WorldWideScience

Sample records for sciatica

  1. Sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - sciatic nerve; Sciatic nerve dysfunction; Low back pain - sciatica; LBP - sciatica; Lumbar radiculopathy - sciatica ... standing or sitting During certain times of the day, such as at night When sneezing, coughing, or ...

  2. Sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Numbness Sciatica Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Doctors & departments Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  3. Diagnosis and Prognosis of Sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H. Verwoerd (Annemieke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Sciatica is one of the most common lumbar spine disorders with a life time incidence of 12 to 40%. The most common cause of sciatica is a herniated disc. Sciatica is associated with significant morbidity. Back problems rank, certainly in the industrialized countries,

  4. [Lumbago and sciatica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán Sacristán, Hipólito

    2008-01-01

    Low back pain, together woth shoulder and neck pain, affect millions of individuals, and is a very usual topic of concern. Frequently is associated with sciatica. Two different low back pain groups are reported: 1--Unspecific low back pain; 2--Organic low bck pain. Unspecific low back pain: two considerations must be present: a) Absence of clinical or radiological signs of concrete disease, and b) Presence of a psychological profile defined by a personality unable to live together with pain. Different pathogenic mechanisms have been invoked to explain the unspecific low back pain: disc herniation irritating the posterior disc ring and the common posterior vertebral ligament, arthritis of small and real--have synovial--, interapophyseal joints, trigger zones of local spasm in the spinal muscles, postural changes after having remained a long time in the same position, and for some few ones, ligament instability in the sacroiliac joint. Organic low back pain: characterized like congenital diseases, acquired diseases--discal herniation, spondylosis, lumbar spine stenosis--, And systemic diseases affecting the spine: aortoiliac chronic vascular disease and abdominal processes causing lumbar and buttocks pain. The therapeutic alternative is either conservative or surgical. Surgery is protagonist in post-traumatic unstale spine, in unstable spondylolisthesis, in spine persistent infections and in spine tumours. Also is subsidiary of surgical treatment the disc degeneration with nerve root irritation causing motor disturbance. The disc degeneration without root irritation precludes conservative management: percutaneous manual nucleotomy, coblation nucleoplasty or back schools programmes, defined like interventions consisting of education and skill programmes supervised by a physical therapist trained in back rehabilitation.

  5. Paradigm shift in MRI for sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barzouhi, Abdelilah el

    2013-01-01

    In contrast with the intuitive feeling of physicians many worrisome MRI findings do not correlate with patient outcome in patients with sciatica. Physicians should for example not automatically ascribe persistent or recurrent symptoms of sciatica to the presence of abnormalities visible on MRI. This

  6. Conservative treatment of sciatica : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroomen, PCAJ; de Krom, MCTFM; Slofstra, PD; Knottnerus, JA

    2000-01-01

    Most patients with sciatica (often caused by disc herniations) are managed conservatively at first. The natural course seems to be favorable. The additional value of many conservative therapies remains controversial. Because a systematic review of the conservative treatment of sciatica is lacking,

  7. Sciatica due to pelvic hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocaman Umit

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sciatica is defined as pain in the sciatic nerve distribution. The most common reason of sciatica is radiculopathy due to lumbar disc hernia. Other causes can be congenital, acquired, infectious, neoplastic, or inflammatory. The piriformis syndrome is another cause. The pain starts in an insidious manner when the cause of sciatica is an extraspinal tumor. It is intermittent at first but a constant and progressive pain that does not decrease with position or rest gradually develops in all patients. The possibility of an intraabdominal or pelvic mass should always be considered and the relevant tests requested when the cause of the sciatica cannot be explained. We present an 83-year-old male who presented with non-traumatic and non-vascular lumbosacral plexopathy due to a large hematoma in the left adductor muscle following the use of warfarin sodium.

  8. Sciatica and claudication caused by ganglion cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Wen, Xiaoyu; Gong, Yubao; Yang, Chen

    2013-12-15

    Case report. We report a rare case that a ganglion cyst compressed the sciatic nerve and caused sciatica and claudication in a 51-year-old male. Sciatica and claudication commonly occurs in spinal stenosis. To our knowledge, only 4 cases have been reported on sciatica resulting from posterior ganglion cyst of hip. A 51-year-old male had a 2-month history of radiating pain on his right leg. He could only walk 20 to 30 m before stopping and standing to rest for 1 to 3 minutes. Interestingly, he was able to walk longer distances (about 200 m) when walking slowly in small steps, without any rest. He had been treated as a case of lumbar disc herniation, but conservative treatment was ineffective. On buttock examination, a round, hard, and fixative mass was palpated at the exit of the sciatic nerve. MR imaging of hip revealed a multilocular cystic mass located on the posterior aspect of the superior gemellus and obturator internus, compressing the sciatic nerve. On operation, we found that the cyst extended to the superior gemellus and the obturator internus, positioned right at the outlet of the sciatic nerve. At 18 months of follow-up, the patient continued to be symptom free. He returned to comprehensive physical activity with no limitations. For an extraspinal source, a direct compression on the sciatic nerve also resulted in sciatica and claudication. A meticulous physical examination is very important for the differential diagnosis of extraspinal sciatica from spinal sciatica.

  9. Influence of Nerve Flossing Technique on acute sciatica and hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sciatica is one of the most common painful and disabling conditions affecting about 40% of low back pain cases and 1.6% - 43% of adult ... have been used to manage sciatica but the effect of Nerve Flossing Technique (NFT), which is a cost effective treatment option in the management of acute sciatica is yet to ...

  10. Management of an unusual sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourghli, Anouar; Chaballout, Ahmed; Obeid, Ibrahim; Boissiere, Louis; Vital, Jean-Marc; Khoury, Ghassan

    2016-11-01

    Extraforaminal entrapment of the L5 nerve root is uncommon, and its management can sometimes be very challenging. We present the case of a 57-year-old female, complaining of a sciatica in her left leg, for 3 years, with no response to any kind of conservative treatment. MRI and CT scan revealed the presence of a large L5S1 strictly lateral osteophyte compressing the left L5 root in its extraforaminal path. The patient underwent a left anterior retroperitoneal approach with assistance from a vascular surgeon given the very close relation between the osteophyte and the left common iliac vein, lying just on top of it, osteophyte was removed in one piece with the use of an osteotome after retraction of the vessels. The patient progressively recovered from her left sciatic pain with a satisfactory clinical result at 1 year. Literature is sparse on the treatment of extraforaminal entrapment of the L5 nerve root; the current case shows a successful treatment strategy with the use of an anterior approach for direct vision of the lesion and good control of the vessels.

  11. Piriformis syndrome: a cause of nondiscogenic sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Shane P

    2015-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a nondiscogenic cause of sciatica from compression of the sciatic nerve through or around the piriformis muscle. Patients typically have sciatica, buttocks pain, and worse pain with sitting. They usually have normal neurological examination results and negative straight leg raising test results. Flexion, adduction, and internal rotation of the hip, Freiberg sign, Pace sign, and direct palpation of the piriformis cause pain and may reproduce symptoms. Imaging and neurodiagnostic studies are typically normal and are used to rule out other etiologies for sciatica. Conservative treatment, including medication and physiotherapy, is usually helpful for the majority of patients. For recalcitrant cases, corticosteroid and botulinum toxin injections may be attempted. Ultrasound and other imaging modalities likely improve accuracy of injections. Piriformis tenotomy and decompression of the sciatic nerve can be done for those who do not respond.

  12. Granulocytic sarcoma: a rare cause of sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsamis, Epaminondas Markos; Glover, Thomas Edward

    2017-02-15

    We describe a case report of a man aged 56 years with a 4-month history of right-sided sciatica-type pain with subclinical disc prolapse evident on MRI. Worsening pain together with the appearance of a tender mass in his right buttock prompted further imaging, which demonstrated an infiltrative mass engulfing the lumbosacral plexus. This was later shown to be a granulocytic sarcoma on biopsy. Intervertebral disc herniation can be an incidental finding and is not always the cause of sciatica. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Prognostic value of MRI findings in sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vroomen, P.C.A.J.; Krom, M.C.T.F.M. de [Department of Neurology, Maastricht University Hospital (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Maastricht University Hospital (Netherlands)

    2002-01-01

    The natural course of sciatica due to disc herniation is generally favourable but individually unpredictable. Some patients recover only after prolonged conservative therapy or surgery. This study aims to ascertain whether magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features can be used to predict outcome of sciatica and help to identify patients unlikely to respond to conservative management. For a transversal diagnostic study 274 primary care patients underwent early MR imaging for leg pain. One hundred and thirty-three patients with sciatica were followed for 3 months, both patients and physicians being unaware of MR imaging findings. At 12 weeks a favourable prognosis was indicated by the following features: annular rupture (P=0.02) and nerve root compression on MR imaging (P=0.03). Poor prognosis was indicated by disc herniation in the foramen (P=0.004). Our findings show that early MR imaging features are related to prognosis. However, the associations are not strong enough to justify routine use of early MR imaging to predict the prognosis of sciatica. (orig.)

  14. Risk factors for first time incidence sciatica: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Chad E; Taylor, Jeffrey; Wright, Alexis; Milosavljevic, Steven; Goode, Adam; Whitford, Maureen

    2014-06-01

    Characteristically, sciatica involves radiating leg pain that follows a dermatomal pattern along the distribution of the sciatic nerve. To our knowledge, there are no studies that have investigated risk factors associated with first time incidence sciatica. The purpose of the systematic review was to identify the longitudinal risk factors associated with first time incidence sciatica and to report incidence rates for the condition. For the purposes of this review, first time incidence sciatica was defined as either of the following: 1) no prior history of sciatica or 2) transition from a pain-free state to sciatica. Studies included subjects of any age from longitudinal, observational, cohort designs. The study was a systematic review. Eight of the 239 articles identified by electronic search strategies met the inclusion criteria. Risk factors and their respective effect estimates were reported using descriptive analysis and the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Modifiable risk factors included smoking, obesity, occupational factors and health status. Non-modifiable factors included age, gender and social class. Incidence rates varied among the included studies, in part reflecting the variability in the operationalized definition of sciatica but ranged from sciatica are modifiable, suggesting the potential benefits of primary prevention. In addition, those risk factors are also associated with unhealthy lifestyles, which may function concomitantly toward the development of sciatica. Sciatica as a diagnosis is inconsistently defined among studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  16. Sciatica: Detection and Confirmation by New Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    We need to overcome limitations of present assessment and also integrate newer research in our work about sciatica. Inflammation induces changes in the DRG and nerve root. It sensitizes the axons. Nociceptor is a unique axon. It is pseudo unipolar: both its ends, central and peripheral, behave in similar fashion. The nerve in periphery which carries these axons may selectively become sensitive to mechanical pressure--“mechanosensitized,” as we coin the phrase. Many pain questionnaires are used and are effective in identifying neuropathic pain solely on basis of descriptors but they do not directly physically correlate nerve root and pain. A thorough neurological evaluation is always needed. Physical examination is not direct pain assessment but testing mobility of nerve root and its effect on pain generation. There is a dogmatic dominance of dermatomes in assessment of leg pain. They are unreliable. Images may not correlate with symptoms and pathology in about 28% of cases. Electrophysiology may be normal in purely inflamed nerve root. Palpation may help in such inflammatory setting to refine our assessment further. Confirmation of sciatica is done by selective nerve root block (SNRB) today but it is fraught with several complications and needs elaborate inpatient and operating room set up. We have used the unique property of the pseudo unipolar axon that both its ends have similar functional properties and so inject along its peripheral end sodium channel blockers to block the basic cause of the mechanosensitization namely upregulated sodium channels in the root or DRG. Thus using palpation we may be able to detect symptomatic nerve in stage of inflammation and with distal end injection, along same inflamed nerve we may be able to abolish and so confirm sciatica. Discussions of sciatica pain diagnosis tend to immediately shift and centre on the affected disc rather than the nerve. Theoretically it may be possible to detect the affected nerve by palpating the

  17. Piriformis ganglion: An uncommon cause of sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Jeong, H J; Shin, H K; Park, S J; Lee, J H; Kim, E

    2016-04-01

    Sciatica can occur due to a spinal lesion, intrapelvic tumor, diabetic neuropathy, and rarely piriformis syndrome. The causes of piriformis syndrome vary by a space-occupying lesion. A ganglionic cyst can occur in various lesions in the body but seldom around the hip joint. In addition, sciatica due to a ganglionic cyst around the hip joint has been reported in one patient in Korea who underwent surgical treatment. We experienced two cases of sciatica from a piriformis ganglionic cyst and we report the clinical characterics and progress after non-operative treatment by ultrasonography-guided aspiration. The two cases were diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and were treated by ultrasonography-guided aspiration. We followed the patients for more than 6months. The symptoms of piriformis syndrome from the ganglion improved following aspiration and this conservative treatment is a treatment method that can be used without extensive incision or cyst excision. Level IV historical case. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Nerve Flossing Technique on acute sciatica and hip ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-08-21

    Aug 21, 2015 ... Background: Sciatica is one of the most common painful and disabling conditions affecting about 40% of low back pain cases and 1.6% - 43% of adult population annually. Many conventional physiotherapeutic modalities have been used to manage sciatica but the effect of Nerve Flossing Technique (NFT), ...

  19. Prognostic factors of sciatica in the Canon of Avicenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaee, Bagher; Abbassian, Alireza; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Rostamian, Abdorrahman

    2013-12-01

    Prognosis studies are fast developing and very practical types of medical research. Sciatica is one of the common types of low back pain and identifying prognostic factors of the illness can help physicians and patients to choose best method of practice. The prognostic factors of sciatica are presented from the Canon of Avicenna, one of the most famous physicians in the history of medicine.

  20. Sciatica due to Schwannoma at the Sciatic Notch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Haspolat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are rarely seen on the sciatic nerve and can cause sciatica. In this case report we aimed to present an unusual location of schwannoma along sciatic nerve that causes sciatica. A 60-years-old-man was admitted to us with complaints of pain on his thigh and paresthesia on his foot. Radiography of the patient revealed a solitary lesion on the sciatic nerve. The lesion was excised and the symptoms resolved after surgery.

  1. Surgery or physical activity in the management of sciatica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Matthew; Ferreira, Manuela L; Refshauge, Kathryn M

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Previous reviews have compared surgical to non-surgical management of sciatica, but have overlooked the specific comparison between surgery and physical activity-based interventions. METHODS: Systematic review using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase and PEDro databases was conducted. Randomised...... controlled trials comparing surgery to physical activity, where patients were experiencing the three most common causes of sciatica-disc herniation, spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Two independent reviewers extracted pain and disability data (converted to a common 0-100 scale) and assessed...

  2. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica (1, 2). We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. PMID:18071287

  3. Sciatica caused by a dilated epidural vein: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Petre, C.; Wilms, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium); Plets, C. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium)

    1999-02-01

    We report the MR imaging findings in a 41-year-old woman presenting with sudden low back pain and sciatica. At surgery a dilated epidural vein was found compressing the nerve root. The MR findings may suggest the diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging of a dilated epidural vein or varix causing sciatica has not been reported until now. (orig.) (orig.) With 1 fig., 4 refs.

  4. Pelvic Hydatid Disease: CT and MRI Findings Causing Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Yildirim, Duzgun [Gulhane Military Medical School, Department of Radiology, 06018, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2007-12-15

    Pelvic masses, especially hydatid disease, rarely present with sciatica. We present the computed tomography (CT) and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 49-year-old female patient with presacral hydatid disease, who was evaluated for her sciatica. We also want to emphasize the importance of assessing the pelvis of patients with symptoms and clinical findings that are inconsistent and that cannot be satisfactorily explained by the spinal imaging findings. isc herniation in the lumbar spine is a well-known etiology of back pains and sciatica, but whenever disc herniation of the lumbar spine is excluded by the employed imaging modalities, then the pelvis should be examined for other possible etiologies of nerve compression. We describe here a patient, who was complaining of sciatica, with no abnormal findings in her lumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The cause of her sciatica was found to be associated with a pelvic hydatid cyst compressing the lumbosacral nerve plexus. In conclusion, if no pathology is evident for the lumbar discal structures, in connection with the cause of sciatica and lumbar back pains, then the pelvis should also be examined for the possible etiologies of compression of the lumbosacral nerve plexus. Whenever a multiseptated cyst is come across in a patient of an endemic origin with a positive history for hydatid disease like surgery, indicating recurrence, hydatid cyst is the most likely diagnosis.

  5. Myositis ossificans circumscripta, secondary to high-velocity gunshot and fragment wound that causes sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokkus, Kemal; Sagtas, Ergin; Suslu, Feride Ekimler; Aydin, Ahmet Turan

    2013-10-17

    This report concerns an unusual cause of sciatica. The case presented is of a young man with myositis ossificans that resulted in sciatica and was treated with en bloc excision and low-dose radiotherapy and indomethacine. The aim of this study was to explain the different diagnostic properties of myositis ossificans around the hip and non-classic causes of sciatica.

  6. Sciatica-like symptoms and the sacroiliac joint: clinical features and differential diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.H.; Nijssen, P.G.; Tijssen, C.C.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Schieving, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the clinical features of patients with sacroiliac joint (SIJ)-related sciatica-like symptoms to those with sciatica from nerve root compression and to investigate the necessity to perform radiological imaging in patients with sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ. METHODS:

  7. CT and MRI in the evaluation of extraspinal sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, T; Lakadamyali, H

    2010-01-01

    Sciatica is the most frequently encountered symptom in neurosurgical practice and is observed in 40% of adults at some point in their lives. It is described as pain of the hip and the lower extremity secondary to pathologies affecting the sciatic nerve within its intraspinal or extraspinal course. The most frequent cause is a herniating lumbar disc pressing on the neural roots. Extraspinal causes of sciatic pain are usually overlooked because they are extremely rare and due to intraspinal causes (lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint osteoarthritis, fracture, and tumors of the spinal cord and spinal column) being the main consideration. Early diagnosis of sciatica significantly improves the likelihood of relieving symptoms, as well as avoiding any additional neurologic injury and unnecessary surgery. We evaluate histolopathologically confirmed extraspinal causes of sciatica cases, accompanied by their presented computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging findings. PMID:20647515

  8. Lumbar spinal canal size of sciatica patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurme, M.; Alaranta, H.; Aalto, T.; Knuts, L.R.; Vanharanta, H.; Troup, J.D.G. (Turku City Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery; Social Insurance Institution, Turku (Finland). Rehabilitation Research Centre; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Liverpool Univ. (UK). Dept. of Orthopaedic and Accident Surgery)

    Seven measures at the three lowest lumbar interspaces were recorded from conventional radiographs of the lumbar spines of 160 consecutive patients with low back pain and sciatica admitted for myelography and possible surgery. Eighty-eight patients were operated upon for disc herniation, and of the conservatively-treated 72 patients, 18 had a pathologic and 54 a normal myelogram. The results were evaluated after one year using the occupational handicap scales of WHO. Correlations of radiographic measures to stature were moderate and to age small. After adjusting for stature and age, only the male interpedicular distances and the antero-posterior diameter of intervertebral foramen at L3 were greater than those of females. The males with a pathologic myelogram had smaller posterior disc height at L3 and a smaller interarticular distance at L3 and L4 than those with normal myelogram, likewise the midsagittal diameter at L3 and L4 in females. In all patients other measures besides posterior disc height were smaller than those for low back pain patients (p<0.001) or for cadavers (p<0.001). The only correlation between measures and clinical manifestations was between pedicular length at L3 and limited straight leg raising. Where the disc material had been extruded into the spinal canal, the interpedicular distance was significantly wider. Only anterior disc height at L3 revealed differences between good and poor outcome one year after surgery, as did the interarticular distance at S1 in patients with normal myelogram after conservative treatment. (orig.).

  9. The Challenges of Treating Sciatica Pain in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Manuela L; McLachlan, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Sciatica is a debilitating condition affecting approximately 25 % of the population. Typically, the patient will complain of lower limb pain that is more severe than pain in the lower back, usually accompanied by numbness and motor weakness. Most international guidelines recommend pharmacological management for the pain relief of sciatica, including paracetamol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioid analgesics, anticonvulsants, and corticosteroids, among others. However, the evidence for most of these pharmacological options is scarce, and the majority of clinical trials exclude older patients. There is overall very limited information on the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of these medicines in older patients with sciatica. This review presents a critical appraisal of the existing evidence for the pharmacological treatment of sciatica, with a special focus on the older adult. The age-related changes in the health of older patients, as well as their impact on the response to pharmacological treatment, including polypharmacy, drug interactions, and drug-disease interactions, is also discussed.

  10. Prognostic factors for return to work in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Keller, Anne; Ntvig, Bård; Brox, Jens I; Grotle, Margreth

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about the prognostic factors for work-related outcomes of sciatica caused by disc herniation. To identify the prognostic factors for return to work (RTW) during a 2-year follow-up among sciatica patients referred to secondary care. Multicenter prospective cohort study including 466 patients. Administrative data from the National Sickness Benefit Register were accessed for 227 patients. Two samples were used. Sample A comprised patients who at the time of inclusion in the cohort reported being on partial sick leave or complete sick leave or were undergoing rehabilitation because of back pain/sciatica. Sample B comprised patients who, according to the sickness benefit register, at the time of inclusion received sickness benefits or rehabilitation allowances because of back pain/sciatica. In Sample A, the outcome was self-reported return to full-time work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample B, the outcome was time to first sustained RTW, defined as the first period of more than 60 days without receiving benefits from the register. Significant baseline predictors of self-reported RTW at 2 years (Analysis A) were identified by multivariate logistic regression. Significant predictors of time to sustained RTW (Analysis B) were identified by multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling. Both analyses included adjustment for age and sex. To assess the effect of surgery on the probability of RTW, analyses similar to A and B were performed, including the variable surgery (yes/no). One-fourth of the patients were still out of work at the 2-year follow-up. In Sample A (n=237), younger age, better general health, lower baseline sciatica bothersomeness, less fear-avoidance work, and a negative straight-leg-raising test result were significantly associated with a higher probability of RTW at the 2-year follow-up. Surgery was not significantly associated with the outcome. In Sample B (n=125), history of sciatica, duration of the current sciatica episode more than 3

  11. Case Report: Sciatic nerve schwannoma - a rare cause of sciatica [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report a rare case of a sciatic nerve schwannoma causing sciatica in a 69-year-old female. Sciatic nerve schwannoma is a rare entity. It should always be considered as a possible cause of sciatica in patients that present with symptoms of sciatica with no prolapsed disc in the lumbar spine and a negative crossed straight leg raise test. Timely diagnosis and complete excision of the lesion leads to complete resolution of the symptoms of such patients.

  12. Advice to stay active or structured exercise in the management of sciatica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez, Matt; Hartvigsen, Jan; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review and meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the evidence on comparative effectiveness of advice to stay active versus supervised structured exercise in the management of sciatica. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Conservative management of sciatica usually includes......) that exercise provides small, superior effects compared with advice to stay active on leg pain in the short term for patients suffering with sciatica. However there is moderate quality evidence showing no difference between advice to stay active and exercise on leg pain and disability status in people...... with sciatica in the long term....

  13. Patients' own accounts of sciatica: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Bie Nio; Konstantinou, Kika; Corbett, Mandy; Hay, Elaine

    2011-07-01

    STUDY DESIGN.: Longitudinal qualitative interview study, nested within a back pain cohort study. OBJECTIVE.: Enhance the understanding of patients' own perspectives on living with sciatica to inform improvements in care and treatment outcomes. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Reports of patients' own accounts of sciatica and its impact on daily life are still scarce. Research on back pain has shown that it is important to understand how people live with pain and how they perceive interactions with health care professionals and interpret interventions. These types of insights help to improve treatments and their acceptability to patients. METHODS.: In-depth qualitative interviews with 37 people at baseline and 6 and 12 months' follow-up. The interviews covered topics that were derived from the Illness Perceptions Questionnaire and allowed open-ended talk about people's experiences of pain. All interviews were tape-recorded, fully transcribed, and thematically analyzed. RESULTS.: People needed to make sense of sciatica through identifying a cause and having it clinically diagnosed. The impact of sciatic pain was seen to be constant, intense, and all-encompassing. Appreciation of this by clinicians was considered important, as well as the provision of clear information about treatment and prognosis. Expectations about treatment options varied between patients, and people balanced pain relief with adverse effects. CONCLUSION.: Our study highlights patients' own accounts of the distinctiveness, impact, and intrusiveness of their sciatic symptoms. Our findings emphasize the importance of leg pain in identifying a subgroup of back-pain patients more likely to have severe symptoms, be at risk of poor outcome, and who should be considered a priority for early diagnosis and management. Future management of sciatica needs to include listening to patients' stories, offering a credible physical assessment, explanation, and diagnosis of the condition. Explaining the limits to

  14. Herpes zoster sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Masao; Mannoji, Chikato; Oikawa, Makiko; Murakami, Masazumi; Okamoto, Yuzuru; Kon, Tamiyo; Okawa, Akihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masashi; Furuya, Takeo

    2015-07-29

    Symptom of herpes zoster is sometimes difficult to distinguish from sciatica induced by spinal diseases, including lumbar disc herniation and spinal canal stenosis. Here we report a case of sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis. A 74-year-old Chinese male patient visited our hospital for left-sided sciatic pain upon standing or walking for 5 min of approximately 1 month's duration. At the first visit to our hospital, there were no skin lesions. A magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal canal stenosis between the 4th and 5th lumbar spine. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with sciatica induced by spinal canal stenosis. We considered decompression surgery for the stenosis of 4th and 5th lumbar spine because conservative therapy failed to relieve the patient's symptom. At that time, the patient complained of a skin rash involving his left foot for several days. A vesicular rash and erythema were observed on the dorsal and plantar surfaces of the great toe and lateral malleolus. The patient was diagnosed with herpes zoster in the left 5th lumbar spinal nerve area based on clinical findings, including the characteristics of the pain and vesicular rash and erythema in the 5th lumbar spinal dermatome. The patient was treated with famciclovir (1,500 mg/day) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After 1 week of medication, the skin rash resolved and pain relief was obtained. In conclusion, spinal surgeons should keep in mind herpes zoster infection as one of the possible differential diagnoses of sciatica, even if there is no typical skin rash.

  15. Pregabalin and gabapentin for the treatment of sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kelvin; Marshman, Laurence A G; Plummer, David

    2016-04-01

    Whilst pregabalin (PGB) and gabapentin (GBP) are both used to treat neuropathic pain, their relative role in sciatica is unclear. Our aim was to extensively review the roles of PGB and GBP in treating sciatica. The efficacy, side effects (SE) profile and cost of PGB and GBP in neuropathic pain states were reviewed with special reference to sciatica. Eleven articles matched the criteria: seven systematic reviews, one retrospective cross-sectional study, one placebo-controlled-crossover study, one randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study and one case report. GBP and PGB appeared to demonstrate comparable efficacy and SE. However, the amount and quality of evidence was low, and only indirect comparisons were available. Importantly, no direct "head-to-head" study existed. Globally, costs varied widely (by up to 31 times) and unpredictably (PGB cheaper than GBP, or vice versa). Formulary regulator rulings were globally disparate; however, many exclusively favoured the more expensive drug (whether GBP or PGB). No studies assessed PGB-GBP interchange. Weak evidence suggests that efficacy and SE with GBP and PGB are probably similar; however, firm conclusions are precluded. Despite weak data, and having cited minor titration, but definite cost, advantages, UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence favoured PGB over GBP. Given that no evidence supports unhindered PGB-GBP interchange, neither drug should probably be favoured. Prospective "head-to-head" studies are urgently required to provide robust evidence-based knowledge for choice of GBP or PGB in sciatica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Timing of surgery for sciatica: Subgroup analysis alongside a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C. Peul (Wilco); M.P. Arts (Mark); R. Brand (René); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSurgery speeds up recovery for sciatica. Prolonged conservative care with surgery for those patients with persistent sciatica however, yields similar results at 1 year. To investigate whether baseline variables modify the difference in recovery rates between these treatment strategies,

  17. Role of environmental factors and history of low back pain in sciatica symptoms among Finnish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Ulla; Paananen, Markus; Okuloff, Annaleena; Taimela, Simo; Auvinen, Juha; Männikkö, Minna; Karppinen, Jaro

    2013-06-01

    Cross-sectional study in a subcohort of the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (n = 1987). To investigate the role of environmental factors and LBP history in sciatica symptoms among Finnish young adults. History of low back pain (LBP), smoking, and male sex are associated with sciatica in adult populations. The role of the environmental determinants of sciatica has not been evaluated in populations consisting of only adolescents. Sciatic symptoms and environmental exposures were elicited by a mailed questionnaire and the associations were analyzed using multinomial logistic regression. Female sex was associated with severe sciatica at 18 years (OR, 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.6-9.3). Both reported LBP at 16 years and LBP requiring consultation of a health care professional were associated with mild sciatica at 18 years (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.3-4.9; and OR, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.2-11.9). In addition, LBP at 16 years requiring consultation of a health care professional was associated with severe sciatica at 18 years (OR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.7-15.3). Smoking, obesity, physical workload, and level of physical activity were not associated with sciatica. Females reported sciatic pain more often than males. LBP at 16 years predicted sciatica at 18 years. 2.

  18. Sciatica leading to the discovery of a renal cell carcinoma | Lakmichi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Metastatic renal cell cancer is not exceptional in kidney cancer (30% of patients with kidneyl cancer). Its prognosis is particularly severe. However, sciatic neuralgia (sciatica) remains an exceptional revealing clinical sign of this disease. The authors report the case of a patient admitted with right sciatica as chief complain, ...

  19. Surgery versus conservative management of sciatica due to a lumbar herniated disc : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Wilco C H; van Tulder, Maurits; Arts, Mark P.; Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Ostelo, Raymond; Verhagen, Arianne; Koes, Bart; Peul, Wilco C.

    The effectiveness of surgery in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniations is not without dispute. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of surgery versus conservative therapy (including epidural injections) for patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation. A

  20. Surgical techniques for sciatica due to herniated disc, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Wilco C H; Arts, Mark P.; van Tulder, Maurits W; Rubinstein, Sidney M; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Ostelo, Raymond W; Verhagen, Arianne P; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Disc herniation with sciatica accounts for five percent of low-back disorders but is one of the most common reasons for spine surgery. The goal of this study was to update the Cochrane review on the effect of surgical techniques for sciatica due to disc herniation, which was last

  1. Lifestyle Risk Factors Increase the Risk of Hospitalization for Sciatica: Findings of Four Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Rahman; Euro, Ulla; Heliövaara, Markku; Hirvensalo, Mirja; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Karppinen, Jaro; Lahti, Jouni; Rahkonen, Ossi; Raitakari, Olli T; Solovieva, Svetlana; Yang, Xiaolin; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Lallukka, Tea

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of lifestyle risk factors on the risk of hospitalization for sciatica and to determine whether overweight or obesity modifies the effect of leisure-time physical activity on hospitalization for sciatica. We included 4 Finnish prospective cohort studies (Health 2000 Survey, Mobile Clinic Survey, Helsinki Health Study, and Young Finns Study) consisting of 34,589 participants and 1259 hospitalizations for sciatica during 12 to 30 years of follow-up. Sciatica was based on hospital discharge register data. We conducted a random-effects individual participant data meta-analysis. After adjustment for confounding factors, current smoking at baseline increased the risk of subsequent hospitalization for sciatica by 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%-56%), whereas past smokers were no longer at increased risk. Obesity defined by body mass index increased the risk of hospitalization for sciatica by 36% (95% CI 7%-74%), and abdominal obesity defined by waist circumference increased the risk by 41% (95% CI 3%-93%). Walking or cycling to work reduced the risk of hospitalization for sciatica by 33% (95% CI 4%-53%), and the effect was independent of body weight and other leisure activities, while other types of leisure activities did not have a statistically significant effect. Smoking and obesity increase the risk of hospitalization for sciatica, whereas walking or cycling to work protects against hospitalization for sciatica. Walking and cycling can be recommended for the prevention of sciatica in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in follow-up assessment of sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently performed during follow-up in patients with known lumbar-disk herniation and persistent symptoms of sciatica. The association between findings on MRI and clinical outcome is controversial. We studied 283 patients in a randomized trial comparing surgery and prolonged conservative care for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation. Patients underwent MRI at baseline and after 1 year. We used a 4-point scale to assess disk herniation on MRI, ranging from 1 for "definitely present" to 4 for "definitely absent." A favorable clinical outcome was defined as complete or nearly complete disappearance of symptoms at 1 year. We compared proportions of patients with a favorable outcome among those with a definite absence of disk herniation and those with a definite, probable, or possible presence of disk herniation at 1 year. The area under the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve was used to assess the prognostic accuracy of the 4-point scores regarding a favorable or unfavorable outcome, with 1 indicating perfect discriminatory value and 0.5 or less indicating no discriminatory value. At 1 year, 84% of the patients reported having a favorable outcome. Disk herniation was visible in 35% with a favorable outcome and in 33% with an unfavorable outcome (P=0.70). A favorable outcome was reported in 85% of patients with disk herniation and 83% without disk herniation (P=0.70). MRI assessment of disk herniation did not distinguish between patients with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome (area under ROC curve, 0.48). MRI performed at 1-year follow-up in patients who had been treated for sciatica and lumbar-disk herniation did not distinguish between those with a favorable outcome and those with an unfavorable outcome. (Funded by the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development and the Hoelen Foundation; Controlled Clinical Trials number, ISRCTN26872154.).

  3. Tactile allodynia in patients with lumbar radicular pain (sciatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrin, Ruth; Devor, Marshall; Brill, Silviu

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel symptom in many patients with low back pain (LBP) that sheds new light on the underlying pain mechanism. By means of quantitative sensory testing, we compared patients with radicular LBP (sciatica), axial LBP (LBP without radiation into the leg), and healthy controls, searching for cutaneous allodynia in response to weak tactile and cooling stimuli on the leg and low back. Most patients with radicular pain (~60%) reported static and dynamic tactile allodynia, as well as cooling allodynia, on the leg, often extending into the foot. Some also reported allodynia on the low back. In axial LBP, allodynia was almost exclusively on the back. The degree of dynamic tactile allodynia correlated with the degree of background pain. The presence of allodynia suggests that the peripheral nerve generators of background leg and back pain have also induced central sensitization. The distal (foot) location of the allodynia in patients who have it indicates that the nociceptive drive that maintains the central sensitization arises paraspinally (ectopically) in injured ventral ramus afferents; this is not an instance of somatic referred pain. The presence of central sensitization also provides the first cogent account of shooting pain in sciatica as a wave of activity sweeping vectorially across the width of the sensitized dorsal horn. Finally, the results endorse leg allodynia as a pain biomarker in animal research on LBP, which is commonly used but has not been previously validated. In addition to informing the underlying mechanism of LBP, bedside mapping of allodynia might have practical implications for prognosis and treatment. How can you tell whether pain radiating into the leg in a patient with sciatica is neuropathic, ie, due to nerve injury? Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sonographic evaluation of sciatic nerves in patients with unilateral sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Murat; Özçakar, Levent; Tiftik, Tülay; Kaymak, Bayram; Özel, Sumru; Akkuş, Selami; Akinci, Ayşen

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the sciatic nerves of patients with unilateral sciatica by using an ultrasound, and to determine whether ultrasonographic findings were related to clinical and electrophysiologic parameters. Cross-sectional study. Physical medicine and rehabilitation departments of a university hospital and a rehabilitation hospital. Consecutive patients (N=30; 10 men, 20 women) with complaints of low back pain and unilateral sciatica of more than 1 month of duration were enrolled. Not applicable. All patients underwent a substantial clinical assessment, and they were also evaluated by electromyogram and magnetic resonance imaging. Pain was evaluated by a visual analog scale and the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) Scale. A linear array probe (7.5-12MHz) was used to scan sciatic nerves bilaterally in the prone position. Sciatic nerve diameters-thickness (short axis) and width (long axis)-and cross-sectional areas were measured bilaterally at the same levels, proximal to the bifurcation and midthigh. The values pertaining to the unaffected limbs were taken as controls. When compared with the unaffected sides, mean values for sciatic nerve measurements-long axis at bifurcation level (P=.017) and cross-sectional area at midthigh level (P=.005)-were significantly larger on the affected sides. Swelling ratios negatively correlated with symptom duration (r=-.394, P=.038) and LANSS scores (r=-.451, P=.016) at only midthigh level. Sciatic nerves seem to be enlarged on the side of sciatica in patients with low back pain. Our preliminary results may provide insight into better understanding the lower limb radiating pain in this group of patients. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trial of Pregabalin for Acute and Chronic Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Stephanie; Maher, Christopher G; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Koes, Bart W; Hancock, Mark J; Harris, Ian; Day, Richard O; Billot, Laurent; Pik, Justin; Jan, Stephen; Lin, C-W Christine

    2017-03-23

    Sciatica can be disabling, and evidence regarding medical treatments is limited. Pregabalin is effective in the treatment of some types of neuropathic pain. This study examined whether pregabalin may reduce the intensity of sciatica. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pregabalin in patients with sciatica. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either pregabalin at a dose of 150 mg per day that was adjusted to a maximum dose of 600 mg per day or matching placebo for up to 8 weeks. The primary outcome was the leg-pain intensity score on a 10-point scale (with 0 indicating no pain and 10 the worst possible pain) at week 8; the leg-pain intensity score was also evaluated at week 52, a secondary time point for the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included the extent of disability, back-pain intensity, and quality-of-life measures at prespecified time points over the course of 1 year. A total of 209 patients underwent randomization, of whom 108 received pregabalin and 101 received placebo; after randomization, 2 patients in the pregabalin group were determined to be ineligible and were excluded from the analyses. At week 8, the mean unadjusted leg-pain intensity score was 3.7 in the pregabalin group and 3.1 in the placebo group (adjusted mean difference, 0.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.2 to 1.2; P=0.19). At week 52, the mean unadjusted leg-pain intensity score was 3.4 in the pregabalin group and 3.0 in the placebo group (adjusted mean difference, 0.3; 95% CI, -0.5 to 1.0; P=0.46). No significant between-group differences were observed with respect to any secondary outcome at either week 8 or week 52. A total of 227 adverse events were reported in the pregabalin group and 124 in the placebo group. Dizziness was more common in the pregabalin group than in the placebo group. Treatment with pregabalin did not significantly reduce the intensity of leg pain associated with sciatica and did not significantly improve other outcomes

  6. Cyclic sciatica caused by infiltrative endometriosis: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Kumbasar, Basak; Tunaci, Atadan; Barman, Ahmet; Tunaci, Mehtap [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, 34390, Capa, Istanbul (Turkey); Bengisu, Ergin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Yavuz, Ekrem [Department of Pathology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, 34390, Capa, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-03-01

    Endometriosis, an important gynecological disorder of reproductive women, affects most commonly the ovaries and less frequently the gastrointestinal tract, chest, urinary tract, and soft tissues. Endometriosis classically appears on MRI as a mass with a large cystic component and variable signal intensities on T1- and T2-weighted images due to the presence of variable degradation of hemorrhagic products. Endometriosis in an atypical location, an infiltrative appearance and without cystic-hemorrhagic components has rarely been described. We report on a 33-year-old woman with cyclic sciatica due to histologically documented infiltrative endometriosis involving the area of the left sciatic notch. (orig.)

  7. Acupuncture for treating sciatica: a systematic review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zongshi; Liu, Xiaoxu; Yao, Qin; Zhai, Yanbing; Liu, Zhishun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This systematic review aims to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for treating sciatica. Methods The following nine databases will be searched from their inception to 30 October 2014: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), the Chinese Medical Current Content (CMCC), the Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP database), the Wan-Fang Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Citation Information by National Institute of Informatics (CiNii). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for sciatica in English, Chinese or Japanese without restriction of publication status will be included. Two researchers will independently undertake study selection, extraction of data and assessment of study quality. Meta-analysis will be conducted after screening of studies. Data will be analysed using risk ratio for dichotomous data, and standardised mean difference or weighted mean difference for continuous data. Dissemination This systematic review will be disseminated electronically through a peer-reviewed publication or conference presentations. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42014015001. PMID:25922105

  8. MRI of intraspinal nerve sheath tumours presenting with sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L.; Chan, C.S. [United Christian Hospital (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Ma, H.T.G. [St Teresa`s Hospital, Kowloon (Hong Kong). MRI and CT scanning Dept.; Ward, S.C.; Metreweli, C. [Prince of wales Hospital, New Territories (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of 14 intraspinal nerve sheath tumours (NST) presenting with sciatica were reviewed. The group comprised seven schwannomas, six neurofibromas and one perineuroma. The tumours were either iso- or hypointense with respect to spinal cord on T1-weighted (T1W) images; almost all tumours were hyperintense compared with spinal cord on T2-weighted (T2W) images. The tumours were all detectable on unenhanced T1 W images. Nine NST were scanned following Gadolinium-Diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) injection and all showed intense enhancement. This aids differentiation from sequestrated disc fragments. Tumours were more likely to show homogeneous enhancement unless they were recurrent tumours. Rim enhancement occurs more commonly in schwannomas and this can be used to differentiate these from neurofibromas. It is estimated that on unenhanced images, schwannomas cannot be distinguished from neurofibromas. Four tumours occurred at T1 1-T12. There was poor correlation of the site of the lesion with the clinical findings. It is recommended that the MRI studies in patients with sciatica should include the lower thoracic region especially if no protruded disc was found in the lumbar region. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis with sciatica; MR imaging vs myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annertz, M.; Holtaas, S.; Cronqvist, S.; Joensson, B.; Stroemqvist, B. (Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1990-09-01

    Seventeen patients with sciatica and isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis were studied with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In 13, myelography was also performed: 5 had dural sac deformation and root sleeve shortening, 2 had deformation with unilateral root sleeve shortening, one had bilateral root sleeve shortening only, and one had sac deformation only. In 4, myelography was normal. On sagittal MR examinations the neural foramen had an altered shape bilaterally with the long axis horizontal in all cases. In addition to altered shape the following was found in the 33 foramina evaluated. I: Normal nerve (n=8), II: Compressed nerve (n=16); III: Disappearance of fat, nerve not possible to identify (n=9). In patients with unilateral sciatica, the degree of foraminal stenosis correlated well with the side of symptoms. Coronal views showed the course of the nerve and pedicular kinking. Eight patients underwent decompressive surgery which revealed nerve compression by hypertrophic fibrous tissue and pedicular kinking, which correlated well with the findings on MR. Since the site of nerve compression often was peripheral to the root sleeves, myelography did not give complete information. (orig.).

  10. Influence of low back pain and prognostic value of MRI in sciatica patients in relation to back pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelilah el Barzouhi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with sciatica frequently complain about associated back pain. It is not known whether there are prognostic relevant differences in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI findings between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. METHODS: The study population contained patients with sciatica who underwent a baseline MRI to assess eligibility for a randomized trial designed to compare the efficacy of early surgery with prolonged conservative care for sciatica. Two neuroradiologists and one neurosurgeon independently evaluated all MR images. The MRI readers were blinded to symptom status. The MRI findings were compared between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. The presence of disabling back pain at baseline was correlated with perceived recovery at one year. RESULTS: Of 379 included sciatica patients, 158 (42% had disabling back pain. Of the patients with both sciatica and disabling back pain 68% did reveal a herniated disc with nerve root compression on MRI, compared to 88% of patients with predominantly sciatica (P<0.001. The existence of disabling back pain in sciatica at baseline was negatively associated with perceived recovery at one year (Odds ratio [OR] 0.32, 95% Confidence Interval 0.18-0.56, P<0.001. Sciatica patients with disabling back pain in absence of nerve root compression on MRI at baseline reported less perceived recovery at one year compared to those with predominantly sciatica and nerve root compression on MRI (50% vs 91%, P<0.001. CONCLUSION: Sciatica patients with disabling low back pain reported an unfavorable outcome at one-year follow-up compared to those with predominantly sciatica. If additionally a clear herniated disc with nerve root compression on MRI was absent, the results were even worse.

  11. Prognostic factors in non-surgically treated sciatica: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Julie; Konstantinou, Kika; Dunn, Kate M

    2011-09-25

    When present sciatica is considered an obstacle to recovery in low back pain patients, yet evidence is limited regarding prognostic factors for persistent disability in this patient group. The aim of this study is to describe and summarise the evidence regarding prognostic factors for sciatica in non-surgically treated cohorts. Understanding the prognostic factors in sciatica and their relative importance may allow the identification of patients with particular risk factors who might benefit from early or specific types of treatment in order to optimise outcome. A systematic literature search was conducted using Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL electronic databases. Prospective cohort studies describing subjects with sciatica and measuring pain, disability or recovery outcomes were included. Studies of cohorts comprised entirely of surgically treated patients were excluded and mixed surgically and conservatively treated cohorts were included only if the results were analysed separately by treatment group or if the analysis was adjusted for treatment. Seven adequate or high quality eligible studies were identified. There were conflicting but mainly negative results regarding the influence of baseline pain severity, neurological deficit, nerve root tension signs, duration of symptoms and radiological findings on outcome. A number of factors including age, gender, smoking, previous history of sciatica and heaviness of work do not appear to influence outcome. In contrast to studies of low back pain and purely surgically treated sciatica cohorts, psychological factors were rarely investigated. At present, the heterogeneity of the available studies makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about sciatica prognosis, and highlights the need for further research for this group of patients. Large scale prospective studies of high methodological quality, using a well-defined, consistent definition of sciatica and investigating psychosocial factors alongside clinical and

  12. The role of arginine vasopressin in electroacupuncture treatment of primary sciatica in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Shun; Yang, Jun; Sun, Fang-Jie; Wang, Da-Xin; Wang, Chang-Hong; He, Wei-Ya

    2015-08-01

    It has been implicated that electroacupuncture can relieve the symptoms of sciatica with the increase of pain threshold in human, and arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the brain rather than the spinal cord and blood circulation participates in antinociception. Our previous study has proven that AVP in the brain played a role in the process of electroacupuncture analgesia in rat. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of AVP in electroacupuncture in treating primary sciatica in human. The results showed that (1) AVP concentration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (7.5 ± 2.5 pg/ml), not plasma (13.2 ± 4.2 pg/ml) in primary sciatica patients was lower than that in health volunteers (16.1 ± 3.8 pg/ml and 12.3 ± 3.4 pg/ml), although the osmotic pressure in CSF and plasma did not change; (2) electroacupuncture of the bilateral "Zusanli" points (St. 36) for 60 min relieved the pain sensation in primary sciatica patients; (3) electroacupuncture increased the AVP level of CSF, not plasma in primary sciatica patients; and (4) there was the positive correlation between the effect of electroacupuncture relieving the pain and the AVP level of CSF in the primary sciatica patients. The data suggested that central AVP, not peripheral AVP might improve the effect of electroacupuncture treatment of primary sciatica in human, i.e., central AVP might take part in the electroacupuncture relieving the pain sensation in primary sciatica patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors in lumbar radicular pain or clinically defined sciatica: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Jaro; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Solovieva, Svetlana; Varonen, Helena; Kalso, Eija; Ukkola, Olavi; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2007-01-01

    Lumbar radicular pain is a fairly common health problem, yet its risk factors are far from clear. There are no published systematic reviews on associations between cardiovascular or lifestyle risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess associations between these risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. We conducted a systematic search of the Medline database for all original articles on lumbar radicular pain or sciatica published until August 2006. Twenty-two papers from 19 studies were included in the review. Overweight or obesity was associated with sciatica in most of the case-control and cohort studies. Some studies showed an increased risk of lumbar radicular pain in smokers with a long smoking history or in those with high levels of physical activity. A few case-control studies showed an association between serum C-reactive protein and sciatica. No consistent associations were found for serum lipids levels or high blood pressure. In summary, the associations of overweight, long smoking history, high physical activity and a high serum C-reactive protein level with lumbar radicular pain or sciatica were substantiated by the present review. However, more prospective studies are needed in order to further clarify these associations and the mechanisms of action. PMID:17525856

  14. Do MRI findings identify patients with low back pain or sciatica who respond better to particular interventions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffens, Daniel; Hancock, Mark J; Pereira, Leani S M

    2016-01-01

    ) or sciatica who respond better to particular interventions. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases were searched. We included RCTs investigating MRI findings as treatment effect modifiers for patients with LBP or sciatica. We excluded studies with specific diseases as the cause of LBP. Risk of bias...... in more than a single trial. High quality, adequately powered trials investigating MRI findings as effect modifiers are essential to determine the clinical importance of MRI findings in LBP and sciatica (PROSPERO: CRD42013006571)....

  15. Traction for low-back pain with or without sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Inge; Widyahening, Indah S; van Tulder, Maurits W; Blomberg, Stefan E I; de Vet, Henrica Cw; Brønfort, Gert; Bouter, Lex M; van der Heijden, Geert J

    2013-08-19

    Traction has been used to treat low-back pain (LBP), often in combination with other treatments. We included both manual and machine-delivered traction in this review. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1995, and previously updated in 2006. To assess the effects of traction compared to placebo, sham traction, reference treatments and no treatment in people with LBP. We searched the Cochrane Back Review Group Specialized Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2012, Issue 8), MEDLINE (January 2006 to August 2012), EMBASE (January 2006 to August 2012), CINAHL (January 2006 to August 2012), and reference lists of articles and personal files. The review authors are not aware of any important new randomized controlled trial (RCTs) on this topic since the date of the last search. RCTs involving traction to treat acute (less than four weeks' duration), subacute (four to 12 weeks' duration) or chronic (more than 12 weeks' duration) non-specific LBP with or without sciatica. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. As there were insufficient data for statistical pooling, we performed a descriptive analysis. We did not find any case series that identified adverse effects, therefore we evaluated adverse effects that were reported in the included studies. We included 32 RCTs involving 2762 participants in this review. We considered 16 trials, representing 57% of all participants, to have a low risk of bias based on the Cochrane Back Review Group's 'Risk of bias' tool.For people with mixed symptom patterns (acute, subacute and chronic LBP with and without sciatica), there was low- to moderate-quality evidence that traction may make little or no difference in pain intensity, functional status, global improvement or return to work when compared to placebo, sham traction or no treatment. Similarly, when comparing the combination of physiotherapy plus traction with

  16. Diagnosis and management of low back pain and sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A H

    1995-10-01

    Acute low back pain with associated sciatica is usually a benign, self-limited disorder. Appropriate medical treatment may include passive forms of physical therapy, including McKenzie exercises, manipulation, medication and therapeutic injections. After pain is controlled, the patient should be taught self-management techniques, including exercises and ergonomic protection of the spine. Evidence is increasing that exercise programs are effective, although the optimal regimen has yet to be defined and may vary from patient to patient. Chronic low back pain is a complex disorder that must be managed aggressively with a multidisciplinary approach that addresses physical, psychologic and socioeconomic aspects of the illness. Self-administered traction, corsets, medications and other treatment methods may prove to be useful adjuncts to an active program of exercise and education that promotes functional restoration.

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus Ja; Roelofs, Pepijn Ddm; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M

    2016-10-15

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for the treatment of sciatica. A previous Cochrane review on the efficacy of NSAIDs summarised findings for acute and chronic low back pain (LBP) and sciatica. This is an update of the original review (2008) focusing on people suffering from sciatica. To determine the efficacy of NSAIDs in pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported side effects in people with sciatica. We performed electronic searches up to 24 June 2015 in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and two trials registers. We searched reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews on the topics for additional trials. We included randomised controlled trials (double-blind, single-blind, and open-label) that assessed the efficacy of NSAIDs in sciatica. We included all trials that compared NSAIDs to placebo, to other NSAIDs, or to other medication. Additional interventions were allowed if there was a clear contrast for the treatment with NSAIDs in the trial. Three review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted the data. Where feasible we calculated pooled results using Review Manager 5.3. We reported pain relief outcomes using mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). We used risk ratios (RR) with 95% CI to report global improvement of treatment, adverse effects, and additional medication. We performed a meta-analysis if possible. We assessed level of evidence using the GRADE approach. We used standard methodological procedures recommended by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 10 trials reported in 9 publications (N = 1651). Only one trial out of 10 was assessed at low risk of bias. Five trials used the currently recommended daily dose for the drug, and two trials used lower daily doses available over the counter. Three trials investigated NSAIDs no longer approved for human use. The follow-up duration

  18. Intensive short-term vasodilation effect in the pain area of sciatica patients--case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Rychlik, Michał; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Bednarek, Agata; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2014-09-09

    Varied and complicated etiology of low back pain radiating distally to the extremities is still causing disagreement and controversy around the issue of its diagnosis and treatment. Most clinicians believe that the source of that pain is generally radicular. While some of them postulate the clinical significance of the sacroiliac joint syndrome, others demonstrate that almost one in five people with back pain experience symptoms indicative of the neuropathic pain component. To date, neuropathic involvement has not been completely understood, and different mechanisms are thought to play an important role. It has been established that muscle pain (myofascial pain) e.g. active trigger points from the gluteus minimus, can mimic pain similar to sciatica, especially in the chronic stage. This paper describes patients presenting with radicular sciatica (case one and two) and sciatica-like symptoms (case three). For the first time, intensive short-term vasodilation in the pain area following needle infiltration of the gluteus minimus trigger point was recorded. Three Caucasian, European women suffering from radicular sciatica (case one and two) and sciatica-like symptoms (case three) at the age of 57, 49 and 47 respectively underwent infrared camera observation during needle infiltration of the gluteus minimus trigger point. The patients were diagnosed by a neurologist; they underwent magnetic resonance imaging, electromyography, neurography and blood test analysis. Apart from that, the patients were diagnosed by a clinician specializing in myofascial pain diagnosis. In the examined cases, trigger points-related short-term vasodilation was recorded. Confirmation of these findings in a controlled, blinded study would indicate the existence of a link between the pain of sciatica patients (radicular or sciatica-like pain) and the activity of the autonomic nervous system. Further studies on a bigger group of patients are still needed.

