutes and industries actively participated. 45 contributed papers and 8 invited talks were presented in the symposium. The volume contains selected papers which were contributed by the participants. Some of them dealt with AI applications in nuclear science and technology. (original)

  5. Nanotechnology in food science: Functionality, applicability, and safety assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojia He

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of nanotechnology is expected to transform many areas of food science and food industry with increasing investment and market share. In this article, current applications of nanotechnology in food systems are briefly reviewed. Functionality and applicability of food-related nanotechnology are highlighted in order to provide a comprehensive view on the development and safety assessment of nanotechnology in the food industry. While food nanotechnology offers great potential benefits, there are emerging concerns arising from its novel physicochemical properties. Therefore, the safety concerns and regulatory policies on its manufacturing, processing, packaging, and consumption are briefly addressed. At the end of this article, the perspectives of nanotechnology in active and intelligent packaging applications are highlighted.

  6. Applications of sliding mode control in science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lien, Chang-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Gathering 20 chapters contributed by respected experts, this book reports on the latest advances in and applications of sliding mode control in science and engineering. The respective chapters address applications of sliding mode control in the broad areas of chaos theory, robotics, electrical engineering, physics, chemical engineering, memristors, mechanical engineering, environmental engineering, finance, and biology. Special emphasis has been given to papers that offer practical solutions, and which examine design and modeling involving new types of sliding mode control such as higher order sliding mode control, terminal sliding mode control, super-twisting sliding mode control, and integral sliding mode control. This book serves as a unique reference guide to sliding mode control and its recent applications for graduate students and researchers with a basic knowledge of electrical and control systems engineering.

  7. Nanotechnology in food science: Functionality, applicability, and safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojia; Hwang, Huey-Min

    2016-10-01

    Rapid development of nanotechnology is expected to transform many areas of food science and food industry with increasing investment and market share. In this article, current applications of nanotechnology in food systems are briefly reviewed. Functionality and applicability of food-related nanotechnology are highlighted in order to provide a comprehensive view on the development and safety assessment of nanotechnology in the food industry. While food nanotechnology offers great potential benefits, there are emerging concerns arising from its novel physicochemical properties. Therefore, the safety concerns and regulatory policies on its manufacturing, processing, packaging, and consumption are briefly addressed. At the end of this article, the perspectives of nanotechnology in active and intelligent packaging applications are highlighted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Carbon nanotubes applications in separation science: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V.; Gonzalez-Curbelo, Miguel Angel [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Hernandez-Borges, Javier, E-mail: jhborges@ull.es [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Rodriguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs in Separation Science in the period 2009-2011 is reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as stationary phases in LC, CE and GC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as pseudostationary phases in EKC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as sorbents in SPE and SPME. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other uses of CNTs in separation science, as LDI substrates or in membranes. - Abstract: Due to the intensive and multidisciplinary research carried out during the last two decades on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the scientific community understands nowadays much better the chemistry, structure and properties of these interesting materials. In fact, they have found their particular place in a wide number of application fields (nanotechnology, electronics, optics, medicine, etc.) among which Analytical Chemistry is becoming more and more important. The aim of this review is to provide an updated report of the most recent manuscripts (years 2009-2011) regarding the use of CNTs in Separation Science. In particular, the use of CNTs as solid-phase extraction and microextraction sorbents, as part of membranes as well as their use in chromatography and electrophoresis will be discussed and commented. Besides, although not as fully related to Separation Science as the previous techniques, the use of CNTs as laser desorption/ionization substrates has also been considered because of its importance in the field.

  9. Carbon nanotubes applications in separation science: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V.; González-Curbelo, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The use of CNTs in Separation Science in the period 2009–2011 is reviewed. ► CNTs as stationary phases in LC, CE and GC. ► CNTs as pseudostationary phases in EKC. ► CNTs as sorbents in SPE and SPME. ► Other uses of CNTs in separation science, as LDI substrates or in membranes. - Abstract: Due to the intensive and multidisciplinary research carried out during the last two decades on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the scientific community understands nowadays much better the chemistry, structure and properties of these interesting materials. In fact, they have found their particular place in a wide number of application fields (nanotechnology, electronics, optics, medicine, etc.) among which Analytical Chemistry is becoming more and more important. The aim of this review is to provide an updated report of the most recent manuscripts (years 2009–2011) regarding the use of CNTs in Separation Science. In particular, the use of CNTs as solid-phase extraction and microextraction sorbents, as part of membranes as well as their use in chromatography and electrophoresis will be discussed and commented. Besides, although not as fully related to Separation Science as the previous techniques, the use of CNTs as laser desorption/ionization substrates has also been considered because of its importance in the field.

  10. Using Science Driven Technologies for the Defense and Security Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Zukor, Dorthy; Ambrose, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    For the past three decades, Earth science remote sensing technologies have been providing enormous amounts of useful data and information in broadening our understanding of our home planet as a system. This research, as it has expanded our learning process, has also generated additional questions. This has further resulted in establishing new science requirements, which have culminated in defining and pushing the state-of-the-art technology needs. NASA s Earth science program has deployed 18 highly complex satellites, with a total of 80 sensors, so far and is in a process of defining and launching multiple observing systems in the next decade. Due to the heightened security alert of the nation, researchers and technologists are paying serious attention to the use of these science driven technologies for dual use. In other words, how such sophisticated observing and measuring systems can be used in detecting multiple types of security concerns with a substantial lead time so that the appropriate law enforcement agencies can take adequate steps to defuse any potential risky scenarios. This paper examines numerous NASA technologies such as laser/lidar systems, microwave and millimeter wave technologies, optical observing systems, high performance computational techniques for rapid analyses, and imaging products that can have a tremendous pay off for security applications.

  11. Understanding Materials Science History · Properties · Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hummel, Rolf E

    2005-01-01

    This introduction to materials science both for students of engineering and physics and for the interested general public examines not only the physical and engineering properties of virtually all kinds of materials, but also their history, uses, development, and some of the implications of resource depletion and recycling. It covers all topics on materials from an entirely novel perspective: the role materials have played throughout history in the development of humankind and technologies. Specifically, it shows the connection between the technical and the cultural, economic, ecological, and societal aspects of materials science. It aims to whet the appetite of its readers and inspire them to further explore the properties and applications of metals, alloys, ceramics, plastics, and electronic materials by presenting easily understandable explanations and entertaining historical facts. It is also intended to raise the reader’s awareness of their obligations to society as practicing engineers and scientists....

  12. Developing Deep Learning Applications for Life Science and Pharma Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegismund, Daniel; Tolkachev, Vasily; Heyse, Stephan; Sick, Beate; Duerr, Oliver; Steigele, Stephan

    2018-06-01

    Deep Learning has boosted artificial intelligence over the past 5 years and is seen now as one of the major technological innovation areas, predicted to replace lots of repetitive, but complex tasks of human labor within the next decade. It is also expected to be 'game changing' for research activities in pharma and life sciences, where large sets of similar yet complex data samples are systematically analyzed. Deep learning is currently conquering formerly expert domains especially in areas requiring perception, previously not amenable to standard machine learning. A typical example is the automated analysis of images which are typically produced en-masse in many domains, e. g., in high-content screening or digital pathology. Deep learning enables to create competitive applications in so-far defined core domains of 'human intelligence'. Applications of artificial intelligence have been enabled in recent years by (i) the massive availability of data samples, collected in pharma driven drug programs (='big data') as well as (ii) deep learning algorithmic advancements and (iii) increase in compute power. Such applications are based on software frameworks with specific strengths and weaknesses. Here, we introduce typical applications and underlying frameworks for deep learning with a set of practical criteria for developing production ready solutions in life science and pharma research. Based on our own experience in successfully developing deep learning applications we provide suggestions and a baseline for selecting the most suited frameworks for a future-proof and cost-effective development. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Application of AMS radiocarbon in earth system science studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dong Jin; Park, Mi Kyung; Kim, Kyung Ryul

    2001-01-01

    Radiocarbon, a cosmic ray-produced isotope, is one of the most important tracers in Earth system sciences. The strong involvement of carbon in the biosphere and its half life of 5720 years are reflected in appropriate applications in archeology, as well as in the Earth system sciences. Radiocarbon dating had an important turning point in 1977 with the discovery that mass spectrometry with tandem acceleration could be used to measure C-14. This new technique, known as AMS or accelerator mass spectrometry reduced the required sample size to the order of mg, three orders of magnitude smaller than for conventional techniques, thus opening the range of applicability of C-14 studies to a much wider range of samples. However, the application has been complicated by two major activities of human beings on a global scale: the extensive usage of fossil fuel since the industrial revolution and nuclear testing in the atmosphere, which have influenced the natural balance of radiocarbon in the atmosphere. However, the separation of bomb-produced carbon from natural background carbon has produced a very fruitful understanding of the global carbon cycle and the conveyor belt system in the ocean, which will be essential for understanding global environmental problems, such as global warming, in the coming century. Carbon cycle studies in Korea have been made since the early 1990s. The studies include monitoring of CO 2 concentrations in the atmosphere, stable isotope studies, and carbon cycle studies in the sea around Korea. The opening of ths AMS facility at Seoul National University (SNU) will enhance carbon studies in Earth system sciences greatly in the future

  14. Bayesian probability theory applications in the physical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Linden, Wolfgang von der; Toussaint, Udo von

    2014-01-01

    From the basics to the forefront of modern research, this book presents all aspects of probability theory, statistics and data analysis from a Bayesian perspective for physicists and engineers. The book presents the roots, applications and numerical implementation of probability theory, and covers advanced topics such as maximum entropy distributions, stochastic processes, parameter estimation, model selection, hypothesis testing and experimental design. In addition, it explores state-of-the art numerical techniques required to solve demanding real-world problems. The book is ideal for students and researchers in physical sciences and engineering.

  15. Some applications of SIMS in conservation science, archaeometry and cosmochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPhail, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    Some applications of SIMS in conservation science, archaeometry and cosmochemistry are described. Ultra-low energy SIMS depth profiling and TOF-SIMS imaging are used to study the corrosion of low-lime glass vessels from the V and A museum. Static SIMS and focused ion beam (FIB) SIMS are used to study the effects of laser cleaning on museum artefacts. Archaeological glass from Raqqa, Syria is studied with FIB-SIMS and micrometeorite impacts on space vessels are studied with FIB and FIB-SIMS. The new analytical challenges provided to the SIMS community by these materials are presented and the ethical issues associated with sampling and destructive analysis discussed

  16. Deep Learning and its Applications in the Natural Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a brief historical perspective on scientific discovery, this talk will review some of the theory and open problems of deep learning and describe how to design efficient feedforward and recursive deep learning architectures for applications in the natural sciences. In particular, the focus will be on multiple particle problems at different scales: in biology (e.g. prediction of protein structures), chemistry (e.g. prediction of molecular properties and reactions), and high-energy physics (e.g. detection of exotic particles, jet substructure and tagging, "dark matter and dark knowledge")

  17. Models and applications of chaos theory in modern sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Zeraoulia, Elhadj

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a select group of papers that provide a comprehensive view of the models and applications of chaos theory in medicine, biology, ecology, economy, electronics, mechanical, and the human sciences. Covering both the experimental and theoretical aspects of the subject, it examines a range of current topics of interest. It considers the problems arising in the study of discrete and continuous time chaotic dynamical systems modeling the several phenomena in nature and society-highlighting powerful techniques being developed to meet these challenges that stem from the area of nonli

  18. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zacharias Fourie; Janalt Damstra; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years.Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines,particularly in the fields of orthodontics,maxillofacial surgery,plastic and reconstructive surgery,neurosurgery and forensic sciences.In most cases,3D facial imaging overcomes the limitations of traditional 2D methods and provides the clinician with more accurate information regarding the soft-tissues and the underlying skeleton.The aim of this study was to review the types of imaging methods used for facial imaging.It is important to realize the difference between the types of 3D imaging methods as application and indications thereof may differ.Since 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging will play an increasingly importanl role in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery,special emphasis should be placed on discussing CBCT applications in facial evaluations.

  19. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno Né Lehmann, Thomas M; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein Né Fritzsche, Klaus H; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment.

  20. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  1. Applications of chaos and nonlinear dynamics in science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Rondoni, Lamberto; Mitra, Mala

    Chaos and nonlinear dynamics initially developed as a new emergent field with its foundation in physics and applied mathematics. The highly generic, interdisciplinary quality of the insights gained in the last few decades has spawned myriad applications in almost all branches of science and technology—and even well beyond. Wherever the quantitative modeling and analysis of complex, nonlinear phenomena are required, chaos theory and its methods can play a key role.    This second volume concentrates on reviewing further relevant, contemporary applications of chaotic nonlinear systems as they apply to the various cutting-edge branches of engineering. This encompasses, but is not limited to, topics such as the spread of epidemics; electronic circuits; chaos control in mechanical devices; secure communication; and digital watermarking. Featuring contributions from active and leading research groups, this collection is ideal both as a reference work and as a ‘recipe book’ full of tried and tested, successf...

  2. A hyperspectral image analysis workbench for environmental science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.; Slater, J.C.

    1992-10-01

    A significant challenge to the information sciences is to provide more powerful and accessible means to exploit the enormous wealth of data available from high-resolution imaging spectrometry, or ``hyperspectral`` imagery, for analysis, for mapping purposes, and for input to environmental modeling applications. As an initial response to this challenge, Argonne`s Advanced Computer Applications Center has developed a workstation-based prototype software workbench which employs Al techniques and other advanced approaches to deduce surface characteristics and extract features from the hyperspectral images. Among its current capabilities, the prototype system can classify pixels by abstract surface type. The classification process employs neural network analysis of inputs which include pixel spectra and a variety of processed image metrics, including image ``texture spectra`` derived from fractal signatures computed for subimage tiles at each wavelength.

  3. A hyperspectral image analysis workbench for environmental science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.; Slater, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    A significant challenge to the information sciences is to provide more powerful and accessible means to exploit the enormous wealth of data available from high-resolution imaging spectrometry, or hyperspectral'' imagery, for analysis, for mapping purposes, and for input to environmental modeling applications. As an initial response to this challenge, Argonne's Advanced Computer Applications Center has developed a workstation-based prototype software workbench which employs Al techniques and other advanced approaches to deduce surface characteristics and extract features from the hyperspectral images. Among its current capabilities, the prototype system can classify pixels by abstract surface type. The classification process employs neural network analysis of inputs which include pixel spectra and a variety of processed image metrics, including image texture spectra'' derived from fractal signatures computed for subimage tiles at each wavelength.

  4. Noble gas mass spectrometry. Application to earth sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaoka, Nobuo [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1983-03-01

    The method for the isotopic analysis of trace noble gas is described briefly, and the theoretical background of the application to earth science is discussed. Furthermore, the measured results of /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio in volcanic gases and hot spring gases from various areas in Japan, and /sup 3/He//sup 4/He and /sup 40/Ar//sup 36/Ar ratios in mantle-origi nated rocks and minerals are presented. The examples of the application of these results to the field of earth science are introduced. The magma activity which is specific to the considered volcano is identified from the decrease in /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio with the process of volcanic activity. The possibility of earthquake prediction by the measurement of /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio is suggested from the measured results of /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio in the gas sampled from an earthquake fault. The isotopes of He and Ar in a diamond were analyzed, and from these results, the isotope composition in mantle when the diamond had been formed was estimated. The mantle model that the mantle is constituted from upper depleted mantle and lower fertile mantle is explained, based on the results of the analysis of He and Ar isotopes in various volcanic eruptions.

  5. Activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 2, 1987 through March 31, 1988.

  6. [Research Conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period 1 Oct. 1996 - 31 Mar. 1997.

  7. Research in progress at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1987 through October 1, 1987.

  8. Activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April 1, 1985 through October 2, 1985 is summarized.

  9. Animal health surveillance applications: The interaction of science and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeberg, Preben

    2012-08-01

    Animal health surveillance is an ever-evolving activity, since health- and risk-related policy and management decisions need to be backed by the best available scientific evidence and methodology. International organizations, trade partners, politicians, media and the public expect fast, understandable, up-to-date presentation and valid interpretation of animal disease data to support and document proper animal health management - in crises as well as in routine control applications. The delivery and application of surveillance information need to be further developed and optimized, and epidemiologists, risk managers, administrators and policy makers need to work together in order to secure progress. Promising new developments in areas such as risk-based surveillance, spatial presentation and analysis, and genomic epidemiology will be mentioned. Limitations and areas in need of further progress will be underlined, such as the general lack of a wide and open exchange of international animal disease surveillance data. During my more than 30 year career as a professor of Veterinary Epidemiology I had the good fortune of working in challenging environments with different eminent colleagues in different countries on a variety of animal health surveillance issues. My career change from professor to Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO) - "from science to application" - was caused by my desire to see for myself if and how well epidemiology would actually work to solve real-life problems as I had been telling my students for years that it would. Fortunately it worked for me! The job of a CVO is not that different from that of a professor of Veterinary Epidemiology; the underlying professional principles are the same. Every day I had to work from science, and base decisions and discussions on documented evidence - although sometimes the evidence was incomplete or data were simply lacking. A basic understanding of surveillance methodology is very useful for a CVO, since it provides

  10. Semiconductor Pixel detectors and their applications in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubek, J

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in semiconductor technology allow construction of highly efficient and low noise pixel detectors of ionizing radiation. Steadily improving quality of front end electronics enables fast digital signal processing in each pixel which offers recording of more complete information about each detected quantum (energy, time, number of particles). All these features improve an extend applicability of pixel technology in different fields. Some applications of this technology especially for imaging in life sciences will be shown (energy and phase sensitive X-ray radiography and tomography, radiography with heavy charged particles, neutron radiography, etc). On the other hand a number of obstacles can limit the detector performance if not handled. The pixel detector is in fact an array of individual detectors (pixels), each of them has its own efficiency, energy calibration and also noise. The common effort is to make all these parameters uniform for all pixels. However an ideal uniformity can be never reached. Moreover, it is often seen that the signal in one pixel can affect the neighbouring pixels due to various reasons (e.g. charge sharing). All such effects have to be taken into account during data processing to avoid false data interpretation. A brief view into the future of pixel detectors and their applications including also spectroscopy, tracking and dosimetry is given too. Special attention is paid to the problem of detector segmentation in context of the charge sharing effect.

  11. Applications of artificial neural networks in medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jigneshkumar L; Goyal, Ramesh K

    2007-09-01

    Computer technology has been advanced tremendously and the interest has been increased for the potential use of 'Artificial Intelligence (AI)' in medicine and biological research. One of the most interesting and extensively studied branches of AI is the 'Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs)'. Basically, ANNs are the mathematical algorithms, generated by computers. ANNs learn from standard data and capture the knowledge contained in the data. Trained ANNs approach the functionality of small biological neural cluster in a very fundamental manner. They are the digitized model of biological brain and can detect complex nonlinear relationships between dependent as well as independent variables in a data where human brain may fail to detect. Nowadays, ANNs are widely used for medical applications in various disciplines of medicine especially in cardiology. ANNs have been extensively applied in diagnosis, electronic signal analysis, medical image analysis and radiology. ANNs have been used by many authors for modeling in medicine and clinical research. Applications of ANNs are increasing in pharmacoepidemiology and medical data mining. In this paper, authors have summarized various applications of ANNs in medical science.

  12. Ausubel's Theory of Learning and its Application to Introductory Science Part II--Primary Science: An Ausubelian View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    1982-01-01

    In part 1 (SE 532 193) an outline of Ausubel's learning theory was given. The application of the theory to elementary school science is addressed in this part, clarifying what elementary science means and indicating how it relates to what may be expected to be already known by elementary school children. (Author/JN)

  13. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Tsakanikas

    Full Text Available Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing's outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples.

  14. High Throughput Multispectral Image Processing with Applications in Food Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Dimitris; Nychas, George-John

    2015-01-01

    Recently, machine vision is gaining attention in food science as well as in food industry concerning food quality assessment and monitoring. Into the framework of implementation of Process Analytical Technology (PAT) in the food industry, image processing can be used not only in estimation and even prediction of food quality but also in detection of adulteration. Towards these applications on food science, we present here a novel methodology for automated image analysis of several kinds of food products e.g. meat, vanilla crème and table olives, so as to increase objectivity, data reproducibility, low cost information extraction and faster quality assessment, without human intervention. Image processing's outcome will be propagated to the downstream analysis. The developed multispectral image processing method is based on unsupervised machine learning approach (Gaussian Mixture Models) and a novel unsupervised scheme of spectral band selection for segmentation process optimization. Through the evaluation we prove its efficiency and robustness against the currently available semi-manual software, showing that the developed method is a high throughput approach appropriate for massive data extraction from food samples.

  15. Application of radiation and radioisotopes in life science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation and Radioisotopes have been played an important role in the wide range of life science, from the field study, such as fertilizer or pesticide development or production of new species, to gene engineering researches. Many mutants through radiation have been provided to the market and the usage of radioactive tracers was an effective tool to study plant physiology. It has been granted that the contribution of radioisotopes has been accelerated the development of the gene engineering technology, which is now overwhelming all the other usages of radiation or radioisotopes. However, because of the difficulty to get social acceptance for gene modified plants, the orientation of the life science is now changing towards, so called ''post genome era''. Therefore, from the point of radiation or radioisotope usage, new application methods are needed to develop new type of researches. We present how (1) neutron activation analysis, (2) neutron radiography and (3) positron emission tomography are promising to study living plant physiology. Some of these techniques are not necessarily new methods but with a little modification, they show new aspects of plant activity. (author)

  16. Applications of Natural Language Processing in Biodiversity Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E. Thessen

    2012-01-01

    A computer can handle the volume but cannot make sense of the language. This paper reviews and discusses the use of natural language processing (NLP and machine-learning algorithms to extract information from systematic literature. NLP algorithms have been used for decades, but require special development for application in the biological realm due to the special nature of the language. Many tools exist for biological information extraction (cellular processes, taxonomic names, and morphological characters, but none have been applied life wide and most still require testing and development. Progress has been made in developing algorithms for automated annotation of taxonomic text, identification of taxonomic names in text, and extraction of morphological character information from taxonomic descriptions. This manuscript will briefly discuss the key steps in applying information extraction tools to enhance biodiversity science.

  17. Decomposition techniques in mathematical programming engineering and science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Conejo, Antonio J; Minguez, Roberto; Garcia-Bertrand, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    Optimization plainly dominates the design, planning, operation, and c- trol of engineering systems. This is a book on optimization that considers particular cases of optimization problems, those with a decomposable str- ture that can be advantageously exploited. Those decomposable optimization problems are ubiquitous in engineering and science applications. The book considers problems with both complicating constraints and complicating va- ables, and analyzes linear and nonlinear problems, with and without in- ger variables. The decomposition techniques analyzed include Dantzig-Wolfe, Benders, Lagrangian relaxation, Augmented Lagrangian decomposition, and others. Heuristic techniques are also considered. Additionally, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis for characterizing the solution of optimization problems is carried out. This material is particularly novel and of high practical interest. This book is built based on many clarifying, illustrative, and compu- tional examples, which facilitate the learning p...

  18. Nonparametric statistics with applications to science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Kvam, Paul H

    2007-01-01

    A thorough and definitive book that fully addresses traditional and modern-day topics of nonparametric statistics This book presents a practical approach to nonparametric statistical analysis and provides comprehensive coverage of both established and newly developed methods. With the use of MATLAB, the authors present information on theorems and rank tests in an applied fashion, with an emphasis on modern methods in regression and curve fitting, bootstrap confidence intervals, splines, wavelets, empirical likelihood, and goodness-of-fit testing. Nonparametric Statistics with Applications to Science and Engineering begins with succinct coverage of basic results for order statistics, methods of categorical data analysis, nonparametric regression, and curve fitting methods. The authors then focus on nonparametric procedures that are becoming more relevant to engineering researchers and practitioners. The important fundamental materials needed to effectively learn and apply the discussed methods are also provide...

  19. Nanocrystalline diamond--an excellent platform for life science applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Frank R; Najam-Ul-Haq, Muhammed; Rainer, Matthias; Gassner, Robert; Lepperdinger, Günter; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther; Klauser, Frederik; Liu, Xianjie; Memmel, Norbert; Bertel, Erminald; Garrido, Jose A; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris

    2007-12-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) has recently been successfully utilized in a variety of life science applications. NCD films are favorable and salubrious substrates for cells during cultivation. Therefore NCD has also been employed in tissue engineering strategies. NCD as reported in this contribution was grown by means of a modified hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique, which results in less than 3% sp2-hybridization and yields grain sizes of 5-20 nm. After production the NCD surface was rather hydrophobic, however it could be efficiently refined to exhibit more hydrophilic properties. Changing of the surface structure was found to be an efficient means to influence growth and differentiation capacity of a variety of cells. The particular needs for any given cell type has to be proven empirically. Yet flexible features of NCD appear to be superior to plastic surfaces which can be hardly changed in quality. Besides its molecular properties, crystal structural peculiarities of NCD appear to influence cell growth as well. In our attempt to facilitate, highly specialized applications in biomedicine, we recently discovered that growth factors can be tightly bound to NCD by mere physisorption. Hence, combination of surface functionalization together with further options to coat NCD with any kind of three-dimensional structure opens up new avenues for many more applications. In fact, high through-put protein profiling of early disease stages may become possible from serum samples, because proteins bound to NCD can now be efficiently analyzed by MALDI/TOF-MS. Given these results, it is to be presumed that the physical properties and effective electrochemical characteristics of NCD will allow tailoring devices suitable for many more diagnostic as well as therapeutic applications.

  20. Plasma Science and Applications at the Intel Science Fair: A Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Lee

    2009-11-01

    For the past five years, the Coalition for Plasma Science (CPS) has presented an award for a plasma project at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF). Eligible projects have ranged from grape-based plasma production in a microwave oven to observation of the effects of viscosity in a fluid model of quark-gluon plasma. Most projects have been aimed at applications, including fusion, thrusters, lighting, materials processing, and GPS improvements. However diagnostics (spectroscopy), technology (magnets), and theory (quark-gluon plasmas) have also been represented. All of the CPS award-winning projects so far have been based on experiments, with two awards going to women students and three to men. Since the award was initiated, both the number and quality of plasma projects has increased. The CPS expects this trend to continue, and looks forward to continuing its work with students who are excited about the possibilities of plasma. You too can share this excitement by judging at the 2010 fair in San Jose on May 11-12.

  1. Introducing Students to the Application of Statistics and Investigative Methods in Political Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Dominic D.; Nemire, Nathan A.

    2017-01-01

    This exercise introduces students to the application of statistics and its investigative methods in political science. It helps students gain a better understanding and a greater appreciation of statistics through a real world application.

  2. Pharmaceutical applications of cyclodextrins: basic science and product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Brewster, Marcus E

    2010-11-01

    Drug pipelines are becoming increasingly difficult to formulate. This is punctuated by both retrospective and prospective analyses that show that while 40% of currently marketed drugs are poorly soluble based on the definition of the biopharmaceutical classification system (BCS), about 90% of drugs in development can be characterized as poorly soluble. Although a number of techniques have been suggested for increasing oral bioavailability and for enabling parenteral formulations, cyclodextrins have emerged as a productive approach. This short review is intended to provide both some basic science information as well as data on the ability to develop drugs in cyclodextrin-containing formulations. There are currently a number of marketed products that make use of these functional solubilizing excipients and new product introduction continues to demonstrate their high added value. The ability to predict whether cyclodextrins will be of benefit in creating a dosage form for a particular drug candidate requires a good working knowledge of the properties of cyclodextrins, their mechanism of solubilization and factors that contribute to, or detract from, the biopharmaceutical characteristics of the formed complexes. We provide basic science information as well as data on the development of drugs in cyclodextrin-containing formulations. Cyclodextrins have emerged as an important tool in the formulator's armamentarium to improve apparent solubility and dissolution rate for poorly water-soluble drug candidates. The continued interest and productivity of these materials bode well for future application and their currency as excipients in research, development and drug product marketing. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

  3. Solid State nuclear track detector - [Part] III : applications in science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Nand

    1992-01-01

    The present article describes the applications of solid state nuclear track detection techniques in different branches of science (e.g. life sciences, nuclear physics, cosmic ray and solar physics, earth sciences, teaching laboratories) and technology with selected examples from voluminous literature available on the subject. (author). 28 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  4. New applications of particle accelerators in medicine, materials science, and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recently, the application of particle accelerators to medicine, materials science, and other industrial uses has increased dramatically. A random sampling of some of these new programs is discussed, primarily to give the scope of these new applications. The three areas, medicine, materials science or solid-state physics, and industrial applications, are chosen for their diversity and are representative of new accelerator applications for the future

  5. Making Learning Interesting and Its Application to the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Brady Michael; Lin, Huann-shyang

    2017-01-01

    Generations of students are graduating from secondary school disinterested in post-secondary study of science or pursuing careers in science-related fields beyond formal education. We propose that destabilising such disinterest among future students requires science educators to begin listening to secondary school students regarding their views of…

  6. Proceedings of the sixth conference of nuclear sciences and applications. Vol. 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    The six conference on nuclear sciences and applications was held on 15-20 March, 1996 in Cairo. The specialists discussed nuclear Sciences. The applications of nuclear engineering, chemistry, radioactive waste management, nuclear fuel and nuclear material were discussed at the proceeing.More than 1000 paper

  7. Proceedings of the sixth conference of nuclear sciences and applications. Vol. 1-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The six conference on nuclear sciences and applications was held on 15-20 March, 1996 in Cairo. The specialists discussed nuclear Sciences. The applications of nuclear engineering, chemistry, radioactive waste management, nuclear fuel and nuclear material were discussed at the proceeing.More than 1000 paper.

  8. Perceptions of teachers of the application of science process skills in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reports on teachers' perceptions of the application of science process skills in the teaching of Geography in secondary schools in the Free State province. A teachers' questionnaire on the application of the science process skills in the teaching of Geography was constructed and the questionnaire was content ...

  9. 77 FR 37016 - Applications for New Awards: Upward Bound Math and Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards: Upward Bound Math and Science Program AGENCY... Bound Math and Science Program. Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2012.... There are three types of grants under the UB Program: regular UB grants, Veterans UB grants, and UB Math...

  10. 77 FR 76028 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and Its Identified Subcontractor...: EPA has authorized its contractor, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of McLean, VA... information may be claimed or determined to be Confidential Business Information (CBI). DATES: Access to the...

  11. 78 FR 66697 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and Its Identified Subcontractors..., Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of McLean, VA, and its subcontractors to access...). Some of the information may have been claimed or determined to be Confidential Business Information...

  12. The SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) Tsunami Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stephanie L.; Jones, Lucile M.

    2013-01-01

    The Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) tsunami scenario depicts a hypothetical but plausible tsunami created by an earthquake offshore from the Alaska Peninsula and its impacts on the California coast. The tsunami scenario is a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Geological Survey (CGS), the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), other Federal, State, County, and local agencies, private companies, and academic and other institutions. This document presents evidence for past tsunamis, the scientific basis for the source, likely inundation areas, current velocities in key ports and harbors, physical damage and repair costs, economic consequences, environmental and ecological impacts, social vulnerability, emergency management and evacuation challenges, and policy implications for California associated with this hypothetical tsunami. We also discuss ongoing mitigation efforts by the State of California and new communication products. The intended users are those who need to make mitigation decisions before future tsunamis, and those who will need to make rapid decisions during tsunami events. The results of the tsunami scenario will help managers understand the context and consequences of their decisions and how they may improve preparedness and response. An evaluation component will assess the effectiveness of the scenario process for target stakeholders in a separate report to improve similar efforts in the future.

  13. Probability with applications in engineering, science, and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Carlton, Matthew A

    2017-01-01

    This updated and revised first-course textbook in applied probability provides a contemporary and lively post-calculus introduction to the subject of probability. The exposition reflects a desirable balance between fundamental theory and many applications involving a broad range of real problem scenarios. It is intended to appeal to a wide audience, including mathematics and statistics majors, prospective engineers and scientists, and those business and social science majors interested in the quantitative aspects of their disciplines. The textbook contains enough material for a year-long course, though many instructors will use it for a single term (one semester or one quarter). As such, three course syllabi with expanded course outlines are now available for download on the book’s page on the Springer website. A one-term course would cover material in the core chapters (1-4), supplemented by selections from one or more of the remaining chapters on statistical inference (Ch. 5), Markov chains (Ch. 6), stoch...

  14. Common themes, methods, and applications in multiscale science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    In 1993, under the leadership of Richard Slansky, the T-Division Director, an initiative was started to facilitate cross communications and interactions between a large number of different workers who were, from their own perspectives and with regard to their own challenges, in fact working on very difficult problems which involved multiple size and time scales. The realization of this common element had the potential for valuable mutual interaction. His initiative led initially to a competency development initiative and subsequently to a broadening recognition of the importance of multiscale science and a broadening application of it to problems and concerns inherent in significant fields of endeavor at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. One of the aspects of this effort was a series of meetings which emphasizes cross communication between the workers. It was realized early on that this cross communication would be fare more effective, considering the difficult technical nature and that the range of the material was well outside the area of specialization of individual members of the group, if notes were taken, written up, and disseminated. This report represents the collection of these notes.

  15. FOSS Tools and Applications for Education in Geospatial Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ciolli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While the theory and implementation of geographic information systems (GIS have a history of more than 50 years, the development of dedicated educational tools and applications in this field is more recent. This paper presents a free and open source software (FOSS approach for education in the geospatial disciplines, which has been used over the last 20 years at two Italian universities. The motivations behind the choice of FOSS are discussed with respect to software availability and development, as well as educational material licensing. Following this philosophy, a wide range of educational tools have been developed, covering topics from numerical cartography and GIS principles to the specifics regarding different systems for the management and analysis of spatial data. Various courses have been implemented for diverse recipients, ranging from professional training workshops to PhD courses. Feedback from the students of those courses provides an invaluable assessment of the effectiveness of the approach, supplying at the same time directions for further improvement. Finally, lessons learned after 20 years are discussed, highlighting how the management of educational materials can be difficult even with a very open approach to licensing. Overall, the use of free and open source software for geospatial (FOSS4G science provides a clear advantage over other approaches, not only simplifying software and data management, but also ensuring that all of the information related to system design and implementation is available.

  16. Current developments and applications of HREM in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchison, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    As the dimensions involved in the design and fabrication of advanced materials steadily decreases, the need for accurate structural characterization at the atomic level becomes greater. In this paper we will consider the contributions of high resolution electron microscopy to modern materials science. We will first of all review the current status of high resolution electron microscopy instrumentation, which has seen several significant advances in recent years. These include the development of versatile and elegant electron optical systems which are capable of producing small probes, down to 1 nm in size, combined with high spatial resolution. These instruments also successfully combine low aberration objective lenses with stable specimen tilting devices, essential for the careful characterization of nano scale crystalline structures involved in new materials. On the other hand, there is now renewed interest in the development of 'large installation' mega volt instruments operating at up to 1.3 MeV, and designed for resolutions approaching 0.1 nm. These installations are not without problems of course; they include both 'instrumental' problems of reliability, vibration, cost(') and also 'specimen' problems, especially electron irradiation damage. There are now several of these high voltage, high resolution microscopes in operation, and some of their recent results will be discussed. In the second part of the talk, we will describe some typical applications of atomic scale imaging in materials. These will include: defects and defect interactions in CVD-grown diamond films; defect in solid electrolytes, interface structures in semiconductors and other important systems. (author)

  17. Numerical simulation in material science: principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruste, Jacky

    2006-06-01

    The objective is here to describe the main simulation techniques currently used in material science. After a presentation of the concepts of modelling and simulation, of their objectives and uses, of the issue of simulation scale, and of means of numeric simulation, the author addresses simulations performed at a nano-scopic scale: 'ab-initio' methods, molecular dynamics, examples of applications of ab-initio methods to energy issues or to the study of surface properties of nano-materials. The next chapter addresses various Monte Carlo methods (Metropolis, atomic kinetics, objects kinetics, transport with the simulation of particle trajectories, generation of random numbers). The next parts address simulations performed at a mesoscopic scale (simulation and microstructure, phase field methods, dynamics of discrete dislocations, homogeneous chemical kinetics) and at a macroscopic scale (medium discretization with the notion of mesh, simulation of structure mechanics and of fluid behaviour). The issues of code coupling and scale coupling are then discussed. The last part proposes an overview of virtual metallurgy and modelling of industrial processes (welding, vacuum arc re-fusion, rolling, forming)

  18. Developing nanotechnology for biofuel and plant science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenstein, Justin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation presents the research on the development of mesoporous silica based nanotechnology for applications in biofuels and plant science. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have been the subject of great interest in the last two decades due to their unique properties of high surface area, tunable pore size and particle morphology. The robust nature of the silica framework is easily functionalized to make the MSNs a promising option for selective separations. Also, the independent channels that form the pores of MSN have been exploited in the use of particles as platforms for molecular delivery. Pore size and organic functionality are varied to identify the ideal adsorbent material for free fatty acids (FFAs). The resulting material is able to sequester FFAs with a high degree of selectivity from a simulated solution and microalgal oil. The recyclability and industrial implications are also explored. A continuation of the previous material, further tuning of MSN pore size was investigated. Particles with a smaller diameter selectively sequester polyunsaturated free fatty acids (PUFAs) over monounsaturated FFAs and saturated FFAs. The experimental results were verified with molecular modeling. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials with a pore diameter of 10 nm (MSN-10) were decorated with small gold nanoparticles. The resulting materials were shown to deliver proteins and DNA into plant cells using the biolistic method.

  19. Development of phase-contrast imaging technique for material science and medical science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashyap, Y.S.; Roy, Tushar; Sarkar, P.S; Shukla, Mayank; Yadav, P.S; Sinha, Amar; Verma, Vishnu; Ghosh, A.K.

    2007-07-01

    In-line phase contrast imaging technique is an emerging method for study of materials such as carbon fibres, carbon composite materials, polymers etc. These represent the class of materials for which x-ray attenuation cross-section is very small. Similarly, this technique is also well suited for imaging of soft materials such as tissues, distinguishing between tumour and normal tissue. Thus this method promises a far better contrast for low x-ray absorbing substances than the conventional radiography method for material and medical science applications. Though the conventional radiography technique has been carried out for decades, the phase-imaging technique is being demonstrated for the first time within, the country. We have set up an experimental facility for phase contrast imaging using a combination of x-ray CCD detector and a microfocus x-ray source. This facility is dedicated for micro-imaging experiments such as micro-tomography and high resolution phase contrast experiments. In this report, the results of phase contrast imaging using microfocus source and ELETTRA, synchrotron source are discussed. We have also discussed the basic design and heat load calculation for upcoming imaging beamline at Indus-II, RRCAT, Indore. (author)

  20. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period October 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984 is summarized.