  19. Barriers and facilitators to implement shared decision making in multidisciplinary sciatica care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Wentink, Manon M; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2013-08-23

    The Dutch multidisciplinary sciatica guideline recommends that the team of professionals involved in sciatica care and the patient together decide on surgical or prolonged conservative treatment (shared decision making [SDM]). Despite this recommendation, SDM is not yet integrated in sciatica care. Existing literature concerning barriers and facilitators to SDM implementation mainly focuses on one discipline only, whereas multidisciplinary care may involve other barriers and facilitators, or make these more complex for both professionals and patients. Therefore, this qualitative study aims to identify barriers and facilitators perceived by patients and professionals for SDM implementation in multidisciplinary sciatica care. We conducted 40 semi-structured interviews with professionals involved in sciatica care (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and orthopedic surgeons) and three focus groups among patients (six to eight per group). The interviews and focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed in full. Reported barriers and facilitators were classified according to the framework of Grol and Wensing. The software package Atlas.ti 7.0 was used for analysis. Professionals reported 53 barriers and 5 facilitators, and patients 35 barriers and 18 facilitators for SDM in sciatica care. Professionals perceived most barriers at the level of the organizational context, and facilitators at the level of the individual professional. Patients reported most barriers and facilitators at the level of the individual professional. Several barriers and facilitators correspond with barriers and facilitators found in the literature (e.g., lack of time, motivation) but also new barriers and facilitators were identified. Many of these new barriers mentioned by both professionals and patients were related to the multidisciplinary setting, such as lack of visibility, lack of trust in expertise of other disciplines, and lack of communication between

  20. Influence of low back pain and prognostic value of MRI in sciatica patients in relation to back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); G.J.L.A. Nijeholt (Geert J. Lycklama A); B.F.W. van der Kallen (Bas); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patients with sciatica frequently complain about associated back pain. It is not known whether there are prognostic relevant differences in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. Methods: The study population

  1. Designing an implementation strategy to improve interprofessional shared decision making in sciatica: study protocol of the DISC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, S.N.; Marang-van de Mheen, P.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, C.L.; Stiggelbout, A.M.; Vroomen, P.C.; van den Hout, W.B.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.; Bodegom-Vos, L. van; for the, D.s.g.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sciatica is a common condition worldwide that is characterized by radiating leg pain and regularly caused by a herniated disc with nerve root compression. Sciatica patients with persisting leg pain after six to eight weeks were found to have similar clinical outcomes and

  2. Designing an implementation strategy to improve interprofessional shared decision making in sciatica : study protocol of the DISC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Assendelft, Willem J. J.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Vroomen, Patrick C. A. J.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Vlieland, Thea P. M. Vliet; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sciatica is a common condition worldwide that is characterized by radiating leg pain and regularly caused by a herniated disc with nerve root compression. Sciatica patients with persisting leg pain after six to eight weeks were found to have similar clinical outcomes and associated costs

  3. Prognostic Factors for Persistent Leg-Pain in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeld, Olaf; Grotle, Margreth; Siewers, Vibeke; Pedersen, Linda M; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Zwart, John-Anker

    2017-03-01

    Prospective cohort study. To identify potential prognostic factors for persistent leg-pain at 12 months among patients hospitalized with acute severe sciatica. The long-term outcome for patients admitted to hospital with sciatica is generally unfavorable. Results concerning prognostic factors for persistent sciatica are limited and conflicting. A total of 210 patients acutely admitted to hospital for either surgical or nonsurgical treatment of sciatica were consecutively recruited and received a thorough clinical and radiographic examination in addition to responding to a comprehensive questionnaire. Follow-up assessments were done at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Potential prognostic factors were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks. The impact of these factors on leg-pain was analyzed by multiple linear regression modeling. A total of 151 patients completed the entire study, 93 receiving nonrandomized surgical treatment. The final multivariate models showed that the following factors were significantly associated with leg-pain at 12 months: high psychosocial risk according to the Örebro Musculosceletal Pain Questionnaire (unstandardized beta coefficient 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72-2.38, P sciatica. 2.

  4. Diagnosis value of NMR imaging in recurring postoperative sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frocrain, L.; Duvauferrier, R.; Chales, G.; Ramee, A.; Pawlotsky, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Twelve patients who had a subsequent lumbar sciatica after surgery were evaluated with computerized tomography (C.T.) and magnetic resonance imaging (M.R.I.). The M.R.I. was performed with a 0.35 T whole body superconducting unit using spin echo technique. Two pulse sequences were realized varying the repetition time (TR) from 500 to 2,000 ms and the echo time (TE) from 28 to 60 ms. For the longer pulse, the twice echo were interpreted. The slide obtained with a surface-coil were performed in sagittal plane for the twice pulse sequences and in transaxial plane for the shorter pulse sequence. In seven cases, the results obtained with C.T. and M.R.I. were correlated. In two cases, the C.T. showed a scar formation, the M.R.I. showed a recurrent disk herniation. In three times, C.T. was unable to differentiate clearly between recurrent disk herniation and scar formation, the M.R.I. showed unequivocally on one case a scar formation and on two cases a recurrent disk herniation.

  5. Influence of low back pain and prognostic value of MRI in sciatica patients in relation to back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-01-01

    Patients with sciatica frequently complain about associated back pain. It is not known whether there are prognostic relevant differences in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. The study population contained patients with sciatica who underwent a baseline MRI to assess eligibility for a randomized trial designed to compare the efficacy of early surgery with prolonged conservative care for sciatica. Two neuroradiologists and one neurosurgeon independently evaluated all MR images. The MRI readers were blinded to symptom status. The MRI findings were compared between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. The presence of disabling back pain at baseline was correlated with perceived recovery at one year. Of 379 included sciatica patients, 158 (42%) had disabling back pain. Of the patients with both sciatica and disabling back pain 68% did reveal a herniated disc with nerve root compression on MRI, compared to 88% of patients with predominantly sciatica (Psciatica at baseline was negatively associated with perceived recovery at one year (Odds ratio [OR] 0.32, 95% Confidence Interval 0.18-0.56, PSciatica patients with disabling back pain in absence of nerve root compression on MRI at baseline reported less perceived recovery at one year compared to those with predominantly sciatica and nerve root compression on MRI (50% vs 91%, PSciatica patients with disabling low back pain reported an unfavorable outcome at one-year follow-up compared to those with predominantly sciatica. If additionally a clear herniated disc with nerve root compression on MRI was absent, the results were even worse.

  6. Persistent sciatica induced by quadratus femoris muscle tear and treated by surgical decompression: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzanakakis George

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Quadratus femoris tear is an uncommon injury, which is only rarely reported in the literature. In the majority of cases the correct diagnosis is delayed due to non-specific symptoms and signs. A magnetic resonance imaging scan is crucial in the differential diagnosis since injuries to contiguous soft tissues may present with similar symptoms. Presentation with sciatica is not reported in the few cases existing in the English literature and the reported treatment has always been conservative. Case presentation We report here on a case of quadratus femoris tear in a 22-year-old Greek woman who presented with persistent sciatica. She was unresponsive to conservative measures and so was treated with surgical decompression. Conclusion The correct diagnosis of quadratus muscle tear is a challenge for physicians. The treatment is usually conservative, but in cases of persistent sciatica surgical decompression is an alternative option.

  7. Neuropathic pain, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein in sciatica patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Tomas; Bob, Petr

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that neuropathic pain component in low back pain (LBP) patients is associated with higher ratings of comorbidities such as depression and anxiety disorders. In line with current findings, the purpose of this clinical study is to examine a hypothesis regarding a relationship of neuropathic pain component, depression, and other psychopathological symptoms in a specific group of LBP patients with sciatica pain. With respect to findings that depression is related to inflammatory changes, and inflammatory mediators may play a role in neuropathic pain generation, we have assessed also serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Results of the present study show that increased neuropathic pain component in sciatica patients is associated with elevated levels of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and serum CRP levels. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that CRP levels in sciatica patients are closely associated with neuropathic pain.

  8. Timing of surgery for sciatica: subgroup analysis alongside a randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Mark P.; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W.

    2009-01-01

    Surgery speeds up recovery for sciatica. Prolonged conservative care with surgery for those patients with persistent sciatica however, yields similar results at 1 year. To investigate whether baseline variables modify the difference in recovery rates between these treatment strategies, baseline data of 283 patients enrolled in a randomized trial, comparing early surgery with prolonged conservative care, were used to analyse effect modification of the allotted treatment strategy. For predictors shown to modify the effect of the treatment strategy, repeated measurement analyses with the Roland Disability Questionnaire and visual analogue scale pain as continuous outcomes were performed for every level of that predictor. Presumed predictive variables did not have any interaction with treatment, while “sciatica provoked by sitting” showed to be a significant effect modifier (P = 0.07). In a Cox model we estimated a hazard ratio (HR, surgery versus conservative) of 2.2 (95% CI 1.7–3.0) in favour of surgery when sciatica was provoked by sitting, while the HR was 1.3 (95% CI 0.8–2.2) when this sign was absent. The interaction effect is marginally significant (interactions are usually tested at the 10% level) but the patterns generated by the repeated measurement analyses of all primary outcomes are completely consistent with the inferred pattern from the survival analysis. Classical signs did not show any contribution as decision support tools in deciding when to operate for sciatica, whereas treatment effects of early surgery are emphasized when sciatica is provoked by sitting and negligible when this symptom is absent. PMID:19132412

  9. Primary Epidural Varicosis as a Rare Cause of Sciatica: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-discogenic sciatica can be caused by any lesion along the course of the lumbosacral nerve roots and sciatic nerve. We aim to present a rare case of refractory sciatica in an otherwise healthy 25-year-old man. He complained of left leg pain without significant back pain. Extensor hallucis longus muscle was weak on the left side with limited straight leg rising. On magnetic resonance imaging, a space-occupying lesion resembling a sequestrated disc was noted that after surgical decompression, epidural varicosis was demonstrated.

  10. Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Treating Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongshi Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a systematic review and meta-analysis, which aimed to assess the current evidence on the effects and safety of acupuncture for treating sciatica. In this review, a total of 11 randomized controlled trials were included. As a result, we found that the use of acupuncture may be more effective than drugs and may enhance the effect of drugs for patients with sciatica, but because of the insufficient number of relevant and rigorous studies, the evidence is limited. Future trials using rigorous methodology, appropriate comparisons, and clinically relevant outcomes should be conducted.

  11. Refractory sciatica could be a sign of malignancy: A unique case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, Karuppiah

    2016-01-04

    t Renal cell carcinoma is one of the highly aggressive tumors and notorious for late presentations. It is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Renal cell carcinoma is known for rare metastatic sites. In clinical practice, it is often important not to anchor to a particular diagnosis but rather revisit and revaluate entire history and clinical examination. We describe a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma that was initially treated as sciatica and later found to have advanced debilitating malignancy. Internal medicine physicians should be able to recognize one of the rare metastatic sites of renal cell carcinoma and understand the importance of imaging studies if patient has persisting sciatica symptoms without improvement.

  12. Comorbid subjective health complaints in patients with sciatica: a prospective study including comparison with the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne J; Ihlebaek, Camilla M; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens I; Grotle, Margreth

    2011-06-01

    Chronic nonspecific low back pain is accompanied by high rates of comorbid mental and physical conditions. The aims of this study were to investigate if patients with specific back pain, that is, sciatica caused by lumbar herniation, report higher rates of subjective health complaints (SHCs) than the general population and if there is an association between change in sciatica symptoms and change in SHCs over a 12-month period. A multicenter cohort study of 466 sciatica patients was conducted with follow-up at 3 months and 1 year. Comorbid SHCs were measured by 27 items of the SHC inventory. Odds ratios (ORs) for each SHC were calculated with comparison to a general population sample (n=928) by logistic regression. The SHC number was calculated by summing all complaints present. At baseline, the ORs for reporting SHCs for the sciatica patients were significantly elevated in 15 of the 27 items with a mean (S.D.) SHC number of 7.5 (4.4), compared to 5.2 (4.4) in the general population (Psciatica, the SHC number was reduced to normal levels. Among those with persisting or worsening sciatica, the number increased to a level almost double that of the general population. Compared to the general population, the prevalence of subjective health complaints in sciatica is increased. During follow-up, the number of health complaints increased in patients with persisting or worsening sciatica. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Concurrent measurement of isokinetic muscle strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles in patients with lumbar disc herniation with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Cheng; Kuo, Chu-Wen; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chang, Shin-Tsu; Ni, Shou-Min; Ho, Cheng-Wen

    2010-12-15

    A cross-sectional study comparing normal subjects and patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with sciatica. To simultaneously measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles in both groups. Coordination between the trunk and lower extremity muscles is important for normal physical activity. Reduced trunk and knee muscle strength have been reported in patients with lower level LDH; however, ankle performance in these patients is still unknown. We recruited 43 normal subjects as controls and 33 patients with lower level LDH with sciatica. The isokinetic strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles was measured at 2 velocities in random order: 60°/s and 120°/s, and 60°/s and 180°/s for trunk and ankle strength and for knee strength, respectively. The isokinetic trunk strength was significantly lower in the LDH group irrespective of test modes or velocity. Despite unilateral sciatica or test modes and velocity, the unilateral knee strength was significantly lower in the LDH group than that in the control group. Knee extension torque was also found to be significantly lower in the limbs with sciatica than in those without sciatica at the testing velocity of 180°/s (80.25 ± 24.88 vs. 95.42 ± 26.29 Nm, P sciatica or test velocity, ankle plantar flexion torque revealed to be significantly lower in the LDH group than the control group; however, dorsiflexion torque was not different. Significant correlations were demonstrated among the total muscle strength of the trunk, knees, and ankles in both groups. Besides the lower trunk strength, concurrent lower unilateral knee and ankle plantar flexion but not dorsiflexion strength was demonstrated in the LDH subjects with unilateral sciatica, regardless of its location. As compared to the limbs without sciatica, an additional 14% reduction of knee extension torque at 180°/s was found in the limbs with sciatica in the LDH patients.

  14. Sciatica-like symptoms and the sacroiliac joint: clinical features and differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, L H; Nijssen, P G N; Tijssen, C C; van Middendorp, J J; Schieving, J

    2013-07-01

    To compare the clinical features of patients with sacroiliac joint (SIJ)-related sciatica-like symptoms to those with sciatica from nerve root compression and to investigate the necessity to perform radiological imaging in patients with sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ. Patients with pain radiating below the buttocks with a duration of 4 weeks to 1 year were included. After physical and radiological examinations, a diagnosis of SI joint-related pain, pain due to disk herniation, or a combination of these two causes was made. Patients with SIJ-related leg pain (n = 77/186) were significantly more often female, had shorter statue, a shorter duration of symptoms, and had more often pain radiating to the groin and a history of a fall on the buttocks. Muscle weakness, corkscrew phenomenon, finger-floor distance ≥25 cm, lumbar scoliosis, positive Bragard or Kemp sign, and positive leg raising test were more often present when radiologic nerve root compression was present. Although these investigations may help, MRI of the spine is necessary to discriminate between the groups. Sciatica-like symptoms derived from the SIJ can clinically mimic a radiculopathy. We suggest to perform a thorough physical examination of the spine, SI joints, and hips with additional radiological tests to exclude other causes.

  15. The prognosis of self-reported paresthesia and weakness in disc-related sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grøvle, L; Haugen, A J; Natvig, B; Brox, J I; Grotle, M

    2013-11-01

    To explore how patients with sciatica rate the 'bothersomeness' of paresthesia (tingling and numbness) and weakness as compared with leg pain during 2 years of follow-up. Observational cohort study including 380 patients with sciatica and lumbar disc herniation referred to secondary care. Using the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index paresthesia, weakness and leg pain were rated on a scale from 0 to 6. A symptom score of 4-6 was defined as bothersome. Along with leg pain, the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness both improved during follow-up. Those who received surgery (n = 121) reported larger improvements in both symptoms than did those who were treated without surgery. At 2 years, 18.2% of the patients reported bothersome paresthesia, 16.6% reported bothersome leg pain, and 11.5% reported bothersome weakness. Among patients with no or little leg pain, 6.7% reported bothersome paresthesia and 5.1% bothersome weakness. During 2 years of follow-up, patients considered paresthesia more bothersome than weakness. At 2 years, the percentage of patients who reported bothersome paresthesia was similar to the percentage who reported bothersome leg pain. Based on patients' self-report, paresthesia and weakness are relevant aspects of disc-related sciatica.

  16. The Efficacy of Acupuncture for the Treatment of Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sciatica is one of the most frequently reported complaints; it affects quality of life and reduces social and economic efficacy. Clinical studies on the efficacy of acupuncture therapy in sciatica are increasing, while systematic reviews assessing the efficacy of acupuncture therapy are still lacking. Objective. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture therapy for sciatica. Methods. Comprehensive searches of 8 databases were conducted up until April 2015. Outcomes included effectiveness (proportion of patients who improved totally or partly in clinical symptoms, pain intensity, and pain threshold. Effect sizes were presented as risk ratio (RR and mean difference (MD. Pooled effect sizes were calculated by fixed effects or random effects model. Results. A total of 12 studies (involving 1842 participants were included. Results showed that acupuncture was more effective than conventional Western medicine (CWM in outcomes effectiveness (RR 1.21, 95% CI: 1.16–1.25, pain intensity (MD −1.25, 95% CI: −1.63 to −0.86, and pain threshold (MD: 1.08, 95% CI: 0.98–1.17. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis found that the results did not change in different treatment method and drug categories substantially. The reported adverse effects were acceptable. Conclusions. Acupuncture may be effective in treating the pain associated with sciatica.

  17. Estimates of success in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation depend upon outcome measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Grøvle, Lars; Brox, Jens Ivar; Natvig, Bård; Keller, Anne; Soldal, Dag; Grotle, Margreth

    2011-10-01

    The objectives were to estimate the cut-off points for success on different sciatica outcome measures and to determine the success rate after an episode of sciatica by using these cut-offs. A 12-month multicenter observational study was conducted on 466 patients with sciatica and lumbar disc herniation. The cut-off values were estimated by ROC curve analyses using Completely recovered or Much better on a 7-point global change scale as external criterion for success. The cut-off values (references in brackets) at 12 months were leg pain VAS 17.5 (0-100), back pain VAS 22.5 (0-100), Sciatica Bothersomeness Index 6.5 (0-24), Maine-Seattle Back Questionnaire 4.5 (0-12), and the SF-36 subscales bodily pain 51.5, and physical functioning 81.7 (0-100, higher values indicate better health). In conclusion, the success rates at 12 months varied from 49 to 58% depending on the measure used. The proposed cut-offs may facilitate the comparison of success rates across studies.

  18. epidural injection use for low back pain associated with sciatica at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... Objective: To assess the effects of lumbar epidural steroid injections in patients with radiculopathy. (sciatica), by assessing reduction of pain at short term (3 weeks) and intermediate term (12 weeks). Design: This was a prospective study done between August 2005 and July 2011 at Kikuyu Orthopaedic.

  19. Sciatica in the female patient: anatomical considerations, aetiology and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovay, Philippe; Gobelet, Charles

    2006-01-01

    The principal author was confronted few years ago with the case of a 38-year-old woman with a 5-month history of ill-defined L5 sciatic pain that was referred to an orthopaedic department for investigation and eventual surgical treatment for what was suspected to be herniated disc-related sciatica. Removal of her enlarged uterus found unexpectedly close to the sacroiliac joint upon lumbar MRI abolished her symptoms. Review of the literature showed that the lumbosacral trunk is vulnerable to pressure from any abdominal mass originating from the uterus and the ovaries. Physiological processes in the female patient and gynaecological diseases may be the source of sciatica, often not readily searched for, leading to fruitless investigations and surgical treatments. The aim of the paper is to highlight gynaecological and obstetrical causes of sciatica and sciatica-like symptoms. To prevent unproductive expenses and morbidity, a thorough gynaecological examination should be done even though neurological examination may be suggestive of a herniated intervertebral disc, and the cyclic pattern of pain related to menses should be routinely asked for. PMID:16622708

  20. Epidural injection use for low back pain associated with sciatica at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the effects of lumbar epidural steroid injections in patients with radiculopathy (sciatica), by assessing reduction of pain at short term (3 weeks) and intermediate term (12 weeks). Design: This was a prospective study done between August 2005 and July 2011 at Kikuyu Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation ...

  1. Systematic review of prognostic factors predicting outcome in non-surgically treated patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, A J H; Luijsterburg, P A J; Lin, C W C; Jacobs, W C H; Koes, B W; Verhagen, A P

    2013-09-01

    Identification of prognostic factors for surgery in patients with sciatica is important to be able to predict surgery in an early stage. Identification of prognostic factors predicting persistent pain, disability and recovery are important for better understanding of the clinical course, to inform patient and physician and support decision making. Consequently, we aimed to systematically review prognostic factors predicting outcome in non-surgically treated patients with sciatica. A search of Medline, Embase, Web of Science and Cinahl, up to March 2012 was performed for prospective cohort studies on prognostic factors for non-surgically treated sciatica. Two reviewers independently selected studies for inclusion and assessed the risk of bias. Outcomes were pain, disability, recovery and surgery. A best evidence synthesis was carried out in order to assess and summarize the data. The initial search yielded 4392 articles of which 23 articles reporting on 14 original cohorts met the inclusion criteria. High clinical, methodological and statistical heterogeneity among studies was found. Reported evidence regarding prognostic factors predicting the outcome in sciatica is limited. The majority of factors that have been evaluated, e.g., age, body mass index, smoking and sensory disturbance, showed no association with outcome. The only positive association with strong evidence was found for leg pain intensity at baseline as prognostic factor for subsequent surgery. © 2013 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of the clinical examination in identifying the level of herniation in patients with sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, M.J.; Koes, B.W.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Peul, W.C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design.: Cross sectional Objective.: To investigate the ability of the neurological examination to identify the specific level of a disc herniation in patients with sciatica and confirmed disc herniation. Summary of Background Data.: Tests included in a neurological examination theoretically

  3. A preliminary clinical evaluation of external snehan and asanas in the patients of sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh K Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower back pain radiating to either on one leg or both legs along the course of sciatic nerve is a common ailment in the clinical practice, this type of peculiar symptomatology is termed as "Sciatica" in modern medicine. The medical treatment is unsatisfactory for both the patient and the neurosurgeons, as the surgical treatment has its own hazards and the cost of the surgical procedure and medical treatment is prohibitory to most of the Indian patients. Hence, most of the patients present themselves to the practitioners of Indian medicines like Ayurveda and yoga. This study was designed to evaluate the preliminary clinical effects of Bahya Snehan and Asanas in the patients of sciatica. This was a prospective randomized active control trial. A total of 60 participants showing classical symptoms of Sciatica between 18 and 65 years of age were randomly assigned to receive Ayurvedic or Yogic measure. One group received Snehan (external with Bhujang and Shalabh Asana while another group received Bhujang and Salabh Asana only. Both groups practiced supervised intervention for 4 weeks. The signs and symptoms like Katishool (pain, tenderness, Stambha (rigidity, difficulty in walking, pain on bending forward were graded and interpreted at the end of the trail Significant improvement was observed in both groups before and after external Snehan with Bhujang and Shalabh Asana and in another group Bhujang and Salabh Asana only. Conclusions: Both groups, one with Snehan with asanas and the second with asanas only showed significant improvement in the patients of sciatica (Gridhrasi.

  4. PRECISE - pregabalin in addition to usual care for sciatica: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mathieson (Stephanie); C. Maher (Chris); A.J. McLachlan (Andrew); J. Latimer (Jane); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.J. Hancock (Mark J.); I. Harris (Ian); R.N. Day (Richard); J. Pik (Justin); S. Jan (Stephen); L. Billot (Laurent); C.-W.C. Lin (Chung-Wei Christine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Sciatica is a type of neuropathic pain that is characterised by pain radiating into the leg. It is often accompanied by low back pain and neurological deficits in the lower limb. While this condition may cause significant suffering for the individual, the lack of evidence

  5. Dry Needling Related Short-Term Vasodilation in Chronic Sciatica under Infrared Thermovision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Rychlik, Michał; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Vasomotor responses to dry needling (DN) of trigger points (TrPs) under infrared thermovision (IRT) camera control and TrPs coexistence in chronic sciatica patients have never been studied. Materials and Methods. Fifty consecutive chronic sciatica patients were enrolled in the study. DN under IRT control was performed for all patients regardless of gluteus minimus (GM) active TrPs examination. Then, the vasomotor response and its agreement with TrPs examination were evaluated. Results. The prevalence of GM active TrPs was 32%. DN provokes intensive vasodilatation for TrPs-positive patients only, with the localization dependent on referred pain during the procedure (r = 0.896;  P = 0.000) not the daily complaint. The increase of vasodilatation was, for example, for thigh, TrPs-positive +30.29% (P < 0.05) versus TrPs-negative +4.08%. Additionally, a significant skin temperature increase was observed for TrPs-positive only, for example, thigh +1.5 ± 1.3°C (maximum) and +1.2 ± 1.0°C (average) (both P < 0.05). Conclusion. GM active TrPs prevalence among chronic sciatica patients was around one in three. Every TrPs-positive subject presented with vasodilatation under IRT in the area of DN related referred pain. Although TrPs involvement in chronic sciatica patients is possible, further studies on a bigger group of patients are still required. PMID:25821479

  6. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs for Sciatica : An Updated Cochrane Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus J. A.; Roelofs, Pepijn D. D. M.; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review and meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported adverse effects in people with sciatica. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: NSAIDs are one of the most frequently

  7. Intradermal capsaicin as a neuropathic pain model in patients with unilateral sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykanat, Verna; Gentgall, Melanie; Briggs, Nancy; Williams, Desmond; Yap, Sharon; Rolan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    AIM This study compared the responses between patients with unilateral sciatica and pain-free volunteers following administration of intradermal capsaicin. METHODS Fourteen patients with unilateral sciatica and 12 pain-free volunteers received one injection per hour over 4 h of 1 µg and 10 µg capsaicin, into each calf. For each dose, spontaneous pain (10 cm VAS), area of flare (cm2) and the sum of allodynia and hyperalgesia radii across eight axes (cm) were recorded pre-injection and at 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min post injection. RESULTS Sciatica subjects experienced higher spontaneous pain and hyperalgesia responses in both legs compared with pain-free volunteers. The largest mean difference in spontaneous pain was 2.8 cm (95% CI 1.6, 3.9) at 5 min in the unaffected leg following 10 µg. The largest mean difference in hyperalgesia was 19.7 cm (95% CI 12.4, 27.0) at 60 min in the unaffected leg following 10 µg. Allodynia was greater in patients than in controls with the largest mean difference of 2.9 cm (95% CI 1, 4.8) at 5 min following 10 µg in the affected leg. Allodynia was also higher in the affected leg compared with the unaffected leg in sciatica patients with the highest mean difference of 3.0 cm (95% CI 1.2, 4.7) at 5 min following 10 µg. CONCLUSIONS The responses to intradermal capsaicin are quantitatively and qualitatively different in unilateral sciatica patients compared with pain-free controls. PMID:21740458

  8. Efficacy and tolerance of systemic steroids in sciatica: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncoroni, Cécile; Baillet, Athan; Durand, Marjorie; Gaudin, Philippe; Juvin, Robert

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of pharmacological interventions in sciatica is limited and the use of systemic steroids is still controversial. We aimed at evaluating the efficacy and tolerance of systemic steroids in sciatica. A systematic literature search was performed in the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases until February 2010. Randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy and the tolerance of systemic steroids in sciatica were included. Efficacy and tolerance were assessed using the relative risk (RR) and 95% CI with the inverse variance method (RR > 1 means that the event is more likely to occur in the steroid group). We explored the heterogeneity between the studies using subgroup analysis. Seven studies (383 patients) were included. The difference in the rate of responders between both groups was not statistically significant (RR = 1.22, 95% CI 0.96, 1.56). The rate of adverse events was 13.3% for the patients in the steroid group and 6.6% for the placebo group (RR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.06, 3.80). The number needed to harm was 20 (95% CI 10, ∞). Twenty (15.3%) patients in the steroid group and seven (5.7%) patients in the placebo group underwent surgery. A trend towards a higher requirement for spinal surgery was observed in the steroid group (RR = 1.14, 95% CI 0.74, 1.75). The methodological quality slightly influenced the results. We did not find any publication bias. Steroid efficacy is not superior to the placebo in sciatica, but it has more side effects. The tolerance : efficacy ratio indicates against the use of systemic steroids in sciatica.

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang, E-mail: njmu_wangdehang@126.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha monoclonal antibody, infliximab, used to manage severe sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Jaro; Korhonen, Timo; Malmivaara, Antti; Paimela, Leena; Kyllönen, Eero; Lindgren, Karl-August; Rantanen, Pekka; Tervonen, Osmo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Seitsalo, Seppo; Hurri, Heikki

    2003-04-15

    An open-label study was conducted. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of infliximab, a monoclonal chimeric antibody, against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) for the treatment of severe sciatica. Evidence from animal studies indicates that TNFalpha plays a role in the pathophysiology of sciatica. Anti-TNFalpha therapy has not been previously evaluated in sciatic patients. In this study, 10 patients with disc herniation-induced severe sciatica received infliximab (Remicade 3 mg/kg) intravenously over 2 hours. The outcome was assessed at 1 hour, 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 3 months after the infusion and compared to historical control subjects consisting of 62 patients who received saline in a trial of periradicular infiltration for sciatica. Leg pain was the primary outcome, with more than a 75% decrease from the baseline score constituting a painless state. Fisher's exact test and repeated measures analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis. At 1 hour after the infusion, leg pain had decreased by 50%. At 2 weeks, 60% of the patients in the infliximab group were painless, as compared with 16% of the control patients (P = 0.006). The difference was sustained at 3 months (90% vs 46%; P = 0.014). Infliximab was superior over the whole follow-up period in terms of leg pain (P = 0.003) and back-related disability (P = 0.004). At 1 month, every patient in the infliximab group had returned to work, whereas 38% of the control subjects still were on sick leave (P = 0.02). None of the patients treated with infliximab underwent surgery during the follow-up period. No immediate or delayed adverse drug reactions and no adverse effects related to medication were observed. Anti-TNFalpha therapy is a promising treatment option for sciatica. There is an urgent need for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate whether thesepromising early results can be confirmed.

  11. Recovery of motor deficit accompanying sciatica--subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdevest, Gijsbert M; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-09-01

    In patients with sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation, it is generally recommended to reserve surgical treatment for those who suffer from intolerable pain or those who demonstrate persistent symptoms after conservative management. Controversy exists about the necessity of early surgical intervention for those patients that have an additional motor deficit. The aim of this study was to compare the recovery of motor deficit among patients receiving early surgery to those receiving prolonged conservative treatment. Subgroup analysis of a randomized controlled trial. This subgroup analysis focuses on 150 (53%) of 283 patients with sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and whose symptoms at baseline (before randomization) were accompanied by a motor deficit. Motor deficit was assessed through manual muscle testing and graded according to the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale. In total, 150 patients with 6 to 12 weeks of sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and whose symptoms were accompanied by a moderate (MRC Grade 4) or severe (MRC Grade 3) motor deficit were randomly allocated to early surgery or prolonged conservative treatment. Repeated standardized neurologic examinations were performed at baseline and at 8, 26, and 52 weeks after randomization. This study was supported by a grant from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMW) and the Hoelen Foundation The Hague. Sciatica recovered among seven (10%) of the 70 patients assigned to early surgery before surgery could be performed, and of the 80 patients assigned to conservative treatment, 32 patients (40%) were treated surgically because of intolerable pain. Baseline severity of motor deficit was graded moderate in 84% of patients and severe in 16% of patients. Motor deficit recovered significantly faster among patients allocated to early surgery (p=.01), but the difference was no longer significant at 26 (p=.21) or 52 weeks (p=.92). At 1 year, complete recovery of motor

  12. The Effect of Smoking on the Risk of Sciatica: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Rahman; Falah-Hassani, Kobra

    2016-01-01

    The role of smoking in sciatica is unknown. This study aimed to estimate the effect of smoking on lumbar radicular pain and clinically verified sciatica. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, and ResearchGate databases from 1964 through March 2015. We used a random-effects meta-analysis, assessed heterogeneity and publication bias, and performed sensitivity analyses with regard to study design, methodological quality of included studies, and publication bias. Twenty-eight (7 cross-sectional [n = 20,111 participants], 8 case control [n = 10,815], and 13 cohort [n = 443,199]) studies qualified for a meta-analysis. Current smokers had an increased risk of lumbar radicular pain or clinically verified sciatica (pooled adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.30-1.64, n = 459,023). Former smokers had only slightly elevated risk compared with never smokers (pooled adjusted OR 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02-1.30, n = 387,196). For current smoking the pooled adjusted OR was 1.64 (95% CI, 1.24-2.16, n = 10,853) for lumbar radicular pain, 1.35 (95% CI, 1.09-1.68, n = 110,374) for clinically verified sciatica, and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.16-1.80, n = 337,796) for hospitalization or surgery due to a herniated lumbar disc or sciatica. The corresponding estimates for past smoking were 1.57 (95% CI, 0.98-2.52), 1.09 (95% CI, 1.00-1.19), and 1.10 (95% CI, 0.96-1.26). The associations did not differ between men and women, and they were independent of study design. Moreover, there was no evidence of publication bias, and the observed associations were not due to selection or detection bias, or confounding factors. Smoking is a modest risk factor for lumbar radicular pain and clinically verified sciatica. Smoking cessation appears to reduce, but not entirely eliminate, the excess risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Sciatica in Finnish Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Lemmelä

    Full Text Available Sciatica or the sciatic syndrome is a common and often disabling low back disorder in the working-age population. It has a relatively high heritability but poorly understood molecular mechanisms. The Finnish population is a genetic isolate where small founder population and bottleneck events have led to enrichment of certain rare and low frequency variants. We performed here the first genome-wide association (GWAS and meta-analysis of sciatica. The meta-analysis was conducted across two GWAS covering 291 Finnish sciatica cases and 3671 controls genotyped and imputed at 7.7 million autosomal variants. The most promising loci (p<1x10-6 were replicated in 776 Finnish sciatica patients and 18,489 controls. We identified five intragenic variants, with relatively low frequencies, at two novel loci associated with sciatica at genome-wide significance. These included chr9:14344410:I (rs71321981 at 9p22.3 (NFIB gene; p = 1.30x10-8, MAF = 0.08 and four variants at 15q21.2: rs145901849, rs80035109, rs190200374 and rs117458827 (MYO5A; p = 1.34x10-8, MAF = 0.06; p = 2.32x10-8, MAF = 0.07; p = 3.85x10-8, MAF = 0.06; p = 4.78x10-8, MAF = 0.07, respectively. The most significant association in the meta-analysis, a single base insertion rs71321981 within the regulatory region of the transcription factor NFIB, replicated in an independent Finnish population sample (p = 0.04. Despite identifying 15q21.2 as a promising locus, we were not able to replicate it. It was differentiated; the lead variants within 15q21.2 were more frequent in Finland (6-7% than in other European populations (1-2%. Imputation accuracies of the three significantly associated variants (chr9:14344410:I, rs190200374, and rs80035109 were validated by genotyping. In summary, our results suggest a novel locus, 9p22.3 (NFIB, which may be involved in susceptibility to sciatica. In addition, another locus, 15q21.2, emerged as a promising one, but failed to replicate.

  14. Sciatica as a presenting feature of thyroid follicular adenocarcinoma in a 79-year-old woman.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ogbodo, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe an unusual case of metastatic thyroid follicular adenocarcinoma presenting with sciatica in a 79-year-old woman. The primary thyroid tumour was undiagnosed until this clinical presentation. The patient gave a short history of back pain and right-sided sciatica, which was progressive and nocturnal in nature. Neuroimaging revealed an enhancing intradural mass lesion, which was completely excised through a right L1-L3 hemilaminectomy. Histopathological examination of the excised tissue revealed a follicular thyroid carcinoma. Subsequent metastatic investigation revealed a heterogeneously attenuating mixed solid cystic mass in a retrosternal thyroid gland, with multiple solid pulmonary nodules suggestive of metastatic disease. She opted for palliative radiotherapy for the primary thyroid cancer and made remarkable postoperative improvement. The authors conclude that surgical treatment of solitary metastatic lesion may produce good symptomatic relief irrespective of patient\\'s age and primary pathology, while emphasising the need for detailed clinical evaluation of patients with \\'red flag\\' symptoms.

  15. Obturator internus pyomyositis manifested as sciatica in a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Ching; Hsu, Jin-Yi; Chen, Michael Yu-Chih; Liang, Chung-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of the skeletal muscles causing myalgia and fever in patients. Hematogenous seeding engendered by persistent bacteremia and septic embolism is usually the underlying cause of the disease. Trauma, intravenous drug use, and immunodeficiency are the main predisposing factors. Obturator internus pyomyositis with sciatica has not previously been reported. We report a rare case of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting with left buttock pain and sciatica. Computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of obturator internus pyomyositis. The patient was discharged uneventfully after successful antibiotic treatment. The mortality rate of patients who have pyomyositis comorbid with another condition or disease is extremely high. Early diagnosis and aggressive management are imperative. PMID:27472717

  16. Drugs for relief of pain in patients with sciatica: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Chris G; Ferreira, Manuela L; Ferreira, Paulo H; Hancock, Mark; Oliveira, Vinicius C; McLachlan, Andrew J; Koes, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of analgesic and adjuvant pain drugs typically administered in primary care for the management of patients with sciatica. Design Systematic review. Data source International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, PsycINFO, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, and LILACS. Study selection Randomised controlled trials assessing the efficacy and tolerability of drugs versus placebo or other treatment for sciatica. Data extraction Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Pain and disability outcomes were converted to a common 0 to 100 scale. Data were pooled with a random effects model, and the GRADE approach was used in summary conclusions. Results Twenty three published reports met the inclusion criteria. The evidence to judge the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants, and opioid analgesics ranged from moderate to low quality. Most of the pooled estimates did not favour the active treatment over placebo. The pooled results of two trials of corticosteroids (mean difference in overall and leg pain −12.2, 95% confidence interval −20.9 to −3.4) and a single trial of the anticonvulsant gabapentin for chronic sciatica (mean difference in overall pain relief −26.6, −38.3 to −14.9) showed some benefits but only in the short term. The median rate of adverse events was 17% (interquartile range 10-30%) for the active drugs and 11% (3-23%) for placebo. Trial limitations included failure to use validated outcome measures, lack of long term follow-up, and small sample size. Conclusions As the existing evidence from clinical trials is of low quality, the efficacy and tolerability of drugs commonly prescribed for the management of sciatica in primary care is unclear. PMID:22331277

  17. Obesity as a risk factor for sciatica: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Rahman; Lallukka, Tea; Karppinen, Jaro; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the associations of overweight and obesity with lumbar radicular pain and sciatica using a meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science databases from 1966 to July 2013. We performed a random-effects meta-analysis and assessed publication bias. We included 26 (8 cross-sectional, 7 case-control, and 11 cohort) studies. Both overweight (pooled odds ratio (OR) = 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14, 1.33; n = 19,165) and obesity (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.27, 1.55; n = 19,165) were associated with lumbar radicular pain. The pooled odds ratio for physician-diagnosed sciatica was 1.12 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.20; n = 109,724) for overweight and 1.31 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.62; n = 115,661) for obesity. Overweight (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.24; n = 358,328) and obesity (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.23, 1.54; n = 358,328) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization for sciatica, and overweight/obesity was associated with increased risk of surgery for lumbar disc herniation (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.25, 2.86; n = 73,982). Associations were similar for men and women and were independent of the design and quality of included studies. There was no evidence of publication bias. Our findings consistently showed that both overweight and obesity are risk factors for lumbar radicular pain and sciatica in men and women, with a dose-response relationship.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of endometriosis of the piriform muscle causing sciatica: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, N.A.J.; Murphy, J.P.; Bloom, C.; Hamilton, P. [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-02-01

    Endometriosis is the presence of functioning endometrial tissue in a location outside the uterus and is a rare cause of sciatica. The superior soft-tissue contrast and sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting blood products make it a valuable imaging modality in patients with pelvic endometriosis. In the case described below, it allowed a presumptive diagnosis to be made and the response to medical therapy to be monitored. (author)

  19. Dry Needling Related Short-Term Vasodilation in Chronic Sciatica under Infrared Thermovision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Skorupska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasomotor responses to dry needling (DN of trigger points (TrPs under infrared thermovision (IRT camera control and TrPs coexistence in chronic sciatica patients have never been studied. Materials and Methods. Fifty consecutive chronic sciatica patients were enrolled in the study. DN under IRT control was performed for all patients regardless of gluteus minimus (GM active TrPs examination. Then, the vasomotor response and its agreement with TrPs examination were evaluated. Results. The prevalence of GM active TrPs was 32%. DN provokes intensive vasodilatation for TrPs-positive patients only, with the localization dependent on referred pain during the procedure (r=0.896;  P=0.000 not the daily complaint. The increase of vasodilatation was, for example, for thigh, TrPs-positive +30.29% (P<0.05 versus TrPs-negative +4.08%. Additionally, a significant skin temperature increase was observed for TrPs-positive only, for example, thigh +1.5 ± 1.3°C (maximum and +1.2 ± 1.0°C (average (both P<0.05. Conclusion. GM active TrPs prevalence among chronic sciatica patients was around one in three. Every TrPs-positive subject presented with vasodilatation under IRT in the area of DN related referred pain. Although TrPs involvement in chronic sciatica patients is possible, further studies on a bigger group of patients are still required.

  20. Obturator internus pyomyositis manifested as sciatica in a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Wei-Ching; Hsu, Jin-Yi; Chen, Michael Yu-Chih; Liang, Chung-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of the skeletal muscles causing myalgia and fever in patients. Hematogenous seeding engendered by persistent bacteremia and septic embolism is usually the underlying cause of the disease. Trauma, intravenous drug use, and immunodeficiency are the main predisposing factors. Obturator internus pyomyositis with sciatica has not previously been reported. We report a rare case of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting with left buttoc...

  1. Dorsal root ganglion compression as an animal model of sciatica and low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiao-Yu; Yang, Jing; LI, HUI-MING; Hu, San-Jue; Xing, Jun-Ling

    2012-01-01

    As sciatica and low back pain are among the most common medical complaints, many studies have duplicated these conditions in animals. Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) is one of these models. The surgery is simple: after exposing the L4/L5 intervertebral foramina, stainless steel rods are implanted unilaterally, one rod for each vertebra, to chronically compress the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Then, CCD can be used to simulate the clinical conditions caused by steno...

  2. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients’ self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica. PMID:19488793

  3. Psychological defensive profile of sciatica patients with neuropathic pain and its relationship to quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutoglu, A; Boyaci, A; Karababa, I F; Koca, I; Kaya, E; Kucuk, A; Yetisgin, A

    2015-09-01

    To identify differences between defense styles and mechanisms in sciatica patients with or without neuropathic pain and their relationship to quality of life. The study included 37 sciatica patients with neuropathic pain (SNP), 36 sciatica patients without neuropathic pain and 38 healthy subjects. Pain severity was measured using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Psychological condition was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Defense mechanisms were assessed using a 40-item Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40) and quality of life was assessed using Short Form-36 (SF-36). BDI and BAI scores were significantly higher in the SNP group (p < 0.001). Idealization and immature defense styles, as well as isolation, displacement and somatization were significantly higher in the SNP group (p < 0.05). SF-36 parameters also differed significantly between the groups, with controls having the best scores and the SNP group the worst. In linear regression analysis, acting out and BDI were found to affect the pain domain of the SF-36 (p < 0.001). The acting out defensive style and BDI were independently associated with pain-related quality of life. In the SNP group, significant differences were found in the immature and neurotic styles of the defense mechanisms.

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5-S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3-S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Magnetic resonance neurography evaluation of chronic extraspinal sciatica after remote proximal hamstring injury: a preliminary retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucknor, Matthew D; Steinbach, Lynne S; Saloner, David; Chin, Cynthia T

    2014-08-01

    Extraspinal sciatica can present unique challenges in clinical diagnosis and management. In this study, the authors evaluated qualitative and quantitative patterns of sciatica-related pathology at the ischial tuberosity on MR neurography (MRN) studies performed for chronic extraspinal sciatica. Lumbosacral MRN studies obtained in 14 patients at the University of California, San Francisco between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients had been referred by neurosurgeons or neurologists for chronic unilateral sciatica (≥ 3 months), and the MRN reports described asymmetrical increased T2 signal within the sciatic nerve at the level of the ischial tuberosity. MRN studies were also performed prospectively in 6 healthy volunteers. Sciatic nerve T2 signal intensity (SI) and cross-sectional area at the ischial tuberosity were calculated and compared between the 2 sides in all 20 subjects. The same measurements were also performed at the sciatic notch as an internal reference. Adjacent musculoskeletal pathology was compared between the 2 sides in all subjects. Seven of the 9 patients for whom detailed histories were available had a specific history of injury or trauma near the proximal hamstring preceding the onset of sciatica. Eight of the 14 patients also demonstrated soft-tissue abnormalities adjacent to the proximal hamstring origin. The remaining 6 had normal muscles, tendons, and marrow in the region of the ischial tuberosity. There was a significant difference in sciatic nerve SI and size between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides at the level of the ischial tuberosity, with a mean adjusted SI of 1.38 compared with 1.00 (p sciatica remains a diagnosis of exclusion, this distinct category of patients has not been described in the radiographic literature and merits special attention from clinicians and radiologists in the management of extraspinal sciatica. Magnetic resonance neurography is useful for evaluating chronic sciatic neuropathy both

  6. Identification of risk factors for new-onset sciatica in Japanese workers: findings from the Japan epidemiological research of Occupation-related Back pain study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsudaira, Ko; Kawaguchi, Mika; Isomura, Tatsuya; Arisaka, Mayumi; Fujii, Tomoko; Takeshita, Katsushi; Kitagawa, Tomoaki; Miyoshi, Kota; Konishi, Hiroaki

    2013-12-15

    Two-year, prospective cohort data collected for the Japan epidemiological research of Occupation-related Back pain study were used for the analysis. To identify potential risk factors for the development of new-onset sciatica in initially symptom-free Japanese workers with no history of sciatica. Although the associations between individual and occupational factors and cases of new-onset sciatica are established, the effect of psychosocial factors on the development of sciatica has still not been adequately clarified. In total, 5310 participants responded to a self-administered baseline questionnaire (response rate: 86.5%). Furthermore, 3194 (60.2%) completed both 1- and 2-year follow-up questionnaires. The baseline questionnaire assessed individual characteristics, ergonomic work demands, and work-related psychosocial factors. The outcome of interest was new-onset sciatica with or without low back pain during the 2-year follow-up period. Incidence was calculated for participants who reported no low back pain in the preceding year and no history of lumbar radicular pain (sciatica) at baseline. Logistical regression assessed risk factors associated with new-onset sciatica. Of 765 eligible participants, 141 (18.4%) reported a new episode of sciatica during the 2-year follow-up. In crude analysis, significant associations were found between new-onset sciatica and age and obesity. In adjusted analysis, significant associations were found for obesity and mental workload in a qualitative aspect after controlling for age and sex. Consequently, in multivariate analysis with all the potential risk factors, age and obesity remained statistically significant (odds ratios: 1.59, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-2.52; odds ratios: 1.77, 95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.68, respectively). In previously asymptomatic Japanese workers, the risk of developing new-onset sciatica is mediated by individual factors. Our findings suggest that the management of obesity may prevent new

  7. PRECISE - pregabalin in addition to usual care for sciatica: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Stephanie; Maher, Christopher G; McLachlan, Andrew J; Latimer, Jane; Koes, Bart W; Hancock, Mark J; Harris, Ian; Day, Richard O; Pik, Justin; Jan, Stephen; Billot, Laurent; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine

    2013-07-11

    Sciatica is a type of neuropathic pain that is characterised by pain radiating into the leg. It is often accompanied by low back pain and neurological deficits in the lower limb. While this condition may cause significant suffering for the individual, the lack of evidence supporting effective treatments for sciatica makes clinical management difficult. Our objectives are to determine the efficacy of pregabalin on reducing leg pain intensity and its cost-effectiveness in patients with sciatica. PRECISE is a prospectively registered, double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial of pregabalin compared to placebo, in addition to usual care. Inclusion criteria include moderate to severe leg pain below the knee with evidence of nerve root/spinal nerve involvement. Participants will be randomised to receive either pregabalin with usual care (n = 102) or placebo with usual care (n = 102) for 8 weeks. The medicine dosage will be titrated up to the participant's optimal dose, to a maximum 600 mg per day. Follow up consultations will monitor individual progress, tolerability and adverse events. Usual care, if deemed appropriate by the study doctor, may include a referral for physical or manual therapy and/or prescription of analgesic medication. Participants, doctors and researchers collecting participant data will be blinded to treatment allocation. Participants will be assessed at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 26 and 52. The primary outcome will determine the efficacy of pregabalin in reducing leg pain intensity. Secondary outcomes will include back pain intensity, disability and quality of life. Data analysis will be blinded and by intention-to-treat. A parallel economic evaluation will be conducted from health sector and societal perspectives. This study will establish the efficacy of pregabalin in reducing leg pain intensity in patients with sciatica and provide important information regarding the effect of pregabalin treatment on disability and quality of life

  8. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Sciatica in Finnish Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmelä, Susanna; Solovieva, Svetlana; Shiri, Rahman; Benner, Christian; Heliövaara, Markku; Kettunen, Johannes; Anttila, Verneri; Ripatti, Samuli; Perola, Markus; Seppälä, Ilkka; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Salomaa, Veikko; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Palotie, Aarno; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    Sciatica or the sciatic syndrome is a common and often disabling low back disorder in the working-age population. It has a relatively high heritability but poorly understood molecular mechanisms. The Finnish population is a genetic isolate where small founder population and bottleneck events have led to enrichment of certain rare and low frequency variants. We performed here the first genome-wide association (GWAS) and meta-analysis of sciatica. The meta-analysis was conducted across two GWAS covering 291 Finnish sciatica cases and 3671 controls genotyped and imputed at 7.7 million autosomal variants. The most promising loci (psciatica patients and 18,489 controls. We identified five intragenic variants, with relatively low frequencies, at two novel loci associated with sciatica at genome-wide significance. These included chr9:14344410:I (rs71321981) at 9p22.3 (NFIB gene; p = 1.30x10-8, MAF = 0.08) and four variants at 15q21.2: rs145901849, rs80035109, rs190200374 and rs117458827 (MYO5A; p = 1.34x10-8, MAF = 0.06; p = 2.32x10-8, MAF = 0.07; p = 3.85x10-8, MAF = 0.06; p = 4.78x10-8, MAF = 0.07, respectively). The most significant association in the meta-analysis, a single base insertion rs71321981 within the regulatory region of the transcription factor NFIB, replicated in an independent Finnish population sample (p = 0.04). Despite identifying 15q21.2 as a promising locus, we were not able to replicate it. It was differentiated; the lead variants within 15q21.2 were more frequent in Finland (6-7%) than in other European populations (1-2%). Imputation accuracies of the three significantly associated variants (chr9:14344410:I, rs190200374, and rs80035109) were validated by genotyping. In summary, our results suggest a novel locus, 9p22.3 (NFIB), which may be involved in susceptibility to sciatica. In addition, another locus, 15q21.2, emerged as a promising one, but failed to replicate.

  9. Efficacy of infliximab for disc herniation-induced sciatica: one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Timo; Karppinen, Jaro; Malmivaara, Antti; Autio, Reijo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Paimela, Leena; Kyllönen, Eero; Lindgren, Karl-August; Tervonen, Osmo; Seitsalo, Seppo; Hurri, Heikki

    2004-10-01

    An open-label trial. To test the long-term efficacy of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in disc herniation-induced sciatica. Our recent trial indicated that a single infusion of 3 mg/weight-kg of infliximab produced a rapid curative effect in disc herniation-induced sciatica. Here, we describe the 1-year effect of a 3 mg/kg of infliximab in these 10 patients and our experience with a lower dose of 1 mg/kg of infliximab for the same indication in 2 additional patients. Patients with severe sciatica were treated with a single infusion of infliximab, 3 mg/weight-kg in 10 patients and 1 mg/kg in 2 patients, intravenously over 2 hours. The outcomes (leg and back pain on a 100-mm visual scale, Oswestry disability, clinical signs) were assessed at 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after the infusion. The outcomes with 3 mg/kg of infliximab were compared to 62 patients who received periradicular saline for sciatica in a previous trial. The resorption rate of disc herniations from baseline to 1 year was compared between infliximab and control groups. The response to 1 mg/kg of infliximab for leg pain was good only in 1 of the 2 patients treated, whereas the response to 3 mg/kg of infliximab for leg pain was sustained in most patients over the 1-year follow-up. The 1-year response significantly favored 3 mg/kg of infliximab over periradicular saline in leg pain (P = 0.005) and disability (P = 0.003). Neurologic abnormalities normalized more comprehensively in the infliximab group (P = 0.001). Reduction in disc herniation volume did not differ between the infliximab-treated patients and controls. The results showed that the beneficial effect of a single infusion of 3 mg/kg of infliximab for herniation-induced sciatica is sustained in most patients over a 1-year follow-up period. Furthermore, infliximab does not seem to interfere with the spontaneous resorption of disc herniations.

  10. Prognostic factors for non-success in patients with sciatica and disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haugen Anne

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have investigated prognostic factors for patients with sciatica, especially for patients treated without surgery. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with non-success after 1 and 2 years of follow-up and to test the prognostic value of surgical treatment for sciatica. Methods The study was a prospective multicentre observational study including 466 patients with sciatica and lumbar disc herniation. Potential prognostic factors were sociodemographic characteristics, back pain history, kinesiophobia, emotional distress, pain, comorbidity and clinical examination findings. Study participation did not alter treatment considerations for the patients in the clinics. Patients reported on the questionnaires if surgery of the disc herniation had been performed. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate factors associated with non-success, defined as Maine–Seattle Back Questionnaire score of ≥5 (0–12 (primary outcome and Sciatica Bothersomeness Index ≥7 (0–24 (secondary outcome. Results Rates of non-success were at 1 and 2 years 44% and 39% for the main outcome and 47% and 42% for the secondary outcome. Approximately 1/3 of the patients were treated surgically. For the main outcome variable, in the final multivariate model non-success at 1 year was significantly associated with being male (OR 1.70 [95% CI; 1.06 − 2.73], smoker (2.06 [1.31 − 3.25], more back pain (1.0 [1.01 − 1.02], more comorbid subjective health complaints (1.09 [1.03 − 1.15], reduced tendon reflex (1.62 [1.03 − 2.56], and not treated surgically (2.97 [1.75 − 5.04]. Further, factors significantly associated with non-success at 2 years were duration of back problems >; 1 year (1.92 [1.11 − 3.32], duration of sciatica >; 3 months (2.30 [1.40 − 3.80], more comorbid subjective health complaints (1.10 [1.03 − 1.17] and

  11. Prognostic factors for non-success in patients with sciatica and disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grøvle, Lars; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Soldal, Dag; Grotle, Margreth

    2012-09-22

    Few studies have investigated prognostic factors for patients with sciatica, especially for patients treated without surgery. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with non-success after 1 and 2 years of follow-up and to test the prognostic value of surgical treatment for sciatica. The study was a prospective multicentre observational study including 466 patients with sciatica and lumbar disc herniation. Potential prognostic factors were sociodemographic characteristics, back pain history, kinesiophobia, emotional distress, pain, comorbidity and clinical examination findings. Study participation did not alter treatment considerations for the patients in the clinics. Patients reported on the questionnaires if surgery of the disc herniation had been performed. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate factors associated with non-success, defined as Maine-Seattle Back Questionnaire score of ≥5 (0-12) (primary outcome) and Sciatica Bothersomeness Index ≥7 (0-24) (secondary outcome). Rates of non-success were at 1 and 2 years 44% and 39% for the main outcome and 47% and 42% for the secondary outcome. Approximately 1/3 of the patients were treated surgically. For the main outcome variable, in the final multivariate model non-success at 1 year was significantly associated with being male (OR 1.70 [95% CI; 1.06 - 2.73]), smoker (2.06 [1.31 - 3.25]), more back pain (1.0 [1.01 - 1.02]), more comorbid subjective health complaints (1.09 [1.03 - 1.15]), reduced tendon reflex (1.62 [1.03 - 2.56]), and not treated surgically (2.97 [1.75 - 5.04]). Further, factors significantly associated with non-success at 2 years were duration of back problems >; 1 year (1.92 [1.11 - 3.32]), duration of sciatica >; 3 months (2.30 [1.40 - 3.80]), more comorbid subjective health complaints (1.10 [1.03 - 1.17]) and kinesiophobia (1.04 [1.00 - 1.08]). For the secondary outcome variable

  12. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation : two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peul, W.C.; Hout, van den W.B.; Brand, R.; Thomeer, R.T.W.M.; Koes, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica.