  1. Summary of research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989 is summarized.

  2. Research and Applications of Chemical Sciences in Forestry: Proceedings of the 4th Southern Station Chemical Sciences Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.A. Vozzo; [Compiler

    1994-01-01

    This proceedings is the result of 65 scientists representing 34 facilities reported in 28 presentations. As titled, Research and Applications of Chemical Sciences in Forestry, the contributors represent academic, basic, and applied researchers from universities and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Their presence and experience represent a significant showing toward...

  3. Small format digital photogrammetry for applications in the earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke-Zapp, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Small format digital photogrammetry for applications in the earth sciences Photogrammetry is often considered one of the most precise and versatile surveying techniques. The same camera and analysis software can be used for measurements from sub-millimetre to kilometre scale. Such a measurement device is well suited for application by earth scientists working in the field. In this case a small toolset and a straight forward setup best fit the needs of the operator. While a digital camera is typically already part of the field equipment of an earth scientist the main focus of the field work is often not surveying. Lack in photogrammetric training at the same time requires an easy to learn, straight forward surveying technique. A photogrammetric method was developed aimed primarily at earth scientists for taking accurate measurements in the field minimizing extra bulk and weight of the required equipment. The work included several challenges. A) Definition of an upright coordinate system without heavy and bulky tools like a total station or GNS-Sensor. B) Optimization of image acquisition and geometric stability of the image block. C) Identification of a small camera suitable for precise measurements in the field. D) Optimization of the workflow from image acquisition to preparation of images for stereo measurements. E) Introduction of students and non-photogrammetrists to the workflow. Wooden spheres were used as target points in the field. They were more rugged and available in different sizes than ping pong balls used in a previous setup. Distances between three spheres were introduced as scale information in a photogrammetric adjustment. The distances were measured with a laser distance meter accurate to 1 mm (1 sigma). The vertical angle between the spheres was measured with the same laser distance meter. The precision of the measurement was 0.3° (1 sigma) which is sufficient, i.e. better than inclination measurements with a geological compass. The upright

  4. Human Factors Science: Brief History and Applications to Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sarah Henrickson

    2015-12-01

    This section will define the science of human factors, its origins, its impact on safety in other domains, and its impact and potential for impact on patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Radiation Sciences and Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the Radiation Sciences and Application conference. the conference consistes of Chemistry; Food Sciences and Technology; Entomolgy; Biology; Waste Management; Safety and Microbiology. This conference consists of one volume and 360 pages., figs., tabs., refs.

  6. Elementary Students Using a Tablet-Based Note-Taking Application in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Seungoh; Fulton, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the potential of a tablet-based note-taking application (TbNA) to serve as a digital notebook in support of students' classroom science practices. An elementary teacher (Grades 4-5) from a public charter school integrated a TbNA into her science class for one semester while participating in professional…

  7. EVALUATION REPORT SCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION S-CAD CHEMICAL AGENT DETECTION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USEPA's National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC)Technology Testing and Evaluation Program (TTEP) is carrying out performance tests on homeland security technologies. Under TTEP, Battelle recently evaluated the performance of the Science Applications International Co...

  8. Progress on research of materials science and biotechnology by ion beam application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Isao [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Research of materials science and biotechnology by ion beam application in Takasaki Establishment was reviewed. Especially, the recent progresses of research on semiconductors in space, creation of new functional materials and topics in biotechnology were reported. (author)

  9. Radiation environmental impact assessment of the radioisotope's application on nuclear medical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongshi

    2004-01-01

    The radiation environmental impact assessment of the radioisotope's application on nuclear medical science is introduced, including the assessment criteria, the assessment methods and the environmental impact assessment of three wastes emission. (authors)

  10. Journal of Computer Science and Its Application - Vol 20, No 2 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Computer Science and Its Application - Vol 20, No 2 (2013) ... Fuzzy analysis and adaptive anthropometry model for object identification in surveillance system ... Natural language processing techniques for automatic test questions ...

  11. Presentations of the 1. Eurasia Conference on Nuclear Science and Its Application. Vol.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of this conference was to enable scientists from the Eurasia region to exchange views in the field of nuclear science and its applications, for establishing collaboration among the respective countries, such carrying out joint projects, organizing conferences, seminars, training programs and related activities. The topics discussed at the conference were: Nuclear energy satatus and perspectives, Applications of nuclear techniques, Fundamental problems of nuclear science. Full texts of presentations published in two volumes

  12. Application of best available science to the regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghissi, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    The current grant is a continuation of a previous grant awarded to the Institute for Regulatory Science. In July, 1989, the functions of the Institute were transferred to the University of Maryland and the studies started at the Institute were continued at the University. The current grant started February 1, 1990. Therefore, much of the discussion in this progress report relies upon the grant funded at the Institute for Regulatory Science. This progress report covers the period from February 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. The objective of the project is to assure that societal decisions are based on the best available science (BAS). A great deal of progress was made to establish relevant organizations for the development of consensus on relevant scientific information. During the next year, emphasis will be placed on Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), particularly as related to its reauthorization and mixed waste

  13. Application of nuclear-physics methods in space materials science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, L. S.; Voronina, E. N.; Galanina, L. I.; Chirskaya, N. P.

    2017-07-01

    The brief history of the development of investigations at the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) in the field of space materials science is outlined. A generalized scheme of a numerical simulation of the radiation impact on spacecraft materials and elements of spacecraft equipment is examined. The results obtained by solving some of the most important problems that modern space materials science should address in studying nuclear processes, the interaction of charged particles with matter, particle detection, the protection from ionizing radiation, and the impact of particles on nanostructures and nanomaterials are presented.

  14. Science For Sendai - Bridging the gap between research and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J.

    2015-12-01

    Disasters have an enormous cost in lives and livelihoods, but the use of rigorous evidence-based scientific approaches to minimise their impact remains poor. Vast amounts of science which could be readily applied for disaster risk reduction (DRR) is under-utilised, if used at all. Previous international agreements have failed to change this picture, but there is a clear call from the international community that the 2015 Sendai framework should make a difference; it is thus re-appraising how to bridge the chasm that exists between DRR relevant scientists and potential users of their research. There is widespread recognition of the need for risk affected countries and communities to engage in science-based decision-making, but several barriers, such as a lack of infrastructure or necessary skills, institutions, and enforcement of science-based policies require significant attention. There are now incentives for governments to respond: the framework has science embedded throughout and it sets-out national targets against which science uptake can be monitored; similarly, widening access to insurance also demands sound science. Advances such as open-data and models, increasing computational capacity, expanding networks, evolving diverse mobile technologies and the other multiple facets of the big data agenda, also should drive change. So, how does the scientific community need to adapt? Whilst vast amounts of 'DRR-relevant' science has been produced, too little of it can be readily used in DRR science. Much remains highly disciplinary and focused on analysis of limited distributions or single processes with a small number of agents; by contrast real-world DRR problems are commonly complex, with multiple drivers and uncertainties. There is a major need for a trans-disciplinary DRR-focused risk research agenda to evolve. Not only do research funders need to develop and resource risk research, but researchers themselves need to identify that focussing on the bigger risk

  15. Fire science application and integration in support of decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom Zimmerman

    2011-01-01

    Wildland fire management in the United States has historically been a challenging and complex program governed by a multitude of factors including situational status, objectives, operational capability, science and technology, and changes and advances in all these factors. The improvement and advancement of risk-informed decision making has the potential to improve...

  16. Enhancing the Scientific Process with Artificial Intelligence: Forest Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Daniel L. Schmoldt; H. Michael Rauscher

    1991-01-01

    Forestry, as a science, is a process for investigating nature. It consists of repeatedly cycling through a number of steps, including identifying knowledge gaps, creating knowledge to fill them, and organizing, evaluating, and delivering this knowledge. Much of this effort is directed toward creating abstract models of natural phenomena. The cognitive techniques of AI...

  17. Information Theory for Information Science: Antecedents, Philosophy, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losee, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an historical overview of the theoretical antecedents leading to information theory, specifically those useful for understanding and teaching information science and systems. Information may be discussed in a philosophical manner and at the same time be measureable. This notion of information can thus be the subject of…

  18. Students' Risk Perceptions of Nanotechnology Applications: Implications for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Grant; Jones, Gail; Taylor, Amy; Forrester, Jennifer; Robertson, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Scientific literacy as a goal of a science education reform remains an important discourse in the research literature and is a key component of students' understanding and acceptance of emergent technologies like nanotechnology. This manuscript focuses on undergraduate engineering students' perceptions of the risks and benefits posed by…

  19. Data Science for Imbalanced Data: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reid A.

    2016-01-01

    Data science is a broad, interdisciplinary field concerned with the extraction of knowledge or insights from data, with the classification of data as a core, fundamental task. One of the most persistent challenges faced when performing classification is the class imbalance problem. Class imbalance refers to when the frequency with which each class…

  20. Hierarchical modelling for the environmental sciences statistical methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, James S

    2006-01-01

    New statistical tools are changing the way in which scientists analyze and interpret data and models. Hierarchical Bayes and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods for analysis provide a consistent framework for inference and prediction where information is heterogeneous and uncertain, processes are complicated, and responses depend on scale. Nowhere are these methods more promising than in the environmental sciences.

  1. Nano-Science-Engineering-Technology Applications to Food and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Wang, Zheng; Chaudhry, Qasim; Park, Hyun Jin; Juneja, Lekh R

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology are applied to Food and Nutrition. Various delivery systems include nanoemulsions, microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and liposomes. The nanoscale systems have advantages, such as higher bioavailabitity, and other physicochemical properties. The symposium will provide an overview of the formulation, characterization, and utilization of nanotechnology-based food and nutrition.

  2. Atmospheric rivers emerge as a global science and applications focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, F. Martin; Dettinger, Michael; Lavers, David A.; Gorodetskaya, Irina; Martin, Andrew; Viale, Maximilliano; White, Allen; Oakley, Nina; Rutz, Jonathan; Spackman, J. Ryan; Wernli, Heini; Cordeira, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in atmospheric sciences and hydrology have identified the key role of atmo-spheric rivers (ARs) in determining the distribution of strong precipitation events in the midlatitudes. The growth of the subject is evident in the increase in scientific publications that discuss ARs (Fig. 1a). Combined with related phenomena, that is, warm conveyor belts (WCBs) and tropical moisture exports (TMEs), the frequency, position, and strength of ARs determine the occurrence of floods, droughts, and water resources in many parts of the world. A conference at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California, recently gathered over 100 experts in atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, and polar science; ecology; water management; and civil engineering to assess the state of AR science and to explore the need for new information. This first International Atmospheric Rivers Conference (IARC) allowed for much needed introductions and interactions across fields and regions, for example, participants came from five continents, and studies covered ARs in six continents and Greenland (Fig. 1b). IARC also fostered discussions of the status and future of AR science, and attendees strongly supported the idea of holding another IARC at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the summer of 2018.

  3. Applications of the Advanced Light Source to problems in the earth, soil, and environmental sciences report of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics: ALS status and research opportunities; advanced light source applications to geological materials; applications in the soil and environmental sciences; x-ray microprobe analysis; potential applications of the ALS in soil and environmental sciences; and x-ray spectroscopy using soft x-rays: applications to earth materials

  4. Introduction to lattice theory with computer science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, Vijay K

    2015-01-01

    A computational perspective on partial order and lattice theory, focusing on algorithms and their applications This book provides a uniform treatment of the theory and applications of lattice theory. The applications covered include tracking dependency in distributed systems, combinatorics, detecting global predicates in distributed systems, set families, and integer partitions. The book presents algorithmic proofs of theorems whenever possible. These proofs are written in the calculational style advocated by Dijkstra, with arguments explicitly spelled out step by step. The author's intent

  5. Proceedings of the first nuclear science and technology conference no. 1. Nuclear science and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This conference contains papers on non-power applications of nuclear technology in agriculture and industry. These applications include irradiation of food for disinfestation and radiopreservation, radiation monitoring, and radiation chemistry important to industrial processes

  6. Interactive Processing and Visualization of Image Data forBiomedical and Life Science Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staadt, Oliver G.; Natarjan, Vijay; Weber, Gunther H.; Wiley,David F.; Hamann, Bernd

    2007-02-01

    Background: Applications in biomedical science and life science produce large data sets using increasingly powerful imaging devices and computer simulations. It is becoming increasingly difficult for scientists to explore and analyze these data using traditional tools. Interactive data processing and visualization tools can support scientists to overcome these limitations. Results: We show that new data processing tools and visualization systems can be used successfully in biomedical and life science applications. We present an adaptive high-resolution display system suitable for biomedical image data, algorithms for analyzing and visualization protein surfaces and retinal optical coherence tomography data, and visualization tools for 3D gene expression data. Conclusion: We demonstrated that interactive processing and visualization methods and systems can support scientists in a variety of biomedical and life science application areas concerned with massive data analysis.

  7. The Office of Space Science and Applications strategic plan, 1990: A strategy for leadership in space through excellence in space science and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    A strategic plan for the U.S. space science and applications program during the next 5 to 10 years was developed and published in 1988. Based on the strategies developed by the advisory committees of both the National Academy of Science and NASA, the plan balances major, moderate, and small mission initiatives, the utilization of the Space Station Freedom, and the requirements for a vital research base. The Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) strategic plan is constructed around five actions: establish a set of programmatic themes; establish a set of decision rules; establish a set of priorities for missions and programs within each theme; demonstrate that the strategy will yield a viable program; and check the strategy for consistency within resource constraints. The OSSA plan is revised annually. This OSSA 1990 Strategic Plan refines the 1989 Plan and represents OSSA's initial plan for fulfilling its responsibilities in two major national initiatives. The Plan is now built on interrelated, complementary strategies for the core space science and applications program, for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, and for the Space Exploration Initiative. The challenge is to make sure that the current level of activity is sustained through the end of this century and into the next. The 1990 Plan presents OSSA's strategy to do this.

  8. Consumer Science applications in meat research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. Ngapo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Consumer studies with meat as the subject have been increasingly reported over the last couple of decades. Many of these are aimed at marketing to different groups of consumers, but a select few are aimed at improving meat quality and/or the meat industry. It is these latter types of studies that this presentation will focus on. This general overview illustrates some of the ways that consumer science can be used in meat science. Attitude-based studies, focus groups, image surveys, labeling studies and tastings are but a few of the tools that those in the meat industry from producer to scientist to manager, can use to complement their work continually improving our meat chains.

  9. Ultrasonic spectroscopy applications in condensed matter physics and materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Leisure, Robert G

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic spectroscopy is a technique widely used in solid-state physics, materials science, and geology that utilizes acoustic waves to determine fundamental physical properties of materials, such as their elasticity and mechanical energy dissipation. This book provides complete coverage of the main issues relevant to the design, analysis, and interpretation of ultrasonic experiments. Topics including elasticity, acoustic waves in solids, ultrasonic loss, and the relation of elastic constants to thermodynamic potentials are covered in depth. Modern techniques and experimental methods including resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, digital pulse-echo, and picosecond ultrasound are also introduced and reviewed. This self-contained book includes extensive background theory and is accessible to students new to the field of ultrasonic spectroscopy, as well as to graduate students and researchers in physics, engineering, materials science, and geophysics.

  10. Inertial fusion sciences and applications 99: state of the art 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labaune, Ch.; Hogan, W.J.; Tanaka, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    This book brings together the texts of the communications presented at the conference 'Inertial fusion sciences and applications' held in Paris in 1999. These proceedings are shared into five sessions: laser fusion physics, fusion with particle beams, fusion with implosions, inertial fusion energy, and experimental applications of inertial fusion. (J.S.)

  11. University Applicants' Critical Thinking Skills: The Case of the Finnish Educational Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utriainen, Jukka; Marttunen, Miika; Kallio, Eeva; Tynjälä, Päivi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of the critical thinking skills of applicants (n = 77) seeking entry to the faculty of educational sciences in a Finnish university and how these skills are associated with the applicant's age, previous higher education experience, and matriculation and entrance examination scores. The data consist of the…

  12. Applications of airborne remote sensing in atmospheric sciences research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, R. J.; Szejwach, G.; Phillips, B. B.

    1984-01-01

    This paper explores the potential for airborne remote sensing for atmospheric sciences research. Passive and active techniques from the microwave to visible bands are discussed. It is concluded that technology has progressed sufficiently in several areas that the time is right to develop and operate new remote sensing instruments for use by the community of atmospheric scientists as general purpose tools. Promising candidates include Doppler radar and lidar, infrared short range radiometry, and microwave radiometry.

  13. The Effect of Simulation-Assisted Laboratory Applications on Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes towards Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulukök, Seyma; Sari, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of computer-assisted laboratory applications on pre-service science teachers' attitudes towards science teaching were investigated and the opinions of the pre-service teachers about the application were also determined. The study sample consisted of 46 students studying science teaching Faculty of Education. The study…

  14. Neutron applications in earth, energy and environmental sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Liyuan; Schober, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    This text is a comprehensive overview of neutron scattering techniques that enhance the study of materials at the micro and nanoscale. The well structured volume provides introductions to various neutron applications from leading experts in the field.

  15. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells science, applications, and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Alejandro A

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on the recent research progresses on the fundamentals understanding of the materials degradation phenomena in PEFC, for automotive applications. On a multidisciplinary basis, through contributions of internationally recognized researchers in the field, this book provides a complete and comprehensive critical review on crucial scientific topics related to PEFC materials degradation, and ensures a strong complementary between experimental and theoretical analysis and preparation techniques with several practical applications for both the research and the industry communities.

  16. Calculus introductory theory and applications in physical and life science

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, R M

    1995-01-01

    This lucid and balanced introduction for first year engineers and applied mathematicians conveys the clear understanding of the fundamentals and applications of calculus, as a prelude to studying more advanced functions. Short and fundamental diagnostic exercises at the end of each chapter test comprehension before moving to new material.Provides a clear understanding of the fundamentals and applications of calculus, as a prelude to studying more advanced functionsIncludes short, useful diagnostic exercises at the end of each chapter

  17. Proceedings of the third Eurasian conference on nuclear science and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-10-15

    The third Eurasian conference on nuclear science and its application was held on 5-8 October, 2004 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei, radiochemistry, radioisotope production, technology of radioisotopes and compounds, activations analysis applications, radionuclides, radioimmunoassays, application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture. More than 330 talks were presented in the meeting. (k.m.)

  18. Proceedings of the third Eurasian conference on nuclear science and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    The third Eurasian conference on nuclear science and its application was held on 5-8 October, 2004 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei, radiochemistry, radioisotope production, technology of radioisotopes and compounds, activations analysis applications, radionuclides, radioimmunoassays, application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture. More than 330 talks were presented in the meeting. (k.m.)

  19. Abstracts of the third Eurasian conference on nuclear science and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuldashev, B; Salikhbaev, U; Ibragimova, E; Fazylov, M [eds.

    2004-10-01

    The third Eurasian conference on nuclear science and its application was held on 5-8 October, 2004 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of particle physics, relativistic nuclear physics and physics of atomic nuclei, radiochemistry, radioisotope production, technology of radioisotopes and compounds, activations analysis applications, radionuclides, radioimmunoassays, application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture. More than 330 talks were presented in the meeting. (k.m.)

  20. Data Science and Political Economy: Application to Financial Regulatory Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharyn O'Halloran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of computational data science techniques in natural language processing and machine learning algorithms to analyze large and complex textual information opens new avenues for studying the interaction between economics and politics. We apply these techniques to analyze the design of financial regulatory structure in the United States since 1950. The analysis focuses on the delegation of discretionary authority to regulatory agencies in promulgating, implementing, and enforcing financial sector laws and overseeing compliance with them. Combining traditional studies with the new machine learning approaches enables us to go beyond the limitations of both methods and offer a more precise interpretation of the determinants of financial regulatory structure.

  1. Communication products for the Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) tsunami scenario: Chapter K in The SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) Tsunami Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Suzanne C.

    2013-01-01

    Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR), like its predecessor the Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project, has a mission to increase the use of science by decision-makers of all kinds. Thus, an important part of any SAFRR scenario is development of products that enhance usability of the science. In this tsunami scenario, the focus has been on development of three kinds of products: products that augment typical outputs of scientific studies, such as reports, to make the results of the scenario more relevant and usable to nonscientists; products that distill local impacts and allow users in specific locales to identify which aspects of the broad regional study apply to their local area; and

  2. Worldwide application of prevention science in adolescent health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Richard F; Fagan, Abigail A; Gavin, Loretta E; Greenberg, Mark T; Irwin, Charles E; Ross, David A; Shek, Daniel T L

    2015-01-01

    The burden of morbidity and mortality from non-communicable disease has risen worldwide and is accelerating in low-income and middle-income countries, whereas the burden from infectious diseases has declined. Since this transition, the prevention of non-communicable disease as well as communicable disease causes of adolescent mortality has risen in importance. Problem behaviours that increase the short-term or long-term likelihood of morbidity and mortality, including alcohol, tobacco, and other drug misuse, mental health problems, unsafe sex, risky and unsafe driving, and violence are largely preventable. In the past 30 years new discoveries have led to prevention science being established as a discipline designed to mitigate these problem behaviours. Longitudinal studies have provided an understanding of risk and protective factors across the life course for many of these problem behaviours. Risks cluster across development to produce early accumulation of risk in childhood and more pervasive risk in adolescence. This understanding has led to the construction of developmentally appropriate prevention policies and programmes that have shown short-term and long-term reductions in these adolescent problem behaviours. We describe the principles of prevention science, provide examples of efficacious preventive interventions, describe challenges and potential solutions to take efficacious prevention policies and programmes to scale, and conclude with recommendations to reduce the burden of adolescent mortality and morbidity worldwide through preventive intervention. PMID:22538180

  3. Introduction to Plasma Technology Science, Engineering and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Harry, John Ernest

    2011-01-01

    Written by a university lecturer with more than forty years experience in plasma technology, this book adopts a didactic approach in its coverage of the theory, engineering and applications of technological plasmas. The theory is developed in a unified way to enable brevity and clarity, providing readers with the necessary background to assess the factors that affect the behavior of plasmas under different operating conditions. The major part of the book is devoted to the applications of plasma technology and their accompanying engineering aspects, classified by the various pressure and densit

  4. Mathematical and statistical applications in life sciences and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, Mahima; Chaubey, Yogendra

    2017-01-01

    The book includes articles from eminent international scientists discussing a wide spectrum of topics of current importance in mathematics and statistics and their applications. It presents state-of-the-art material along with a clear and detailed review of the relevant topics and issues concerned. The topics discussed include message transmission, colouring problem, control of stochastic structures and information dynamics, image denoising, life testing and reliability, survival and frailty models, analysis of drought periods, prediction of genomic profiles, competing risks, environmental applications and chronic disease control. It is a valuable resource for researchers and practitioners in the relevant areas of mathematics and statistics.

  5. Math tools 500+ applications in science and arts

    CERN Document Server

    Glaeser, Georg

    2017-01-01

    In this book, topics such as algebra, trigonometry, calculus and statistics are brought to life through over 500 applications ranging from biology, physics and chemistry to astronomy, geography and music. With over 600 illustrations emphasizing the beauty of mathematics, Math Tools complements more theoretical textbooks on the market, bringing the subject closer to the reader and providing a useful reference to students. By highlighting the ubiquity of mathematics in practical fields, the book will appeal not only to students and teachers, but to anyone with a keen interest in mathematics and its applications.

  6. Grid3: An Application Grid Laboratory for Science

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    level services required by the participating experiments. The deployed infrastructure has been operating since November 2003 with 27 sites, a peak of 2800 processors, work loads from 10 different applications exceeding 1300 simultaneous jobs, and data transfers among sites of greater than 2 TB/day. The Grid3 infrastructure was deployed from grid level services provided by groups and applications within the collaboration. The services were organized into four distinct "grid level services" including: Grid3 Packaging, Monitoring and Information systems, User Authentication and the iGOC Grid Operatio...

  7. Proceedings of the 2011 2nd International Congress on Computer Applications and Computational Science

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Quang

    2012-01-01

    The latest inventions in computer technology influence most of human daily activities. In the near future, there is tendency that all of aspect of human life will be dependent on computer applications. In manufacturing, robotics and automation have become vital for high quality products. In education, the model of teaching and learning is focusing more on electronic media than traditional ones. Issues related to energy savings and environment is becoming critical.   Computational Science should enhance the quality of human life,  not only solve their problems. Computational Science should help humans to make wise decisions by presenting choices and their possible consequences. Computational Science should help us make sense of observations, understand natural language, plan and reason with extensive background knowledge. Intelligence with wisdom is perhaps an ultimate goal for human-oriented science.   This book is a compilation of some recent research findings in computer application and computational sci...

  8. Semantic Web applications and tools for the life sciences: SWAT4LS 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Albert; Paschke, Adrian; Romano, Paolo; Marshall, M Scott; Splendiani, Andrea

    2012-01-25

    As Semantic Web technologies mature and new releases of key elements, such as SPARQL 1.1 and OWL 2.0, become available, the Life Sciences continue to push the boundaries of these technologies with ever more sophisticated tools and applications. Unsurprisingly, therefore, interest in the SWAT4LS (Semantic Web Applications and Tools for the Life Sciences) activities have remained high, as was evident during the third international SWAT4LS workshop held in Berlin in December 2010. Contributors to this workshop were invited to submit extended versions of their papers, the best of which are now made available in the special supplement of BMC Bioinformatics. The papers reflect the wide range of work in this area, covering the storage and querying of Life Sciences data in RDF triple stores, tools for the development of biomedical ontologies and the semantics-based integration of Life Sciences as well as clinicial data.

  9. Aspects of Mathematical Modelling Applications in Science, Medicine, Economics and Management

    CERN Document Server

    Hosking, Roger J

    2008-01-01

    The construction of mathematical models is an essential scientific activity. Mathematics has long been associated with developments in the exact sciences and engineering, but more recently mathematical modelling has been used to investigate complex systems that arise in many other fields. The contributors to this book demonstrate the application of mathematics to modern research topics in ecology and environmental science, health and medicine, phylogenetics and neural networks, theoretical chemistry, economics and management.

  10. Artificial intelligence applications concepts for the remote sensing and earth science community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. J.; Roelofs, L. H.

    1984-01-01

    The following potential applications of AI to the study of earth science are described: (1) intelligent data management systems; (2) intelligent processing and understanding of spatial data; and (3) automated systems which perform tasks that currently require large amounts of time by scientists and engineers to complete. An example is provided of how an intelligent information system might operate to support an earth science project.

  11. The tandetron: applications to earth sciences and archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontugne, M.

    1996-01-01

    The TANDETRON is a mass spectrometer coupled with a tandem accelerator. Its main advantage is being able to measure the radioactivity of C 14 in samples thousand times smaller than those allowed in classical β-counting methods. Some applications to paleoclimatology and archaeology are described. (A.C.)

  12. Multitracer techniques: applications in chemical and life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Dalia

    2001-01-01

    The scope and approaches of the 'multitracer technique' have briefly been reviewed. The various aspects of the 'multitracer technique' include, the methods of accelerator production of 'multitracers' and their separation, the application of this technique in the study of adsorption of metal ions on solid surfaces and in the study of distribution of trace elements in plants and animals

  13. SciQL, A Query Language for Science Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Kersten (Martin); Y. Zhang (Ying); M.G. Ivanova (Milena); N.J. Nes (Niels)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractScientific applications are still poorly served by contemporary relational database systems. At best, the system provides a bridge towards an external library using user-defined functions, explicit import/export facilities or linked-in Java/C# interpreters. Time has come to rectify this

  14. Other applications of neutron beams in material sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novion, C.H. de

    1997-01-01

    The various applications of neutron beams are reviewed. The different mechanisms involved in neutron interaction with matter are explained. We notice that generally neutron radiation effects are unfavorable but can be turned into efficient tools to add new structures or properties to materials, silicon doping is an example. The basis principles of neutron activation analysis and neutron radiography are described. (A.C.)

  15. NATO Advanced Research Institute on the Application of Systems Science to Energy Policy Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Cherniavsky, E; Laughton, M; Ruff, L

    1981-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute (ARI) on "The Application of Systems Science to Energy Policy Planning" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science in collaboration with the National Center for Analysis of Energy Sys­ tems, Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international cooperation. Advanced Research Institutes are sponsored by the NATO Science Committee for the purposes of bringing together senior scientists to seek consensus on an assessment of the present state of knowl­ edge on a specific topic and to make recommendations for future research directions. Meetings are structured to encourage inten­ sive group discussion. Invitees are carefully selected so that the group as a whole will contain the experience and expertise neces­ sary to make the conclusions valid and significant. A final report is published presenting the various viewpoints and conclusions....

  16. Policy for Robust Space-based Earth Science, Technology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Escobar, Vanessa Marie; Aschbacher, Josef; Milagro-Pérez, Maria Pilar; Doorn, Bradley; Macauley, Molly K.; Friedl, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology has contributed to the transformation of multiple earth science domains, putting space observations at the forefront of innovation in earth science. With new satellite missions being launched every year, new types of earth science data are being incorporated into science models and decision-making systems in a broad array of organizations. Policy guidance can influence the degree to which user needs influence mission design and when, and ensure that satellite missions serve both the scientific and user communities without becoming unfocused and overly expensive. By considering the needs of the user community early on in the mission-design process, agencies can ensure that satellites meet the needs of multiple constituencies. This paper describes the mission development process in NASA and ESA and compares and contrasts the successes and challenges faced by these agencies as they try to balance science and applications within their missions.

  17. Applications of pulsed energy sources and hydrodynamic response to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, F.; Nelson, W.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic response of materials to pulsed, relativistic electron beams was studied for materials science applications over two decades ago. Presently, intense light ion beams are being explored for materials science applications. These include the Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST) of materials for producing stronger and more corrosion-resistant materials and the evaporative deposition of polycrystalline thin films. Laser sources are also being extensively utilized as pulsed energy sources in medical science and in clinical applications. In particular, laser-tissue interactions are being investigated for laser angioplasty and surgery as well as cancer therapy. The understanding of the energy deposition and hydrodynamic response of a wide range of materials is essential to the success of these applications. In order to address these materials science applications, the authors are utilizing and developing high quality, energy deposition-hydrodynamic code techniques which can aid in the design and interpretation of experiments. Consequently, the authors strongly encourage the development of 3-dimensional, species-selective diagnostic techniques, e.g. Resonant Holographic Interferometry Spectroscopy (RHIS), to be used in analyzing the ablation plume in the thin film deposition experiments. In this presentation they show the results and discuss the limitations of calculations for these materials applications. They also discuss the status of the RHIS diagnostic

  18. Thermodynamics and Diffusion Coupling in Alloys—Application-Driven Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ågren, John

    2012-10-01

    As emphasized by Stokes (1997), the common assumption of a linear progression from basic research (science), via applied research, to technological innovations (engineering) should be questioned. In fact, society would gain much by supporting long-term research that stems from practical problems and has usefulness as a key word. Such research may be fundamental, and often, it cannot be distinguished from "basic" research if it were not for its different motivation. The development of the Calphad method and the more recent development of accompanying kinetic approaches for diffusion serve as excellent examples and are the themes of this symposium. The drivers are, e.g., the development of new materials, processes, and lifetime predictions. Many challenges of the utmost practical importance require long-term fundamental research. This presentation will address some of them, e.g., the effect of various ordering phenomena on activation barriers, and the strength and practical importance of correlation effects.

  19. An Evaluation of Protocols for UAV Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Stewart, David E.; Sullivan, Donald V.; Finch, Patrick E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper identifies data transport needs for current and future science payloads deployed on the NASA Global Hawk Unmanned Aeronautical Vehicle (UAV). The NASA Global Hawk communication system and operational constrains are presented. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission is used to provide the baseline communication requirements as a variety of payloads were utilized in this mission. User needs and desires are addressed. Protocols are matched to the payload needs and an evaluation of various techniques and tradeoffs are presented. Such techniques include utilization rate-base selective negative acknowledgement protocols and possible use of protocol enhancing proxies. Tradeoffs of communication architectures that address ease-of-use and security considerations are also presented.

  20. Nuclear science and technology: applications for the welfare of mankind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    A short review of used nuclear techniques in the practice is given. Nuclear techniques play an important role in environmental protection by providing assistance in promoting alternate sources of energy, reducing air pollution, managing fresh water resources, controlling water pollution and guarding the oceans and seas. They are also used to analyze minerals, soils, gases, water and other substances used in industry, and the results often influence economic, ecological, medical and legal decisions. The International Atomic Energy Agency works to foster the role of nuclear science and technology in support of sustainable human development. This involves both advancing knowledge and exploiting this knowledge to tackle pressing world-wide challenges - hunger, disease, natural resources management, environmental pollution and industrial quality control. (authors)

  1. Experimental design with applications in management, engineering and the sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Paul D; Celli, Giovana B

    2018-01-01

    This text introduces and provides instruction on the design and analysis of experiments for a broad audience. Formed by decades of teaching, consulting, and industrial experience in the Design of Experiments field, this new edition contains updated examples, exercises, and situations covering the science and engineering practice. This text minimizes the amount of mathematical detail, while still doing full justice to the mathematical rigor of the presentation and the precision of statements, making the text accessible for those who have little experience with design of experiments and who need some practical advice on using such designs to solve day-to-day problems. Additionally, an intuitive understanding of the principles is always emphasized, with helpful hints throughout.

  2. Application of calorimetry and thermodynamics to critical problems in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atake, Tooru

    2009-01-01

    Calorimetry and thermodynamic studies have long been playing a very important role in the research fields of fundamental science and technology. Some topics and examples of thermodynamics studies are given, and the details are explained on the basis of the present author's experience, focusing attention to application of adiabatic calorimetry and thermodynamics to solve critical problems in materials science: (1) condensed gas calorimetry and third law entropy, (2) phase transition and polymorphism in simple molecular crystals, (3) incommensurate phase transitions, (4) particle size effects on the phase transitions in ferroelectric/ferroelastic crystals, (5) relaxor ferroelectrics and multi-ferroics, and some other topics in materials science and technology

  3. Research in progress and other activities of the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics and computer science during the period April 1, 1993 through September 30, 1993. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustic and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  4. Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative: evolution of scientific investigations to applicable science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soja, Amber J; Groisman, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The letters collected in this focus issue of Environmental Research Letters on ‘Environmental, socio-economic and climatic changes in Northern Eurasia and their feedbacks to the global Earth system’ represent the third special issue based on the results of research within the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI: http://neespi.org) program domain. Through the years, NEESPI researchers have presented a diverse array of articles that represent a variety of spatial scales and demonstrate the degree to which abrupt climatic and socio-economic changes are acting across Northern Eurasia and feed back to the global Earth system. (synthesis and review)

  5. Studies on time series applications in environmental sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Bărbulescu, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Time series analysis and modelling represent a large study field, implying the approach from the perspective of the time and frequency, with applications in different domains. Modelling hydro-meteorological time series is difficult due to the characteristics of these series, as long range dependence, spatial dependence, the correlation with other series. Continuous spatial data plays an important role in planning, risk assessment and decision making in environmental management. In this context, in this book we present various statistical tests and modelling techniques used for time series analysis, as well as applications to hydro-meteorological series from Dobrogea, a region situated in the south-eastern part of Romania, less studied till now. Part of the results are accompanied by their R code. .

  6. New applications of photographic materials in science and technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buschmann, H.T.; Deml, R.; Duville, R.; Philippaerts, H.; Bollen, R.; Ranz, E.

    1976-01-01

    In spite of some disatvantages photographic materials based on silver halides possess the outstanding feature of high sensitivity. So again and again special photographic materials have been developed for new techniques including information storage. This contribution reports on some special photographic materials and it briefly discusses some applications. Materials are discussed in detail for holography, carrier-frequency photography, producing masks for integrated circuits, recording equidensities, bubble chamber photography, and for neutron-radiography. (orig.) [de

  7. A hyperspectral image data exploration workbench for environmental science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woyna, M.A.; Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.

    1994-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Image Data Exploration Workbench (HIDEW) software system has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to enable analysts at Unix workstations to conveniently access and manipulate high-resolution imagery data for analysis, mapping purposes, and input to environmental modeling applications. HIDEW is fully object-oriented, including the underlying database. This system was developed as an aid to site characterization work and atmospheric research projects

  8. A hyperspectral image data exploration workbench for environmental science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyna, M.A.; Christiansen, J.H.; Zawada, D.G.; Simunich, K.L.

    1994-08-01

    The Hyperspectral Image Data Exploration Workbench (HIDEW) software system has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to enable analysts at Unix workstations to conveniently access and manipulate high-resolution imagery data for analysis, mapping purposes, and input to environmental modeling applications. HIDEW is fully object-oriented, including the underlying database. This system was developed as an aid to site characterization work and atmospheric research projects.

  9. The Science and Applications Tethered Platform (SATP) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlina, P.

    1986-01-01

    The capabilities of tether systems in orbit are going to be demonstrated by the first planned flights of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS). These test flights will investigate the properties of tether systems as low altitude atmospheric research facilities and as electric power generators. Studies are being conducted with the purpose of testing a variety of concepts and approaches. A comparative analysis of results will allow the choosing of the most promising ideas for further development. The broad range of applications presently under study include applications in electrodynamics, transportation, microgravity in addition to basic research. The SATP project definition study is now about midway through its first phase. The analyses conducted have led to an appraisal of users interest in the project and to a deeper understanding of the problems associated with large, long-lived tether systems in space. In addition, two specialized platform designs, devoted to microgravity and precise pointing applications, are being studied because of their potential usefulness and the promise of technical feasibility.

  10. Radiocarbon application in environmental science and archaeology in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajcar Bronic, I., E-mail: krajcar@irb.h [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Obelic, B.; Horvatincic, N.; Baresic, J.; Sironic, A. [Radiocarbon Laboratory, Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Minichreiter, K. [Institute of Archaeology, Ulica grada Vukovara 68, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2010-07-21

    Radiocarbon is a cosmogenic radioisotope equally distributed throughout the troposphere and biosphere. This fact enables its most common application-radiocarbon dating. Natural equilibrium of radiocarbon has been disturbed by diverse anthropogenic activities during the last {approx}150 years, enabling also the use of {sup 14}C in various environmental applications. Here we present three types of studies by using {sup 14}C that were performed in the Zagreb Radiocarbon Laboratory. {sup 14}C in atmospheric CO{sub 2} has been monitored at several sites with various anthropogenic influences and the difference between the clean-air sites, the industrial city and the vicinity of a nuclear power plant has been established. {sup 14}C has been applied in geochronology of karst areas, especially in dating of tufa, speleothems and lake sediments, as well as in studies of geochemical carbon cycle. {sup 14}C has been used in various archaeological studies, among which the dating of the early Neolithic settlements in Croatia is presented. In these studies {sup 14}C was measured by radiometric techniques, i.e., by gas proportional counting and more recently by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Two sample preparation techniques for LSC measurement were used: benzene synthesis for archaeological dating and other applications that require better precision, and direct absorption of CO{sub 2} for monitoring purposes. The presented results show that various studies by using {sup 14}C can be successfully performed by the LSC technique, providing a large enough sample (>1 g of carbon).

  11. The Fifteenth International Conference on the Science and Application of Nanotubes (NT14)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    cronin, stephen

    2015-01-06

    The Fifteenth International Conference on the Science and Application of Nanotubes (NT14) was held at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California on June 2-6, 2014. NT14 upheld the NT tradition of presenting the latest results in the science and applications of nanotubes and related materials in plenary sessions. Emphasis was given to convivial poster sessions and student participation. Over 225 participants attended the conference, including students, post-docs, faculty, and members from industry. A total of 45 talks were presented, as well as 157 posters.

  12. Nanotechnology and its applications in Veterinary and Animal Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Patil

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has a tremendous potential to revolutionize agriculture and livestock sector. It can provide new tools for molecular and cellular biology, biotechnology, veterinary physiology, animal genetics, reproduction etc. which will allow researchers to handle biological materials such as DNA, proteins or cells in minute quantities usually nano-liters or pico-liters. Nanotechnology tools like microfluidics, nanomaterials, bioanalytical nanosensors, etc. has the potential to solve many more puzzles related to animal health, production, reproduction and prevention and treatment of diseases. It is reasonable to presume that in the upcoming year’s nanotechnology research will reform the science and technology of the animal health and will help to boost up the livestock production. Nanotechnology will have a profound impact, but not in the immediate future as it is in the early stages of its development and needs to equip scientists, engineers and biologists to work at the cellular and molecular levels for significant benefits in healthcare and animal medicine. But It is reasonable to presume that in the upcoming year’s nanotechnology research will revolutionize animal health and help to boost up livestock production. [Vet World 2009; 2(12.000: 475-477

  13. NASA FDL: Accelerating Artificial Intelligence Applications in the Space Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, J.; Navas-Moreno, M.; Dahlstrom, E. L.; Jennings, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    NASA has a long history of using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for exploration purposes, however due to the recent explosion of the Machine Learning (ML) field within AI, there are great opportunities for NASA to find expanded benefit. For over two years now, the NASA Frontier Development Lab (FDL) has been at the nexus of bright academic researchers, private sector expertise in AI/ML and NASA scientific problem solving. The FDL hypothesis of improving science results was predicated on three main ideas, faster results could be achieved through sprint methodologies, better results could be achieved through interdisciplinarity, and public-private partnerships could lower costs We present select results obtained during two summer sessions in 2016 and 2017 where the research was focused on topics in planetary defense, space resources and space weather, and utilized variational auto encoders, bayesian optimization, and deep learning techniques like deep, recurrent and residual neural networks. The FDL results demonstrate the power of bridging research disciplines and the potential that AI/ML has for supporting research goals, improving on current methodologies, enabling new discovery and doing so in accelerated timeframes.

  14. Application of decision science to resilience management in Jamaica Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Mitchell; Fuller, Angela K.; Johnson, Fred A.; Hare, M. P.; Stedman, Richard C.; Sanderson, E.W.; Solecki, W. D.; Waldman, J.R.; Paris, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    This book highlights the growing interest in management interventions designed to enhance the resilience of the Jamaica Bay socio-ecological system. Effective management, whether the focus is on managing biological processes or human behavior or (most likely) both, requires decision makers to anticipate how the managed system will respond to interventions (i.e., via predictions or projections). In systems characterized by many interacting components and high uncertainty, making probabilistic predictions is often difficult and requires careful thinking not only about system dynamics, but also about how management objectives are specified and the analytic method used to select the preferred action(s). Developing a clear statement of the problem(s) and articulation of management objectives is often best achieved by including input from managers, scientists and other stakeholders affected by the decision through a process of joint problem framing (Marcot and others 2012; Keeney and others 1990). Using a deliberate, coherent and transparent framework for deciding among management alternatives to best meet these objectives then ensures a greater likelihood for successful intervention. Decision science provides the theoretical and practical basis for developing this framework and applying decision analysis methods for making complex decisions under uncertainty and risk.

  15. Application of short-time activation analysis in the sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grass, F.

    1991-01-01

    Short-time activation analysis has proved to be a valuable tool in nearly all fields of science. To take full advantage of this technique, it is favorable to use a fast transfer system and a high resolution high rate gamma-spectroscopy system for short lived gamma-emitters and a Cherenkov detector for the determination of hard beta-emitters. It is then possible to utilize sub-minute nuclides Li-8 (740 ms), B-12 (20 ms), F-20 (11.1 s), Y-89m (16 s), and Pb-207m (800 ms) for the determination of these elements. Besides these sub-minute nuclides which constitute the only possibility for neutron activation analysis of these elements there are a number of other elements which form longer lived nuclides on short irradiation. The analysis of the halogenides F, Cl, Br, I in waste water of a sewage incineration plant can be achieved with a single 20 s irradiation and two consecutive measurement of 20 and 600 s using Cl-38m, F-20, Br-79m as well as the longer lived Cl-38, Br-80, I-128

  16. Geometric algebra with applications in science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sobczyk, Garret

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this book is to present a unified mathematical treatment of diverse problems in mathematics, physics, computer science, and engineer­ ing using geometric algebra. Geometric algebra was invented by William Kingdon Clifford in 1878 as a unification and generalization of the works of Grassmann and Hamilton, which came more than a quarter of a century before. Whereas the algebras of Clifford and Grassmann are well known in advanced mathematics and physics, they have never made an impact in elementary textbooks where the vector algebra of Gibbs-Heaviside still predominates. The approach to Clifford algebra adopted in most of the ar­ ticles here was pioneered in the 1960s by David Hestenes. Later, together with Garret Sobczyk, he developed it into a unified language for math­ ematics and physics. Sobczyk first learned about the power of geometric algebra in classes in electrodynamics and relativity taught by Hestenes at Arizona State University from 1966 to 1967. He still vividly remembers a feeling ...

  17. Studies of radioisotope tracer technique and its applications to pesticide sciences in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Minghong; Chen Qing; Zheng Ran

    1996-05-01

    The improper use of chemical pesticides has resulted in serious environmental problems and food pollutions, affecting the ecosystem balance and human being health. There are more and more scientists and research institutions being engaged in the area of radioisotope tracer techniques for pesticide sciences in China. So far, more than 80 labeled compounds, including insecticides, fungicides, acaricides, herbicides, metabolic intermediates, fertilizer and biological agents, etc. have been synthesized at the laboratory for application of isotopes in Institute for Application of Atomic Energy, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences. Over past several years, the great achievements have been made in the researches of radioisotope tracer techniques and their applications to pesticide sciences in China, especially in the researches for isotopic labeling, residues, degradation and metabolism of pesticides in plant and animal, behavior and fate of pesticides in environment, and techniques for safe application of pesticide, and so on. The researches of radioisotope tracer techniques and their applications to pesticide sciences in China in the past years are briefly introduced. Some problems are put forward and the development in future is predicted. (1 tab.)

  18. Fast Track to the Cloud: Design Patterns for 12-Factor Earth Sciences Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawloski, Andrew; McLaughlin, Brett; Lynnes, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    As expanding service offerings and decreasing prices make the cloud increasingly attractive to Earth Science applications, there are nontrivial practical considerations which can hinder its meaningful use. In this talk, we will discuss architectural recommendations and lessons learned while working on EOSDIS' cloud efforts, particularly the NASA-compliant General Application Platform (NGAP) and its associated applications. Prominent in our findings is the importance of 12-factor design patterns and the powerful "wins" they enable in the cloud. We will share our strategies for "fast-tracking" applications to the cloud --whether they be legacy, planned for the future, or somewhere in between.

  19. Proceedings of the 11th China symposium on computer application in modern science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The 11th China symposium on computer application in modern science and technology were held by China Electronics Society and Nuclear Electronics and Nuclear Detecting Technology branch Society of China Nuclear Society on september, 8th-12th, 2003 in Changdao of Shandong province 77 articles is collected in the proceedings. The contents included calculation and calculation method, software system and software application, data acquisition and control system, database, and management information system, general system, network application and grid calculation and its application system and so on

  20. Optimal control theory applications to management science and economics

    CERN Document Server

    Sethi, Suresh P

    2006-01-01

    Optimal control methods are used to determine the best ways to control a dynamic system. This book applies theoretical work to business management problems developed from the authors' research and classroom instruction. The thoroughly revised new edition has been refined with careful attention to the text and graphic material presentation. Chapters cover a range of topics including finance, production and inventory problems, marketing problems, machine maintenance and replacement, problems of optimal consumption of natural resources, and applications of control theory to economics. The book in

  1. Polymers in life sciences: Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Anna Angela; Dalmoro, Annalisa; d'Amore, Matteo; Lamberti, Gaetano; Cascone, Sara; Titomanlio, Giuseppe

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the work done by prof. Titomanlio and his group in the fields of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of polymers. In particular, the main topics covered are: i) controlled drug release from pharmaceuticals based on hydrogel for oral delivery of drugs; ii) production and characterization of micro and nanoparticles based on stimuli-responsive polymers; iii) use of polymers for coronary stent gel-paving; iv) design and realization of novel methods (in-vitro and in-silico) to test polymer-based pharmaceuticals.

  2. Application of supercritical fluid extraction in analytical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional solvent extraction process owing to its potential to minimize the generation of the liquid volume and simplification of the extraction process.This technology is some times referred to as 'green technology' and 'clean technology'. Supercritical fluid extraction process assumes significance as it exhibits practical advantages such as enhanced extraction rate due to rapid mass transfer in supercritical fluid medium and change of solvent properties such as density by tuning pressure/temperature conditions. Supercritical fluids (SCF) offer faster, cleaner and efficient extraction owing to low viscosity, high density, low surface tension and better diffusivity properties. Higher diffusivity than liquids facilitates rapid mass transfer and faster completion of reaction. Due to low viscosity and surface tension, SCF can penetrate deep inside the material, extracting the component of interest. Liquid like solvating characteristics of SCFs enable dissolution of compounds whereas gas like diffusion characteristics provide conditions for high degree of extraction in shorter time duration. CO 2 has been widely employed as supercritical fluid owing to its moderate critical constants (Pc= 72.9 atm, Tc =304.3 K, ñ c = 0.47 g mL -1 ) and attractive properties such as being easily available, recyclable, non-toxic, chemically inert, non inflammable and radio-chemically stable. SCF finds application in variety of fields. In nuclear industry for separation and purification of actinides from liquids and solid matrices. In food industry, Decaffeination of coffee is done by SCF. Pharmaceutical industry, organic compounds can be extracted from plants by SC CO 2 avoiding liquid solvent usage. SCF may also be utilised for the production of fine powders. In polymer and plastics industries, examples of applications include the impregnation of medical material

  3. NOAA's Big Data Partnership and Applications to Ocean Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    New opportunities for the distribution of NOAA's oceanographic and other environmental data are being explored through NOAA's Big Data Partnership (BDP) with Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform, IBM, Microsoft Corp. and the Open Cloud Consortium. This partnership was established in April 2015 through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, and is seeking new, financially self-sustaining collaborations between the Partners and the federal government centered upon NOAA's data and their potential value in the information marketplace. We will discuss emerging opportunities for collaboration among businesses and NOAA, progress in making NOAA's ocean data more widely accessible through the Partnerships, and applications based upon this access to NOAA's data.

  4. Applications of Chemical Shift Imaging to Marine Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haakil Lee

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The successful applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in medicine are mostly due to the non-invasive and non-destructive nature of MRI techniques. Longitudinal studies of humans and animals are easily accomplished, taking advantage of the fact that MRI does not use harmful radiation that would be needed for plain film radiographic, computerized tomography (CT or positron emission (PET scans. Routine anatomic and functional studies using the strong signal from the most abundant magnetic nucleus, the proton, can also provide metabolic information when combined with in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. MRS can be performed using either protons or hetero-nuclei (meaning any magnetic nuclei other than protons or 1H including carbon (13C or phosphorus (31P. In vivo MR spectra can be obtained from single region ofinterest (ROI or voxel or multiple ROIs simultaneously using the technique typically called chemical shift imaging (CSI. Here we report applications of CSI to marine samples and describe a technique to study in vivo glycine metabolism in oysters using 13C MRS 12 h after immersion in a sea water chamber dosed with [2-13C]-glycine. This is the first report of 13C CSI in a marine organism.

  5. Applications of Mapping and Tomographic Techniques in Gem Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Gem Sciences are scientific studies of gemstones - their genesis, provenance, synthesis, enhancement, treatment and identification. As high quality forms of specific minerals, the gemstones exhibit unusual physical properties that are usually unseen in the regular counterparts. Most gemstones are colored by trace elements incorporated in the crystal lattice during various growth stages; forming coloration zones of various scales. Studying the spectral and chemical contrast across color zones helps elucidating the origins of colors. These are done by UV-visible spectrometers with microscope and LA-ICPMS in modern gemological laboratories. In the case of diamonds, their colored zones arise from various structural defects incorporated in different growth zones and are studied with FTIR spectrometers with IR microscope and laser photoluminescence spectrometers. Advancement in modern synthetic techniques such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has created some problem for identification. Some exploratory experiments in carbon isotope mapping were done on diamonds using SIMS. The most important issue in pearls is to identify one particular pearl being a cultured one or a natural pearl. The price difference can be enormous. Classical way of such identification is done by x-ray radiographs, which clearly show the bead and the nacre. Modern cultured pearl advancement has eliminated the need for an artificial bead, but a small piece of tissue instead. Nowadays, computer x-ray tomography (CT) scanning devices are used to depict the clear image of the interior of a pearl. In the Chinese jade market, filling fissures with epoxy and/or wax are very commonly seen. We are currently exploring Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique to map the distribution of artificial resin within a polycrystalline aggregates.

  6. Application of electron beam, ion beam and positron beam to polymer sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Seiichi

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Particle beams are finding increasing application in material sciences and the interest covers both applied as well as fundamental investigations. In the present talk application of electron and ion beams in several polymers such as polysilanes, polystyrene, polyolefins, polymethylmethacrylates and related polymers will be presented. It includes among other investigations (such as product analysis) pulse radiolysis studies and effect of LET on polymers. Importance of positron studies in material sciences especially bulk polymers is well documented. A relatively new technique, namely, positron beam application especially in thin film polymers is a new and emerging areas. The interest ranges from applied aspects as well as fundamental understanding of surfaces and interfaces. The present talk will detail the development of a pulsed positron beam using LINAC at Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR) as well as its applications to polymer thin films

  7. Cloud computing applications for biomedical science: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navale, Vivek; Bourne, Philip E

    2018-06-01

    Biomedical research has become a digital data-intensive endeavor, relying on secure and scalable computing, storage, and network infrastructure, which has traditionally been purchased, supported, and maintained locally. For certain types of biomedical applications, cloud computing has emerged as an alternative to locally maintained traditional computing approaches. Cloud computing offers users pay-as-you-go access to services such as hardware infrastructure, platforms, and software for solving common biomedical computational problems. Cloud computing services offer secure on-demand storage and analysis and are differentiated from traditional high-performance computing by their rapid availability and scalability of services. As such, cloud services are engineered to address big data problems and enhance the likelihood of data and analytics sharing, reproducibility, and reuse. Here, we provide an introductory perspective on cloud computing to help the reader determine its value to their own research.

  8. Positron lifetime technique with applications in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J. de.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis deals with the positron lifetime technique as a method to measure extremely low concentrations of extremely small cavities in materials. The method is based upon the fact that the positron lieftime decreases as the electron density increases and upon the fact that a positron preferably annihilates in cavity-like defects in lattices. The theory of positron behaviour in materials and technical aspects of measuring positron liefetimes are described in ch.'s 2 and 3 respectively. Three methods for increasing the time resolution are discussed and some positron sources are described (ch.4). Some applications of the positron lifetime technique and experimental results are shown in chapter 5. 125 refs.; 61 figs.; 18 tabs

  9. Cascaded nonlinearities for ultrafast nonlinear optical science and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten

    the cascading nonlinearity is investigated in detail, especially with focus on femtosecond energetic laser pulses being subjected to this nonlinear response. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are used to understand the cascading interaction and applications are demonstrated. The defocusing soliton...... observations with analogies in fiber optics are observed numerically and experimentally, including soliton self-compression, soliton-induced resonant radiation, supercontinuum generation, optical wavebreaking and shock-front formation. All this happens despite no waveguide being present, thanks...... is of particular interest here, since it is quite unique and provides the solution to a number of standing challenges in the ultrafast nonlinear optics community. It solves the problem of catastrophic focusing and formation of a filaments in bulk glasses, which even under controlled circumstances is limited...

  10. Space science for applications - The history of Landsat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, P. E.

    1981-01-01

    The history of the Landsat project is discussed in terms of three historical phases, each characterized by a dominant problem. From 1964 to 1967, the challenge was to develop interagency cooperation and to achieve consensus on basic plans for the satellite. Between 1968 and 1971, the cooperating agencies had to persuade the Bureau of the Budget to provide funding for the project. Since 1972, the challenge to NASA has been to encourage applications of the Landsat data and plan the shift from an experimental program to an operational one. The tension between experimental and operational goals has run through all these phases, and the conflicts between agencies is detailed, as well as the interaction between technological and political systems.

  11. Discrete chaos with applications in science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Elaydi, Saber N

    2007-01-01

    PREFACE FOREWORD The Stability of One-Dimensional Maps Introduction Maps vs. Difference Equations Maps vs. Differential Equations Linear Maps/Difference Equations Fixed (Equilibrium) Points Graphical Iteration and Stability Criteria for Stability Periodic Points and Their Stability The Period-Doubling Route to Chaos Applications Attraction and Bifurcation Introduction Basin of Attraction of Fixed Points Basin of Attraction of Periodic Orbits Singer's Theorem Bifurcation Sharkovsky's Theorem The Lorenz Map Period-Doubling in the Real World Poincaré Section/Map Appendix Chaos in One Dimension Introduction Density of the Set of Periodic Points Transitivity Sensitive Dependence Definition of Chaos Cantor Sets Symbolic Dynamics Conjugacy Other Notions of Chaos Rössler's Attractor Saturn's Rings Stability of Two-Dimensional Maps Linear Maps vs. Linear Systems Computing An Fundamental Set of Solutions Second-Order Difference Equations Phase Space ...

  12. Application of Genomic In Situ Hybridization in Horticultural Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Ramzan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular cytogenetic techniques, such as in situ hybridization methods, are admirable tools to analyze the genomic structure and function, chromosome constituents, recombination patterns, alien gene introgression, genome evolution, aneuploidy, and polyploidy and also genome constitution visualization and chromosome discrimination from different genomes in allopolyploids of various horticultural crops. Using GISH advancement as multicolor detection is a significant approach to analyze the small and numerous chromosomes in fruit species, for example, Diospyros hybrids. This analytical technique has proved to be the most exact and effective way for hybrid status confirmation and helps remarkably to distinguish donor parental genomes in hybrids such as Clivia, Rhododendron, and Lycoris ornamental hybrids. The genome characterization facilitates in hybrid selection having potential desirable characteristics during the early hybridization breeding, as this technique expedites to detect introgressed sequence chromosomes. This review study epitomizes applications and advancements of genomic in situ hybridization (GISH techniques in horticultural plants.

  13. Cold and ultracold molecules: science, technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Lincoln D; DeMille, David; Krems, Roman V; Ye Jun

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current state of the art in the research field of cold and ultracold molecules. It serves as an introduction to the focus issue of New Journal of Physics on Cold and Ultracold Molecules and describes new prospects for fundamental research and technological development. Cold and ultracold molecules may revolutionize physical chemistry and few-body physics, provide techniques for probing new states of quantum matter, allow for precision measurements of both fundamental and applied interest, and enable quantum simulations of condensed-matter phenomena. Ultracold molecules offer promising applications such as new platforms for quantum computing, precise control of molecular dynamics, nanolithography and Bose-enhanced chemistry. The discussion is based on recent experimental and theoretical work and concludes with a summary of anticipated future directions and open questions in this rapidly expanding research field.

  14. Application of electron beams irradiation in science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmy, N.; Razzak, M.T.; Chosdu, R.; Soebianto, Y.S.

    1996-01-01

    The research and development of radiation technology in Indonesia is mainly conducted at the Center for Application of Isotopes and Radiation of the National Atomic Energy Agency (CAIR-BATAN). During the past 10 years, the center has gained a great progress in the development of gamma irradiation techniques for industrial processing, food preservation, health care products sterilization, and waste treatment. A low energy (300 keV, 50 mA) electron beam accelerator has been installed in cooperation with IAEA/UNDP as a training and demonstration facility for wood surface coating. In spite of the advantages of radiation curing, this technique is still unacceptable in the industries due to the uneconomical reasons and inferiority of the products. The research and development using this facility is also considered expensive, due to the high cost of the liquid nitrogen consumed by the accelerator. The medium energy (2 MeV, 10 mA) accelerator has been installed recently. This is a multipurpose irradiator provided with a belt conveyer, but also designed for wire and cable irradiation. The main technical parameters have been measured under different operating conditions during its commissioning, and the nominal dose measurement has been performed using alanine polyethylene, ethanol-chlorobenzene solution, and FWT-60 film dosimeters. Research and development of polymer cross-linking and shrinkable tubes have become the concern of the accelerator application. The radiation curable polyethylene compound for the cable insulation has been formulated with a characteristic of high voltage and heat resistant. Dosimetry of spices with 0.3-0.6 g/cm 3 density and health care products of 0.2-0.3 g/cm 3 density have been carried out for the promising food preservation and radiation sterilization, energy beam on micro-organism, and surface modification of some synthetic and natural polymers are also carried out. (J.P.N.)

  15. DCA++: A case for science driven application development for leadership computing platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Michael S; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Meredith, Jeremy; Maier, Thomas A [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Mail Stop 6164, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Schulthess, Thomas C, E-mail: schulthess@cscs.c [Swiss National Supercomputer Center and Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, CSCS MAN E 133, Galeria 2, CH-9628 Manno (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    The DCA++ code was one of the early science applications that ran on jaguar at the National Center for Computational Sciences, and the first application code to sustain a petaflop/s under production conditions on a general-purpose supercomputer. The code implements a quantum cluster method with a Quantum Monte Carlo kernel to solve the 2D Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductivity. It is implemented in C++, making heavy use of the generic programming model. In this paper, we discuss how this code was developed, reaching scalability and high efficiency on the world's fastest supercomputer in only a few years. We show how the use of generic concepts combined with systematic refactoring of codes is a better strategy for computational sciences than a comprehensive upfront design.

  16. High End Computing Technologies for Earth Science Applications: Trends, Challenges, and Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor); Biswas, Rupak; Yan, Jerry C.; Brooks, Walter F.; Sterling, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.

  17. DAE-BRNS workshop on applications of image processing in plant sciences and agriculture: lecture notes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    Images form important data and information in biological sciences. Until recently photography was the only method to reproduce and report such data. It is difficult to quantify or treat the photographic data mathematically. Digital image processing and image analysis technology based on recent advances in microelectronics and computers circumvents these problems associated with traditional photography. WIPSA (Workshop on Applications of Image Processing in Plant Sciences and Agriculture) will feature topics on the basic aspects of computers, imaging hardware and software as well advanced aspects such as colour image processing, high performance computing, neural networks, 3-D imaging and virtual reality. Imaging done using ultrasound, thermal, x-rays and γ rays, neutron radiography and the film-less phosphor-imager technology will also be discussed. Additionally application of image processing/analysis in plant sciences, medicine and satellite imagery are discussed. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  18. Methods and applications of statistics in engineering, quality control, and the physical sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Balakrishnan, N

    2011-01-01

    Inspired by the Encyclopedia of Statistical Sciences, Second Edition (ESS2e), this volume presents a concise, well-rounded focus on the statistical concepts and applications that are essential for understanding gathered data in the fields of engineering, quality control, and the physical sciences. The book successfully upholds the goals of ESS2e by combining both previously-published and newly developed contributions written by over 100 leading academics, researchers, and practitioner in a comprehensive, approachable format. The result is a succinct reference that unveils modern, cutting-edge approaches to acquiring and analyzing data across diverse subject areas within these three disciplines, including operations research, chemistry, physics, the earth sciences, electrical engineering, and quality assurance. In addition, techniques related to survey methodology, computational statistics, and operations research are discussed, where applicable. Topics of coverage include: optimal and stochastic control, arti...

  19. DCA++: A case for science driven application development for leadership computing platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, Michael S; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Meredith, Jeremy; Maier, Thomas A; Schulthess, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    The DCA++ code was one of the early science applications that ran on jaguar at the National Center for Computational Sciences, and the first application code to sustain a petaflop/s under production conditions on a general-purpose supercomputer. The code implements a quantum cluster method with a Quantum Monte Carlo kernel to solve the 2D Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductivity. It is implemented in C++, making heavy use of the generic programming model. In this paper, we discuss how this code was developed, reaching scalability and high efficiency on the world's fastest supercomputer in only a few years. We show how the use of generic concepts combined with systematic refactoring of codes is a better strategy for computational sciences than a comprehensive upfront design.

  20. [National Academies' Board on Mathematical Sciences and their Application] Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott T. Weidman

    2005-01-11

    The National Academies' Board on Mathematical Sciences and their Applications (BMSA) is a primary interface between the research enterprise and federal agencies that rely on the mathematical sciences. The Board provides objective and authoritative advice on how best to apply the tools of mathematics, statistics, operations research, financial engineering, computational modeling, computational science, information analysis, and decision analysis to practical problems of national importance. In so doing, the Board strengthens the policy-making process and increases the visibility of, and appreciation for, the mathematical sciences while also identifying growth areas for the discipline. The Board consists of 18 pro bono experts from a broad range of quantitative fields, with experience in academia, industry, and national laboratories.

  1. Sesame Synchrotron Light for Experimental Sciences and Application in the Middle East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khalafawy, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Anew international center for synchrotron radiation for research excellence for scientists from throughout the Middle East as well as other parts of the world could do for science what CERN has done for science in Europe. SESAME Project (Synchrotron Light for Experimental Sciences and Application in the Middle East ) under the umbrella for UNESCO establish the first major international research center as a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the Middle East, opened to all qualified scientists. It will be propeller for the regional economy while promoting the peaceful development of science and technology in the Middle East. SESAME will have as its centerpiece a synchrotron radiation based on a gift from Germany of the 0.8 GeV BESSYI storage ring and injector system which stopped operation at the end of November 1999

  2. Report on applications of nuclear science in New Zealand, 1981-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    This report describes the more important applications of nuclear science at various centres in New Zealand with emphasis on those involving research or new developments. The work within the Government departments, universities, hospitals and industry is summarized, and this is followed by the main reports

  3. Report on applications of nuclear science in New Zealand 1979-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    This report describes the more important applications of nuclear science at various centres in New Zealand with emphasis on those involving research or new developments. The work within Goverment departments, universities, hospitals and industry is summarised, and this is followed by the main reports. (DAGR)

  4. New developments in the application of synchrotron radiation to material science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    Recent developments in the application of synchrotrons radiation to materials science are discussed, using techniques which exploit the high brilliance of the newer synchrotrons sources, such as microbeam techniques and correlation spectroscopy. These include studies of environmental systems, residual stress, slow dynamics of condensed matter systems and studies of liquid surfaces and thin magnetic films

  5. 78 FR 19468 - Applications for New Awards; Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... the introductory years of science and engineering programs. We invite applications for projects that... research courses into the introductory STEM curricula. Expand the use of scientific research and... strong statistical controls for selection bias and for discerning the influence of internal factors...

  6. The Broad Application of Data Science and Analytics: Essential Tools for the Liberal Arts Graduate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Navia, Isabel; Fitzgerald, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    New technologies and data science are transforming a wide range of organizations into analytics-intensive enterprises. Despite the resulting demand for graduates with experience in the application of analytics, though, undergraduate education has been slow to change. The academic and policy communities have engaged in a decade-long conversation…

  7. AREAL low energy electron beam applications in life and materials sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanov, V.M., E-mail: tsakanov@asls.candle.am [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Aroutiounian, R.M. [Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Amatuni, G.A. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Aloyan, L.R.; Aslanyan, L.G. [Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Avagyan, V.Sh. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Babayan, N.S. [Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Institute of Molecular Biology NAS, 0014 Yerevan (Armenia); Buniatyan, V.V. [State Engineering University of Armenia, 0009 Yerevan (Armenia); Dalyan, Y.B.; Davtyan, H.D. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Derdzyan, M.V. [Institute for Physical Research NAS, 0203 Ashtarak (Armenia); Grigoryan, B.A. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Grigoryan, N.E. [A.I. Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory (YerPhi), 0036 Yerevan (Armenia); Hakobyan, L.S. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Haroutyunian, S.G. [Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Harutiunyan, V.V. [A.I. Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory (YerPhi), 0036 Yerevan (Armenia); Hovhannesyan, K.L. [Institute for Physical Research NAS, 0203 Ashtarak (Armenia); Khachatryan, V.G. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Martirosyan, N.W. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); State Engineering University of Armenia, 0009 Yerevan (Armenia); Melikyan, G.S. [State Engineering University of Armenia, 0009 Yerevan (Armenia); and others

    2016-09-01

    The AREAL laser-driven RF gun provides 2–5 MeV energy ultrashort electron pulses for experimental study in life and materials sciences. We report the first experimental results of the AREAL beam application in the study of molecular-genetic effects, silicon-dielectric structures, ferroelectric nanofilms, and single crystals for scintillators.

  8. Enabling Laser and Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  9. Advances in Laser/Lidar Technologies for NASA's Science and Exploration Mission's Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program, begun in 2002, has achieved many technology advances in only 3.5 years. The recent selection of several lidar proposals for Science and Exploration applications indicates that the LRRP goal of enabling future space-based missions by lowering the technology risk has already begun to be met.

  10. A Brief History of the Most Remarkable Numbers "e," "i" and "?" in Mathematical Sciences with Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with a brief history of the most remarkable Euler numbers "e,"?"i"?and?"?" in mathematical sciences. Included are many properties of the constants "e,"?"i"?and?"?" and their applications in algebra, geometry, physics, chemistry, ecology, business and industry. Special…

  11. Proceedings of the second national conference on nanotechnology - applications and its advantages in natural science: souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The second national conference on nanotechnology - applications and its advantages in natural science was held during February 4-5, 2011. The most relevant topics discussed in the conference were: characterisation of nanoparticles, synthesis of nanostructures, electro-catalytic oxidation, rare earth oxides etc. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  12. The Expanded Application of Forensic Science and Law Enforcement Methodologies in Army Counterintelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    enforcement (LE) capabilities during the investigation of criminal offenses has become commonplace in the U.S. criminal justice system . These... system , and FORENSICS AND LAW ENFORCEMENT IN ARMY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE 22 would likely need to go to their local Army CID or military police...THE EXPANDED APPLICATION OF FORENSIC SCIENCE AND LAW ENFORCEMENT METHODOLOGIES IN ARMY COUNTERINTELLIGENCE A RESEARCH PROJECT

  13. A Different Approach to Have Science and Technology Student-Teachers Gain Varied Methods in Laboratory Applications: A Sample of Computer Assisted POE Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Arzu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach and assess the application for the science and technology student-teachers to gain varied laboratory methods in science and technology teaching. It is also aimed to describe the computer-assisted POE application in the subject of "Photosynthesis-Light" developed in the context of…

  14. The Heritage of Earth Science Applications in Policy, Business, and Management of Natural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macauley, M.

    2012-12-01

    From the first hand-held cameras on the Gemini space missions to present day satellite instruments, Earth observations have enhanced the management of natural resources including water, land, and air. Applications include the development of new methodology (for example, developing and testing algorithms or demonstrating how data can be used) and the direct use of data in decisionmaking and policy implementation. Using well-defined bibliographic search indices to systematically survey a broad social science literature, this project enables identification of a host of well-documented, practical and direct applications of Earth science data in resource management. This literature has not previously been well surveyed, aggregated, or analyzed for the heritage of lessons learned in practical application of Earth science data. In the absence of such a survey, the usefulness of Earth science data is underestimated and the factors that make people want to use -- and able to use -- the data are poorly understood. The project extends and updates previous analysis of social science applications of Landsat data to show their contemporary, direct use in new policy, business, and management activities and decisionmaking. The previous surveys (for example, Blumberg and Jacobson 1997; National Research Council 1998) find that the earliest attempts to use data are almost exclusively testing of methodology rather than direct use in resource management. Examples of methodology prototyping include Green et al. (1997) who demonstrate use of remote sensing to detect and monitor changes in land cover and use, Cowen et al. (1995) who demonstrate design and integration of GIS for environmental applications, Hutchinson (1991) who shows uses of data for famine early warning, and Brondizio et al. (1996) who show the link of thematic mapper data with botanical data. Blumberg and Jacobson (in Acevedo et al. 1996) show use of data in a study of urban development in the San Francisco Bay and the

  15. Liquid Li based neutron source for BNCT and science application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiike, H; Murata, I; Iida, T; Yoshihashi, S; Hoashi, E; Kato, I; Hashimoto, N; Kuri, S; Oshiro, S

    2015-12-01

    Liquid lithium (Li) is a candidate material for a target of intense neutron source, heat transfer medium in space engines and charges stripper. For a medical application of BNCT, epithermal neutrons with least energetic neutrons and γ-ray are required so as to avoid unnecessary doses to a patient. This is enabled by lithium target irradiated by protons at 2.5 MeV range, with utilizing the threshold reaction of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be at 1.88 MeV. In the system, protons at 2.5 MeV penetrate into Li layer by 0.25 mm with dissipating heat load near the surface. To handle it, thin film flow of high velocity is important for stable operation. For the proton accelerator, electrostatic type of the Schnkel or the tandem is planned to be employed. Neutrons generated at 0.6 MeV are gently moderated to epithermal energy while suppressing accompanying γ-ray minimum by the dedicated moderator assembly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel applications of photoacoustic spectroscopy in life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolik, S.

    2004-10-01

    The Photoacoustic Spectroscopy, based on the generation of acoustic waves following the absorption of the modulated light by an enclosed material, was discovered in 1880 by Alexander Graham Bell. There are a lot of remarkable achievements in this topic since those days. It has been intended to present a relatively new tool to the researchers in biological areas and, simultaneously, to propose new fields of investigation to those who have been attracted by physics. The application of Photoacoustic trace gas detection to the determination of ethylene content in mice exhalation is described as a biomarker of free radicals production. It has been demonstrated the feasibility of studying the lipid peroxidation in vivo by this technique. Specifically, the results of δ-aminolevulinic acid administration in mice are presented. This drug has been used to induce Protoporphyrin IX production and ultimately to apply the Photodynamic Therapy, a recent method in cancer treatment. A kinetic study of Protoporphyrin IX production in mice skin and blood after δ-aminolevulinic acid administration in different doses is also shown. This study was performed using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in solids.

  17. Complexity Science Applications to Dynamic Trajectory Management: Research Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhill, Bruce; Herriot, James; Holmes, Bruce J.; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The promise of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is strongly tied to the concept of trajectory-based operations in the national airspace system. Existing efforts to develop trajectory management concepts are largely focused on individual trajectories, optimized independently, then de-conflicted among each other, and individually re-optimized, as possible. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time are valuable, though perhaps could be greater through alternative strategies. The concept of agent-based trajectories offers a strategy for automation of simultaneous multiple trajectory management. The anticipated result of the strategy would be dynamic management of multiple trajectories with interacting and interdependent outcomes that satisfy multiple, conflicting constraints. These constraints would include the business case for operators, the capacity case for the Air Navigation Service Provider (ANSP), and the environmental case for noise and emissions. The benefits in capacity, fuel, and time might be improved over those possible under individual trajectory management approaches. The proposed approach relies on computational agent-based modeling (ABM), combinatorial mathematics, as well as application of "traffic physics" concepts to the challenge, and modeling and simulation capabilities. The proposed strategy could support transforming air traffic control from managing individual aircraft behaviors to managing systemic behavior of air traffic in the NAS. A system built on the approach could provide the ability to know when regions of airspace approach being "full," that is, having non-viable local solution space for optimizing trajectories in advance.

  18. The Rocket Balloon (Rocketball): Applications to Science, Technology, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Originally envisioned to study upper atmospheric phenomena, the Rocket Balloon system (or Rocketball for short) has utility in a range of applications, including sprite detection and in-situ measurements, near-space measurements and calibration correlation with orbital assets, hurricane observation and characterization, technology testing and validation, ground observation, and education. A salient feature includes the need to reach space and near-space within a critical time-frame and in adverse local meteorological conditions. It can also provide for the execution of technology validation and operational demonstrations at a fraction of the cost of a space flight. In particular, planetary entry probe proof-of-concepts can be examined. A typical Rocketball operational scenario consists of a sounding rocket launch and subsequent deployment of a balloon above a desired location. An obvious advantage of this combination is the additional mission 'hang-time' rendered by the balloon once the sounding rocket flight is completed. The system leverages current and emergent technologies at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and other organizations.

  19. Earth Science Data and Applications for K-16 Education from the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, C. S.; Chambers, L. H.; Alston, E. J.; Moore, S. W.; Oots, P. C.

    2005-05-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate aims to stimulate public interest in Earth system science and to encourage young scholars to consider careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. NASA's Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at Langley Research Center houses over 700 data sets related to Earth's radiation budget, clouds, aerosols and tropospheric chemistry that are being produced to increase academic understanding of the natural and anthropogenic perturbations that influence global climate change. However, barriers still exist in the use of these actual satellite observations by educators in the classroom to supplement the educational process. Thus, NASA is sponsoring the "Mentoring and inquirY using NASA Data on Atmospheric and earth science for Teachers and Amateurs" (MY NASA DATA) project to systematically support educational activities by reducing the ASDC data holdings to `microsets' that can be easily accessible and explored by the K-16 educators and students. The microsets are available via Web site (http://mynasadata.larc.nasa.gov) with associated lesson plans, computer tools, data information pages, and a science glossary. A MY NASA DATA Live Access Server (LAS) has been populated with ASDC data such that users can create custom microsets online for desired time series, parameters and geographical regions. The LAS interface is suitable for novice to advanced users, teachers or students. The microsets may be visual representations of data or text output for spreadsheet analysis. Currently, over 148 parameters from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), Surface Radiation Budget (SRB), Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TOR) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are available and provide important information on clouds, fluxes and cycles in the Earth system. Additionally, a MY NASA DATA OPeNDAP server has been established to facilitate file transfer of

  20. The Effects of Problem Solving Applications on the Development of Science Process Skills, Logical Thinking Skills and Perception on Problem Solving Ability in the Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyhan, Hatice Güngör

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted with 98 prospective science teachers, who were composed of 50 prospective teachers that had participated in problem-solving applications and 48 prospective teachers who were taught within a more researcher-oriented teaching method in science laboratories. The first aim of this study was to determine the levels of…

  1. Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffer, Shelley (Sam) I.