  13. Prolonged conservative care versus early surgery in patients with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation: Two year results of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.C. Peul (Wilco); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); R. Brand (René); R.T.W.M. Thomeer (Raph); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To evaluate the effects of early lumbar disc surgery compared with prolonged conservative care for patients with sciatica over two years of follow-up. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Nine Dutch hospitals. Participants: 283 patients with 6-12 weeks of sciatica.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings as predictors of clinical outcome in patients with sciatica receiving active conservative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Secher; Albert, Hanne B; Sorensen, Joan S

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the possible prognostic value of disk-related magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in relation to recovery at 14 months in patients with severe sciatica, and whether improvement of disk herniation and/or nerve root compromise is concurrent...... with recovery. METHODS: All patients included in this prospective observational study of patients with sciatica receiving active conservative treatment were scanned at baseline and at 14 months' follow-up. Definite recovery at follow-up was defined as an absence of sciatic leg pain and a Roland Morris...... in that the prevalence of disk-related MRI findings was different for men and women, and they had different recovery rates. Improvement of disk herniations and nerve root compromise over time did not coincide with definite recovery. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with sciatica receiving active conservative treatment, broad...

  15. A Comparison of the Efficacy and Tolerability of the Treatments for Sciatica: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian-Rong; Jin, Xiao-Ju; Shen, Hua-Chun; Wang, Huan; Zhou, Xun; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhu, Na-Na

    2017-12-01

    There remains a lack of a systematic summary of the efficacy and safety of various medicines for sciatica, and discrepancies among these exist. The aim of this study is to comprehensively assess the efficacy of and tolerance to several medical options for the treatment of sciatica. We performed a network meta-analysis and illustrated the results by the mean difference or odds ratio. The surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) was used for indicating the preferable treatments. All data analyses and graphs were achieved via R 3.3.2 and Stata 13.0. The subcutaneous anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) was superior to the epidural steroid + anesthetic in reducing lumbar pain in both acute + chronic sciatica patients and acute sciatica patients. The epidural steroid demonstrated a better ability regarding the Oswestry disability score (ODI) compared to the subcutaneous anti-TNF-α. In addition, for total pain relief, the use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs was inferior to the epidural steroid + anesthetic. The epidural anesthetic and epidural steroid + anesthetic both demonstrated superiority over the epidural steroid and intramuscular steroid. The intravenous anti-TNF-α ranked first in leg pain relief, while the subcutaneous anti-TNF-α ranked first in lumbar pain relief, and the epidural steroid ranked first in the ODI on the basis of SUCRA. In addition, their safety outcome (withdrawal) rankings were all medium to high. Intravenous and subcutaneous anti-TNF-α were identified as the optimal treatments for both acute + chronic sciatica patients and acute sciatica patients. In addition, the epidural steroid was also recommended as a good intervention due to its superiority in reducing ODI.

  16. Designing an implementation strategy to improve interprofessional shared decision making in sciatica: study protocol of the DISC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Assendelft, Willem J J; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2012-06-15

    Sciatica is a common condition worldwide that is characterized by radiating leg pain and regularly caused by a herniated disc with nerve root compression. Sciatica patients with persisting leg pain after six to eight weeks were found to have similar clinical outcomes and associated costs after prolonged conservative treatment or surgery at one year follow-up. Guidelines recommend that the team of professionals involved in sciatica care and patients jointly decide about treatment options, so-called interprofessional shared decision making (SDM). However, there are strong indications that SDM for sciatica patients is not integrated in daily practice. We designed a study aiming to explore the barriers and facilitators associated with the everyday embedding of SDM for sciatica patients. All related relevant professionals and patients are involved to develop a tailored strategy to implement SDM for sciatica patients. The study consists of two phases: identification of barriers and facilitators and development of an implementation strategy. First, barriers and facilitators are explored using semi-structured interviews among eight professionals of each (para)medical discipline involved in sciatica care (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and orthopedic surgeons). In addition, three focus groups will be conducted among patients. Second, the identified barriers and facilitators will be ranked using a questionnaire among a representative Dutch sample of 200 GPs, 200 physical therapists, 200 neurologists, all 124 neurosurgeons, 200 orthopedic surgeons, and 100 patients. A tailored team-based implementation strategy will be developed based on the results of the first phase using the principles of intervention mapping and an expert panel. Little is known about effective strategies to increase the uptake of SDM. Most implementation strategies only target a single discipline, whereas multiple disciplines are involved in SDM among sciatica

  17. Designing an implementation strategy to improve interprofessional shared decision making in sciatica: study protocol of the DISC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofstede Stefanie N

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sciatica is a common condition worldwide that is characterized by radiating leg pain and regularly caused by a herniated disc with nerve root compression. Sciatica patients with persisting leg pain after six to eight weeks were found to have similar clinical outcomes and associated costs after prolonged conservative treatment or surgery at one year follow-up. Guidelines recommend that the team of professionals involved in sciatica care and patients jointly decide about treatment options, so-called interprofessional shared decision making (SDM. However, there are strong indications that SDM for sciatica patients is not integrated in daily practice. We designed a study aiming to explore the barriers and facilitators associated with the everyday embedding of SDM for sciatica patients. All related relevant professionals and patients are involved to develop a tailored strategy to implement SDM for sciatica patients. Methods The study consists of two phases: identification of barriers and facilitators and development of an implementation strategy. First, barriers and facilitators are explored using semi-structured interviews among eight professionals of each (paramedical discipline involved in sciatica care (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and orthopedic surgeons. In addition, three focus groups will be conducted among patients. Second, the identified barriers and facilitators will be ranked using a questionnaire among a representative Dutch sample of 200 GPs, 200 physical therapists, 200 neurologists, all 124 neurosurgeons, 200 orthopedic surgeons, and 100 patients. A tailored team-based implementation strategy will be developed based on the results of the first phase using the principles of intervention mapping and an expert panel. Discussion Little is known about effective strategies to increase the uptake of SDM. Most implementation strategies only target a single discipline, whereas

  18. Association with isokinetic ankle strength measurements and normal clinical muscle testing in sciatica patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, N; Erol, O; Ozcakar, L; Ceceli, E; Ciner, O Akar; Yorgancioglu, Z R

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive muscle strength tests are needed to measure muscle strength in the diagnosis and management of sciatica patients. The aim of this study was to assess the isokinetic muscle strength in sciatica patients' and control subjects' ankles that exhibited normal ankle muscle strength when measured clinically. Forty-six patients with L5 and/or S1 nerve compression, and whose age, sex, weight, and height matched 36 healthy volunteers, were recruited to the study. Heel-walking, toe-walking, and manual muscle testing were used to perform ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion strengths in clinical examination. Patients with normal ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion strengths assessed by manual muscle testing and heel-and toe-walking tests were included in the study. Bilateral isokinetic (concentric/concentric) ankle plantar-flexion-dorsiflexion measurements of the patients and controls were performed within the protocol of 30°/sec (5 repetitions). Peak torque and peak torque/body weight were obtained for each ankle motion of the involved limb at 30°/s speed. L5 and/or S1 nerve compression was evident in 46 patients (76 injured limbs). Mean disease duration was two years. The plantar flexion muscle strength of the patients was found to be lower than that of the controls (p=0.036). The dorsiflexion muscle strength of the patients was found to be the same as that of the controls (p=0.211). Isokinetic testing is superior to clinical muscle testing when evaluating ankle plantar flexion torque in sciatica patients. Therefore, isokinetic muscle testing may be helpful when deciding whether to place a patient into a focused rehabilitation program.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of different strategies to manage patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Phillips, Ceri J; Bennett, Hayley; Jones, Mari; Williams, Nefyn; Lewis, Ruth; Sutton, Alex; Matar, Hosam E; Din, Nafees; Burton, Kim; Nafees, Sadia; Hendry, Maggie; Rickard, Ian; Wilkinson, Claire

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to estimate the relative cost-effectiveness of treatment regimens for managing patients with sciatica. A deterministic model structure was constructed based on information from the findings from a systematic review of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, published sources of unit costs, and expert opinion. The assumption was that patients presenting with sciatica would be managed through one of 3 pathways (primary care, stepped approach, immediate referral to surgery). Results were expressed as incremental cost per patient with symptoms successfully resolved. Analysis also included incremental cost per utility gained over a 12-month period. One-way sensitivity analyses were used to address uncertainty. The model demonstrated that none of the strategies resulted in 100% success. For initial treatments, the most successful regime in the first pathway was nonopioids, with a probability of success of 0.613. In the second pathway, the most successful strategy was nonopioids, followed by biological agents, followed by epidural/nerve block and disk surgery, with a probability of success of 0.996. Pathway 3 (immediate surgery) was not cost-effective. Sensitivity analyses identified that the use of the highest cost estimates results in a similar overall picture. While the estimates of cost per quality-adjusted life year are higher, the economic model demonstrated that stepped approaches based on initial treatment with nonopioids are likely to represent the most cost-effective regimens for the treatment of sciatica. However, development of alternative economic modelling approaches is required. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative clinical effectiveness of management strategies for sciatica: systematic review and network meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ruth A; Williams, Nefyn H; Sutton, Alex J; Burton, Kim; Din, Nafees Ud; Matar, Hosam E; Hendry, Maggie; Phillips, Ceri J; Nafees, Sadia; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Rickard, Ian; Wilkinson, Clare

    2015-06-01

    There are numerous treatment approaches for sciatica. Previous systematic reviews have not compared all these strategies together. To compare the clinical effectiveness of different treatment strategies for sciatica simultaneously. Systematic review and network meta-analysis. We searched 28 electronic databases and online trial registries, along with bibliographies of previous reviews for comparative studies evaluating any intervention to treat sciatica in adults, with outcome data on global effect or pain intensity. Network meta-analysis methods were used to simultaneously compare all treatment strategies and allow indirect comparisons of treatments between studies. The study was funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment program; there are no potential conflict of interests. We identified 122 relevant studies; 90 were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs. Interventions were grouped into 21 treatment strategies. Internal and external validity of included studies was very low. For overall recovery as the outcome, compared with inactive control or conventional care, there was a statistically significant improvement following disc surgery, epidural injections, nonopioid analgesia, manipulation, and acupuncture. Traction, percutaneous discectomy, and exercise therapy were significantly inferior to epidural injections or surgery. For pain as the outcome, epidural injections and biological agents were significantly better than inactive control, but similar findings for disc surgery were not statistically significant. Biological agents were significantly better for pain reduction than bed rest, nonopioids, and opioids. Opioids, education/advice alone, bed rest, and percutaneous discectomy were inferior to most other treatment strategies; although these findings represented large effects, they were statistically equivocal. For the first time, many different treatment strategies for sciatica have been compared in the

  1. Leisure-time physical activity and sciatica: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, R; Falah-Hassani, K; Viikari-Juntura, E; Coggon, D

    2016-11-01

    The role of leisure-time physical activity in sciatica is uncertain. This study aimed to assess the association of leisure-time physical activity with lumbar radicular pain and sciatica. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and ResearchGate databases from 1964 through August 2015. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed, and heterogeneity and small-study bias were assessed. Ten cohort (N = 82,024 participants), four case-control (N = 9350) and four cross-sectional (N = 10,046) studies qualified for meta-analysis. In comparison with no regular physical activity, high level of physical activity (≥4 times/week) was inversely associated with new onset of lumbar radicular pain or sciatica in a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies [risk ratio (RR) = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-0.99, I 2  = 0%, 7 studies, N = 78,065]. The association for moderate level of physical activity (1-3 times/week) was weaker (RR = 0.93, CI 0.82-1.05, I 2  = 0%, 6 studies, N = 69,049), and there was no association with physical activity for at least once/week (RR = 0.99, CI 0.86-1.13, 9 studies, N = 73,008). In contrast, a meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies showed a higher prevalence of lumbar radicular pain or sciatica in participants who exercised at least once/week [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.29, CI 1.09-1.53, I 2  = 0%, 4 studies, N = 10,046], or 1-3 times/week (PR = 1.34, CI 1.02-1.77, I 2  = 0%, N = 7631) than among inactive participants. There was no evidence of small-study bias. This meta-analysis suggests that moderate to high level of leisure physical activity may have a moderate protective effect against development of lumbar radicular pain. However, a large reduction in risk (>30%) seems unlikely. Leisure-time physical activity may reduce the risk of developing lumbar radicular pain. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  2. Suspected herniated lumbar disc - computed tomography in differential diagnosis of non-disc-related sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, T.; Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Claussen, C.; Felix, R.

    1984-07-01

    The most common reason a patient is referred for spinal CT examination is to exclude a ruptured intervertebral disc. Besides nerve root entrapment due to herniated disc, a number of unusual or unexpected conditions have been encountered in the course of CT lumbar spine studies. These include spondylolisthesis, spinal dysraphism, Paget's disease, and inflammatory, neoplastic, or metastatic lesions. The application of spinal (small-circle) target imaging includes the risk of overlooking soft tissue lesions that extend beyond the reconstruction circle. Therefore, complete (large-circle) circumferential abdominal scanning is recommended in case of a suspected extraspinal cause of sciatica.

  3. Pain-related fear and functional recovery in sciatica: results from a 2-year observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haugen AJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available AJ Haugen,1 L Grøvle,1 JI Brox,2 B Natvig,3 M Grotle4 1Department of Rheumatology, Østfold Hospital Trust, Grålum, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Division for Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital, 3Department of General Practice, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, 4FORMI (Communication Unit for Musculoskeletal Disorders, Division of Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the associations between pain-related fear, pain disability, and self-perceived recovery among patients with sciatica and disk herniation followed up for 2 years.Patients and methods: Pain-related fear was measured by the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (FABQ-PA subscale. Disability was measured by the Maine–Seattle Back Questionnaire. At 2 years, patients reported their sciatica/back problem on a global change scale ranging from completely gone to much worse. No specific interventions regarding pain-related fear were provided.Results: Complete data were obtained for 372 patients. During follow-up, most patients improved. In those who at 2 years were fully recovered (n=66, pain-related fear decreased substantially. In those who did not improve (n=50, pain-related fear remained high. Baseline levels of pain-related fear did not differ significantly between those who were fully recovered and the rest of the cohort. In the total cohort, the correlation coefficients between the 0–2-year change in disability and the changes in the TSK and the FABQ-PA were 0.33 and 0.38, respectively. In the adjusted regression models, the 0–2-year change in pain-related disability explained 15% of the variance in the change in both questionnaires.Conclusion: Pain-related fear decreased substantially in patients who recovered from sciatica and remained high in those who did not improve. Generally, the TSK and the FABQ

  4. The Clinical Report on the 3 Cases of Sciatica treated on Direct Moxibustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hyuk Kang

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The purpose of this report is to examine the effects of direct moxibustion on the Low back pain and Lowerlimb radiating pain. Methods : The patients were hospitalized in Daejeon Univ. Oriental Hospital and treated with acupuncture treatment, physical treatment and direct moxibustion. After treatments, we measured the Results & Conclusions : VAS(Visual Analogue Scale and PRS(Pain Rating Scale. VAS(Visual Analogue Scale and PRS(Pain Rating Scale scores were improved in 3 cases of Low back pain and Lowerlimb radiating pain treated with direct moxibustion. So it is suggested that direct moxibution have the possibility to treat on sciatica

  5. Back pain's association with vertebral end-plate signal changes in sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; van der Kallen, Bas F; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-02-01

    Patients with sciatica frequently experience disabling back pain. One of the proposed causes for back pain is vertebral end-plate signal changes (VESC) as visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To report on VESC findings, changes of VESC findings over time, and the correlation between VESC and disabling back pain in patients with sciatica. A randomized clinical trial with 1 year of follow-up. Patients with 6 to 12 weeks of sciatica who participated in a multicenter, randomized clinical trial comparing an early surgery strategy with prolonged conservative care with surgery if needed. Patients were assessed by means of the 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain (with 0 representing no pain and 100 the worst pain ever experienced) at baseline and 1 year. Disabling back pain was defined as a VAS score of at least 40 mm. Patients underwent MRI both at baseline and after 1 year follow-up. Presence and change of VESC was correlated with disabling back pain using chi-square tests and logistic regression analysis. At baseline, 39% of patients had disabling back pain. Of the patients with VESC at baseline, 40% had disabling back pain compared with 38% of the patients with no VESC (p=.67). The prevalence of type 1 VESC increased from 1% at baseline to 35% 1 year later in the surgical group compared with an increase from 3% to 11% in the conservative group. The prevalence of type 2 VESC decreased from 40% to 29% in the surgical group while remaining almost stable in the conservative group at 41%. The prevalence of disabling back pain at 1 year was 12% in patients with no VESC at 1 year, 16% in patients with type 1 VESC, 11% in patients with type 2 VESC, and 3% in patients with both types 1 and 2 VESC (p=.36). Undergoing surgery was associated with increase in the extent of VESC (odds ratio [OR], 8.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.7-15.7; psciatica was highly associated with the development of VESC after 1 year. However, in contrast with the intuitive feeling

  6. Isolated Facet Joint Fracture as a Cause of Chronic Low Back Pain and Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Teasell

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of facet joint fracture following a rear-end motor vehicle accident who presented with chronic low back pain and sciatica is outlined. Diagnosis was made with 99Tc nuclear bone scan and was confirmed on computed tomographic scan after diagnosis with regular radiographs had failed. Facetectomy relieved pain but led to symptoms related to asymmetric load on the opposite facet joint. Symptoms were substantially relieved with a facet joint deinnervation procedure. Facet joint fracture was felt to occur as a consequence of compression forces on the facet joint at the time of impact.

  7. Ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy: a novel treatment option for refractory discogenic sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, M T; Moynagh, M; Long, N; Kilcoyne, A; Dicker, P; Synnott, K; Eustace, S J

    2014-12-01

    To assess the short and medium-term efficacy and safety of a novel, minimally invasive therapeutic option combining automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, intradiscal ozone injection, and caudal epidural: ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy (OPLD). One hundred and forty-seven patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of discogenic sciatica who were refractory to initial therapy were included. Fifty patients underwent OPLD whilst 97 underwent a further caudal epidural. Outcomes were evaluated using McNab's score, improvement in visual analogue score (VAS) pain score, and requirement for further intervention. Follow-up occurred at 1 and 6 months, and comparison was made between groups. OPLD achieved successful outcomes in almost three-quarters of patients in the short and medium term. OPLD achieved superior outcomes at 1 and 6 months compared to caudal epidural. There was a reduced requirement for further intervention in the OPLD group. No significant complications occurred in either group. OPLD is a safe and effective treatment for patients with refractory discogenic sciatica in the short and medium term. OPLD has the potential to offer an alternative second-line minimally invasive treatment option that could reduce the requirement for surgery in this patient cohort. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Heart rate variability in sciatica patients referred to spine surgery: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södervall, Jarmo; Karppinen, Jaro; Puolitaival, Jukka; Kyllönen, Eero; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Tulppo, Mikko P; Hautala, Arto J

    2013-04-26

    A chronic pain condition may result in altered autonomic nervous system regulation in various patient populations. We evaluated whether autonomic regulation differs between sciatica patients referred to spine surgery and age-matched healthy controls analyzed with heart rate variability techniques (HRV). HRV of patients (n = 201) and healthy controls (n = 138) were measured in standing conditions (5 min). High frequency (HF) power as an index of cardiac vagal modulation and the low-to-high-frequency (LF/HF) ratio and short-term fractal scaling exponent α1 as indices of sympathovagal balance were analyzed. Pain intensity was assessed on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and perceived disability with Oswestry Disability Index. The Oswestry and VAS scores were higher in the patients than in the controls (p Sciatica patients referred to spine surgery had altered cardiac autonomic regulation expressed as decreased vagal activity and an increased sympathovagal balance toward sympathetic dominance when compared with age-matched healthy controls.

  9. [Sciatica due to unusual causes: Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, M; Korbaa, W; Zrour, S; Bejia, I; Touzi, M; Bergaoui, N

    2009-03-01

    Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies usually involve lumbosacral roots and are often asymptomatic. MRI has enabled recognition of many conditions that used to be missed by CT or myelography investigations performed for back and leg pain. However, even without additional compressive impingement (disc hernia, spondylolisthesis or lumbar canal stenosis) these anomalies can be responsible for sciatica, motor deficit and bladder sphincter dysfunction. Tarlov cysts are perinervous dilatations of the dorsal root ganglion. CT and especially MRI can reveal these cysts and their precise relations with the neighboring structures. Delayed filling of the cysts can be visualized on the myelogram. MRI is more sensitive than CT myelography for a positive diagnosis of nerve root anomalies, a differential diagnosis with disc hernia and classification of these anomalies. Surgical treatment is indicated for symptomatic Tarlov cysts and nerve root anomalies resistant to conservative treatment. Better outcome is observed in patients with an additional compressive impingement component. We report two cases of sciatica: one caused by Tarlov cysts diagnosed by MRI and the other by nerve root anomalies diagnosed by CT myelography. In both cases, conservative treatment was undertaken. The clinical, radiological and therapeutic aspects of these disorders are discussed.

  10. Treatment of acute sciatica with transforaminal epidural corticosteroids and local anesthetic : Design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Meulen, Bastiaan C.; Maas, Esther T.; Vyas, Amrita; Van Der Vegt, Marinus; De Priester, Koo; De Boer, Michiel R.; Van Tulder, Maurits W.; Weinstein, Henry C.; Ostelo, Raymond W.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transforaminal epidural injections with steroids (TESI) are used increasingly for patients with sciatica. However there is much debate about their safety and effectiveness. It is important to identify patients that benefit most from TESI and only few trials have yet evaluated the effects

  11. Whole-body vibration and the risk of low back pain and sciatica: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Lage; Nilsson, Tohr; Wahlström, Jens

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to evaluate the association between whole-body vibration (WBV) and low back pain (LBP) and sciatica with special attention given to exposure estimates. Moreover, the aim was to estimate the magnitude of such an association using meta-analysis and to compare our findings with previous reviews. The authors systematically searched the PubMed (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda), Nioshtic2 (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH, Morgantown), and ScienceDirect (Elsevier, Amsterdam) databases for records up to December 31, 2013. Two of the authors independently assessed studies to determine their eligibility, validity, and possible risk of bias. The literature search gave a total of 306 references out of which 28 studies were reviewed and 20 were included in the meta-analysis. Exposure to WBV was associated with increased prevalence of LBP and sciatica [pooled odds ratio (OR) = 2.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.61-2.91 and OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.38-2.67, respectively]. Workers exposed to high vibration levels had a pooled risk estimate of 1.5 for both outcomes when compared with workers exposed to low levels of vibration. The results also indicate that some publication bias could have occurred especially for sciatica. This review shows that there is scientific evidence that exposure to WBV increases the risk of LBP and sciatica.

  12. [Treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and sciatica with percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Song, Hua-Wei; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ming-Lian

    2013-10-01

    To analyze the clinical effects of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic technique in treating lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and sciatica. From June 2011 to January 2012,the clinical data of 46 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and sciatica underwent percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic technique were retrospectively analyzed. There were 28 males and 18 females,ranging in age from 11 to 77 years old with an average of (39.7_ 15.3) years old,20 cases were L5S1 and 26 cases were L4,5. All patients had the symptoms such as lumbago and sciatica and their straight-leg raising test were positive. Straight-leg raising test of patients were instantly repeated after operation;operative time,volume of blood loss,complication, length of stay and duration of back to work or daily life were recorded. The clinical effects were assessed according to the VAS,JOA and JOABPEQ score. All operations were successful,postoperative straight-leg raising test were all negative. Operative time,volume of blood loss,length of stay,duration of back to work or daily life,follow-up time were (93.0+/-28.0) min, (20.0+/-9.0)ml, (3.1+/-1.5) d, (11.6+/-4.2) d, (13.9+/-1.6) months,respectively. VAS score of lumbar before operation and at the 1st and 3rd,6th,12th month after operation were 5.3+/-1.2,1.9+/-1.1,1.0+/-0.8,0.9+/-0.8,0.8+/-0.6,respectively;VAS score of leg before operation and at the 1st and 3rd,6th,12th month after operation were 7.2+ 1.2,0.8+/-1.2,0.5+/-0.8,0.5+/-0.8,0.3+/-0.8,respectively. Five factors of JOABPEQ score,including lumbar pain,lumbar function, locomotor activity,social life viability and mental status,were respectively 27.0+/-30.6,37.3+/-27.4,38.5+/-26.6,33.0+/-13.7,55.4+/-19.0 before operation and 83.6+/-24.8,89.4+/-15.7,87.0+/-17.9,58.4+/-14.6,79.5+/-13.4 at final follow-up. Preoperative and postoperative JOA score were 9.1+/-2.6 and 27.3+/- 1.7, respectively. The postoperative VAS,JOA and JOABPEQ score had significantly improved (Psciatica

  13. Myelopathy and sciatica induced by an extradural S1 root haemangioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermier, M.; Cotton, F.; Froment, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Lyon (France); Saint-Pierre, G.; Jouvet, A. [Department of Neuropathology, Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Lyon (France); Ongolo-Zogo, P. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Lyon (France); Department of Radiology, Hopital Central, Yaounde (Cameroon); Fischer, G. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hopital Neurologique et Neurochirurgical, Lyon (France)

    2002-06-01

    Haemangioblastomas are vascular tumours which mainly involve the central nervous system and retina, often in the setting of von Hippel-Lindau disease. Haemangioblastomas occurring outside the central nervous system are uncommon. Wherever it is, recognising this tumour prior to surgery is desirable, as preoperative embolisation may be considered. We report the clinical, imaging and pathological features of a sporadic sacral root haemangioblastoma in a 58-year-old man with chronic sciatica and myelopathy. The diagnosis was questioned preoperatively because an enlarged sacral foramen, seen to be filled by a highly vascular, enhancing mass and dilated vessels. Myelopathy was attributed to the presumed high venous pressure resulting from increased flow in veins draining the vascular tumour. Microneurosurgical excision was performed after endovascular embolisation and led to persistent clinical improvement. (orig.)

  14. Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Reoperation for Recurrent Sciatica Symptoms: A Retrospective Analysis of Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in 94 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junlong; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Kang; Li, Changqing; Zhou, Yue

    2018-01-01

    Recurrent symptoms of sciatica after previous surgical intervention is a relatively common and troublesome clinical problem. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar decompression has been proved to be an effective method for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. However, the prognostic factors and outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar reoperation (PELR) for recurrent sciatica symptoms were still unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and prognostic factors of patients who underwent PELR for recurrent sciatica symptoms. From 2009 to 2015, 94 patients who underwent PELR for recurrent sciatica symptoms were enrolled. The primary surgeries include transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (n = 16), microendoscopic discectomy (n = 31), percutaneous endoscopic lumbar decompression (PELD, n = 17), and open discectomy (n = 30). The mean follow-up period was 36 months, and 86 (91.5%) patients had obtained at least 24 months' follow-up. Of the 94 patients with adequate follow-up, 51 (54.3%) exhibited excellent improvement, 23 (24.5%) had good improvement, and 7 (7.4%) had fair improvement according to modified Macnab criteria. The average re-recurrence rate was 9.6%, with no difference among the different primary surgery groups (PELD, 3/17; microendoscopic discectomy, 2/31; open discectomy, 3/30; transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, 1/16). There was a trend toward greater rates of symptom recurrence in the primary group of PELD who underwent percutaneous endoscopic lumbar reoperation compared with other groups, but this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). Multivariate analysis suggested that age, body mass index, and surgeon level was independent prognostic factors. Obesity (hazard ratio 13.98, 95% confidence interval 3.394-57.57; P sciatica symptoms regardless of different primary operation type. Obesity, inferior surgeon level, and patient age older than 40 years were associated with a worse prognosis. Obesity was also a strong and

  15. Treatment of acute sciatica with transforaminal epidural corticosteroids and local anesthetic: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; Maas, Esther T; Vyas, Amrita; van der Vegt, Marinus; de Priester, Koo; de Boer, Michiel R; van Tulder, Maurits W; Weinstein, Henry C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G

    2017-05-25

    Transforaminal epidural injections with steroids (TESI) are used increasingly for patients with sciatica. However there is much debate about their safety and effectiveness. It is important to identify patients that benefit most from TESI and only few trials have yet evaluated the effects in patients with acute sciatica. We describe a prospective, randomized controlled trial (RCT), with the aim to evaluate the hypothesis that TESI plus Levobupivacaine (TESI-plus) added to oral pain medication is more effective compared to pain medication alone or compared to transforaminal injection with a local anesthetic of short duration among patients with acute sciatica. We will recruit a total of 264 patients with sciatica (TESI-plus (intervention group one), 3) oral pain medication and transforaminal epidural injection (TEI) with Levobupivaine and saline solution (intervention group two). Primary outcomes are functional status (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire), pain intensity for both leg and back, (100 mm visual analogous scale (VAS)), and global perceived recovery (GPR, reported on a 7-point Likert scale, dichotomized into 'recovered' and 'not recovered'). The secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life (EQ5D-5 L) and patient satisfaction (7-point Likert scale). We will also collect information on healthcare utilization and costs, to perform an economic evaluation. All outcomes are measured at three and six weeks, three and six months after randomization. We defined a minimal clinically relevant difference between groups as a difference between both intervention groups and the control group of 20 points for pain (100-point VAS), four points for functional status (24-point RDQ) and a 20% difference on dichotomized GPR (recovered versus not recovered). A clinically relevant outcome in favor of TESI-plus implies that future patients with acute sciatica should be recommended TESI-plus within the first few weeks rather than being treated with pain medication

  16. [Uncomplicated herniated discs and sciatica: epidemiologic and semiotic aspects in 143 black African subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Dieu-Donné; Eti, Edmond; Daboiko, Jean-Claude; Simon, Frankz; Chuong, Van Tuan; Zué, Marcel Kouakou N

    2007-01-01

    To study the epidemiologic and semiotic characteristics of uncomplicated sciatica in patients in a university hospital in Côte d'Ivoire. This retrospective study included 143 patients with an uncomplicated herniated disc hospitalized in the Cocody University Hospital from 1998 through 2002; patients were excluded if they were excessively sensitive to pain, had related motor deficits, cauda equina syndrome, or were resistant to medical treatment. Patients' average age was 42.5 years (range: 15-81), 58% were women, and mean body mass index (BMI) was 26.16. Ninety-nine (69.2%) reported relatively sedentary work. The disorder was characterized by an antalgic position (in 46.9%), an abnormal Schöber index in 117 (81.8%), the "bell sign" (in 63.6%) and a cough impulse in 58.7%. Lasègue's sign was homolateral at 114 (79.7%), and the average amplitude 42.2 degrees (range: 10 to 80). Paresis of 3/5 or higher was observed in 32 patients (22.4%). Radiography showed a disc disorder in 63% of cases; posterior osteoarthritis in 39.2% and a narrowed lumbar channel in 14 %. Computed tomography was performed for 56 patients and confirmed the presence of a hernia (median: 42,8%; paramedian: 48,2%; foraminal: 8,0%) of L4-l5 in 43 patients (77%); a large hernia, defined by a size greater than half of the rachidian channel, was found in eight (14,3%). After medical treatment, the course was favourable during this hospitalisation. Contrary to preconceived ideas, uncomplicated sciatica of black subjects has the same characteristics as in the white population.

  17. Vascular entrapment of the sciatic plexus causing catamenial sciatica and urinary symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nucelio; Marques, Renato Moretti; Kamergorodsky, Gil; Ploger, Christine; Schor, Eduardo; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic congestion syndrome is a well-known cause of cyclic pelvic pain (Ganeshan et al., Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 30(6):1105-11, 2007). What is much less well known is that dilated or malformed branches of the internal or external iliac vessels can entrap the nerves of the sacral plexus against the pelvic sidewalls, producing symptoms that are not commonly seen in gynecological practice, such as sciatica, or refractory urinary and anorectal dysfunction (Possover et al., Fertil Steril 95(2):756-8. 2011). The objective of this video is to explain and describe the symptoms suggestive of vascular entrapment of the sacral plexus, as well as the technique for the laparoscopic decompression of these nerves. Two anecdotal cases of intrapelvic vascular entrapment are used to review the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus and demonstrate the laparoscopic surgical technique for decompression at two different sites, one on the sciatic nerve and one on the sacral nerve roots. After surgery, the patient with the sciatic entrapment showed full recovery of the sciatica and partial recovery of the myofascial pain. The patient with sacral nerve root entrapment showed full recovery with resolution of symptoms. The symptoms suggestive of intrapelvic nerve entrapment are: perineal pain or pain irradiating to the lower limbs in the absence of a spinal disorder, and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of prolapse of a bladder lesion. In the presence of such symptoms, the radiologist should provide specific MRI sequences of the intrapelvic portion of the sacral plexus and a team and equipment to expose and decompress the sacral nerves should be prepared.

  18. Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional microdiscectomy in sciatica: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Brand, Ronald; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Schenk, Barry; van den Berg-Huijsmans, Annette A; Koes, Bart W; van Buchem, M A; Arts, Mark P; Peul, Wilco C

    2015-05-01

    Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) is a minimally invasive treatment for lumbar disc herniation, with Food and Drug Administration approval since 1991. However, no randomized trial comparing PLDD to conventional treatment has been performed. In this trial, we assessed the effectiveness of a strategy of PLDD as compared with conventional surgery. This randomized prospective trial with a noninferiority design was carried out in two academic and six teaching hospitals in the Netherlands according to an intent-to-treat protocol with full institutional review board approval. One hundred fifteen eligible surgical candidates, with sciatica from a disc herniation smaller than one-third of the spinal canal, were included. The main outcome measures for this trial were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for sciatica, visual analog scores for back and leg pain, and the patient's report of perceived recovery. Patients were randomly allocated to PLDD (n=57) or conventional surgery (n=58). Blinding was impossible because of the nature of the interventions. This study was funded by the Healthcare Insurance Board of the Netherlands. The primary outcome, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, showed noninferiority of PLDD at 8 (-0.1; [95% confidence interval (CI), -2.3 to 2.1]) and 52 weeks (-1.1; 95% CI, -3.4 to 1.1) compared with conventional surgery. There was, however, a higher speed of recovery in favor of conventional surgery (hazard ratio, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.42-0.97]). The number of reoperations was significantly less in the conventional surgery group (38% vs. 16%). Overall, a strategy of PLDD, with delayed surgery if needed, resulted in noninferior outcomes at 1 year. At 1 year, a strategy of PLDD, followed by surgery if needed, resulted in noninferior outcomes compared with surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine Versus Paracetamol in Sciatica: A Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serinken, Mustafa; Eken, Cenker; Gungor, Faruk; Emet, Mucahit; Al, Behcet

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to compare intravenous morphine and intravenous acetaminophen (paracetamol) for pain treatment in patients presenting to the emergency department with sciatica. Patients, between the ages of 21 and 65 years, suffering from pain in the sciatic nerve distribution and a positive straight leg-raise test composed the study population. Study patients were assigned to one of three intravenous interventions: morphine (0.1 mg/kg), acetaminophen (1 g), or placebo. Physicians, nurses, and patients were blinded to the study drug. Changes in pain intensity were measured at 15 and 30 minutes using a visual analog scale. Rescue drug (fentanyl) use and adverse effects were also recorded. Three-hundred patients were randomized. The median change in pain intensity between treatment arms at 30 minutes were as follows: morphine versus acetaminophen 25 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] = 20 to 29 mm), morphine versus placebo 41 mm (95% CI = 37 to 45 mm), and acetaminophen versus placebo 16 mm (95% CI = 12 to 20 mm). Eighty percent of the patients in the placebo group (95% CI = 63.0% to 99%), 18% of the patients in the acetaminophen group (95% CI = 10.7% to 28.5%), and 6% of those in the morphine group (95% CI = 2.0% to 13.2%) required a rescue drug. Adverse effects were similar between the morphine and acetaminophen groups. Morphine and acetaminophen are both effective for treating sciatica at 30 minutes. However, morphine is superior to acetaminophen. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs for Sciatica: An Updated Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Barr, Eva; Held, Ulrike; Grooten, Wilhelmus J A; Roelofs, Pepijn D D M; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Wertli, Maria M

    2017-04-15

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. To determine the efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on pain reduction, overall improvement, and reported adverse effects in people with sciatica. NSAIDs are one of the most frequently prescribed drugs for sciatica. We updated a 2008 Cochrane Review through June 2015. Randomized controlled trials that compared NSAIDs with placebo, with other NSAIDs, or with other medication were included. Outcomes included pain using mean difference (MD, 95% confidence intervals [95% CI]). For global improvement and adverse effects risk ratios (RR, 95% CI) were used. We assessed level of evidence using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach. Ten trials were included (N = 1651). Nine out of 10 trials were assessed at high risk of bias. For pain reduction (visual analog scale, 0 to 100) NSAIDs were no more effective than placebo (MD -4.56, 95% CI -11.11 to 1.99, quality of evidence: very low). For global improvement NSAIDs were more effective than placebo (RR 1.14 [95% CI 1.03 to 1.27], low quality of evidence). One trial reported the effect of NSAIDs on disability with very low-quality evidence that NSAIDs are no more effective than placebo. There was low-quality evidence that the risk for adverse effects is higher for NSAID than placebo (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.93). Our findings show very low-quality evidence that the efficacy of NSAIDs for pain reduction is comparable with that of placebo, low-quality evidence that NSAIDs is better than placebo for global improvement and low-quality evidence for higher risk of adverse effects using NSAIDs compared with placebo. The findings must be interpreted with caution, due to small study samples, inconsistent results, and a high risk of bias in the included trials. 1.

  1. The prognostic value of electrodiagnostic testing in patients with sciatica receiving physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Nathan J; Fritz, Julie M; Kircher, John C; Thackeray, Anne

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of electrodiagnostic testing in patients with sciatica receiving physical therapy. Electrodiagnostic testing was performed on 38 patients with sciatica participating in a randomized trial comparing different physical therapy interventions. Patients were grouped and analyzed according to the presence or absence of radiculopathy based on electrodiagnostic testing. Longitudinal data analysis was conducted using multilevel growth modeling with ten waves of data collected from baseline through the treatment and post-treatment periods up to 6 months. The primary outcome measure was changes in low back pain-related disability assessed using the Roland and Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ). Patients with radiculopathy (n = 19) had statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in RMDQ scores at every post-treatment follow-up occasion regardless of treatment received. The final multilevel growth model revealed improvements in RMDQ scores in patients with radiculopathy at the 6-week (-8.1, 95 % CI -12.6 to -2.6; P = 0.006) and 6-month (-4.1, 95 % CI -7.4 to -0.7; P = 0.020) follow-up occasions compared to patients without radiculopathy. Treatment group was not a significant predictive factor at any follow-up occasion. An interaction between electrodiagnostic status and time revealed faster weekly improvements in RMDQ scores in patients with radiculopathy at the 6-week (-0.72, 95 % CI -1.4 to -0.04; P = 0.040) through the 16-week (-0.30, 95 % CI, -0.57 to -0.04; P = 0.028) follow-up occasions compared to patients without radiculopathy. The presence of lumbosacral radiculopathy identified with electrodiagnostic testing is a favorable prognostic factor for recovery in low back pain-related disability regardless of physical therapy treatment received.

  2. Obturator internus pyomyositis manifested as sciatica in a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Ching; Hsu, Jin-Yi; Chen, Michael Yu-Chih; Liang, Chung-Chao

    2016-07-01

    Pyomyositis is a pyogenic infection of the skeletal muscles causing myalgia and fever in patients. Hematogenous seeding engendered by persistent bacteremia and septic embolism is usually the underlying cause of the disease. Trauma, intravenous drug use, and immunodeficiency are the main predisposing factors.Obturator internus pyomyositis with sciatica has not previously been reported. We report a rare case of a patient with subacute bacterial endocarditis presenting with left buttock pain and sciatica.Computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis of obturator internus pyomyositis. The patient was discharged uneventfully after successful antibiotic treatment.The mortality rate of patients who have pyomyositis comorbid with another condition or disease is extremely high. Early diagnosis and aggressive management are imperative.

  3. Dimensions of the spinal canal in individuals symptomatic and non-symptomatic for sciatica: A CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, J.T.; Korte, J.H.; Penning, L.

    1988-12-01

    Measurements obtained in 50 spinal CT studies of patients referred for suspected lumbosacral nerve root compression, were compared to those of a group of 30 individuals asymptomatic in this respect, who had been referred for abdominal pathology. Transverse ligamentous interfacet and transverse dural dimensions were significantly reduced in the sciatica group, with usually normal interpedicular and sagittal dimensions ruling out idiopathic developmental stenosis. The borderline value for ligamentous interfacet distance (ILD) at L4-5 appeared to be 11 mm.

  4. Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional microdiscectomy for patients with sciatica: Two-year results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Brand, Ronald; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Jacobs, Wilco Ch; Schenk, Barry; van den Berg-Huijsmans, Annette A; Koes, Bart W; Arts, Mark A; van Buchem, M A; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-06-01

    Background Percutaneous laser disc decompression is a minimally invasive treatment, for lumbar disc herniation and might serve as an alternative to surgical management of sciatica. In a randomised trial with two-year follow-up we assessed the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression compared to conventional surgery. Materials and methods This multicentre randomised prospective trial with a non-inferiority design, was carried out according to an intent-to-treat protocol with full institutional review board approval. One hundred and fifteen eligible surgical candidates, with sciatica from a disc herniation smaller than one-third of the spinal canal, were randomly allocated to percutaneous laser disc decompression ( n = 55) or conventional surgery ( n = 57). The main outcome measures for this trial were the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for sciatica, visual analogue scores for back and leg pain and the patient's report of perceived recovery. Results The primary outcome measures showed no significant difference or clinically relevant difference between the two groups at two-year follow-up. The re-operation rate was 21% in the surgery group, which is relatively high, and with an even higher 52% in the percutaneous laser disc decompression group. Conclusion At two-year follow-up, a strategy of percutaneous laser disc decompression, followed by surgery if needed, resulted in non-inferior outcomes compared to a strategy of microdiscectomy. Although the rate of reoperation in the percutaneous laser disc decompression group was higher than expected, surgery could be avoided in 48% of those patients that were originally candidates for surgery. Percutaneous laser disc decompression, as a non-surgical method, could have a place in the treatment arsenal of sciatica caused by contained herniated discs.

  5. Advice to Stay Active or Structured Exercise in the Management of Sciatica: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Matt; Hartvigsen, Jan; Ferreira, Manuela L; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Machado, Aryane F; Lemes, Ítalo R; Maher, Chris G; Ferreira, Paulo H

    2015-09-15

    A systematic review and meta-analysis. To evaluate the evidence on comparative effectiveness of advice to stay active versus supervised structured exercise in the management of sciatica. Conservative management of sciatica usually includes interventions to promote physical activity in the form of advice to stay active or exercise, but there has been no systematic review directly comparing the effectiveness of these 2 approaches. Data Sources included MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PEDro databases. Studies were randomized controlled trials comparing advice with exercise. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the PEDro scale. Pain and disability data were extracted for all time points and converted to a common 0 to 100 scale. Data were pooled with a random effects model for short, intermediate, and long-term follow-ups. The GRADE approach was used to summarize the strength of evidence. Five trials were included in the meta-analysis, which showed a significant, although small effect favoring exercise over advice for reducing leg pain intensity in the short term (weighted mean difference: 11.43 [95% confidence interval, 0.71-22.16]) but no difference for disability (weighted mean difference: 1.45 [95% confidence interval, -2.86 to 5.76]). Furthermore, there was no difference at intermediate and long-term follow-ups between advice and exercise for patient-relevant outcomes. There is low-quality evidence (GRADE) that exercise provides small, superior effects compared with advice to stay active on leg pain in the short term for patients experiencing sciatica. However, there is moderate-quality evidence showing no difference between advice to stay active and exercise on leg pain and disability status in people with sciatica in the long term. 1.

  6. Do MRI findings identify patients with low back pain or sciatica who respond better to particular interventions? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Daniel; Hancock, Mark J; Pereira, Leani S M; Kent, Peter M; Latimer, Jane; Maher, Chris G

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal a range of degenerative findings and anatomical abnormalities; however, the clinical importance of these remains uncertain and controversial. We aimed to investigate if the presence of MRI findings identifies patients with low back pain (LBP) or sciatica who respond better to particular interventions. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL databases were searched. We included RCTs investigating MRI findings as treatment effect modifiers for patients with LBP or sciatica. We excluded studies with specific diseases as the cause of LBP. Risk of bias was assessed using the criteria of the Cochrane Back Review Group. Each MRI finding was examined for its individual capacity for effect modification. Eight published trials met the inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of trials was inconsistent. Substantial variability in MRI findings, treatments and outcomes across the eight trials prevented pooling of data. Patients with Modic type 1 when compared with patients with Modic type 2 had greater improvements in function when treated by Diprospan (steroid) injection, compared with saline. Patients with central disc herniation when compared with patients without central disc herniation had greater improvements in pain when treated by surgery, compared with rehabilitation. Although individual trials suggested that some MRI findings might be effect modifiers for specific interventions, none of these interactions were investigated in more than a single trial. High quality, adequately powered trials investigating MRI findings as effect modifiers are essential to determine the clinical importance of MRI findings in LBP and sciatica ( CRD42013006571).

  7. Prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Peul, Wilco C; Verhagen, Arianne P; Lycklama À Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; Koes, Bart W; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE This study aimed to determine the prognostic value of MRI variables to predict outcome in patients with herniated disc-related sciatica, and whether MRI could facilitate the decision making between early surgery and prolonged conservative care in these patients. METHODS A prospective observational evaluation of patients enrolled in a randomized trial with 1-year follow-up was completed. A total of 283 patients with sciatica who had a radiologically confirmed disc herniation were randomized either to surgery or to prolonged conservative care with surgery if needed. Outcome measures were recovery and leg pain severity. Recovery was registered on a 7-point Likert scale. Complete/near complete recovery was considered a satisfactory outcome. Leg pain severity was measured on a 0- to 100-mm visual analog scale. Multiple MRI characteristics of the degenerated disc herniation were independently scored by 3 spine experts. Cox models were used to study the influence of MRI variables on rate of recovery, and linear mixed models were used to determine the predictive value of MRI variables for leg pain severity during follow-up. The interaction of each MRI predictor with treatment allocation was tested. There were no study-specific conflicts of interest. RESULTS Baseline MRI variables associated with less leg pain severity were the reader's assessment of presence of nerve root compression (p < 0.001), and assessment of extrusion compared with protrusion of the disc herniation (p = 0.006). Both variables tended to be associated, but not significantly, with satisfactory outcome during follow-up (HR 1.45, 95% CI 0.93-2.24, and HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.96-1.61, respectively). The size of disc herniation at baseline was not associated with outcome. There was no significant change in the effects between treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS MRI assessment of the presence of nerve root compression and extrusion of a herniated disc at baseline was associated with less leg pain during 1-year

  8. Surgery or physical activity in the management of sciatica: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Matthew; Ferreira, Manuela L; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Hartvigsen, Jan; Silva, Isabela R C; Maher, Chris G; Koes, Bart W; Ferreira, Paulo H

    2016-11-01

    Previous reviews have compared surgical to non-surgical management of sciatica, but have overlooked the specific comparison between surgery and physical activity-based interventions. Systematic review using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase and PEDro databases was conducted. Randomised controlled trials comparing surgery to physical activity, where patients were experiencing the three most common causes of sciatica-disc herniation, spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Two independent reviewers extracted pain and disability data (converted to a common 0-100 scale) and assessed methodological quality using the PEDro scale. The size of the effects was estimated for each outcome at three different time points, with a random effects model adopted and the GRADE approach used in summary conclusions. Twelve trials were included. In the short term, surgery provided better outcomes than physical activity for disc herniation: disability [WMD -9.00 (95 % CI -13.73, -4.27)], leg pain [WMD -16.01 (95 % CI -23.00, -9.02)] and back pain [WMD -12.44 (95 % CI -17.76, -7.09)]; for spondylolisthesis: disability [WMD -14.60 (95 % CI -17.12, -12.08)], leg pain [WMD -35.00 (95 % CI -39.66, -30.34)] and back pain [WMD -20.00 (95 % CI -24.66, -15.34)] and spinal stenosis: disability [WMD -11.39 (95 % CI -17.31, -5.46)], leg pain [WMD, -27.17 (95 % CI -35.87, -18.46)] and back pain [WMD -20.80 (95 % CI -25.15, -16.44)]. Long-term and greater than 2-year post-randomisation results favoured surgery for spondylolisthesis and stenosis, although the size of the effects reduced with time. For disc herniation, no significant effect was shown for leg and back pain comparing surgery to physical activity. There are indications that surgery is superior to physical activity-based interventions in reducing pain and disability for disc herniation at short-term follow-up only; but high-quality evidence in this field is lacking (GRADE). For spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis, surgery is superior to physical

  9. A systematic review of low back pain and sciatica patients' expectations and experiences of health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopayian, Kevork; Notley, Caitlin

    2014-08-01

    Previous systematic reviews of patients' experience of health services have used mixed qualitative and quantitative studies. This review focused on qualitative studies, which are more suitable for capturing experience, using modern methods of synthesis of qualitative studies. To describe the experience of health care of low back pain and sciatica patients and the sources of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with special reference to patients who do not receive a diagnosis. A systematic review of qualitative studies. Primary qualitative studies identified from Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and Psychinfo databases. Conceptual themes of patients' experiences. Data collection and analysis were through thematic content analysis. Two reviewers independently screened titles and collected and analyzed data. The authors were in receipt of a Primary Care Research Bursary from National Health Service Suffolk and Norfolk Research Departments, a not-for-profit organization. Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria. Most studies were of high quality. Nine themes emerged: the process and content of care, relationships and interpersonal skills, personalized care, information, the outcome of care, the importance of a diagnosis, delegitimation, recognizing the expert, and service matters. How care was given mattered greatly to patients, with importance given to receiving a perceived full assessment, consideration for the individual's context, good relationships, empathy, and the sharing of information. These aspects of care facilitated the acceptance by some of the limitations of health care and were spread across disciplines. Not having a diagnosis made coping more difficult for some but for others led to delegitimation, a feeling of not being believed. Service matters such as cost and waiting time received little mention. Although much research into the development of chronic low back pain (LBP) has focused on the patient, this review suggests that research into aspects of care

  10. A comparative study of Agni karma with Lauha, Tamra and PanchadhatuShalakas in Gridhrasi (Sciatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhashi, Babita; Gupta, S K; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Bhuyan, C

    2010-04-01

    Sushruta has mentioned different methods of management of diseases, such as Bheshaja karma, Kshara Karma, Agni karma, Shastrakarma and Raktamokshana. The approach of Agni karma has been mentioned in the context of diseases like Arsha, Arbuda, Bhagandar, Sira, Snayu, Asthi, Sandhigata Vata Vikaras and Gridhrasi. Gridhrasi is seen as a panic condition in the society as it is one of the burning problems, especially in the life of daily laborers. It is characterized by distinct pain starting from Sphik Pradesha (gluteal region) and goes down toward the Parshni Pratyanguli (foot region) of the affected side of leg. On the basis of symptomatology, Gridhrasi may be simulated with the disease sciatica in modern parlance. In modern medicine, the disease sciatica is managed only with potent analgesics or some sort of surgical interventions which have their own limitations and adverse effects, whereas in Ayurveda, various treatment modalities like Siravedha, Agni karma, Basti Chikitsa and palliative medicines are used successfully. Among these, Agni karma procedure seems to be more effective by providing timely relief. Shalakas for Agni karma, made up of different Dhatus like gold, silver, copper, iron, etc. for different stages of the disease conditions, have been proposed. In the present work, a comparative study of Agni karma by using iron, copper and previously studied Panchadhatu Shalaka in Gridhrashi has been conducted. A total of 22 patients were treated in three groups. Result of the entire study showed that Agni karma by Panchadhatu Shalaka provided better result in combating the symptoms, especially Ruka and Tandra, while Lauhadhatu Shalaka gave better results in combating symptoms of Spanadana and Gaurava. In the meantime, Tamradhatu Shalaka provided better effect in controlling symptoms like Toda, Stambha and Aruchi. Fifty percent patients in Panchadhatu Shalaka (Group A) were completely relieved. In Lauhadhatu Shalaka (Group B), the success rate was 00.00%, and

  11. [Tomodensitometric image of the lumbar spine. Study of 150 patients hospitalized for discal sciatica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, J M; Guillot, P; Glémarec, J; Lopes, L; Bertrand-Vasseur, A; Maugars, Y; Prost, A

    1998-01-17

    There would be some discordance between patient expectations and expert recommendations concerning computed tomography (CT) of the spine for discal disorders. We analyzed patient opinion. At admission, a 25-item questionnaire was given to 150 patients hospitalized in a rheumatology unit for discal sciatica. Patients were asked to express their expectations concerning the CT exploration. Seventy percent of the patients had already undergone CT explorations requested by a general practitioner (55%) or a specialist (45%), 20% had had two CT explorations and 20% magnetic resonance imaging. Seventy-five percent felt they should have had a CT scan earlier, 85% thought a CT should be performed for back pain of less than one month duration and 96% in case of sciatica for 2 months or more. Patients felt their exploration came "late" because the physician was under financial pressure (52%), had incorrectly appreciated the patient's need (28%) or was incompetent in the matter (22%). Nevertheless, 15% of the patients recognized that the CT scan could be useless and 89% knew that all cases of hernia are not operable. Thirty percent recognized that hernias can go undetected on the CT scan and 78% that they may remain asymptomatic. Finally, 56% of the patients thought that the CT scan would not change their treatment and only 23% expected to undergo surgery sooner because of the CT exploration. Several factors would explain what patients expect from CT exploration of the spine: patient understanding that causes other than discal hernia can cause back pain (98%) or sciatic (77%); their fear of having another disorder (56% wanted to be reassured, which would explain in part why 27% hoped the CT would improve pain, 50% wanted to "see" their discal hernia, and 30 wanted to eliminate another cause of their pain); patient distrust of clinical diagnosis which they felt was less pertinent than CT (80% of the patients for generalists and 70% for specialists). Patient expectations did not

  12. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Cohort study of lumbar percutaneous chemonucleolysis using ethanol gel in sciatica refractory to conservative treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touraine, Sebastien; Tran, Olivia; Laredo, Jean-Denis [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Radiologie Osteo-Articulaire, Paris Cedex 10 (France); Damiano, Joel [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Rhumatologie, Centre Viggo-Petersen, Paris Cedex 10 (France)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate the efficacy of percutaneous chemonucleolysis using ethanol gel (PCEG) in alleviating radicular pain due to disc herniation after failure of conservative treatment. After failure of conservative treatment, PCEG was performed under fluoroscopic guidance in 42 patients with sciatica >4/10 on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for at least 6 weeks and consistent disc herniation on MRI or CT <3 months. The VAS pain score was determined at baseline, then after 1 and 3 months. We assessed the influence of patient-related factors (age, gender, pain duration) and disc herniation-related factors (level, migration pattern, disc herniation-related spinal stenosis) on outcome of PCEG. Mean pain duration was 6.7 months. Pain intensity decreased by 44 % and 62.6 % after 1 and 3 months, respectively, versus baseline (P = 0.007). A mild improvement was noted by the rheumatologist in 30/42 (71.4 %) and 36/42 (85.7 %) patients after 1 and 3 months, respectively, and in 31/42 (73.8 %) and 33/42 (78.6 %) patients by self-evaluation. Patients who failed PCEG were significantly older (49.8 vs. 37.3 years, P = 0.03). None of the other variables studied were significantly associated with pain relief. PCEG may significantly improve disc-related radicular pain refractory to conservative treatment. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of epidural blockade as therapy for patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Carlos Sanfelice Nunes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Sciatic pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation is a complex condition that is often highly limiting. The causes of pain in disc herniation are multifactorial. Two physiopathological mechanisms are involved in discogenic pain: mechanical deformation of nerve roots and a biochemical inflammatory component resulting from contact between the intervertebral disc and neural tissue, by way of the nucleus pulposus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of epidural blockade as therapy for bulging lumbar disc herniation. METHODS: A clinical study was conducted based on a retrospective and prospective survey. The blockade consisted of interlaminar puncture and bolus drug delivery. The number of procedures varied according to the clinical response, as determined through weekly evaluations and then 30, 90, and 180 days after the final session. A total of 124 patients who received one to five blockades were evaluated. RESULTS: The success rate (defining success as a reduction in sciatic pain of at least 80% was 75.8%. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated the therapeutic action of epidural blockade over the short term, i.e. in cases of acute pain, thus showing that intense and excruciating sciatic pain can be relieved through this technique. Because of the multifactorial genesis of sciatica and the difficulties encountered by healthcare professionals in treating this condition, epidural blockade can become part of therapeutic arsenal available. This procedure is situated between conservative treatment with an eminently clinical focus and surgical approaches.