    2014-12-01

    This is a final report of the DOE award DE-SC0001132, Advanced Artificial Science. The development of an artificial science and engineering research infrastructure to facilitate innovative computational modeling, analysis, and application to interdisciplinary areas of scientific investigation. This document describes the achievements of the goals, and resulting research made possible by this award.

  2. Morphological Control: A Design Principal for Applications in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchslin, R. M.; Dumont, E.; Flumini, D.; Fuchs, H. U.; Hauser, H.; Jaeger, C.; Scheidegger, S.; Schönenberger-Deuel, J.; Lichtensteiger, L.; Luchsinger, R.; Weyland, M.

    Designing robots for applications in space flight requires a different prioritization of design criteria than for systems operating on Earth. In this article, we argue that the field of soft robotics offers novel approaches meeting the specific requirements of space flight. We present one especially promising construction principle, so called Tensairity, in some detail. Tensairity, as the name suggests, takes ideas from Tensegrity, but uses inflatable structures instead of cables and struts. Soft robots pose substantial challenges with respect to control. One way to meet these challenges is given by the concept of morphological computation and control. Morphological computation can be loosely defined as the exploitation of the shape, material properties, and dynamics of a physical system to improve the efficiency of computation and to deal with systems for which it is difficult to construct a virtual representation using a kinematic model. We discuss fundamental aspects of morphological control and their relevance for space flight. Besides low weight, small consumption of space in the inactive state and advantageous properties with respect to intrinsic safety and energy consumption, we discuss how the blurring of the discrimination of hard- and software leads to control strategies that require only very little and very simple electronic circuitry (which is beneficial in an environment with high irradiation). Finally, we present a research strategy that bundles activities in space flight with research and development in medicine, especially for support systems for an aging population, that are faced with similar morphological computing challenges to astronauts. Such a combination meets the demands for research that is not only effective, but also efficient with respect to economic resources.

  3. Liquid Li based neutron source for BNCT and science application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiike, H.; Murata, I.; Iida, T.; Yoshihashi, S.; Hoashi, E.; Kato, I.; Hashimoto, N.; Kuri, S.; Oshiro, S.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid lithium (Li) is a candidate material for a target of intense neutron source, heat transfer medium in space engines and charges stripper. For a medical application of BNCT, epithermal neutrons with least energetic neutrons and γ-ray are required so as to avoid unnecessary doses to a patient. This is enabled by lithium target irradiated by protons at 2.5 MeV range, with utilizing the threshold reaction of "7Li(p,n)"7Be at 1.88 MeV. In the system, protons at 2.5 MeV penetrate into Li layer by 0.25 mm with dissipating heat load near the surface. To handle it, thin film flow of high velocity is important for stable operation. For the proton accelerator, electrostatic type of the Schnkel or the tandem is planned to be employed. Neutrons generated at 0.6 MeV are gently moderated to epithermal energy while suppressing accompanying γ-ray minimum by the dedicated moderator assembly. - Highlights: • Liquid lithium (Li) is a candidate material for a target of intense neutron source. • An accelerator based neutron source with p-liquid Li target for boron neutron capture therapy is under development in Osaka University, Japan. • In our system, the harmful radiation dose due to rays and fast neutrons will be suppressed very low. • The system performance are very promising as a state of art cancer treatment system. • The project is planned as a joint undertaking between industries and Osaka University.

  4. Potential applications of plasma science techniques for water treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlik, D.

    1994-01-01

    The historical evolution of water treatment techniques and their impact on man and his environment are presented. Ancient man recognized the relationship between good water and good health. However, it was not until the late 1800's that man's own contribution to the pollution of water via biological and chemical contamination of the water stream was recognized as having adverse affects on water quality. Since that time virtually every nation has adopted laws and regulations to ensure that safe sources of unpolluted water are available to its citizens. In the United States, water quality is governed by the Clean Water Act of 1972 administered at the federal level by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Further, each state has established its equivalent agency which administers its own laws and regulations. Different biological and chemical biohazards present in the water system are discussed. Biological contaminants include various types of viruses, bacteria, fungii, molds, yeasts, algae, amoebas, and parasites. Chemical contaminates include elemental heavy metals and other organic and inorganic compounds which interfere with normal biological functions. Conventional water treatments for both consumption and sewage effluent commonly employ four different principals: mechanical filtration, quiescent gravity settling, biological oxidation, and chemical treatment. Although these techniques have greatly reduced the incidence of water-borne disease recent studies suggest that more effective means of eliminating biohazards are needed. Regulatory requirements for more aggressive treatment and elimination of residual contaminants present a significant opportunity for the application of various forms of electromagnetic radiation techniques. A comparison between conventional techniques and more advanced methods using various forms of electromagnetic radiation is discussed

  5. Integrated photon sources for quantum information science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanto, M. L.; Tison, C. C.; Steidle, J. A.; Lu, T.; Wang, Z.; Mogent, N. A.; Rizzo, A.; Thomas, P. M.; Preble, S. F.; Alsing, P. M.; Englund, D. R.

    2017-10-01

    Ring resonators are used as photon pair sources by taking advantage of the materials second or third order non- linearities through the processes of spontaneous parametric downconversion and spontaneous four wave mixing respectively. Two materials of interest for these applications are silicon for the infrared and aluminum nitride for the ultraviolet through the infrared. When fabricated into ring type sources they are capable of producing pairs of indistinguishable photons but typically suffer from an effective 50% loss. By slightly decoupling the input waveguide from the ring, the drop port coincidence ratio can be significantly increased with the trade-off being that the pump is less efficiently coupled into the ring. Ring resonators with this design have been demonstrated having coincidence ratios of 96% but requiring a factor of 10 increase in the pump power. Through the modification of the coupling design that relies on additional spectral dependence, it is possible to achieve similar coincidence ratios without the increased pumping requirement. This can be achieved by coupling the input waveguide to the ring multiple times, thus creating a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. This coupler design can be used on both sides of the ring resonator so that resonances supported by one of the couplers are suppressed by the other. This is the ideal configuration for a photon-pair source as it can only support the pump photons at the input side while only allowing the generated photons to leave through the output side. Recently, this device has been realized with preliminary results exhibiting the desired spectral dependence and with a coincidence ratio as high as 97% while allowing the pump to be nearly critically coupled to the ring. The demonstrated near unity coincidence ratio infers a near maximal heralding efficiency from the fabricated device. This device has the potential to greatly improve the scalability and performance of quantum computing and communication systems.

  6. Application of Synchrotron Radiation in the Geological and Environmental Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    A survey of some of the different ways that synchrotrons x-ray beams can be used to study geological materials is presented here. This field developed over a period of about 30 years, and it is clear that the geological community has made major use of the many synchrotrons facilities operating around the world during this time period. This was a time of rapid change in the operational performance of the synchrotrons facilities and this in itself has made it possible for geologists to develop new and more refined types of experiments that have yielded many important results. The advance in experimental techniques has proceeded in parallel with a revolution in computing techniques that has made it possible to cope with the great amount of data accumulated in the experiments. It is reasonable, although risky, to speculate about what might be expected to develop in the field during the next five- to ten-year period. It does seem plausible that the rate of change in the performance of what might now be called conventional x-ray storage rings will slow. There are no new facilities that are superior to the ESRF, ALS, APS, or SPring8 facilities under construction or about to come into operation. Thus, performance increments in the characteristics of the x-ray sources may come through the introduction of specialized devices in existing storage rings. The free electron laser is one example of a developing new technology that should take us into new regions of performance for radiation sources and stimulate new types of experimental applications. It is also likely that major advances will come through the introduction of more sophisticated experimental devices developed for use with the very recently operational undulator or wiggler sources at the newer rings. Improved x-ray optics and x-ray detectors and more powerful computation and high-speed data transmission can bring about more refined experiments and make the synchrotrons facilities more widely available to the

  7. Abstracts of 12. Conference on Solid State Crystals Materials Science and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The solid state crystals are the modern materials being very interesting from the view point of actual and possible applications in microelectronics, optics, laser materials, detectors etc. 12. Conference on Solid State Crystals, Materials Science and Applications, Zakopane'99 created the review forum for broad range of investigations on topics related to; crystal growth and doping, new materials preparation, thin layer structure, physical properties and special methods for electrical, magnetic, optical and mechanical properties measurements of obtained materials. The insulating, semiconducting and superconducting monocrystals, polycrystals and also amorphous glasses have been investigated and their possible applications discussed. 52 oral lectures and 128 posters have been presented in the course of the conference

  8. Modelling with the master equation solution methods and applications in social and natural sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Haag, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the theory and practical applications of the Master equation approach, which provides a powerful general framework for model building in a variety of disciplines. The aim of the book is to not only highlight different mathematical solution methods, but also reveal their potential by means of practical examples. Part I of the book, which can be used as a toolbox, introduces selected statistical fundamentals and solution methods for the Master equation. In Part II and Part III, the Master equation approach is applied to important applications in the natural and social sciences. The case studies presented mainly hail from the social sciences, including urban and regional dynamics, population dynamics, dynamic decision theory, opinion formation and traffic dynamics; however, some applications from physics and chemistry are treated as well, underlining the interdisciplinary modelling potential of the Master equation approach. Drawing upon the author’s extensive teaching and research experience...

  9. Large-scale Labeled Datasets to Fuel Earth Science Deep Learning Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskey, M.; Ramachandran, R.; Miller, J.

    2017-12-01

    Deep learning has revolutionized computer vision and natural language processing with various algorithms scaled using high-performance computing. However, generic large-scale labeled datasets such as the ImageNet are the fuel that drives the impressive accuracy of deep learning results. Large-scale labeled datasets already exist in domains such as medical science, but creating them in the Earth science domain is a challenge. While there are ways to apply deep learning using limited labeled datasets, there is a need in the Earth sciences for creating large-scale labeled datasets for benchmarking and scaling deep learning applications. At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, we are using deep learning for a variety of Earth science applications where we have encountered the need for large-scale labeled datasets. We will discuss our approaches for creating such datasets and why these datasets are just as valuable as deep learning algorithms. We will also describe successful usage of these large-scale labeled datasets with our deep learning based applications.

  10. The application of nuclear science technology to understanding and solving environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuk, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has for many years been involved in applying nuclear science-based and related technologies to the understanding of environmental processes and to the development and implementation of practical and effective solutions to site specific problems, for a broad spectrum of industry, government regulatory agencies, and other organisations in Australia, Europe, North and South America and South East Asia. ANSTO's environmental science program arose out of the need for research to predict, measure, evaluate and monitor the environmental impacts associated with : uranium mining and processing in Australia; the operation of the research reactor at Lucas Heights; and the safe treatment and disposal of radioactive and conventional wastes associated with these activities. The expertise developed in these activities, has found application to a much broader range of environmental concerns. This paper will present an overview of ANSTO's application of nuclear science-based techniques to, inter alia: coastal and marine studies; minesite rehabilitation; transport and geochemical modelling of radionuclides, heavy metals and organic chemicals in the geosphere; the application of naturally-occurring radionuclides and radioactive tracers to corrosion and sedimentation studies in the coastal environment; dating sediments, fish corals and archaeological samples; the understanding of the kinetics and the physiological responses of aquatic organisms to radionuclides and metals in the environment: and the use of aquatic organism as archival and 'realtime' monitors of pollutants

  11. Computational biomechanics for medicine fundamental science and patient-specific applications

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol; Wittek, Adam; Nielsen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges facing the computational engineering community is to extend the success of computational mechanics to fields outside traditional engineering, in particular to biology, the biomedical sciences, and medicine. The Computational Biomechanics for Medicine titles provide an opportunity for specialists in computational biomechanics to present their latest methodologies and advancements. This latest installment comprises nine of the latest developments in both fundamental science and patient-specific applications, from researchers in Australia, New Zealand, USA, UK, France, Ireland, and China. Some of the interesting topics discussed are: cellular mechanics; tumor growth and modeling; medical image analysis; and both patient-specific fluid dynamics and solid mechanics simulations.

  12. Creating Mobile and Web Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for NASA Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostra, D.; Chambers, L. H.; Lewis, P. M.; Moore, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at the NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia houses almost three petabytes of data, a collection that increases every day. To put it into perspective, it is estimated that three petabytes of data storage could store a digitized copy of all printed material in U.S. research libraries. There are more than ten other NASA data centers like the ASDC. Scientists and the public use this data for research, science education, and to understand our environment. Most importantly these data provide the potential for all of us make new discoveries. NASA is about making discoveries. Galileo was quoted as saying, "All discoveries are easy to understand once they are discovered. The point is to discover them." To that end, NASA stores vast amounts of publicly available data. This paper examines an approach to create web applications that serve NASA data in ways that specifically address the mobile web application technologies that are quickly emerging. Mobile data is not a new concept. What is new, is that user driven tools have recently become available that allow users to create their own mobile applications. Through the use of these cloud-based tools users can produce complete native mobile applications. Thus, mobile apps can now be created by everyone, regardless of their programming experience or expertise. This work will explore standards and methods for creating dynamic and malleable application programming interfaces (APIs) that allow users to access and use NASA science data for their own needs. The focus will be on experiences that broaden and increase the scope and usage of NASA science data sets.

  13. Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Keywords and Their Applications in Earth Science Data Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, A.

    2017-12-01

    This presentation will provide an overview and discussion of the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) Keywords and their applications in Earth science data discovery. The GCMD Keywords are a hierarchical set of controlled keywords covering the Earth science disciplines, including: science keywords, service keywords, data centers, projects, location, data resolution, instruments and platforms. Controlled vocabularies (keywords) help users accurately, consistently and comprehensively categorize their data and also allow for the precise search and subsequent retrieval of data. The GCMD Keywords are a community resource and are developed collaboratively with input from various stakeholders, including GCMD staff, keyword users and metadata providers. The GCMD Keyword Landing Page and GCMD Keyword Community Forum provide access to keyword resources and an area for discussion of topics related to the GCMD Keywords. See https://earthdata.nasa.gov/about/gcmd/global-change-master-directory-gcmd-keywords

  14. Synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers accelerator physics, instrumentation and science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat; Schneider, Jochen; Hastings, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Hardly any other discovery of the nineteenth century did have such an impact on science and technology as Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen’s seminal find of the X-rays. X-ray tubes soon made their way as excellent instruments for numerous applications in medicine, biology, materials science and testing, chemistry and public security. Developing new radiation sources with higher brilliance and much extended spectral range resulted in stunning developments like the electron synchrotron and electron storage ring and the freeelectron laser. This handbook highlights these developments in fifty chapters. The reader is given not only an inside view of exciting science areas but also of design concepts for the most advanced light sources. The theory of synchrotron radiation and of the freeelectron laser, design examples and the technology basis are presented. The handbook presents advanced concepts like seeding and harmonic generation, the booming field of Terahertz radiation sources and upcoming brilliant light sources dri...

  15. Promoting positive human development and social justice: Integrating theory, research and application in contemporary developmental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard M

    2015-06-01

    The bold claim that developmental science can contribute to both enhancing positive development among diverse individuals across the life span and promoting social justice in their communities, nations and regions is supported by decades of theoretical, methodological and research contributions. To explain the basis of this claim, I describe the relational developmental systems (RDS) metamodel that frames contemporary developmental science, and I present an example of a programme of research within the adolescent portion of the life span that is associated with this metamodel and is pertinent to promoting positive human development. I then discuss methodological issues associated with using RDS-based models as frames for research and application. Finally, I explain how the theoretical and methodological ideas associated with RDS thinking may provide the scholarly tools needed by developmental scientists seeking to contribute to human thriving and to advance social justice in the Global South. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  16. Application Architecture of Avian Influenza Research Collaboration Network in Korea e-Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoon; Lee, Junehawk

    In the pursuit of globalization of the AI e-Science environment, KISTI is fostering to extend the AI research community to the AI research institutes of neighboring countries and to share the AI e-Science environment with them in the near future. In this paper we introduce the application architecture of AI research collaboration network (AIRCoN). AIRCoN is a global e-Science environment for AI research conducted by KISTI. It consists of AI virus sequence information sharing system for sufficing data requirement of research community, integrated analysis environment for analyzing the mutation pattern of AI viruses and their risks, epidemic modeling and simulation environment for establishing national effective readiness strategy against AI pandemics, and knowledge portal for sharing expertise of epidemic study and unpublished research results with community members.

  17. Fourth International Conference on Computer Science and Its Applications (CIIA 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamed, Otmane; Bellatreche, Ladjel; Recent Advances in Robotics and Automation

    2013-01-01

        "During the last decades Computational Intelligence has emerged and showed its contributions in various broad research communities (computer science, engineering, finance, economic, decision making, etc.). This was done by proposing approaches and algorithms based either on turnkey techniques belonging to the large panoply of solutions offered by computational intelligence such as data mining, genetic algorithms, bio-inspired methods, Bayesian networks, machine learning, fuzzy logic, artificial neural networks, etc. or inspired by computational intelligence techniques to develop new ad-hoc algorithms for the problem under consideration.    This volume is a comprehensive collection of extended contributions from the 4th International Conference on Computer Science and Its Applications (CIIA’2013) organized into four main tracks: Track 1: Computational Intelligence, Track  2: Security & Network Technologies, Track  3: Information Technology and Track 4: Computer Systems and Applications. This ...

  18. An introduction to metabolomics and its potential application in veterinary science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Oliver A H; Cheung, Victoria L

    2007-10-01

    Metabolomics has been found to be applicable to a wide range of fields, including the study of gene function, toxicology, plant sciences, environmental analysis, clinical diagnostics, nutrition, and the discrimination of organism genotypes. This approach combines high-throughput sample analysis with computer-assisted multivariate pattern-recognition techniques. It is increasingly being deployed in toxico- and pharmacokinetic studies in the pharmaceutical industry, especially during the safety assessment of candidate drugs in human medicine. However, despite the potential of this technique to reduce both costs and the numbers of animals used for research, examples of the application of metabolomics in veterinary research are, thus far, rare. Here we give an introduction to metabolomics and discuss its potential in the field of veterinary science.

  19. AMP: a science-driven web-based application for the TeraGrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitaszek, M.; Metcalfe, T.; Shorrock, I.

    The Asteroseismic Modeling Portal (AMP) provides a web-based interface for astronomers to run and view simulations that derive the properties of Sun-like stars from observations of their pulsation frequencies. In this paper, we describe the architecture and implementation of AMP, highlighting the lightweight design principles and tools used to produce a functional fully-custom web-based science application in less than a year. Targeted as a TeraGrid science gateway, AMP's architecture and implementation are intended to simplify its orchestration of TeraGrid computational resources. AMP's web-based interface was developed as a traditional standalone database-backed web application using the Python-based Django web development framework, allowing us to leverage the Django framework's capabilities while cleanly separating the user interface development from the grid interface development. We have found this combination of tools flexible and effective for rapid gateway development and deployment.

  20. Application of expert system in library and information science: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, A.R.

    1988-09-01

    This study seeks to provide an overview of the current state of development in the application of expert system in technology in the field of library and information science. The study starts briefly looking into the capabilities of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in general and then its relevance to LIS (Library Information System) work. A basic introduction to expert system technology and outgrowth of AI research is given. The major components of a generalized expert system are discussed in some detail, and the ways in which system development can be approached are looked at. The main area of expert system applications in library and information science are discussed, looking at cataloguing, classification, reference work and library management etc. (author)

  1. Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. Vol.1,2,3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, H.F.

    2000-01-01

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for nuclear sciences and applications vol.1: (1) radiochemistry; (2) radiation chemistry; (3) isotope production; (4) waste management; vol.2: (1) nuclear and reactor; (2) physics; (3) plasma physics; (4) instrumentation and devices; (5) trace and ultra trace analysis; (6) environmental; vol.3: (1) radiation protection; (2) radiation health hazards; (3) nuclear safety; (4) biology; (5) agriculture

  2. Lightning Observations from the International Space Station (ISS) for Science Research and Operational Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.; Bateman, M.; Stewart, M. F.; O'Brien, S.; Wilson, T.; hide

    2015-01-01

    There exist several core science applications of LIS lightning observations, that range from weather and climate to atmospheric chemistry and lightning physics due to strong quantitative connections that can be made between lightning and other geophysical processes of interest. The space-base vantage point, such as provided by ISS LIS, still remains an ideal location to obtain total lightning observations on a global basis.

  3. Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. Vol.1,2,3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, H F [ed.

    2000-07-01

    The publication has been set up as a textbook for nuclear sciences and applications vol.1: (1) radiochemistry; (2) radiation chemistry; (3) isotope production; (4) waste management; vol.2: (1) nuclear and reactor; (2) physics; (3) plasma physics; (4) instrumentation and devices; (5) trace and ultra trace analysis; (6) environmental; vol.3: (1) radiation protection; (2) radiation health hazards; (3) nuclear safety; (4) biology; (5) agriculture.

  4. The Role of Technology in Science Teaching Activities: Web Based Teaching Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma ALKAN; Canan KOÇAK ALTUNDAĞ

    2016-01-01

    2015 Abstract In this research the attitudes of pre-service teachers studying at Hacettepe University, Division of Science Education towards the importance of technological equipment in chemistry education activities and how effective they find technology in teaching different skills and applications have been examined. Pre-test/post-test control group design has been used in the research. In the experimental group Titrimetric Analysis has been conducted with simulations ...

  5. Student Opinions on Mobile Augmented Reality Application and Developed Content in Science Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damla Karagozlu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most important branches of science, natural science studies have never lost their currency. The purpose of this study is to examine the development process of Augmented Reality contents which were developed using a design-based research method with the purpose of using it in teaching of natural science topics and to look into student evaluations. In the study which employed design-based research model, developed contents were applied, analysed and re-designed with students constantly. The study group of the research consisted of forty 7th grade students at a private college in 2016-2017 fall semester. Augmented reality contents developed for science teaching were evaluated by teachers and students as effective. According to the teacher and student opinions, it was concluded that augmented reality contents of science teaching developed during design-based research process was nice, easily applicable and useful. It can be said that while developing educative materials for students, applying design-based research model and paying attention to material design principles secures the effectiveness of the developed material.

  6. Applications of the gas chromatography in the nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco Sanchez, L.

    1972-01-01

    This paper is a review on the applications of the gas chromatography in the nuclear science and technology published up to December 1971. Its contents has been classified under the following heads; I) Radiogaschromatography, II) Isotope separation, III) Preparation of labelled molecules, IV) Nuclear fuel cycle, V) Nuclear reactor technology, VI) Irradiation chemistry, VIl) Separation of me tal compounds in gas phase, VIII) Applications of the gas chromatography carried out at the Junta de Energia Nuclear, Spain. Arapter VIII only includes the investigations carried out from January 1969 to December 1971. Previous investigations in this field has been published elsewhere. (Author)

  7. Mathematical and computational modeling with applications in natural and social sciences, engineering, and the arts

    CERN Document Server

    Melnik, Roderick

    2015-01-01

    Illustrates the application of mathematical and computational modeling in a variety of disciplines With an emphasis on the interdisciplinary nature of mathematical and computational modeling, Mathematical and Computational Modeling: With Applications in the Natural and Social Sciences, Engineering, and the Arts features chapters written by well-known, international experts in these fields and presents readers with a host of state-of-the-art achievements in the development of mathematical modeling and computational experiment methodology. The book is a valuable guide to the methods, ideas,

  8. How to Do Research on IT Design and Applications in Healthcare Science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    ’s ”knowledge in practice”, Boltes' concepts and requirements for the design of and application of IT and Latour’s ideas about a new scheme for research and inquiry into a number of modes to retrieve knowledge about the world. Like the realistic paradigm the points of departure of all the three scientists......How to Do Research on IT Design and Applications in Healthcare Science? Background It is of pivotal importance for an increasing number of scientists in the healthcare research community to retrieve knowledge about which IT design and applications empower the end-user to master their own life...... scientists in the field find that the dominant research paradigm (referred to as “the paradigm of evidence”) says very little about whether designs and applications fulfil the purpose. Objective Therefore, they seek new principles for research (often referred to as “the paradigm of realism”) able to find...

  9. Experimental Design and Bioinformatics Analysis for the Application of Metagenomics in Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2015-11-03

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have prompted the widespread application of metagenomics for the investigation of novel bioresources (e.g., industrial enzymes and bioactive molecules) and unknown biohazards (e.g., pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes) in natural and engineered microbial systems across multiple disciplines. This review discusses the rigorous experimental design and sample preparation in the context of applying metagenomics in environmental sciences and biotechnology. Moreover, this review summarizes the principles, methodologies, and state-of-the-art bioinformatics procedures, tools and database resources for metagenomics applications and discusses two popular strategies (analysis of unassembled reads versus assembled contigs/draft genomes) for quantitative or qualitative insights of microbial community structure and functions. Overall, this review aims to facilitate more extensive application of metagenomics in the investigation of uncultured microorganisms, novel enzymes, microbe-environment interactions, and biohazards in biotechnological applications where microbial communities are engineered for bioenergy production, wastewater treatment, and bioremediation.

  10. Post-genomics nanotechnology is gaining momentum: nanoproteomics and applications in life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobeissy, Firas H; Gulbakan, Basri; Alawieh, Ali; Karam, Pierre; Zhang, Zhiqun; Guingab-Cagmat, Joy D; Mondello, Stefania; Tan, Weihong; Anagli, John; Wang, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    The post-genomics era has brought about new Omics biotechnologies, such as proteomics and metabolomics, as well as their novel applications to personal genomics and the quantified self. These advances are now also catalyzing other and newer post-genomics innovations, leading to convergences between Omics and nanotechnology. In this work, we systematically contextualize and exemplify an emerging strand of post-genomics life sciences, namely, nanoproteomics and its applications in health and integrative biological systems. Nanotechnology has been utilized as a complementary component to revolutionize proteomics through different kinds of nanotechnology applications, including nanoporous structures, functionalized nanoparticles, quantum dots, and polymeric nanostructures. Those applications, though still in their infancy, have led to several highly sensitive diagnostics and new methods of drug delivery and targeted therapy for clinical use. The present article differs from previous analyses of nanoproteomics in that it offers an in-depth and comparative evaluation of the attendant biotechnology portfolio and their applications as seen through the lens of post-genomics life sciences and biomedicine. These include: (1) immunosensors for inflammatory, pathogenic, and autoimmune markers for infectious and autoimmune diseases, (2) amplified immunoassays for detection of cancer biomarkers, and (3) methods for targeted therapy and automatically adjusted drug delivery such as in experimental stroke and brain injury studies. As nanoproteomics becomes available both to the clinician at the bedside and the citizens who are increasingly interested in access to novel post-genomics diagnostics through initiatives such as the quantified self, we anticipate further breakthroughs in personalized and targeted medicine.

  11. Chemical Equilibrium Modeling of Hanford Waste Tank Processing: Applications of Fundamental Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Wang, Zheming; Dixon, David A.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2004-01-01

    The development of computational models based upon fundamental science is one means of quantitatively transferring the results of scientific investigations to practical application by engineers in laboratory and field situations. This manuscript describes one example of such efforts, specifically the development and application of chemical equilibrium models to different waste management issues at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The development of the chemical models is described with an emphasis on the fundamental science investigations that have been undertaken in model development followed by examples of different waste management applications. The waste management issues include the leaching of waste slurries to selective remove non-hazardous components and the separation of Sr90 and transuranics from the waste supernatants. The fundamental science contributions include: molecular simulations of the energetics of different molecular clusters to assist in determining the species present in solution, advanced synchrotron research to determine the chemical form of precipitates, and laser based spectroscopic studies of solutions and solids.

  12. Design and Evaluation of Dedicated Smartphone Applications for Collaborative Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertitta, John A., Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past several years, the use of scientific probes is becoming more common in science classrooms. The goal of teaching with these science probes is to engage students in inquiry-based learning. However, they are often complicated and stationary, forcing experiments to remain in the classroom and limiting their use. The Internet System for Networked Sensor Experimentation (iSENSE) was created to address these limitations. iSENSE is a web-system for storing and visualizing sensor data. The project also includes a hardware package, the PINPoint, that interfaces to existing probes, and acts as a probe itself. As the mobile phone industry continues to advance, we are beginning to see smartphones that are just as powerful, if not more powerful, than many desktop computers. These devices are often equipped with advanced sensors, making them as capable as some science probes at a lower cost. With this background, this thesis explores the use of smartphones in secondary school science classrooms. By collaborating with one teacher, three custom applications were developed for four separate curriculum-based learning activities. The smartphones replaced existing traditional tools and science probes. Some data collected with the smartphones were uploaded to the iSENSE web-system for analysis. Student use of the smartphones and the subsequent scientific visualizations using the iSENSE web-system were observed. A teacher interview was conducted afterward. It was found that a collaborative design process involving the teacher resulted in the successful integration of smartphone applications into learning activities. In one case, the smartphones and use of iSENSE did not improve the students' understanding of the learning objectives. In several others, however, the smartphones out-performed traditional probeware as a data collector, and with the classroom teachers guidance, the iSENSE web-system facilitated more in-depth discussions of the data.

  13. Strategic plan, 1991: A strategy for leadership in space through excellence in space science and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In 1988, the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) developed and published a Strategic Plan for the United States' space science and applications program during the next 5 to 10 years. The Plan presented the proposed OSSA program for the next fiscal year and defined a flexible process that provides the basis for near-term decisions on the allocation of resources and the planning of future efforts. Based on the strategies that have been developed by the advisory committees both of the National Academy of Sciences and of NASA, the Plan balances major, moderate, and small mission initiatives, the utilization of Space Station Freedom, and the requirements for a vital research base. The Plan can be adjusted to accommodate varying budget levels, both those levels that provide opportunities for an expanded science and applications program, and those that constrain growth. SSA's strategic planning is constructed around five actions: establish a set of programmatic themes; establish a set of decision rules; establish a set of priorities for missions and programs within each theme; demonstrate that the strategy can yield a viable program; and check the strategy for consistency with resource constraints. The outcome of this process is a clear, coherent strategy that meets both NASA's and OSSA's goals, that assures realism in long-range planning and advanced technology development, and that provides sufficient resiliency to respond and adapt to both known and unexpected internal and external realities. The OSSA Strategic Plan is revised annually to reflect the approval of new programs, improved understanding of requirements and issues, and any major changes in the circumstances, both within NASA and external to NASA, in which OSSA initiatives are considered.

  14. Multi-criteria decision analysis in environmental sciences: ten years of applications and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ivy B; Keisler, Jeffrey; Linkov, Igor

    2011-09-01

    Decision-making in environmental projects requires consideration of trade-offs between socio-political, environmental, and economic impacts and is often complicated by various stakeholder views. Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) emerged as a formal methodology to face available technical information and stakeholder values to support decisions in many fields and can be especially valuable in environmental decision making. This study reviews environmental applications of MCDA. Over 300 papers published between 2000 and 2009 reporting MCDA applications in the environmental field were identified through a series of queries in the Web of Science database. The papers were classified by their environmental application area, decision or intervention type. In addition, the papers were also classified by the MCDA methods used in the analysis (analytic hierarchy process, multi-attribute utility theory, and outranking). The results suggest that there is a significant growth in environmental applications of MCDA over the last decade across all environmental application areas. Multiple MCDA tools have been successfully used for environmental applications. Even though the use of the specific methods and tools varies in different application areas and geographic regions, our review of a few papers where several methods were used in parallel with the same problem indicates that recommended course of action does not vary significantly with the method applied. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Riding the Hype Wave: Evaluating new AI Techniques for their Applicability in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, R.; Zhang, J.; Maskey, M.; Lee, T. J.

    2016-12-01

    Every few years a new technology rides the hype wave generated by the computer science community. Converts to this new technology who surface from both the science community and the informatics community promulgate that it can radically improve or even change the existing scientific process. Recent examples of new technology following in the footsteps of "big data" now include deep learning algorithms and knowledge graphs. Deep learning algorithms mimic the human brain and process information through multiple stages of transformation and representation. These algorithms are able to learn complex functions that map pixels directly to outputs without relying on human-crafted features and solve some of the complex classification problems that exist in science. Similarly, knowledge graphs aggregate information around defined topics that enable users to resolve their query without having to navigate and assemble information manually. Knowledge graphs could potentially be used in scientific research to assist in hypothesis formulation, testing, and review. The challenge for the Earth science research community is to evaluate these new technologies by asking the right questions and considering what-if scenarios. What is this new technology enabling/providing that is innovative and different? Can one justify the adoption costs with respect to the research returns? Since nothing comes for free, utilizing a new technology entails adoption costs that may outweigh the benefits. Furthermore, these technologies may require significant computing infrastructure in order to be utilized effectively. Results from two different projects will be presented along with lessons learned from testing these technologies. The first project primarily evaluates deep learning techniques for different applications of image retrieval within Earth science while the second project builds a prototype knowledge graph constructed for Hurricane science.

  16. Applications of Augmented Reality in Informal Science Learning Sites: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Eric E.; Mulvey, Kelly Lynn; Irvin, Matthew J.; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2018-05-01

    The importance of increasing interest in the STEM disciplines has been noted in a number of recent national reports. While many previous studies have focused on such efforts inside of the formal classroom, comparatively few have looked closely at informal learning environments. We investigate the innovative use of technology in informal learning by reviewing research on the incorporation of augmented reality (AR) at exhibit-based informal science education (ISE) settings in the literature. We report on the common STEM-focused topics that are covered by current AR applications for ISE learning, as well as the different devices used to support these applications. Additionally, we report on the prevalence of positive learning outcomes and engagement factors commonly associated with the use AR applications in informal environments. This review aims to foster continued development and implementation of AR technology in exhibit-based ISE settings by informing the community of recent findings and promoting additional rigorous research for the future.

  17. Application of neutron activation analysis for determination of elements in field of public health science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Ikuyo

    2010-01-01

    Outline of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and application examples of this method to ensure safety of food and environment are explained. It consists of four chapters such as introduction, what is NAA, quality control of NAA, application examples of NAA for determination of the elements in the field of public health science. The quality control of NAA is carried out by using certified reference materials, identification of individual difference of sample, and homogeneity of samples. Some application examples of NAA for determination Cd in rice, Hg and As in fish, U in soil, food and aerosol, 128 I and 129 I in environment, Cs and 133 Cs in mushroom, the essential elements and trace elements in food are reported. Analytical results of elements in certified reference materials, content of elements in ashed samples (carrots and bamboo shoots), average use frequency of ingredients in a sample, and correlation between Cs and 137 Cs in mushroom are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  18. Project of the JAERI superconducting AVF cyclotron for applications in biotechnology and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kurashima, Satoshi; Okumura, Susumu; Chiba, Atsuya; Agematsu, Takashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Kaneko, Hirohisa; Nara, Takayuki; Saito, Yuichi; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Sakai, Takuro; Mizuhashi, Kiyoshi; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Yokota, Watalu; Arakawa, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    A project for expanding TIARA (Takasaki Ion accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities of JAERI has been proposed to broaden application region of biotechnology and materials science. As a result of the investigation of TIARA facility user's request, energy increase up to more than 100 MeV/n for heavy ions and up to 300 MeV for proton are strongly required. The magnet of a superconducting AVF cyclotron with a K number of 900 has been designed to cope with acceleration of both 150 MeV/n heavy ions and 300 MeV protons. The lower limit of energies has been investigated to overlap the energy region covered by the JAERI AVF cyclotron, required to increase beam time for present users. We have designed a beam transport system to satisfy various requirements of the applications. (author)

  19. Advanced information science and object-oriented technology for information management applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, J.R.; Swietlik, C.E.

    1996-10-01

    The role of the military has been undergoing rapid change since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The kinds of missions the US military has been asked to participate in have often fallen into the category of {open_quotes}Military Operations Other Than War{close_quotes} and those involving military responses have been more of a surgical nature directed against different kinds of threats, like rogue states or in response to terrorist actions. As a result, the requirements on the military planner and analyst have also had to change dramatically. For example, preparing response options now requires rapid turnaround and a highly flexible simulation capability. This in turn requires that the planner or analyst have access to sophisticated information science and simulation technologies. In this paper, we shall discuss how advanced information science and object-oriented technologies can be used in advanced information management applications. We shall also discuss how these technologies and tools can be applied to DoD applications by presenting examples with a system developed at Argonne, the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS). DIAS has been developed to exploit advanced information science and simulation technologies to provide tools for future planners and analysts.

  20. Breaking the Boundaries: Academic Applications of Multidisciplinary Research in Computer Science and Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Witt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Undergrad students are trained on a specific set of skills matching their corresponding careers, as modern sciences trend to specialization; however, it has promoted the creation of a virtual boundary among different professions. In this regard, state-of-the-art dental research involves the application of ever-increasing complex computational solutions; thus, requiring of multidisciplinary research teams. Multidisciplinarity is often achieved on a higher research context (e.g., postgrad; but involves a high degree of difficulty for both factions. The aim of this work is to present a novel application of multidisciplinary research to the learning process of undergrad students in computer sciences and dentistry careers. In order to do so, we leveraged previous research on computational intelligence and image processing techniques applied to dental diagnosis, and integrated it with the clinical assessment and software engineering subjects on dental and computer engineering careers correspondently. With this, we explored the possibility to enhance diagnosis skills of dental students, while improving the software engineering skills of computer sciences students; furthermore, we intended to introduce the concepts of applied computational intelligence, multidisciplinarity, and collaboration on both sides.