  15. Imaging of sciatica; A short historical review and the present situation. Bildediagnostikk ved isjas; En kort historisk oversikt og status presens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anda, S. (Trondheim Regional Hospital (Norway))

    1993-02-01

    Cotugno described the clinical entity of sciatica in 1764. However, the association between sciatica and compression of lumbar nerve roots was not realized until the 1920s. Back surgery for herniated nucleus pulposus then became fashionable, and plain radiography and myelography enabled preoperative mapping. Recently other imaging techniques have emerged, such as computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This has increased the knowledge of the etiology of lumbar root compressions, and invasive therapies for sciatica have become more diversified. It is easy to lose perspective among the available imaging procedures and therapeutic techniques. The aim of this paper is to present the current status from a historical point of view, with special emphasis on the most common imaging methods for the investigation of lumbosacral radiculopathies. 48 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Bilim Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)); Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A. (Dept. of Radiology of Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Ozturk, E. (Dept. of Radiology, GATA Haydarpasa Teaching Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Karatoprak, O. (Dept. of Orthopeadic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey))

    2009-02-15

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  17. Efeitos do ultrassom terapêutico em modelo experimental de ciatalgia Therapeutic ultrasound effects in a sciatica experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Policam Ciena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A ciática possui grande prevalência geral e seu tratamento tende a resolver as causas de compressão nervosa. A fisioterapia objetiva reduzir os sintomas causados pela compressão. O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a eficácia do ultrassom terapêutico sobre a dor, em animais submetidos a modelo experimental de ciatalgia. Foram usados 18 ratos neste estudo, divididos em três grupos: GS (n = 4, submetido a modelo de ciatalgia e tratados com ultrassom desligado; GUP (n = 7, submetido à ciatalgia e tratados com ultrassom pulsado 2W/cm² (SATP; 0,4 - SATA; e grupo GUC (n = 7, submetido à ciática e ultrassom contínuo (0,4W/cm². O nervo ciático do membro posterior direito foi exposto à compressão com fio categute em quatro pontos. No 3º dia pós-operatório (PO, iniciou-se tratamento indireto por quatro dias. No 9º dia PO, o tratamento direto começou sobre a área do procedimento cirúrgico, por cinco dias consecutivos. O tempo de elevação da pata, durante a marcha, foi avaliado antes e após a ciatalgia, no 3º, 6º, 9º e 13º PO. Os resultados demonstraram que a aplicação do ultrassom reduziu a dor com ambos os tratamentos efetivos e tendeu a ser mais eficaz na forma pulsada.The sciatica possesses great general population prevalence, and its treatment tends to solve the nervous compression causes. Physiotherapy aims to reduce the symptoms caused by compression. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound on pain in animals subjected to sciatica experimental model. Eighteen rats were used and they were divided in 3 groups: group SG (n=4 submitted to the sciatica and treated with the ultrasound off, group PUG (n=7 submitted to the sciatica and treated with pulsed ultrasound 2 W/cm² (SATP; 0,4 - SATA and group CUG (n=7 submitted to the sciatica and treated with continuous ultrasound (0,4 W/cm². The sciatic nerve of the posterior right limb was exposed to the compression with Catgut wire in 4

  18. Reliability of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings and their correlation with clinical outcome in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A M; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J; Van der Kallen, Bas F; van den Hout, Wilbert B; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C

    2014-11-01

    Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-MRI) is often performed in the evaluation of patients with persistent sciatica after lumbar disc surgery. However, correlation between enhancement and clinical findings is debated, and limited data are available regarding the reliability of enhancement findings. To evaluate the reliability of Gd-MRI findings and their correlation with clinical findings in patients with sciatica. Prospective observational evaluation of patients who were enrolled in a randomized trial with 1-year follow-up. Patients with 6- to 12-week sciatica, who participated in a multicentre randomized clinical trial comparing an early surgery strategy with prolonged conservative care with surgery if needed. In total 204 patients underwent Gd-MRI at baseline and after 1 year. Patients were assessed by means of the Roland Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) for sciatica, visual analog scale (VAS) for leg pain, and patient-reported perceived recovery at 1 year. Kappa coefficients were used to assess interobserver reliability. In total, 204 patients underwent Gd-MRI at baseline and after 1 year. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were correlated to the outcome measures using the Mann-Whitney U test for continuous data and Fisher exact tests for categorical data. Poor-to-moderate agreement was observed regarding Gd enhancement of the herniated disc and compressed nerve root (kappa0.95). Of the 59 patients with an enhancing herniated disc at 1 year, 86% reported recovery compared with 100% of the 12 patients with nonenhancing herniated discs (p=.34). Of the 12 patients with enhancement of the most affected nerve root at 1 year, 83% reported recovery compared with 85% of the 192 patients with no enhancement (p=.69). Patients with and without enhancing herniated discs or nerve roots at 1 year reported comparable outcomes on RDQ and VAS-leg pain. Reliability of Gd-MRI findings was poor-to-moderate and no correlation was observed between enhancement and

  19. Use of Temporary Implantable Biomaterials to Reduce Leg Pain and Back Pain in Patients with Sciatica and Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gere S. diZerega

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The principle etiology of leg pain (sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is mechanical compression of the nerve root. Sciatica is reduced by decompression of the herniated disc, i.e., removing mechanical compression of the nerve root. Decompression surgery typically reduces sciatica more than lumbar back pain (LBP. Decompression surgery reduces mechanical compression of the nerve root. However, decompression surgery does not directly reduce sensitization of the sensory nerves in the epidural space and disc. In addition, sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus and epidural space are not protected from topical interaction with pain mediators induced by decompression surgery. The secondary etiology of sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is sensitization of the nerve root. Sensitization of the nerve root results from a mechanical compression, b exposure to cellular pain mediators, and/or c exposure to biochemical pain mediators. Although decompression surgery reduces nerve root compression, sensory nerve sensitization often persists. These observations are consistent with continued exposure of tissue in the epidural space, including the nerve root, to increased cellular and biochemical pain mediators following surgery. A potential contributor to lumbar back pain (LBP is stimulation of sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus by a cellular pain mediators and/or b biochemical pain mediators that accompany annular tears or disruption. Sensory fibers located in the outer one-third of the annulus fibrosus increase in number and depth as a result of disc herniation. The nucleus pulposus is comprised of material that can produce an autoimmune stimulation of the sensory nerves located in the annulus and epidural space leading to LBP. The sensory nerves of the annulus fibrosus and epidural space may be sensitized by topical exposure to cellular and biochemical pain mediators induced by lumbar surgery. Annulotomy or annular rupture allows the nucleus pulposus

  20. Use of Temporary Implantable Biomaterials to Reduce Leg Pain and Back Pain in Patients with Sciatica and Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    diZerega, Gere S.; Traylor, Melissa M.; Alphonso, Lisa S.; Falcone, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    The principle etiology of leg pain (sciatica) from lumbar disc herniation is mechanical compression of the nerve root. Sciatica is reduced by decompression of the herniated disc, i.e., removing mechanical compression of the nerve root. Decompression surgery typically reduces sciatica more than lumbar back pain (LBP). Decompression surgery reduces mechanical compression of the nerve root. However, decompression surgery does not directly reduce sensitization of the sensory nerves in the epidural space and disc. In addition, sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus and epidural space are not protected from topical interaction with pain mediators induced by decompression surgery. The secondary etiology of sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is sensitization of the nerve root. Sensitization of the nerve root results from a) mechanical compression, b) exposure to cellular pain mediators, and/or c) exposure to biochemical pain mediators. Although decompression surgery reduces nerve root compression, sensory nerve sensitization often persists. These observations are consistent with continued exposure of tissue in the epidural space, including the nerve root, to increased cellular and biochemical pain mediators following surgery. A potential contributor to lumbar back pain (LBP) is stimulation of sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus by a) cellular pain mediators and/or b) biochemical pain mediators that accompany annular tears or disruption. Sensory fibers located in the outer one-third of the annulus fibrosus increase in number and depth as a result of disc herniation. The nucleus pulposus is comprised of material that can produce an autoimmune stimulation of the sensory nerves located in the annulus and epidural space leading to LBP. The sensory nerves of the annulus fibrosus and epidural space may be sensitized by topical exposure to cellular and biochemical pain mediators induced by lumbar surgery. Annulotomy or annular rupture allows the nucleus pulposus topical

  1. Efficacy and safety of etanercept in the treatment of sciatica: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Shangfei; Yang, Chenyuan; Zhang, Xiaofei; Wen, Shuzheng; Li, Yuankui

    2017-10-01

    Etanercept might be promising to alleviate sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation and spinal stenosis. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of etanercept in patients with sciatica. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and Controlled clinical trials (CCT) assessing the efficacy of etanercept on sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation and spinal stenosis were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcome was leg pain scores. Meta-analysis was performed using random-effect model. Four RCTs and one CCT involving 184 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with placebo, etanercept could significantly reduce leg pain (Std. mean difference=-0.83; 95% CI=-1.59 to -0.06; P=0.03) and back pain (Std. mean difference=-1.89; 95% CI=-3.34 to -0.43; P=0.01). However, when comparing etanercept to steroids there was no significant difference in the relief of leg pain (Std. mean difference=-1.18; 95% CI=-3.21 to 0.84; P=0.25) and back pain (Std. mean difference=-0.29; 95% CI=-1.26 to 0.67; P=0.55). Etanercept showed no increase in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) compared with placebo (Std. mean difference=-0.83; 95% CI=-2.03 to 0.37; P=0.18) and steroids (Std. mean difference=-0.19; 95% CI=-1.15 to 0.77; P=0.70). Etanercept treatment was associated with a significantly reduced pain in leg and back compared to placebo and may possibly improve leg pain relief compared to steroids, but failed to improve ODI. Etanercept should be recommended for sciatica with caution because of heterogeneity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cohort study of lumbar percutaneous chemonucleolysis using ethanol gel in sciatica refractory to conservative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touraine, Sébastien; Damiano, Joël; Tran, Olivia; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of percutaneous chemonucleolysis using ethanol gel (PCEG) in alleviating radicular pain due to disc herniation after failure of conservative treatment. After failure of conservative treatment, PCEG was performed under fluoroscopic guidance in 42 patients with sciatica >4/10 on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for at least 6 weeks and consistent disc herniation on MRI or CT <3 months. The VAS pain score was determined at baseline, then after 1 and 3 months. We assessed the influence of patient-related factors (age, gender, pain duration) and disc herniation-related factors (level, migration pattern, disc herniation-related spinal stenosis) on outcome of PCEG. Mean pain duration was 6.7 months. Pain intensity decreased by 44% and 62.6% after 1 and 3 months, respectively, versus baseline (P = 0.007). A mild improvement was noted by the rheumatologist in 30/42 (71.4%) and 36/42 (85.7%) patients after 1 and 3 months, respectively, and in 31/42 (73.8%) and 33/42 (78.6%) patients by self-evaluation. Patients who failed PCEG were significantly older (49.8 vs. 37.3 years, P = 0.03). None of the other variables studied were significantly associated with pain relief. PCEG may significantly improve disc-related radicular pain refractory to conservative treatment. • Percutaneous chemonucleolysis using ethanol gel (PCEG) is feasible on an outpatient basis. • PCEG improves disc-related radicular pain refractory to conservative treatment. • PCEG is feasible on an outpatient basis. • Failure of PCEG does not interfere with subsequent spinal surgery.

  3. Cyclic Sciatica and Back Pain Responds to Treatment of Underlying Endometriosis: Case Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Jaya; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Jenkins, Arthur L

    2017-01-01

    Multiple causes outside the spine can mimic spinal back pain. Endometriosis is an important gynecologic disorder, which commonly affects the lower region of the female pelvis and less frequently the spine and soft tissues. The lumbosacral trunk is vulnerable to pressure from any abdominal mass originating from the uterus and the ovaries. Therefore symptoms of endometriosis include severe reoccurring pain in the pelvic area as well as lower back and abdominal pain. We report on a 39-year-old gymnast with cyclic sciatica and back pain, whose initial presentation initially led to a spinal fusion at L4/5 and L5/S1, but that procedure did not change her symptoms. Her diagnosis of endometriosis was not made until 2 years after her spinal fusion. Ultimately, once diagnosed with endometriosis of the retroperitoneal spinal and neural elements, her back and leg pain responded completely to hormonal therapy and then to a hysterectomy and a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Because her true diagnosis of endometriosis was unknown and she had some degenerative changes in her spine, she underwent a spinal fusion that would probably not have been done if the diagnosis of endometriosis had been suggested. It is critical for any clinician who deals with back pain to at least consider the diagnosis of endometriosis in female patients who have a history of pelvic pain. The diagnosis of endometriosis should be considered in candidate patients by asking whether there is a significant hormonal cyclic nature to the symptoms, to prevent such unnecessary surgical adventures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging interpretation in patients with sciatica who are potential candidates for lumbar disc surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelilah El Barzouhi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is considered the mainstay imaging investigation in patients suspected of lumbar disc herniations. Both imaging and clinical findings determine the final decision of surgery. The objective of this study was to assess MRI observer variation in patients with sciatica who are potential candidates for lumbar disc surgery. METHODS: Patients for this study were potential candidates (n = 395 for lumbar disc surgery who underwent MRI to assess eligibility for a randomized trial. Two neuroradiologists and one neurosurgeon independently evaluated all MRIs. A four point scale was used for both probability of disc herniation and root compression, ranging from definitely present to definitely absent. Multiple characteristics of the degenerated disc herniation were scored. For inter-agreement analysis absolute agreements and kappa coefficients were used. Kappa coefficients were categorized as poor (<0.00, slight (0.00-0.20, fair (0.21-0.40, moderate (0.41-0.60, substantial (0.61-0.80 and excellent (0.81-1.00 agreement. RESULTS: Excellent agreement was found on the affected disc level (kappa range 0.81-0.86 and the nerve root that most likely caused the sciatic symptoms (kappa range 0.86-0.89. Interobserver agreement was moderate to substantial for the probability of disc herniation (kappa range 0.57-0.77 and the probability of nerve root compression (kappa range 0.42-0.69. Absolute pairwise agreement among the readers ranged from 90-94% regarding the question whether the probability of disc herniation on MRI was above or below 50%. Generally, moderate agreement was observed regarding the characteristics of the symptomatic disc level and of the herniated disc. CONCLUSION: The observer variation of MRI interpretation in potential candidates for lumbar disc surgery is satisfactory regarding characteristics most important in decision for surgery. However, there is considerable variation between observers in specific

  5. Disc extrusions and bulges in nonspecific low back pain and sciatica: Exploratory randomised controlled trial comparing yoga therapy and normal medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monro, Robin; Bhardwaj, Abhishek Kumar; Gupta, Ram Kumar; Telles, Shirley; Allen, Beth; Little, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Previous trials of yoga therapy for nonspecific low back pain (nsLBP) (without sciatica) showed beneficial effects. To test effects of yoga therapy on pain and disability associated with lumbar disc extrusions and bulges. Parallel-group, randomised, controlled trial. Sixty-one adults from rural population, aged 20-45, with nsLBP or sciatica, and disc extrusions or bulges. Randomised to yoga (n=30) and control (n=31). Yoga: 3-month yoga course of group classes and home practice, designed to ensure safety for disc extrusions. normal medical care. OUTCOME MEASURES (3-4 months) Primary: Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ); worst pain in past two weeks. Secondary: Aberdeen Low Back Pain Scale; straight leg raise test; structural changes. Disc projections per case ranged from one bulge or one extrusion to three bulges plus two extrusions. Sixty-two percent had sciatica. Intention-to-treat analysis of the RMDQ data, adjusted for age, sex and baseline RMDQ scores, gave a Yoga Group score 3.29 points lower than Control Group (0.98, 5.61; p=0.006) at 3 months. No other significant differences in the endpoints occurred. No adverse effects of yoga were reported. Yoga therapy can be safe and beneficial for patients with nsLBP or sciatica, accompanied by disc extrusions and bulges.

  6. Immediate relief of herniated lumbar disc-related sciatica by ankle acupuncture: A study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Anfeng; Xu, Mingshu; Liang, Yan; Wei, Jinzi; Liu, Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Around 90% of sciatica cases are due to a herniated intervertebral disc in the lumbar region. Ankle acupuncture (AA) has been reported to be effective in the treatment of acute nonspecific low back pain. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a single session of ankle acupuncture for disc-related sciatica. This will be a double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients diagnosed with disc-related sciatica will be randomly divided into 3 parallel groups. The treatment group (n = 30) will receive ankle acupuncture. The 2 control groups will either undergo traditional needle manipulation (n = 30) or sham acupuncture (n = 30) at the same point as the treatment group. The primary outcome will be pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes will be paresthesia intensity on a VAS and the Abbreviated Acceptability Rating Profile (AAPR). The success of blinding will be evaluated, and the needle-induced sensation and adverse events will be recorded. All outcomes will be evaluated before, during, and after the treatment. This study will determine the immediate effect and specificity of ankle acupuncture for the treatment of disc-related sciatica. We anticipate that ankle acupuncture might be more effective than traditional needle manipulation or sham acupuncture. ChiCTR-IPR-15007127 (http://www.chictr.org.cn/showprojen.aspx?proj=11989). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Physical therapy plus general practitioners' care versus general practitioners' care alone for sciatica: a randomised clinical trial with a 12-month follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijsterburg, P.A.; Verhagen, A.P.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Hoogen, H.J.M. van den; Peul, W.C.; Avezaat, C.J.; Koes, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    A randomised clinical trial in primary care with a 12-months follow-up period. About 135 patients with acute sciatica (recruited from May 2003 to November 2004) were randomised in two groups: (1) the intervention group received physical therapy (PT) added to the general practitioners' care, and (2)

  8. The treatment of disc herniation-induced sciatica with infliximab - One-year follow-up results of FIRST II, a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, Timo; Karppinen, Jaro; Paimela, Leena; Malmivaara, Antti; Lindgren, Karl-August; Bowman, Chris; Hammond, Anthony; Kirkham, Bruce; Jarvinen, Simo; Niinimaki, Jaakko; Veeger, Nic; Haapea, Marianne; Torkki, Markus; Tervonen, Osmo; Seitsalo, Seppo; Hurri, Heikki

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. A randomized controlled trial. Objectives. To evaluate the long-term efficacy of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), in patients with acute/subacute sciatica secondary to herniated disc. Summary of Background Data. The results of

  9. [A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation-induced Sciatica by Acupuncture Stimulation of Sciatic Nerve Trunk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ling; Hu, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Xue-Yu; Zheng, Xu; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Min; He, Liu

    2016-10-25

    To observe the efficacy of acupuncture stimulation of the sciatic nerve trunk in the treatment of patients suffering from sciatica induced by lumbar disc herniation (LDH). A total of 60 LDH sciatica patients met the inclusion criteria were randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 30 cases in each. Patients of the treatment group were treated by directly needling the sciatic nerve and routine acupuncture of Ashi -points, Lumbar Jiaji (EX-B 2), Dachangshu (BL 28), etc., and those of the control group treated by simple routine acupuncture. The treatment was conducted once a day, 5 times a week, 4 weeks altogether. The clinical effect was evaluated according to the "Standards for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Effect Evaluation of Syndromes of Chinese Medicine" and the pain intensity was assessed by using simplified Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) containing pain rating index (PRI), visual analogue scale (VAS) and present pain intensity (PPI). After the treatment, of the two 30 cases of LDH sciatica patients in the control and treatment groups, 11 and 18 were cured, 7 and 7 experienced marked improvement, 10 and 4 were effective, 2 and 1 was invalid, with the effective rate being 93.3% and 96.7%, respectively. The cured+markedly effective rate of the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group ( P sciatica in LDH patients, and is superior to simple routine acupuncture in the clinical efficacy.

  10. The clinical and cost-effectiveness of stratified care for patients with sciatica: the SCOPiC randomised controlled trial protocol (ISRCTN75449581).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nadine E; Konstantinou, Kika; Lewis, Martyn; Ogollah, Reuben; Dunn, Kate M; van der Windt, Danielle; Beardmore, Ruth; Artus, Majid; Bartlam, Bernadette; Hill, Jonathan C; Jowett, Sue; Kigozi, Jesse; Mallen, Christian; Saunders, Benjamin; Hay, Elaine M

    2017-04-26

    Sciatica has a substantial impact on patients, and is associated with high healthcare and societal costs. Although there is variation in the clinical management of sciatica, the current model of care usually involves an initial period of 'wait and see' for most patients, with simple measures of advice and analgesia, followed by conservative and/or more invasive interventions if symptoms fail to resolve. A model of care is needed that does not over-treat those with a good prognosis yet identifies patients who do need more intensive treatment to help with symptoms, and return to everyday function including work. The aim of the SCOPiC trial (SCiatica Outcomes in Primary Care) is to establish whether stratified care based on subgrouping using a combination of prognostic and clinical information, with matched care pathways, is more effective than non-stratified care, for improving time to symptom resolution in patients consulting with sciatica in primary care. We will also assess the impact of stratified care on service delivery and evaluate its cost-effectiveness compared to non-stratified care. Multicentre, pragmatic, parallel arm randomised trial, with internal pilot, cost-effectiveness analysis and embedded qualitative study. We will recruit 470 adult patients with sciatica from general practices in England and Wales, over 24 months. Patients will be randomised to stratified care or non-stratified care, and treated in physiotherapy and spinal specialist services, in participating NHS services. The primary outcome is time to first resolution of sciatica symptoms, measured on a 6-point ordered categorical scale, collected using text messaging. Secondary outcomes include physical function, pain intensity, quality of life, work loss, healthcare use and satisfaction with treatment, and will be collected using postal questionnaires at 4 and 12-month follow-up. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with a subsample of participants and clinicians will explore the

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF NEURAL TISSUE MOBILISATION ON PAIN, PAIN FREE PASSIVE SLR RANGE OF MOTION AND FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY IN LOW BACK ACHE SUBJECTS WITH SCIATICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Geethika

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is a common, benign, and self-limiting disease that affects almost all persons, with a lifetime prevalence of up to 84%. In contrast, sciatica affects only 40 % of all persons in the Western industrialized countries. In sciatica, pain radiates down the legs, below the knee along the distribution of sciatic nerve. Nerve root compression is the most common cause of sciatica. Neuro dynamics or Neural Tissue Mobilization is relatively new approach in treatment of neuro musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of the study to determine the effectiveness of Neural Tissue mobilization on pain, pain free passive SLR ROM &functional disability in LBA subjects with Sciatica. Objective of the study is to study and compare the effectiveness of Neural tissue mobilization in LBA subjects with sciatica in terms of pain, pain free SLR ROM and Oswestry Disability Index. Methods: 30 subjects were selected by simple random sampling and assigned in to Control(n=15 &Experimental group(n=15.The subjects in control group were given conventional physiotherapy and those in Experimental group were given Neural Tissue Mobilization in addition to conventional therapy. All the participants were assessed with VAS, ODI and pain free passive SLR ROM. Results: After the analysis, the results were found to be significant improvement in pain, pain free SLR ROM, ODI in both groups (p< 0.00.But there is a high significance in Experimental group when compared to control group. Conclusion: Results suggest that NEURAL TISSUE MOBILIZATION along with conventional therapy is more effective in reducing pain, decreasing disability and improving SLR ROM.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation in Patients with Sciatica Who Are Potential Candidates for Lumbar Disc Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A. M.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Van der Kallen, Bas F.; van den Hout, Wilbert B.; Verwoerd, Annemieke J. H.; Koes, Bart W.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is considered the mainstay imaging investigation in patients suspected of lumbar disc herniations. Both imaging and clinical findings determine the final decision of surgery. The objective of this study was to assess MRI observer variation in patients with sciatica who are potential candidates for lumbar disc surgery. Methods Patients for this study were potential candidates (n = 395) for lumbar disc surgery who underwent MRI to assess eligibility for a randomized trial. Two neuroradiologists and one neurosurgeon independently evaluated all MRIs. A four point scale was used for both probability of disc herniation and root compression, ranging from definitely present to definitely absent. Multiple characteristics of the degenerated disc herniation were scored. For inter-agreement analysis absolute agreements and kappa coefficients were used. Kappa coefficients were categorized as poor (<0.00), slight (0.00–0.20), fair (0.21–0.40), moderate (0.41–0.60), substantial (0.61–0.80) and excellent (0.81–1.00) agreement. Results Excellent agreement was found on the affected disc level (kappa range 0.81–0.86) and the nerve root that most likely caused the sciatic symptoms (kappa range 0.86–0.89). Interobserver agreement was moderate to substantial for the probability of disc herniation (kappa range 0.57–0.77) and the probability of nerve root compression (kappa range 0.42–0.69). Absolute pairwise agreement among the readers ranged from 90–94% regarding the question whether the probability of disc herniation on MRI was above or below 50%. Generally, moderate agreement was observed regarding the characteristics of the symptomatic disc level and of the herniated disc. Conclusion The observer variation of MRI interpretation in potential candidates for lumbar disc surgery is satisfactory regarding characteristics most important in decision for surgery. However, there is considerable variation between observers in

  13. Gabapentin Superadded to a Pre-Existent Regime Containing Amytriptyline for Chronic Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kelvin L; Marshman, Laurence A G

    2016-11-01

    There is currently a gross lack of evidence base guiding the medical management of chronic sciatica (CS). Only scant previous studies have assessed gabapentin (GBP) in CS. Extrapolating NICE-UK guidelines, prescribing authorities often insist on trialling anti-depressants (e.g., amytriptyline, AMP) as a first line for neuropathic pain states such as CS. When super-adding second-line agents, such as GBP, NICE-UK encourages overlap with first-line agents to avoid decreased pain-control. No study has reflected this practice. Evaluate efficacy and side effects (SE) of GBP superadded to a pre-existent regime containing AMP for CS. Prospective cohort of patients with unilateral CS attending a specialist spine clinic. Eligible patients had experienced partial benefit to a pre-existent regime containing AMP: none had significant SE. No drugs other than GBP were added or discontinued (the latter was considered inequitable) for 3 months. Visual analog pain score (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), and SE were recorded. Efficacy: in 56% (43/77) there were reductions in VAS (5.3 ± 3.6→2.8 ± 2.7, P < 0.0001) and ODI (42.8 ± 31.1→30.7 ± 25.2, P = 0.008). SE: Eighty-two SE (23 types) were reported in 53% (41/77). Efficacy was less in those with SE: a trend existed for a lesser reduction in VAS (2.0 ± 2.4 v 3.0 ± 2.7, P = 0.08), which proved significant for ODI (8.1 ± 11.4 v 16.7 ± 18.2, P = 0.01). Thirty-four percent (26/77) discontinued GBP all within 1 week (i.e., during titration). This is the first prospective cohort study of GBP super-added to a pre-existent regime containing AMP for CS, as per routine clinical practice and NICE-UK principles. Super-added GBP demonstrated further efficacy over the previous regime in 56%; however, SE were frequent (53%) and diverse (23 types), and 34% abruptly discarded GBP. Although SE were associated with decreased efficacy, 37% nevertheless tolerated GBP despite SE. © 2016

  14. The effect of age on result of straight leg raising test in patients suffering lumbar disc herniation and sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Tabesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ninety percent of all people sometimes during their lives experience low back pain, and 30-40% develops radicular leg pain with the sciatica characteristics. Although for clinical diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation (LDH straight leg raising (SLR test in 85-90% of cases indicates LDH, but in our practice with LDH patients this test is frequently negative despite radicular leg pain due to LDH. Hence, we decided to evaluate this test in LDH in different age groups. Materials and Methods: All patients with leg pain referring to neurosurgery clinic were enrolled. Those with a history of pain other than sciatica excluded and SLR test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the lumbosacral spine performed. The patients with negative MRI findings excluded and finally 269 patients with true sciatica and positive MRI were included. SLR tests were performed for different age groups. Results: Of 269 patients, 167 were male. The age range was 16-80 years. The most involved levels were L5-S1 (47% and L4-L5 (42%, respectively. The rate of positive SLR result, which was 100%, 87% and 82% for 10-19, 20-29 and 30-39 years age group respectively. With an increment of age, the rate of positive test regularly declined . The chance of positive SLR in men is 1.3 times the women (odds ratio [OR] 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.265-4.557; P = 0.007. Increasing the age has suppression effect in positivity of SLR so that for each 1-year the chance of SLR become 0.27 times less to become positive and this is also statically meaningful (OR = 0.271;95% CI = 0.188-0.391; P,0.001. The chance of positive SLR for patients under 60 is 5.4 folds more than patients above 60 years old (OR = 5.4; 95% CI = 4-8.3; P, 0.001. Conclusion: Age, sex (male, and disk level had statistically the effect on SLR positive test.

  15. The Effects of Pregabalin and the Glial Attenuator Minocycline on the Response to Intradermal Capsaicin in Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumracki, Nicole M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Gentgall, Melanie; Briggs, Nancy; Williams, Desmond B.; Rolan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with unilateral sciatica have heightened responses to intradermal capsaicin compared to pain-free volunteers. No studies have investigated whether this pain model can screen for novel anti-neuropathic agents in patients with pre-existing neuropathic pain syndromes. Aim This study compared the effects of pregabalin (300 mg) and the tetracycline antibiotic and glial attenuator minocycline (400 mg) on capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia in patients with unilateral sciatica on both their affected and unaffected leg. Methods/Results Eighteen patients with unilateral sciatica completed this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way cross-over study. Participants received a 10 µg dose of capsaicin into the middle section of their calf on both their affected and unaffected leg, separated by an interval of 75 min. Capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were recorded pre-injection and at 5, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min post-injection. Minocycline tended to reduce pre-capsaicin injection values of hyperalgesia in the affected leg by 28% (95% CI 0% to 56%). The area under the effect time curves for capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were not affected by either treatment compared to placebo. Significant limb differences were observed for flare (AUC) (−38% in affected leg, 95% CI for difference −19% to −52%). Both hand dominance and sex were significant covariates of response to capsaicin. Conclusions It cannot be concluded that minocycline is unsuitable for further evaluation as an anti-neuropathic pain drug as pregabalin, our positive control, failed to reduce capsaicin-induced neuropathic pain. However, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of minocycline observed pre-capsaicin injection is promising pilot information to support ongoing research into glial-mediated treatments for neuropathic pain. The differences in flare response between limbs may

  16. Radiological imaging in patients with low back pain and sciatica[6 figs., 14 refs]; Billeddiagnostikk ved lumbago og isjas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullerud, R. [Aker Sykehus, Oslo (Norway)

    1999-05-01

    Low back pain and sciatica are among the most common medical problems in Western countries, affecting up to 80% of the population at some time during their lives. Plain radiography is still a sensitive method in degenerative spinal disease and for the identification of spondylolysis and destructions as well as transitional vertebra and other anomalies in the lumbosacral region. In lumbar disk herniation CT and MR have higher sensitivity than lumbar myelography and should be used as the primary imaging methods. Myelography is still the method of choice in lumbar spinal stenosis. Myelography should also be considered in patients with poor consistency between CT and MR findings and the clinical presentation. Postoperatively MR is superior to CT and myelography for distinguishing between scar tissue and recurrent disk herniation.

  17. Patients with sciatica still experience pain and disability 5 years after surgery: A systematic review with meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, G C; Witzleb, A J; Fritsch, C; Maher, C G; Ferreira, P H; Ferreira, M L

    2016-11-01

    The clinical course of patients with sciatica is believed to be favourable, but there is conflicting evidence on the postoperative course of this condition. We aimed to investigate the clinical course of sciatica following surgery. An electronic search was conducted on MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from inception to April 2015. We screened for prospective cohort studies investigating pain or disability outcomes for patients with sciatica treated surgically. Fractional polynomial regression analysis was used to generate pooled means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of pain and disability up to 5 years after surgery. Estimates of pain and disability (converted to a 0-100 scale) were plotted over time, from inception to last available follow-up time. Forty records (39 cohort studies) were included with a total of 13,883 patients with sciatica. Before surgery, the pooled mean leg pain score was 75.2 (95% CI 68.1-82.4) which reduced to 15.3 (95% CI 8.5-22.1) at 3 months. Patients were never fully recovered in the long-term and pain increased to 21.0 (95% CI 12.5-29.5) at 5 years. The pooled mean disability score before surgery was 55.1 (95% CI 52.3-58.0) and this decreased to 15.5 (95% CI 13.3-17.6) at 3 months, and further reduced to 13.1 (95% CI 10.6-15.5) at 5 years. Although surgery is followed by a rapid decrease in pain and disability by 3 months, patients still experience mild to moderate pain and disability 5 years after surgery. WHAT DOES THIS REVIEW ADD?: This review provides a quantitative summary of the postoperative course of patients with sciatica. Patients with sciatica experienced a rapid reduction in pain and disability in the first 3 months, but still had mild to moderate symptoms 5 years after surgery. Although no significant differences were found, microdiscectomy showed larger improvements compared to other surgical techniques. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  18. A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing the Effectiveness of Electroacupuncture versus Medium-Frequency Electrotherapy for Discogenic Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the short- and long-term effects of electroacupuncture (EA compared with medium-frequency electrotherapy (MFE on chronic discogenic sciatica. Methods. One hundred participants were randomized into two groups to receive EA (n=50 or MFE (n=50 for 4 weeks. A 28-week follow-up of the two groups was performed. The primary outcome measure was the average leg pain intensity. The secondary outcome measures were the low back pain intensity, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, patient global impression (PGI, drug use frequency, and EA acceptance. Results. The mean changes in the average leg pain numerical rating scale (NRS scores were 2.30 (1.86–2.57 and 1.06 (0.62–1.51 in the EA and MFE groups at week 4, respectively. The difference was significant (P<0.001. The long-term follow-up resulted in significant differences. The average leg pain NRS scores decreased by 2.12 (1.70–2.53 and 0.36 (−0.05–0.78 from baseline in the EA and MFE groups, respectively, at week 28. However, low back pain intensity and PGI did not differ significantly at week 4. No serious adverse events occurred. Conclusions. EA showed greater short-term and long-term benefits for chronic discogenic sciatica than MFE, and the effect of EA was superior to that of MFE. The study findings warrant verification. This trial was registered under identifier ChiCTR-IPR-15006370.

  19. Does the diagnosis influence the outcome in multimodal outpatient pain management program for low back pain and sciatica? a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Stephan Kurz, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, GermanyAbstract: The literature describes multimodal pain-management programs as successful therapy options in the conservative treatment of chronic low back pain. Yet, the intensity and inclusion criteria of such programs remain debatable. In many studies, the pain originating from spinal structures is described as nonspecific low back pain – a diffuse diagnosis without serious implications. The purpose of this study is to compare the short-term outcomes between patients suffering from sciatica due to a discus intervertebralis herniation and those suffering from low back pain caused by facet joint disease after 3 weeks of treatment in an intense multimodal outpatient program in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the university hospital.Keywords: chronic low back pain, sciatica, interdisciplinary management, discus herniation, spondylarthritis

  20. Sciatica as the first manifestation of synovial sarcoma. Contribution of magnetic resonance imaging to the diagnosis; Sciatique revelatrice d`un synovialosarcome. Interet de l`IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillard, E.; Le Dantec, P.; Chales, G.; Jean, S.; Pawlotsky, Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 35 - Rennes (France)

    1995-07-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with paralyzing sciatica as the first manifestation of synovial sarcoma of his right leg. Although neurologic symptoms sometimes occur as manifestations of synovial sarcoma, they are exceptionally inaugural. Magnetic resonance imaging is a valuable tool in patients with synovial tumors, both for establishing the diagnosis and for evaluating the extent of the lesion. (authors). 13 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Healthcare utilisation of pregnant women who experience sciatica, leg cramps and/or varicose veins: A cross-sectional survey of 1835 pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Helen; Lauche, Romy; Adams, Jon; Steel, Amie; Broom, Alex; Sibbritt, David

    2016-02-01

    Common discomforts of pregnancy experienced in the lower extremity include sciatica, leg cramps and varicose veins. Whilst research attention has focused on aetiology and outcomes, the health service utilisation of pregnant women suffering from these complaints has been largely overlooked. To examine the health status and health service utilisation profile of pregnant women experiencing sciatica, leg cramps or varicose veins. Linear and logistic regression was applied to a cross-sectional survey of a pregnant women drawn from the 1973 to 1978 cohort (aged 31-36 years in 2009), of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (n=1835). Participant's demographics, health status and health service utilisation were compared for all three complaints based upon three subgroups (yes, sought help; yes, did not seek help; no). A number of women experienced sciatica (22.1%), leg cramps (18.2%) or varicose veins (9.4%). Of these, a greater proportion of women with sciatica (79.3%) or varicose veins (71.5%) sought help for their condition compared with women with leg cramps (46.7%). Comparisons between women with the conditions of interest who did seek help and those who did not only found that women with a university degree were 0.29 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.85) times less likely to seek help for their condition compared to women with a school only education. Further research examining all health seeking behaviour and treatment use of pregnant women who experience lower extremity problems is required in order to facilitate safe, effective and coordinated maternity care to further support these women during pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Do MRI Findings Change Over a Period of Up to 1 Year in Patients With Low Back Pain and/or Sciatica?: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, John; Hush, Julia; Steffens, Daniel; Hancock, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    Systematic review OBJECTIVE.: The aim of the study was to investigate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings change over a relatively short period of time (sciatica. We also investigated whether there was an association between any change in MRI findings and change in clinical outcomes. MRI offers the potential to identify possible pathoanatomic sources of LBP and/or sciatica; however, the clinical importance of MRI findings remains unclear. Little is known about whether lumbar MRI findings change over the short term and if so whether these changes are associated with changes in clinical outcomes. Medline, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched. Included were cohort studies that performed repeat MRI scans within 12 months in patients with LBP and/or sciatica. Data on study characteristics and change in MRI findings were extracted from included studies. Any data describing associations between change in MRI findings and change in clinical outcomes were also extracted. A total of 12 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Pooling was not possible due to heterogeneity of studies and findings. Seven studies reported on changes in disc herniation and reported 15% to 93% of herniations reduced or disappeared in size. Two studies reported on changes in nerve root compression and reported 17% to 91% reduced or disappeared. Only one study reported on the association between change in MRI findings and change in clinical outcomes within 1 year, and found no association. This review found moderate evidence that the natural course of herniations and nerve root compression is favorable over a 1-year period in people with sciatica or LBP. There is a lack of evidence on whether other MRI findings change, and whether changes in MRI findings are associated with changes in clinical outcomes. 1.

  3. Does Kinesiophobia Modify the Effects of Physical Therapy on Outcomes in Patients With Sciatica in Primary Care? Subgroup Analysis From a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Koes, Bart W; el Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2015-09-01

    A higher level of kinesiophobia appears to be associated with poor recovery in patients with sciatica. The aim of this study was to investigate whether kinesiophobia modifies the effect of physical therapy on outcomes in patients with sciatica. This was a subgroup analysis from a randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a primary care setting. A total of 135 patients with acute sciatica participated. Patients were randomly assigned to groups that received (1) physical therapy plus general practitioners' care (intervention group) or (2) general practitioners' care alone (control group). Kinesiophobia at baseline was measured with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and a single substitute question for kinesiophobia (SQK). Pain and recovery were assessed at 3- and 12-month follow-ups. Regression analysis was used to test for interaction between the level of kinesiophobia at baseline and treatment allocation. Subgroup results were calculated for patients classified with high fear of movement and for those classified with low fear of movement. Kinesiophobia at baseline interacted with physical therapy in the analysis with leg pain intensity at 12-month follow-up. Kinesiophobia at baseline did not interact with physical therapy regarding any outcome at 3-month follow-up or recovery at 12-month follow-up. When comparing both treatment groups in the subgroup of patients with high fear of movement (n=73), the only significant result was found for leg pain intensity difference from baseline at 12-month follow-up (intervention group: X̅=-5.0, SD=2.6; control group: X̅=-3.6, SD=2.7). The post hoc study design and relatively small sample size were limitations of the study. In 135 patients with sciatica, evidence shows that patients with a higher level of kinesiophobia at baseline may particularly benefit from physical therapy with regard to decreasing leg pain intensity at 12-month follow-up. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  4. High-Force Versus Low-Force Lumbar Traction in Acute Lumbar Sciatica Due to Disc Herniation: A Preliminary Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Dufour, Stéphane Pascal; Schaeffer, Michael; Sauleau, Erik; Vautravers, Philippe; Lecocq, Jehan; Dupeyron, Arnaud

    This study compared the effects of high-force versus low-force lumbar traction in the treatment of acute lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation. A randomized double blind trial was performed, and 17 subjects with acute lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation were assigned to high-force traction at 50% body weight (BW; LT50, n = 8) or low force traction at 10% BW (LT10, n = 9) for 10 sessions in 2 weeks. Radicular pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), lumbo-pelvic-hip complex motion (finger-to-toe test), lumbar-spine mobility (Schöber-Macrae test), nerve root compression (straight-leg-raising test), disability (EIFEL score), drug consumption, and overall evaluation of each patient were measured at days 0, 7, 1, 4, and 28. Significant (P traction treatment was independent of the level of medication. During the 2-week follow-up at day 28, only the LT10 group improved (P lumbar sciatica secondary to disc herniation who received 2 weeks of lumbar traction reported reduced radicular pain and functional impairment and improved well-being regardless of the traction force group to which they were assigned. The effects of the traction treatment were independent of the initial level of medication and appeared to be maintained at the 2-week follow-up. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The relationship between history and physical examination findings and the outcome of electrodiagnostic testing in patients with sciatica referred to physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Nathan J; Fritz, Julie M; Thackeray, Anne

    2014-07-01

    Cross-sectional diagnostic accuracy study. To investigate the relationship between history and physical examination findings and the outcome of electrodiagnostic testing in patients with sciatica referred to physical therapy. Electrodiagnostic testing is routinely used to evaluate patients with sciatica. Recent evidence suggests that the presence of radiculopathy identified with electrodiagnostic testing may predict better functional outcomes in these patients. While some patient history and physical examination findings have been shown to predict the presence of disc herniation or neurological insult, little is known about their relationship to the results of electrodiagnostic testing. Electrodiagnostic testing was performed on 38 patients with sciatica who participated in a randomized trial that compared different physical therapy interventions. The diagnostic gold standard was the presence or absence of radiculopathy, based on the results of the needle electromyographic examination. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity values were calculated, along with corresponding likelihood ratios, for select patient history and physical examination variables. No significant relationship was found between select patient history and physical examination findings, analyzed individually or in combination, and the outcome of electrodiagnostic testing. Diagnostic sensitivity values ranged from 0.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.00, 0.24) to a high of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.99), and specificity values ranged from 0.10 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.34) to a high of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.99). Positive likelihood ratios ranged from 0.15 (95% CI: 0.01, 2.87) to a high of 2.33 (95% CI: 0.71, 7.70), and negative likelihood ratios ranged from 2.00 (95% CI: 0.35, 11.48) to a low of 0.50 (95% CI: 0.03, 8.10). In this investigation, the relationship between patient history and physical examination findings and the outcome of electrodiagnostic testing among patients with sciatica was not found to be

  6. Progressive paralyzing sciatica revealing a pelvic pseudoaneurysm a year after hip surgery in a 12yo boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulouis, Grégoire; Shotar, Eimad; Dangouloff-Ros, Volodia; Janklevicz, Pierre-Henri; Boddaert, Nathalie; Naggara, Olivier; Brunelle, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Identifying extra spinal causes of a lumbar radiculopathy or polyneuropathy can be a tricky diagnosis challenge, especially in children. Among them, traumatic or iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms of iliac arteries have been seldom reported, in adults' series. The authors report an unusual case of progressive paralyzing left sciatica and lumbar plexopathy in a 12 years old boy, 12 months after a pelvic osteotomy for bilateral hip luxation secondary to osteochondritis dissecans. Spine MRI and pelvic CT angiography revealed a giant internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm, enclosed in a chronic hematoma. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular coil embolization, and subsequent surgical hematoma evacuation. However, three months after treatment, neurological recovery was incomplete. This case highlights the importance of a rapid and extensive diagnosis work up of all causes of lower limb radiculopathies in children, including pelvic arteries lesions especially after pelvic surgery to avoid therapeutic delays that may jeopardize the chances of neurological recovery. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of multiple doses of BG00010, a neurotrophic factor with anti-hyperalgesic effects, in patients with sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkerse, Pieter; Hay, Justin L; Versage, Eve; Tang, Yongqiang; Galluppi, Gerald; Ravina, Bernard; Verma, Ajay; Williams, Leslie; Aycardi, Ernesto; Groeneveld, Geert Jan

    2016-07-01

    BG00010 is a protein in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family. It is a selective ligand for the GDNF family receptor alpha-3 (GFRα3) co-receptor that normalizes cellular changes resulting from damage or disease, and potentially alleviates neuropathic pain. The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and safety profiles and to determine the effects on pain of ascending doses of intravenous injections of BG00010 in patients with sciatica. This was a randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled multiple-dose study in subjects with sciatica. In Part I (16 patients), four IV dose levels were examined (50, 150, 400, 800 μg kg(-1) ) and in Part II (12 patients), three dose levels were examined (400, 600 and 1200 μg kg(-1) ). Safety and efficacy assessments were used as endpoints. The BG00010 concentration-time data indicated relatively low inter-patient variability and there was a dose-dependent (not dose-proportional) increase in serum exposure from 150 to 1200 μg kg(-1) . The effective half-life was between 40 and 60 h. The most frequently occurring adverse events (AEs) reported by patients receiving BG00010 were headache (67-83%), feeling hot (50-100%), and pruritus (42-67%). Most AEs were mild; no serious AEs or AEs leading to discontinuation occurred. Higher dose regimens of BG00010 resulted in greater pain reduction than placebo or lower dose regimens, although a clear dose-response relationship was not seen. The pharmacokinetic profile of BG00010 was characterized by low intra-patient variability. These data from a small sample suggest that BG00010 may have a benefit for patients with sciatica. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Prolonged conservative treatment or 'early' surgery in sciatica caused by a lumbar disc herniation: rationale and design of a randomized trial [ISRCT 26872154

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peul, Wilco C; van Houwelingen, Hans C; van der Hout, Wilbert B; Brand, Ronald; Eekhof, Just AH; Tans, Joseph ThJ; Thomeer, Ralph TWM; Koes, Bart W

    2005-01-01

    Background The design of a randomized multicenter trial is presented on the effectiveness of a prolonged conservative treatment strategy compared with surgery in patients with persisting intense sciatica (lumbosacral radicular syndrome). Methods/design Patients presenting themselves to their general practitioner with disabling sciatica lasting less than twelve weeks are referred to the neurology outpatient department of one of the participating hospitals. After confirmation of the diagnosis and surgical indication MRI scanning is performed. If a distinct disc herniation is discerned which in addition covers the clinically expected site the patient is eligible for randomization. Depending on the outcome of the randomization scheme the patient will either be submitted to prolonged conservative care or surgery. Surgery will be carried out according to the guidelines and between six and twelve weeks after onset of complaints. The experimental therapy consists of a prolonged conservative treatment under supervision of the general practitioner, which may be followed by surgical intervention in case of persisting or progressive disability. The main primary outcome measure is the disease specific disability of daily functioning. Other primary outcome measures are perceived recovery and intensity of legpain. Secondary outcome measures encompass severity of complaints, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism, costs and preference. The main research question will be answered at 12 months after randomization. The total follow-up period covers two years. Discussion Evidence is lacking concerning the optimal treatment of lumbar disc induced sciatica. This pragmatic randomized trial, focusses on the 'timing' of intervention, and will contribute to the decision of the general practictioner and neurologist, regarding referral of patients for surgery. PMID:15707491

  9. Adalimumab in acute sciatica reduces the long-term need for surgery: a 3-year follow-up of a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevay, S; Finckh, A; Zufferey, P; Viatte, S; Balagué, F; Gabay, C

    2012-04-01

    Two subcutaneous injections of adalimumab in severe acute sciatica significantly reduced the number of back operations in a short-term randomised controlled clinical trial. To determine in a 3-year follow-up study whether the short-term benefit of adalimumab in sciatica is sustained over a longer period of time. The primary outcome of this analysis was incident discectomy. Three years after randomisation, information on surgery could be retrieved in 56/61 patients (92%).A multivariate Cox proportional hazard models, adjusted for potential confounders, was used to determine factors predisposing to surgery. Twenty-three (41%) patients had back surgery within 3 years, 8/29 (28%) in the adalimumab group and 15/27 (56%) in the placebo group, p=0.04. Adalimumab injections reduced the need for back surgery by 61% (HR)=0.39 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.92). In a multivariate model, treatment with a tumour necrosis factor-α antagonist remained the strongest protective factor (HR=0.17, p=0.002). Other significant predictors of surgery were a good correlation between symptoms and MRI findings (HR=11.6, p=0.04), baseline intensity of leg pain (HR=1.3, p=0.06), intensity of back pain (HR=1.4, p=0.03) and duration of sickness leave (HR=1.01 per day, p=0.03). A short course of adalimumab in patients with severe acute sciatica significantly reduces the need for back surgery.

  10. A single question was as predictive of outcome as the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia in people with sciatica: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Timman, Reinier; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2012-01-01

    In people with sciatica in primary care, can a single question be used to predict outcome at 1 year followup as accurately as validated questionnaires on kinesiophobia, disability, and health-related quality of life? Observational study within a randomised cohort. 135 people with sciatica in primary care. Kinesiophobia was measured with the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), disability with the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), and health-related quality of life with the EQ-5D and the 36-item Short Form (SF-36) Physical Component Summary. Participants also answered a newly devised substitute question for each questionnaire on an 11-point numerical rating scale. Global perceived effect and severity of leg pain were recorded at 1 year follow-up. The correlation coefficient between the TSK and its substitute question was r=0.46 (p<0.001). The substitute question was better at predicting pain severity in the leg at 1 year follow-up than the TSK (addition of explained variation of 11% versus 4% in a logistic regression analysis). The TSK and its substitute question did not significantly differ in their prediction of global perceived effect at 1 year follow-up. The other substitute questions and both the RDQ and EQ-5D did not contribute significantly to one or both of their prediction models. It may be feasible to replace the TSK by a single substitute question for predicting outcome in people with sciatica in primary care. The other substitute questions did not consistently predict outcome at 1 year follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by .. All rights reserved.

  11. The treatment of disc herniation-induced sciatica with infliximab: results of a randomized, controlled, 3-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Timo; Karppinen, Jaro; Paimela, Leena; Malmivaara, Antti; Lindgren, Karl-August; Järvinen, Simo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Veeger, Nic; Seitsalo, Seppo; Hurri, Heikki

    2005-12-15

    A randomized controlled trial. To evaluate the efficacy of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in a randomized controlled setting. Recently, we obtained encouraging results in an open-label study of infliximab in patients with disc herniation-induced sciatica. Furthermore, the results of experimental studies support the use of infliximab in sciatica. Therefore, we initiated a randomized, controlled trial (FIRST II, Finnish Infliximab Related STudy) to confirm the efficacy of a single infusion of infliximab for sciatic pain. Inclusion criteria were unilateral moderate to severe sciatic pain with an MRI-confirmed disc herniation concordant with the symptoms and signs of radicular pain. Patients had to be candidates for discectomy, as evaluated by an independent orthopedic surgeon. Forty patients were allocated to a single intravenous infusion of either infliximab 5 mg/kg or placebo. Assessments at baseline and various time points included clinical examination with measurement of straight leg raising restriction; questionnaires related to subjective symptoms (leg and back pain by 100-mm visual analog scale, Oswestry disability); sick leaves; number of discectomies; and adverse effects possibly related to treatment. The primary endpoint was a reduction in leg pain from baseline to 12 weeks, which was analyzed using a Mann-Whitney U test and repeated-measures analysis. A significant reduction in leg pain was observed in both groups, with no significant difference between treatment regimens. Similar efficacy was observed between treatment groups for secondary endpoints. Seven patients in each group required surgery. No adverse effects related to treatment were encountered. The results of this randomized trial do not support the use of infliximab for lumbar radicular pain in patients with disc herniation-induced sciatica.

  12. Assessment of patient-specific surgery effect based on weighted estimation and propensity scoring in the re-analysis of the sciatica trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart J A Mertens

    Full Text Available We consider a re-analysis of the wait-and-see (control arm of a recent clinical trial on sciatica. While the original randomised trial was designed to evaluate the public policy effect of a conservative wait-and-see approach versus early surgery, we investigate the impact of surgery at the individual patient level in a re-analysis of the wait-and-see group data. Both marginal structural model re-weighted estimates as well as propensity score adjusted analyses are presented. Results indicate that patients with high propensity to receive surgery may have beneficial effects at 2 years from delayed disc surgery.

  13. Assessment of Patient-Specific Surgery Effect Based on Weighted Estimation and Propensity Scoring in the Re-Analysis of the Sciatica Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Bart J. A.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Brand, Ronald; Peul, Wilco C.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a re-analysis of the wait-and-see (control) arm of a recent clinical trial on sciatica. While the original randomised trial was designed to evaluate the public policy effect of a conservative wait-and-see approach versus early surgery, we investigate the impact of surgery at the individual patient level in a re-analysis of the wait-and-see group data. Both marginal structural model re-weighted estimates as well as propensity score adjusted analyses are presented. Results indicate that patients with high propensity to receive surgery may have beneficial effects at 2 years from delayed disc surgery. PMID:25353633

  14. A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Mens, Jan; El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Peul, Wilco C; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2016-05-01

    To test whether the localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining matters in the assessment of lumbosacral nerve root compression or disc herniation on MRI. Recently the diagnostic accuracy of history items to assess disc herniation or nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. A total of 395 adult patients with severe sciatica of 6-12 weeks duration were included in this study. The question regarding the influence of coughing, sneezing and straining on the intensity of pain could be answered on a 4 point scale: no worsening of pain, worsening of back pain, worsening of leg pain, worsening of back and leg pain. Diagnostic odds ratio's (DORs) were calculated for the various dichotomization options. The DOR changed into significant values when the answer option was more narrowed to worsening of leg pain. The highest DOR was observed for the answer option 'worsening of leg pain' with a DOR of 2.28 (95 % CI 1.28-4.04) for the presence of nerve root compression and a DOR of 2.50 (95 % CI 1.27-4.90) for the presence of a herniated disc on MRI. Worsening of leg pain during coughing, sneezing or straining has a significant diagnostic value for the presence of nerve root compression and disc herniation on MRI in patients with sciatica. This study also highlights the importance of the formulation of answer options in history taking.

  15. Ultra-som terapêutico contínuo térmico em modelo experimental de ciatalgia Continuous thermic therapeutic ultrasound in sciatica experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Polican Ciena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O ultra-som é um recurso fisioterapêutico que pode atuar na redução dos sintomas da ciatalgia. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a eficácia do ultra-som terapêutico, no modo contínuo, em duas diferentes densidades de potência (0,5 W/cm² e 1 W/cm², na redução do quadro álgico em ratos submetidos a modelo experimental de ciatalgia. Foram utilizados 20 ratos, divididos em 3 grupos: G1 (n=6 submetido à ciatalgia e a tratamento placebo; G2 (n=7 submetido à ciatalgia e tratado com ultra-som com 0,5 W/cm²; e G3 (n=7 submetido à ciatalgia e tratado com ultra-som com 1 W/cm². A ciatalgia foi provocada por lesão cirúrgica de compressão do nervo no membro posterior direito de todos os animais. O tratamento na região do procedimento cirúrgico, iniciado no 3º dia pós-operatório, consistiu em 10 sessões diárias de 5 minutos. Verificou-se a dor pelo do tempo de elevação da pata (TEP durante a marcha, medido pré-cirurgia e em mais cinco momentos. Os resultados mostram aumentos no TEP em todos os grupos após a lesão; e, naqueles tratados com ultra-som terapêutico, houve diminuição significativa da TEP, restaurando-se os valores iniciais, sendo mais precoce e intensa em G2. Conclui-se que a entrega na forma continua do ultra-som terapêutico foi eficaz na redução da dor ciática.Therapeutic ultrasound is a physical therapy resource for relieving sciatic pain. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of continuous therapeutic ultrasound in two different power densities (0,5 W/cm² and 1 W/cm², on reducing pain in rats submitted to a sciatica experimental model. Twenty rats were used, divided into 3 groups: G1 (n=6 submitted to sciatica and placebo treatment; G2 (n=7 submitted to sciatica and treated with 0.5 W/cm² ultrasound; and G3 (n=7, submitted to sciatica and treated with 1 W/cm² ultrasound. Sciatica was provoked by surgical nerve compression on the right posterior limb of all animals. Treatment on the

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-α blockade in recurrent and disabling chronic sciatica associated with post-operative peridural lumbar fibrosis: results of a double-blind, placebo randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christelle; Palazzo, Clémence; Grabar, Sophie; Feydy, Antoine; Sanchez, Katherine; Zee, Nathalie; Quinquis, Laurent; Ben Boutieb, Myriam; Revel, Michel; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Rannou, François

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibition with infliximab (IFX) in treating recurrent and disabling chronic sciatica pain associated with post-operative peridural lumbar fibrosis. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized 35 patients presenting with sciatica pain associated with post-operative peridural lumbar fibrosis to two groups: IFX (n = 18), a single intravenous injection of 3 mg/kg IFX; and placebo (n = 17), a single saline serum injection. The primary outcome was a 50 % reduction in sciatica pain on a visual analog scale (VAS) at day 10. Secondary outcomes were radicular and lumbar VAS pain at day 0 and radicular and lumbar VAS pain, Québec disability score, drug-sparing effect and tolerance at days 10, 30, 90, and 180. At day 10, the placebo and IFX groups did not differ in the primary outcome (50 % reduction in sciatica pain observed in three (17.6 %) versus five (27.8 %) patients; p = 0.69). The number of patients reaching the patient acceptable symptom state for radicular pain was significantly higher in the placebo than IFX group after injection (12 (70.6 %) versus five (27.8 %) patients; p = 0.01). The two groups were comparable for all other secondary outcomes. Treatment with a single 3 mg/kg IFX injection for post-operative peridural lumbar fibrosis-associated sciatica pain does not significantly reduce radicular symptoms at day 10 after injection. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00385086 ; registered 4 October 2006 (last updated 15 October 2015).

  17. Most Important Factors for the Implementation of Shared Decision Making in Sciatica Care: Ranking among Professionals and Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Wentink, Manon M.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; de Mheen, Perla J. Marang-van

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Due to the increasing specialization of medical professionals, patients are treated by multiple disciplines. To ensure that delivered care is patient-centered, it is crucial that professionals and the patient together decide on treatment (shared decision making (SDM)). However, it is not known how SDM should be integrated in multidisciplinary practice. This study determines the most important factors for SDM implementation in sciatica care, as it is known that a prior inventory of factors is crucial to develop a successful implementation strategy. Methods 246 professionals (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons) (30% response) and 155 patients (96% response) responded to an internet-based survey. Respondents ranked barriers and facilitators identified in previous interviews, on their importance using Maximum Difference Scaling. Feeding back the personal top 5 most important factors, each respondent indicated whether these factors were barriers or facilitators. Hierarchical Bayes estimation was used to estimate the relative importance (RI) of each factor. Results Professionals assigned the highest importance to: quality of professional-patient relationship (RI 4.87; CI 4.75–4.99); importance of quick recovery of patient (RI 4.83; CI 4.69–4.97); and knowledge about treatment options (RI 6.64; CI 4.53–4.74), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Professionals working in primary care had a different ranking than those working in hospital care. Patients assigned the highest importance to: correct diagnosis by professionals (barrier, RI 8.19; CI 7.99–8.38); information provision about treatment options and potential harm and benefits (RI 7.87; CI 7.65–8.08); and explanation of the professional about the care trajectory (RI 7.16; CI 6.94–7.38), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Conclusions Knowledge, information provision and a good relationship are the most important

  18. A rare anterior sacral osteochondroma presenting as sciatica in an adult: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kingsley R; Kim, Jaehon M

    2010-05-01

    Osteochondroma is the most common primary benign bone tumor and is usually located in the metaphyses of long bones and rarely in the spine or anterior sacrum. To the best of our knowledge, en bloc excision of a solitary osteochondroma of the anterior sacrum in an adult patient has not been previously reported in a peer-reviewed journal. The purposes of this study were to document the first report of an osteochondroma of the anterior sacrum along with the clinical course and operative management and review the literature on solitary osteochondroma of the sacrum. The study setting is an academic institution. This is a case report and review of the literature. The patient is an adult female. The outcome measure is the visual analog score for pain. A 54-year-old woman presented with 9/10 disabling low back and radicular pain in the left lower extremity. Radiologic studies showed a pedunculated mass occurring from the anterior sacrum thought to be causing nerve root compression. The patient received en bloc excision of the mass through an abdominal retroperitoneal approach. We also conducted a literature review of solitary sacral osteochondroma in peer-reviewed journals. Histologic studies confirmed the mass to be an osteochondroma without pathologic signs of malignant transformation. The patient complained of dysesthesia in the left leg after surgery, which progressively improved completely over 8 months after the operation. At the 2-year follow-up, there was no evidence of local recurrence and she was pain free. A literature review revealed one previous case of en block resection of a solitary osteochondroma, but it involved the posterior sacrum. Solitary osteochondroma can rarely present in the sacrum as low back pain and sciatica. In general, when osteochondroma causes pain in an adult, we should think that some structure is impinged or that it could have initiated a malignant transformation, so en bloc excision should be used to remove the tumor and histologic

  19. Most important factors for the implementation of shared decision making in sciatica care: ranking among professionals and patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie N Hofstede

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Due to the increasing specialization of medical professionals, patients are treated by multiple disciplines. To ensure that delivered care is patient-centered, it is crucial that professionals and the patient together decide on treatment (shared decision making (SDM. However, it is not known how SDM should be integrated in multidisciplinary practice. This study determines the most important factors for SDM implementation in sciatica care, as it is known that a prior inventory of factors is crucial to develop a successful implementation strategy. METHODS: 246 professionals (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons (30% response and 155 patients (96% response responded to an internet-based survey. Respondents ranked barriers and facilitators identified in previous interviews, on their importance using Maximum Difference Scaling. Feeding back the personal top 5 most important factors, each respondent indicated whether these factors were barriers or facilitators. Hierarchical Bayes estimation was used to estimate the relative importance (RI of each factor. RESULTS: Professionals assigned the highest importance to: quality of professional-patient relationship (RI 4.87; CI 4.75-4.99; importance of quick recovery of patient (RI 4.83; CI 4.69-4.97; and knowledge about treatment options (RI 6.64; CI 4.53-4.74, which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Professionals working in primary care had a different ranking than those working in hospital care. Patients assigned the highest importance to: correct diagnosis by professionals (barrier, RI 8.19; CI 7.99-8.38; information provision about treatment options and potential harm and benefits (RI 7.87; CI 7.65-8.08; and explanation of the professional about the care trajectory (RI 7.16; CI 6.94-7.38, which were reported as barrier and facilitator. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge, information provision and a good relationship are the most important

  20. Most important factors for the implementation of shared decision making in sciatica care: ranking among professionals and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Wentink, Manon M; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing specialization of medical professionals, patients are treated by multiple disciplines. To ensure that delivered care is patient-centered, it is crucial that professionals and the patient together decide on treatment (shared decision making (SDM)). However, it is not known how SDM should be integrated in multidisciplinary practice. This study determines the most important factors for SDM implementation in sciatica care, as it is known that a prior inventory of factors is crucial to develop a successful implementation strategy. 246 professionals (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons) (30% response) and 155 patients (96% response) responded to an internet-based survey. Respondents ranked barriers and facilitators identified in previous interviews, on their importance using Maximum Difference Scaling. Feeding back the personal top 5 most important factors, each respondent indicated whether these factors were barriers or facilitators. Hierarchical Bayes estimation was used to estimate the relative importance (RI) of each factor. Professionals assigned the highest importance to: quality of professional-patient relationship (RI 4.87; CI 4.75-4.99); importance of quick recovery of patient (RI 4.83; CI 4.69-4.97); and knowledge about treatment options (RI 6.64; CI 4.53-4.74), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Professionals working in primary care had a different ranking than those working in hospital care. Patients assigned the highest importance to: correct diagnosis by professionals (barrier, RI 8.19; CI 7.99-8.38); information provision about treatment options and potential harm and benefits (RI 7.87; CI 7.65-8.08); and explanation of the professional about the care trajectory (RI 7.16; CI 6.94-7.38), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Knowledge, information provision and a good relationship are the most important conditions for SDM perceived by both patients and

  1. Clinical significance of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors in the treatment of sciatica: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun Fu; Chen, Ping You; Chang, Wei; Zhu, Fi Qi; Xu, Li Li; Wang, Song Lin; Chang, Li Ying; Luo, Jie; Liu, Guang Jian

    2014-01-01

    Currently, no satisfactory treatment is available for sciatica caused by herniated discs and/or spinal stenosis. The objective of this study is to assess the value of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors in the treatment of sciatica. Without language restrictions, we searched PubMed, OVID, EMBASE, the Web of Science, the Clinical Trials Registers, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the China Academic Library and Information System. We then performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the enrolled trials that met the inclusion criteria. Nine prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and two before-after controlled trials involving 531 patients met our inclusion criteria and were included in this study. Our systematic assessment and meta-analysis demonstrated that in terms of the natural course of the disease, compared with the control condition, TNF-α inhibitors neither significantly relieved lower back and leg pain (both p > 0.05) nor enhanced the proportion of patients who felt overall satisfaction (global perceived effect (satisfaction)) or were able to return to work (return to work) (combined endpoint; p > 0.05) at the short-term, medium-term and long-term follow-ups. In addition, compared with the control condition, TNF-α inhibitors could reduce the risk ratio (RR) of discectomy or radicular block (combined endpoint; RR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.00, p = 0.049) at medium-term follow-up, but did not decrease RR at the short-term (RR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.17 to 2.40, p = 0.508) and long-term follow-ups (RR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.03, p = 0.065). The currently available evidence demonstrated that other than reducing the RR of discectomy or radicular block (combined endpoint) at medium-term follow-up, TNF-α inhibitors showed limited clinical value in the treatment of sciatica caused by herniated discs and/or spinal stenosis.

  2. Clinical significance of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors in the treatment of sciatica: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Fu Wang

    Full Text Available Currently, no satisfactory treatment is available for sciatica caused by herniated discs and/or spinal stenosis. The objective of this study is to assess the value of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors in the treatment of sciatica.Without language restrictions, we searched PubMed, OVID, EMBASE, the Web of Science, the Clinical Trials Registers, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the China Academic Library and Information System. We then performed a systematic review and meta-analysis on the enrolled trials that met the inclusion criteria.Nine prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs and two before-after controlled trials involving 531 patients met our inclusion criteria and were included in this study. Our systematic assessment and meta-analysis demonstrated that in terms of the natural course of the disease, compared with the control condition, TNF-α inhibitors neither significantly relieved lower back and leg pain (both p > 0.05 nor enhanced the proportion of patients who felt overall satisfaction (global perceived effect (satisfaction or were able to return to work (return to work (combined endpoint; p > 0.05 at the short-term, medium-term and long-term follow-ups. In addition, compared with the control condition, TNF-α inhibitors could reduce the risk ratio (RR of discectomy or radicular block (combined endpoint; RR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.00, p = 0.049 at medium-term follow-up, but did not decrease RR at the short-term (RR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.17 to 2.40, p = 0.508 and long-term follow-ups (RR = 0.64, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.03, p = 0.065.The currently available evidence demonstrated that other than reducing the RR of discectomy or radicular block (combined endpoint at medium-term follow-up, TNF-α inhibitors showed limited clinical value in the treatment of sciatica caused by herniated discs and/or spinal stenosis.

  3. The treatment of disc-herniation-induced sciatica with infliximab: one-year follow-up results of FIRST II, a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Timo; Karppinen, Jaro; Paimela, Leena; Malmivaara, Antti; Lindgren, Karl-August; Bowman, Chris; Hammond, Anthony; Kirkham, Bruce; Järvinen, Simo; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Veeger, Nic; Haapea, Marianne; Torkki, Markus; Tervonen, Osmo; Seitsalo, Seppo; Hurri, Heikki

    2006-11-15

    A randomized controlled trial. To evaluate the long-term efficacy of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), in patients with acute/subacute sciatica secondary to herniated disc. The results of experimental studies and our open-label trial support the use of infliximab in sciatica. Here we report the 1-year results of a randomized controlled trial (FIRST II, Finnish Infliximab Related STudy) evaluating the efficacy and safety of a single infusion of infliximab for sciatic pain. Inclusion criteria were unilateral sciatic pain with a disc herniation concordant with the symptoms and signs of radicular pain. Patients had to be candidates for discectomy. Criteria for discectomy included (in addition to a symptomatic disc herniation on MRI) neural entrapment (straight leg raising [SLR] < or =60 degrees ) with either a short-term (2-4 weeks) severe or long-term (4-12 weeks) moderate leg pain. Forty patients were allocated to a single intravenous infusion of either infliximab 5 mg/kg or placebo. Differences in the clinical examination parameters (straight leg raise [SLR], muscle strength, sensory defects, tendon reflexes), patient-reported symptoms (leg and back pain using a visual analog scale [VAS], Oswestry disability, quality-of-life [RAND-36]), sick leaves, number of discectomies, and adverse effects between the two treatment groups over the 1-year follow-up were compared using Mann-Whitney U test or Student's t test, repeated-measures analysis, or Cox proportional hazards model. Logistic regression was used to assess the predictors of good response. Sixty-seven percent of patients in the infliximab group reported no pain at 52 weeks compared with 63% in the control group (P = 0.72). Similar efficacy was observed between treatment groups for other outcomes. Eight patients in each group required surgery. Three nonserious adverse reactions were encountered in the infliximab group. The response (irrespective of the treatment

  4. Uso do laser, 670 nm, no quadro álgico de ratos submetidos à modelo experimental de ciatalgia Use of laser, 670 nm, in painful episodes of rats submitted to experimental model of sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia Broetto Cunha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A ciatalgia deve-se a compressão do nervo isquiático em algum ponto de seu trajeto, e seu tratamento consiste em solucionar a causa da compressão nervosa, seja por tratamento cirúrgico ou conservador. Alguns recursos fisioterapêuticos atuam basicamente na redução dos sintomas ocasionados por este distúrbio. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a eficácia do laser 670 nm, em duas diferentes densidades de energia, na redução do quadro álgico, em ratos submetidos a modelo experimental de ciatalgia. Foram utilizados 18 ratos, divididos em 3 grupos: G1 (n=6 submetidos à ciatalgia e simulado o tratamento (grupo placebo, G2 (n=6 submetido à ciatalgia e tratados com laser 2 J/cm², G3 (n=6 submetidos à ciatalgia e irradiados com laser 4 J/cm². O nervo isquiático do membro posterior direito dos animais foi exposto e compressão com fio catgut em 4 pontos ao redor do nervo foi realizada. No 3° dia pós-operatório, iniciou-se o tratamento com laser na região do procedimento cirúrgico do membro posterior direito durante 10 dias consecutivos. Verificou-se por meio da marcha, o tempo em que o membro permanecia no ar nos períodos: anterior à ciatalgia, pré e pós-tratamento. Os resultados demonstraram que o laser não foi eficaz na redução do quadro álgico, porém com 4 J/cm² houve efeito positivo, sem restabelecimento completo da funcionalidade.Sciatica is caused by the sciatic nerve compression in some point of its course, and its treatment consists of solving the nervous compression cause, either by surgical or conservative treatment. Some physiotherapeutic resources act basically in the reduction of the symptoms caused by this disturbance. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of the laser 670 nm, in two different energy densities, in the pain reduction, in rats submitted to a sciatica experimental model. Eighteen rats, divided in 3 groups were used: G1 (n=6 submitted to sciatica and simulated treatment (placebo

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in low back pain and sciatica with special emphasis on the postdiskectomy period. A study using 0.2 and 0.3 T vertical magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annertz, M.

    1994-09-01

    The diagnostic capability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 0.3 T was evaluated and compared with other modalities in patients with previous disk surgery and remaining or recurrent sciatica, and in patients with spondylolisthesis and sciatica. In the early postoperative period after successful lumbar diskectomy, MR showed a large amount of abnormal soft tissue in the anterior epidural space, without correlation with clinical symptoms. In the late postoperative period, contrast-enhanced MR provided the best correlation with surgical findings, compared with CT and myelography, in discriminating recurrent/remaining disk herniation from epidural fibrosis in patients with the lumbar postdiskectomy syndrome. Contrast-enhanced MR could not demonstrate any differences regarding presence and extent of epidural fibrosis between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. In spondylolisthesis, MR gave excellent information about the root canals and the degree of nerve root stretching and compression, which was not possible to evaluate with myelography. MR at 0.3 T provided information comparable to that reported from examinations performed with superconducting MR scanners, and is well suited as the imaging modality in the evaluation of lumbar spine disorders. After introducing MR at 0.2 and 0.3 T with vertical magnetic fields as the first neuroradiological modality, instead of myelography or CT, in the evaluation of the soft tissues of the lumbar spine in patients with low back pain and sciatica, a significant increase in the number of patients examined, a moderate increase in the total cost of investigations, and a significant decrease in the cost per investigated and per operated patient was noted.

  6. [L5 sciatica caused by the compression of the lumbo-sacral trunk of osseous origin at the sacro-iliac level. Treatment by an antero-lateral subperitoneal approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataigner, H; Onimus, M

    1998-07-01

    A 42 years old patient presented with a 4 years history of a left L5 sciatica unresponsive to a previous L4-L5 surgical decompression. CT scan showed a solid tumor developed on the anterior aspect of the sacro-iliac joint, in contact with the lumbo-sacral trunk. An antero-lateral extraperitoneal approach was performed, with progressive subperitoneal dissection along the inner aspect of the iliac wing to the sacro-iliac joint and sacral ala. The exostosis was removed with "en block" excision, Postoperatively pain completely disappeared. Considerations are made on the mechanism of the compression as well as on the surgical approach performed.

  7. The Effect of 8 weeks of combined training on the angle of lumbar lordosis and pain of women suffering from sciatica pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Karimi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain is among the most commonly pains caused by malfunctions, poor physical condition, and mental stresses. Various non-surgical methods are recommended to reduce pain, to maintain mobility, and to minimize disability in patients. The main objective of this study was to determine the impact of 8 weeks of combined exercises on lumbar lordosis angle, pain, and quality of life of females suffering from sciatic pain. In this study, 15 female patients participated aged between 30 and 50 years with low back pain, sciatic pain, and lumbar lordosis. Lumbar lordosis angle (flexible ruler and pain (McGill questionnaire of patients before and after 8 weeks of exercise were evaluated. Data were analyzed using t-test (P<0.05. In this study, no significant difference was found in lumbar lordosis angle of sciatica patients before (± 0.1 43.2 and after the exercises (0.8 ± 34.2 (p<0.05.Significant difference was observed in pain perceptions between the before (0.8 ± 2.6 and after exercises (0.5 ± 1.8, emotional perceptions of pain between before (0.26 ± 1.4 and after exercises (0.3 ± 1.9 and various pain perceptions between before (0.6 ± 2.2 and after exercises (0.2 ± 1.5 (P<0.05. It can be concluded that hydrotherapy exercises along with on land exercises can improve lumbar lordosis and pain in patients with sciatic pain. Therefore, it can be recommended as a modality for these patients.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of decompression according to Gill versus instrumented spondylodesis in the treatment of sciatica due to low grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis: A prospective randomised controlled trial [NTR1300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Mark P; Verstegen, Marco JT; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W; Akker, M Elske van den; Peul, Wilco C

    2008-01-01

    Background Nerve root decompression with instrumented spondylodesis is the most frequently performed surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with symptomatic low-grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. Nerve root decompression without instrumented fusion, i.e. Gill's procedure, is an alternative and less invasive approach. A comparative cost-effectiveness study has not been performed yet. We present the design of a randomised controlled trial on cost-effectiveness of decompression according to Gill versus instrumented spondylodesis. Methods/design All patients (age between 18 and 70 years) with sciatica or neurogenic claudication lasting more than 3 months due to spondylolytic spondylolisthesis grade I or II, are eligible for inclusion. Patients will be randomly allocated to nerve root decompression according to Gill, either unilateral or bilateral, or pedicle screw fixation with interbody fusion. The main primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient measured with the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica at 12 weeks and 2 years. Other primary outcome measures are perceived recovery and intensity of leg pain and low back pain. The secondary outcome measures include, incidence of re-operations, complications, serum creatine phosphokinase, quality of life, medical consumption, costs, absenteeism, work perception, depression and anxiety, and treatment preference. The study is a randomised prospective multicenter trial in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurse will not be blinded during the follow-up period of 2 years. Discussion Currently, nerve root decompression with instrumented fusion is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of low-grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, although scientific proof justifying instrumented spondylodesis over simple decompression is lacking. This trial is designed to elucidate the controversy in best surgical treatment of

  9. Neural mobilization and static stretching in an experimental sciatica model: an experimental study Mobilização neural e alongamento estático em um modelo experimental de ciatalgia: estudo experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladson R. F. Bertolini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To verify the effectiveness of neural mobilization and static stretching in reducing pain in rats submitted to experimental sciatica. METHODS: The rats (n=23 were divided into three groups: sham (SG/n=8, without intervention; stretching (STCG/n=8, treated with static stretching; and neural mobilization (NMG/n=7, treated with neural mobilization. The animals underwent an experimental model of sciatica by compression of the right ischiatic nerve with catgut suture thread. There were five consecutive sessions of treatment that began on the third day after lesion. The pain caused by the sciatica was evaluated by a functional incapacitation test that measured paw elevation time (PET, and values over 10s were indicative of pain. PET was measured at the following moments: before the lesion (M1, immediately before (M2 and after the first session (M3, immediately after the last session (M4 and 24h after the last session (M5. ANOVA was applied with repeated measures and unrepeated measures for intra- and inter-group comparison, respectively. RESULTS: In the SG, post-lesion PETs were greater than M1 (pOBJETIVO: Verificar a eficácia da mobilização neural e do alongamento estático na redução da dor em ratos submetidos à ciática experimental. MÉTODOS: Os ratos (n=23 foram divididos em três grupos: simulacro (GS/n=8, sem intervenção; alongamento (GAL/n=8, tratados com alongamento estático; e mobilização neural (GMN/n=7, tratados com mobilização neural. Submeteram-se os animais a um modelo experimental de ciática, comprimindo o nervo isquiático direito com fio de catgut. Realizaram-se cinco sessões consecutivas de tratamento que se iniciaram no terceiro dia pós-lesão. Avaliou-se a dor, provocada pela ciática, pelo teste de incapacidade funcional que mensurava o tempo de elevação da pata (TEP do animal, e valores maiores que 10 segundos eram indicativos de dor. O TEP foi mensurado nos momentos: antes da lesão (M1

  10. First-In-Human, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Dose-Escalation Study of BG00010, a Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Family Member, in Subjects with Unilateral Sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolan, Paul E; O'Neill, Gilmore; Versage, Eve; Rana, Jitesh; Tang, Yongqiang; Galluppi, Gerald; Aycardi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of single doses of BG00010 (neublastin, artemin, enovin) in subjects with unilateral sciatica. This was a single-center, blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized Phase 1 sequential-cohort, dose-escalation study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00961766; funded by Biogen Idec). Adults with unilateral sciatica were enrolled at The Royal Adelaide Hospital, Australia. Four subjects were assigned to each of eleven cohorts (intravenous BG00010 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, or 800 μg/kg, or subcutaneous BG00010 50 μg/kg) and were randomized 3:1 to receive a single dose of BG00010 or placebo. The primary safety and tolerability assessments were: adverse events; clinical laboratory parameters and vital signs; pain as measured by a Likert rating scale; intra-epidermal nerve fiber density; and longitudinal assessment of quantitative sensory test parameters. Blood, serum, and plasma samples were collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessments. Subjects were blinded to treatment assignment throughout the study. The investigator was blinded to treatment assignment until the Data Safety Review Committee review of unblinded data, which occurred after day 28. Beyond the planned enrollment of 44 subjects, four additional subjects were enrolled into to the intravenous BG00010 200 μg/kg cohort after one original subject experienced mild generalized pruritus. Therefore, a total of 48 subjects were enrolled between August 2009 and December 2011; all were included in the safety analyses. BG00010 was generally well tolerated: in primary analyses, the most common treatment-emergent adverse events were changes in temperature perception, pruritus, rash, or headache; no trends were observed in clinical laboratory parameters, vital signs, intra-epidermal nerve fiber density, or quantitative sensory testing. BG00010 was not associated with any clear, dose-dependent trends in Likert pain scores. BG00010 was

  11. Validation and Test-Retest Reliability of New Thermographic Technique Called Thermovision Technique of Dry Needling for Gluteus Minimus Trigger Points in Sciatica Subjects and TrPs-Negative Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychlik, Michał; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and test-retest reliability of Thermovision Technique of Dry Needling (TTDN) for the gluteus minimus muscle. TTDN is a new thermography approach used to support trigger points (TrPs) diagnostic criteria by presence of short-term vasomotor reactions occurring in the area where TrPs refer pain. Method. Thirty chronic sciatica patients (n=15 TrP-positive and n=15 TrPs-negative) and 15 healthy volunteers were evaluated by TTDN three times during two consecutive days based on TrPs of the gluteus minimus muscle confirmed additionally by referred pain presence. TTDN employs average temperature (T avr), maximum temperature (T max), low/high isothermal-area, and autonomic referred pain phenomenon (AURP) that reflects vasodilatation/vasoconstriction. Validity and test-retest reliability were assessed concurrently. Results. Two components of TTDN validity and reliability, T avr and AURP, had almost perfect agreement according to κ (e.g., thigh: 0.880 and 0.938; calf: 0.902 and 0.956, resp.). The sensitivity for T avr, T max, AURP, and high isothermal-area was 100% for everyone, but specificity of 100% was for T avr and AURP only. Conclusion. TTDN is a valid and reliable method for T avr and AURP measurement to support TrPs diagnostic criteria for the gluteus minimus muscle when digitally evoked referred pain pattern is present. PMID:26137486

  12. Validation and Test-Retest Reliability of New Thermographic Technique Called Thermovision Technique of Dry Needling for Gluteus Minimus Trigger Points in Sciatica Subjects and TrPs-Negative Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Skorupska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the validity and test-retest reliability of Thermovision Technique of Dry Needling (TTDN for the gluteus minimus muscle. TTDN is a new thermography approach used to support trigger points (TrPs diagnostic criteria by presence of short-term vasomotor reactions occurring in the area where TrPs refer pain. Method. Thirty chronic sciatica patients (n=15 TrP-positive and n=15 TrPs-negative and 15 healthy volunteers were evaluated by TTDN three times during two consecutive days based on TrPs of the gluteus minimus muscle confirmed additionally by referred pain presence. TTDN employs average temperature (Tavr, maximum temperature (Tmax, low/high isothermal-area, and autonomic referred pain phenomenon (AURP that reflects vasodilatation/vasoconstriction. Validity and test-retest reliability were assessed concurrently. Results. Two components of TTDN validity and reliability, Tavr and AURP, had almost perfect agreement according to κ (e.g., thigh: 0.880 and 0.938; calf: 0.902 and 0.956, resp.. The sensitivity for Tavr, Tmax, AURP, and high isothermal-area was 100% for everyone, but specificity of 100% was for Tavr and AURP only. Conclusion. TTDN is a valid and reliable method for Tavr and AURP measurement to support TrPs diagnostic criteria for the gluteus minimus muscle when digitally evoked referred pain pattern is present.

  13. [Sciatica. From stretch rack to microdiscectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, P; Böni, T

    2015-12-01

    In ancient times as well as in the Middle Ages treatment options for discogenic nerve compression syndrome were limited and usually not very specific because of low anatomical and pathophysiological knowledge. The stretch rack (scamnum Hippocratis) was particularly prominent but was widely used as a therapeutic device for very different spinal disorders. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century anatomical knowledge increased and the advances in the fields of asepsis, anesthesia and surgery resulted in an increase in surgical interventions on the spine. In 1908 the first successful lumbar discectomy was initiated and performed by the German neurologist Heinrich O. Oppenheim (1858-1919) and the surgeon Fedor Krause (1857-1937); however, neither recognized the true pathological condition of discogenic nerve compression syndrome. With the landmark report in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1934, the two American surgeons William Jason Mixter (1880-1958) and Joseph Seaton Barr (1901-1963) finally clarified the pathomechanism of lumbar disc herniation and furthermore, propagated discectomy as the standard therapy. Since then interventions on intervertebral discs rapidly increased and the treatment options for lumbar disc surgery quickly evolved. The surgical procedures changed over time and were continuously being refined. In the late 1960s the surgical microscope was introduced for spinal surgery by the work of the famous neurosurgeon Mahmut Gazi Yasargil and his colleague Wolfhard Caspar and so-called microdiscectomy was introduced. Besides open discectomy other interventional techniques were developed to overcome the side effects of surgical procedures. In 1964 the American orthopedic surgeon Lyman Smith (1912-1991) introduced chemonucleolysis, a minimally invasive technique consisting only of a cannula and the proteolytic enzyme chymopapain, which is injected into the disc compartment to dissolve the displaced disc material. In 1975 the Japanese orthopedic surgeon Sadahisa Hijikata described percutaneous discectomy for the first time, which was a further minimally invasive surgical technique. Further variants of minimally invasive surgical procedures, such as percutaneous laser discectomy in 1986 and percutaneous endoscopic microdiscectomy in 1997, were also introduced; however, open discectomy, especially microdiscectomy remains the therapeutic gold standard for lumbar disc herniation.

  14. Acetabular paralabral cyst: an uncommon cause of sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, P.M.; Sanders, T.G. [Department of Radiology, Wilford Hall Medical Center, 2200 Bergquist Drive, Ste. 1, Lackland AFB, TX 78236 (United States); Matchette, M.W. [University of Texas Medical School, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Parsons, T.W. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Wilford Hall Medical Center, 2200 Bergquist Drive, Ste. 1, Lackland AFB, TX 78236 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    The association between tears of the acetabular labrum and paralabral cysts has been well documented, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be the most accurate noninvasive method of depicting not only the normal anatomic structures of the hip, but also the common pathologic processes such as labral tears and paralabral cysts. We present the case of an acetabular paralabral cyst that resulted in clinically symptomatic compression of the sciatic nerve. (orig.)

  15. A Case Report of Schwannoma Presenting as Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Afshar Fard

    2012-08-01

    The patient underwent operation and sciatic nerve explored via posterior tight and unique neural branch of mass dissociated of sciatic and mass resected. Pathology report confirmed Schwannoma in the patient. Conclusion: In patients with sciatic pain, schwannoma nerve is one of the differential diagnosis and it needs to be considered in assessing of patients.

  16. A Rare Primary Pelvic Hydatid Cyst Presenting as Sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen S Rathod

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid cyst in the pelvis is rare, and usually presents with pressure symptoms affecting the adjacent abdominal organs. We describe a rare hydatid cyst which was eroding the sacral hallow, protruding into the right sciatic foramen and presenting as a radiating pain and weakness of right lower limb due to compression of the lumbosacral nerve roots. Laparotomy with removal of cyst and postoperative treatment with albendazole is effective in controlling the disease and preventing recurrence.

  17. Effect of Vatari Guggulu in the management of Gridhrasi (sciatica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathavane, Geeta V; Pandya, Darshana H; Baghel, Madhav Singh

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is one of the common conditions of loco motor system disorder, affects people during their productive life. About 40% cases of low back pain are of radicular in origin and considered under the umbrella of sciatic syndrome. It is a pain dominant disease and reduces human activity considerably in terms of personal as well as social and professional life. The condition resembles disease Gridhrasi mentioned in Ayurveda under the umbrella of Vatavyadhi, and here piercing type of pain which restricts the movement of the affected leg, make his walking pattern-like bird vulture and put him in disgraceful condition. To assess the effect of Vatari Guggulu on the management of Gridhrasi. A total of 40 patients of Gridhrasi were registered and Vatari Guggulu 3 tablet (500 mg each) twice a day was administered before meal with lukewarm water for 30 days. About 32.35% of the patient improved moderately while mild improvement was observed in 47.09% of the patients. The drug has shown better effect on patients of Vata Kaphaja type of Gridhrasi in comparison of Vataja type of Gridhrasi.

  18. Effect of Vatari Guggulu in the management of Gridhrasi (sciatica)

    OpenAIRE

    Sathavane, Geeta V.; Pandya, Darshana H.; Baghel, Madhav Singh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Low back pain is one of the common conditions of loco motor system disorder, affects people during their productive life. About 40% cases of low back pain are of radicular in origin and considered under the umbrella of sciatic syndrome. It is a pain dominant disease and reduces human activity considerably in terms of personal as well as social and professional life. The condition resembles disease Gridhrasi mentioned in Ayurveda under the umbrella of Vatavyadhi, and here piercin...

  19. [Clinico-etiological correlations in children with sciatica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling-Ostrowska, E; Wykrzykowska, L

    1983-01-01

    During a period of 30 years 21 children with sciatic pains were treated at the Developmental Age Neurology, Medical Academy in Gdańsk. The aetiological factors and clinical manifestations were analysed. Nucleus pulposus prolapse was diagnosed in 5 children, in 9 cases neoplasms were found (in 3 cases malignant tumours of the sacral bone, intraspinal tumours in 6 cases); in 4 cases obliterative intraspinal arachnitis, and in 3 cases other causes were diagnosed. With the exception of one child the other ones were in the school-age group. In nearly all cases the onset was insidious. In one-third of children with neoplastic processes the neurological symptoms appeared after injuries and caused initially considerable diagnostic difficulties. In 18 cases disturbances of spinal configuration and mobility were observed. Pain produced by stretching was present in 20 cases. Sphincter disturbances were observed in 6 cases (including 5 with tumours). Motor defects were noticed in all patients, more pronounced in cases of tumours. Patency of the subarachnoid spinal space was without any greater importance for the diagnosis of sciatic pains. Raised protein level in the cerebrospinal fluid was highest in cases of intraspinal tumours, and it was moderately pronounced in obliterative arachnitis, while in nucleus pulposus prolapse the protein level varied. Plain films were of lower diagnostic importance, with the exception of sacral bone tumours and nucleus pulposus prolapse. Of greater importance were contrast medium radiological examinations of fluid spaces.

  20. [A 61-year-old man with sciatica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Kristin Lif; Laurini, Ricardo; Steen, Rolf; Alstadhaug, Karl Bjørnar

    2009-05-14

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our department with radicular back-pain and progressive gait-difficulties. On examination he had flaccid paraparesis and bladder-retention. He subsequently developed palsy of n. oculomotorius, dysarthria, right-sided Bells palsy and weakness of his right arm over a 4-week period. He became disoriented and died without a diagnosis. MRI of the brain and columna were negative. Extensive search for malignancies yielded negative results. Cytology specimens were inconclusive and repeated liquor-examinations showed very low glucose levels, mild pleocytosis, elevated protein. Autopsy revealed a small adenocarcinoma of the lung and meningeal carcinomatosis originating from the adenocarcinoma.

  1. Correlação do sinal de Lasègue e manobra da elevação da perna, retificada com os achados cirúrgicos em pacientes com ciatalgia portadores de hérnia discal lombar Correlación del signo de Lasègue y maniobra de elevación de la pierna recta con los resultados quirúrgicos en pacientes con ciática que tenían hernia lumbar discal Correlation of Lasègue sign and the straight-leg-raising test with surgical findings in patients with sciatica and lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatas Sanchez Fernandez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar a correlação entre as manobras de estiramento do nervo ciático, como o Teste de Lasègue (TL e o Teste de Elevação da Perna Estendida (TEPE, com os achados cirúrgicos nos pacientes com ciatalgia. MÉTODOS: 178 pacientes portadores de hérnia de disco lombar foram examinados previamente pelo autor através do TL e do TEPE. Os achados cirúrgicos foram anotados e comparados com os achados do exame clínico. RESULTADOS: Dos pacientes estudados, 162 (91% apresentaram TL positivo enquanto 118 (66,2% apresentaram a TEPE positivo. CONCLUSÃO: O TL foi a manobra diagnóstica pré-operatória mais sensível em correlação com a hérnia discal lombar.OBJETIVO: Investigar la correlación entre las maniobras de estiramiento del nervio ciático, como la Prueba de Lasègue (PL y la Prueba de Elevación de la Pierna Extendida (PEPE, con los resultados quirúrgicos en pacientes con ciática. MÉTODOS: 178 pacientes con hernia discal lumbar fueron examinados previamente por el autor mediante la PL y la PEPE. Los resultados quirúrgicos fueron registrados y comparados con los hallazgos en el examen clínico. RESULTADOS: De los pacientes estudiados, 162 (91% fueron positivos en la PL, mientras que 118 (66,2% presentaron PEPE positiva. CONCLUSIÓN: La PL fue la maniobra de diagnóstico preoperatorio más sensible en correlación con hernia discal lumbar.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the correlation between maneuversfor stretching the sciatic nerve, as the Lasègue Sign (LS and the Straight-Leg-Raising Test (SLRT, with surgical findings in patients with sciatica. METHODS: 178 patients with herniated lumbar disc were previously examined by the author through LS and SLRT. Surgical findings were recorded and compared with findings on clinical examination. RESULTS: Of the patients studied, 162 (91% had positive LS while 118 (66.2% were positive to SLRT. CONCLUSION: The LS was the most sensitive preoperative physical diagnostic test with respect

  2. Predictive value of radioculography in patients with lumbago-sciatica. A prospective study (part 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espersen, J.O.; Kosteljanetz, M. (University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Halaburt, H.; Miletic, T. (University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark). Dept. of Neuroradiology)

    1984-01-01

    One hundred patients with symptoms of lumbo-sacral root compression were prospectively and consecutively assigned to operation based alone on clinical findings. A preoperative myelogram was performed in all patients and described without a knowledge of the clinical features. All patients were explored for the clinically and myelographically relevant disc. When the myelogram was normal (16 patients) both lower lumbar interspaces were exposed. In 58 patients a herniated disc was revealed at surgery. Only 'myelographic herniation' with indentation of the contrast column was accompanied by a high frequency of disc herniation at surgery (73-87%). In cases with normal myelograms only 5% had a disc herniation. The severity of the myelographic finding was clearly correlated to the frequency of positive surgical findings and good outcomes. The preoperative radiculogram gives a high degree of certainty in the preoperative evaluation whether a surgical lesion is present or not and reveals a precise prediction of the outcome of surgery.

  3. A postmenopausal woman with sciatica from broad ligament leiomyoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ya-Chu May

    2016-10-31

    Unilateral lower abdominal pain and/or sciatic nerve pain is a common presentation in the elderly population. The prevalence of broad ligament leiomyoma is <1 % with the prevalence declining after the menopause and it is rare for broad ligament leiomyomas to be clinically significant. Thus, we highlight a case of symptomatic broad ligament leiomyoma in a postmenopausal woman whose symptoms improved after definitive treatment. A 62-year-old postmenopausal Macedonian woman was referred to our gynecological department with unexplained pain in her left leg and left iliac fossa region on walking. There was minimal relief with increasing analgesia use prescribed by the family physician. Investigations revealed an ipsilateral adnexal mass and subsequent treatment with laparoscopic broad ligament myomectomy helped to alleviate her symptoms. Our case highlights the importance of staying mindful of alternate diagnoses when presented with a common presentation of iliac fossa pain and pain in the leg. Although broad ligament leiomyomas are benign tumors, the uncommon symptomatic presentation led us to report and focus some attention on this type of tumor.

  4. Percutaneous laser disc decompression versus microdiscectomy for sciatica: Cost utility analysis alongside a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; Brouwer, Patrick A; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart; van den Hout, Wilbert B; van Buchem, Mark A; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-10-01

    Background Percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) for patients with lumbar disc herniation is believed to be cheaper than surgery. However, cost-effectiveness has never been studied. Materials and Methods A cost utility analysis was performed alongside a randomized controlled trial comparing PLDD and conventional surgery. Patients reported their quality of life using the EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D), 36-item short form health survey (SF-36 and derived SF-6D) and a visual analogue scale (VAS). Using cost diaries patients reported health care use, non-health care use and hours of absenteeism from work. The 1-year societal costs were compared with 1-year quality adjusted life years (QALYs) based on the United States (US) EQ-5D. Sensitivity analyses were carried out on the use of different utility measures (Netherland (NL) EQ-5D, SF-6D, or VAS) and on the perspective (societal or healthcare). Results On the US EQ-5D, conventional surgery provided a non-significant gain in QALYs of 0.033 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.026 to 0.093) in the first year. PLDD resulted in significantly lower healthcare costs (difference €1771, 95% CI €303 to €3238) and non-significantly lower societal costs (difference €2379, 95% CI -€2860 to €7618). For low values of the willingness to pay for a QALY, the probability of being cost-effective is in favor of PLDD. For higher values of the willingness to pay, between €30,000 and €70,000, conventional microdiscectomy becomes favorable. Conclusions From a healthcare perspective PLDD, followed by surgery when needed, results in significantly lower 1-year costs than conventional surgery. From a societal perspective PLDD appears to be an economically neutral innovation.

  5. Evaluation of the clinical efficiency of transforaminal epidural steroid injection in the treatment of sciatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gündoğdu Zafer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluation of clinical efficiancy of fluoroscopy-accompanied transforaminal epidural steroid injection in patients with symptomatic lumbar foraminal intervertebral disc herniation and foraminal stenosis. Methods: Fifty patients, who underwent fluoroscopic-guided epidural steroid injection between 19.12.2013 - 28.02.2014, were evaluated retrospectively. Pain levels of patients before the procedure, after 3 weeks and after 6 months were compared using visuel analog scale (VAS. Fifty percent or more decrease, less than 50% decrease and no change in VAS were evaluated as sufficient response, insufficient response and unresponsiveness, respectively. The patients were asked whether they would undergo this process again and “Yes”, “Maybe” and “No” answers were evaluated for patient satisfaction score. Results: In 50 patients (32 female, 18 male, average pain levels were found to be 8.4 (VAS 7-9, 4.3 (VAS 1-9 and 4.4 (VAS 0-9 before the procedure, 3 weeks after the procedure and 6 months after the procedure, respectively. While thirty-seven (74% of the patients were found to have sufficient response to treatment 3 weeks after the procedure, 10 (20% patients were found to have insufficient response. There was no response to treatment in 3 (6% patients. While thirty-five (70% of the patients were found to have sufficient response to treatment 6 months after the procedure, 10 (20% patients were found to have insufficient response. Six months after the procedure, there was no response to treatment in 5 patients (%10. Statistically significant improvement was observed when the pre and post-procedure VAS scores were compared. Forty (80% patients gave the answer “Yes” to the question whether they would undergo this procedure again. Conclusion: We found that fluoroscopic guided transforaminal epidural steroid injection is effective in pain relief in patients with lumbar foraminal intervertebral disc herniation and foraminalstenosis that are resistant to pharmacological and physical therapy and have no absolute indication for surgery.

  6. Sciatica from a Foraminal Lumbar Root Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarush Rustagi

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and “failure of conservative treatment.”

  7. Sequential imaging of intraneural sciatic nerve endometriosis provides insight into symptoms of cyclical sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Collins, Mark S; Sandroni, Paola; Cheville, John C; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis of the nerve often remains an elusive diagnosis. We report the first case of intraneural lumbosacral plexus endometriosis with sequential imaging at different phases of the menstrual cycle: during the luteal phase and menstruation. Compared to the first examination, the examination performed during the patient's period revealed the lumbosacral plexus larger and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. The intraneural endometriosis cyst was also larger and showed recent hemorrhage. Additionally, this case represents another example of perineural spread of endometriosis from the uterus to the lumbosacral plexus along the autonomic nerves and then distally to the sciatic nerve and proximally to the spinal nerves.

  8. CT-diskography in patients with sciatica. Comparison with plain CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullerud, R. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Section of Neuroradiology; Johansen, J.G. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Section of Neuroradiology

    1995-09-01

    The findings at CT-diskography (CT-D), including recording of the pain introduced at contrast injection, were compared with plain CT and MR imaging in 111 disks in 101 patients aged 18 to 68 years. Six disks which were normal at CT had normal CT-D and 5 of them had normal signal on MR imaging. The degree of annular degeneration and the depth of the annular tears were significantly associated with each other and with loss of disk height, but not with size or location of the hernias. Only the depth of the tears was significantly associated with loss of signal on MR. However, frequently complete annular tears and severe annular degeneration were seen in association with small bulges and hernias, even in disks with normal or slightly reduced signal on MR and with normal height. The type and intensity of the pain introduced were associated with each other and with the depth of the annular tears, but not with the degree of annular degeneration, size of the hernia or the MR signal intensity of the disks. Annular degeneration and tears on one hand, and the type and intensity of pain introduced on the other, see to be related rather than separate phenomena. (orig./MG).

  9. Minimally-invasive posterior lumbar stabilization for degenerative low back pain and sciatica. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaldi, G., E-mail: bbonaldi@yahoo.com [Neuroradiology Department, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo (Italy); Brembilla, C. [Department of neurosurgery, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo (Italy); Cianfoni, A. [Neuroradiology of Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland, Lugano, CH (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    The most diffused surgical techniques for stabilization of the painful degenerated and instable lumbar spine, represented by transpedicular screws and rods instrumentation with or without interbody cages or disk replacements, require widely open and/or difficult and poorly anatomical accesses. However, such surgical techniques and approaches, although still considered “standard of care”, are burdened by high costs, long recovery times and several potential complications. Hence the effort to open new minimally-invasive surgical approaches to eliminate painful abnormal motion. The surgical and radiological communities are exploring, since more than a decade, alternative, minimally-invasive or even percutaneous techniques to fuse and lock an instable lumbar segment. Another promising line of research is represented by the so-called dynamic stabilization (non-fusion or motion preservation back surgery), which aims to provide stabilization to the lumbar spinal units (SUs), while maintaining their mobility and function. Risk of potential complications of traditional fusion methods (infection, CSF leaks, harvest site pain, instrumentation failure) are reduced, particularly transitional disease (i.e., the biomechanical stresses imposed on the adjacent segments, resulting in delayed degenerative changes in adjacent facet joints and discs). Dynamic stabilization modifies the distribution of loads within the SU, moving them away from sensitive (painful) areas of the SU. Basic biomechanics of the SU will be discussed, to clarify the mode of action of the different posterior stabilization devices. Most devices are minimally invasive or percutaneous, thus accessible to radiologists’ interventional practice. Devices will be described, together with indications for patient selection, surgical approaches and possible complications.

  10. Growth Factor and Laminin Effect with Muscular Fiber Sheath on Repairing of the Sciatica Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Torabi

    2014-01-01

    Background & aim: Peripheral nerve injuries which can lead to a physical disability. If the defect is very low, direct suture without tension on both ends of the cut nerve regeneration is considered as a standard procedure. Otherwise, to reconstruct the axons, the gap must be filled by graft material in order to the guidance. Due to the similarity of the matrix tubular skeletal muscle and nerve muscles graft was used to repair in this study. Methods: In the present experimental study, 42 female Wistar rats were divided into three groups and underwent surgery. In the first group a narrow strip of muscle was prepared by freezing – thawing, and later sutured between the distal and proximal sciatic nerve. In the second group, the gap caused by muscle graft was regenerated and the nerve growth factor and laminin was injected into the graft. In the control group, the two ends of the cut nerve were hidden beneath the adjacent muscles. Next, a group of rats with sciatic functional index was investigated for the behavioral. On the other group were examined for histological studies after two months. Results: Sciatic functional index and Mean counts of myelinated fibers in two graft groups compared with the control group was significant p<0.05. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. Conclusion: co-axially aligned muscle grafts were an appropriate alternative substitute for repairing. It seems that the nerve growth factor and laminin have a positive role in axonal regeneration and functional recovery acceleration. Key words: Sciatic Functional Index, muscle graft, NGF, Laminin

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Interpretation in Patients with Sciatica Who Are Potential Candidates for Lumbar Disc Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. el Barzouhi (Abdelilah); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); G.J. Lycklama à Nijeholt (Geert); B.F.W. van der Kallen (Bas); W.B. van den Hout (Wilbert); A.J.H. Verwoerd (Annemieke); B.W. Koes (Bart); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground:Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is considered the mainstay imaging investigation in patients suspected of lumbar disc herniations. Both imaging and clinical findings determine the final decision of surgery. The objective of this study was to assess MRI observer variation in

  12. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... numbness, tingling or weakness of the leg called "sciatica." Sciatica affects about 1-2% of all people, usually ... show a positive straight leg raise test demonstrating sciatica and possibly muscle weakness numbness or reflex changes. ...

  13. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually easy to diagnose and is known as sciatica. Sciatica usually causes back pain that shoots down one leg along the path of the sciatic nerve. Sciatica can happen any time, not just when you ...

  14. Does the duration of symptoms influence outcome in patients with sciatica undergoing micro-discectomy and decompressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsika, Marina; Thomas, Eleanor; Shaheen, Sabeena; Sharma, Himanshu

    2016-04-01

    Early surgical treatment for back and leg pain secondary to disc herniation has been associated with very good outcomes. However, there are conflicting data on the role of surgical treatment in case of prolonged radicular symptomatology. We aimed to evaluate whether the duration of symptoms at presentation affects the subjective outcome. This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a single surgeon including micro-discectomies and lateral recess decompressions in patients younger than 60 years old using patient medical notes, radiology imaging, operation notes, and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS) including Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale for back pain and leg pain (VAS-BP and VAS-LP). The final follow-up was carried out through postal questionnaire or telephone consultation. Demographic information, duration of symptoms, type and incidence of complications, length of hospital stay, and follow-up were analyzed. Data were categorized into four subgroups: symptoms 0≥6 months, 6 months≥1 year, 1 year≥2 years, and >2 years. A clinically significant result was an average improvement of 2 or more points in the VAS and of 20% and over in the ODI. The level of statistical significance was 2 years (VAS-LP 4.77±3.61, VAS-BP 3.54±3.43, ODI 28.36±20.93). The length of hospital stay and complication rate was comparable between groups. Average follow-up was 15.69 months. Our study showed significant improvement in patients with symptoms beyond 1 as well as 2 years since onset, and surgery is a viable option in selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Should routine MRI of the lumbar spine be required prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection for sciatica pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaly, Ramis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: We describe three patients who received lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESI) for lumbosacral radicular pain that resulted in worsening of their symptoms. The procedures were performed following a review of remote diagnostic imaging studies. These cases demonstrate the lack of consensus in pain management domains for how to approach the workup and treatment of persistent/chronic low back pain, with a noted fragmentation in pain management strategies and applied therapies. Case Description: We present three patients; two female patients (37 and 38 years old) undergoing LESI for remotely diagnosed disc herniations, and one 61-year-old male receiving an LESI for a presumed, unverified lumbar intervertebral disc disorder. Following a worsening of symptoms after LESI, neurosurgical consultations ultimately determined the presence of, respectively, an epidural hematoma, a neurilemoma, and a lung cancer metastasis to the sacrum as the source of symptoms, instead of being due to the intervertebral disc pathology. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize several principles in the diagnosis and use of imaging of the lumbosacral region prior to undertaking invasive neuraxial procedures. PMID:25883840

  16. Efficacy of epidural administration of anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody onto spinal nerve for treatment of sciatica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ohtori, Seiji; Miyagi, Masayuki; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Nakamura, Junichi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Takaso, Masashi; Furuya, Takeo; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-01-01

    ... clarified. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of the anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, tocilizumab, on radicular pain by its epidural administration onto spinal nerves in patients...

  17. Traction for low back pain with or without sciatica: an updated systematic review within the framework of the Cochrane collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, J.; van Tulder, M.; Blomberg, S; de Vet, H.C.W.; van der Heijden, G; Bronfort, G.