  1. Human resource development progress to sustain nuclear science and technology applications in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, A.; Nyobe, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Cameroon as a Member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has made full use of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme in his effort to promote peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology at national level. This paper presents the progress made in the development of reliable human resources. Results obtained have been achieved through national and regional technical co-operation projects. Over the past twenty years, the development of human resources in nuclear science and technology has focused on the training of national scientists and engineers in various fields such as crop and animal production, human and animal nutrition, human health applications, medical physics, non-destructive testing in industry, groundwater management, maintenance of medical and scientific equipment, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Efforts made also involve the development of graduate teaching in nuclear sciences at the national universities. However, the lack of adequate training facilities remains a major concern. The development of new training/learning methods is being considered at national level through network linking of national training centres with existing international training institutions, and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) which offer great flexibility with regard to the number of trainees and the actual needs. (author)

  2. Human resource development progress to sustain nuclear science and technology applications in Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simo, A.; Nyobe, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Cameroon as a Member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has made full use of the Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme in his effort to promote peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology at national level. This paper presents the progress made in the development of reliable human resources. Results obtained have been achieved through national and regional technical co-operation projects. Over the past twenty years, the development of human resources in nuclear science and technology has focussed on the training of national scientists and engineers in various fields such as crop and animal production, human and animal nutrition, human health applications, medical physics, non destructive testing in industry, groundwater management, maintenance of medical and scientific equipment, radiation protection and radioactive waste management. Efforts made also involve the development of graduate teaching in nuclear sciences at the national universities. However, the lack of adequate training facilities remains a major concern. The development of new training/learning methods is being considered at national level through network linking of national training centres with existing international training institutions, and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) which offer great flexibility with regard to the number of trainees and the actual needs. (author)

  3. Comprehensive report of aeropropulsion, space propulsion, space power, and space science applications of the Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The research activities of the Lewis Research Center for 1988 are summarized. The projects included are within basic and applied technical disciplines essential to aeropropulsion, space propulsion, space power, and space science/applications. These disciplines are materials science and technology, structural mechanics, life prediction, internal computational fluid mechanics, heat transfer, instruments and controls, and space electronics.

  4. The Effects of Cognitive Styles on Naïve Impetus Theory Application Degrees of Pre-Service Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataloglu, Erdat; Ates, Salih

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between pre-service science teachers' Field Dependent or Field Independent (FD/FI) cognitive styles and the application of degrees of naive impetus theory. The sample consisted of 122 pre-service science teachers (97 females and 25 males) who were enrolled in the…

  5. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    Give us the tools: science and technology for development. Ottawa, ...... altered technical rela- tionships among the factors used in the process of production, and the en- .... to ourselves only the rights of audit and periodic substantive review." If a ...... and destroying scarce water reserves, recreational areas and a generally.

  6. International symposium on clusters and nanomaterials (energy and life-sciences applications)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Purusottam [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2017-02-09

    The International Symposium on Clusters and Nanomaterials was held in Richmond, Virginia during October 26-29, 2015. The symposium focused on the roles clusters and nanostructures play in solving outstanding problems in clean and sustainable energy and life sciences applications; two of the most important issues facing science and society. Many of the materials issues in renewable energies, environmental impacts of energy technologies as well as beneficial and toxicity issues of nanoparticles in health are intertwined. Realizing that both fundamental and applied materials issues require a multidisciplinary approach the symposium provided a forum by bringing researchers from physics, chemistry, materials science, and engineering fields to share their ideas and results, identify outstanding problems, and develop new collaborations. Clean and sustainable energy sessions addressed challenges in production, storage, conversion, and efficiency of renewable energies such as solar, wind, bio, thermo-electric, and hydrogen. Environmental issues dealt with air- and water-pollution and conservation, environmental remediation and hydrocarbon processing. Topics in life sciences included therapeutic and diagnostic methods as well as health hazards attributed to nanoparticles. Cross-cutting topics such as reactions, catalysis, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties were also covered. The symposium attracted 132 participants from 24 countries in the world. It featured 39 invited speakers in 14 plenary sessions, in addition to one key-note session. Eighty-five contributed papers were presented in two poster sessions and 14 papers from this list were selected to be presented orally at the end of each session to highlight hot topics. Papers presented at the symposium were reviewed and published in SPIE so that these can reach a wide audience. The symposium was highly interactive with ample time allotted for discussions and making new collaborations. The participants’ response

  7. Creating a FIESTA (Framework for Integrated Earth Science and Technology Applications) with MagIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jarboe, N.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (https://earthref.org/MagIC) has recently developed a containerized web application to considerably reduce the friction in contributing, exploring and combining valuable and complex datasets for the paleo-, geo- and rock magnetic scientific community. The data produced in this scientific domain are inherently hierarchical and the communities evolving approaches to this scientific workflow, from sampling to taking measurements to multiple levels of interpretations, require a large and flexible data model to adequately annotate the results and ensure reproducibility. Historically, contributing such detail in a consistent format has been prohibitively time consuming and often resulted in only publishing the highly derived interpretations. The new open-source (https://github.com/earthref/MagIC) application provides a flexible upload tool integrated with the data model to easily create a validated contribution and a powerful search interface for discovering datasets and combining them to enable transformative science. MagIC is hosted at EarthRef.org along with several interdisciplinary geoscience databases. A FIESTA (Framework for Integrated Earth Science and Technology Applications) is being created by generalizing MagIC's web application for reuse in other domains. The application relies on a single configuration document that describes the routing, data model, component settings and external services integrations. The container hosts an isomorphic Meteor JavaScript application, MongoDB database and ElasticSearch search engine. Multiple containers can be configured as microservices to serve portions of the application or rely on externally hosted MongoDB, ElasticSearch, or third-party services to efficiently scale computational demands. FIESTA is particularly well suited for many Earth Science disciplines with its flexible data model, mapping, account management, upload tool to private workspaces, reference metadata, image

  8. Application of micro-PIXE and imaging technology to life science (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Takahiro; Ishii, Keizo

    2011-03-01

    The joint research on 'Application of micro-PIXE and imaging technology to life science' supported by the Inter-organizational Atomic Energy Research Program, had been performed for three years, from 2006FY to 2009FY. Aiming to apply in-air micro-PIXE analytical system to life science, the research was consisting of 7 collaborative themes related to beam engineering for micro-PIXE and applied technology of element mapping in biological/medical fields. The system, so-called micro-PIXE camera, to acquire spatial element mapping in living cells was originally developed by collaborative research between the JAEA and the department of engineering of Tohoku University. This review covers these research results. (author)

  9. [Research Progress on the Detection Method of DNA Methylation and Its Application in Forensic Science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Y C; Yu, L J; Guan, H; Zhao, Y; Rong, H B; Jiang, B W; Zhang, T

    2017-06-01

    As an important part of epigenetic marker, DNA methylation involves in the gene regulation and attracts a wide spread attention in biological auxology, geratology and oncology fields. In forensic science, because of the relative stable, heritable, abundant, and age-related characteristics, DNA methylation is considered to be a useful complement to the classic genetic markers for age-prediction, tissue-identification, and monozygotic twins' discrimination. Various methods for DNA methylation detection have been validated based on methylation sensitive restriction endonuclease, bisulfite modification and methylation-CpG binding protein. In recent years, it is reported that the third generation sequencing method can be used to detect DNA methylation. This paper aims to make a review on the detection method of DNA methylation and its applications in forensic science. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine.

  10. Submicron x-ray diffraction and its applications to problems in materials and environmental science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, N.; Celestre, R. S.; MacDowell, A. A.; Padmore, H. A.; Spolenak, R.; Valek, B. C.; Meier Chang, N.; Manceau, A.; Patel, J. R.

    2002-03-01

    The availability of high brilliance third generation synchrotron sources together with progress in achromatic focusing optics allows us to add submicron spatial resolution to the conventional century-old x-ray diffraction technique. The new capabilities include the possibility to map in situ, grain orientations, crystalline phase distribution, and full strain/stress tensors at a very local level, by combining white and monochromatic x-ray microbeam diffraction. This is particularly relevant for high technology industry where the understanding of material properties at a microstructural level becomes increasingly important. After describing the latest advances in the submicron x-ray diffraction techniques at the Advanced Light Source, we will give some examples of its application in material science for the measurement of strain/stress in metallic thin films and interconnects. Its use in the field of environmental science will also be discussed.

  11. Networking for large-scale science: infrastructure, provisioning, transport and application mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Nageswara S; Carter, Steven M; Wu Qishi; Wing, William R; Zhu Mengxia; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Veeraraghavan, Malathi; Blondin, John M

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale science computations and experiments require unprecedented network capabilities in the form of large bandwidth and dynamically stable connections to support data transfers, interactive visualizations, and monitoring and steering operations. A number of component technologies dealing with the infrastructure, provisioning, transport and application mappings must be developed and/or optimized to achieve these capabilities. We present a brief account of the following technologies that contribute toward achieving these network capabilities: (a) DOE UltraScienceNet and NSF CHEETAH network testbeds that provide on-demand and scheduled dedicated network connections; (b) experimental results on transport protocols that achieve close to 100% utilization on dedicated 1Gbps wide-area channels; (c) a scheme for optimally mapping a visualization pipeline onto a network to minimize the end-to-end delays; and (d) interconnect configuration and protocols that provides multiple Gbps flows from Cray X1 to external hosts

  12. Networking for large-scale science: infrastructure, provisioning, transport and application mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nageswara S [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Carter, Steven M [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wu Qishi [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wing, William R [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Zhu Mengxia [Department of Computer Science, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Veeraraghavan, Malathi [Department of Computer Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Blondin, John M [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale science computations and experiments require unprecedented network capabilities in the form of large bandwidth and dynamically stable connections to support data transfers, interactive visualizations, and monitoring and steering operations. A number of component technologies dealing with the infrastructure, provisioning, transport and application mappings must be developed and/or optimized to achieve these capabilities. We present a brief account of the following technologies that contribute toward achieving these network capabilities: (a) DOE UltraScienceNet and NSF CHEETAH network testbeds that provide on-demand and scheduled dedicated network connections; (b) experimental results on transport protocols that achieve close to 100% utilization on dedicated 1Gbps wide-area channels; (c) a scheme for optimally mapping a visualization pipeline onto a network to minimize the end-to-end delays; and (d) interconnect configuration and protocols that provides multiple Gbps flows from Cray X1 to external hosts.

  13. Submicron X-Ray Diffraction and its Applications to Problems in Materials and Environmental Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, J. R.

    2002-08-16

    The availability of high brilliance 3rd generation synchrotron sources together with progress in achromatic focusing optics allow to add submicron spatial resolution to the conventional century-old X-ray diffraction technique. The new capabilities include the possibility to map in-situ, grain orientations, crystalline phase distribution and full strain/stress tensors at a very local level, by combining white and monochromatic X-ray microbeam diffraction. This is particularly relevant for high technology industry where the understanding of material properties at a microstructural level becomes increasingly important. After describing the latest advances in the submicron X-ray diffraction techniques at the ALS, we will give some examples of its application in material science for the measurement of strain/stress in metallic thin films and interconnects. Its use in the field of environmental science will also be discussed.

  14. Submicron X-ray diffraction and its applications to problems in materials and environmental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, N.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Spolenak, R.; Valek, B.C.; Meier Chang, N.; Manceau, A.; Patel, J.R.

    2002-03-26

    The availability of high brilliance 3rd generation synchrotron sources together with progress in achromatic focusing optics allow to add submicron spatial resolution to the conventional century-old X-ray diffraction technique. The new capabilities include the possibility to map in-situ, grain orientations, crystalline phase distribution and full strain/stress tensors at a very local level, by combining white and monochromatic X-ray microbeam diffraction. This is particularly relevant for high technology industry where the understanding of material properties at a microstructural level becomes increasingly important. After describing the latest advances in the submicron X-ray diffraction techniques at the ALS, we will give some examples of its application in material science for the measurement of strain/stress in metallic thin films and interconnects. Its use in the field of environmental science will also be discussed.

  15. Materials science and biophysics applications at the ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, U., E-mail: uwahl@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-12-15

    The ISOLDE isotope separator facility at CERN provides a variety of radioactive ion beams, currently more than 800 different isotopes from {approx}70 chemical elements. The radioisotopes are produced on-line by nuclear reactions from a 1.4 GeV proton beam with various types of targets, outdiffusion of the reaction products and, if possible, chemically selective ionisation, followed by 60 kV acceleration and mass separation. While ISOLDE is mainly used for nuclear and atomic physics studies, applications in materials science and biophysics account for a significant part (currently {approx}15%) of the delivered beam time, requested by 18 different experiments. The ISOLDE materials science and biophysics community currently consists of {approx}80 scientists from more than 40 participating institutes and 21 countries. In the field of materials science, investigations focus on the study of semiconductors and oxides, with the recent additions of nanoparticles and metals, while the biophysics studies address the toxicity of metal ions in biological systems. The characterisation methods used are typical radioactive probe techniques such as Moessbauer spectroscopy, perturbed angular correlation, emission channeling, and tracer diffusion studies. In addition to these 'classic' methods of nuclear solid state physics, also standard semiconductor analysis techniques such as photoluminescence or deep level transient spectroscopy profit from the application of radioactive isotopes, which helps them to overcome their chemical 'blindness' since the nuclear half life of radioisotopes provides a signal that changes in time with characteristic exponential decay or saturation curves. In this presentation an overview will be given on the recent research activities in materials science and biophysics at ISOLDE, presenting some of the highlights during the last five years, together with a short outlook on the new developments under way.

  16. Algebras Generated by Geometric Scalar Forms and their Applications in Physics and Social Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the consequences of defining that the geometric scalar form is not necessarily quadratic, but in general K-atic, that is obtained from the K th power of the linear form, requiring {e i ;i = 1,...,N;(e i ) K = 1} and d-vector Σ i x i e i . We consider the algebras which are thus generated, for positive integer K, a generalization of the geometric algebras we know under the names of Clifford or Grassmann algebras. We then obtain a set of geometric K-algebras. We also consider the generalization of special functions of geometry which corresponds to the K-order scalar forms (as trigonometric functions and other related geometric functions which are based on the use of quadratic forms). We present an overview of the use of quadratic forms in physics as in our general theory, we have called START. And, in order to give an introduction to the use of the more general K-algebras and to the possible application to sciences other than physics, the application to social sciences is considered.For the applications to physics we show that quadratic spaces are a fundamental clue to understand the structure of theoretical physics (see, for example, Keller in ICNAAM 2005 and 2006).

  17. Automatic Removal of Physiological Artifacts in EEG: The Optimized Fingerprint Method for Sports Science Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, David B; Tamburro, Gabriella; Fiedler, Patrique; Haueisen, Jens; Comani, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Data contamination due to physiological artifacts such as those generated by eyeblinks, eye movements, and muscle activity continues to be a central concern in the acquisition and analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) data. This issue is further compounded in EEG sports science applications where the presence of artifacts is notoriously difficult to control because behaviors that generate these interferences are often the behaviors under investigation. Therefore, there is a need to develop effective and efficient methods to identify physiological artifacts in EEG recordings during sports applications so that they can be isolated from cerebral activity related to the activities of interest. We have developed an EEG artifact detection model, the Fingerprint Method, which identifies different spatial, temporal, spectral, and statistical features indicative of physiological artifacts and uses these features to automatically classify artifactual independent components in EEG based on a machine leaning approach. Here, we optimized our method using artifact-rich training data and a procedure to determine which features were best suited to identify eyeblinks, eye movements, and muscle artifacts. We then applied our model to an experimental dataset collected during endurance cycling. Results reveal that unique sets of features are suitable for the detection of distinct types of artifacts and that the Optimized Fingerprint Method was able to correctly identify over 90% of the artifactual components with physiological origin present in the experimental data. These results represent a significant advancement in the search for effective means to address artifact contamination in EEG sports science applications.

  18. Applications of Fusion Energy Sciences Research - Scientific Discoveries and New Technologies Beyond Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendt, Amy; Callis, Richard; Efthimion, Philip; Foster, John; Keane, Christopher; Onsager, Terry; O'Shea, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the U.S. and around the world have worked hard to make an elusive goal to be achieved on Earth: harnessing the reaction that fuels the stars, namely fusion. Practical fusion would be a source of energy that is unlimited, safe, environmentally benign, available to all nations and not dependent on climate or the whims of the weather. Significant resources, most notably from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), have been devoted to pursuing that dream, and significant progress is being made in turning it into a reality. However, that is only part of the story. The process of creating a fusion-based energy supply on Earth has led to technological and scientific achievements of far-reaching impact that touch every aspect of our lives. Those largely unanticipated advances, spanning a wide variety of fields in science and technology, are the focus of this report. There are many synergies between research in plasma physics (the study of charged particles and fluids interacting with self-consistent electric and magnetic fields), high-energy physics, and condensed matter physics dating back many decades. For instance, the formulation of a mathematical theory of solitons, solitary waves which are seen in everything from plasmas to water waves to Bose-Einstein Condensates, has led to an equal span of applications, including the fields of optics, fluid mechanics and biophysics. Another example, the development of a precise criterion for transition to chaos in Hamiltonian systems, has offered insights into a range of phenomena including planetary orbits, two-person games and changes in the weather. Seven distinct areas of fusion energy sciences were identified and reviewed which have had a recent impact on fields of science, technology and engineering not directly associated with fusion energy: Basic plasma science; Low temperature plasmas; Space and astrophysical plasmas; High energy density

  19. Applications of Fusion Energy Sciences Research - Scientific Discoveries and New Technologies Beyond Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Amy [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Callis, Richard [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Efthimion, Philip [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Foster, John [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Keane, Christopher [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Onsager, Terry [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States); O' Shea, Patrick [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1950s, scientists and engineers in the U.S. and around the world have worked hard to make an elusive goal to be achieved on Earth: harnessing the reaction that fuels the stars, namely fusion. Practical fusion would be a source of energy that is unlimited, safe, environmentally benign, available to all nations and not dependent on climate or the whims of the weather. Significant resources, most notably from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES), have been devoted to pursuing that dream, and significant progress is being made in turning it into a reality. However, that is only part of the story. The process of creating a fusion-based energy supply on Earth has led to technological and scientific achievements of far-reaching impact that touch every aspect of our lives. Those largely unanticipated advances, spanning a wide variety of fields in science and technology, are the focus of this report. There are many synergies between research in plasma physics (the study of charged particles and fluids interacting with self-consistent electric and magnetic fields), high-energy physics, and condensed matter physics dating back many decades. For instance, the formulation of a mathematical theory of solitons, solitary waves which are seen in everything from plasmas to water waves to Bose-Einstein Condensates, has led to an equal span of applications, including the fields of optics, fluid mechanics and biophysics. Another example, the development of a precise criterion for transition to chaos in Hamiltonian systems, has offered insights into a range of phenomena including planetary orbits, two-person games and changes in the weather. Seven distinct areas of fusion energy sciences were identified and reviewed which have had a recent impact on fields of science, technology and engineering not directly associated with fusion energy: Basic plasma science; Low temperature plasmas; Space and astrophysical plasmas; High energy density

  20. The Consortium for the Valuation of Applications Benefits Linked with Earth Science (VALUABLES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwayama, Y.; Mabee, B.; Wulf Tregar, S.

    2017-12-01

    National and international organizations are placing greater emphasis on the societal and economic benefits that can be derived from applications of Earth observations, yet improvements are needed to connect to the decision processes that produce actions with direct societal benefits. There is a need to substantiate the benefits of Earth science applications in socially and economically meaningful terms in order to demonstrate return on investment and to prioritize investments across data products, modeling capabilities, and information systems. However, methods and techniques for quantifying the value proposition of Earth observations are currently not fully established. Furthermore, it has been challenging to communicate the value of these investments to audiences beyond the Earth science community. The Consortium for the Valuation of Applications Benefits Linked with Earth Science (VALUABLES), a cooperative agreement between Resources for the Future (RFF) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), has the goal of advancing methods for the valuation and communication of the applied benefits linked with Earth observations. The VALUABLES Consortium will focus on three pillars: (a) a research pillar that will apply existing and innovative methods to quantify the socioeconomic benefits of information from Earth observations; (b) a capacity building pillar to catalyze interdisciplinary linkages between Earth scientists and social scientists; and (c) a communications pillar that will convey the value of Earth observations to stakeholders in government, universities, the NGO community, and the interested public. In this presentation, we will describe ongoing and future activities of the VALUABLES Consortium, provide a brief overview of frameworks to quantify the socioeconomic value of Earth observations, and describe how Earth scientists and social scientist can get involved in the Consortium's activities.

  1. A 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction soft X-ray detector for environmental science applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Cramer, Stephen P.; Green, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    We are operating a superconducting tunnel junction detector for high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron. We have recently upgraded the instrument from 9 to 36 pixels for increased sensitivity. We have also acquired a new digital signal readout to increase the total count rate capabilities to ∼10 6 counts/s while maintaining a high peak-to-background ratio. We report on the performance of the spectrometer, and discuss speciation measurements of chromium in welding aerosols as a typical application of the instrument in environmental science

  2. 3rd International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Ngoc; Do, Tien

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the extended versions of papers presented at the 3rd International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications (ICCSAMA 2015) held on 11-13 May, 2015 in Metz, France. The book contains 5 parts: 1. Mathematical programming and optimization: theory, methods and software, Operational research and decision making, Machine learning, data security, and bioinformatics, Knowledge information system, Software engineering. All chapters in the book discuss theoretical and algorithmic as well as practical issues connected with computation methods & optimization methods for knowledge engineering and machine learning techniques.  

  3. Ordinary least square regression, orthogonal regression, geometric mean regression and their applications in aerosol science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Ling; Zhang Tianyi; Kleinman, Lawrence; Zhu Wei

    2007-01-01

    Regression analysis, especially the ordinary least squares method which assumes that errors are confined to the dependent variable, has seen a fair share of its applications in aerosol science. The ordinary least squares approach, however, could be problematic due to the fact that atmospheric data often does not lend itself to calling one variable independent and the other dependent. Errors often exist for both measurements. In this work, we examine two regression approaches available to accommodate this situation. They are orthogonal regression and geometric mean regression. Comparisons are made theoretically as well as numerically through an aerosol study examining whether the ratio of organic aerosol to CO would change with age

  4. A 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction soft X-ray detector for environmental science applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Advanced Detector Group, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)]. E-mail: friedrich1@llnl.gov; Drury, Owen B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Advanced Detector Group, 7000 East Avenue, L-270, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cramer, Stephen P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Green, Peter G. [University of California Davis, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    We are operating a superconducting tunnel junction detector for high-resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray Facility at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron. We have recently upgraded the instrument from 9 to 36 pixels for increased sensitivity. We have also acquired a new digital signal readout to increase the total count rate capabilities to {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s while maintaining a high peak-to-background ratio. We report on the performance of the spectrometer, and discuss speciation measurements of chromium in welding aerosols as a typical application of the instrument in environmental science.

  5. Applications of Continuous-Flow Photochemistry in Organic Synthesis, Material Science, and Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambié, Dario; Bottecchia, Cecilia; Straathof, Natan J W; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2016-09-14

    Continuous-flow photochemistry in microreactors receives a lot of attention from researchers in academia and industry as this technology provides reduced reaction times, higher selectivities, straightforward scalability, and the possibility to safely use hazardous intermediates and gaseous reactants. In this review, an up-to-date overview is given of photochemical transformations in continuous-flow reactors, including applications in organic synthesis, material science, and water treatment. In addition, the advantages of continuous-flow photochemistry are pointed out and a thorough comparison with batch processing is presented.

  6. Differential equation analysis in biomedical science and engineering ordinary differential equation applications with R

    CERN Document Server

    Schiesser, William E

    2014-01-01

    Features a solid foundation of mathematical and computational tools to formulate and solve real-world ODE problems across various fields With a step-by-step approach to solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs), Differential Equation Analysis in Biomedical Science and Engineering: Ordinary Differential Equation Applications with R successfully applies computational techniques for solving real-worldODE problems that are found in a variety of fields, including chemistry, physics, biology,and physiology. The book provides readers with the necessary knowledge to reproduce andextend the comp

  7. Differential equation analysis in biomedical science and engineering partial differential equation applications with R

    CERN Document Server

    Schiesser, William E

    2014-01-01

    Features a solid foundation of mathematical and computational tools to formulate and solve real-world PDE problems across various fields With a step-by-step approach to solving partial differential equations (PDEs), Differential Equation Analysis in Biomedical Science and Engineering: Partial Differential Equation Applications with R successfully applies computational techniques for solving real-world PDE problems that are found in a variety of fields, including chemistry, physics, biology, and physiology. The book provides readers with the necessary knowledge to reproduce and extend the com

  8. Proceedings of the workshop cum symposium on applications of neural networks in nuclear science and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Workshop cum Symposium on Application of Neural Networks in Nuclear Science and Industry was held at Bombay during November 24-26. 1993. The past decade has seen many important advances in the design and technology of artificial neural networks in research and industry. Neural networks is an interdisciplinary field covering a broad spectrum of applications in surveillance, diagnosis of nuclear power plants, nuclear spectroscopy, speech and written text recognition, robotic control, signal processing etc. The objective of the symposium was to promote awareness of advances in neural network research and applications. It was also aimed at conducting the review of the present status and giving direction for future technological developments. Contributed papers have been organized into the following groups: a) neural network architectures, learning algorithms and modelling, b) computer vision and image processing, c) signal processing, d) neural networks and fuzzy systems, e) nuclear applications and f) neural networks and allied applications. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately. (M.K.V.)

  9. 8th International Conference on Computer Science and its Applications (CSA-16) and the 11st International Conference on Ubiquitous Information Technologies and Applications (CUTE 2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Yi; Yi, Gangman; Loia, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the combined proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Science and its Applications (CSA-16) and the 11st International Conference on Ubiquitous Information Technologies and Applications (CUTE 2016), both held in Bangkok, Thailand, December 19 - 21, 2016. The aim of these two meetings was to promote discussion and interaction among academics, researchers and professionals in the field of ubiquitous computing technologies. These proceedings reflect the state-of-the-art in the development of computational methods, involving theory, algorithm, numerical simulation, error and uncertainty analysis and novel application of new processing techniques in engineering, science, and other disciplines related to ubiquitous computing.

  10. Application of atomic force microscopy as a nanotechnology tool in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongshun; Wang, Yifen; Lai, Shaojuan; An, Hongjie; Li, Yunfei; Chen, Fusheng

    2007-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a method for detecting nanoscale structural information. First, this review explains the fundamentals of AFM, including principle, manipulation, and analysis. Applications of AFM are then reported in food science and technology research, including qualitative macromolecule and polymer imaging, complicated or quantitative structure analysis, molecular interaction, molecular manipulation, surface topography, and nanofood characterization. The results suggested that AFM could bring insightful knowledge on food properties, and the AFM analysis could be used to illustrate some mechanisms of property changes during processing and storage. However, the current difficulty in applying AFM to food research is lacking appropriate methodology for different food systems. Better understanding of AFM technology and developing corresponding methodology for complicated food systems would lead to a more in-depth understanding of food properties at macromolecular levels and enlarge their applications. The AFM results could greatly improve the food processing and storage technologies.

  11. Development and Preliminary Application of Multi-channel Agricultural Science and Technology Consulting Service U Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W. S.; Luo, C. S.; Wei, Q. F.; Zheng, Y. M.; Cao, C. Z.

    2017-12-01

    To deal with the “last kilometer” problem during the agricultural science and technology information service, the USB flash disk “Zixuntong”, which integrated five major consulting channels, i.e., telephone consultation, mutual video, message consultation, online customer service and QQ group was developed on the bases of capital experts and date resources. Since the products have the computer and telephone USB interface and are combined with localized information resources, users can obtain useful information on any terminal without the restriction of network. Meanwhile, the cartoon appearance make it friendly and attractive to people. The USB flash disk was used to provide agricultural expert consulting services and obtained a good preliminary application achievement. Finally, we concluded the creative application of USB flash disk in agricultural consulting services and prospected the future development direction of agricultural mobile consultation.

  12. Next-generation science information network for leading-edge applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urushidani, S.; Matsukata, J.

    2008-01-01

    High-speed networks are definitely essential tools for leading-edge applications in many research areas, including nuclear fusion research. This paper describes a number of advanced features in the Japanese next-generation science information network, called SINET3, and gives researchers clues on the uses of advanced high-speed network for their applications. The network services have four categories, multiple layer transfer, enriched virtual private network, enhanced quality-of-service, and bandwidth on demand services, and comprise a versatile service platform. The paper also describes the network architecture and advanced networking capabilities that enable economical service accommodation and flexible network resource assignment as well as effective use of Japan's first 40-Gbps lines

  13. Next-generation science information network for leading-edge applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urushidani, S. [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)], E-mail: urushi@nii.ac.jp; Matsukata, J. [National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8430 (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    High-speed networks are definitely essential tools for leading-edge applications in many research areas, including nuclear fusion research. This paper describes a number of advanced features in the Japanese next-generation science information network, called SINET3, and gives researchers clues on the uses of advanced high-speed network for their applications. The network services have four categories, multiple layer transfer, enriched virtual private network, enhanced quality-of-service, and bandwidth on demand services, and comprise a versatile service platform. The paper also describes the network architecture and advanced networking capabilities that enable economical service accommodation and flexible network resource assignment as well as effective use of Japan's first 40-Gbps lines.

  14. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Synthetic Membranes : Science, Engineering and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lonsdale, H; Pinho, M

    1986-01-01

    The chapters in this book are based upon lectures given at the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Synthetic Membranes (June 26-July 8, 1983, Alcabideche, Portugal), which provided an integrated presentation of syn­ thetic membrane science and technology in three broad areas. Currently available membrane formation mechanisms are reviewed, as well as the manner in which synthesis conditions can be controlled to achieve desired membrane structures. Membrane performance in a specific separa­ tionprocess involves complex phenomena, the understanding of which re­ quires a multidisciplinary approach encompassing polymer chemistry, phys­ ical chemistry, and chemical engineering. Progress toward a global understanding of membrane phenomena is described in chapters on the principles of membrane transport. The chapters on membrane processes and applications highlight both established and emerging membrane processes, and elucidate their myriad applications. It is our hope that this book will be an enduring, comprehensi...

  15. The application of computer image analysis in life sciences and environmental engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, R.; Lewicki, A.; Przybył, K.; Zaborowicz, M.; Koszela, K.; Boniecki, P.; Mueller, W.; Raba, B.

    2014-04-01

    The main aim of the article was to present research on the application of computer image analysis in Life Science and Environmental Engineering. The authors used different methods of computer image analysis in developing of an innovative biotest in modern biomonitoring of water quality. Created tools were based on live organisms such as bioindicators Lemna minor L. and Hydra vulgaris Pallas as well as computer image analysis method in the assessment of negatives reactions during the exposition of the organisms to selected water toxicants. All of these methods belong to acute toxicity tests and are particularly essential in ecotoxicological assessment of water pollutants. Developed bioassays can be used not only in scientific research but are also applicable in environmental engineering and agriculture in the study of adverse effects on water quality of various compounds used in agriculture and industry.

  16. U.S. Geological Survey Ecosystems science strategy: advancing discovery and application through collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Byron K.; Wingard, G. Lynn; Brewer, Gary; Cloern, James E.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Jacobson, Robert B.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.; McGuire, Anthony David; Nichols, James D.; Shapiro, Carl D.; van Riper, Charles; White, Robin P.

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystem science is critical to making informed decisions about natural resources that can sustain our Nation’s economic and environmental well-being. Resource managers and policymakers are faced with countless decisions each year at local, regional, and national levels on issues as diverse as renewable and nonrenewable energy development, agriculture, forestry, water supply, and resource allocations at the urbanrural interface. The urgency for sound decisionmaking is increasing dramatically as the world is being transformed at an unprecedented pace and in uncertain directions. Environmental changes are associated with natural hazards, greenhouse gas emissions, and increasing demands for water, land, food, energy, mineral, and living resources. At risk is the Nation’s environmental capital, the goods and services provided by resilient ecosystems that are vital to the health and wellbeing of human societies. Ecosystem science—the study of systems of organisms interacting with their environment and the consequences of natural and human-induced change on these systems—is necessary to inform decisionmakers as they develop policies to adapt to these changes. This Ecosystems Science Strategy is built on a framework that includes basic and applied science. It highlights the critical roles that U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and partners can play in building scientific understanding and providing timely information to decisionmakers. The strategy underscores the connection between scientific discoveries and the application of new knowledge, and it integrates ecosystem science and decisionmaking, producing new scientific outcomes to assist resource managers and providing public benefits. We envision the USGS as a leader in integrating scientific information into decisionmaking processes that affect the Nation’s natural resources and human well-being. The USGS is uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in ecosystem science. With its wide range of

  17. SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) Tsunami Scenario--Executive Summary and Introduction: Chapter A in The SAFRR (Science Application for Risk Reduction) Tsunami Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stephanie L.; Jones, Lucile M.; Miller, Kevin H.; Porter, Keith A.; Wein, Anne; Wilson, Rick I.; Bahng, Bohyun; Barberopoulou, Aggeliki; Borrero, Jose C.; Brosnan, Deborah M.; Bwarie, John T.; Geist, Eric L.; Johnson, Laurie A.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Knight, William R.; Long, Kate; Lynett, Patrick; Mortensen, Carl E.; Nicolsky, Dmitry J.; Perry, Suzanne C.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Real, Charles R.; Ryan, Kenneth; Suleimani, Elena; Thio, Hong Kie; Titov, Vasily V.; Whitmore, Paul M.; Wood, Nathan J.

    2013-01-01

    The Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) tsunami scenario depicts a hypothetical but plausible tsunami created by an earthquake offshore from the Alaska Peninsula and its impacts on the California coast. The tsunami scenario is a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the California Geological Survey, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), other Federal, State, County, and local agencies, private companies, and academic and other institutions. This document presents evidence for past tsunamis, the scientific basis for the source, likely inundation areas, current velocities in key ports and harbors, physical damage and repair costs, economic consequences, environmental and ecological impacts, social vulnerability, emergency management and evacuation challenges, and policy implications for California associated with this hypothetical tsunami. We also discuss ongoing mitigation efforts by the State of California and new communication products. The intended users are those who need to make mitigation decisions before future tsunamis, and those who will need to make rapid decisions during tsunami events. The results of the tsunami scenario will help managers understand the context and consequences of their decisions and how they may improve preparedness and response. An evaluation component will assess the effectiveness of the scenario process for target stakeholders in a separate report to improve similar efforts in the future.

  18. Electronic-nose applications in forensic science and for analysis of volatile biomarkers in the human breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    AD Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The application of electronic-nose (E-nose) technologies in forensic science is a recent new development following a long history of progress in the development of diverse applications in the related biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. Data from forensic analyses must satisfy the needs and requirements of both the scientific and legal communities. The type of data...

  19. Look back and look forward to the future of computer applications in the field of nuclear science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yanming; Dai Guiling

    1988-01-01

    All previous National Conferences on computer application in the field of nuclear science and technology sponsored by the Society of Nuclear Electronics and Detection Technology are reviewed. Surveys are geiven on the basic situations and technique levels of computer applications for each time period. Some points concerning possible developments of computer techniques are given as well

  20. Deuterium- and tritium-labelled compounds. Applications in the life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker; Kerr, William J.; Reid, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes are unique tools for identifying and understanding biological and chemical processes. Hydrogen isotope labelling allows for the traceless and direct incorporation of an additional mass or radioactive tag into an organic molecule with almost no changes in its chemical structure, physical properties, or biological activity. Using deuterium-labelled isotopologues to study the unique mass-spectrometric patterns generated from mixtures of biologically relevant molecules drastically simplifies analysis. Such methods are now providing unprecedented levels of insight in a wide and continuously growing range of applications in the life sciences and beyond. Tritium ( 3 H), in particular, has seen an increase in utilization, especially in pharmaceutical drug discovery. The efforts and costs associated with the synthesis of labelled compounds are more than compensated for by the enhanced molecular sensitivity during analysis and the high reliability of the data obtained. In this review, advances in the application of hydrogen isotopes in the life sciences are described. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Medical application of nuclear science: nuclear medicine and production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, L.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear science in attendance on medicine or from Radium to Radiopharmaceuticals. By a brief historical reminder of the evolution of the radioactivity and development of nuclear science, we could see a very early interest and application of the radioactivity in the medical field. Main steps: Detection of natural radioactivity/Discovery of artificial radioactivity/First treatment of leukaemia and thyroid/First nuclear reactor/First radioisotope laboratory in hospital/First scintigraphy/First radiopharmaceutical/First cyclotron and cyclotron products/First immunoscintigraphy/Biotechnology and radioisotope/Evolution of technics [equipment for diagnosis (imaging, scintigraphy) and therapy]/Evolution of production technics and concept of products (generators of Technetium) and machines, reactor, cyclotron/Evolution of importance and interest of nuclear medicine/Creation of international association of nuclear medicine and producers (example ARPR)/Evolution of safety and pharmaceuticals regulation. After the sixties, period extremely rich in invention of products, characterized by a high fertility specially due to a non-restrictive regulation in terms of safety and pharmaceutical consideration, the evolution of technics, the importance of costs (investment, research, healthcare and the evolution of the regulations) have smoothly but continuously transformed the contexts and different actors. Consequences and facts: Rationalization and standardization of the catalogues, total integration of radiopharmaceuticals into the pharmaceutical laws, stop of nuclear research reactors, increase of number of cyclotrons, transformation of size and role of the producers and nuclear centers, risk in supply of some raw materials like Molybdenum, medical nuclear application as a worldwide business

  2. Applications of plasma spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography in environmental and food science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordache, Andreea-Maria; Biraruti, Elisabeta-Irina; Ionete, Roxana-Elena

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Plasma spectrometry has many applications in food science in analysis of a wide range of samples in the food chain. Food science in the broadest sense can be extended to include soil chemistry, plant uptake and, at the other end of the food chain, studies into the metabolic fate of particular elements or elemental species when the foods are consumed by humans or animals. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry allows multi-element measurements of most elements in the periodic table. A very sensitive analytical technique for trace analysis of samples can be performed by inductively plasma mass spectrometer with quadrupolar detector using ultrasonic nebulization. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) is an analytical technique for the separation and determination of organic and inorganic solutes in any samples especially biological, pharmaceutical, food, environmental. The present paper emphasizes that the future tendencies HPLC-ICP-MS is often the preferred analytical technique for these applications due to the simplicity of the coupling between the HPLC and ICP-MS Varian 820 using ultrasonic nebulization, potential for on-line separations with high species specificity and the capability for optimum limits of detection without the necessity of using complex hydride generation mechanisms. (authors)

  3. Synergetic Use of Crowdsourcing for Environmental Science Research, Applications and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, U. S.; Thau, D.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental science research and applications often utilize information that is not readily available or routinely collected by government agencies. Whereas, the quality and quantity of environmental monitoring data is continually improving (e. g., spectral and spatial resolution of satellite imagery) contextual information needed to effectively utilize the data is sparse. Examples of such contextual information include ground truth data for land cover classification, presence/absence of species, prevalence of mosquito breeding sites and characteristics of urban land cover. Often, there are no agencies tasked with routine collection of such contextual information, which could be effectively collected through crowdsourcing. Crowdsourcing of such information, that is useful for environmental science research and applications, also provide opportunities for experiential learning at all levels of education. Appropriately designed crowdsourcing activity can be transform students from passive recipients of information to generators of knowledge. Multiple examples of synergistic use of crowdsourcing, developed by the Public Environmental Education and Research Apps (PEERA) group, at the University of Alabama in Huntsville will be presented. One example is crowdsourcing of land use and land cover (LULC) data using Open Data Kit (ODK) and associated analysis of satellite imagery using Google Earth Engine (GEE). Implementation of this activity as inquiry based learning exercise, for both middle school and for pre-service teachers will be discussed. Another example will detail the synergy between crowdsourcing for biodiversity mapping in southern India and environmental education. Other crowdsourcing activities that offer potential for synergy between research and public education will also be discussed.