    2006-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Systematic review. OBJECTIVE. To determine if traction is more effective than reference treatments, placebo/sham traction, or no treatment for low back pain (LBP). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Various types of traction are used in the treatment of LBP, often in conjunction with other

  18. The treatment of disc herniation-induced sciatica with infliximab - Results of a randomized, controlled, 3-month follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korhonen, T; Karppinen, J; Paimela, L; Malmivaara, A; Lindgren, KA; Jarvinen, S; Niinimaki, J; Veeger, N; Seitsalo, S; Hurri, H

    2005-01-01

    Study Design. A randomized controlled trial. Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy of infliximab, a monoclonal antibody against tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha in a randomized controlled setting. Summary of Background Data. Recently, we obtained encouraging results in an open-label study of

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing lumbar spinal pathology in adult patients with low back pain or sciatica: a diagnostic systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenaar, M.; van Rijn, R.M.; van Tulder, M.W.; Verhagen, A.P.; van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Koes, B.W.; de Boer, M.R.; Ginai, A.Z.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In about 5% of all cases LBP is associated with serious underlying pathology requiring diagnostic confirmation and directed treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used for this diagnostic purpose yet its role remains controversial. Consequently, this review aimed to summarize

  20. Transforaminal endoscopic discectomy to relieve sciatica and delay fusion in a 31-year-old man with pars defects and low-grade spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-02-01

    Isthmic spondylolisthesis due to pars defects resulting from trauma or spondylolysis is not uncommon. Symptomatic patients with such pars defects are traditionally treated with a variety of fusion surgeries. The authors present a unique case in which such a patient was successfully treated with endoscopic discectomy without iatrogenic destabilization. A 31-year-old man presented with a history of left radicular leg pain along the distribution of the sciatic nerve. He had a disc herniation at L5/S1 and bilateral pars defects with a Grade I spondylolisthesis. Dynamic radiographic studies did not show significant movement of L-5 over S-1. The patient did not desire to have a fusion. After induction of local anesthesia, the patient underwent an awake transforaminal endoscopic discectomy via the extraforaminal approach, with decompression of the L-5 and S-1 nerve roots. His preoperative pain resolved immediately, and he was discharged home the same day. His preoperative Oswestry Disability Index score was 74, and postoperatively it was noted to be 8. At 2-year follow-up he continued to be symptom free, and no radiographic progression of the listhesis was noted. In this case preservation of stabilizing structures, including the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments and the facet capsule, may have reduced the likelihood of iatrogenic instability while at the same time achieving symptom control. This may be a reasonable option for select patient symptoms confined to lumbosacral radiculopathy.

  1. Herniectomy versus herniectomy with the DIAM spinal stabilization system in patients with sciatica and concomitant low back pain: results of a prospective randomized controlled multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krappel, Ferdinand; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Alessi, Giovanni; Remacle, Jean-Michel; Lopez, Luis Alberto; Fernández, Jesus Javier; Maestretti, Gianluca; Pfirrmann, Christian W A

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the short and medium term efficacy and patient outcomes of DIAM spinal stabilization system on back pain, disability, leg pain and quality of life. 165 patients were enrolled; 146 patients with a single level disc herniation (L2 to L5) were randomized: 75 investigational (herniectomy and DIAM) and 71 control (herniectomy alone) treated and followed up for 24 months. Significant improvements overtime (P back pain at 6 months (investigational -3.97 ± 2.55 vs control-3.37 ± 3.15, P = 0.228) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at 12 months (-38.55 ± 20.10 vs -37.19 ± 22.61, P = 0.719). For both outcomes, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups, at all postoperative time points. Although the enrolment ended before the intended sample size (308 patients) was reached, the number of patients reaching the VAS back pain minimally clinically important difference (MCID) of ≥2.2 at 6 months was higher in the investigational (79.4 % vs control 57.1 %, P = 0.008). These results were sustained throughout 24 months (82.8 vs 64.4 %, P pain (mean decrease -6.41 ± 2.57 to -6.41 vs -5.61 ± to -3.30); improved quality of life (SF-36: 20.68 ± 9.44 vs 16.90 ± 10.74); pain medication reduction: 56.7 vs 47.9 %; return to work: 45.7 vs 38.0 %. Adverse event rates: 68.5 % investigational and 66.2 % control. This is the first randomized controlled trial to report equivalent efficacy and safety of herniectomy with or without DIAM spinal stabilizing device. Leg pain, back pain and the level of disability were not significantly different between groups; however, number of patients reaching the MCID for back pain was significantly higher in the investigational group at 6 through 24 months.

  2. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Francis Eastside Hospital, Greenville, SC, 07/10/2012) Sciatica Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower ... Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Sciatica Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower ...

  3. No Evidence for Presence of Bacteria in Modic Type I Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedderkopp, Niels; Thomsen, Karsten; Manniche, Claus

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest an association between sciatica and Propionibacterium acnes. "Modic type I changes" in the vertebrae are closely associated with sciatica and lower back pain, and recent studies have questioned the ability of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  4. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  5. Pain: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tendonitis or tenosynovitis , affecting one or more tendons. Sciatica is a generic term representing pain in the ... down into the thighs, legs, ankles, and feet . Sciatica can be caused by a number of factors ...

  6. Yoga for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... results. People with high blood pressure, glaucoma, or sciatica, and women who are pregnant should modify or ... and may damage the eye’s optic nerve), and sciatica (pain, weakness, numbing, or tingling that may extend ...

  7. Students' perceptions of a multimedia computer-aided instruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IDS (aspirin!, ibuprofen·). Prescribed. Pri'3Cri~d pharmaceutical pl'ysical methods methods. Nonspecific low back. Nonspecific low. Sciatica symptoms and/or back symptoms sciatica. Other .:'-1SAIDsI. Manipulation (in place of medication.

  8. Surgery Videos: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Francis Eastside Hospital, Greenville, SC, 07/10/2012) Sciatica Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower ... Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Sciatica Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower ...

  9. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Back pain and sciatica are common health complaints. Almost everyone has back ... Back Pain Read more MRI Scans Read more Sciatica Read more A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  10. Definitions A-Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... numbness, tingling or weakness of the leg called “sciatica.” Also known as a slipped or ruptured disc, ... above the coccyx and below the lumbar spine. sciatica: Pain, numbness, tingling in the distribution of the ...

  11. Studying the Effectiveness of One Type of Iranian Traditional Massage on Lumbar Radiculopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hashemi, Mamak; Jafarian, Ali Akbar; Tofighi, Shahram; Mahluji, Kamran; Halabchi, Farzin

    2016-01-01

    .... Massage is one of the therapeutic modalities, advised for sciatica. Due to different aspects of sciatica in modern medicine, massage is not indicated as treatment, but it is advised in Iranian traditional medicine...

  12. The Scope of Back Pain in Navy Helicopter Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Experienced an episode of sciatica in which my right leg would experience pain and numbness. Experienced it a couple times on deployment...when off the controls. In 2001 I had bad sciatica . After my surgery, I no longer have sciatica , but I do have stiffness. In the seat too long, the...lower back and neck pain Lower back pain Sciatica Slipped disc (L5-S1) Maybe, since I’ve acquired my own padding the back issues have decreased. If

  13. Cost-effectiveness of decompression according to Gill versus instrumented spondylodesis in the treatment of sciatica due to low grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis: A prospective randomised controlled trial [NTR1300

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Arts (Mark); M.J.T. Verstegen (Marco); R. Brand (René); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.E. van den Akker (Elske); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Nerve root decompression with instrumented spondylodesis is the most frequently performed surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with symptomatic low-grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. Nerve root decompression without instrumented fusion, i.e. Gill's procedure,

  14. Surgically Treated Symptomatic Prolapsed Lumbar and Sacral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatica is a relatively common condition with a lifetime incidence varying from 13 to 40%.[1] The corresponding annual incidence of an episode of sciatica ranges from 1 to 5%.[1]. Intervertebral disc prolapse, protrusion, or extrusion account for less than 5% (though some reports put it between 5% and. 10%) of all low back ...

  15. Tarlov Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Sciatica × What research is being done? The NINDS, a ... Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Sciatica See More About Research The NINDS, a component ...

  16. ISSN 2073 ISSN 2073 9990 East Cent. Afr. J. s 9990 East Cent. Afr.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    annulus7,12,13. Disc degeneration and loss of disc space height, leads to increased stresses on the facet joints with craniocaudal subluxation resulting in facet joint arthropathy15. LBP is the main presenting symptom followed by sciatica. Features suggestive of sciatica are unilateral or bilateral leg pain radiating to the feet ...

  17. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-04-10

    Apr 10, 2011 ... Patient and case report. A 70 years old woman was admitted for paraplegia. Past medical history of the patient revealed bilateral sciatica evolving since July 2009, not alleviated by symptomatic treatment. A month prior admission, the sciatica symptoms worsened towards a gradual onset of paraplegia, ...

  18. East African Orthopaedic Journal - Vol 6, No 2 (2012)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidural injection use for low back pain associated with sciatica at an Orthopaedic centre in Kenya · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. JK Kingori, LN Gakuu, 60-62 ...

  19. AJTCAM PROOF

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Fever, coughs (leaf + flower). Dog bite, cancer, ecbolic, flatulency (leaf + stem + flower). Bacterial infections, fungal infections, inflammation, helminthiasis, biliary problems, obstinate remittent fever, constipation in children, sciatica, rheumatoid arthritis, alopecia (leaf + bark + flower + seed). 12. Premna integrifolia L. Goniari.

  20. What do patients value about spinal manipulation and home exercise for back-related leg pain? A qualitative study within a controlled clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maiers, M.; Hondras, M. A.; Salsbury, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient perceptions may influence the effectiveness and utilization of healthcare interventions, particularly for complex health conditions such as sciatica or back-related leg pain (BRLP). Objectives To explore BRLP patients’ perceptions of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and home...

  1. In vitro antifungal activity of methanol extracts of some Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... febrifuge, stomachic, tonic, arthritis, chlorea, cough, dysentry, dysamenorrhoea, dyspepsia, fever, flatulence , headache, haemorrhoids, inflammation, leprosy, rheumatism, sciatica, ulcers, vermifuge, wounds adverse effects, show recurrence, or lead to the development of resistance. There is general con-.

  2. Claudication of the lower limb: an approach to investigation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatica. Lumbar spondylosis. Arthropathy (osteo, rheumatoid, gout, etc.) Varicose veins. Deep-vein thrombosis/post-phlebitic syndrome. Peripheral neuropathy (diabetic, alco- hol-associated, etc.) Chronic regional pain syndromes. Chronic exertional syndromes (anterior compartment syndrome, etc.) Restless leg syndrome.

  3. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; Design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Brouwer (Patrick); W.C. Peul (Wilco); R. Brand (René); M.P. Arts (Mark); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.A. van den Berg (Annette); M.A. van Buchem (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser

  4. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 31/2014) Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower Back Pain (Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee ... 2012) Sciatica Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower Back Pain (Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee ...

  5. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 4/20/2012) Genetic Brain Disorders Treating Moyamoya Disease (Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Sciatica Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower Back Pain (Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee ...

  6. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kanthila Mahesha

    2017-01-01

      Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy...

  7. Effectiveness of conservative treatments for the lumbosacral radicular syndrome: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); R.W.J.G. Ostelo (Raymond); T.A.G. van Os (Ton); W.C. Peul (Wilco); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractPatients with a lumbosacral radicular syndrome are mostly treated conservatively first. The effect of the conservative treatments remains controversial. To assess the effectiveness of conservative treatments of the lumbosacral radicular syndrome (sciatica). Relevant electronic databases

  8. Computed tomography as the primary radiological examination of lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkko, E.; Laehde, S.

    1988-10-01

    A series of 235 patients examined by lumbar CT because of sciatica or other low back disorder was studied. The need of additional examinations and correlations to surgical findings were evaluated. Inadequate information was the cause of additional examination, mostly myelography in 20 patients (8,5%). It was concluded that lumbar CT is a suitable first examination of the lumbar spine in sciatica and low back pain. The indications to complementary myelography and its benefit are discussed.

  9. A CLINICAL STUDY OF OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC PROLAPSE

    OpenAIRE

    Anilkumar S. D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Amongst painful diseases, sciatica occupies a foremost place by reason of its prevalence, its production by a great variety of conditions, the great disablement it may produce and its tending to relapse all of which have led to its recognition as one of the great scourges of humanity. Intervertebral disc prolapse is the important and common cause of low back pain and sciatica. Here, the subject of laminectomy and discectomy in the treatment of proven intervertebral disc...

  10. TREATMENT OF LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC PROL APSE BY TRADITIONAL LAMINECTOMY: DISCECTOMY AND BY INTER LAM INAR DISCECTOMY: FORAMINOTOMY: A COMPARITIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Ananthula Krishna; Prashanth; Ashok; Saive; Chandrashekar Rao

    2015-01-01

    Low back ache might not be lethal but it certainly makes up for in the misery it causes in the modern society. Intervertebral disc prolapse is one of the commonest causes for low back ache with sciatica affecting the young adults. Management of sciatica v aries considerably. Patients are commonly treated conservatively. But in selected patients surgical intervention results in more rapid relief of symptoms and restoration of function. With advanced instrumentation, opt...

  11. Discólisis con ozono intradiscal en el tratamiento de la ciática por hernia discal: Seguimiento de 100 pacientes en 24 meses Ozone discolysis in the treatment of sciatica due to a herniated disc: A 24-month follow-up of 100 patients

    OpenAIRE

    L. M. Torres; M.J. Terrero; M; Vidal; F. Aragón; Martínez, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objetivo: Estudio retrospectivo para evaluar la efectividad y la seguridad del uso de ozono para la discólisis en cuadros de ciática por hernia discal contenida. Material y método: Se incluyó en el estudio a 100 pacientes con clínica de lumbociática con dolor intenso, escala visual analógica (EVA) > 6, de más de 3 meses de duración, que no respondieron al tratamiento de analgésicos y corticoides, por vía sistémica, durante un período mínimo de 1 mes, con signos de dolor radicular e irradiació...

  12. A new concept for evaluating muscle function in the lower extremities in cases of low back pain syndrome in anamnesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Lisiński

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction. There are difficulties in objective evaluation of activity of the muscles in the lower extremities of patients after successful treatment of sciatica and pseudosciatica, when no clear clinical symptoms are detected. However, the existence of some muscle dysfunction can be hypothesised and its detection was the aim of the study. objective. Recordings from chosen lower extremity muscles during standing were performed as supplementary differential diagnosis in evaluation of these patients. EMG in standing positions constitutes a new methodological approach not described in detail. methods. Twenty patients (11 after sciatica and 9 after sciatica-like episodes were enrolled into the study. On the day of examination, clinical and electroneurographical (ENG; M and F waves tests studies showed no pathology. The percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC defined muscle activity during standing. Mean amplitude and number of changes in muscle activity (fluctuations were measured in surface electromyography recordings (sEMG during normal standing and tandem positions. results and conclusions. Activity of proximal lower extremity muscles expressed as percentage of MVC was bilaterally increased in patients after sciatica in normal standing position, compared with results from the group of healthy volunteers (N=9. Patients after sciatica were also characterized with a significant increase of mean sEMG amplitude, recorded especially in distal muscles on the affected side during tandem position. This pathological change was related to decrease in ‘fluctuations’ frequency in patients after sciatica (P<0.001 more than after pseudosciatica (P<0.01 groups in both standing positions, compared to parameters of healthy volunteers. Sciatica and pseudosciatica in anamnesis cause different abnormal patterns of lower extremity muscle activity during standing positions when recorded with surface EMG.

  13. Taking it to the next level: lumbar radiculopathy from thoracic nerve schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anene Ukaigwe

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve and its branches, the common fibular and tibial nerves, causes sciatica which is a common syndrome characterized most often by radiating pain from the lower back down the legs and also manifesting as sensory and motor deficits. Sciatica is a common presentation of lumbosacral disc prolapse and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in ambulatory settings. Schwannomas rarely cause sciatica; hence, it is seldom considered in evaluation of a patient with radiculopathy. Our patient presented with lumbar radiculopathy, mild degenerative changes on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan, and failed conservative treatment. Myelopathy was confirmed with electromyogram (EMG. Thoracolumbar spine MRI revealed the schwannoma in the thoracic region. He recovered neurologic function after tumor excision. This case highlights the diagnostic challenge that may arise in evaluating a patient with lumbar radiculopathy, negative lumbosacral spine imaging, and failure of conservative therapy.

  14. Imaging of the lumbar spine after diskectomy; Imagerie du rachis lombaire apres discectomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laredo, J.D.; Wybier, M. [Hopital Lariboisiere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-12-31

    The radiological investigation of persistent or recurrent sciatica after lumbar diskectomy essentially consists of demonstrating recurrent disk herniation. Comparison between plain and contrast enhanced CT or MR examinations at the level of the diskectomy is the main step of the radiological survey. The meanings of the various radiological findings are discussed. Other lesions that may induce persistent sciatica after lumbar diskectomy include degenerative narrowing of the lateral recess, spinal instability, stress fracture of the remaining neural arch, pseudo-meningomyelocele after laminectomy. (authors). 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Correlative CT and anatomic study of the sciatic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pech, P.; Haughton, V.

    1985-05-01

    Sciatica can be caused by numerous processes affecting the sciatic nerve or its components within the pelvis including tumors, infectious diseases, aneurysms, fractures, and endometriosis. The CT diagnosis of these causes of sciatica has not been emphasized. This study identified the course and appearance of the normal sciatic nerve in the pelvis by correlating CT and anatomic slices in cadavers. For purposes of discussion, the sciatic nerve complex is conveniently divided into three parts: presacral, muscular, and ischial. Each part is illustrated here by two cryosections with corresponding CT images.

  16. Slipped vertebral epiphysis (report of 2 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Reza Farrokhi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available

    • Avulsion or fracture of posterior ring apophysis of lumbar vertebra is an uncommon cause of radicular low back pain in pediatric age group, adolescents and athletes. This lesion is one of differential diagnosis of disc herniation. We reported two teenage boys with sever low back pain and sciatica during soccer play that ultimately treated with diagnosis of lipped vertebral apophysis.
    • KEY WORDS: Ring Apophysis, vertebral fracture, sciatica, low back pain, disc herniation.

  17. Neurinoma of the cauda equina misdiagnosed as prolapsed lumbar disk. Report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, L; Mariottini, A; Muzii, V F; Bolognini, A; Scarfò, G B

    1994-09-01

    The authors report three cases of neurinoma of the cauda equina initially misdiagnosed as prolapsed lumbar disk. Computed Tomography failed to reveal the tumour, while showing evidence of disk-degenerative patology and being thus misleading. Similar cases are reported in literature. After a thorough analysis of the causes of such an apparently gross error, it is concluded that the main source of pitfalls arises from neglecting those typical clinical features differentiating prolapsed disk from oncogenetic sciatica. When oncogenetic sciatica is suspected Computed Tomography is inappropriate and even misleading, while the elective investigation is Magnetic Resonance.

  18. Neurolymphomatosis of the sciatic nerve and F.D.G. PET: case report and review; Neurolymphomatose du nerf sciatique en TEP au FDG: a propos d'un cas et revue de la litterature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruna-Muraille, C.; Papathanassiou, D.; Cuif-Job, A.; Liehn, J.C. [Institut Jean-Godinot, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 51 - Reims (France); Job, L. [CHU Robert-Debre, Service de Radiologie, 51 - Reims (France); Kolb, B.; Himberlin, C.; Delmer, A. [CHU Robert-Debre, Service d' Hematologie Clinique, 51 - Reims (France)

    2009-12-15

    We are reporting the case of a woman who has been suffering from sciatica for several months. A neurolymphomatosis of the sciatic nerve was found. In this report, we present the characteristics of this lesion in conventional imaging and in F.D.G. PET. (authors)

  19. Characteristics and natural course of vertebral endplate signal (Modic) changes in the Danish general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue S; Bendix, Tom; Sorensen, Joan S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vertebral endplate signal changes (VESC) are more common among patients with low back pain (LBP) and/or sciatica than in people who are not seeking care for back pain. The distribution and characteristics of VESC have been described in people from clinical and non-clinical populations...

  20. Evaluating Low Back Pain Patients for Prolapsed Interverbral Disc in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of low back pain for prolapsed intervertebral disk (PID) is based on history, physical findings and im- aging examination such as Computerized Tomography. (CT) scan or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). In pa- tients with recurrent low back pain, reflex sciatica, strik- ing tenderness on spinal processes or ...

  1. Lumbar Modic Changes - A Comparison Between Findings at Low-and High-field MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Tom; Sorensen, Joan S; Henriksson, Gustaf A C

    2012-01-01

    -81), with or without sciatica, seen in a Danish outpatient LBP clinic were included. All patients had MRI scans on both a high-field and a low-field MRI scanner. Two radiologists evaluated all lumbar endplates independently using a standardized evaluation protocol. Kappa statistics were used to analyze the inter...

  2. Urinary retention in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    common urological symptoms, together with lower back pain, bilateral sciatica, saddle anaesthesia, lower limb weakness and bowel dysfunction.[6] EMG demonstrates bladder and sphincter denervation, and the diagnosis is usually made by computed tomography. (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or myelography.

  3. LOW BACK PAINS –THE ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEON'S ENIGMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although man has been troubled by low back and leg pains since the start of recorded history, it is only during this century that the low back pain symptom complex has taken on epidemic proportions in the developed world. It was Cotugno in the 18th century who attributed the leg pain of sciatica to hydrops of the sciatic ...

  4. ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent. Afr. J. surg

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    Back Pain and Sciatica. N England J Med.1988; 318:291-300. 9. Espeland A, Korsbrekke K, Albrektsen G, et al: Observer variation in plain radiography of the lumbosacral spine; British Journal of radiology. 1998; 71: 366-375. 10. Halpin SF, Yeoman L, Dundas DD: Radiographic examination of the lumbar spine in a.

  5. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... Abstract. Metastatic renal cell cancer is not exceptional in kidney cancer (30% of patients with kidneyl cancer). Its prognosis is particularly severe. However, sciatic neuralgia (sciatica) remains an exceptional revealing clinical sign of this disease. The authors report the case of a patient admitted with right.

  6. Nyctanthes arbor-tristis L. of Oleaceae (Sanskrit: Parijatham, Hindi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowers are small, white with a bright orange corolla tube. Fruit is bilaterally compressed. The yellowish dye extracted from the flowers is used to colour rice preparations. Leaves are useful in fever and rheumatism. Decoction of leaves prepared in a particular way is specific for sciatica. Seeds are useful in treating baldness ...

  7. Lumbar myelography with Omnipaque (iohexol)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleaas, F.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Weber, H.

    1986-07-01

    Lumbar myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed in 103 consecutive adult patients with low back pain or sciatica. The patients were observed for 48 h with registration of possible adverse reactions. Mild or moderate transient side effects were recorded in 24 patients. No serious adverse reactions were noted, and EEG recorded in 25 patients showed no changes.

  8. a brief history of low back pain: yesterday-today-tommorow

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    such as sciatica pain and LBP were first mentioned by Hippocrates' teachings for most of the early centuries of the first millennium. Arabian influence then permeated into the medical landscape with the writing of The Canons of Medicine by Avicenna (981-. 1037) (6) physicians of the time recommended that surgery could ...

  9. Kyste synovial postérieur lombaire | Badaoui | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lumbar synovial cyst is a periarticular cystic developing from the posterior interapophyseal joints and representing a rare, non discal etiology of lower back pain and/or of sciatica of spinal origin. We report the case of a 50-year old woman who consulted with left L5 radiculopathy. Lumbar CT scan (A) showed, at the ...

  10. Wang et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2016) 13(1):134 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF ADEWUNMI

    GB30) in patients with sciatica, and specific changes in the brain default network (Li et al., 2012). Wang et al. observed the effect of acupuncture Taichong(LR3) and Hegu(LI4) for mild cognitive impairment. (MCI) and Alzheimer diseases (AD), and ...

  11. A genetic variant in COL11A1 is functionally associated with lumbar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    sciatica related with the premenstrual period in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Turk Neurosurg, 20(4), 437-441. Antoniou, J., Steffen, T., Nelson, F., Winterbottom, N., Hollander, A. P., Poole, R. A., et al. (1996). The human lumbar intervertebral disc: evidence for changes in the biosynthesis and denaturation of the ...

  12. Bioequivalence evaluation of new microparticulate capsule and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    production by reducing cyclo-oxygenase (COX) activity. It is successfully being used in clinical settings for alleviating the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, acute sciatica and ankylosing spondylitis. Moreover, it has demonstrated comparable analgesic efficacy to morphine for relieving postoperative pain [3].

  13. The effect of different treatments on improving seed germination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-27

    Sep 27, 2010 ... special remedy for sciatica. A poultice of the ground up seeds has been used on burns and sores. Semi-dried oil is obtained from the seed. The leaves are stored with corn to prevent it from spoiling (Zargari, 2008). P. ovata is a plant from Plantaginaceae, an annual herb that grows to a height of 12-18 in.

  14. Reliability of standing weight-bearing (0.25T) MR imaging findings and positional changes in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke B; Hansen, Philip; Christensen, Anders F

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the reliability and absolute agreement of common degenerative findings in standing positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Low back pain patients with and without sciatica were consecutively enrolled to undergo a supine and standing pMRI. Three...

  15. Evaluating Low Back Pain Patients for Prolapsed Interverbral Disc in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of the six hundred and three patients (267 males, 336 females) who were evaluated, risk factors were recorded in 39.5% patients, 35.3% patients had sciatica while straight leg raising test was performed in 52.2% patients. Investigations performed in these patients included plain roentograms (38.5%), CT scan (9.1%) and ...

  16. A genetic variant in COL11A1 is functionally associated with lumbar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WENJUN LIU

    2017-12-14

    Dec 14, 2017 ... back pain and sciatica related with the premenstrual period in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Turk. Neurosurg. 20,. 437–441. Antoniou J., Steffen T., Nelson F., Winterbottom N., Hollander. A. P., Poole R. A. et al. 1996 The human lumbar intervertebral disc: evidence for changes in the biosynthesis and ...

  17. Assessment of Antidermatophytic Activities of Urtica dioica L against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reported for decoction prepared from the leaves of the nettle [1]. In folk medicine, nettle has been used to treat iron deficiency anemia due to its high content of iron and also used to stop excessive menstrual bleeding, hematuria and nosebleeds. The root of nettle has been employed for treating asthma, rheumatism, sciatica ...

  18. Vertebral endplate signal changes (Modic change)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Secher; Karppinen, Jaro; Sorensen, Joan S

    2008-01-01

    /or sciatica and 6% in non-clinical populations. The prevalence was positively associated with age and was negatively associated with the overall quality of the studies. A positive association between VESC and non-specific LBP was found in seven of ten studies from the general, working, and clinical...

  19. Non‑drug Non‑invasive Treatment in the Management of Low Back ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of hospitalization for sciatica in males who smoked at a young age.[26] It has been estimated that LBP will affect 84% of the general adult population at some point in their life, with 49% reporting some LBP in the previous 6 months, 23% suffering from chronic LBP and 11% experiencing physical impairment due to LBP.

  20. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    Perennial. Bulb. External. Rheumatism and sciatica. 52. Fumaria parviflora Lam. Fumariaceae. Shatareh. Shahtareh-e- irani. Fumitory. H. Annual. Flowers, Stem,. Leaves. External. Dermal discords, wound and eczema. 53. Glycyrrhiza glabra L. var. glabra. Fabaceae. Balik. Shirin bayan. Licorice. H. Perennial Roots, Flowers.

  1. Low back pain and the post-laminectomy pain syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These include neurofibromas, meningiomas and ependy- momas (e.g. from filum terminale). Tumour can present as back pain plus sciatica or just with incontinence, or with wasted legs without pain. When pain occurs, it can be without signs, and these patients are often labelled neurotic. The pain is, however, characteristic.

  2. Treatment and outcome of herniated lumbar intervertebral disk in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of treatment in cases of lumbar disk herniation is to return the patient to normal activities as quickly as possible. Therefore unnecessary surgery should be avoided (2). However about 10% of patients with lumbar disk herniation will ultimately require surgery (3). Surgery is recommended if the sciatica is severe and ...

  3. Traitement chirurgical du spondylolisthésis lombaire à Douala. A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Were included twenty five patients with paralytic sciatica spondylolisthesis in medically refractory after at least 12 weeks of follow-up .The intensity of pain was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), while functional disability was assessed functional scale OSWESTRY. All patients underwent laminectomy followed by ...

  4. Rheumatic diseases in the Corpus Hippocraticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Squillace

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Medecine of V and IV centuries B.C. attested in the Corpus Hippocraticum ascribes all diseases to the rheuma, i.e. the flux of humours into the body. This flux produces not only the rise of cold, hoarsness, cough, reddenings, dropsy, but also arthritis, sciatica, gout.

  5. Gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of symptomatic nerve roots in MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; McCall, I.W. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Institute of Orthopaedics, The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital NHS Trust, Oswestry, Shropshire SY10 7AG (United Kingdom)

    1998-02-01

    Disc prolapse presenting with sciatica may be associated with enhancement of the symptomatic nerve root following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intravenous gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA. Previous studies have shown, however, that this does not occur in all cases. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of nerve root enhancement in patients with sciatica and disc prolapse and to try to identify any specific features that might be associated with the phenomenon. A total of 227 patients presenting with low back pain and/or sciatica underwent a MRI study of the lumbar spine with intravenous contrast enhancement. Nineteen of 81 (23.5 %) patients with disc prolapse demonstrated nerve root enhancement. Nerve root enhancement had a highly significant association with sequestrated disc lesions (13/19, 68 %; P < 0.0005), and was primarily seen in the symptomatic ipsilateral nerve root (16/19, 84 %). The sensitivity of nerve root enhancement associated with disc prolapse was 23.5 % with a specificity of 95.9 %, a positive predictive value of 76 % and a negative predictive value of 69.3 %. Nerve root enhancement may be indicative of the symptomatic level but its poor sensitivity negates the routine use of Gd-DTPA in MRI for sciatica. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 37 refs.

  6. Bhardwaj et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2016) 13(5):7-16

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ailments including ulcers, wounds, inflammation, rheumatism and gout, sciatica, bruises and swellings, fever, asthma, bronchitis and toothache etc (Kirtikar and Basu, 1999; Gaire and Subedi, 2013). Inflammation has been reported to be accompanied by the formation of reactive oxygen species and free radicals. Excessive ...

  7. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a nutshell. • A patient with sudden onset of a cold, weak, numb and painful foot has acute lower extremity ischaemia (ALEXI) until proven otherwise. Labelling patients as acute gout, acute phlegmasia (deep vein thrombosis), acute sciatica, etc. may result in unnecessary delays in treatment, with tragic consequences.

  8. Dalbergia sissoo Roxb. (English: Sissoo; Hindi: Shisham or Sisam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... digestive and anthelmintic and diuretic useful in treating dyspepsia, colic, diarrhoea and gonorrhoea. The bark and heartwood are astringent, acrid, bitter, thermogenic, depurative, anti- inflammatory, aphrodisiac, abortifacient, antipyretic and are useful in skin diseases, leprosy, leuco- derma, ulcers, bronchitis, sciatica and ...

  9. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Windt, Daniëlle A.W.M.; Simons, Emmanuel; Riphagen, Ingrid; Ammendolia, Carlo; Verhagen, Arianne P.; Laslett, Mark; Devillé, Walter; Aertgeerts, Bert; Deyo, Rick A.; Bouter, Lex M.; De Vet, Henrica C.W.

    2008-01-01

    Of all patients with back pain, less than 2% will undergo surgery for a herniated disc in the lumbar spine. In back pain patients who also have leg pain (sciatica), doctors and therapists use a physical examination to estimate the probability that the p...

  10. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhangen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Aertgeerts, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care

  11. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Windt, D.A.W.M.; Simons, E.; Riphagen, I.I.; Ammendolia, C.; Verhagen, A.P.; Laslett, M.; Devillé, W.; Deyo, R.A.; Bouter, L.M.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Aertgeerts, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care

  12. Management of Symptomatic Lumbar Disk Herniation: An International Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Gadjradj (Pravesh S.); M.P. Arts (Mark); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); Rietdijk, W.J.R. (Wim J. R.); W.C. Peul (Wilco); B.S. Harhangi (Biswadjiet)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjective To evaluate the current practice patterns of surgeons regarding both the surgical and nonsurgical management of lumbar disk herniation (LDH) worldwide and to compare this with the current literature Summary of Background Data Sciatica is a common diagnosis in the general

  13. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Winston-Salem, NC, 1/06/2014) Treating Moyamoya Disease (Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Bones, ... 4/20/2012) Genetic Brain Disorders Treating Moyamoya Disease (Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Sciatica ...

  14. PRECISE - pregabalin in addition to usual care: Statistical analysis plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mathieson (Stephanie); L. Billot (Laurent); C. Maher (Chris); A.J. McLachlan (Andrew J.); J. Latimer (Jane); B.W. Koes (Bart); M.J. Hancock (Mark J.); I. Harris (Ian); R.O. Day (Richard O.); J. Pik (Justin); S. Jan (Stephen); C.-W.C. Lin (Chung-Wei Christine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Sciatica is a severe, disabling condition that lacks high quality evidence for effective treatment strategies. This a priori statistical analysis plan describes the methodology of analysis for the PRECISE study. Methods/design: PRECISE is a prospectively registered, double

  15. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 31/2014) Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower Back Pain (Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, KS, 3/ ... 2012) Sciatica Spinal Fusion Surgery for Relief of Chronic Lower Back Pain (Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, KS, 3/ ...

  16. Development and validation of spectrophotometric method for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and lornoxicam in different dissolution media

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Dasharath M.; Sardhara, Bhavesh M.; Thumbadiya, Diglesh H.; Patel, Chhagan N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol and lornoxicam in combined tablet dosage form are available in the market. This combination is used to treat inflammatory diseases of the joints, osteoarthritis and sciatica. Spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been reported for their simultaneous estimation in tablet dosage form in specific solvent. This paper presents simple, accurate and reproducible spectrophotometric method for simultaneous determination of paracetamol...

  17. Studying the Effectiveness of One Type of Iranian Traditional Massage on Lumbar Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Mamak; Jafarian, Ali Akbar; Tofighi, Shahram; Mahluji, Kamran; Halabchi, Farzin

    2016-05-01

    Low-back pain is one of the most common human morbidities worldwide, which is damaging individually, socially and economically. Recent studies have shown that its prevalence is rising. Most of the low-back pains are non-specific though specific ones need more complicated and more expensive treatments. Sciatica or lumbar radiculopathy is one of these specific low-back pains and is explained in Iranian traditional medicine textbooks in detail. Massage is one of the therapeutic modalities, advised for sciatica. Due to different aspects of sciatica in modern medicine, massage is not indicated as treatment, but it is advised in Iranian traditional medicine. In Iran, many patients resort to traditional massage for sciatica and are satisfied. Thus, the effectiveness of one type of Iranian traditional massage "Kermanshahi family" and conventional treatment were compared based on three outcomes of pain, disability, and quality of life score. A total of 50 patients were observed in two groups (25 per group) of case (massage) and control (classic treatment) in a non-randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients suffering from lumbar radicular pain for 8 weeks or longer, before referring to each center (neurosurgery or traditional massage clinic), were enrolled continuously. In the case group, patients underwent traditional massage sessions whereas in the control group they were prescribed as routine. Three outcomes were observed during three periods of before intervention, 1-month, and 3-month after intervention. The mean difference of pain severity decrease in both groups was meaningful (P=0/007). The mean difference of disability decrease in both groups was meaningful (P=0/003). However, the mean difference of quality of life increase in both groups was not meaningful. Iranian traditional massage may be useful for the treatment of non-acute sciatica, but more studies are required to confirm and clarify the protocols.

  18. The timing of surgery in lumbar disc prolapse: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh B Sabnis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of nucleus pulposus leading to leg pain is the commonest indication for lumbar spine surgery. However, there is no consensus when to stop conservative treatment and when to consider for surgery. A systematic review of literature was done to find a consensus on the issue of when should surgery be performed for herniation of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine was conducted. Electronic database searches of Medline, Embase and Pubmed Central were performed to find articles relating to optimum time to operate in patients with herniation of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine, published between January 1975 and 10 December 2012. The studies were independently screened by two reviewers. Disagreements between reviewers were settled at a consensus meeting. A scoring system based on research design, number of patients at final followup, percentage of patients at final followup, duration of followup, journal impact factor and annual citation index was devised to give weightage to Categorize (A, B or C each of the articles. Twenty one studies fulfilled the criteria. Six studies were of retrospective design, 13 studies were of Prospective design and two studies were randomized controlled trials. The studies were categorized as: Two articles in category A (highest level of evidence, 12 articles in category B (moderate level of evidence while seven articles in Category C (poor level of evidence. Category A studies conclude that duration of sciatica prior to surgery made no difference to the outcome of surgery in patients with herniation of nucleus pulposus in the lumbar spine. Ten out of 12 studies in Category B revealed that longer duration of sciatica before surgery leads to poor results while 2 studies conclude that duration of sciatica makes no difference to outcome. In category C, five studies conclude that longer duration of sciatica before surgery leads to poor outcome while two studies find no difference in outcome with regards to duration of

  19. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korse, Nina S; Kruit, Mark C; Peul, Wilco C; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A

    2017-01-01

    Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated because of sciatica. MRIs of CES patients were assessed for the following features: level of disc lesion, type (uni- or bilateral) and severity of caudal compression. Pre- and postoperative clinical features (micturition dysfunction, defecation dysfunction, altered sensation of the saddle area) were retrieved from the medical files. In addition, anteroposterior (AP) lumbar spinal canal diameters of CES patients were measured at MRI. AP diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica, were measured for comparison. 48 CES patients were included. At MRI, bilateral compression was seen in 82%; complete caudal compression in 29%. MRI features were not associated with clinical presentation nor outcome. AP diameter was measured for 26 CES patients and for 31 lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. Comparison displayed a significant smaller AP diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in CES patients (largest p = 0.002). Compared to average diameters in literature, diameters of CES patients were significantly more often below average than that of the sciatica patients (largest p = 0.021). This is the first study demonstrating differences in lumbar spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES and lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. This finding might imply that lumbar herniated disc patients with a

  20. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S Korse

    Full Text Available Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1 evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2 comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated because of sciatica.MRIs of CES patients were assessed for the following features: level of disc lesion, type (uni- or bilateral and severity of caudal compression. Pre- and postoperative clinical features (micturition dysfunction, defecation dysfunction, altered sensation of the saddle area were retrieved from the medical files. In addition, anteroposterior (AP lumbar spinal canal diameters of CES patients were measured at MRI. AP diameters of lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica, were measured for comparison.48 CES patients were included. At MRI, bilateral compression was seen in 82%; complete caudal compression in 29%. MRI features were not associated with clinical presentation nor outcome. AP diameter was measured for 26 CES patients and for 31 lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. Comparison displayed a significant smaller AP diameter of the lumbar spinal canal in CES patients (largest p = 0.002. Compared to average diameters in literature, diameters of CES patients were significantly more often below average than that of the sciatica patients (largest p = 0.021.This is the first study demonstrating differences in lumbar spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES and lumbar herniated disc patients without CES, operated for sciatica. This finding might imply that lumbar herniated disc patients with

  1. Computed tomography in lumbar canal stenosis. Relationship between its findings and clinical symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Shu; Baba, Itsushi; Ishida, Akihisa; Sumida, Tadayuki; Sasaki, Seishu (Hiroshima Shiritsu Asa Shimin Hospital (Japan))

    1984-09-01

    Preoperative CT was done in 39 patients with lumbar canal stenosis. Marked symmetrical narrowing of the whole vertebral canal was seen in the group with nervous symptoms in the cauda equina. Deformed bilateral intervertebral joints were seen in the group with both nervous symptoms in the cauda equina and radicular sciatica. The lateral recess on the affected side was markedly narrowed by the projection of the upper and lower joints and herniation. In the group with radicular sciatica, the vertebral canal itself was not so narrowed, but the unilateral intervertebral joint was extremely deformed, causing a narrowing of the lateral recess. There were large differences in the angle of the left and right intervertebral joints.

  2. RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION WITH TRANSFORAMINAL NERVE ROOT BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EMILIANO NEVES VIALLE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the efficacy of anesthetic transforaminal nerve root block in patients with sciatica secondary to lumbar disc herniation through a prospective observational study. Methods: The study included 176 patients from a private clinic undergoing transforaminal injection performed by a single spinal surgeon. The patients were assessed after two weeks, three months and six months regarding to the improvement of the pain radiating to the lower limbs. In case of persistent symptoms, patients could choose to perform a new nerve root block and maintenance of physical therapy or be submitted to conventional microdiscectomy. Results: By the end of six-month follow-up of the 176 patients, 116 had a favorable outcome (95 after one block and 21 after two blocks, and only 43 required surgery. Conclusion: The results of our study suggest a positive effect of transforaminal block for the treatment of sciatica in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

  3. Case Report: A case report highlighting bilateral EDB wasting as a clinical marker for lumbar canal stenosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoy Mohan Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Herein we discuss a case of a 55 year old male presenting with history suggestive of sciatica on the left leg. Straight leg raising (SLR test was positive at 45 degrees on the left side. His ankle reflex was absent and the power of extensor hallusus longus (EHL was 4/5 on the same side. MRI lumbosacral spine revealed left paramedian disc prolapsed on L4/L5 level with spinal canal diameter of 9mm.However since his bilateral extensor digitorm brevis (EDB were wasted, we suspected associated lumbar canal stenosis and thereby opted for laminectomy and discectomy in this case. Intraoperatively dural wasting, hypertrophied facets and narrow canal were confirmed. Laminectomy, medial facectectomy and discectomy were carried out. The patient recovered uneventfully with resolution of his sciatica-like pain. Bilateral EDB wasting thereby provides a clinical clue to the underlying lumbar canal stenosis and can help in making correct therapeutic decisions.

  4. The furcal nerve revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanjundappa S. Harshavardhana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/ professionals involved in spine care.

  5. Comparison of radiation delivered by current diagnostic procedures for herniated disc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasquet, C.; Drouineau, J.; Goubault, F.; Hurmic, A.; Lavigne, B.; Vandermarcq, P. (Hopital Jean-Bernard, 86 - Poitiers (France))

    Three methods are currently employed for the diagnosis of sciatica due to disc lesions: radiculography, spinal phlebography, and computed tomography. Though their indications vary according to the author, it seemed worthwhile to compare radiation delivered by each of them, because of the often young age of the patients. Dosimetric studies using a Rando Phantom enabled calculation of doses to the skin, spinal cord, and gonads. Results indicated that low doses were delivered by the scanner, relatively high doses by spinal phlebography, and intermediate doses by radiculography. These findings suggest that the initial examination preoperatively in cases of simple sciatica due to herniated disc should be a CT scan whenever possible. Phlebography, on the contrary, and particularly in young women, should be used only exceptionally, as a result of the high doses delivered to the ovaries even during technically simple explorations.

  6. Fat transfer and fatal macroembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astarita, Denis C; Scheinin, Lisa A; Sathyavagiswaran, Lakshmanan

    2015-03-01

    Fat embolism is usually associated with long bone fractures or other trauma. The diagnosis is usually clinical, and in most cases, emboli are not fatal and not usually seen on gross examination. At the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office, we autopsied the victim of fatal macroscopic fat embolization to the lungs. The patient died during buttock enhancement surgery when fat from liposuction was injected into her buttocks. Fat embolism from liposuction and fat injection is reportedly rare, and macroscopic embolization is rarer still. Varicose veins can occur in the area of the sciatic notch and are known to cause painful sciatica symptoms. We suggest them as a potential conduit for macroscopic fat to reach the lungs. Simple pre-operative questioning for sciatica symptoms and possible radiologic study to rule out sciatic varices seem prudent before undertaking buttock-enhancing surgery. Careful fat injection with pre-aspiration is always advised. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  7. Predictors of Health-related Quality of Life in Patients with Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr Ogunlana

    Back pain and sciatica. New England Journal of Medicine 318(5): 291-300. Horng, Y.S., Y.H. Hwang, H.C. Wu, H.W. Liang, Y. Jang, F.C.. Twu and J.D. Wang. 2005. Predicting health-related quality of life in patients with low back pain. Spine 30: 551.-5. Kovacs, F.M., V. Abraira, J. Zamora and C. Fernandez. 2005. The.

  8. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the sacrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brat, H.G.; Renton, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Sandison, A. [Dept. of Histopathology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore (United Kingdom); Cannon, S. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    A 30-year-old man with a 7-month history of mild sacral pain and intermittant left sciatica was found to have an expansile lesion in the sacrum on a plain radiograph. Biopsy confirmed a chondromyxoid fibroma which was removed surgically. A 1-year follow-up showed no recurrence. The case is the fifth to be reported. Plain film and MRI appearances, histology and treatment are described. The previously reported cases are reviewed and the current literature is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Lumbar spine joint synovial cysts of intraspinal development. CT scan imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, C.; Chevrot, A.; Benhamouda, M. and others

    CT scan imaging findings are described in 22 patients with lumbar spine joint synovial cysts, of intraspinal development, provoking sciatica or lumbosciatica from nerve compression in spinal canal. Diagnosis was suggested by a mass at the posterior joint level, of variable density, sometimes with peripheral calcification, presenting a vacuum appearance on occasions, and with enhanced image with contrast. Differential diagnosis is from excluded hernia and postoperative fibrosis. Posterior intra-articular arthrography can confirm diagnosis and allow treatment with prolonged action corticoid infiltrations.

  10. Lumbar spinal canal MRI diameter is smaller in herniated disc cauda equina syndrome patients

    OpenAIRE

    Korse, Nina S.; Kruit, Mark C.; Peul, Wilco C.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical features in cauda equina syndrome (CES) is unknown; nor is known whether there are differences in MRI spinal canal size between lumbar herniated disc patients with CES versus lumbar herniated discs patients without CES, operated for sciatica. The aims of this study are 1) evaluating the association of MRI features with clinical presentation and outcome of CES and 2) comparing lumbar spinal canal diameters of lumbar...

  11. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-05-07

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with herniated lumbar disc presenting with predominantly contralateral motor weakness radiculopathy, which resolved after discectomy.

  12. Is that lumbar disc symptomatic? Herniated lumbar disc associated with contralateral radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Jalil, Muhammad Fahmi; Lam, Miu Fei; Wang, Yi Yuen

    2014-01-01

    Herniated lumbar disc may be asymptomatic or associated with lower limb radiculopathy. Most spinal surgeons would offer surgery following a period of conservative measures if the radiological and clinical findings correlate. However, the existing dictum that lumbar radiculopathy should correlate with ipsilateral lumbar disc herniation may not be accurate as it can rarely present with contralateral sciatica. Literature regarding this phenomenon is scarce. Therefore, we report a patient with he...

  13. Acupuncture and postpartum pyogenic sacroiliitis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Millwala, Farida; Chen, Shuo; Tsaltskan, Vladislav; Simon, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pyogenic sacroiliitis, a rare form of septic arthritis, occurs in patients following trauma, intravenous drug use, genitourinary infections and pregnancy. Here we report a rare case where both acupuncture and pregnancy served as predisposing risk factors to the development of this infection. Case presentation A 33-year-old white woman received several sessions of acupuncture treatment during her gestation at the site of her sacroiliac joint for sciatica; she developed biopsy-conf...

  14. Preliminary results of a soft novel lumbar intervertebral prothesis (DIAM) in the degenerative spinal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariottini, A; Pieri, S; Giachi, S; Carangelo, B; Zalaffi, A; Muzii, F V; Palma, L

    2005-01-01

    The authors report a series of 43 patients suffering from lower limb pain, almost constantly associated with chronic or acute backpain, treated by microsurgical nerve root decompression and by implantation of a soft intervertebral prothesis (DIAM). Satisfying results were obtained in 97% of cases, inducing the authors to consider the device a reliable tool for curing low-back pain and sciatica. Selection criteria are exposed and discussed.

  15. Piriformis Syndrome in Fibromyalgia: Clinical Diagnosis and Successful Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Md Abu Bakar Siddiq; Moshiur Rahman Khasru; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis m...

  16. Diagnosis and surgical strategy for sacral meningeal cysts with check-valve mechanism: technical note

    OpenAIRE

    Asamoto, Shunji; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Nishiyama, Makoto; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Satoshi; Muto, Jun; Shiono, Yuta; Doi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Motoo; Ishii, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective There is agreement that symptomatic sacral meningeal cysts with a check-valve mechanism and/or large cysts representing space-occupying lesions should be treated surgically. This study investigated factors indicating a need for surgical intervention and surgical techniques for sacral meningeal cysts with a check-valve mechanism. Methods In ten patients presenting with sciatica and neurological deficits, myelography, computed tomography (CT) myelography, and magnetic resonance imagin...

  17. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koes Bart W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD. This treatment can be carried out in an outpatient setting and swift recovery and return to daily routine are suggested. Thus far, no randomized trial into cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus standard surgical procedure has been performed. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial, studying the cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus conventional open discectomy in patients with sciatica from lumbar disc herniation. Methods/design The study is a randomized prospective multi-center trial, in which two treatment strategies are compared in a parallel group design. Patients (age 18–70 years visiting the neurosurgery department of the participating hospitals, are considered for inclusion in the trial when sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation has lasted more than 8 weeks. Patients with disc herniation smaller than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, without concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eligible for participation, and are randomized into one of two treatment arms; either Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression or conventional discectomy. The functional outcome of the patient, as assessed by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica at 8 weeks and 1 year after treatment, is the primary outcome measure. The secondary outcome parameters are recovery as perceived by the patient, leg and back pain, incidence of re-intervention, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absence of work and secondary costs. Discussion Open discectomy is still considered to be the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Whether Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression has at least as

  18. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Kanthila Mahesha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy is the least invasive procedure for lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome, quality of life, neurologic function, and complications. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with lumbar disc prolapse who wer...

  19. Besonderheiten eines Bandscheibenvorfalles bei Spondylolisthese [ = Characteristics of an intervertebral disk herniation in spondylolisthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Grifka, Joachim; Möller, J.

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of intervertebral disc herniation associated with spondylolisthesis is not different from common procedures concerning indication for surgery and surgical technique as far as sciatica is not related to retrolisthetic soft tissue or the posterior edge of the vertebral body. In a case of a disc herniation L5/S1 and an olisthesis grade I with radicular pain L5 a microdiscectomy of the prolapse and parts of the retrolisthetic soft tissue was performed. An immediate reintervention was ne...

  20. Demographic Characteristics and Medical Service Use of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome Patients at an Integrated Treatment Hospital Focusing on Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Retrospective Review of Electronic Medical Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Seung Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report the patient demographics and nonsurgical complementary and alternative medicine treatment used at a Korean medicine hospital for low back pain (LBP and/or sciatica after surgery. Methods. Medical records of patients who visited a spine-specialized Korean medicine hospital at 2 separate sites for continuous or recurrent LBP or sciatica following back surgery were reviewed. The demographics, MRI and/or CT scans, and treatments were assessed. Results. Of the total 707 patients, 62% were male and the average age was 50.20 years. Ninety percent of patients presented with LBP and 67% with sciatica. Eighty-four percent were diagnosed with herniated nucleus pulposus at time of surgery. Of these patients, 70% had pain recurrence 6 months or later, but 19% experienced no relief or immediate aggravation of pain after surgery. Many patients selected traditional Korean medicine treatment as primary means of postsurgery care (47%. When time to pain recurrence was short or pain persisted after surgery, return of symptoms at the same disc level and side was frequent. Conclusion. An integrative treatment model focusing on Korean medicine and used in conjunction with radiological diagnostics and conventional medicine is currently used as a treatment option for patients with pain after lumbar spine surgery.

  1. A Clinical Observation on the Case of Cauda Equina Syndrome Using Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hwi-yong

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was investigated on the Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture of Caude equina syndrome which has been described as a complex of low back pain, bilateral sciatica, saddle anesthesia and motor weakness in the lower extremity that progress to paraplegia with baldder and bowel incontinence. Methods & Results : Clinical observation was done on Cauda equina syndrome in the Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion, Woosuk jeonju Oriental Medical Hospital frome May 30 to July 13. The patient was treated with Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture at Shinsu(B23, Gihaesu(B24, Taejangsu(B25, Gwanweonsu(b26, Dangryo(b31, Charyo(b32, Jang-gang(gv1 and Hoe-eum(cv1 with Oriental Medicine treatment. We evaluated SF-36, the bladder incontinence, bowel incontinence, sensibility by sting skin, before and after treatmeat. Conclusion : 1. At the early time, gait disturbance was treated well, but discomfort of bladder incontinence, bilateral sciatica, saddle anesthesia and motor weakness was remained. 2. The symptoms of Cauada equina syndrome, especially bladder incontinence and bilateral sciatica, was recurred in short duration by scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture and oriental medicine treatment.

  2. Herniated Nucleus Pulposus in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annisa Ikhsanawati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP is one of the most common diseases of the spine. For an optimal management and prevention, there’s a need for data on factors related to the onset of complaints because this disease lowers the quality of life and increases morbidity. This study is aimed to see the scale and pattern of the HNP in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung. Methods: This is a descriptive study with the design of case series, data was obtained from medical records of patients with the diagnosis of HNP in the inpatient care of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital in the period of 2007–2011. Results: According to the study on 79 patients, with 43 men and 36 women, the highest incidence was at the age group of 51–60 years old (31.6% and most common occupation was civil servant (11.4%. The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica (51.9% and low back pain (51.9%. Most frequent location was in the lumbar vertebrae at the level of L5–S1 (58.2%. Trauma was found to be the highest relatable history in the patients (39.2%. Therapy of choice was primarily conservative (58.2% and most patients went home after the progression (84.8%. The year 2007 showed the highest prevalence of HNP at 25.3%. The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica (51.9% and low back pain (51.9% Conclusions: The most common clinical symptoms were sciatica and low back pain. Most frequent location was in the lumbar vertebrae at the level L5–S1.

  3. Superior facet syndrome. Findings on metrizamide CT myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Yoshichika; Igarashi, Seishi; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1985-02-01

    Sciatica caused by root entrapment in the lateral recess was named superior facet syndrome by Epstein in 1972. Few reports on this subject based on large numbers of cases have been documented to date. Of the patients with sciatica, 32 patients were diagnosed to have root entrapment at the lateral recess L5 or/and S1 lumbar spine. Out of 32 patients, 20 patients were operated on and the lateral entrapment was recognized in all of surgical cases. Neuroradiological findings, especially of metrizamide CT (met. CT), were documented in detail. Thirty two patients were classified in three types according to radiological findings. They were congenital or developmental, degenerative, and combined type, respectively. Fourteen cases belonged to the congenital type, 13 to the degenerative and 5 to the combined type. Each group had the mean ages of 23.4, 53.8, and 36.8 years old, respectively. Of 32 cases the entrapment occured in 47 L5 roots and 11 S1 roots. There was no remarkable laterality. In operation the unroofing of the lateral recess were done and the sciatica subsided postoperatively in all of surgical cases. Met. CT revealed extreme medial protrusion of the superior articular joint in 18 of 24 cases(75%) and none filling of the root in the lateral recess in 21 of 24 cases (87.5%). In the degenerative type, met. CT showed some degenerative changes that were hypertrophy or deformity of the articular joints and spur formation of the vertebral body. In contrast to met. CT, metrizamide myelography revealed only slight changes, which were poor filling of the root before it turned out the pedicle of lateral compression of the root. In plain films or lumbar spine articular joints at Lsub(4/5) were formed in coronal plane in 69% of cases of the L5 root entrapment. Met. CT using ReView technique was of great diagnostic value in superior facet syndrome.