  4. Deuterium- and tritium-labelled compounds. Applications in the life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atzrodt, Jens; Derdau, Volker [Isotope Chemistry and Metabolite Synthesis, Integrated Drug Discovery, Medicinal Chemistry, Frankfurt (Germany); Kerr, William J.; Reid, Marc [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, WestCHEM, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2018-02-12

    Hydrogen isotopes are unique tools for identifying and understanding biological and chemical processes. Hydrogen isotope labelling allows for the traceless and direct incorporation of an additional mass or radioactive tag into an organic molecule with almost no changes in its chemical structure, physical properties, or biological activity. Using deuterium-labelled isotopologues to study the unique mass-spectrometric patterns generated from mixtures of biologically relevant molecules drastically simplifies analysis. Such methods are now providing unprecedented levels of insight in a wide and continuously growing range of applications in the life sciences and beyond. Tritium ({sup 3}H), in particular, has seen an increase in utilization, especially in pharmaceutical drug discovery. The efforts and costs associated with the synthesis of labelled compounds are more than compensated for by the enhanced molecular sensitivity during analysis and the high reliability of the data obtained. In this review, advances in the application of hydrogen isotopes in the life sciences are described. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Studies and applications of nuclear tracks in solids in basic science and technology in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.A.; Qureshi, I.E.; Khan, E.U.

    2008-01-01

    The solid state nuclear track detection (SSNTD) technique is now a well-established tool for the detection of charged particles with stopping power greater than a certain threshold value. Being a passive detection system, it existed in the form of primordial crystals and hence qualified to be regarded as the 'oldest' member of the nuclear detection systems. Since the advent of its laboratory use in 1958, the technique was adopted by different laboratories at different times all over the world. Pakistan is one of the countries that established an SSNTD-laboratory in the earliest developmental stage of the technique. Consequently, significant contributions were made by a small but energetic group of scientists toward the methodology of the technique as well as its applications in diverse areas such as nuclear physics, cosmology, material science, geology, geophysics, bio-medical physics and environmental science. In this article we will attempt to present a brief summary of the important advances made in the development of this technique and its innovative applications by Pakistani researchers in various fields of science and technology. As elsewhere in the world, the technique is not ubiquitous in all nuclear research laboratories in Pakistan because of the well-known limitations of the detection system. However, the number of workers involved in research studies has been growing over the years. These included both the fresh researchers as well as those who shifted from other research interests. This has resulted in a healthy reinforcement of the manpower engaged in SSNTD-based research work. After a selective presentation of the on-going investigations based on the use of SSNTDs in Pakistan, some comments are made for the possible future directions of progress. To put the Pakistani experience in international perspective, it is emphasized that the unique features of SSNTDs are facing serious challenges from rapid advances in high precision electronic detectors. The

  6. Potential applications of luminescent molecular rotors in food science and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassawi, Fatemah M; Corradini, Maria G; Rogers, Michael A; Ludescher, Richard D

    2017-06-29

    Fluorescent molecular rotors (MRs) are compounds whose emission is modulated by segmental mobility; photoexcitation generates a locally excited (LE), planar state that can relax either by radiative decay (emission of a photon) or by formation of a twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state that can relax nonradiatively due to internal rotation. If the local environment around the probe allows for rapid internal rotation in the excited state, fast non-radiative decay can either effectively quench the fluorescence or generate a second, red-shifted emission band. Conversely, any environmental restriction to twisting in the excited state due to free volume, crowding or viscosity, slows rotational relaxation and promotes fluorescence emission from the LE state. The environmental sensitivity of MRs has been exploited extensively in biological applications to sense microviscosity in biofluids, the stability and physical state of biomembranes, and conformational changes in macromolecules. The application of MRs in food research, however, has been only marginally explored. In this review, we summarize the main characteristics of fluorescent MRs, their current applications in biological research and their current and potential applications as sensors of physical properties in food science and engineering.

  7. Beyond 3-D: The New Spectrum of Lidar Applications for Earth and Ecological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Jan U. H.; Hofle, Bernhard; Vierling, Lee A.; Abellan, Antonio; Asner, Gregory P.; Deems, Jeffrey S.; Glennie, Craig L.; Joerg, Phillip C.; LeWinter, Adam L.; Magney, Troy S.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Capturing and quantifying the world in three dimensions (x,y,z) using light detection and ranging (lidar) technology drives fundamental advances in the Earth and Ecological Sciences (EES). However, additional lidar dimensions offer the possibility to transcend basic 3-D mapping capabilities, including i) the physical time (t) dimension from repeat lidar acquisition and ii) laser return intensity (LRI?) data dimension based on the brightness of single- or multi-wavelength (?) laser returns. The additional dimensions thus add to the x,y, and z dimensions to constitute the five dimensions of lidar (x,y,z, t, LRI?1... ?n). This broader spectrum of lidar dimensionality has already revealed new insights across multiple EES topics, and will enable a wide range of new research and applications. Here, we review recent advances based on repeat lidar collections and analysis of LRI data to highlight novel applications of lidar remote sensing beyond 3-D. Our review outlines the potential and current challenges of time and LRI information from lidar sensors to expand the scope of research applications and insights across the full range of EES applications.

  8. NASA LWS Institute GIC Working Group: GIC science, engineering and applications readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, A. A.; Thomson, A. W. P.; Bernabeu, E.

    2016-12-01

    In recognition of the rapidly growing interest on the topic, this paper is based on the findings of the very first NASA Living With a Star (LWS) Institute Working Group that was specifically targeting the GIC issue. The new LWS Institutes program element was launched 2014 and the concept is built around small working group style meetings that focus on well defined problems that demand intense, direct interactions between colleagues in neighboring disciplines to facilitate the development of a deeper understanding of the variety of processes that link the solar activity to Earth's environment. The LWS Institute Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GIC) Working Group (WG) led by A. Pulkkinen (NASA GSFC) and co-led by E. Bernabeu (PJM) and A. Thomson (BGS) was selected competitively as the pilot activity for the new LWS element. The GIC WG was tasked to 1) identify, advance, and address the open scientific and engineering questions pertaining to GIC, 2) advance predictive modeling of GIC, 3) advocate and act as a catalyst to identify resources for addressing the multidisciplinary topic of GIC. In this paper, we target the goal 1) of the GIC WG. More specifically, the goal of this paper is to review the current status and future challenges pertaining to science, engineering and applications of the GIC problem. Science is understood here as the basic space and Earth sciences research that allow improved understanding and physics-based modeling of physical processes behind GIC. Engineering in turn is understood here as the "impact" aspect of GIC. The impact includes any physical effects GIC may have on the performance of the manmade infrastructure. Applications is understood as the models, tools and activities that can provide actionable information to entities such as power systems operators for mitigating the effects of GIC and government for managing any potential consequences from GIC impact to critical infrastructure. In this sense, applications can be considered as

  9. The Evolution of Successful Satellite Science to Air Quality Application Projects: From Inception to Realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soja, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Teams of scientist have been working for almost a decade with state, local, regional and federal Air Quality regulators and scientists on several projects that have been focused on improving biomass burning emissions within our nation's National Emissions Inventory (NEI). Initially, the NEI was based strictly on ground-based information that often used data aggregated from previous years reported at the county-centroid and completely ignored the spatial domain of all fires. This methodology resulted in gross inaccuracies; however it was an ingrained system and the users and organizations were largely comfortable. Improvements were viewed as too costly. Our task was to convince regulators, managers and users of the value that could be added by using satellite data to enhance the NEI. Certainly, there were individuals that understood the value of using satellite data, but they needed support to convince the establishment of the intrinsic, cost-effective value of publically-available satellite data. It was essential to present arguments, as well as requested verification and validation statistics, in the format that most suited the objectives of application organizations. This process incorporated: knowledge of state-of-the-art satellite data, algorithms and science; a working knowledge of the users applications and requirements; interacting with individuals with a variety of skill sets and goals; and perhaps most importantly, listening to the goals and responsibilities of the user community and fully communicating. Today, the Environmental Protection Agency and several state and regional organizations are using satellite data to estimate biomass burnings emissions at daily and annual scales for a number of critical environmental management and policy activities including regulation setting and regional strategy development for attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). We continue to work at the local, state and federal levels to improve the

  10. Horizon Scanning: How Will Metabolomics Applications Transform Food Science, Bioengineering, and Medical Innovation in the Current Era of Foodomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Mustafa; Gökırmaklı, Çağlar

    2018-03-01

    Food and engineering sciences have tended to neglect the importance of human nutrition sciences and clinical study of new molecules discovered by food engineering community, and vice versa. Yet, the value of systems thinking and use of omics technologies in food engineering are rapidly emerging. Foodomics is a new concept and practice to bring about "precision nutrition" and integrative bioengineering studies of food composition, quality, and safety, and applications to improve health of humans, animals, and other living organisms on the planet. Foodomics signals a three-way convergence among (1) food engineering; (2) omics systems science technologies such as proteomics, metabolomics, glycomics; and (3) medical/life sciences. This horizon scanning expert review aims to challenge the current practices in food sciences and bioengineering so as to adopt foodomics and systems thinking in foodstuff analysis, with a focus on possible applications of metabolomics. Among the omics biotechnologies, metabolomics is one of the prominent analytical platforms of interest to both food engineers and medical researchers engaged in nutritional sciences, precision medicine, and systems medicine diagnostics. Medical and omics system scientists, and bioengineering scholars can mutually learn from their respective professional expertise. Moving forward, establishment of "Foodomics Think Tanks" is one conceivable strategy to integrate medical and food sciences innovation at a systems scale. With its rich history in food sciences and tradition of interdisciplinary scholarship, the Silk Road countries offer notable potential for synthesis of diverse knowledge strands necessary to realize the prospects of foodomics from Asia and Middle East to Europe.

  11. The Role of Suomi NPP VIIRS Data in Land Science and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, C. O.; Csiszar, I. A.; Roman, M. O.; Vermote, E.

    2014-12-01

    The current Suomi-NPP mission was designed as a bridging mission to the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) next-generation, operational satellites. The VIIRS instrument on-board Suomi-NPP provides continuity with NASA's Earth Observing System Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations and a much-needed replacement of the long-serving, operational NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) system, to meet the expanding needs of Earth Science and Applications of Societal Benefit. Post-launch evaluation has proven the instrument to be excellent for land observations and capable of providing measurement continuity with MODIS. This provides a critical contribution to the scientific study of global change. Several regions of the World are undergoing rapid land transformations, driven by economic development and population growth. In addition, changes in climate conditions are resulting in ecosystem responses and changes in land cover and land use. Long-term, systematic observations of the global land surface at coarse resolution enable detection, monitoring and characterization of such changes to the land surface. A suite of Land environmental data records (EDRs) from the VIIRS, are being developed by NOAA to meet operational data needs, primarily for the National Weather Service (e.g., Albedo, Land Surface Temperature, Fractional Vegetation Cover, Surface Type, Snow and Ice Monitoring). Scientists funded by NOAA and NASA, have been evaluating and validating these products. Based on these evaluations, NASA is embarking on a program to develop enhanced and additional products to provide continuity with MODIS to meet the needs of the global change science community. In addition, and as with MODIS, data from the VIIRS can be used as input to a number of practical applications of societal benefit and the associated decision support systems. For example, progress with VIIRS data is being made in the areas of fire and agricultural monitoring

  12. [Research Conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering for the Period October 1, 1999 through March 31, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, computer science, fluid mechanics, and structures and materials during the period October 1, 1999 through March 31, 2000.

  13. Enabling Extreme Scale Earth Science Applications at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaj, V. G.; Mozdzynski, G.; Hamrud, M.; Deconinck, W.; Smith, L.; Hack, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Oak Ridge Leadership Facility (OLCF), established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), welcomes investigators from universities, government agencies, national laboratories and industry who are prepared to perform breakthrough research across a broad domain of scientific disciplines, including earth and space sciences. Titan, the OLCF flagship system, is currently listed as #2 in the Top500 list of supercomputers in the world, and the largest available for open science. The computational resources are allocated primarily via the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program, sponsored by the U.S. DOE Office of Science. In 2014, over 2.25 billion core hours on Titan were awarded via INCITE projects., including 14% of the allocation toward earth sciences. The INCITE competition is also open to research scientists based outside the USA. In fact, international research projects account for 12% of the INCITE awards in 2014. The INCITE scientific review panel also includes 20% participation from international experts. Recent accomplishments in earth sciences at OLCF include the world's first continuous simulation of 21,000 years of earth's climate history (2009); and an unprecedented simulation of a magnitude 8 earthquake over 125 sq. miles. One of the ongoing international projects involves scaling the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) model to over 200K cores of Titan. ECMWF is a partner in the EU funded Collaborative Research into Exascale Systemware, Tools and Applications (CRESTA) project. The significance of the research carried out within this project is the demonstration of techniques required to scale current generation Petascale capable simulation codes towards the performance levels required for running on future Exascale systems. One of the techniques pursued by ECMWF is to use Fortran2008 coarrays to overlap computations and communications and

  14. Frontiers in Science and technology of Non-Destructive Evaluation Applications to Industry, Health and Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, Baldev; Venkatraman, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research (IGCAR) located at Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu, India is the second largest research center of the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). It has been established with the mandate to develop fast reactor technology and associated fuel cycle technologies. As part of this strategy, a 40 MW (th) test reactor, the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (Fbtr), was constructed. This reactor is completing 24 years of successful operation since its first criticality in October 1985. At IGCAR, a small NDE group was established in early 1980s. Combining a dedicated group of multi disciplinary professionals from metallurgy, physics, engineering and instrumentation and through development and application of cutting edge technologies, this group has achieved international recognition. Today, the NDE Center at IGCAR is unique in India, combining conventional and advanced NDE under a single roof with excellent expertise in the areas of modelling, research, NDE hardware and software design, development and applications. It is a Center for Excellence and well recognised internationally. This is reflected in over 600 publications in peer reviewed journals, successful organization of national and international conferences, including more than 15 patents, about 20 books and the international linkages and collaborations. The robust NDE technologies and methodologies developed by this group based on sound basic science principles and engineering validation has been utilised by the strategic and core sectors in India and internationally to solve many challenging problems. This paper highlights NDE solutions to challenging problems encountered during manufacture of important components of 500 MWE PFBR. The paper also highlights the application oriented Research and Development that has been undertaken to enhance the limit and reliability of detection. Many of these technologies and procedures have significant Societal applications. The paper also outlines some

  15. Application of a Sensemaking Approach to Ethics Training in the Physical Sciences and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligyte, Vykinta; Marcy, Richard T.; Waples, Ethan P.; Sevier, Sydney T.; Godfrey, Elaine S.; Mumford, Michael D.; Hougen, Dean F.

    2008-06-01

    Integrity is a critical determinant of the effectiveness of research organizations in terms of producing high quality research and educating the new generation of scientists. A number of responsible conduct of research (RCR) training programs have been developed to address this growing organizational concern. However, in spite of a significant body of research in ethics training, it is still unknown which approach has the highest potential to enhance researchers' integrity. One of the approaches showing some promise in improving researchers' integrity has focused on the development of ethical decision-making skills. The current effort proposes a novel curriculum that focuses on broad metacognitive reasoning strategies researchers use when making sense of day-to-day social and professional practices that have ethical implications for the physical sciences and engineering. This sensemaking training has been implemented in a professional sample of scientists conducting research in electrical engineering, atmospheric and computer sciences at a large multi-cultural, multi-disciplinary, and multi-university research center. A pre-post design was used to assess training effectiveness using scenario-based ethical decision-making measures. The training resulted in enhanced ethical decision-making of researchers in relation to four ethical conduct areas, namely data management, study conduct, professional practices, and business practices. In addition, sensemaking training led to researchers' preference for decisions involving the application of the broad metacognitive reasoning strategies. Individual trainee and training characteristics were used to explain the study findings. Broad implications of the findings for ethics training development, implementation, and evaluation in the sciences are discussed.

  16. Radiation chemistry from basics to applications in material and life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belloni, J.; Mostafavi, M.; Douki, Th.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2008-01-01

    This book gives a progress report on the many and original contributions of radiation chemistry to the fundamental knowledge of the vast domain of chemical reactions and its applications. Radiation chemistry techniques indeed make it possible to elucidate detailed physicochemical mechanisms in inorganic and organic chemistry (including in space) and in biochemistry. Moreover, this comprehension is applied in materials science to precisely control syntheses by radiation, such as radiopolymerization, radio-grafting, specific treatment of surfaces (textiles, paintings, inks,..), synthesis of complex nano-materials, degradation of environmental pollutants and radioresistance of materials for nuclear reactors. In life sciences, the study of the effects of radiation on bio-macromolecules (DNA, proteins, lipids) not only permits the comprehension of normal or pathological biological mechanisms, but also the improvement of our health. In particular, many advances in cancer radiotherapy, in the radioprotection of nuclear workers and the general population, as well as in the treatment of diseases and the radiosterilization of drugs, could be obtained thanks to this research. Abundantly illustrated and written in English by top international specialists who have taken care to render the subjects accessible, this work will greatly interest those curious about a scientific field that is new to them and students attracted by the original and multidisciplinary aspects of the field. At a time when radiation chemistry research is experiencing spectacular development in numerous countries, this book will attract newcomers to the field. (authors)

  17. Challenges in network science: Applications to infrastructures, climate, social systems and economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlin, S.; Kenett, D. Y.; Ben-Jacob, E.; Bunde, A.; Cohen, R.; Hermann, H.; Kantelhardt, J. W.; Kertész, J.; Kirkpatrick, S.; Kurths, J.; Portugali, J.; Solomon, S.

    2012-11-01

    Network theory has become one of the most visible theoretical frameworks that can be applied to the description, analysis, understanding, design and repair of multi-level complex systems. Complex networks occur everywhere, in man-made and human social systems, in organic and inorganic matter, from nano to macro scales, and in natural and anthropogenic structures. New applications are developed at an ever-increasing rate and the promise for future growth is high, since increasingly we interact with one another within these vital and complex environments. Despite all the great successes of this field, crucial aspects of multi-level complex systems have been largely ignored. Important challenges of network science are to take into account many of these missing realistic features such as strong coupling between networks (networks are not isolated), the dynamics of networks (networks are not static), interrelationships between structure, dynamics and function of networks, interdependencies in given networks (and other classes of links, including different signs of interactions), and spatial properties (including geographical aspects) of networks. This aim of this paper is to introduce and discuss the challenges that future network science needs to address, and how different disciplines will be accordingly affected.

  18. The story of light science from early theories to today's extraordinary applications

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderwerf, Dennis F

    2017-01-01

    This book traces the evolution of our understanding and utilization of light from classical antiquity and the early thoughts of Pythagoras to the present time.   From the earliest recorded theories and experiments to the latest applications in photonic communication and computation, the ways in which light has been put to use are numerous and astounding.  Indeed, some of the latest advances in light science are in fields  that until recently belonged to the realm of science fiction.  The author, writing for an audience of both students and other scientifically interested readers, describes fundamental investigations of the nature of light and ongoing methods to measure its speed as well as the emergence of the wave theory of light and the complementary photon theory.  The importance of light in the theory of relativity is discussed as is the development of electrically-driven light sources and lasers. The information here covers the range of weak single-photon light sources to super-high power lasers an...

  19. Research Data Alliance: Understanding Big Data Analytics Applications in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Morris; Ramachandran, Rahul; Baumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Research Data Alliance (RDA) enables data to be shared across barriers through focused working groups and interest groups, formed of experts from around the world - from academia, industry and government. Its Big Data Analytics (BDA) interest groups seeks to develop community based recommendations on feasible data analytics approaches to address scientific community needs of utilizing large quantities of data. BDA seeks to analyze different scientific domain applications (e.g. earth science use cases) and their potential use of various big data analytics techniques. These techniques reach from hardware deployment models up to various different algorithms (e.g. machine learning algorithms such as support vector machines for classification). A systematic classification of feasible combinations of analysis algorithms, analytical tools, data and resource characteristics and scientific queries will be covered in these recommendations. This contribution will outline initial parts of such a classification and recommendations in the specific context of the field of Earth Sciences. Given lessons learned and experiences are based on a survey of use cases and also providing insights in a few use cases in detail.

  20. An evaluation of some replication techniques for materials science applications of scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, G.J.C.; Baird, J.

    1976-06-01

    Several techniques for producing positive replicas for materials science applications have been critically examined: 1) Consistent high resolution replicas can be produced by vacuum evaporation of a gold film onto a 'Bioden' (cellulose acetate) negative replica, backing the film with electroplated copper and dissolving the 'Bioden'; 2) negative replicas that are easy to strip and handle may be made using a silicone rubber compound, 'Silastic' RTV 'A' but with highly variable resolution; 3) an epoxy resin, 'Ren', gave good resolution but could not easily be stripped from a specimen surface: it is therefore only suitable for the final (positive) stage of replication. Some possible techniques for obtaining more consistent resolution from 'Silastic' RTV synthetic rubbers are suggested. (author)

  1. Application of X-ray topography to USSR and Russian space materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shul'pina, I L; Prokhorov, I A; Serebryakov, Yu A; Bezbakh, I Zh

    2016-05-01

    The authors' experience of the application of X-ray diffraction imaging in carrying out space technological experiments on semiconductor crystal growth for the former USSR and for Russia is reported, from the Apollo-Soyuz programme (1975) up to the present day. X-ray topography was applied to examine defects in crystals in order to obtain information on the crystallization conditions and also on their changes under the influence of factors of orbital flight in space vehicles. The data obtained have promoted a deeper understanding of the conditions and mechanisms of crystallization under both microgravity and terrestrial conditions, and have enabled the elaboration of terrestrial methods of highly perfect crystal growth. The use of X-ray topography in space materials science has enriched its methods in the field of digital image processing of growth striations and expanded its possibilities in investigating the inhomogeneity of crystals.

  2. 2nd International Conference on Applications of Mathematics and Informatics in Military Sciences (2nd AMIMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Applications of Mathematics and Informatics in Science and Engineering

    2014-01-01

    Analysis, assessment, and data management are core competencies for operation research analysts. This volume addresses a number of issues and developed methods for improving those skills. It is an outgrowth of a conference held in April 2013 at the Hellenic Military Academy, and brings together a broad variety of mathematical methods and theories with several applications. It discusses directions and pursuits of scientists that pertain to engineering sciences. It is also presents the theoretical background required for algorithms and techniques applied to a large variety of concrete problems. A number of open questions as well as new future areas are also highlighted. This book will appeal to operations research analysts, engineers, community decision makers, academics, the military community, practitioners sharing the current “state-of-the-art,” and analysts from coalition partners. Topics covered include Operations Research, Games and Control Theory, Computational Number Theory and Information Security,...

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics in Complex Systems Theory and Applications for the Life-, Neuro- and Natural Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Armin

    2013-01-01

    With many areas of science reaching across their boundaries and becoming more and more interdisciplinary, students and researchers in these fields are confronted with techniques and tools not covered by their particular education. Especially in the life- and neurosciences quantitative models based on nonlinear dynamics and complex systems are becoming as frequently implemented as traditional statistical analysis. Unfamiliarity with the terminology and rigorous mathematics may discourage many scientists to adopt these methods for their own work, even though such reluctance in most cases is not justified.This book bridges this gap by introducing the procedures and methods used for analyzing nonlinear dynamical systems. In Part I, the concepts of fixed points, phase space, stability and transitions, among others, are discussed in great detail and implemented on the basis of example elementary systems. Part II is devoted to specific, non-trivial applications: coordination of human limb movement (Haken-Kelso-Bunz ...

  4. The Role of Technology in Science Teaching Activities: Web Based Teaching Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma ALKAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 2015 Abstract In this research the attitudes of pre-service teachers studying at Hacettepe University, Division of Science Education towards the importance of technological equipment in chemistry education activities and how effective they find technology in teaching different skills and applications have been examined. Pre-test/post-test control group design has been used in the research. In the experimental group Titrimetric Analysis has been conducted with simulations supported web based instruction and in the control group with teacher-centered instruction. In general, it has been found out that the attitudes of pre-service teachers in experiment group towards the importance of technological equipment as a teaching tool in chemistry are more positive than those in control group. In other words, statistically significant differences have occurred in attitudes of pre-service teachers in both experiment and control group towards the role of technology in chemistry teaching activities after web based teaching.

  5. CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector and its application in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Pengji; Tang Xiaowei; Wang Long; Liang Tianjiao

    2000-01-01

    The transparent and stable plastic material CR-39 can be used as a nuclear track detector which is highly sensitive to charged particles. It can record tracks induced by protons , alphas, fission fragments and other charged particles. Among various available solid state nuclear track detectors CR-39 has the lowest deposited energy density detection-threshold. The response of CR-39 to charged particles and the response curve of υ T of different charged particles to REL are given. The CR-39 detector is widely used in studies of nuclear reactions, angular distributions and reaction cross-sections caused by neutrons and charged particles. Neutron spectra, over a wide energy range, can be measured by the combination of CR-39 and a transformation screen. The successful applications of CR-39 in alpha particle dosimetry, environmental science (especially in the measurement of radon) and in biomedicine, such as the analysis of alpha radioactivity in sections of organic tissues, are described

  6. A comprehensive mission to planet Earth: Woods Hole Space Science and Applications Advisory Committee Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA program Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE) is described in this set of visuals presented in Massachusetts on July 29, 1991. The problem presented in this document is that the earth system is changing and that human activity accelerates the rate of change resulting in increased greenhouse gases, decreasing levels of stratospheric ozone, acid rain, deforestation, decreasing biodiversity, and overpopulation. Various national and international organizations are coordinating global change research. The complementary space observations for this activity are sun-synchronous polar orbits, low-inclination, low altitude orbits, geostationary orbits, and ground measurements. The Geostationary Earth Observatory is the major proposed mission of MTPE. Other proposed missions are EOS Synthetic Aperture Radar, ARISTOTELES Magnetic Field Experiment, and the Global Topography Mission. Use of the NASA DC-8 aircraft is outlined as carrying out the Airborne Science and Applications Program. Approved Earth Probes Program include the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Other packages for earth observation are described.

  7. Topic maps standard and its application in library and information science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Baji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Topic maps are an ISO standard (ISO 13250 that is used for presenting the information about information resources structures. The initial idea of this standard was raised in 1991 and due to its strength; it turned into an ISO standard. This paper investigates concepts and model of topic maps and aims to mention applications of this standard in library and information science (LIS realm. A topic map, as a type of document is defined as XML or SGML technically. Research show that this standard is compatible with some of LIS techniques and rules especially in knowledge organization, but it attempts to use these rules in the web. So it can be said that according to some challenges that LIS field faces in adapting traditional techniques for knowledge organization in the Web, topic maps standard can help in solving such problems and challenges and this is what some experts of LIS tried to do.

  8. Technical note: Application of the Box-Cox data transformation to animal science experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, M R; Wilcox, C J; Sharp, D C

    1998-03-01

    In the use of ANOVA for hypothesis testing in animal science experiments, the assumption of homogeneity of errors often is violated because of scale effects and the nature of the measurements. We demonstrate a method for transforming data so that the assumptions of ANOVA are met (or violated to a lesser degree) and apply it in analysis of data from a physiology experiment. Our study examined whether melatonin implantation would affect progesterone secretion in cycling pony mares. Overall treatment variances were greater in the melatonin-treated group, and several common transformation procedures failed. Application of the Box-Cox transformation algorithm reduced the heterogeneity of error and permitted the assumption of equal variance to be met.

  9. Networked Learning and Network Science: Potential Applications to Health Professionals' Continuing Education and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Alvaro; Parboosingh, John

    2015-01-01

    Prior interpersonal relationships and interactivity among members of professional associations may impact the learning process in continuing medical education (CME). On the other hand, CME programs that encourage interactivity between participants may impact structures and behaviors in these professional associations. With the advent of information and communication technologies, new communication spaces have emerged that have the potential to enhance networked learning in national and international professional associations and increase the effectiveness of CME for health professionals. In this article, network science, based on the application of network theory and other theories, is proposed as an approach to better understand the contribution networking and interactivity between health professionals in professional communities make to their learning and adoption of new practices over time. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  10. Neutrons and synchrotron radiation in engineering materials science. From fundamentals to applications. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staron, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Zentrum fuer Material- und Kuestenforschung GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Materials Research; Schreyer, Andreas [European Spallation Source ERIC, Lund (Sweden); Clemens, Helmut; Mayer, Svea (eds.) [Montanuniv. Leoben (Austria). Dept. of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing

    2017-07-01

    This book provides a systematic overview of the increasingly important field of characterization of engineering materials with the help of neutrons and synchrotron radiation. The first part introduces readers to the fundamentals of structure-property relationships in materials and the radiation sources suitable for materials characterization. The second part then focuses on such characterization techniques as diffraction and scattering methods, as well as direct imaging and tomography. The third part presents new and emerging methods of materials characterization in the field of 3D characterization techniques like three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy. The fourth and final part is a collection of examples that demonstrate the application of the methods introduced in the first parts to problems in materials science.

  11. Complex Systems Models and Their Applications: Towards a New Science of Verification, Validation & Uncertainty Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Trucano, Timothy G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kleban, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naugle, Asmeret Bier [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Verzi, Stephen Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swiler, Laura Painton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, Curtis M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Mark A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flanagan, Tatiana Paz [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vugrin, Eric D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gabert, Kasimir Georg [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lave, Matthew Samuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chen, Wei [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); DeLaurentis, Daniel [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Hubler, Alfred [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Oberkampf, Bill [WLO Consulting, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report contains the written footprint of a Sandia-hosted workshop held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 22-23, 2016 on “Complex Systems Models and Their Applications: Towards a New Science of Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification,” as well as of pre-work that fed into the workshop. The workshop’s intent was to explore and begin articulating research opportunities at the intersection between two important Sandia communities: the complex systems (CS) modeling community, and the verification, validation and uncertainty quantification (VVUQ) community The overarching research opportunity (and challenge) that we ultimately hope to address is: how can we quantify the credibility of knowledge gained from complex systems models, knowledge that is often incomplete and interim, but will nonetheless be used, sometimes in real-time, by decision makers?

  12. Projects for the implementation of science technology society approach in basic concept of natural science course as application of optical and electrical instruments’ material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satria, E.

    2018-03-01

    Preservice teachers in primary education should be well equipped to meet the challenges of teaching primary science effectively in 21century. The purpose of this research was to describe the projects for the implementation of Science-Technology-Society (STS) approach in Basic Concept of Natural Science course as application of optical and electrical instruments’ material by the preservice teachers in Elementary Schools Teacher Education Program. One of the reasons is the lack of preservice teachers’ ability in making projects for application of STS approach and optical and electrical instruments’ material in Basic Concept of Natural Science course. This research applied descriptive method. The instrument of the research was the researcher himself. The data were gathered through observation and documentation. Based on the results of the research, it was figured out that preservice teachers, in groups, were creatively and successful to make the projects of optical and electrical instruments assigned such as projector and doorbell. It was suggested that the construction of the instruments should be better (fixed and strong structure) and more attractive for both instruments, and used strong light source, high quality images, and it could use speaker box for projector, power battery, and heat sink for electrical instruments.

  13. Space Shuttle 750 psi Helium Regulator Application on Mars Science Laboratory Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Yankura, George; Rust, Thomas; Anderson, John R.; Dien, Anthony; Garda, Hoshang; Bezer, Mary Ann; Johnson, David; Arndt, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) is NASA's next major mission to Mars, to be launched in September 2009. It is a nuclear powered rover designed for a long duration mission, with an extensive suite of science instruments. The descent and landing uses a unique 'skycrane' concept, where a rocket-powered descent stage decelerates the vehicle, hovers over the ground, lowers the rover to the ground on a bridle, then flies a safe distance away for disposal. This descent stage uses a regulated hydrazine propulsion system. Performance requirements for the pressure regulator were very demanding, with a wide range of flow rates and tight regulated pressure band. These indicated that a piloted regulator would be needed, which are notoriously complex, and time available for development was short. Coincidentally, it was found that the helium regulator used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter main propulsion system came very close to meeting MSL requirements. However, the type was out of production, and fabricating new units would incur long lead times and technical risk. Therefore, the Space Shuttle program graciously furnished three units for use by MSL. Minor modifications were made, and the units were carefully tuned to MSL requirements. Some of the personnel involved had built and tested the original shuttle units. Delta qualification for MSL application was successfully conducted on one of the units. A pyrovalve slam start and shock test was conducted. Dynamic performance analyses for the new application were conducted, using sophisticated tools developed for Shuttle. Because the MSL regulator is a refurbished Shuttle flight regulator, it will be the only part of MSL which has physically already been in space.

  14. Assessment of power output in jump tests for applicants to a sports sciences degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, A J; Abián, J; Alegre, L M; Jiménez, L; Aguado, X

    2006-09-01

    Our study aimed: 1) to describe the jump performance in a population of male applicants to a Faculty of Sports Sciences, 2) to apply different power equations from the literature to assess their accuracy, and 3) to develop a new regression equation from this population. The push off phases of the counter-movement jumps (CMJ) on a force platform of 161 applicants (age: 19+/-2.9 years; weight: 70.4+/-8.3 kg) to a Spanish Faculty of Sports Sciences were recorded and subsequently analyzed. Their hands had to be placed on the hips and the knee angle during the counter movement was not controlled. Each subject had 2 trials to reach a minimum of 29 cm of jump height, and when 2 jumps were performed the best trial was analyzed. Multiple regression analysis was performed to develop a new regression equation. Mean jump height was 34.6+/-4.3 cm, peak vertical force 1 663.9+/-291.1 N and peak power 3524.4+/-562 W. All the equations underestimated power, from 74% (Lewis) to 8% (Sayers). However, there were high and significant correlations between peak power measured on the force platform, and those assessed by the equations. The results of the present study support the development of power equations for specific populations, to achieve more accurate assessments. The power equation from this study [Power = (62.5 x jump height (cm)) + (50.3 x body mass (kg)) 2184.7] can be used accurately in populations of male physical education students.

  15. A Discussion of Students Understanding, Learning and Application of Theory of Science within Humanities and Social Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    when they learn a disciplinary area and in this context design strategies for investigations and project writing. Due to the massification of education and research (Gibbons 1998, 2005) in most universities the tendency is that science and research have become oriented towards practice, partnerships...... is to discuss the role of theory of science in teaching and learning in the actual university context. It is to be discussed why a discussion of ontological complexity is relevant for the understanding of scientific work for both the researcher of today and the academics which are to apply research strategies......: European Educational Research Journal, Volume 6, no. 2, 2007 Nowotny, H. Scott, P., Gibbons, M. (2011). Re-Thinking Science, Cambridge: Polity Press Wittgenstein, L. (1984). Philosophische Untersuchungen. I: Wittgenstein, L. Werkausgabe Band 1. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp....

  16. Applications of neural networks in environmental and energy sciences and engineering. Proceedings of the 1995 workshop on environmental and energy applications of neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    These proceedings contain edited versions of the technical presentations of the Workshop on Environmental and Energy Applications of Neural Networks, held on March 30--31, 1995, in Richland, Washington. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for discussing environmental, energy, and biomedical applications of neural networks. Panels were held to discuss various research and development issues relating to real-world applications in each of the three areas. The applications covered in the workshop were: Environmental applications -- modeling and predicting soil, air and water pollution, environmental sensing, spectroscopy, hazardous waste handling and cleanup; Energy applications -- process monitoring and optimization of power systems, modeling and control of power plants, environmental monitoring for power systems, power load forecasting, fault location and diagnosis of power systems; and Biomedical applications -- medical image and signal analysis, medical diagnosis, analysis of environmental health effects, and modeling biological systems. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. 5 CFR 5301.105 - Restrictions applicable to Members of the National Science Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... National Science Board. 5301.105 Section 5301.105 Administrative Personnel NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SUPPLEMENTAL STANDARDS OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR EMPLOYEES OF THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION § 5301.105...) by the Chairman of the National Science Board or by the Designated Agency Ethics Official. (3) A...

  18. Bridging the Gap Between Climate Science and Water-resource Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J. R.; Clark, M. P.; Wood, A.; Gutmann, E. D.; Nijssen, B.; Brekke, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Climate Preparedness and Resilience Program has supported development of a coordinated system of products and tools to improve use of climate information in water-resource planning and management. The key products include: 1) a new understanding of the limitations of methods used to quantify impacts of climate change on water resources; 2) development and evaluation of national-domain climate downscaling and hydrologic simulation capabilities to provide information from climate model output relevant to the multiple scales of water resources decision-making with a spatially consistent assessment of the impacts of climate change on hydrologic conditions; and 3) development and evaluation of advanced streamflow forecasting methods. This will support USACE Districts and their stakeholders and partners with new data, new and newly evaluated model output, and specific tools in a framework to help with routine applications for managing water resources throughout the U.S., and to enhance considerations of climate preparedness and resilience in that work. This presentation will summarize the collaborative development of some of those products; describe current and planned future USACE capabilities for incorporating advanced climate information at multiple scales of analysis and decision; discuss uses of climate information in water-resources planning and management; and outline key unanswered science questions being addressed to increase utility and use of information in short- and longer-term planning. Specifically, we will describe the current suite and planned trajectory of new products, moving from capability development through to testing in limited pilot domains, on to product applications throughout the U.S., and, ultimately, into actual implementation at the level of USACE Districts to address climate change issues. Two key foci of this talk will be: 1) where climatological and hydrologic science is currently

  19. Applications of wavelet-based compression to multidimensional earth science data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    A data compression algorithm involving vector quantization (VQ) and the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is applied to two different types of multidimensional digital earth-science data. The algorithm (WVQ) is optimized for each particular application through an optimization procedure that assigns VQ parameters to the wavelet transform subbands subject to constraints on compression ratio and encoding complexity. Preliminary results of compressing global ocean model data generated on a Thinking Machines CM-200 supercomputer are presented. The WVQ scheme is used in both a predictive and nonpredictive mode. Parameters generated by the optimization algorithm axe reported, as are signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements of actual quantized data. The problem of extrapolating hydrodynamic variables across the continental landmasses in order to compute the DWT on a rectangular grid is discussed. Results are also presented for compressing Landsat TM 7-band data using the WVQ scheme.The formulation of the optimization problem is presented along with SNR measurements of actual quantized data. Postprocessing applications are considered in which the seven spectral bands are clustered into 256 clusters using a k-means algorithm and analyzed using the Los Alamos multispectral data analysis program, SPECTRUM, both before and after being compressed using the WVQ program.