  4. A pilot study examining the effectiveness of physical therapy as an adjunct to selective nerve root block in the treatment of lumbar radicular pain from disk herniation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Anne; Fritz, Julie M; Brennan, Gerard P; Zaman, Faisel M; Willick, Stuart E

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic selective nerve root blocks (SNRBs) are a common intervention for patients with sciatica. Patients often are referred to physical therapy after SNRBs, although the effectiveness of this intervention sequence has not been investigated. This study was a preliminary investigation of the effectiveness of SNRBs, with or without subsequent physical therapy, in people with low back pain and sciatica. This investigation was a pilot randomized controlled clinical trial. The settings were spine specialty and physical therapy clinics. Forty-four participants (64% men; mean age=38.5 years, SD=11.6 years) with low back pain, with clinical and imaging findings consistent with lumbar disk herniation, and scheduled to receive SNRBs participated in the study. They were randomly assigned to receive either 4 weeks of physical therapy (SNRB+PT group) or no physical therapy (SNRB alone [SNRB group]) after the injections. All participants received at least 1 SNRB; 28 participants (64%) received multiple injections. Participants in the SNRB+PT group attended an average of 6.0 physical therapy sessions over an average of 23.9 days. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 8 weeks, and 6 months with the Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, a numeric pain rating scale, and the Global Rating of Change. Significant reductions in pain and disability occurred over time in both groups, with no differences between groups at either follow-up for any outcome. Nine participants (5 in the SNRB group and 4 in the SNRB+PT group) underwent surgery during the follow-up period. The limitations of this study were a relatively short-term follow-up period and a small sample size. A physical therapy intervention after SNRBs did not result in additional reductions in pain and disability or perceived improvements in participants with low back pain and sciatica.

  5. Dynamic Ultrasonography of the Deep External Rotator Musculature of the Hip: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Patrick J; Mattox, Ross; Haun, Daniel W; Welk, Aaron B; Kettner, Norman W

    2016-07-01

    No detailed reports exist describing the methodology of ultrasound image acquisition of the deep external rotator muscles of the hip. Because gluteal pain and sciatica are common, ultrasound may be a useful dynamic imaging adjunct in the evaluation of these patients. To describe dynamic ultrasonography of the deep external rotator muscles of the hip for diagnostic purposes. Descriptive. University radiology department. Participants (n = 25; 14 male) without gluteal pain or sciatica were enrolled (mean age 27.6 ± 4.7 years; mean body mass index 26.0 ± 4.1 kg/m(2)). Ultrasonographic cine clips oriented to the long axis of each deep external rotator muscle were captured. In addition, cine clips of the piriformis tendon and obturator internus tendon were obtained. Cine clips were analyzed approximately 1 week after completion of image acquisition independently by 2 blinded raters. A 5-point Likert scale to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the ultrasound image. The modal Likert scores for rater 1 were as follows: piriformis muscle = 4; piriformis tendon = 4; superior gemellus muscle = 3; obturator internus muscle = 4; obturator internus tendon = 4; inferior gemellus muscle = 4; quadratus femoris muscle = 4. The modal scores for rater 2 were: piriformis muscle = 4; piriformis tendon = 3; superior gemellus muscle = 4; obturator internus muscle = 3; obturator internus tendon = 4; inferior gemellus muscle = 3; quadratus femoris muscle = 4. Dynamic ultrasonography may be useful to image the hip deep external rotator musculature for diagnostic purposes and therefore aid in the evaluation of gluteal pain and sciatica. Future work should investigate the reliability and validity of ultrasonography in the evaluation of pathology of these muscles. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The efficacy of a risk factor-based cognitive behavioral intervention and electromyographic biofeedback in patients with acute sciatic pain. An attempt to prevent chronicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbring, M; Ulrich, H W; Hartmann, M; Soyka, D

    1999-12-01

    An investigation of the efficacy of an individually scheduled, risk factor-based cognitive behavioral therapy and a standardized electromyographic biofeedback intervention in the prevention of chronicity in patients with acute sciatica and psychosocial risk factors for chronicity. To investigate the possibility of enhancing pain relief and preventing chronicity in patients with acute sciatica, based on a screening for psychosocial high-risk factors of chronification. Psychological interventions were evaluated mainly in patients with chronic low back pain. Numerous randomized trials have demonstrated their efficacy, whereas the amount of pain relief was found to be marginal. Subjective and behavioral outcome parameters were compared with the respective parameters in age-, gender-, and diagnosis-matched high- and low-risk patients. No additional behavioral treatment for in-patient medical therapy was offered to the patients. Outcome of these patients also was compared with that of a group of refusers of behavioral therapy. Psychological, functional, and behavioral variables were measured before and after treatment and at 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month follow-up visits. Changes over time, group differences, and possible group x time interactions were analyzed by analysis of variance and nonparameteric comparisons. Data analysis showed a statistically and clinically significant, beneficial effect of both behavioral interventions. However, risk factor-based cognitive behavioral therapy was superior to electromyographic biofeedback intervention with respect to pain relief and application for early retirement. The cognitive behavioral therapy showed a similar good outcome (e.g., 90% showed a clinical significant pain reduction) as the low-risk patients (83% pain reduction). High risk patients and refusers of therapy showed a poor outcome in pain (33% and 20% pain reduction, respectively), disability, and work performance. Individually scheduled, risk factor-based cognitive

  7. Stretching of roots contributes to the pathophysiology of radiculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Darrieutort-Laffite, Christelle; Maugars, Yves

    2017-01-20

    To perform a synthesis of articles addressing the role of stretching on roots in the pathophysiology of radiculopathy. Review of relevant articles on this topic available in the PubMed database. An intraoperative microscopy study of patients with sciatica showed that in all patients the hernia was adherent to the dura mater of nerve roots. During the SLR (Lasègue's) test, the limitation of nerve root movement occurs by periradicular adhesive tissue, and temporary ischemic changes in the nerve root induced by the root stretching cause transient conduction disturbances. Spinal roots are more frail than peripheral nerves, and other mechanical stresses than root compression can also induce radiculopathy, especially if they also impair intraradicular blood flow, or the function of the arachnoid villi intimately related to radicular veins. For instance arachnoiditis, the lack of peridural fat around the thecal sac, and epidural fibrosis following surgery, can all promote sciatica, especially in patients whose sciatic trunks also stick to piriformis or internus obturator muscles. Indeed, stretching of roots is greatly increased by adherence at two levels. As excessive traction of nerve roots is not shown by imaging, many physicians have unlearned to think in terms of microscopic and physiologic changes, although nerve root compression in the lumbar MRI is lacking in more than 10% of patients with sciatica. It should be reminded that, while compression of a spinal nerve root implies stretching of this root, the reverse is not true: stretching of some roots can occur without any visible compression. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimising the image of the intradural nerve root: the value of MR radiculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, P.A.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1996-10-01

    We evaluated the additional value of MR radiculography for increasing the sensitivity and specificity of MRI with regard to nerve root compression in patients with sciatica. The single slices of a heavily T 2-weighted oblique coronal image set were reformatted with a maximum intensity projection protocol. This image resembles a classical contrast radiculogram and shows the intradural nerve root and its sleeve. In 43 patients studied with a standard MRI examination there was a need for further assessment of nerve root compression in 19 (44 %). In 13 (68 %) of these, MR radiculography made a definite verdict possible. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Use of radionuclide method in preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis of osteoid osteoma of the spine. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israeli, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Horoszowski, H.; Farine, I.

    1983-05-01

    A 24-year-old man with persistent low back pain and right sciatica, was found to have an osteoid osteoma of the right pedicle of the second lumbar vertebra. /sup 99m/Tc-MDP bone scan and CAT scan produced an early diagnosis of the lesion. Intraoperative /sup 99m/Tc-MDP in vitro combined with imaging and quantitative activity measurements were useful for accurate localization and complete removal. The method is simple and can be performed in every nuclear medicine department, with no need for special operating room facilities.

  10. Discography. Diskografi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lie, H.; Lilleaas, F. (Ullevaal Sykehus, Oslo (Norway))

    1990-10-01

    Discography means imaging of the intervertebral discs by intradiscal contrast injections. Discography with a combined CT/discography allows a more detailed classification of annular disruption and degeneration. Combined with a pain response registration, discography can be of value in the diagnosis of chronic low back pain with signs of sciatica in cases where other X-ray modalities have failed to explain the source of pain. Among 20 discography examinations there was a correleation between radicular symptoms and annular disruption with contrast leakage to the epidural space, and disc protrusion on CT scanning. 12 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine; Cistos sinoviais lombares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Machado, Marcio Martins [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas]. E-mail: anaclaudiaferreira@ig.com.br; Figueiredo, Marco Antonio Junqueira [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Tomografia Computadorizada; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2002-10-01

    Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroid injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods. (author)

  12. Chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine: MRI diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Barquero, A.; Pinto, J.I. [Univ. Hospital ' ' Marques de Valdecilla' ' , Santander (Spain). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Abascal, F.; Garcia-Valtuille, R.; Cerezal, L. [Hospital Mompia, Cantabria, (Spain). Dept. of Radiology; Figols, F.J. [Univ. Hospital Marques de Valdecilla, Santander (Spain). Dept. of Pathology

    2000-10-01

    An uncommon case of chronic nontraumatic spinal epidural hematoma of the lumbar spine in a 75-year-old woman is reported. The patient presented with a 7-month history of low back pain and bilateral sciatica. Magnetic resonance imaging enabled a correct preoperative diagnosis revealing a nodular, well-circumscribed epidural mass with peripheral enhancement and signal intensities consistent with chronic hematoma, which extended from L2 to L3. Laminectomy of L2-L3 was performed and the hematoma was totally resected. Histological examination of the surgical specimen demonstrated a chronic encapsulated hematoma. No evidence of vascular malformation was found. The patient recovered fully after surgical treatment. (orig.)

  13. Current imaging of spondylolytic spondylolisthesis; Imagerie actuelle du spondylolisthesis par lyse isthmique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wybier, M.; Champsaur, P.; Hamze, B. [Hopital Lariboisiere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-12-31

    Unilateral spondylolytic spondylolisthesis may cause lateral tilt of the overlying spinous processes towards the normal isthmus on PA views. Bilateral spondylolytic spondylolisthesis is generally located at the L5-S1 level. The vertebral shift is usually moderate. Instability at the level of spondylolisthesis may be demonstrated by stress lateral views but is uneasy to quantify. In case of sciatica associated to spondylolisthesis, foramen stenosis is probably the most frequent cause but foramen compression of the spinal ganglion is difficult to assess on imaging. (authors). 15 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Aggressive Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma With Asymptomatic Spinal Cord Compression Revealed By A “Curtain Sign”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Housset

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The author presents a case with an unusually aggressive evolution of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck. The patient presented with sciatica one year after initial diagnosis. She was otherwise asymptomatic. Complete work-up for bone involvement, included bone scan and MRI. The patient had asymptomatic thoracic (T5 vertebral metastasis revealed by a typical curtain sign on MRI. She benefited from radiotherapy and did not develop respiratory distress, paraplegia or pain but died of other metastases.

  15. Causes of lumbosacral plexopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planner, A.C.; Donaghy, M.; Moore, N.R

    2006-12-15

    The lumbosacral plexus represents the nerve supply to the lower back, pelvis and legs. This review will focus on diseases and disorders affecting the pathway as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). We stress the need to review the lumbosacral plexus in patients with non-specific symptoms such as back, hip, pelvic pain, and in those who present with sciatica unaccompanied by demonstrable intervertebral disc prolapse. We illustrate that the imaging appearances may be non-specific and re-inforce the importance of the clinical history and the use of tissue sampling to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

  16. A case of deep vein thrombosis with postthrombotic syndrome cured by homoeopathic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyandas G Wadhwani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old woman consulted for right-sided deep vein thrombosis in external iliac, common femoral, superficial femoral and popliteal veins with extension along with postthrombotic syndrome. After homoeopathic consultation, she was prescribed Argentum nitricum in ascending LM potencies. Symptomatic relief was reported within 2 weeks of treatment, and gradually the quality of life improved after simultaneous reduction in pain due to other complaints of sciatica and osteoarthrosis. Venous Doppler studies repeated a year later showed complete resolution of the medical condition with homoeopathic drug therapy alone. The physical examination also revealed a reduction in limb circumference.

  17. Paraganglioma of the Cauda Equina Presenting with Erectile and Sphincter Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Marcol

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Paragangliomas of the cauda equina are rare neuroepithelial tumors, usually manifesting clinically as sciatica. Here, we report a case of cauda equina paraganglioma with an unusual course in a 43-year-old man. His main complaints were erectile and sphincter dysfunction. The low back pain was initially ascribed to accidental injury. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed intradural tumor at the L2/L3 level. The patient underwent gross tumor resection, and the diagnosis of paraganglioma was based on neuropathologic examination. The symptoms completely resolved after tumor resection.

  18. Piriformis syndrome in fibromyalgia: clinical diagnosis and successful treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Khasru, Moshiur Rahman; Rasker, Johannes J

    2014-01-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome.

  19. [Clinical management of low back pain in primary health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, H

    1999-06-10

    Diagnostic differentiation seems crucial in the treatment of patients with low back pain. We must try to distinguish between pain originating from the moving segments or the soft tissue in the columna, and differentiate between radicular pain and referred pain to the leg. Principles of treatment for the acute and recurrent low back pain attacks are dealt with, as well as the treatment of patients with acute chronic sciatica and spinal stenosis. The special problems concerning treatment of degenerative disc disease and patients with back pain caused by psychosocial problems are further discussed.

  20. Piriformis Syndrome in Fibromyalgia: Clinical Diagnosis and Successful Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Bakar Siddiq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis syndrome is an underdiagnosed extraspinal association of sciatica. Patients usually complain of deep seated gluteal pain. In severe cases the clinical features of piriformis syndrome are primarily due to spasm of the piriformis muscle and irritation of the underlying sciatic nerve but this mysterious clinical scenario is also described in lumbar spinal canal stenosis, leg length discrepancy, piriformis myofascial pain syndrome, following vaginal delivery, and anomalous piriformis muscle or sciatic nerve. In this paper, we describe piriformis and fibromyalgia syndrome in a 30-year-old young lady, an often missed diagnosis. We also focus on management of the piriformis syndrome.

  1. Changes in Systolic Blood Pressure during Isometric Contractions of Different Size Muscle Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    gree in Physical Therapy at the May, 1 1979 graduation Thesisee hIi supervisor I M:embere;Am I - IN Copyrigh-l tzy J07 A. BUCK All !Piahts Peserved...Arthritis, gout , amoutation, sciatica, back pain or otrer disorder of the muscles, bones, or joints? I I- 4 102 Ř-DICA1- HISTOPY rOHRM(conttd.) 11...L.P.T., PhD. Joe A. Buck, L.P.T. I, --------------------------------- , hereby certify that I have bean told by L.R. Amundsen or of the physical therapy

  2. Radiology of posterior lumbar apophyseal ring fractures: Report of 13 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietemann, J.L.; Beaujeux, R.; Wackenheim, A.; Runge, M.; Bonneville, J.F.; Badoz, A.; Dosch, J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The authors report radiological findings in 13 cases of avulsion of the posterior lumbar apophyseal ring. The lesion affected young adults in 10 cases and adolescents in 3 cases. The lesion involved the inferior endplate of L4 in 11, and of L5 in 2 patients. 6 patients presented with unilateral sciatica, 3 with bilateral sciatica, and 4 with low back pain. Acute spinal trauma was evident only in 2 adolescents. Radiological recognition of the lesion was possible on plain films in 9 cases. CT demonstrates association of avulsion of the posterior vertebral apophyseal ring and herniated disc in all cases. Avulsion of the posterior apophyseal ring has to be differentiated from posterior longitudinal ligament, annulus, or herniated disc calcifications, as well as from posterior degenerative ridge osteophytes. Controversy about physiopathology of the lesion remains: Weakness of the apophyseal ring during childhood and in patients with Scheuermann's disease may explain avulsion of the apophyseal ring in association with median disc herniation.

  3. Persistent cauda equina syndrome after caudal epidural injection under severe spinal stenosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo YT

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Young Tak Seo,1 Hyun Ho Kong,1 Goo Joo Lee,1 Heui Je Bang1,2 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chungbuk National University Hospital, 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea Abstract: Caudal epidural injection (CEI is one of the most common treatments for low-back pain with sciatica. CEI rarely leads to neurologic complications. We report a case of persistent cauda equina syndrome after CEI. A 44-year-old male patient with severe L4 and L5 spinal stenosis underwent CEI for low-back pain and sciatica. The CEI solution consisted of bupivacaine, hyaluronidase, triamcinolone acetonide, and normal saline. He experienced motor weakness and sensory loss in both lower extremities and neurogenic bladder for more than 1 year after the procedure. His ankle dorsiflexors, big-toe extensors, and ankle plantar flexors on both sides were checked and categorized as motor-power Medical Research Council grade 0. His bilateral ankle-jerk reflection was absent. An electrophysiological study showed lumbosacral polyradiculopathy affecting both sides of the L5 and S1 nerve roots. A urodynamic study revealed hypoactive neurogenic bladder affecting both sacral roots. Keywords: epidural injection, cauda equina syndrome, complications

  4. Transient and chronic neurological complications of fast neutron radiation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, K.J.; Laramore, G.E.; Wiens, L.W.; Griffeth, J.T.; Koh, W.J.; Griffin, B.R.; Austin-Seymour, M.M.; Griffin, T.W. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA). Lab. of Radiation Ecology); Krieger, J.N. (Washington University, Seattle (USA). Department of Urology); Davis, L.W. (Albert Einstein Coll. of Medicine, Bronx, NY (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The records of 132 patients participating in clinical trials using fast neutron (n = 94), mixed neutron and photon (n = 16), or conventional photon (n = 22) irradiation for primary management of prostatic cancer were retrospectively reviewed to assess treatment-related neurological complications. With a median follow-up of 14 months (range 1 to 101 months), 31/132 patients (26 neutron, 3 mixed beam, 2 photon) have experienced either sciatica beginning during or shortly after treatment, or diminished bladder or bowel continence that developed at a median time of 6.5 months following treatment. Sciatica responded to oral steroids and was usually self-limited, whereas sphincter dysfunction appears to be permanent. Pre-treatment risk factors for complications included a history of hypertension, diabetes, cigarette smoking or peripheral vascular disease, with 81% of affected patients having one or more risk factors compared witn 55% of unaffected patients (p = 0.01). Seven patients have moderate (5) or severe (2) residual problems, all in the cohorts receiving neutrons (6/7) or mixed beam therapy (1/7). (author). 31 refs.; 5 tabs.

  5. Safety and efficacy of an add-on therapy with curcumin phytosome and piperine and/or lipoic acid in subjects with a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy treated with dexibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Roberto Settembre2 1Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milan, Italy; 2Neurosurgery Department, Di Venere Hospital, Bari, Italy Abstract: We conducted an 8-week, open, randomized controlled clinical trial on 141 subjects affected by neuropathic pain to investigate the role of an adjunctive therapy added to the administration of dexibuprofen (400 mg twice a day and based on a multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur, consisting of lipoic acid plus curcumin phytosome and piperine, in patients with a diagnosis of lumbar sciatica, lumbar disk herniation, and/or lumbar canal stenosis (96 subjects, or with carpal tunnel syndrome (45 subjects. A total of 135 participants completed the study. Treatment with the multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur reduced neuropathic pain by more than 66% in both conditions (subjects with lumbar sciatica and with carpal tunnel syndrome, and these reductions were statistically significant. Moreover, the treatment reduced dexibuprofen use by about 40%. An add-on therapy with only lipoic acid has not shown any significant results. On the basis of its safety and efficacy, Lipicur could be considered an effective complementary therapy to be added to conventional treatments to achieve better efficacy in reducing neuropathic pain. Keywords: curcumin, phytosome, piperine, dexibuprofen, neuropathic pain

  6. Detection of the symptomatic nerve root; A contrast-enhanced MR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masayasu (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1993-04-01

    Twenty-five patients with lumbar disc herniation with a chief complaint of unilateral leg pain underwent gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI, particularly to examine the nerve root in the distal area of hernia. MRI appearance fell into three grades: 0 - no visualization (n=7), 1 - heterogeneous visualization (n=7), and 2 - homogeneous visualization (n=10). In the quantitative evaluation of the severity of sciatica using SLR and JOA scores, it was found to be associated with the degree of visualization. All patients of grade 2 were required to receive surgery because pain relief was not attained in spite of 3 months or more conservative treatment. These findings indicatd the usefulness of MRI in predicting prognosis, as well as in diagnosing the responsible level. Since blood-nerve barrier damage and intraneural edema are considered to be involved in the visualization of the nerve root on MRI, MRI will help in diagnosing radicular sciatica and elucidating the pathophysiology of the disease. (N.K.).

  7. Value of functional myelography with both lateral bending anterior-posterior views in lumbar radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Joon; Park, Jong Yeon; Kim, Kun Il; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    There are considerable discrepancies between clinical symptoms and imaging diagnosis in the localization of the responsible rediculopathy. The purpose of this study are to analyze the dynamic alteration of contrast filling of the spinal nerve sleeves during positional changes and determine how the abnormalities of nerve sleeves on lateral bending A-P views correlate with sciatica. The criteria indicating the root abnormality in functional myelography were (1) bad filling of ipsolateral root to sciatica and (2) good filling of contralateral root compared with those in neutral A-P view. Of total 77 patients, 67 had radiculopathy and 10 had no radiculopathy. In 23 (34.3%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their clinical symptoms well correlated with conventional myelographic findings. However, in 35 (52.2%) of 67 patients with radiculopathy and 6 (60%) of 10 patients with no radiculopathy, their symptoms well correlated with functional myelographic findings. This study suggest that the functional myelography using both lateral bending A-P views can be used as a complementary tool in the evaluation of the radiculopathy.

  8. Three dimensional analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in individuals with acutely herniated lumbar intervertebral disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation affects a large number of patients annually and are the most common cause of sciatica. This study was aimed at measuring the spino-pelvic alignment and its relation to the functional limitations in subjects with acutely herniated lumbar disc. Sixteen patients with acute Lumbar Disc Herniation (LDH group) and 16 healthy matched volunteers (healthy group) represented the sample of the study. The patients were recently diagnosed as lumbar disc herniation (L4-5 or L5-S1) with acute sciatica and antalgic posture using magnetic resonance imaging. Spino-pelvic alignment was measured via Rasterstereography. Functional disability among patients was assessed using Oswestry Disability Index Arabic version. Trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic obliquity, pelvic torsion, lordotic and scoliotic angles were significantly different between groups (P ≤ 0.05). A non-significant difference in kyphotic angle was found between the patients and healthy controls. There was no association between the measured postural changes and functional disabilities in patients with lumbar disc herniation (P ≤ 0.05). There are significant postural changes in patients with acutely herniated lumbar disc which has no relation to functional disability. These results support the concept of staying active during acute stage.

  9. Arachnoiditis Following Caudal Epidural Injections for the Lumbo-Sacral Radicular Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Yallappa, Sachin; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    Caudal epidural steroid injection is a very common intervention in treatment of low back pain and sciatica symptoms. Although extensively used, it is not devoid of complications. A few reports of chemical and infective arachnoiditis exist following lumbar epidural anaesthesia, but none following a caudal epidural steroid injection.We report a case of arachnoiditis following caudal epidural steroid injections for lumbar radiculopathy. The patient presented with contralateral sciatica, worsening low back pain and urinary retention few days following the injection, followed by worsening motor functions in L4/L5/S1 myotomes with resultant dense foot drop. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested infective arachnoiditis with diffuse enhancement and clumping of the nerve roots within the lumbar and sacral thecal sac. As the number of injections in the management of back pain and lumbo-sacral radicular pain is increasing annually, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of this potentially dangerous complication and educate the patients appropriately. PMID:24353855

  10. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure.

  11. [In Process Citation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Eva

    2014-01-01

    A discrepancy of word choice can be noted in the account of Jacob's wrestling at the river Jabbok (Gen. 32, 23-33) if we compare the Hebrew version on one hand and the Greek and Latin versions on the other. The lesion that incurred Jacob a permanent limp and constitutes the dietary ban on the sciatic nerve is described as a luxation or strain (see symbol) of the hip joint (see symbol) in the Hebrew bible, whereas Septuagint, Vetus Latina and Vulgata use (see symbol) and emarceo or obstipesco as well as (see symbol) and latitudinem faemoris. They thus suggest hints of a painful sensory deficit felt on the outside of the thigh and a paralysis. In a synopsis of knowledge of sciatica in antiquity and modern knowledge on nerve root irritation and compression syndromes, it can be argued that the originators of the Septuagint and subsequent Greek and Latin translators and authors supported their translations with a diagnosis that we today would call an L5-syndrome with sciatica, sensory deficit, weak foot dorsiflexion and Trendelenburg gait.

  12. Localized venous plexi in the spine simulating prolapse of an intervertebral disc: a report of six cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Alan; Knight, Ian; Agarwal, Anand

    2003-01-01

    Six cases are reported in which the clinical presentation of a prolapsed intervertebral disc was found to be caused by a localized venous plexus. To emphasize the fact that the clinical presentation of a localized plexus of epidural veins in the lumbar spine can resemble that of an acute disc prolapse. The finding of enlarged epidural veins during lumbar disc decompression is relatively common, but it is only recently that they have been implicated as the cause of the presenting symptoms. Six individuals presented with severe pain in the lower back accompanied by sciatica, which had begun acutely. Physical examination in most of these patients showed the presence of neurologic signs in the affected leg. The initial clinical assessment was that of an acute prolapse of a lumbar disc. This diagnosis appeared to be borne out by the MRI scans, which demonstrated a "prolapsed disc" at the relevant level of the spine. However, at surgery, the intervertebral disc appeared to be relatively normal, but at the spine was found a large, localized plexus of epidural veins whose configuration matched the MRI image. The symptoms were relieved by decompression of the spine and ablation of the veins. Any pathologic process in the lumbar spine compressing a nerve root can cause localized pain in the back accompanied by sciatica. Most of these conditions can be differentiated by means of an MRI scan. The MRI image of a localized plexus of epidural veins, however, closely resembles that of a prolapsed intervertebral disc, which may be diagnostically misleading.

  13. Lumbar Interverterbral Disc Prolapse (PLID Surgery and Our Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mizanur Rahman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Back pain and sciatica are very common in adult persons. These cause a great loss of working hours with financial loss of individual and the nation. Very careful evaluation must be done to treat these patients. Injudicious treatment, whether medical or surgical, may aggravate the sufferings. Objective: To study immediate and long term effect of the prolapsed intervertebral disc surgery. Materials and Methods: This observational study was done in Enam Medical College & Hospital, Savar, Dhaka during January 2007 to June 2011. Sixty four patients operated during this period for prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc were included in the study. Fifty six (88% were male and 8 (12% were female. Age range was 30 to 50 years. Most of the patients presented with back pain and sciatica with no definite history of trauma or weight lifting. Diagnosis was confirmed by MRI. Results: Sixty (94% patients had no pain after surgery and only 4 patients had occasional pain. Conclusion: Maintenance of strict criteria for the surgery yields very good result.

  14. Anatomical etiology of “pseudo-sciatica” from superior cluneal nerve entrapment: a laboratory investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konno T

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomoyuki Konno,1 Yoichi Aota,2 Hiroshi Kuniya,1 Tomoyuki Saito,1 Ning Qu,3 Shogo Hayashi,3 Shinichi Kawata,3 Masahiro Itoh3 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Department of Spine & Spinal Cord Surgery, Yokohama Brain and Spine Center, Yokohama, 3Department of Anatomy, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan Objective: The superior cluneal nerve (SCN may become entrapped where it pierces the thoracolumbar fascia over the iliac crest; this can cause low back pain (LBP and referred pain radiating into the posterior thigh, calf, and occasionally the foot, producing the condition known as “pseudo-sciatica.” Because the SCN was thought to be a cutaneous branch of the lumbar dorsal rami, originating from the dorsal roots of L1–L3, previous anatomical studies failed to explain why SCN causes “pseudo-sciatica”. The purpose of the present anatomical study was to better elucidate the anatomy and improve the understanding of “pseudo-sciatica” from SCN entrapment. Materials and methods: SCN branches were dissected from their origin to termination in subcutaneous tissue in 16 cadavers (5 male and 11 female with a mean death age of 88 years (range 81–101 years. Special attention was paid to identify SCNs from their emergence from nerve roots and passage through the fascial attachment to the iliac crest. Results: Eighty-one SCN branches were identified originating from T12 to L5 nerve roots with 13 branches passing through the osteofibrous tunnel. These 13 branches originated from L3 (two sides, L4 (six sides, and L5 (five sides. Ten of the 13 branches showed macroscopic entrapment in the tunnel. Conclusion: The majority of SCNs at risk of nerve entrapment originated from the lower lumbar nerve. These anatomical results may explain why patients with SCN entrapment often evince leg pain or tingling that mimics sciatica. Keywords: superior cluneal nerve, entrapment neuropathy, dorsal rami

  15. Inversion therapy in patients with pure single level lumbar discogenic disease: a pilot randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K S Manjunath; Gregson, Barbara A; Hargreaves, Gerard; Byrnes, Tiernan; Winburn, Philip; Mendelow, A David

    2012-01-01

    Backache and sciatica due to protuberant disc disease is a major cause of lost working days and health expenditure. Surgery is a well-established option in the management flowchart. There is no strong evidence proving that traction for sciatica is effective. We report a pilot prospective randomized controlled trial comparing inversion traction and physiotherapy with standard physiotherapy alone in patients awaiting lumbar disc surgery. This study sought to study the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial on the effect of inversion therapy in patients with single level lumbar discogenic disease, who had been listed for surgery. This was a single centre prospective randomized controlled trial undertaken at the Regional Neurosciences Centre, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. It was a prospective randomized controlled trial where patients awaiting surgery for pure lumbar discogenic disease within the ambit of the prestated inclusion/exclusion criteria were allocated to either physiotherapy or physiotherapy and intermittent traction with an inversion device. Post-treatment assessment made by blinded observers at 6 weeks for various outcome measures included the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) Score, Short Form 36 (SF 36), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analogue Pain Score (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance and the need for surgery. Avoidance of surgery was considered a treatment success. Twenty-six patients were enrolled and 24 were randomized [13 to inversion + physiotherapy and 11 to physiotherapy alone (control)]. Surgery was avoided in 10 patients (76.9%) in the inversion group, whereas it was averted in only two patients (22.2%) in the control group. Cancellation of the proposed operation was a clinical decision based on the same criteria by which the patient was listed for surgery initially. There were no significant differences in the RMDQ, SF 36, ODI, VAS or MRI results between the two groups. Intermittent traction with an

  16. Design and study of deep laser acupuncture stimulator of modulation and multibeam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haitao; Wang, Qingguo; Xing, Qian; Li, Fangzheng; Cheng, Dongan

    2002-04-01

    The laser acupuncture stimulation has been applied extensively to replace the acupuncture needles. But the laser is transmitted to the acupoint through the skin, so the curative effect of the laser irradiation on an acupoint from cuticle is limited. We have developed the deep laser acupuncture stimulator of modulation and multibeam. The laser beam (such as He-Ne, LD, etc.) is turned into the modulated waveform. The modulated laser beam can simulate the customary acupuncture way such as twirling and rotating, etc. The laser beam is split into 3-8 beams by the means of optical shunt. After that they enter into laser acupuncture pins separately through the optical fiber joiners. The laser beam and pins can give simultaneously the stimulation in the depths of 3-8 acupoints. It has been proved by the clinical practice that the deep laser acupuncture has the notable efficiency for the apoplexy and sequelae of apoplexy, sciatica, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.

  17. Use of CT scanning for the study of posterior lumbar intervertebral articulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanus, N.; de Becker, D.; Baleriaux, D.; Hauzeur, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    CT scan is peculiarly effective in the study of architectural pathologies of the column; it appears that a number of etiological factors of low back pain are involved and they are often related. Indeed, dis herniation, for instance, is frequently associated with facetal asymmetry, the first signs of arthroses and ligamentous calcification after treatment. The three vertebral axes must be evaluated, one discal and two facetal, the slightest defect in one of which can affect the two others. Moreover, in view of the complexity of the innervation, the entire lumbar column from L1 to L5 S1 must be investigated: it is not uncommonly that low sciatica is caused by a more cranial lumbar pathology. This systematic study promotes better understanding of the etiology of low back pain and suggests a stet judicious therapeutic attitude.

  18. Minimally Invasive Microendoscopic Resection of the Transverse Process for Treatment of Low Back Pain with Bertolotti’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichiro Takata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bertolotti’s syndrome is characterized by anomalous enlargement of the transverse process of the most caudal lumbar segment, causing chronic and persistent low back pain or sciatica. We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with left sciatic pain and low back pain due to a recurrent lumbar disc herniation at L4-5 with Bertolotti’s syndrome. Selective L5 nerve root block and local injection of lidocaine into the articulation between the transverse process and sacral ala temporarily relieved the left sciatic pain and low back pain, respectively. To confirm the effect of local injection on low back pain, we gave a second local injection, which once again relieved the low back pain. Microendoscopic resection of the pseudoarticulation region and discectomy successfully relieved all symptoms. This report illustrates the effectiveness of minimally invasive resection of the transverse process for the treatment of low back pain with Bertolotti’s syndrome.

  19. Hypertrophic Synovitis of the Facet Joint Causing Root Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Iwatsuki M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritic changes in the facet joints are common in the presence of degenerative disc disease. Changes in the joint capsule accompany changes in the articular surfaces. Intraspinal synovial cysts that cause radicular pain, cauda equina syndrome, and myelopathy have been reported; however, there have been few reports in orthopedic or neurosurgical literature regarding hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint presenting as an incidental para-articular mass. Here, we report a case of hypertrophic synovitis causing root pain. We describe the case of a 65-year-old man suffering from right sciatica and right leg pain in the L5 nerve-root dermatome for 1 year; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed an enhanced mass around the L4–5 facet joint. We investigated this mass pathologically. After right medial facetectomy, the symptoms resolved. Pathological investigation revealed this mass was hypertrophic synovitis. Hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint might cause root pain.

  20. Huge Intracanal lumbar Disc Herniation: a Review of Four Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc herniation (LDH is the most common cause of sciatica and only in about 10% of the affected patients, surgical intervention is necessary. The side of the patient (the side of most prominent clinical complaints is usually consistent with the side of imaging (the side with most prominent disc herniation on imaging scans. In this case series, we presented our experience in four cases with huge intracanal LDH that a mismatch between the patient’s side and the imaging’s side was present. In these cases, for deciding to do the operation, the physicians need to rely more on clinical findings, but for deciding the side of discectomy, imaging characteristic (imaging side may be a more important criterion.

  1. Disc-like herniation in association with gas collection in the spinal canal: CT evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitouridis, Ioannis [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece)]. E-mail: hanjk@radcom.snu.ac.kr; Sayegh, Fares E. [3rd Orthopaedic Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece); Papapostolou, Panagiota [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Chondromatidou, Stella [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Goutsaridou, Fotini [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Emmanouilidou, Maria [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Sidiropoulou, Maria S. [Radiology Department, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Peripheral Rd., Nea Efkarpia, 546 29 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kapetanos, George A. [3rd Orthopaedic Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2005-10-01

    Gas production as a part of disk degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. Few cases have been reported in which lumbar intraspinal epidural gas cause nerve root compression symptoms. We present 12 cases of gas collection in the spinal canal that were presented to the orthopaedic out-patient department with symptoms of low back pain and sciatica. CT showed the presence of free epidural gas collections adjacent to or over the affected nerve roots. Relief of symptoms was noted with the change of positions, lying down or sleeping. In this study, we conclude that the presence of lumbar intraspinal epidural gas that causes radicular compressing phenomena, can be easily detected with the use of CT.

  2. LAZA K. LAZAREVIC, DOCTOR AND WRITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade R. Babić

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Laza K. Lazarevic was born on the 13th of May in 1851. He died on the 11th of January in 1891 in Belgrade. Laza K. Lazarevic was a Serb, jurist, warrior, doctor and writer. He studied medicine in Berlin and law in Belgrade. He took part in the Serbian-Turkish war and the Serbian-Bulgarian war. He published seventy-two professional and scientific papers on medicine. He gave some explanations on the appearance of pain in sciatica. He wrote nine short stories. He is an Associate Member of the Serbian Royal Academy. He spoke Russian, German and French. He was a personal doctor of King Milan.

  3. Tarlov cyst: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashad Bhagwat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of sacral perineural cyst presenting with complaints of low back pain with neurological claudication. The patient was treated by laminectomy and excision of the cyst. Tarlov cysts (sacral perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly in the sacral roots, arising between the covering layer of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The incidence of Tarlov cysts is 5% and most of them are asymptomatic, usually detected as incidental findings on MRI. Symptomatic Tarlov cysts are extremely rare, commonly presenting as sacral or lumbar pain syndromes, sciatica or rarely as cauda equina syndrome. Tarlov cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these complaints.

  4. Estudo clínico da eficácia do bloqueio anestésico radicular transforaminal no tratamento da radiculopatia lombar Estudio clínico de la eficacia del bloqueo anestésico radicular transforaminal en el tratamiento de la radiculopatía lumbar Clinical study on the efficacy of transforaminal radicular block in lumbar radiculopathy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Fonseca Rodrigues de Souza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a eficácia da injeção transforaminal nos pacientes com dor radicular devido à hérnia de disco ou estenose foraminal lombar por meio de estudo prospectivo randomizado. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 61 pacientes com quadro de radiculopatia nos membros inferiores. Esses pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos escolhidos aleatoriamente. Desses, 32 foram submetidos à injeção de corticosteroides e 29 foram submetidos à injeção salina. O período de acompanhamento foi de 12 meses. Para avaliar os resultados aplicamos a Escala Analógica Visual de Dor (EAV e o Índice Oswestry (ODI. RESULTADOS: Houve melhora significativa da intensidade de dor (p OBJETIVO: El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar la eficacia de la inyección transforaminal en pacientes con dolor radicular, debido a la hernia discal lumbar o estenosis foraminal, mediante un estudio prospectivo y aleatorizado. MÉTODOS: Se analizó un total de 61 pacientes con cuadro de radiculopatía en miembros inferiores. Estos pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos seleccionados al azar. De ellos, 31 fueron sometidos a inyecciones de corticoides y a 29 se les aplicaron inyecciones de suero fisiológico. El período de seguimiento fue de 12 meses. Para evaluar los resultados se les aplicó la Escala Visual Analógica del dolor (EAV y el Índice de Oswestry (ODI, sigla en inglés. RESULTADOS: Hubo una mejora significativa en la intensidad del dolor (p OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of corticosteroid injections in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation or lumbar foraminal stenosis by a prospective randomized study. METHODS: There were analyzed 61 patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc degeneration. These patients were divided into two groups randomly chosen to radicular blocks with saline solution or corticosteroids. Thirty-one of these patients were submitted to corticosteroids radicular block and 29 patients were submitted

  5. MR Imaging of Ventriculus Terminalis of The Conus Medullaris. A report of two operated patients and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullerud, Reidar; Server, A. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Div. of Radiology; Berg-Johnsen, J. [The National Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    2003-07-01

    We report on 2 patients in whom a cystic dilation of the conus medullaris was incidentally found at MR imaging carried out in the work-up for sciatica. The cysts were well circumscribed and had signal intensity identical to the CSF on both T1- and T2-weighted images. There was no evidence of contrast enhancement. None of the patients had specific symptoms related to the spinal cord. At surgery, no evidence of malignancy was seen in any of the patients. A benign cystic dilation, also called dilated ventriculus terminalis, occasionally can be seen in the conus medullaris as an incidental finding at thoracolumbar MR imaging. Unless the expansion per se indicates cyst drainage, these patients may be monitored by clinical and MR follow-up, avoiding surgery in a substantial number of cases.

  6. Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases.

  7. Surgical treatment and outcomes of lumbar radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggeman, Adam J; Decker, Robert C

    2011-02-01

    Lumbar disk herniation is a significant cause of lumbar radiculopathy and results in billions of dollars in health care expenditure. Herniated lumbar disks cause mechanical and chemical irritation of the nerve roots leading to complaints of sciatica. Surgeons have several surgical options when approaching herniated disks, including various microsurgical procedures. The 3 most prominent studies to date on surgical and nonsurgical management of herniated disks agree on the efficacy of surgery over medical management in the short term but have some discrepancies when looking at long-term results. Cauda equina syndrome is a variation of lumbar disk herniation in which patients experience a combination of saddle anesthesia, abnormal lower extremity reflexes, and neurogenic bowel or bladder symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Retained Intraspinal Bullet: A Rare Case in a Visitor to Malaysia - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Ariffin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Firearm injuries to the spine commonly present with acute neurology caused by direct penetration or indirectly from concussive effects of bullet impact on the vertebral column. We report a case of delayed neurologic presentation of retained intra-spinal bullet in a 42 year-old African who had chronic low back pain and sciatica with a past history of gunshot injury to the spine and radiograph revealed a bullet at the L4-5 disc level. Intra-operative exploration showed a fibrous mass around the bullet compressing on the L4 existing nerve root and L5 traversing nerve root. Removal of the retained bullet resulted in a good clinical outcome with complete resolution of symptoms.

  9. [Extragenital endometriosis leading to piriformis syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, A; Böhm, J; Pretzsch, M; von Salis-Soglio, G

    2006-04-01

    We report on a 44-year-old woman with a history of sciatica fluctuating with her menstrual cycle and going back over 10 years; ultimately it was present continuously and became disabling. Over the years the patient developed ipsilateral foot-drop, a sensory disorder in the lateral aspect of the lower limb and back of the foot, and atrophy of the gluteus muscle. MRI confirmed the suspicion of extragenital endometriosis, which had caused piriformis syndrome by compression with consequent damage to the sciatic and inferior gluteal nerves. After hormonal therapy had been tried without success, the endometrioma was excised to relieve the pressure on the nerves, and the diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically. The motor deficit remained up to the 15 months since surgery, but the patient is now free of pain.

  10. Possible generators of retrotrochanteric gluteal and thigh pain: the gemelli-obturator internus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, James M; Bakkum, Barclay W

    2005-09-01

    To investigate and correlate the anatomy of the gluteal region with the clinical findings of retrotrochanteric and posterior thigh pain, as seen in clinical chiropractic practice, and describe potential treatment options. A descriptive gross anatomic study is correlated to a case presentation of a patient with deep persistent aching pain in the retrotrochanteric region of the left hip and upper posterolateral thigh. The structures that are located in the same location as the retrotrochanteric pain described by the patient are the gemelli-obturator internus muscle complex and associated bursae. In patients with persistent gluteal and sciatica-like pain, especially when centered in the retrotrochanteric region, the gemelli-obturator internus muscle complex and associated bursae should be considered as a possible source of the pain.

  11. Disorders of the cauda equina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    Cauda equina syndrome is an important neurologic disorder characterized by lower back pain, sciatica, perineal numbness, and sphincter dysfunction. This article reviews the anatomy, clinical presentation, evaluation, and treatment of cauda equina dysfunction, focusing on diskogenic cauda equina syndrome. Assessment of suspected cauda equina syndrome is hampered by modest diagnostic accuracy of any one clinical feature. Although urgent operation for diskogenic cauda equina syndrome is standard practice, most data about timing of intervention comes from small case series; however, randomized trials are very unlikely given the ethical implications of delaying surgical intervention. In the absence of high-quality data indicating otherwise, urgent evaluation and intervention are required for diskogenic cauda equina syndrome. Other etiologies of cauda equina dysfunction including neoplastic, infectious, and iatrogenic causes must also be considered, especially in the setting of normal neuroimaging studies.

  12. Clinical and morphological study of calf enlargement following S-1 radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo J. M. Nascimento

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available Calf enlargement following sciatica is a rare condition. It is reported the case of a 28-year-old woman who complained of repeated episodes of lower back pain radiating into the left buttock and foot. One year after the beginning of her symptoms, she noticed enlargement of her left calf. X-ray studies disclosed L5-S1 disk degeneration. EMG showed muscle denervation with normal motor conduction velocity. Open biopsies of the gastrocnemius muscles were performed. The left gastrocnemius muscle showed hypertrophic type 2 fibers in comparison with the right gastrocnemius. Electron microscopy showed mildly increased number of mitochondria in these fibers. A satisfactory explanation for denervation hypertrophy has yet to be provided.

  13. Symptomatic Tarlov cyst: report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyabud, Pradit; Suwanpratheep, Kitti

    2006-07-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The cysts are relatively rare and most of them are asymptomatic. Some Tarlov cysts can exert pressure on nerve elements resulting in pain, radiculopathy and even multiple radiculopathy of cauda equina. There is no consensus on the appropriate therapeutic options of Tarlov cysts. The authors present a case of two sacral cysts diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. The initial symptoms were low back pain and sciatica and progressed to cauda equina syndrome. Surgical treatment was performed by sacral laminectomy and wide cyst fenestration. The neurological deficits were recovered and had not recurred after a follow-up period of nine months. The literature was reviewed and discussed. This is the first reported case in Thailand.

  14. Tarlov cyst: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashad, Bhagwat; Jain, Anil K; Dhammi, Ish K

    2007-10-01

    We describe a case of sacral perineural cyst presenting with complaints of low back pain with neurological claudication. The patient was treated by laminectomy and excision of the cyst. Tarlov cysts (sacral perineural cysts) are nerve root cysts found most commonly in the sacral roots, arising between the covering layer of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The incidence of Tarlov cysts is 5% and most of them are asymptomatic, usually detected as incidental findings on MRI. Symptomatic Tarlov cysts are extremely rare, commonly presenting as sacral or lumbar pain syndromes, sciatica or rarely as cauda equina syndrome. Tarlov cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these complaints.

  15. [Tophaceous gout of the lumbar spine in a patient without systemic gout or normouricaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Alejandro; Lorente, Rafael; Romero, Jorge

    Gout is a common metabolic disorder typically diagnosed in peripheral joints. Tophaceous deposits in the lumbar spine is a very rare condition with very few cases reported in the literature. We present a case of tophaceous gout that originated in the lumbar spine in a patient with normal uric acid blood levels. The following case report concerns a 52-year-old patient with low back pain, left sciatica and numbness in the left leg. Serum uric acid levels were within normal range. MRI and bone scan images suggested an inflammatory-infectious process focussed at L4. After an L4-L5 decompressive laminectomy, histological examination revealed tissue infiltrated with mature plasma cells with negatively birefringent crystals using polarised light consistent with urate deposits. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-standing, neglected sacroiliitis with remarked sacro-iliac degenerative changes as a result of Brucella spp. infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Lior; Deyev, Sergei; Palma, Lucio; Rozen, Nimrod

    2009-03-01

    Osteoarticular disease is universally the most common complication of brucellosis. Sacro-iliac joint (SIJ) is the most frequent osteoarticular location of involvement. Sacroiliitis (SI) usually is associated with acute form of the disease, thus frank SIJ destruction caused by brucellosis is rare. To report the case of a patient suffering from severe, prolonged lumbar pain with sciatica, refractory to medical treatment, in which the correct and misdiagnosed cause of her pain was a long-standing, neglected brucellar SI. Case report. Scintigraphy and imaging methods (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging). The result of the delayed diagnosis was a pronounced degeneration of the SIJ. Sacroiliitis as a result of infection with Brucella might cause severe joint degeneration if left untreated.

  17. The strategy and early clinical outcome of full-endoscopic L5/S1 discectomy through interlaminar approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-zhou; Hou, Shu-xun; Shang, Wei-lin; Song, Ke-ran; Zhao, Hong-liang

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the surgical strategy, safety and clinical outcome of full-endoscopic discectomy through interlaminar approach in the case of L5/S1 intervertebral disc excision. From April 2011 to December 2011, 72 cases of intracanalicular non-contained disc herniations at L5/S1 level were treated with full-endoscopic discectomy through interlaminar approach. L5/S1 disc herniation was divided into three types according to position of herniated disc related to S1 nerve root: axilla type, ventral type and shoulder type. Axilla approach was selected for axilla type while shoulder approach was selected for ventral type and shoulder type. After operation, MRI was reexamined to evaluate the resection completeness of prolapsed disc material. Visual analog scales (VAS) of low back pain and sciatica, and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were recorded in certain preoperative and postoperative time points. MacNab scores were evaluated at the 12-month follow-up. All operations were completed without conversion to other surgical techniques. Average operation time was 45 min (20-80 min). Only one reoccurrence was revised with microendoscopic discectomy. No nerve injury and infection were complicated. Postoperative ODI and VAS of low back pain and sciatica were significantly decreased in each time point (P approach and shoulder approach according to the sites of prolapsed or sequestered disc materials, full-endoscopic L5/S1 discectomy through interlaminar approach is a safe, rational and effective minimally invasive spine surgery technique with excellent clinical short-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Knowledge and utilization of Indian system of Medicine in the state of Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Janak Yadav

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: As no study was available about the usage of Indian system of Medicine and homoeopathy in North eastern states accordingly Indian Council of Medical Research entrusted this study to this Institute. Aims & Objective: To know the knowledge, attitude and practices of Indian system of Medicine and homoeopathy in Assam state. Material & Methods: To achieve these objectives, Fifty villages were selected from each selected district for Assam states. Twenty households with at least one member ill during the last three months and availed medical care services for treatment have been selected from each village. About 3,000 households were covered to know their perception about the ISM&H. From these households in all, 4800 sick persons (who fell sick in  last  three months  and  taken   any  treatment  were interviewed. Results:  More than three fourth of the household are being headed by male members.  About 40 percent of households reported to have visited traditional healers at the time of their illness. Bone setting (37%, Dog bite (23%, Jaundice (20%, Measles (16%, Sciatica (9% and Snake bite (5%. Jaundic, Sciatica, Measles and Migraine were the illnesses for which the patients also visited traditional healers. As a whole, ISM&H was preferred in Government setup by 65% in case of normal ailments but in case of serious ailments, assistance preferred for Government was about 25%. Allopathy system was more preferred in case of serious ailments as compared to Ayurveda in normal ailments which were about 45%.

  19. Changes in gray matter volume after microsurgical lumbar discectomy: A longitudinal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eLuchtmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available People around the world suffer chronic lower back pain. Because spine imaging often does not explain the degree of perceived pain reported by patients, the role of the processing of nociceptor signals in the brain as the basis of pain perception is gaining increased attention. Modern neuroimaging techniques (including functional and morphometric methods have produced results that suggest which brain areas may play a crucial role in the perception of acute and chronic pain. In this study, we examined twelve patients with chronic low back pain and sciatica, both resulting from lumbar disc herniation. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain was performed one day prior to and about four weeks after microsurgical lumbar discectomy. The subsequent MRI revealed an increase in gray matter volume in the basal ganglia but a decrease in volume in the hippocampus, which suggests the complexity of the network that involves movement, pain processing, and aspects of memory. Interestingly, volume changes in the hippocampus were significantly correlated to preoperative pain intensity but not to the duration of chronic pain. Mapping structural changes of the brain that result from lumbar disc herniation has the potential to enhance our understanding of the neuropathology of chronic low back pain and sciatica and therefore may help to optimize the decisions we make about conservative and surgical treatments in the future. The possibility of illuminating more of the details of central pain processing in lumbar disc herniation, as well as the accompanying personal and economic impact of pain relief worldwide, calls for future large-scale clinical studies.