  20. Applications of wavelet-based compression to multidimensional earth science data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, J.N.; Brislawn, C.M.

    1993-02-01

    A data compression algorithm involving vector quantization (VQ) and the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) is applied to two different types of multidimensional digital earth-science data. The algorithm (WVQ) is optimized for each particular application through an optimization procedure that assigns VQ parameters to the wavelet transform subbands subject to constraints on compression ratio and encoding complexity. Preliminary results of compressing global ocean model data generated on a Thinking Machines CM-200 supercomputer are presented. The WVQ scheme is used in both a predictive and nonpredictive mode. Parameters generated by the optimization algorithm axe reported, as are signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements of actual quantized data. The problem of extrapolating hydrodynamic variables across the continental landmasses in order to compute the DWT on a rectangular grid is discussed. Results are also presented for compressing Landsat TM 7-band data using the WVQ scheme.The formulation of the optimization problem is presented along with SNR measurements of actual quantized data. Postprocessing applications are considered in which the seven spectral bands are clustered into 256 clusters using a k-means algorithm and analyzed using the Los Alamos multispectral data analysis program, SPECTRUM, both before and after being compressed using the WVQ program.

  1. A short course on functional equations based upon recent applications to the social and behavioral sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Aczél, J

    1987-01-01

    Recently I taught short courses on functional equations at several universities (Barcelona, Bern, Graz, Hamburg, Milan, Waterloo). My aim was to introduce the most important equations and methods of solution through actual (not artifi­ cial) applications which were recent and with which I had something to do. Most of them happened to be related to the social or behavioral sciences. All were originally answers to questions posed by specialists in the respective applied fields. Here I give a somewhat extended version of these lectures, with more recent results and applications included. As previous knowledge just the basic facts of calculus and algebra are supposed. Parts where somewhat more (measure theory) is needed and sketches of lengthier calcula­ tions are set in fine print. I am grateful to Drs. J. Baker (Waterloo, Ont.), W. Forg-Rob (Innsbruck, Austria) and C. Wagner (Knoxville, Tenn.) for critical remarks and to Mrs. Brenda Law for care­ ful computer-typing of the manuscript (in several versions). A...

  2. Encapsulins: microbial nanocompartments with applications in biomedicine, nanobiotechnology and materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessen, Tobias W

    2016-10-01

    Compartmentalization is one of the defining features of life. Cells use protein compartments to exert spatial control over their metabolism, store nutrients and create unique microenvironments needed for essential physiological processes. Encapsulins are a recently discovered class of protein nanocompartments found in bacteria and archaea that naturally encapsulate cargo proteins. A short C-terminal targeting sequence directs the highly specific encapsulation process in vivo. Here, I will initially discuss the properties, diversity and putative function of encapsulins. The unique characteristics and potential uses of the self-sorting cargo-packaging process found in encapsulin systems will then be highlighted. Examples for the application of encapsulins as cell-specific optical nanoprobes and targeted therapeutic delivery systems will be discussed with an emphasis on the ability to integrate multiple functionalities within a single nanodevice. By fusing targeting sequences to non-native proteins, encapsulins can also be used as specific nanocontainers and enzymatic nanoreactors in vivo. I will end by briefly discussing future avenues for encapsulin research related to both basic microbial metabolism and applications in biomedicine, catalysis and materials science. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rainfall simulators in hydrological and geomorphological sciences: benefits, applications and future research directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserloh, Thomas; Cerdà, Artemi; Fister, Wolfgang; Seitz, Steffen; Keesstra, Saskia; Green, Daniel; Gabriels, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall simulators are used extensively within the hydrological and geomorphological sciences and provide a useful investigative tool to understand many processes, such as: (i) plot-scale runoff, infiltration and erosion; (ii) irrigation and crop management, and; (iii) investigations into flooding within a laboratory setting. Although natural rainfall is desirable as it represents actual conditions in a given geographic location, data acquisition relying on natural rainfall is often hindered by its unpredictable nature. Furthermore, rainfall characteristics such as the intensity, duration, drop size distribution and kinetic energy cannot be spatially or temporally regulated or repeated between experimentation. Rainfall simulators provide a suitable method to overcome the issues associated with depending on potentially erratic and unpredictable natural rainfall as they allow: (i) multiple measurements to be taken quickly without waiting for suitable natural rainfall conditions; (ii) the simulation of spatially and/or temporally controlled rainfall patterns over a given plot area, and; (iii) the creation of a closed environment, allowing simplified measurement of input and output conditions. There is no standardisation of rainfall simulation and as such, rainfall simulators differ in their design, rainfall characteristics and research application. Although this impedes drawing meaningful comparisons between studies, this allows researchers to create a bespoke and tailored rainfall simulator for the specific research application. This paper summarises the rainfall simulators used in European research institutions (Universities of Trier, Valencia, Basel, Tuebingen, Wageningen, Loughborough and Ghent) to investigate a number of hydrological and geomorphological issues and includes details on the design specifications (such as the extent and characteristics of simulated rainfall), as well as a discussion of the purpose and application of the rainfall simulator.

  4. Quasi-experimental Methods in Empirical Regional Science and Policy Analysis – Is there a Scope for Application?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo; Paloyo, Alfredo R.; Alecke, Björn

    Applied econometrics has recently emphasized the identification of causal parameters for policy analysis. This revolution has yet to fully propagate to the field of regional science. We examine the scope for application of the matching approach – part of the modern applied econometrics toolkit...... – in regional science and highlight special features of regional data that make such an application difficult. In particular, our analysis of the effect of regional subsidies on labor-productivity growth in Germany indicates that such policies are effective, but only up to a certain maximum treatment intensity...... to be interpreted with some caution. The matching approach nevertheless can be of great value for regional policy analysis and should be the subject of future research efforts in the field of empirical regional science....

  5. Application in pesticide analysis: Liquid chromatography - A review of the state of science for biomarker discovery and identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book Chapter 18, titled Application in pesticide analysis: Liquid chromatography - A review of the state of science for biomarker discovery and identification, will be published in the book titled High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Pesticide Residue Analysis (Part of the C...

  6. Citizen Science for Earth Observation: Applications in Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotovirta, V.; Toivanen, T.; Tergujeff, R.; Hame, T.; Molinier, M.

    2015-04-01

    Citizen science is a promising way to increase temporal and spatial coverages of in-situ data, and to aid in data processing and analysis. In this paper, we present how citizen science can be used together with Earth observation, and demonstrate its value through three pilot projects focusing on forest biomass analysis, data management in emergencies and water quality monitoring. We also provide recommendations and ideas for follow-up activities. In the forest biomass analysis pilot, in the state of Durango (Mexico), local volunteers make in-situ forest inventory measurements with mobile devices. The collected data is combined with Landsat-8 imagery to derive forest biomass map of the area. The study area includes over 390 permanent sampling plots that will provide reference data for concept validation and verification. The emergency data management pilot focuses in the Philippines, in the areas affected by the typhoons Haiyan in November 2013 and Hagupit in December 2014. Data collected by emergency workers and citizens are combined with satellite data (Landsat-8, VHR if available) to intensify the disaster recovery activities and the coordination efforts. Simple processes for citizens, nongovernmental organisations and volunteers are developed to find and utilize up to date and freely available satellite imagery for coordination purposes and for building new not-for-profit services in disaster situations. In the water quality monitoring pilot, citizens around the Baltic Sea area contribute to the algae situation awareness by collecting algae observations using a mobile application. In-situ observations are compared with surface algal bloom products based on the satellite imagery, e.g. Aqua MODIS images with 500 meter resolution. As an outcome, the usability of the citizen observations together with satellite data in the algae monitoring will be evaluated.

  7. Principles of Gestalt Psychology and Their Application to Teaching Junior High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosser, Patricia E.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses insightful learning, trace system,'' and laws of perception and Pragnanz in connection with problem solving and critical thinking in science teaching. Suggests 19 guidelines for sequencing curriculum and identifying activities for use in science classes. (CC)

  8. Project, building and utilization of a tomograph of micro metric resolution to application in soil science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Alvaro; Torre Neto, Andre; Cruvinel, Paulo Estevao; Crestana, Silvio

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the project , building and utilization of a tomograph of micro metric resolution in soil science. It describes the problems involved in soil's science study and it describes the system and methodology

  9. Depictions of global environmental change in science fiction : an overview of educational applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadonaga, L. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). Dept. of Geography

    2000-06-01

    This paper examined how the use of science fiction books and movies can be used as a tool to educate the public. Narratives encourage interest in global environmental changes and can help demystify how science works. Although most science fiction depictions of global environmental change are outdated and oversimplified, the genre can encourage discussion of ecological and social impacts. Writers of science fiction consider both natural systems and human societies, anticipating the work of impacts researchers. It was argued that while both science fiction writers and global change researchers require knowledge and creativity to construct realistic extrapolations, a well-written science fiction book is likely to reach a larger audience. Science fiction books emphasize that climate projections are intended as warnings. If properly handled, they can improve public awareness of issues such as global warming and climatic change. It was suggested that collaboration between researchers and science fiction writers could produce some interesting work. 48 refs.

  10. [Activities of Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at ICASE in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, computer science, and structures and material sciences during the period April 1, 2000 through September 30, 2000.

  11. A new era in nuclear energy science. When will radiation application receive citizenship ranking along with energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabata, Yoneho; Tagawa, Seiichi; Saito, Naoki; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Japan has been obtaining definite results in these decades in both fields of nuclear power generation (energy utilization) and radiation application thus contributing to a sustainable development of the world. The present special issue of 'Atom Eye' introduces (1) Japanese achievements in cooperative relationships with developing countries in the field of radiation applications, (2) history of research and development of radiation-utilization techniques in Japan, (3) present status of quantum-beam applications in life-science, medial application, and nano-technology, etc, (4) applications of high-intensity neutron source, (5) cancer therapy using high-energy heavy-ion beams, (6) radiation sterilizations, (7) radiation mutations, (8) three interviewer's reports visiting several research institutes of radiation applications in Japan, and introduction of (9) a bencher enterprise and also (10) an accelerator business. (S. Ohno)

  12. Theme-Based Project Learning: Design and Application of Convergent Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Man-Seog; Kang, Kwang Il; Kim, Young H.; Kim, Young Mee

    2015-01-01

    This case study aims to verify the benefits of theme-based project learning for convergent science experiments. The study explores the possibilities of enhancing creative, integrated and collaborative teaching and learning abilities in science-gifted education. A convergent project-based science experiment program of physics, chemistry and biology…

  13. Creating a Coastal National Elevation Database (CoNED) for science and conservation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Cindy A.; Brock, John C.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Poppenga, Sandra K.; Gesch, Dean B.; Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Barras, John; Evans, Gayla A.; Gibbs, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is creating the Coastal National Elevation Database, an expanding set of topobathymetric elevation models that extend seamlessly across coastal regions of high societal or ecological significance in the United States that are undergoing rapid change or are threatened by inundation hazards. Topobathymetric elevation models are raster datasets useful for inundation prediction and other earth science applications, such as the development of sediment-transport and storm surge models. These topobathymetric elevation models are being constructed by the broad regional assimilation of numerous topographic and bathymetric datasets, and are intended to fulfill the pressing needs of decision makers establishing policies for hazard mitigation and emergency preparedness, coastal managers tasked with coastal planning compatible with predictions of inundation due to sea-level rise, and scientists investigating processes of coastal geomorphic change. A key priority of this coastal elevation mapping effort is to foster collaborative lidar acquisitions that meet the standards of the USGS National Geospatial Program's 3D Elevation Program, a nationwide initiative to systematically collect high-quality elevation data. The focus regions are located in highly dynamic environments, for example in areas subject to shoreline change, rapid wetland loss, hurricane impacts such as overwash and wave scouring, and/or human-induced changes to coastal topography.

  14. Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Ellen G.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Tierney, Geraldine L.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; Enquist, Carolyn A.F.; Guertin, Patricia; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Thomas, Kathryn A.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2014-01-01

    Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species’ phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological “status”, or the ability to track presence–absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

  15. Envisioning the Future of Aquatic Animal Tracking: Technology, Science, and Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennox, Robert J.; Aarestrup, Kim; Cooke, Steven J.; Cowley, Paul D.; Deng, Zhiqun D.; Fisk, Aaron T.; Harcourt, Robert G.; Heupel, Michelle; Hinch, Scott G.; Holland, Kim N.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Iverson, Sara J.; Kessel, Steven T.; Kocik, John F.; Lucas, Martyn C.; Flemming, Joanna Mills; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Stokesbury, Michael J. W.; Vagle, Svein; VanderZwaag, David L.; Whoriskey, Frederick G.; Young, Nathan

    2017-09-13

    Electronic tags have proven to be extremely useful for broadening our understanding of aquatic animals by answering diverse questions about their behaviours, physiologies, and life histories fundamental to ecology. Simultaneously, many applied conservation and management efforts are informed by animals tagged with electronic tags. In spite of the many advances in tracking software and hardware, an uncertain future in the world’s aquatic ecosystems portends great challenges for science. Aquatic animal tracking with electronic tags represents both the present and future of integrative biology and ecology in aquatic ecosystems. Here we identify what we regard as the future of aquatic animal tracking in a horizon scanning exercise. We submit that the future of aquatic animal tracking will include opportunities for multi-platform tracking systems for simultaneously monitoring position, activity, physiology, and microhabitat of animals, improved data collection and accessibility with new infrastructure (e.g. tags, receivers) and cyberinfrastructure, and integrated tagging information with animal traits derived from biopsy during tagging. We discuss parallel needs and opportunities in areas related to the application of animal tracking in the future such as knowledge mobilization and governance.

  16. Intermediate Photovoltaic System Application Experiment. Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts. Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the key results of the Phase II efforts for the Intermediate PV System Applications Experiment at the Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts (OCSA). This phase of the project involved fabrication, installation and integration of a nominal 140 kW flat panel PV system made up of large, square polycrystalline-silicon solar cell modules, each nominally 61 cm x 122 cm in size. The output of the PV modules, supplied by Solarex Corporation, was augmented, 1.35 to 1 at peak, by a row of glass reflectors, appropriately tilted northward. The PV system interfaces with the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Utility at the OCSA main switchgear. Any excess power generated by the system is fed into the utility under a one to one buyback arrangement. Except for a shortfall in the system output, presently suspected to be due to the poor performance of the modules, no serious problems were encountered. Certain value engineering changes implemented during construction and early operational failure events associated with the power conditioning system are also described. The system is currently undergoing extended testing and evaluation.

  17. Development of Cyclotron Beam Technology for Applications in Materials Science and Biotechnology at JAERI-TIARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.; Arakawa, K.; Fukuda, M.; Kamiya, T.; Kurashima, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Okumura, S.; Saidoh, M.; Tajima, S.

    2003-01-01

    Recent progress of cyclotron ion beam development for applications in materials science and biotechnology at the ion-irradiation research facility TIARA of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute(JAERI) is overviewed. The AVF cyclotron in TIARA can accelerate protons and heavy ions up to 90 MeV and 27.5 MeV/n, respectively. In order to conform to the requirement of a reliable tuning of microbeam formation, the cyclotron beam current has been stabilized by controlling the temperature of the magnet yoke and pole within +/-0.5 deg. and hence by decreasing the variation of the magnetic field ΔB/B below 10-5. A heavy ion microbeam with energy of hundreds MeV is a significantly useful probe for researches on biofunctional elucidation in biotechnology. Production of the microbeam with spot size as small as 1μm by quadrupole lenses requires the energy spread of the beam ΔE/E < 2 x 10-4. In order to minimize the energy spread of the cyclotron beam, the fifth-harmonic voltage waveform has been successfully superposed on the fundamental one to make energy gain uniform

  18. Microbial soil community analyses for forensic science: Application to a blind test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Schauser, Leif; Dawson, Lorna; Franqueville, Laure; Simonet, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Soil complexity, heterogeneity and transferability make it valuable in forensic investigations to help obtain clues as to the origin of an unknown sample, or to compare samples from a suspect or object with samples collected at a crime scene. In a few countries, soil analysis is used in matters from site verification to estimates of time after death. However, up to date the application or use of soil information in criminal investigations has been limited. In particular, comparing bacterial communities in soil samples could be a useful tool for forensic science. To evaluate the relevance of this approach, a blind test was performed to determine the origin of two questioned samples (one from the mock crime scene and the other from a 50:50 mixture of the crime scene and the alibi site) compared to three control samples (soil samples from the crime scene, from a context site 25m away from the crime scene and from the alibi site which was the suspect's home). Two biological methods were used, Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA), and 16S rRNA gene sequencing with Illumina Miseq, to evaluate the discriminating power of soil bacterial communities. Both techniques discriminated well between soils from a single source, but a combination of both techniques was necessary to show that the origin was a mixture of soils. This study illustrates the potential of applying microbial ecology methodologies in soil as an evaluative forensic tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescence from the maillard reaction and its potential applications in food science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiacevich, Silvia B; Santagapita, Patricio R; Buera, M Pilar

    2005-01-01

    The chemistry of the Maillard reaction involves a complex set of steps, and its interpretation represents a challenge in basic and applied aspects of Food Science. Fluorescent compounds have been recognized as important early markers of the reaction in food products since 1942. However, the recent advances in the characterization of fluorophores' development were observed in biological and biomedical areas. The in vivo non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins produces biological effects, promoting health deterioration. The characteristic fluorescence of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) is similar to that of Maillard food products and represents an indicator of the level of AGE-modified proteins, but the structure of the fluorescent groups is, typically, unknown. Application of fluorescence measurement is considered a potential tool for addressing key problems of food deterioration as an early marker or index of the damage of biomolecules. Fluorophores may be precursors of the brown pigments and/or end products. A general scheme of the Maillard reaction is proposed in this article, incorporating the pool concept. A correct interpretation of the effect of environmental and compositional conditions and their influences on the reaction kinetics may help to define the meaning of fluorescence development for each particular system.

  20. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Chemical Instabilities : Applications in Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, and Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Baras, F

    1984-01-01

    On March 14-18, 1983 a workshop on "Chemical Instabilities: Applications in Chemistry, Engineering, Geology, and Materials Science" was held in Austin, Texas, U.S.A. It was organized jointly by the University of Texas at Austin and the Universite Libre de Bruxelles and sponsored qy NATO, NSF, the University of Texas at Austin, the International Solvay Institutes and the Ex­ xon Corporation. The present Volume includes most of the material of the in­ vited lectures delivered in the workshop as well as material from some posters, whose content was directly related to the themes of the invited lectures. In ,recent years, problems related to the stability and the nonlinear dynamics of nonequilibrium systems invaded a great num­ ber of fields ranging from abstract mathematics to biology. One of the most striking aspects of this development is that subjects reputed to be "classical" and "well-established" like chemistry, turned out to give rise to a rich variety of phenomena leading to multiple steady states and...

  1. Nutrimetabonomics:applications for nutritional sciences, with specific reference to gut microbial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Sandrine P; Swann, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the role of the diet in determining human health and disease is one major objective of modern nutrition. Mammalian biocomplexity necessitates the incorporation of systems biology technologies into contemporary nutritional research. Metabonomics is a powerful approach that simultaneously measures the low-molecular-weight compounds in a biological sample, enabling the metabolic status of a biological system to be characterized. Such biochemical profiles contain latent information relating to inherent parameters, such as the genotype, and environmental factors, including the diet and gut microbiota. Nutritional metabonomics, or nutrimetabonomics, is being increasingly applied to study molecular interactions between the diet and the global metabolic system. This review discusses three primary areas in which nutrimetabonomics has enjoyed successful application in nutritional research: the illumination of molecular relationships between nutrition and biochemical processes; elucidation of biomarker signatures of food components for use in dietary surveillance; and the study of complex trans-genomic interactions between the mammalian host and its resident gut microbiome. Finally, this review illustrates the potential for nutrimetabonomics in nutritional science as an indispensable tool to achieve personalized nutrition.

  2. A highly rationalized procedure of neutron activation analysis for routine applications in dairy science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heine, K.; Wiechen, A.

    1976-01-01

    A rational procedure was developed for the multi-element analysis by neutron activation for applications in dairy science. The preparation of samples prior to irradiation consists of drying, weighing, and welding in quartz ampoules. The neutron flux, samples are exposed to during reactor irradiation , is determined by the mono-comparator technique for which the Co-content of a commercial aluminium foil was chosen as the flux monitor. Constancy of the Co-content and uncomplicated handling of the foil essentially simplify the determination of flux. The samples are irradiated for 72 h, dissolved in HNO 3 /H 2 SO 4 and measured in the liquid state after waiting times of 1-2, 4 and 8 weeks by a Ge(Li)-detector and a 4,096 channel spectrometer. The procedure was confirmed by investigations of the biological KALE standard and by participation in inter-comparisons of biological substances of the Analytical Quality Control Service of the IAEA for the analysis of the elements Na, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, Se, Rb, and Cs. So a procedure was developed suitable for routine multi-element analysis of biologic samples by optimizing and rationalizing all analytical steps. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Translating Knowledge: The role of Shared Learning in Bridging the Science-Application Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moench, M.

    2014-12-01

    As the organizers of this session state: "Understanding and managing our future relation with the Earth requires research and knowledge spanning diverse fields, and integrated, societally-relevant science that is geared toward solutions." In most cases, however, integration is weak and scientific outputs do not match decision maker requirements. As a result, while scientific results may be highly relevant to society that relevance is operationally far from clear. This paper explores the use of shared learning processes to bridge the gap between the evolving body of scientific information on climate change and its relevance for resilience planning in cities across Asia. Examples related to understanding uncertainty, the evolution of scientific knowledge from different sources, and data extraction and presentation are given using experiences generated over five years of work as part of the Rockefeller Foundation supported Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network and other programs. Results suggest that processes supporting effective translation of knowledge between different sources and different applications are essential for the identification of solutions that respond to the dynamics and uncertainties inherent in global change processes.

  4. Optimal Assignment Problem Applications of Finite Mathematics to Business and Economics. [and] Difference Equations with Applications. Applications of Difference Equations to Economics and Social Sciences. [and] Selected Applications of Mathematics to Finance and Investment. Applications of Elementary Algebra to Finance. [and] Force of Interest. Applications of Calculus to Finance. UMAP Units 317, 322, 381, 382.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, David; And Others

    Four units make up the contents of this document. The first examines applications of finite mathematics to business and economies. The user is expected to learn the method of optimization in optimal assignment problems. The second module presents applications of difference equations to economics and social sciences, and shows how to: 1) interpret…

  5. Other applications of neutron beams in material sciences; Autres utilisations des faisceaux de neutrons en science des materiaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novion, C.H. de

    1997-12-31

    The various applications of neutron beams are reviewed. The different mechanisms involved in neutron interaction with matter are explained. We notice that generally neutron radiation effects are unfavorable but can be turned into efficient tools to add new structures or properties to materials, silicon doping is an example. The basis principles of neutron activation analysis and neutron radiography are described. (A.C.)

  6. Measurement of Mars Analog Soil Dielectric Properties for Mars 2020 Radar Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decrossas, E.; Bell, D. J.; Jin, C.; Steinfeld, D.; Batres, J.

    2017-12-01

    On multiple solar system missions, radar instruments have been used to probe subsurface geomorphology and to infer chemical composition based on the dielectric signature derived from the reflected signal. One important planetary application is the identification of subsurface water ice at Mars. Low frequency, 15 MHz to 25 MHz, instruments like SHARAD have been used from Mars orbit to investigate subsurface features from 10's to 1000's of meters below the surface of Mars with a vertical resolution of 15m and a horizontal resolution of 300 to 3000 meters. SHARAD has been able to identify vast layers of CO2 and water ice. The ground-penetrating RIMFAX instrument that will ride on the back of the Mars 2020 rover will operate over the 150 MHz to 1200 MHz band and penetrate to a depth of 10 meters with a vertical resolution of 15 to 30 cm. RIMFAX will be able to identify near surface water ice if it exists below the travel path of the Mars 2020 rover. Identification of near surface water ice has science application to current and past Mars hydrologic processes and to the potential for finding remnants of past Mars biologic activity. Identification of near surface water ice also has application to future human missions that would benefit from access to a Mars local water source. Recently, JPL investigators have been pursuing a secondary use of telecom signals to capture bistatic radar signatures from subsurface areas surrounding the rover but away from its travel path. A particularly promising potential source would be the telecom signal from a proposed Mars Helicopter back to the Mars 2020 rover. The Mars 2020 rover will be equipped with up to three telecom subsystems. The Rover Relay telecom subsystem operates at UHF receiving at 435 MHz frequency. Anticipating opportunistic collection of near-surface bistatic radar signatures from telecom signals received at the rover, it is valuable to understand the dielectric properties of the Martian soil in each of these three

  7. PREFACE: International Symposium on Vacuum Science & Technology and its Application for Accelerators (IVS 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, V. S.; Pal, Gautam

    2012-11-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970 to promote vacuum science and technology in academic, industrial and R&D institutions in India. IVS is a member society of the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technique and Applications (IUVSTA). It has organized International and national symposia, short term courses and workshops on different aspects of Vacuum Science and Technology at regular intervals. So far 27 National symposia, 4 International Symposia and 47 courses have been organized at various locations in India. There has been an active participation from R&D establishments, universities and Indian industries during all these events. In view of the current global situation and emerging trends in vacuum technology, the executive committee of the IVS suggested to us that we organize an International Symposium at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata from 15-17 February 2012. At the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre we have a large number of high vacuum systems used in the K130 Cyclotron and K500 Superconducting Cyclotron. Also a large cryogenic system using LHe plant is in operation for cryopanels and a superconducting magnet for K-500 Cyclotron. The main areas covered at the symposium were the production and measurement of vacuums, leak detection, design and development of large vacuum systems, vacuum metallurgy, vacuum materials and the application of high vacuums in cyclotrons, LINACS and other accelerators. This symposium provided an opportunity for interaction between active researchers and technologists and allowed them to review the current situation, report recent experimental results, share the available expertise and consider the future R&D efforts needed in this area. Keeping the industrial significance of vacuum technology in mind, an exhibition of the vacuum related equipment, accessories, products etc by various suppliers and manufactures was organized alongside the symposium. Participation by a large number of exhibitors

  8. Applications of modern statistical methods to analysis of data in physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, James Eric

    Modern methods of statistical and computational analysis offer solutions to dilemmas confronting researchers in physical science. Although the ideas behind modern statistical and computational analysis methods were originally introduced in the 1970's, most scientists still rely on methods written during the early era of computing. These researchers, who analyze increasingly voluminous and multivariate data sets, need modern analysis methods to extract the best results from their studies. The first section of this work showcases applications of modern linear regression. Since the 1960's, many researchers in spectroscopy have used classical stepwise regression techniques to derive molecular constants. However, problems with thresholds of entry and exit for model variables plagues this analysis method. Other criticisms of this kind of stepwise procedure include its inefficient searching method, the order in which variables enter or leave the model and problems with overfitting data. We implement an information scoring technique that overcomes the assumptions inherent in the stepwise regression process to calculate molecular model parameters. We believe that this kind of information based model evaluation can be applied to more general analysis situations in physical science. The second section proposes new methods of multivariate cluster analysis. The K-means algorithm and the EM algorithm, introduced in the 1960's and 1970's respectively, formed the basis of multivariate cluster analysis methodology for many years. However, several shortcomings of these methods include strong dependence on initial seed values and inaccurate results when the data seriously depart from hypersphericity. We propose new cluster analysis methods based on genetic algorithms that overcomes the strong dependence on initial seed values. In addition, we propose a generalization of the Genetic K-means algorithm which can accurately identify clusters with complex hyperellipsoidal covariance

  9. Perception, Cognition, and Effectiveness of Visualizations with Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkin, Michelle A.

    Visualization is a powerful tool for data exploration and analysis. With data ever-increasing in quantity and becoming integrated into our daily lives, having effective visualizations is necessary. But how does one design an effective visualization? To answer this question we need to understand how humans perceive, process, and understand visualizations. Through visualization evaluation studies we can gain deeper insight into the basic perception and cognition theory of visualizations, both through domain-specific case studies as well as generalized laboratory experiments. This dissertation presents the results of four evaluation studies, each of which contributes new knowledge to the theory of perception and cognition of visualizations. The results of these studies include a deeper clearer understanding of how color, data representation dimensionality, spatial layout, and visual complexity affect a visualization's effectiveness, as well as how visualization types and visual attributes affect the memorability of a visualization. We first present the results of two domain-specific case study evaluations. The first study is in the field of biomedicine in which we developed a new heart disease diagnostic tool, and conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of 2D versus 3D data representations as well as color maps. In the second study, we developed a new visualization tool for filesystem provenance data with applications in computer science and the sciences more broadly. We additionally developed a new time-based hierarchical node grouping method. We then conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the new tool with its radial layout versus the conventional node-link diagram, and the new node grouping method. Finally, we discuss the results of two generalized studies designed to understand what makes a visualization memorable. In the first evaluation we focused on visualization memorability and conducted an online study using Amazon's Mechanical Turk with

  10. On the Application of Science Systems Engineering and Uncertainty Quantification for Ice Sheet Science and Sea Level Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Nicole-Jeanne; Boening, Carmen; Larour, Eric; Limonadi, Daniel; Schodlok, Michael; Seroussi, Helene; Watkins, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Research and development activities at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) currently support the creation of a framework to formally evaluate the observational needs within earth system science. One of the pilot projects of this effort aims to quantify uncertainties in global mean sea level rise projections, due to contributions from the continental ice sheets. Here, we take advantage of established uncertainty quantification tools embedded within the JPL-University of California at Irvine Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). We conduct sensitivity and Monte-Carlo style sampling experiments on forward simulations of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. By varying internal parameters and boundary conditions of the system over both extreme and credible worst-case ranges, we assess the impact of the different parameter ranges on century-scale sea level rise projections. The results inform efforts to a) isolate the processes and inputs that are most responsible for determining ice sheet contribution to sea level; b) redefine uncertainty brackets for century-scale projections; and c) provide a prioritized list of measurements, along with quantitative information on spatial and temporal resolution, required for reducing uncertainty in future sea level rise projections. Results indicate that ice sheet mass loss is dependent on the spatial resolution of key boundary conditions - such as bedrock topography and melt rates at the ice-ocean interface. This work is performed at and supported by the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Supercomputing time is also supported through a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cryosphere program.

  11. 14C accelerator mass spectrometry - applications in archaeology, biomedicine and in the atmospheric sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.

    1990-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is superior to all other analytical techniques in its detection sensitivity of radiocarbon ( 14 C). It has therefore influenced or even laid down the foundations for applications in many fields of science. In the current work, various applications of 14 C AMS are presented through published articles for which the measurements were performed at the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator (VERA). These articles are embedded into an in-depth discussion about characteristic features of the respective fields, emphasizing the broad range of issues which need to be considered in interdisciplinary research. In archaeology new 14 C dates on equipment of the Iceman ('Oetzi'), the world's oldest intact mummy, show reasonable agreement with dates previously obtained on the Iceman himself (3360-3100 BC). However, several botanical remains from the finding place clearly belong to other time periods, indicating that the discovery site of Oetzi has been used as a mountain pass 1500 yr earlier and also 2000 yr later. Dating on spruce logs from the world's oldest salt mines at Hallstatt, Austria provide evidence that salt mining started 1-2 centuries earlier than previously supposed, i.e. in the 14th to the 13th century BC. Recently, Bayesian mathematics is a frequently used tool in calibrating radiocarbon data. So-called vague or non-informative priors employed in this method may cause severe problems as shown by extensive computer simulations. In biomedicine problems in toxicology and in forensic medicine were investigated. Heterocyclic amines (HAs) are probably the epidemiologically most relevant class of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances since they are produced naturally in cooking protein-rich food. A study of 14 C labeled HAs (MeIQx and PhIP) in rodents and humans, one of the first studies using 14 C-labeled mutagens also in healthy human volunteers, severely calls in question the validity of animal models for assessing heterocyclic

  12. Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors (Workshop Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, RE

    2004-07-15

    The ''Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors'' was convened to determine the degree to which an increased effort in modeling and simulation could help bridge the gap between the data that is needed to support the implementation of these advanced nuclear technologies and the data that can be obtained in available experimental facilities. The need to develop materials capable of performing in the severe operating environments expected in fusion and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range of potential Gen-IV fission reactor design concepts and each concept has its own unique demands. Improved economic performance is a major goal of the Gen-IV designs. As a result, most designs call for significantly higher operating temperatures than the current generation of LWRs to obtain higher thermal efficiency. In many cases, the desired operating temperatures rule out the use of the structural alloys employed today. The very high operating temperature (up to 1000 C) associated with the NGNP is a prime example of an attractive new system that will require the development of new structural materials. Fusion power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application. The operating temperatures, neutron exposure levels and thermo-mechanical stresses are comparable to or greater than those for proposed Gen-IV fission reactors. In addition, the transmutation products created in the structural materials by the high energy neutrons produced in the DT plasma can profoundly influence the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of these materials. Although the workshop addressed issues relevant to both Gen-IV and fusion reactor materials, much of the discussion focused on fusion; the same focus is reflected in this report. Most of the physical models and computational methods

  13. A service for the application of data quality information to NASA earth science satellite records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Xing, Z.; Fry, C.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Huang, T.; Chen, G.; Chin, T. M.; Alarcon, C.

    2016-12-01

    A recurring demand in working with satellite-based earth science data records is the need to apply data quality information. Such quality information is often contained within the data files as an array of "flags", but can also be represented by more complex quality descriptions such as combinations of bit flags, or even other ancillary variables that can be applied as thresholds to the geophysical variable of interest. For example, with Level 2 granules from the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) project up to 6 independent variables could be used to screen the sea surface temperature measurements on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Quality screening of Level 3 data from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) instrument can be become even more complex, involving 161 unique bit states or conditions a user can screen for. The application of quality information is often a laborious process for the user until they understand the implications of all the flags and bit conditions, and requires iterative approaches using custom software. The Virtual Quality Screening Service, a NASA ACCESS project, is addressing these issues and concerns. The project has developed an infrastructure to expose, apply, and extract quality screening information building off known and proven NASA components for data extraction and subset-by-value, data discovery, and exposure to the user of granule-based quality information. Further sharing of results through well-defined URLs and web service specifications has also been implemented. The presentation will focus on overall description of the technologies and informatics principals employed by the project. Examples of implementations of the end-to-end web service for quality screening with GHRSST and SMAP granules will be demonstrated.

  14. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  15. An Innovative Approach to Effective Climate Science Application through Stakeholder Participation in Great Plains Grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athearn, N.; Broska, J.

    2015-12-01

    For natural resource managers and other Great Plains stakeholders, climate uncertainties further confound decision-making on a highly altered landscape. Partner organizations comprising the Great Plains Landscape Conservation Cooperative (GPLCC) acknowledge climate change as a high-priority threat to grasslands and associated habitats, affecting water availability, species composition, and other factors. Despite its importance, incorporation of climate change impacts into planning is hindered by high uncertainty and lack of translation to a tangible outcome: effects on species and their habitats. In 2014, the GPLCC initiated a Landscape Conservation Design (LCD) process to ultimately improve the size and connectivity of grasslands - informing land managers of the landscape-scale impacts of local decisions about where to restore, enhance, protect, and develop lands. Defining this goal helped stakeholders envision a tangible product. High resolution land cover data recently completed for Texas and Oklahoma represent current grassland locations. By focusing climate change models to project changes in these land cover datasets, resulting land cover projections can be directly incorporated into LCD-based models to focus restoration where future climates will support grasslands. Broad organizational cooperation has been critical for this USGS-led project, which uses downscaled climate data and other support from the South Central Climate Science Center Consortium and builds on existing work including LCD efforts of the Playa Lakes Joint Venture and the Bureau of Land Management's Southern Great Plains Rapid Ecological Assessment. Ongoing stakeholder guidance through an advisory team ensures effective application of a product that will be both relevant to and understood by decision makers, for whom the primary role of research is to reduce uncertainties and clear the path for more efficient decision-making in the face of climatic uncertainty.

  16. The TPAC Digital Library: A Web Application for Publishing Large Catalogs of Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, P.; Pugh, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Tasmanian Partnership for Advanced Computing (TPAC) has developed a rich web-based application that publishes large catalogs of scientific datasets. The TPAC Digital Library provides a user interface for viewing, searching, and accessing the catalog data collections, as well as enabling data services for user access. The product also provides management functions for librarians of digital data collections. The search features allow files to be selected graphically based on geospatial extent, or by file name, variable name, attribute value, and by tag. Alternatively, there is a file manager style interface that provides a direct route to the data. The interface is specifically geared towards discovery and access of earth science data files, which makes it intuitive and easy to navigate. Files can be downloaded, or accessed through OPeNDAP, GridFTP, WCS, Matlab and other interfaces. The digital library can harvest metadata from THREDDS, Hyrax, IPCC catalogs and other instances of the digital library. The product is freely available under an open-source license, and is currently deployed by a small but active user base. It has existed since 2005, and remains under constant development by TPAC and other contributors (including the Australian Bureau of Meteorology). Current development initiatives will allow interoperability with library service protocols, as well as other data archive organizations and scientific bodies for data reference transparency. There is a project in progress that will allow the data collection’s owner to attach attribute information, access rights, and meta-data to the data collection to conform to various user community and service standards. Future releases will allow publishers to attach media rich information about the data collection, as well as additional information about scientific results, and papers and web pages that reference the data collection. The presentation will discuss the current implementation, and future directions.

  17. RIMS: An Integrated Mapping and Analysis System with Applications to Earth Sciences and Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, A. A.; Glidden, S.; Shiklomanov, A. I.; Lammers, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    A web-based information and computational system for analysis of spatially distributed Earth system, climate, and hydrologic data have been developed. The System allows visualization, data exploration, querying, manipulation and arbitrary calculations with any loaded gridded or vector polygon dataset. The system's acronym, RIMS, stands for its core functionality as a Rapid Integrated Mapping System. The system can be deployed for a Global scale projects as well as for regional hydrology and climatology studies. In particular, the Water Systems Analysis Group of the University of New Hampshire developed the global and regional (Northern Eurasia, pan-Arctic) versions of the system with different map projections and specific data. The system has demonstrated its potential for applications in other fields of Earth sciences and education. The key Web server/client components of the framework include (a) a visualization engine built on Open Source libraries (GDAL, PROJ.4, etc.) that are utilized in a MapServer; (b) multi-level data querying tools built on XML server-client communication protocols that allow downloading map data on-the-fly to a client web browser; and (c) data manipulation and grid cell level calculation tools that mimic desktop GIS software functionality via a web interface. Server side data management of the system is designed around a simple database of dataset metadata facilitating mounting of new data to the system and maintaining existing data in an easy manner. RIMS contains "built-in" river network data that allows for query of upstream areas on-demand which can be used for spatial data aggregation and analysis of sub-basin areas. RIMS is an ongoing effort and currently being used to serve a number of websites hosting a suite of hydrologic, environmental and other GIS data.

  18. Some applications of perturbed angular correlation and positron annihilation to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shengyun Zhu; Yongnan Zheng; Yi Zuo; Dongmei Zhou; Daqing Yuan; Anli Li; Zhiqiang Wang; Xiao Duan; Meng Liu; Yong Li

    2007-01-01

    The perturbed angular correlation (PAC) and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) that use nuclear probes to characterize the micro-structure of materials are briefly described. Three examples are given to show their partial applications. The first example is the study of radiation damage in Si irradiated by fast neutrons of 1.45 x 10 20 cm -2 and 178 W heavy ions of 5 x 10 11 cm -2 , respectively. The PAC and PAS measurements all show that the monovacancy-oxygen complexes and divacancies and divacancy-oxygen complexes were produced by the irradiations, and quadrivacancies and quadrivacancy-oxygen complexes were formed during thermal annealing. The second one illustrates the investigation of high T c superconductivity for YBaCuO. The PAS experiment found the charge transfer during the superconducting transition. The PAC measurement suggested a transition of two- to one-dimensional Cu-O-Cu chain structure at the superconducting transition temperature T c , which favors the charge transfer from the CuO layer to the CuO chain in YBaCuO. The third one is for investigating the hydrogen behavior in Pd 0.75 Ag 0.25 -H x as functions of temperature from 77 K to RT and hydrogen concentration (x) from 0 to 35 at.%. The PAC and PAS results exhibit that hydrogen atoms are congregated into the hydrogen bubbles and the hydrogen bubbles grow with the increasing of the hydrogen concentration in Pd 0.75 Ag 0.25 -H x . These examples demonstrate that the PAC and PAS techniques are very sensitive and powerful tools in materials science, which can well investigate phenomena in materials on atomic scale. (author)

  19. Superradiant terahertz sources and their applications in accelerator diagnostics and ultra-fast science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Bertram

    2017-04-28

    The terahertz (THz) frequency range lies between the frequency range of radio and infrared. The exact limits are not well defined and depend on the scientific community. The most recent ''2017 Terahertz Science and Technology Roadmap'' sets the THz frequency range to between 0.1 and 30 THz. The development of suitable detectors, detection techniques, and sources for this frequency range has seen tremendous progress over the past decade. The arrival of commercial femtosecond (fs) laser systems has enabled new, background-free THz time domain spectroscopy, and both laser-driven and accelerator-driven THz sources are currently producing pulse energies in the μJ, and even mJ, range. This thesis describes the characterization of a new class of accelerator-based light sources, which open up opportunities to provide a unique combination of high pulse energies and high repetition rates. The foreseen applications of these types of sources, coined ''superradiant THz sources'', lie in the area of time-resolved (nonlinear) spectroscopy. One of the first results of this thesis is the observation that the THz pulses from the prototype facility TELBE exhibit large pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in arrivaltime and intensity. These types of instabilities render the intended applications of TELBE for real-world nonlinear THz spectroscopy experiments impossible. As part of this thesis a pulse resolved data acquisition and analysis scheme has therefore been devised which enables the correction of these instabilities and now allows performance of time-resolved THz spectroscopy measurements with sub-30 femtosecond (fs) (FHWM) time resolution with excellent dynamic range up to 106. The thesis is organized as follows: the first chapter introduces the fundamental principles and techniques utilized in this work. The second chapter presents the results, starting with the diagnostic developments, followed by a thorough characterization of the THz source

  20. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, A.; Limaye, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula's "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA's SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT's experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  1. High Temperature, Controlled-Atmosphere Aerodynamic Levitation Experiments with Applications in Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macris, C. A.; Badro, J.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The aerodynamic levitation laser apparatus is an instrument in which spherical samples are freely floated on top of a stream of gas while being heated with a CO2laser to temperatures up to about 3500 °C. Laser heated samples, ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.5 mm diameter, can be levitated in a variety of chemically active or inert atmospheres in a gas-mixing chamber (e.g., Hennet et al. 2006; Pack et al. 2010). This allows for containerless, controlled-atmosphere, high temperature experiments with potential for applications in earth and planetary science. A relatively new technique, aerodynamic levitation has been used mostly for studies of the physical properties of liquids at high temperatures (Kohara et al. 2011), crystallization behavior of silicates and oxides (Arai et al. 2004), and to prepare glasses from compositions known to crystallize upon quenching (Tangeman et al. 2001). More recently, however, aerodynamic levitation with laser heating has been used as an experimental technique to simulate planetary processes. Pack et al. (2010) used levitation and melting experiments to simulate chondrule formation by using Ar-H2 as the flow gas, thus imposing a reducing atmosphere, resulting in reduction of FeO, Fe2O3, and NiO to metal alloys. Macris et al. (2015) used laser heating with aerodynamic levitation to reproduce the textures and diffusion profiles of major and minor elements observed in impact ejecta from the Australasian strewn field, by melting a powdered natural tektite mixed with 60-100 μm quartz grains on a flow of pure Ar gas. These experiments resulted in quantitative modeling of Si and Al diffusion, which allowed for interpretations regarding the thermal histories of natural tektites and their interactions with the surrounding impact vapor plume. Future experiments will employ gas mixing (CO, CO2, H2, O, Ar) in a controlled atmosphere levitation chamber to explore the range of fO2applicable to melt-forming impacts on other rocky planetary bodies

  2. Applications of synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence technique in materials science-possibilities at INDUS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Manoj K.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy has seen remarkable progress over the last few decades. Numerous applications in basic and applied sciences demonstrate its importance. Various advantages of XRF technique have motivated us to construct a microfocus XRF beamline (BL-16) on Indus-2 national synchrotron radiation facility. The BL-16 beamline offers a wide range of usages - both from research laboratories and industries; and for researchers working in diverse fields. Apart from the fields of pure sciences like physics and chemistry, the beamline provides an attractive platform to exercise material science applications, interdisciplinary applied sciences like medical, forensic and environmental studies etc. In addition to micro-XRF characterization, BL-16 beamline allows a user to perform studies using other advanced synchrotron based experimental methodologies, viz; grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis, chemical speciation, near-edge absorption spectroscopy and X-ray reflectivity studies of thin layered materials etc. The combined XRR-GIXRF analysis feature of the BL-16 beamline offers a novel capability to perform GIXRF assisted depth resolved X-ray studies to investigate chemical state and electronic structure of the thin nano-structured materials. The design aspects and various salient features of the BL-16 beamline X-ray reflectometer will be presented along with the measured performance. (author)

  3. Recent applications of harmonic analysis to function spaces, differential equations, and data science novel methods in harmonic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gia, Quoc; Mayeli, Azita; Mhaskar, Hrushikesh; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2017-01-01

    The second of a two volume set on novel methods in harmonic analysis, this book draws on a number of original research and survey papers from well-known specialists detailing the latest innovations and recently discovered links between various fields. Along with many deep theoretical results, these volumes contain numerous applications to problems in signal processing, medical imaging, geodesy, statistics, and data science. The chapters within cover an impressive range of ideas from both traditional and modern harmonic analysis, such as: the Fourier transform, Shannon sampling, frames, wavelets, functions on Euclidean spaces, analysis on function spaces of Riemannian and sub-Riemannian manifolds, Fourier analysis on manifolds and Lie groups, analysis on combinatorial graphs, sheaves, co-sheaves, and persistent homologies on topological spaces. Volume II is organized around the theme of recent applications of harmonic analysis to function spaces, differential equations, and data science, covering topics such a...

  4. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Science Applications Program: Exploring Partnerships to Enhance Decision Making in Public Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Timi S.; Venezia, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Earth Science Enterprise is engaged in applications of NASA Earth science and remote sensing technologies for public health. Efforts are focused on establishing partnerships with those agencies and organizations that have responsibility for protecting the Nation's Health. The program's goal is the integration of NASA's advanced data and technology for enhanced decision support in the areas of disease surveillance and environmental health. A focused applications program, based on understanding partner issues and requirements, has the potential to significantly contribute to more informed decision making in public health practice. This paper intends to provide background information on NASA's investment in public health and is a call for partnership with the larger practice community.

  5. Controversy in Biology Classrooms—Citizen Science Approaches to Evolution and Applications to Climate Change Discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A. Yoho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological sciences encompass topics considered controversial by the American public, such as evolution and climate change. We believe that the development of climate change education in the biology classroom is better informed by an understanding of the history of the teaching of evolution. A common goal for science educators should be to engender a greater respect for and appreciation of science among students while teaching specific content knowledge. Citizen science has emerged as a viable yet underdeveloped method for engaging students of all ages in key scientific issues that impact society through authentic data-driven scientific research. Where successful, citizen science may open avenues of communication and engagement with the scientific process that would otherwise be more difficult to achieve. Citizen science projects demonstrate versatility in education and the ability to test hypotheses by collecting large amounts of often publishable data. We find a great possibility for science education research in the incorporation of citizen science projects in curriculum, especially with respect to “hot topics” of socioscientific debate based on our review of the findings of other authors.

  6. Application of the Reggio Emilia Approach to Early Childhood Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegelin, Dolores A.

    2003-01-01

    This article focuses on the relevance of the Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education for science knowledge and content standards for the preK-12 student population. The article includes: (1) a summary of key concepts; (2) a description of the science curriculum standards for K-3 in the United States; and (3) an example of an in-depth…

  7. Diagnosing Competency Mastery in Science: An Application of GDM to TIMSS 2011 Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabiri, Masoud; Ghazi-Tabatabaei, Mahmood; Bazargan, Abbas; Shokoohi-Yekta, Mohsen; Kharrazi, Kamal

    2017-01-01

    Numerous diagnostic studies have been conducted on large-scale assessments to illustrate the students' mastery profile in the areas of math and reading; however, for science a limited number of investigations are reported. This study investigated Iranian eighth graders' competency mastery of science and examined the utility of the General…

  8. Monolithic photonic integration for visible and short near-infrared wavelengths: technologies and platforms for bio and life science applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Marco A. G.; Artundo, Iñigo; Domenech, J. David; Geuzebroek, Douwe; Sunarto, Rino; Hoofman, Romano

    2018-04-01

    This tutorial aims to provide a general overview on the state-of-the-art of photonic integrated circuits (PICs) in the visible and short near-infrared (NIR) wavelength ranges, mostly focusing in silicon nitride (SiN) substrates, and a guide to the necessary steps in the design toward the fabrication of such PICs. The focus is put on bio- and life sciences, given the adequacy and, thus, a large number of applications in this field.

  9. Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) for Large-Scale Science Applications (COMMON)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokkarane, Vinod [University of Massachusetts

    2013-09-01

    We intend to implement a Coordinated Multi-layer Multi-domain Optical Network (COMMON) Framework for Large-scale Science Applications. In the COMMON project, specific problems to be addressed include 1) anycast/multicast/manycast request provisioning, 2) deployable OSCARS enhancements, 3) multi-layer, multi-domain quality of service (QoS), and 4) multi-layer, multidomain path survivability. In what follows, we outline the progress in the above categories (Year 1, 2, and 3 deliverables).

  10. Applications of neural networks to real-time data processing at the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Kangas, L.J.

    1993-06-01

    Detailed design of the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is nearing completion and construction is scheduled to begin later this year. This facility will assist in the environmental restoration and waste management mission at the Hanford Site. This paper identifies several real-time data processing applications within the EMSL where neural networks can potentially be beneficial. These applications include real-time sensor data acquisition and analysis, spectral analysis, process control, theoretical modeling, and data compression

  11. A brief history of the most remarkable numbers e, i and γ in mathematical sciences with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Lokenath

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with a brief history of the most remarkable Euler numbers e, i and γ in mathematical sciences. Included are many properties of the constants e, i and γ and their applications in algebra, geometry, physics, chemistry, ecology, business and industry. Special attention is given to the growth and decay phenomena in many real-world problems including stability and instability of their solutions. Some specific and modern applications of logarithms, complex numbers and complex exponential functions to electrical circuits and mechanical systems are presented with examples. Included are the use of complex numbers and complex functions in the description and analysis of chaos and fractals with the aid of modern computer technology. In addition, the phasor method is described with examples of applications in engineering science. The major focus of this paper is to provide basic information through historical approach to mathematics teaching and learning of the fundamental knowledge and skills required for students and teachers at all levels so that they can understand the concepts of mathematics, and mathematics education in science and technology.

  12. Science of Signatures Workshop on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) Applications July 24, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickmott, Donald D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Riciputi, Lee D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    The science of signatures focus areas are: (1) Radiological and Nuclear; (2) Chemical and Materials (including explosives); (3) Biological - Signatures of Disease and Health; (4) Energy; (5) Climate; and (6) Space.

  13. Partial Support of Meeting of the Board on Mathematical Sciences and Their Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidman, Scott [National Academy of Sciences, Washington DC (United States)

    2014-08-31

    During the performance period, BMSA released the following major reports: Transforming Combustion Research through Cyberinfrastructure (2011); Assessing the Reliability of Complex Models: Mathematical and Statistical Foundations of Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification (2012); Fueling Innovation and Discovery: The Mathematical Sciences in the 21st Century (2012); Aging and the Macroeconomy: Long-Term Implications of an Older Population (2012); The Mathematical Sciences in 2025 (2013); Frontiers in Massive Data Analysis (2013); and Developing a 21st Century Global Library for Mathematics Research (2014).

  14. Earth Science Data Usages & Diverse Applications based on “User Tickets” at GES DISC

    OpenAIRE

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Greene, Mary; Acker, James; Lei, Guang-Dih; Al-Jazrawi, Atheer F.; Meyer, David J.

    2018-01-01

    Motivation: Arguably the most renowned anecdote in the history of science could be: Young Isaac Newton was hit on his head by a falling apple (the Data!) when he sat in his garden, which inspired Newton’s brilliant insight and his eventual understanding and demonstrating of gravitational force (the Science!). This well-known coupling of “Data & Science” was the trigger for this “data analysis” study. Background: This “Data & Science” analysis was mainly based on avai...

  15. Fault Tolerance and Scaling in e-Science Cloud Applications: Observations from the Continuing Development of MODISAzure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jie [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Humphrey, Marty [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Cheah, You-Wei [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Ryu, Youngryel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management; Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Jackson, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van Ingen, Catharine [Microsoft Research. San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-04-01

    It can be natural to believe that many of the traditional issues of scale have been eliminated or at least greatly reduced via cloud computing. That is, if one can create a seemingly wellfunctioning cloud application that operates correctly on small or moderate-sized problems, then the very nature of cloud programming abstractions means that the same application will run as well on potentially significantly larger problems. In this paper, we present our experiences taking MODISAzure, our satellite data processing system built on the Windows Azure cloud computing platform, from the proof-of-concept stage to a point of being able to run on significantly larger problem sizes (e.g., from national-scale data sizes to global-scale data sizes). To our knowledge, this is the longest-running eScience application on the nascent Windows Azure platform. We found that while many infrastructure-level issues were thankfully masked from us by the cloud infrastructure, it was valuable to design additional redundancy and fault-tolerance capabilities such as transparent idempotent task retry and logging to support debugging of user code encountering unanticipated data issues. Further, we found that using a commercial cloud means anticipating inconsistent performance and black-box behavior of virtualized compute instances, as well as leveraging changing platform capabilities over time. We believe that the experiences presented in this paper can help future eScience cloud application developers on Windows Azure and other commercial cloud providers.

  16. The Illustrated Wavelet Transform Handbook: Introductory Theory and Applications in Science, Engineering, Medicine and Finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kingsbury, J Ng and N G

    2004-01-01

    treatment on finance touches on the use of wavelets by other authors in studying stock prices, commodity behaviour, market dynamics and foreign exchange rates. The treatment on geophysics covers what was omitted from the fourth chapter, namely, seismology, well logging, topographic feature analysis and the analysis of climatic data. The text concludes with an assortment of other application areas which could only be mentioned in passing. Unlike most other publications in the subject, this book does not treat wavelet transforms in a mathematically rigorous manner but rather aims to explain the mechanics of the wavelet transform in a way that is easy to understand. Consequently, it serves as an excellent overview of the subject rather than as a reference text. Keeping the mathematics to a minimum and omitting cumbersome and detailed proofs from the text, the book is best-suited to those who are new to wavelets or who want an intuitive understanding of the subject. Such an audience may include graduate students in engineering and professionals and researchers in engineering and the applied sciences. (book review)

  17. Number Theory in Science and Communication With Applications in Cryptography, Physics, Digital Information, Computing, and Self-Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    "Number Theory in Science and Communication" is a well-known introduction for non-mathematicians to this fascinating and useful branch of applied mathematics . It stresses intuitive understanding rather than abstract theory and highlights important concepts such as continued fractions, the golden ratio, quadratic residues and Chinese remainders, trapdoor functions, pseudoprimes and primitive elements. Their applications to problems in the real world are one of the main themes of the book. This revised fifth edition is augmented by recent advances in coding theory, permutations and derangements and a chapter in quantum cryptography. From reviews of earlier editions – "I continue to find [Schroeder’s] Number Theory a goldmine of valuable information. It is a marvellous book, in touch with the most recent applications of number theory and written with great clarity and humor.’ Philip Morrison (Scientific American) "A light-hearted and readable volume with a wide range of applications to which the author ha...

  18. [Applications and approved projects on traditional Chinese medicine in National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hong-cai; Huang, Jin-ling; Han, Li-wei; Pei, Ling-peng; Guo, Lin; Lin, Na; Wang, Chang-en

    2011-10-01

    In this article, the authors firstly summarized the number of applications submitted to and projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in the field of traditional Chinese medicine research in 2010. Then they described the district distribution, research direction layout and allotment of the approved projects in the three primary disciplines (traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese materia medica and integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine) and their 43 subdisciplines. The targeting suggestions for improvement were given respectively by concluding the reason of disapproved projects from the point of view of applicants and supporting institution, and by stating the common problems existing in the review process from the perspectives of fund managers and evaluation experts. Lastly, the major funding fields in the near future were predicted in the hope of providing guidance for applicants.

  19. Constructing an AIRS Climatology for Data Visualization and Analysis to Serve the Climate Science and Application Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Keim, Elaine; Hearty, Thomas J.; Wei, Jennifer; Savtchenko, Andrey; Theobald, Michael; Vollmer, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is the home of processing, archiving, and distribution services for NASA sounders: the present Aqua AIRS mission and the succeeding SNPP CrIS mission. The AIRS mission is entering its 15th year of global observations of the atmospheric state, including temperature and humidity profiles, outgoing longwave radiation, cloud properties, and trace gases. The GES DISC, in collaboration with the AIRS Project, released product from the version 6 algorithm in early 2013. Giovanni, a Web-based application developed by the GES DISC, provides a simple and intuitive way to visualize, analyze, and access vast amounts of Earth science remote sensing data without having to download the data. Most important variables from version 6 AIRS product are available in Giovanni. We are developing a climatology product using 14-year AIRS retrievals. The study can be a good start for the long term climatology from NASA sounders: the AIRS and the succeeding CrIS. This presentation will show the impacts to the climatology product from different aggregation methods. The climatology can serve climate science and application communities in data visualization and analysis, which will be demonstrated using a variety of functions in version 4 Giovanni. The highlights of these functions include user-defined monthly and seasonal climatology, inter annual seasonal time series, anomaly analysis.

  20. Organizational and training factors that promote team science: A qualitative analysis and application of theory to the National Institutes of Health's BIRCWH career development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Jeanne-Marie; Winter, Susan; Fiore, Stephen M; Regensteiner, Judith G; Nagel, Joan

    2017-04-01

    Research organizations face challenges in creating infrastructures that cultivates and sustains interdisciplinary team science. The objective of this paper is to identify structural elements of organizations and training that promote team science. We qualitatively analyzed the National Institutes of Health's Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health, K12 using organizational psychology and team science theories to identify organizational design factors for successful team science and training. Seven key design elements support team science: (1) semiformal meta-organizational structure, (2) shared context and goals, (3) formal evaluation processes, (4) meetings to promote communication, (5) role clarity in mentoring, (6) building interpersonal competencies among faculty and trainees, and (7) designing promotion and tenure and other organizational processes to support interdisciplinary team science. This application of theory to a long-standing and successful program provides important foundational elements for programs and institutions to consider in promoting team science.

  1. On the Large-Scaling Issues of Cloud-based Applications for Earth Science Dat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, H.

    2016-12-01

    Next generation science data systems are needed to address the incoming flood of data from new missions such as NASA's SWOT and NISAR where its SAR data volumes and data throughput rates are order of magnitude larger than present day missions. Existing missions, such as OCO-2, may also require high turn-around time for processing different science scenarios where on-premise and even traditional HPC computing environments may not meet the high processing needs. Additionally, traditional means of procuring hardware on-premise are already limited due to facilities capacity constraints for these new missions. Experiences have shown that to embrace efficient cloud computing approaches for large-scale science data systems requires more than just moving existing code to cloud environments. At large cloud scales, we need to deal with scaling and cost issues. We present our experiences on deploying multiple instances of our hybrid-cloud computing science data system (HySDS) to support large-scale processing of Earth Science data products. We will explore optimization approaches to getting best performance out of hybrid-cloud computing as well as common issues that will arise when dealing with large-scale computing. Novel approaches were utilized to do processing on Amazon's spot market, which can potentially offer 75%-90% costs savings but with an unpredictable computing environment based on market forces.

  2. Science cafés. Cross-cultural adaptation and educational applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Norton

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Tokyo Institute of Technology (TokyoTech has been developing a number of methodologies to teach graduate students the theory and practice of science communication since 2005. One of the tools used is the science café, where students are taught about the background based primarily on theoretical models developed in the UK. They then apply that knowledge and adapt it the Japanese cultural context and plan, execute and review outcomes as part of their course. In this paper we review 4 years of experience in using science cafés in this educational context; we review the background to the students’ decision-making and consensus-building process towards deciding on the style and subject to be used, and the value this has in illuminating the cultural influences on the science café design and implementation. We also review the value of the science café as an educational tool and conclude that it has contributed to a number of teaching goals related to both knowledge and the personal skills required to function effectively in an international environment.

  3. Application of Model Project Based Learning on Integrated Science in Water Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Y.; Permanasari, A.; Redjeki, S.; Sopandi, W.

    2017-09-01

    The function of this research was to analyze the influence model Project Based Learning (PjBl) on integrated science about the concept mastery for junior high school students. Method used for this research constitutes the quasi of experiment method. Population and sample for this research are the students junior high school in Bandung as many as two classes to be experiment and control class. The instrument that used for this research is the test concept mastery, assessment questionnaire of product and the questionnaire responses of the student about learning integrated science. Based on the result of this research get some data that with accomplishment the model of PjBl. Learning authority of integrated science can increase the concept mastery for junior high school students. The highest increase in the theme of pollution water is in the concept of mixtures and the separation method. The students give a positive response in learning of integrated science for the theme of pollution of the water used model PjBL with questionnaire of the opinion aspect in amount of 83.5%, the anxiety of the students in amount of 95.5%, the profit learning model of PjBL in amount of 96.25% and profit learning of integrated science in amount of 95.75%.

  4. Application of expert-notice dialogue (END) method to assess students’ science communication ability on biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriyati, S.; Amelia, D. N.; Soniyana, G. T.

    2018-05-01

    Student’s science communication ability can be assessed by the Expert-Notice Dialogue (END) method which focusing on verbal explanations using graphs or images as a tool. This study aims to apply the END method to assess students’ science communication ability. The study was conducted in two high schools with each sample of one class at each school (A and B). The number of experts in class A is 8 students and 7 in class B, the number of notice in class A 24 students and 30 in class B. The material chosen for explanation by expert is Ecosystem in class A and plant classification in class B. Research instruments are rubric of science communication ability, observation rubric, notice concept test and notice questionnaire. The implementation recorded with a video camera and then transcribed based on rubric science communication ability. The results showed that the average of science communication ability in class A and B was 60% and 61.8%, respectively, in enough categories. Mastery of the notice concept is in good category with 79.10 averages in class A and 94.64 in class B. Through the questionnaire notice it is known that the END method generally helps notice in understanding the concept.

  5. A review of second law techniques applicable to basic thermal science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, M. Kevin; Zamorski, Joseph R.

    1988-11-01

    This paper reports the results of a review of second law analysis techniques which can contribute to basic research in the thermal sciences. The review demonstrated that second law analysis has a role in basic thermal science research. Unlike traditional techniques, second law analysis accurately identifies the sources and location of thermodynamic losses. This allows the development of innovative solutions to thermal science problems by directing research to the key technical issues. Two classes of second law techniques were identified as being particularly useful. First, system and component investigations can provide information of the source and nature of irreversibilities on a macroscopic scale. This information will help to identify new research topics and will support the evaluation of current research efforts. Second, the differential approach can provide information on the causes and spatial and temporal distribution of local irreversibilities. This information enhances the understanding of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat and mass transfer, and may suggest innovative methods for reducing irreversibilities.

  6. Summary of the Geocarto International Special Issue on "NASA Earth Science Satellite Data for Applications to Public Health" to be Published in Early 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    At the 2011 Applied Science Public Health review held in Santa Fe, NM, it was announced that Dr. Dale Quattrochi from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, John Haynes, Program Manager for the Applied Sciences Public Health program at NASA Headquarters, and Sue Estes, Deputy Program Manager for the NASA Applied Sciences Public Health Program located at the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, AL, would edit a special issue of the journal Geocarto International on "NASA Earth Science Satellite Data for Applications to Public Health". This issue would be focused on compiling research papers that use NASA Earth Science satellite data for applications to public health. NASA's Public Health Program concentrates on advancing the realization of societal and economic benefits from NASA Earth Science in the areas of infectious disease, emergency preparedness and response, and environmental health (e.g., air quality). This application area as a focus of the NASA Applied Sciences program, has engaged public health institutions and officials with research scientists in exploring new applications of Earth Science satellite data as an integral part of public health decision- and policy-making at the local, state and federal levels. Of interest to this special issue are papers submitted on are topics such as epidemiologic surveillance in the areas of infectious disease, environmental health, and emergency response and preparedness, national and international activities to improve skills, share data and applications, and broaden the range of users who apply Earth Science satellite data in public health decisions, or related focus areas.. This special issue has now been completed and will be published n early 2014. This talk will present an overview of the papers that will be published in this special Geocarto International issue.

  7. Harnessing Systems Engineering Methodology in Using Earth Science Research Data for Real Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Policelli, Fritz S.; Zanoni, Vicki M.

    2004-01-01

    For the last three decades, Earth science remote sensing technologies have been providing an enormous amount of useful data and information serving to broaden our understanding of the home planet as a system. NASA's Earth science program has deployed about 18 complex satellites and is in the process of defining and launching multiple observing systems in this decade. At the same time, the European Community and many other countries such as Russia, France, India, Japan, and China have also significantly contributed to Earth science research. To date, the majority of such efforts have concentrated on expanding our scientific understanding of the multiple nonlinear and chaotic processes of Earth's behavior. In recent years, legislators and stakeholders have put serious pressure on the science community to devote more attention to making use of scientific results for societal benefit. For instance, there are a number of areas such as energy forecasting, aviation safety, agricultural efficiency, disaster management, air quality and public health that can directly take advantage of Earth science results to analyze and predict large scale problems and conditions. This is becoming even more important now that we live in a global economy interconnected via the internet and transportation systems; regional environmental conditions can have far reaching impact across continental boundaries. These factors dictate requirements for global data that can help us assess and control the devastating problems of famine, water resources, wildfires, human health and more. To do this requires a serious, organized, and systematic approach that transfers fundamental research products to the applied sciences domain. This paper presents a systems engineering and management process that can effectively make such transfer of data to the user community. Examples are presented on how the above decision making framework can help in solving critical problems such as the spread of vector borne

  8. Service-Learning in the Computer and Information Sciences Practical Applications in Engineering Education

    CERN Document Server

    Nejmeh, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    A road map for service-learning partnerships between information science and nonprofit organizations While service-learning is a well-known educational method for integrating learning experiences with community service, it is only now beginning to emerge in computer and information sciences (CIS). Offering a truly global perspective, this book introduces for the first time an essential framework for service learning in CIS, addressing both the challenges and opportunities of this approach for all stakeholders involved-faculty, students, and community nonprofit organizations (NPOs), both dome

  9. Web-Based Applications in Calculation of Family Heritage (Science of Faroidh)

    OpenAIRE

    Zufria, M. Hasan Azhari, Ilka

    2017-01-01

    Separating of inheritance according in sciences of faroidh each heir does not get the same part depending on their relationship to the inheritance recipient. This is because the needs of each heir are different, such as heirs of boys and girls differ the reason boys have a big responsibility and if already married  should have been obliged to offer for his family while the daughter if already have family responsible for the necessities of life. In addition, in sciences of faroidh also there i...

  10. Using Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing via Aurorasaurus as a Near Real Time Data Source for Space Weather Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, E.; Heavner, M.; Hall, M.; Tapia, A.; Lalone, N.; Clayon, J.; Case, N.

    2014-12-01

    Aurorasaurus is on the cutting edge of space science, citizen science, and computer science simultaneously with the broad goals to develop a real-time citizen science network, educate the general public about the northern lights, and revolutionize real-time space weather nowcasting of the aurora for the public. We are currently in the first solar maximum with social media, which enables the technological roots to connect users, citizen scientists, and professionals around a shared global, rare interest. We will introduce the project which has been in a prototype mode since 2012 and recently relaunched with a new mobile and web presence and active campaigns. We will showcase the interdisciplinary advancements which include a more educated public, disaster warning system applications, and improved real-time ground truth data including photographs and observations of the Northern Lights. We will preview new data which validates the proof of concept for significant improvements in real-time space weather nowcasting. Our aim is to provide better real-time notifications of the visibility of the Northern Lights to the interested public via the combination of noisy crowd-sourced ground truth with noisy satellite-based predictions. The latter data are available now but are often delivered with significant jargon and uncertainty, thus reliable, timely interpretation of such forecasts by the public are problematic. The former data show real-time characteristic significant rises (in tweets for instance) that correlate with other non-real-time indices of auroral activity (like the Kp index). We will discuss the source of 'noise' in each data source. Using citizen science as a platform to provide a basis for deeper understanding is one goal; secondly we want to improve understanding of and appreciation for the dynamics and beauty of the Northern Lights by the public and scientists alike.

  11. Improving Neural Network Approximations in Applications: Case Study in Materials Science

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holeňa, Martin; Steinfeldt, N.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 2 (2009), s. 165-190 ISSN 1210-0552 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : artificial neural networks * approximation capability * crossvalidation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.475, year: 2009

  12. A Sample Application for Use of Biography in Social Studies; Science, Technology and Social Change Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Harun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opinions of social studies teacher candidates on use of biography in science, technology and social change course given in the undergraduate program of social studies education. In this regard, convergent parallel design as a mixed research pattern was used to make use of both qualitative and quantitative…

  13. Translating Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research to Clinical Application: The EVOLVE Mixed Methods Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Janey C.; Czajkowski, Susan; Charlson, Mary E.; Link, Alissa R.; Wells, Martin T.; Isen, Alice M.; Mancuso, Carol A.; Allegrante, John P.; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jobe, Jared B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe a mixed-methods approach to develop and test a basic behavioral science-informed intervention to motivate behavior change in 3 high-risk clinical populations. Our theoretically derived intervention comprised a combination of positive affect and self-affirmation (PA/SA), which we applied to 3 clinical chronic disease…

  14. The Nature and Process of Science and Applications to Geography Education: A US Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Place-name geography, as it is sometimes called, is merely the tip of the iceberg in a field that aims to understand people and places and their interactions with the environment. Geography is also the study of spatial distributions and interpreting what they mean. This review lays out the definition of the nature of science as it relates to…

  15. Teaching Web Application Development: A Case Study in a Computer Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabro, Marcos Didonet; de Alimeda, Eduardo Cunha; Sluzarski, Fabiano

    2012-01-01

    Teaching web development in Computer Science undergraduate courses is a difficult task. Often, there is a gap between the students' experiences and the reality in the industry. As a consequence, the students are not always well-prepared once they get the degree. This gap is due to several reasons, such as the complexity of the assignments, the…

  16. High magnetic field science and its application in the United States current status and future directions

    CERN Document Server

    National Research Council of the National Academies

    2013-01-01

    The Committee to Assess the Current Status and Future Direction of High Magnetic Field Science in the United States was convened by the National Research Council in response to a request by the National Science Foundation. This report answers three questions: (1) What is the current state of high-field magnet science, engineering, and technology in the United States, and are there any conspicuous needs to be addressed? (2) What are the current science drivers and which scientific opportunities and challenges can be anticipated over the next ten years? (3) What are the principal existing and planned high magnetic field facilities outside of the United States, what roles have U.S. high field magnet development efforts played in developing those facilities, and what potentials exist for further international collaboration in this area? A magnetic field is produced by an electrical current in a metal coil. This current exerts an expansive force on the coil, and a magnetic field is "high" if it challenges the str...

  17. Applications of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Johanna Sabine

    2002-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) have been applied as the most important inorganic mass spectrometric techniques having multielemental capability for the characterization of solid samples in materials science. ICP-MS is used for the sensitive determination of trace and ultratrace elements in digested solutions of solid samples or of process chemicals (ultrapure water, acids and organic solutions) for the semiconductor industry with detection limits down to sub-picogram per liter levels. Whereas ICP-MS on solid samples (e.g. high-purity ceramics) sometimes requires time-consuming sample preparation for its application in materials science, and the risk of contamination is a serious drawback, a fast, direct determination of trace elements in solid materials without any sample preparation by LA-ICP-MS is possible. The detection limits for the direct analysis of solid samples by LA-ICP-MS have been determined for many elements down to the nanogram per gram range. A deterioration of detection limits was observed for elements where interferences with polyatomic ions occur. The inherent interference problem can often be solved by applying a double-focusing sector field mass spectrometer at higher mass resolution or by collision-induced reactions of polyatomic ions with a collision gas using an ICP-MS fitted with collision cell. The main problem of LA-ICP-MS is quantification if no suitable standard reference materials with a similar matrix composition are available. The calibration problem in LA-ICP-MS can be solved using on-line solution-based calibration, and different procedures, such as external calibration and standard addition, have been discussed with respect to their application in materials science. The application of isotope dilution in solution-based calibration for trace metal determination in small amounts of noble metals has been developed as a new calibration strategy. This review discusses new

  18. Proceedings of the symposium Actinides 2006 - Basic Science, Applications and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blobaum, Kerri J.M.; Chandler, Elaine A.; Havela, Ladislav; Maple, M. Brian; Neu, Mary P.

    2007-01-01

    These proceedings from the September 2006 symposium includes papers presented on experimental and modeling work with the intention of broadening understanding of the field of actinide research. Actinides have gained attention recently because of their roles in the threat of nuclear terrorism (e.g., 'dirty bombs') and the use of nuclear power to offset fossil fuel consumption. Actinide science is the study of the elements with atomic numbers in the range of 90 to 103, which includes uranium and plutonium. Beyond the well-known nuclear reactions of these heavy radioactive metals, the large electron clouds with 5f electrons in the outer shell yield fascinating and complex chemistries, crystal structures, and physical properties. Traditionally, actinide research has been divided among three scientific disciplines: chemistry (nuclear chemistry and radiochemistry); physics (condensed matter physics and electronic structure); and materials science (metallurgy). Modern actinide research, however, has become an interdisciplinary blend of these traditional fields, and it also incorporates developing fields such as environmental chemistry and superconductivity. Improved scientific understanding of actinides is needed for development of materials for actinide detection and nuclear fuels, and for safer management of nuclear waste. Recently, there has been a resurgence of actinide science at national laboratories and universities. The current multidisciplinary approach to actinide science lays the groundwork for understanding the connection between the 5f electronic structure and observed chemical reactions and physical properties such as structural phase transformations and novel ground states. This work provides many opportunities for new researchers in actinide science. These proceedings gather 25 selected papers among the 53 presentations given at this symposium

  19. A user interface development tool for space science systems Transportable Applications Environment (TAE) Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczur, Martha R.

    1990-01-01

    The Transportable Applications Environment Plus (TAE PLUS), developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, is a portable What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) user interface development and management system. Its primary objective is to provide an integrated software environment that allows interactive prototyping and development that of user interfaces, as well as management of the user interface within the operational domain. Although TAE Plus is applicable to many types of applications, its focus is supporting user interfaces for space applications. This paper discusses what TAE Plus provides and how the implementation has utilized state-of-the-art technologies within graphic workstations, windowing systems and object-oriented programming languages.

  20. Applications of perturbed angular correlation and positron annihilation for materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shengyun; Zheng Yongnan; Zuo Yi; Zhou Dongmei; Yuan Daqing; Duan Xiao; Wang Zhaohui; Wang Zhiqing; Liu Meng

    2005-01-01

    The presentation addresses seven practical applications of perturbed angular correlation (PAC) and positron annihilation (PAS) that use the nuclear probes: study of defects and radiation damage, investigation of order-disorder transformation, investigation of structure and phase transition, investigation of amorphous alloy structure, characterization of hydrids, stusy of high Tc superconductivity and measurement of local susceptibility. Some examples performed by PAC and/or PAS at China Institute of Atomic Energy will be given to show these applications. The PAC and PAS were used simutaneously to study the radiation damage in Si irradiated by fast neutrons of 1.45 x 10 20 cm -2 and 178 W heavy ions of 5 x 10 11 cm -2 . The monovacacy-oxygen complexes and divacancies and divacancy-oxygen complexes were produced by the irradiations, and quadrivacancies and quadrivacancy-oxygen complexes were formed during thermal annealing. The results obtained by both methods are consistent. The temperature dependence of the nuclear quadrupole interaction was measured for the ternary alloy In 0.95 Ga 0.005 Ag 0.04 5 by PAC. The experimental results show that this alloy undergoes an order-disorder transformation at RT and the degree of disorder increases with the increasing of temperature, which discloses the nature of performance worsening of devices made of it. The PAC investigation was conducted for Pd 0.8 Si 0.2 in the temperature region from RT to 870 K. Two silicides were observed and their fractions were found to chang severely with temperature At lower temperatures one silicide is dominamt, while the other at higher temperatures. The quadrupole interaction in Pd 0.8 Si 0.2 amorphous alloy was determined by PAC below and above the crystallization temperature T cry . Broad electric field gradient (EFG) distribution with a FWHM of -0.5 and unique EFG were observed below and above T cry , respectively. The experimental results are in good agreement with computer simulation of the