  20. Association of Lumbar Arterial Stenosis with Low Back Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study Using Two-Dimensional Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkiakoski, A.; Niinimaeki, J.; Karppinen, J.; Korpelainen, R.; Haapea, M.; Natri, A.; Tervonen, O. (Inst. of Clinical Sciences, Dept. of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Recent studies indicate that diminished blood flow may cause low back symptoms and intervertebral disc degeneration. Purpose: To explore the association between lumbar arterial stenosis as detected by two-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (2D TOF-MRA) and lumbar pain symptoms in an occupational cohort of middle-aged Finnish males. Material and Methods: 228 male subjects aged 36 to 55 years (mean 47 years) were imaged with 2D TOF-MRA. Additionally, 20 randomly selected subjects were scanned with contrast-enhanced MRA (ceMRA). In each subject, the first (L1) to fourth (L4) segmental lumbar arteries were evaluated for lumbar artery stenosis using a dichotomic scale. One subject was excluded because of poor image quality, reducing the study population to 227 subjects. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between arterial stenosis in 2D TOF-MRA and low back pain and sciatica symptoms (intensity, duration, frequency). Results: Comparing 2D TOF-MRA and ceMRA images, the kappa value (95% confidence interval) was 0.52 (0.31-0.73). The intraobserver reliability kappa value for 2D TOF-MRA was 0.85 (0.77-0.92), and interobserver kappa was 0.57 (0.49-0.65). The sensitivity of 2D TOF-MRA in detecting stenosis was 0.58, the accuracy 0.89, and the specificity 0.94. In 97 (43%) subjects all arteries were normal, whereas 130 (57%) had at least one stenosed artery. The left L4 artery was most often affected. The degree of arterial stenosis was associated with intensity of low back and sciatic pain, and sciatica pain duration during the past 3 months. Conclusion: 2D TOF-MRA is an acceptable imaging method for arterial stenosis compared to ceMRA. Arterial stenosis was associated with subjective pain symptoms, indicating a role of decreased nutrition in spinal disorders

  1. Incidental Primary Intradural Carcinoid Tumor in a Patient with Lumbar Radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koustais, Stavros; O'Halloran, Philip J; Hassan, Alfrazdaq; Brett, Francesca; Young, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms derived from enterochromaffin cells. Central nervous system involvement is rare. The reported cases include metastases to brain or spinal cord, and primary skeletal or extradural disease resulting in compressive myeloradiculopathy. There are 2 previously reported cases of primary intradural extramedullary carcinoid tumor, presenting with compressive symptoms. We report the first case of primary incidental intradural extramedullary carcinoid tumor. A 68-year-old man was complaining of a 2-month history of left-sided back pain and sciatica; however, he presented with acutely worse symptoms of severe left sciatica. There was no sphincter dysfunction nor power deficit on examination. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the lumbar spine revealed an L4-5 central disk protrusion causing left L5 nerve root compression, and a heterogeneous enhancing intradural mass at the L2-3 level displacing the cauda equina. An L4-5 microdiscectomy followed by an L2-3 laminectomy and resection of the intradural mass was performed. There was a postoperative left S1 paresthesia that was managed medically; however, the postoperative period was unremarkable. A postoperative MRI of the lumbar spine showed complete resection of the mass. A staging scan revealed an incidental thyroid nodule; however, there was no other disease burden. Histopathology of the resected specimen revealed a primary spinal carcinoid tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of incidental primary intradural spinal carcinoid tumor. Even though intradural spinal carcinoid tumors are exceedingly rare, they should be included in the differential diagnosis of enhancing intradural lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early multimodal rehabilitation following lumbar disc surgery: a randomised clinical trial comparing the effects of two exercise programmes on clinical outcome and lumbar multifidus muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Fritz, Julie M; Thackeray, Anne; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Teyhen, Deydre

    2015-01-01

    The optimal components of postoperative exercise programmes following single-level lumbar discectomy have not been identified. Facilitating lumbar multifidus (LM) function after discectomy may improve postoperative recovery. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and muscle function outcomes of patients randomised to receive early multimodal rehabilitation following lumbar discectomy consisting of exercises targeting specific trunk muscles including the LM or general trunk exercises. We included participants aged 18 to 60 years who were scheduled to undergo single-level lumbar discectomy. After two postoperative weeks, participants were randomly assigned to receive an 8-week multimodal exercise programme including either general or specific trunk exercises. The primary outcome was pain-related disability (Oswestry Index). Secondary outcomes included low back and leg pain intensity (0-10 numeric pain rating scale), global change, sciatica frequency, sciatica bothersomeness and LM function measured with real-time ultrasound imaging. Treatment effects 10 weeks and 6 months after surgery were estimated with linear mixed models. 61 participants were randomised to receive a general trunk (n=32) or specific (n=29) exercise programme. There were no between-group differences in clinical or muscle function outcomes. Participants in both groups experienced improvements in most outcome measures. Following lumbar discectomy, multimodal rehabilitation programmes comprising specific or general trunk exercises have similar effects on clinical and muscle function outcomes. Local factors such as the individual patient characteristics identified by specific assessment findings, clinician expertise and patient preferences should direct therapy selection when considering the types of exercises tested in this trial for inclusion in rehabilitation programmes following lumbar disc surgery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  3. Trigger point-related sympathetic nerve activity in chronic sciatic leg pain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupska, Elżbieta; Rychlik, Michał; Pawelec, Wiktoria; Bednarek, Agata; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2014-10-01

    Sciatica has classically been associated with irritation of the sciatic nerve by the vertebral disc and consequent inflammation. Some authors suggest that active trigger points in the gluteus minimus muscle can refer pain in similar way to sciatica. Trigger point diagnosis is based on Travel and Simons criteria, but referred pain and twitch response are significant confirmatory signs of the diagnostic criteria. Although vasoconstriction in the area of a latent trigger point has been demonstrated, the vasomotor reaction of active trigger points has not been examined. We report the case of a 22-year-old Caucasian European man who presented with a 3-year history of chronic sciatic-type leg pain. In the third year of symptoms, coexistent myofascial pain syndrome was diagnosed. Acupuncture needle stimulation of active trigger points under infrared thermovisual camera showed a sudden short-term vasodilatation (an autonomic phenomenon) in the area of referred pain. The vasodilatation spread from 0.2 to 171.9 cm(2) and then gradually decreased. After needling, increases in average and maximum skin temperature were seen as follows: for the thigh, changes were +2.6°C (average) and +3.6°C (maximum); for the calf, changes were +0.9°C (average) and +1.4°C (maximum). It is not yet known whether the vasodilatation observed was evoked exclusively by dry needling of active trigger points. The complex condition of the patient suggests that other variables might have influenced the infrared thermovision camera results. We suggest that it is important to check if vasodilatation in the area of referred pain occurs in all patients with active trigger points. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Management of low back pain in general practice – is it of acceptable quality: an observational study among 25 general practices in South Tyrol (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several guidelines dealing with the management of low back pain (LBP), but only few studies on the quality of care provided within General Practices as judged against those guidelines. The objective of this study is to analyse the management of LBP in Italian General Practice and compare it with guideline recommendations. Methods In this observational study, all patients visiting their General Practitioners (GPs) for treatment of LBP within a 8-week period were monitored for at least four weeks with regard to symptoms and diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Management of LBP was judged by pre-defined quality indicators based on guideline recommendations. Results Twenty-five of 114 eligible GPs participated in the study, representing a total of 43,012 registered patients. Of the 475 patients complaining of LBP and monitored for four weeks, 55.8% were diagnosed as having acute lumbar pain, 13.5% chronic lumbar pain, 17.1% acute sciatica, and 12.6% chronic sciatica; 76.0% underwent no technical investigations, 21.7% underwent x-rays, 5.5% MRI and 4% CT scans; 20.4% were referred to secondary care; 93.3% of all patients received some medication. In those receiving a medication, in 88.3% it was an NSAID, in 6.3% Paracetamol, in 10.4% Paracetamol combined with Codeine, and in 9% a muscle relaxants. When physiotherapy was prescribed (17,1%), it was mostly massage. Hardly more than 50% of GPs (partially) followed locally established guidelines, while the remainder seemed not to follow guidelines at all. Conclusions Our study reveals gross deviations of GP management of LBP from current guidelines and points to two different types of deviators: those who partially follow guidelines, and those who do not follow them at all. Further research should evaluate whether these two types of deviation are best addressed by different foci of education, i.e. on knowledge versus attitudes, respectively. PMID:24090155

  5. Management of low back pain in general practice - is it of acceptable quality: an observational study among 25 general practices in South Tyrol (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoliori, Giuliano; Engl, Adolf; Gatterer, Doris; Sessa, Emiliano; in der Schmitten, Jürgen; Abholz, Heinz-Harald

    2013-10-04

    There are several guidelines dealing with the management of low back pain (LBP), but only few studies on the quality of care provided within General Practices as judged against those guidelines.The objective of this study is to analyse the management of LBP in Italian General Practice and compare it with guideline recommendations. In this observational study, all patients visiting their General Practitioners (GPs) for treatment of LBP within a 8-week period were monitored for at least four weeks with regard to symptoms and diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Management of LBP was judged by pre-defined quality indicators based on guideline recommendations. Twenty-five of 114 eligible GPs participated in the study, representing a total of 43,012 registered patients. Of the 475 patients complaining of LBP and monitored for four weeks, 55.8% were diagnosed as having acute lumbar pain, 13.5% chronic lumbar pain, 17.1% acute sciatica, and 12.6% chronic sciatica; 76.0% underwent no technical investigations, 21.7% underwent x-rays, 5.5% MRI and 4% CT scans; 20.4% were referred to secondary care; 93.3% of all patients received some medication. In those receiving a medication, in 88.3% it was an NSAID, in 6.3% Paracetamol, in 10.4% Paracetamol combined with Codeine, and in 9% a muscle relaxants. When physiotherapy was prescribed (17,1%), it was mostly massage. Hardly more than 50% of GPs (partially) followed locally established guidelines, while the remainder seemed not to follow guidelines at all. Our study reveals gross deviations of GP management of LBP from current guidelines and points to two different types of deviators: those who partially follow guidelines, and those who do not follow them at all. Further research should evaluate whether these two types of deviation are best addressed by different foci of education, i.e. on knowledge versus attitudes, respectively.

  6. NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN LUMBAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Leinonen

    2004-03-01

    to sense a rotational movement in the lumbar area and thus had clearly impaired lumbar movement perception (p = 0.006. Abnormal MEPs had only inconsistent and SEPs showed no associations with impaired movement perception and postural stability in LSS. Abnormal needle EMG findings and flexion-extension activation of paraspinal muscles were frequently observed in LSS patients. Lumbar paraspinal muscle endurance was better than in previously evaluated healthy subjects and chronic LBP patients (p < 0.001. The results demonstrated clearly impaired lumbar sensory and motor function in sciatica and LSS patients. The pure reflex activation of paraspinal muscles was not affected in sciatica but a difference was found in the premotoneuronal response control. The impaired proprioceptive functions and premotoneuronal response control seem to recover at least partially but the maintenance of postural stability is a complex activity which does not seem to recover automatically in operated sciatica patients at least in three months follow-up. Paraspinal muscle denervation and dysfunction were clearly detectable in LSS but lumbar paraspinal muscle endurance was unexpectedly good.

  7. A clinical genetic method to identify mechanisms by which pain causes depression and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao Maryland

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain patients are often depressed and anxious, and benefit less from psychotropic drugs than pain-free patients. We hypothesize that this partial resistance is due to the unique neurochemical contribution to mood by afferent pain projections through the spino-parabrachial-hypothalamic-amygdalar systems and their projections to other mood-mediating systems. New psychotropic drugs for pain patients might target molecules in such brain systems. We propose a method to prioritize molecular targets by studying polymorphic genes in cohorts of patients undergoing surgical procedures associated with a variable pain relief response. We seek molecules that show a significant statistical interaction between (1 the amount of surgical pain relief, and (2 the alleles of the gene, on depression and anxiety during the first postoperative year. Results We collected DNA from 280 patients with sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation, 162 treated surgically and 118 non-surgically, who had been followed for 10 years in the Maine Lumbar Spine Study, a large, prospective, observational study. In patients whose pain was reduced >25% by surgery, symptoms of depression and anxiety, assessed with the SF-36 Mental Health Scale, improved briskly at the first postoperative measurement. In patients with little or no surgical pain reduction, mood scores stayed about the same on average. There was large inter-individual variability at each level of residual pain. Polymorphisms in three pre-specified pain-mood candidate genes, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT, serotonin transporter, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF were not associated with late postoperative mood or with a pain-gene interaction on mood. Although the sample size did not provide enough power to persuasively search through a larger number of genes, an exploratory survey of 25 other genes provides illustrations of pain-gene interactions on postoperative mood – the mu opioid

  8. A CLINICAL STUDY OF OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilkumar S. D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Amongst painful diseases, sciatica occupies a foremost place by reason of its prevalence, its production by a great variety of conditions, the great disablement it may produce and its tending to relapse all of which have led to its recognition as one of the great scourges of humanity. Intervertebral disc prolapse is the important and common cause of low back pain and sciatica. Here, the subject of laminectomy and discectomy in the treatment of proven intervertebral disc prolapse in the lower lumbar region is reviewed and its results examined. AIM OF STUDY This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the following objectives. PRIMARY Analysis of clinical parameters and per operative findings of lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse. SECONDARY Analysis of clinical parameters and surgical outcome in lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse with respect to improvement in pain and neurological status. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was undertaken in 22 patients who attended the Orthopaedic Department of Mount Zion Medical College, Adoor, between August 2014 to July 2015. All of them were suffering from a prolapsed lumbar vertebral disc as shown by clinical examination and investigations. Lumbar laminectomy and discectomy constituted the operative procedure for all of them. RESULTS In acute onset cases and cases with short duration, results were good. By six months, 80% of patients recorded of good pain relief, 80% of patients returned to work within six 6 months, 60% of patients showed good neurological recovery by 6 months. Laminectomy and discectomy in proven cases of lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse is a rewarding procedure. LT definitely relieved pain in all cases and improved morbidity and neurological deficits in most of the cases. CONCLUSION 1. Laminectomy and discectomy is an effective method of treatment in herniation of lumbar intervertebral disc. 2. The procedure is ideally done in those with the disc prolapse proved with the

  9. Fasinumab (REGN475, an antinerve growth factor monoclonal antibody, for the treatment of acute sciatic pain: results of a proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiseo PJ

    2014-08-01

    .9%, and 64.8% in the placebo, fasinumab 0.1mg/kg, and fasinumab 0.3 mg/kg groups, respectively. The most commonly reported TEAEs included paresthesia, arthralgia, pain in extremity, and headache. Conclusion: Administration of fasinumab provided no significant clinical benefit compared with placebo for the pain or functional limitations associated with acute sciatica. Fasinumab was generally well tolerated and incidence of TEAEs appeared to be dose related. Keywords: fasinumab, monoclonal antibody, nerve growth factor, sciatica, lumbar radiculopathy

  10. Do motor control genes contribute to interindividual variability in decreased movement in patients with pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Bikash K

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because excessive reduction in activities after back injury may impair recovery, it is important to understand and address the factors contributing to the variability in motor responses to pain. The current dominant theory is the "fear-avoidance model", in which the some patients' heightened fears of further injury cause them to avoid movement. We propose that in addition to psychological factors, neurochemical variants in the circuits controlling movement and their modification by pain may contribute to this variability. A systematic search of the motor research literature and genetic databases yielded a prioritized list of polymorphic motor control candidate genes. We demonstrate an analytic method that we applied to 14 of these genes in 290 patients with acute sciatica, whose reduction in movement was estimated by items from the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Results We genotyped a total of 121 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 14 of these genes, which code for the dopamine D2 receptor, GTP cyclohydrolase I, glycine receptor α1 subunit, GABA-A receptor α2 subunit, GABA-A receptor β1 subunit, α-adrenergic 1C, 2A, and 2C receptors, serotonin 1A and 2A receptors, cannabinoid CB-1 receptor, M1 muscarinic receptor, and the tyrosine hydroxylase, and tachykinin precursor-1 molecules. No SNP showed a significant association with the movement score after a Bonferroni correction for the 14 genes tested. Haplotype analysis of one of the blocks in the GABA-A receptor β1 subunit showed that a haplotype of 11% frequency was associated with less limitation of movement at a nominal significance level value (p = 0.0025 almost strong enough to correct for testing 22 haplotype blocks. Conclusion If confirmed, the current results may suggest that a common haplotype in the GABA-A β1 subunit acts like an "endogenous muscle relaxant" in an individual with subacute sciatica. Similar methods might be applied a larger set of

  11. Paget sarcoma of the spine: Scottish Bone Tumor Registry experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Himanshu; Mehdi, S A; MacDuff, E; Reece, A T; Jane, M J; Reid, R

    2006-05-20

    Retrospective case study of 13 cases of Paget sarcoma of the spine accrued from a prospectively collected Tumor Registry database. To analyze the clinical, radiologic, and histologic features of Paget sarcoma of the spine and to determine the factors influencing the prognosis. Paget disease of bone is a common disorder with the spine being involved in over 50% of patients. However, sarcomatous degeneration in the vertebral column is an extremely rare complication. There is very little in the literature with regard to clinical presentation and prognosis of patients with Paget sarcoma affecting the vertebral column. Between January 1944 and December 2003, 89 patients were registered with a diagnosis of Paget sarcoma in the Scottish Bone Tumor Registry. Thirteen patients with Paget sarcoma of the spine were analyzed with regard to their clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic features along with the prognostic predictors. The mean age was 66.9 years (range: 56-79 years). There were 10 males and three females. There were seven cases involving the sacral spine (63.6%), three cases involving lumbar vertebrae, two affecting the dorsal spine, and one with diffuse dorsolumbar involvement (D11-L3). The mode of presentation was progressively increasing low back pain (in all 13), unilateral sciatica (six; left-sided, five; right-sided, one), bilateral sciatica (two), lower limb weakness (eight), and autonomic dysfunction (four). Ten of 13 cases (76.9%) were osteosarcoma. The rest were chondrosarcoma (n = 1), fibrosarcoma (n = 1), and malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n = 1). Decompression laminectomy was performed in three patients with progressive neurologic deficit. Eight patients had received radiotherapy. The mean survival was 4.22 months. This series confirmed that Paget sarcoma of the spine has a very poor prognosis. We found a constellation of symptomatology in patients with sarcomatous Paget spine resulting from radiculomedullary compression, primarily lumbosacral

  12. Efficacy of Agnikarma over the padakanistakam (little toe) and Katibasti in Gridhrasi: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Yogitha; Vijayasarathi, R; Ebnezar, John; Venkatesh, BA

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Gridhrasi (Sciatica) is one of the Vatavyadhi which is caused by aggravated Vata dosha. This disease is characterized by ruja (pain) in the waist, back, thigh, knee and calf regions along the course of sciatic nerve. In spite of the different types of treatment modalities mentioned in ancient and modern medical sciences, they have some or the other shortcomings and drawbacks. Considering all these, the present study was taken up with the objective of evaluating the efficacy of Agnikarma (treatment done with cauterization) over the padakanistakam (little toe) in the management of Gridhrasi. To consider the significance of the method of Agnikarma, the efficacy of Katibasti in the management of Gridhrasi which has been established in the previous work was also studied. Materials and Methods: The study was performed after obtaining Ethics Committee approval and patients′ written informed consent. Forty cases presenting with classical features of Gridhrasi (Sciatica) due to lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse were selected. The management of Gridhrasi by Agnikarma and Katibasti was conducted by including the patients in two groups, namely Group A (study group) and Group B (control group). The data were collected and the observations were made before the treatment, on 8th day, 15th day and on 22nd day of the treatment. The data obtained from the results were subjected for statistical analysis and conclusions were drawn. Results: There was a significant reduction in the parameters, pain (P < 0.01) and straight-leg raising (SLR) test (P < 0.01), of the study group compared to the control group (P < 0.01). Pain was assessed through Numerical Pain Analogue Scale. After the treatment with Agnikarma, the pain was totally relieved in 80% of cases. It was reduced to moderate degree in 20% of cases and in 95% of cases, SLR test became negative. After the treatment with Katibasti, the pain was totally relieved in 50% of cases. It was reduced to

  13. Biomechanical aspects of nonspecific back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Harrianto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is a common problem in adult life, since despite its benign nature it is commonly associated with incapacity, productivity loss due to sick leave, and correspondingly high costs to the individual worker. Psychosocial and lifestyle factors and work-place exposures have been implicated in the onset of symptoms. Heavy physical work, static work postures, frequent bending and twisting, lifting and postural movements, repetitive work, and whole body vibrations are occupational factors associated with LBP. The usual classification of LBP is related to the duration of the complaints (acute, subacute, and chronic. However, these terms fail to take into account several clinically important aspects of the course of LBP, which is frequently recurrent and thus neither acute nor chronic. More realistically, LBP should be classified as specific and nonspecific. Approximately 90% of LBP cases have no identifiable cause and is designated nonspecific LBP. However, despite its high prevalence, the etiology and nature of nonspecific LBP are not yet well understood. Its pathophysiology remains complex and multifaceted. Multiple anatomic structures and elements of the lumbar spine (e.g. bones, ligaments, tendons, discs, and muscles are all suspected of playing a role. Many of these components of the lumbar spine have sensory innervations that can generate nociceptive signals in response to tissue-damaging stimuli. Other causes could be neuropathic (e.g. sciatica. Some cases of LBP most likely involve mixed nociceptive and neuropathic etiologies.

  14. POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION AND INSTRUMENTED POSTEROLATERAL FUSION IN ADULT SPONDYLOLISTHESIS: ASSESSMENT AND CLINICAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to assess and compare the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and posterolateral fusion (PLF in adult isthmic spondylosthesis. BACKGROUND: Posterolateral fusion has been considered the best method and widely been used for surgical treatment of adult spondylolisthesis.Superior results have subsequently been reported with interbody fusion with cages and posterior instrumentation MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty six patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis were operated. One group (20 patients had decompression and posterolateral fusion (PLF with a pedicle screw system; other group (16 patients was treated by decompression, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and a Pedicle screw system. In both groups adequate decompression was done RESULTS: Seventy seven percent of the patients had a good result with (PLIF and 68 percent with posterolateral fusion (PLF. However there was no statistical difference in cases with low grade slipping, whereas the difference was significant for cases with high grade slipping. Fusion rate was 93% with (PLIF and 68% with (PLF, but without any significant incidence in the functional outcome. 78% has relief of sciatica and neurogenic claudication. CONCLUSION: Based on these findings we found that for high grade spondylolisthesis which requires reduction or if the disc space is still high posterior lumbar inter body fusion is preferable. For low grade spondylolisthesis or if the disc space is narrow posterolateral fusion is preferable. A successful result of fusion operation depends on adequate decompression which relieves radicular symptoms.

  15. Anatomical, Clinical and Electrical Observations in Piriformis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assoum Hani A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provided clinical and electrical descriptions of the piriformis syndrome, contributing to better understanding of the pathogenesis and further diagnostic criteria. Methods Between 3550 patients complaining of sciatica, we concluded 26 cases of piriformis syndrome, 15 females, 11 males, mean age 35.37 year-old. We operated 9 patients, 2 to 19 years after the onset of symptoms, 5 had piriformis steroids injection. A dorsolumbar MRI were performed in all cases and a pelvic MRI in 7 patients. The electro-diagnostic test was performed in 13 cases, between them the H reflex of the peroneal nerve was tested 7 times. Results After a followup 1 to 11 years, for the 17 non operated patients, 3 patients responded to conservative treatment. 6 of the operated had an excellent result, 2 residual minor pain and one failed. 3 new anatomical observations were described with atypical compression of the sciatic nerve by the piriformis muscle. Conclusion While the H reflex test of the tibial nerve did not give common satisfaction in the literature for diagnosis, the H reflex of the peroneal nerve should be given more importance, because it demonstrated in our study more specific sign, with six clinical criteria it contributed to improve the method of diagnosis. The cause of this particular syndrome does not only depend on the relation sciatic nerve-piriformis muscle, but the environmental conditions should be considered with the series of the anatomical anomalies to explain the real cause of this pain.

  16. Dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal: variations and correlations with somatometric parameters using CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanas, A.H. [Department of CT-MRI, Larissa General Hospital (Greece); Zibis, A.H.; Papaliaga, M.; Georgiou, E.; Rousogiannis, S. [Larissa Medical School, University of Thessaly, Larissa (Greece)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of vertebral dimensions with somatometric parameters in patients without clinical symptoms and radiological signs of central lumbar spinal stenosis. One hundred patients presenting with low back pain or sciatica were studied with CT. In each of the L3, L4 and L5 vertebra three slices were taken with the following measurements: 1. Slice through the intervertebral disc: (a) spinal canal area; (b) interarticular diameter; (c) interligamentous diameter. 2. Slice below the vertebral arcus: (a) dural sac area; (b) vertebral body area. 3. Pediculolaminar level: (a) anteroposterior diameter and interpedicular diameter of the spinal canal; (b) spinal canal area; (c) width of the lateral recesses. The Jones-Thomson index was also estimated. The results of the present study showed that there is a statistically significant correlation of height, weight and age with various vertebral indices. The conventional, widely accepted, anteroposterior diameter of 11.5 mm of the lumbar spinal canal is independent of somatometric parameters, and it is the only constant measurement for the estimation of lumbar spinal stenosis with a single value. The present study suggests that there are variations of the dimensions of the lumbar spinal canal and correlations with height, weight and age of the patient. (orig.) With 1 fig., 6 tabs., 24 refs.

  17. Radium: a miracle cure{exclamation_point} (invited paper)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genet, M

    1998-07-01

    In 1896, the general population had little enthusiasm for the recent discovery of radioactivity by Henri Becquerel. There was certainly much less than for X rays which had appeared, 3 months earlier, as a 'magic radiation'. However, polonium and radium, discovered by the Curies in 1898, aroused new interest in 'uranic rays'. The first weighable amounts of radium, prepared at the beginning of this century, were used for medical applications. Immediately, the therapeutic properties of radium rays against cancer were recognised. The use of radium in medicine became so common that every kind of disease was treated by radium therapy: not only breast cancer, but also, diabetes, sciatica, uraemia, rheumatism, and even impotence{exclamation_point} As a consequence of this tremendous success, the radium industry grew rapidly during the 1920s and numerous goods, especially cosmetics, doped with radium were on sale. It was even considered that in order to be in good health, one should drink a glass of radioactive water every day, prepared by using a radium percolator. This period lasted for more than 25 years, then, just before World War II radium use was considered dangerous and the number of its applications decreased. (author)

  18. Differences in perfusion parameters between upper and lower lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savvopoulou, Vasiliki; Vlahos, Lampros; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela [University of Athens, Areteion Hospital, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Maris, Thomas G. [University of Crete, Deparment of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion (Greece)

    2008-09-15

    To investigate the influence of age, sex and spinal level on perfusion parameters of normal lumbar bone marrow with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE MRI). Sixty-seven subjects referred for evaluation of low back pain or sciatica underwent DCE MRI of the lumbar spine. After subtraction of dynamic images, a region of interest (ROI) was placed on each lumbar vertebral body of all subjects, and time intensity curves were generated. Consequently, perfusion parameters were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to search for perfusion differences among lumbar vertebrae and in relation to age and sex. Upper (L1, L2) and lower (L3, L4, L5) vertebrae showed significant differences in perfusion parameters (p<0.05). Vertebrae of subjects younger than 50 years showed significantly higher perfusion compared to vertebrae of older ones (p<0.05). Vertebrae of females demonstrated significantly increased perfusion compared to those of males of corresponding age (p<0.05). All perfusion parameters, except for washout (WOUT), showed a mild linear correlation with age. Time to maximum slope (TMSP) and time to peak (TTPK) showed the same correlation with sex (0.22

  19. Analysis of discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in 60 patients with herniated nucleus pulposus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Busan(Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    The herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is a major cause of low back pain and sciatica. High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a HNP, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. But the discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings is often confusing. From May 1983 to August 1986, sixty patients with HNP who had both CT and surgical intervention at Pusan National University Hospital were analyzed. The feasibility of the neurologic examination on HNP and the effect of HNP on nerve root were evaluated on the basis of CT findings. The results were as follows : 1. Thirty-four cases (56.7%) of clinical impression were matched to CT findings in determining level of HNP and affected nerve root. 2. In evaluation of affected level, there was high trend to cause discrepancy between neurologic findings and CT findings in multiple disc involvement than in single involvement. 3. There was no correlation between degree of nerve root compression determined by CT and pattern of neurologic signs (motor weakness, sensory deficit, and reflex change)

  20. Radiographic anatomy of the distal dural SAC; A myelographic investigation of dimensions and termination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, J.L.; Olsen, K.O. (Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1991-05-01

    A radio-anatomical study was performed of the distal dural sac (DS) in 121 patients subjected to myelography. In 83.4% the termination of the DS was located from the upper half of the S1-segment to the lower half of the S2-segment. In the remaining patients the dural terminations were more distally located. The average location of the DS-termination was higher than that found in a previous anatomic study. The inference is that in patients with low-back pain and sciatica, the DS tends to terminate at a higher spinal level than in a non-selected anatomic material. The caudal reduction in sagittal diameter of the DS was less than that of the frontal diameter of the sac. The linear diminution in cross-sectional area of the DS from the level of L3 towards the lumbosacral junction was not correlated with the degree of caudal extension of the DS into the sacrum. Thus the length of the DS and its transverse diameters are independent of each other. These results supported the view that the location of the termination of the DS (and hence that of the spinal cord) is not related to stenosis of the central spinal canal. (orig.).

  1. Relationship between low back pain, disability, MR imaging findings and health care provider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Molla, Enrique; Costa, Salvador; Montijano, Ruben [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Clinica Quiron, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Vega, Maria [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Radiology, Valencia (Spain); Bautista, Daniel [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset, Department of Preventive Medicine, Valencia (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    To determine the association between the self-report of pain and disability and findings on lumbar MR images, and to compare two different health care providers in Spanish patients with low back pain (LBP). Cross-sectional A total of 278 patients, 137 men and 141 women aged 44{+-}14 years submitted with low back pain (LBP) were studied. One hundred and nine patients were from the National Health System (NHS) and 169 from private practice. Patients with previous discitis, surgery, neoplasm or traumatic episodes were excluded. Every patient completed a disability questionnaire with six core items, providing a score of disability from 2 to 28. All patients had sagittal spin-echo T1 and turbo spin-echo T2, axial proton-density and MR myelography weighted images. MR images of the two most affected disc levels were read, offering an MR imaging score from 0 to 30. Patients with a combination of LBP and sciatica showed the highest levels of disability (p=0.002). MR imaging scores only correlated with pain interference with normal work (p=0.04), but not with other disability questions. Patients from the NHS showed greater disability scores than private ones (p=0.001) and higher MR imaging scores (p=0.01). In patients with LBP, MR imaging only correlates with pain interference with work but not with other disability questions. Differences are found between private and NHS patients, the latter being more physically affected. (orig.)

  2. Intra-arterial cisplatin and concurrent radiation for invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyanaga, Naoto; Ohtani, Mikinobu; Noguchi, Ryosuke (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine) (and others)

    1991-10-01

    Fifteen patients with invasive bladder cancer were treated with selective intra-arterial cisplatin and external beam radiotherapy (30.6 Gy over 3 weeks) prior to a planned cystectomy. Cisplatin, in total 200 mg, was administered via bilateral internal iliac artery infusion during the course of radiotherapy. Seven patients were evaluated for local response. Partial response (PR) was revealed in 4, and minor response (MR) in 3. Ten patients received total cystectomy, and pathological effects by the criteria adipted by Japanese Urological Association and The Japanese Society of Pathology, were as follows: Ef.3 in 1 case, Ef.2 in 6. Ef.1b in 1 and Ef.1a in 2. Down staging was observed in 8 patients from the clinical to the pathological stage. Thirteen patients are alive for 21 months. Two patients have died (1 lung infarction, 1 pancreatic cancer). Though nausea and sciatica-like pain were observed in some cases, there were no severe systemic side effects such as bone marrow suppression and renal toxicity. From these results it is concluded that this therapeutic modality could be effective in the preoperative work-up of candidates for total cystectomy, and also that it could be useful in the treatment of patients in whom total cystectomy is contraindicated. (author).

  3. Computed Tomography of the lumbar facet joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Mi Ryoung; Kim, Yung Soon; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Jeon, Hae Sang; Kim, Dae Yung [Kang Nam General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-08-15

    The lumbar facet disease is a frequently overlooked cause of sciatic pain, but the lumbar facet joints are well-recognized source of low back pain and radiating leg pain which can be confused with sciatica due to herniated disc. We measured the angulation of the facet joints on axial spine CT films in 149 cases which contains 41 normal group and 108 abnormal group and studied the relationship between the angulation and degeneration of the facets, the asymmetry of each sided facets and facet degeneration, the asymmetry and disc protrusion, and the asymmetry and annular bulging of the disc. The results were as follows: 1. Facet angulation in abnormal group were more sagittally oriented than the normal group. 2. The angulation of right facet was more sagittally oriented than the left in L4-5 level of abnormal group. 3. Degeneration of facet joints occur asymmetrically, and the more facet joint degenerates, the more it orients sagittally, particularly in L4-5. 4. Asymmetry in facet joint degeneration and unilateral disc protrusion of L5-SI level is greater than the normal gro0008.

  4. CT-guided injection of botulinic toxin for percutaneous therapy of piriformis muscle syndrome with preliminary MRI results about denervative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanucci, E.; Masala, S.; Sodani, G.; Varrucciu, V.; Romagnoli, A.; Squillaci, E.; Simonetti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is a cause of sciatica, leg or buttock pain and disability. The pain is usually increased by muscular contraction, palpation or prolonged sitting. The aim of our paper was to evaluate the feasibility of CT-guided percutaneous botulinic toxin (BTX) injection for the purpose of PMS treatment. Thirty patients suffering from PMS, suspected with clinical and electrophysiological criteria, after imaging examinations excluding other causes of sciatic pain, resulted positive at the lidocaine test and were treated by intramuscular injection of BTX type A under CT guidance. The follow-up (12 months) was performed with clinical examination in all cases and with MR 3 months after the procedure in 9 patients to evaluate the denervative process entity of the treated muscle. In 26 cases relief of symptoms was obtained after 5-7 days. In 4 patients an insufficient relief of pain justified a second percutaneous treatment which was clinically successful. No complications or side effects were recorded after BTX injection. The MR examination showed a signal intensity change of the treated muscle in 7 patients due to the denervative process of PM, whereas in the remaining 2 cases only an atrophy of the treated muscle was detected. Larger series are necessary to confirm these MRI preliminary results. The CT-guided BTX injection in the PMS is an emergent and feasible technique that obtains an excellent local therapeutic effect without risk of imprecise inoculation. (orig.)

  5. Lumbar disc excision through fenestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lumbar disc herniation often causes sciatica. Many different techniques have been advocated with the aim of least possible damage to other structures while dealing with prolapsed disc surgically in the properly selected and indicated cases. Methods : Twenty six patients with clinical symptoms and signs of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc having radiological correlation by MRI study were subjected to disc excision by interlaminar fenestration method. Results : The assessment at follow-up showed excellent results in 17 patients, good in 6 patients, fair in 2 patients and poor in 1 patient. The mean preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scores were 9.34 ±0.84 and 2.19 ±0.84 on scale of 0-10 respectively. These were statistically significant (p value< 0.001, paired t test. No significant complications were recorded. Conclusion : Procedures of interlaminar fenestration and open disc excision under direct vision offers sufficient adequate exposure for lumbar disc excision with a smaller incision, lesser morbidity, shorter convalescence, early return to work and comparable overall results in the centers where recent laser and endoscopy facilities are not available.

  6. CT-discography in the evaluation of the post-operative lumbar spine. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crenier, N.; Greselle, J.F.; Richard, O.; Houang, B.; Pinol-Daubisse, H.; Caille, J.M.; Vital, J.M.; Senegas, J.

    1988-06-01

    Thirty-three patients with recurrent sciatica after lumbar-disk surgery were studied for recurrent herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) by CT alone and CT-discography (CTD). Twenty-six patients underwent surgical reexploration allowing correlation with CTD. CTD made a correct diagnosis of recurrent HNP in twenty-one patients showing an extravasation of the contrast medium from the disk space into the medullary canal. In two cases CTD was positive for recurrent HNP but surgery showed only fibrosis. The amount of contrast leak was very small in these two cases along the posterior common longitudinal ligament, and the junction with the disk was very narrow. Because of their clinical presentation three patients with negative studies were operated upon. One showed only fibrosis and the two others showed an associated disk fragment. Among the twenty-one true-positive cases, seven showed a combination of recurrent HNP and scarring. Contamination of CSF by the contrast medium through the dura was observed in two patients. Although a prospective comparative study between CTD and IV-contrast-enhanced CT is necessary, CTD appears to be a useful diagnostic procedure for recurrent HNP after surgery of the lumbar spine.

  7. CT-diskography, diskomanometry and MR imaging as predictors of the outcome of lumbar percutaneous automated nucleotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullerud, R. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Radiology; Amundsen, T. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. Neurology; Lie, H. [Chrismed, Oslo (Norway); Juel, N.G. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Physical Medicine; Magnaes, B. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Dept. of Neurosurgery

    1995-11-01

    This prospective study was performed to assess whether CT-diskography (CT-D), diskomanometry (DMM) including recording of the pain response, or the MR signal intensity of the disks are reliable predictors of the outcome of nucleotomy. Ninety-one patients, 44 females and 47 males aged 18-68 years (mean 37.4) treated at 99 disk levels were included. All had plain CT, MR imaging, CT-D and DMM performed prior to automated percutaneous nucleotomy with the Nucleotome R system. Sixity-nine (76%) of the patients responded well to treatment within 3 months. Due to recurrences, the success rate at 1 year was reduced to 65%. Except for better results following nucleotomy in patients with similar and identical pain as the presenting complaint provoked at diskography, no association was demonstrated between diskographic parameters, or loss of signal on MR, and the outcome. Better results were also seen in patients with a short history of disk disease, but not in patients with predominantly sciatica and focal hernias compared to those with predominantly low-back pain and diffuse posterior buldges. The results do not justify routine use of diskography prior to nucleotomy in patients with pathologic disks demonstrated by noninvasive methods and localizing sciatic pain. (orig./UG).

  8. Brucellar spondylodiscitis mimicking tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshani Dewan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is primarily a disease of domestic and wild animals that can be transmitted to humans (zoonosis. Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose human health risk globally. Brucellosis in endemic and nonendemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading nonspecific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. It may affect any organ of the body with clinical manifestations that include fever, joint pains, loss of weight, sweating, cough, sciatica, splenic enlargement, liver enlargement, orchitis, etc. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella endemic countries. Whereas, this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and semi-automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity and mortality.

  9. Prenatal Paracetamol Exposure and Wheezing in Childhood: Causation or Confounding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Migliore

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported an increased risk of wheezing in the children of mothers who used paracetamol during pregnancy. We evaluated to what extent this association is explained by confounding.We investigated the association between maternal paracetamol use in the first and third trimester of pregnancy and ever wheezing or recurrent wheezing/asthma in infants in the NINFEA cohort study. Risks ratios (RR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated after adjustment for confounders, including maternal infections and antibiotic use during pregnancy.The prevalence of maternal paracetamol use was 30.6% during the first and 36.7% during the third trimester of pregnancy. The prevalence of ever wheezing and recurrent wheezing/asthma was 16.9% and 5.6%, respectively. After full adjustment, the RR for ever wheezing decreased from 1.25 [1.07-1.47] to 1.10 [0.94-1.30] in the first, and from 1.26 [1.08-1.47] to 1.10 [0.93-1.29] in the third trimester. A similar pattern was observed for recurrent wheezing/asthma. Duration of maternal paracetamol use was not associated with either outcome. Further analyses on paracetamol use for three non-infectious disorders (sciatica, migraine, and headache revealed no increased risk of wheezing in children.The association between maternal paracetamol use during pregnancy and infant wheezing is mainly, if not completely explained by confounding.

  10. Comparison of discectomy versus sequestrectomy in lumbar disc herniation: a meta-analysis of comparative studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisheng Ran

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc removal is currently the standard treatment for lumbar disc herniation. No consensus has been achieved whether aggressive disc resection with curettage (discectomy versus conservative removal of the offending disc fragment alone (sequestrectomy provides better outcomes. This study aims to compare the reherniation rate and clinical outcomes between discectomy and sequestrectomy by literature review and a meta-analysis.A systematic search of PubMed, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library was performed up to June 1, 2014. Outcomes of interest assessing the two techniques included demographic and clinical baseline characteristics, perioperative variables, complications, recurrent herniation rate and post-operative functional outcomes.Twelve eligible trials evaluating discectomy vs sequestrectomy were identified including one randomized controlled study, five prospective and six retrospective comparative studies. By contrast to discectomy, sequestrectomy was associated with significantly less operative time (p<0.001, lower visual analogue scale (VAS for low back pain (p<0.05, less post-operative analgesic usage (p<0.05 and better patients' satisfaction (p<0.05. Recurrent herniation rate, reoperation rate, intraoperative blood loss, hospitalization duration and VAS for sciatica were without significant difference.According to our pooled data, sequestrectomy entails equivalent reherniation rate and complications compared with discectomy but maintains a lower incidence of recurrent low back pain and higher satisfactory rate. High-quality prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to firmly assess these two procedures.

  11. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, Jan T. [University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. Radiology

    2010-07-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  12. Conservative treatment in patients with an acute lumbosacral radicular syndrome: design of a randomised clinical trial [ISRCTN68857256

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peul Wilco C

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective is to present the design of randomised clinical trial (RCT on the effectiveness of physical therapy added to general practitioners management compared to general practitioners management only in patients with an acute lumbosacral radicular syndrome (also called sciatica. Methods/Design Patients in general practice diagnosed with an acute (less than 6 weeks lumbosacral radicular syndrome and an age above 18 years are eligible for participation. The general practitioners treatment follows their clinical guideline. The physical therapy treatment will consist of patient education and exercise therapy. The primary outcome measure is patients reported global perceived effect. Secondary outcome measures are severity of complaints, functional status, health status, fear of movement, medical consumption, sickness absence, costs and treatment preference. The follow-up is 52 weeks. Discussion Treatment by general practitioners and physical therapists in this study will be transparent and not a complete "black box". The results of this trial will contribute to the decision of the general practitioner regarding referral to physical therapy in patients with an acute lumbosacral radicular syndrome.

  13. Postoperative lumbar MR imaging with contrast enhancement. Comparison between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grane, P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tullberg, T. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, St. Goeran`s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Rydberg, J. [Dept. of Radiology, St. Goeran`s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Lindgren, L. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-05-01

    Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the spine after surgery for lumbar disk herniation almost always shows pathologic changes. To investigate to what extent these changes are correlated to patients` actual clinical symptoms, we compared the postoperative MR findings in 19 asymptomatic patients with 42 symptomatic patients (43 levels). The asymptomatic patients underwent MR examination one year after surgery. Twenty-six of the symptomatic patients underwent MR one year of less after surgery, and in 16 patients (17 levels) MR was performed more than one year after surgery. Sixteen percent of the asymptomatic and 42% of the symptomatic patients had disk herniation at the level of previous surgery. Most of the herniated disks were found in the symptomatic patients less than one year after surgery. The amount of epidural scar tissue, displacement and thickening of nerve roots, and compression of the dural sac were also studied. Disk herniation as a probable cause of recurrent sciatica was a common finding among symptomatic patients examined one year or less after surgery. In comparing asymptomatic patients and symptomatic patients with more than one year between surgery and MR examination, no significant radiologic differences, including disk herniation, were found. (orig.).

  14. CT five years after myelographic diagnosis of lumbar disk herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurme, M.; Katevuo, K.; Nykvist, F.; Aalto, T.; Alaranta, H.; Einola, S. (Turku Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery Turku Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Social Insurance Inst., Turku (Finland). Rehabilitation Research Centre)

    1991-07-01

    Fifty-seven patients were examined with CT 5 years after primary myelography for disabling sciatica and suspected herniated lumbar disk. Forty were in an operated group, 22 with good and 18 with poor results evaluated by occupational handicap (21) 5 years after surgery. Seventeen patients had myelography indicating disk herniation, but were treated conservatively, 9 with good and 8 with poor result. Various spinal dimensions measured at CT did not correlate with outcome. Operated patients had narrower canals than others, and male canals were broader than those in females. Increased amount of scar tissue at L4 level correlated with poor result (p=0.008). Operated patients with poor result had more advanced lateral stenosis than those treated conservatively (p<0.001). Patients with good result after operation had more degeneration observed on CT of erector spinae muscle than those treated conservatively with good outcome. Only 9% of operated patients did not have muscle degeneration. A tendency for more frequent recurrent disk herniations could be ssen for conservatively treated patients. The narrowing of the spinal canal 5 years after operation did not correlate with the 5-year outcome. (orig.).

  15. Surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis with microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ploumis Avraam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interspinous distraction devices (IPDD are indicated as stand-alone devices for the treatment of spinal stenosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the results of patients undergoing surgery for spinal stenosis with a combination of unilateral microdecompression and interspinous distraction device insertion. Methods This is a prospective clinical and radiological study of minimum 2 years follow-up. Twenty-two patients (average age 64.5 years with low-back pain and unilateral sciatica underwent decompressive surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. Visual Analogue Scale, Oswestry Disability Index and walking capacity plus radiologic measurements of posterior disc height of the involved level and lumbar lordosis Cobb angle were documented both preoperatively and postoperatively. One-sided posterior subarticular and foraminal decompression was conducted followed by dynamic stabilization of the diseased level with an IPDD (X-STOP. Results The average follow-up time was 27.4 months. Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index improved statistically significantly (p Conclusions The described surgical technique using unilateral microdecompression and IPDD insertion is a clinically effective and radiologically viable treatment method for symptoms of spinal stenosis resistant to non-operative treatment.

  16. Non-formation of the main trunk of the sciatic nerve and unusual relationships to the piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stoyanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The sciatic nerve is the largest branch of the sacral plexus. Variations of its origin, exit from the pelvis, emergence and branching in the posterior region of the thigh, especially in regards to the piriformis muscle, are an object of interest due to the possibility to be involved in the pathogenensis of clinically significant non-discogenic sciatica or piriformis syndrome. Case report: We present a case of variant anatomy of the sciatic nerve, discovered during routine dissection of the left gluteal region of an adult female cadaver. We observed a non-formation of the main trunk of the nerve; rather, the tibial nerve passed inferiorly to the piriformis muscle, while the common peroneal nerve went through the body of the bifid piriformis muscle, immediately next to its tendon. The two branches continued their course in the thigh without joining and forming a proper sciatic nerve. The medical records of the body donor did not reveal any neurological impairment which could be linked to this anatomical peculiarity. Conclusion: The anatomy of the sciatic nerve could be considered to be a factor of clinical significance. The high prevalence of similar anatomical variations should be kept in mind during the diagnostic process of clinical entities involving the sciatic nerve.

  17. MR imaging of the lumber spine; Visualization capability of the nerve root

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Kazumasa; Hieda, Hiroshi; Goto, Takeshi; Goto, Hiroshi; Koga, Hiromichi; Hiraoka, Kouji (Moji Rousai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We studied visualization capability of the nerve root in mainly coronary section pattern using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI was carried out in 91 patients with lumbago and sciatica. Coronary section was additionally photographed in 58 cases of these patients (32 with intervertebral hernia, 20 with spinal canal stenosis, 2 with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 2 with compression fracture and the other 2 patients). The visualization capability of the nerve root was studied with photographing 2 pulse systems of the coronary section by using spin echo and field echo methods. The high signal area of the cerebrospinal fluid and nerve root in the normal lumbar vertebra was noted by field echo method, and pattern that is visualized by myelogram was obtained. The coincidence of the main foci (disturbed lesions of the nerve root) in the intervertebral hernia and coronary section pattern was noted in 21 of 32 cases (64.5%) with considerably high ratio. The condition of the nerve root in the blocked lesion was visualized in the spinal canal stenosis. (author).

  18. Cystic synovial sarcomas: imaging features with clinical and histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Hirofumi; Araki, Nobuhito [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3, Nakamichi, Higashinari-Ku, 537-8511, Osaka (Japan); Sawai, Yuka [Department of Radiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Kudawara, Ikuo [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Mano, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Shingo [Department of Pathology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Ueda, Takafumi; Yoshikawa, Hideki [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-12-01

    To characterize the radiological and clinicopathologic features of cystic synovial sarcoma. Seven patients with primary cystic synovial sarcoma were evaluated. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were undertaken at the first presentation. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was made on the basis of histological examinations followed by molecular analysis. Radiological and clinicopathologic findings were reviewed. CT showed well-defined soft tissue mass without cortical bone erosion and invasion. Calcification was seen at the periphery of the mass in three cases. T2-weighted MR images showed multilocular inhomogeneous intensity mass in all cases, five of which showed fluid-fluid levels. On gross appearance, old and/or fresh hematomas were detected in six cases. In the one remaining case, microscopic hemorrhage in the cystic lumen was proven. Four cases had poorly differentiated areas. In five cases prominent hemangiopericytomatous vasculature was observed. Histologic grade was intermediate in one tumor and high in six. One case had a history of misdiagnosis for tarsal tunnel syndrome, one for lymphadenopathy, two for sciatica and two for hematoma. All cystic synovial sarcomas demonstrated multilocularity with well-circumscribed walls and internal septae. Synovial sarcoma should be taken into consideration in patients with deeply situated multicystic mass with triple signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. (orig.)

  19. Paraspinal muscle hypotrophy and chronic discogenic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truszczyńska-Baszak Aleksandra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: Low back pain is accompanied by deconditioning of trunk muscles due to pain limiting patients’ physical activity, but so far it has not been explained whether the changes in the structure of muscles are the cause of disc disease or its result. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of segmental paraspinal muscle hypotrophy in patients with chronic low back pain and sciatica. Material and methods: The study involved magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of 40 patients: 20 women and 20 men aged from 30 to 47, mean 39.51 ± 3.73 years, with single level disc extrusion at L4-L5. The entire cross-sectional area of the par­aspinal muscles, the adipose tissue area in the paraspinal muscles and the extensor muscle tissue area at the level of L4-L5 were measured and compared with the healthy L3-L4 level. T2-weighted axial slices were used to facilitate distinguishing between the muscle and the fat tissue. Results: Fat tissue ingrowth and paravertebral muscle tissue hypotrophy at the disc extrusion level were highly statistically significant (p < 0.001 compared to the healthy level. Conclusions: 1. Ingrowth of the adipose tissue into the muscle tissue occurs only at the level of disc extrusion. 2. It seems rea­sonable to introduce strengthening exercises after the resolution of pain in order to rebuild the muscles of the spine.

  20. Cistos sinoviais lombares Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cláudia Ferreira Rosa

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Os cistos sinoviais localizados na coluna lombar são raros, em geral associados a alterações degenerativas das articulações facetárias, mais freqüentemente vistos na transição L4-L5. Raramente causam sintomas, que, quando ocorrem, são sobretudo lombociatalgia. O diagnóstico é feito de maneira satisfatória pela tomografia computadorizada e pela ressonância magnética e é importante para que se institua o correto tratamento dos cistos. Existem diversas formas de tratamento, desde repouso e imobilização até a injeção de corticóide no cisto sinovial guiada por tomografia computadorizada, e mesmo cirurgia nos casos refratários aos outros tipos de tratamento.Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroids injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods.

  1. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kadono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression.

  2. Epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Mi Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Pucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Low back pain combined with radicular pain remains as one of the most challenging musculoskeletal problems for its therapeutic management. This malady results from nerve root impingement and/or inflammation that causes neurologic symptoms in the distribution of the affected nerve root(s) Conservative treatment, percutaneous spine interventions and surgery have all been used as treatment; and the particular treatment that's chosen depends on the severity of the clinical and neurologic presentation. In 1930, Evans reported that sciatica could treated by epidural injection. The use of epidural corticosteroid injections for the treatment of axial and radicular back pain was first reported in 1953. Epidural steroid injections are currently used by many medical professionals for the treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Performing 'blind' epidural steroid injection lacks target specificity that often results in incorrect delivery of medication to the lesion. Imaging-guided steroid injections are now becoming more popular despite the controversy regarding their efficacy. Many reports, including a few randomized controlled trials, have documented the clinical utility of epidural steroid injections.

  3. Arthrography of the lumber facet joint and facet block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo; Park, Hyung Chun; Moon, Jae Ho; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    In spite of numerous clinical and patho-anatomical studied made in the past, there are still different opinions concerning the mechanism of low back pain. We have focused attention on the posterior structures as an alternative source of low back pain with sciatica. So we have studied and analyzed the finding of arthrography of facet joint and effect of the injection of methyprednisolone acetate suspension (Depomedrol) 20mg into the each facet joint. Our results are as follows: 1. Abnormal findings of facet joint arthrogram were degenerative osteoarthritis of facet joint (70.5%), synovial cyst (11.8%), accessory bone (11.8%), and spondylolysis (5.9%). 2. The mean facet angulations of patients of facet syndrome were abnormal on lower lumbar facet joint in 9 of 13 cases (69.2%). 3. On initial assessment, 11 of 17 cases (64.7%) showed complete relief and one month later, 6 of 11 cases (35.3%) showed continuous relief, after steroid injection.

  4. Prospective 1-year follow-up pilot study of CT-guided microwave ablation in the treatment of bone and soft-tissue malignant tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sebastien; Kastler, Bruno [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); University of Franche-Comte, I4S laboratory, INSERM EA4268, Besancon (France); Dubut, Jonathan; Nueffer, Jean-Philippe [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); Chaigneau, Loic [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Oncology, Besancon (France); Vidal, Chrystelle [University Hospital of Besancon, Clinical Investigation Center, INSERM CIT808, Besancon (France)

    2017-04-15

    The aims of this work were to assess the feasibility, efficacy, short-term outcome and safety of microwave ablation (MWA) in the treatment of malignant musculoskeletal tumours. Sixteen bone and soft-tissue malignant tumours were prospectively included and were treated by CT-guided MWA. The percentage and size of necrosis of the lesions were measured by contrast-enhanced MRI before the procedure and after 1, 3, 6 and 12 months. mRECIST criteria were used to assess tumour response. Procedural success was defined as ≥80 % necrosis. Patient pain (as assessed using a numeric visual scale (NVS)) and side effects were noted. Six osteolytic metastases, five osteoblastic metastases and five soft tissue sarcomas were treated. At 1 month, 40 % were treated completely, the percentage of necrosis was 85 ± 30.4 %, and the success rate was 80 %. At 3, 6 and 12 months the success rate was 80 %, 76.9 % and 63.6 %, respectively. At 12 months, four lesions (36.3 %) still had no recurrence. Mean NVS during the procedure was 3.5 ± 2.8. One patient had transitory sciatica without neurological deficit that was treated medically. CT-guided MWA of bone and soft-tissue malignant tumours is efficient, well tolerated and has good short-term anti-cancer effects. (orig.)

  5. The Strategy and Early Clinical Outcome of Percutaneous Full-Endoscopic Interlaminar or Extraforaminal Approach for Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Kong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to analyze the surgical strategy, safety, and clinical results of percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through interlaminar or extraforaminal puncture technique for LDH. Preoperative CT and MRI were analyzed, which were based on the main location of the herniated disc and its relationship with compressed nerve root. Sixty-two patients satisfied the inclusion criteria during the period from August 2012 to March 2014. We use percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through different puncture technique to remove the protrusive NP for LDH. Sixty patients completed the full-endoscopic operation successfully. Their removed disc tissue volume ranged from 1.5 mL to 3.8 mL each time. Postoperative ODI and VAS of low back and sciatica pain were significantly decreased in each time point compared to preoperative ones. No nerve root injury, infection, and other complications occurred. The other two patients were shifted to open surgery. No secondary surgery was required and 91.6% of excellent-to-good ratio was achieved on the basis of Macnab criteria at postoperative 12 months. Acquired benefits are fewer complications, rapid recovery, complete NP removal, effective nerve root decompression, and satisfactory cosmetic effect as well. This is a safe, effective, and rational minimally invasive spine-surgical technology with excellent clinical outcome.

  6. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  7. Topical herbal remedies for treatment of joint pain according to Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint pain is one of the most common complaints with many possible causes.Some medicines used for joint pain relief such as NSAIDs have substantial and frequent side effects. Topical route possibly reduces adverse reactions by maximizing local delivery and minimizing systemic toxicity. Throughout history, plants have been the most important sources of medicines for human health and Iranian Traditional Medicine (ITM is well known for its extensive use of herbal medicines to treat diseases accompanied with joint pain for centuries. In the present study, the plants used topically for relieving joint pain in ITM were searched. Moreover, their pharmacological effectiveness in modern medicine was reviewed. The terms “Waja mafasil” (joint pain, “Waja-ol-mafasil” (joint pain, “Irq-on-nasa” (sciatica, “Waja-ol-warik” (coxalgia, ‘Waja-ol-zahr” (back pain, “Waja-ol-rakbah” (knee pain and “Niqris” (gout were searched in three important Iranian traditional books including “Canon”, “Al-Hawi” and “Tohfat al-mu’minin” and topical preparations introduced as “Tela” and “Zemad” were selected. The scientific literatures were searched for their effectiveness related to the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Thirty five plants were selected on the basis of their topical use to relief joint pain. Among these plants, 22 species have been found to exhibit anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities.

  8. Spine epidural and sacroiliac joints injections – when and how to perform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Orazio, Federico, E-mail: federico.dorazio@gmail.com; Gregori, Lorenzo Maria, E-mail: lollog@hotmail.it; Gallucci, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.gallucci@cc.univaq.it

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Image guided interventions focused to administer drugs inside the epidural space are effective in reducing the perceived spinal pain, but their efficacy seems to be limited in time. • To treat spinal pain with image guided interventions is safe and repeatable. • Sacroiliac dysfunction is a common cause of sciatica-like pain which can be treated with CT-guided interventions (both steroids and pulsed RF denervation). - Abstract: Objectives: To review the state-of-the-art of image – guided techniques used to treat painful syndromes of the lower back, their indications, how they should be performed, their related risks and the expected results. Methods: We describe the actual standards about image-guided infiltrative therapies both on spine and on sacroiliac joints. Results: Both spinal epidural and sacroiliac injections appear useful in a large percentage of treated patients to get control of the perceived pain. Performing these therapies under CT or fluoroscopic guidance is the best and safest way to obtain satisfactory results because it is possible to target the use of drugs directly to the involved painful structures. Conclusions: Image-guided injections of the epidural space and of the sacroiliac joints are effective techniques for the treatment of pain; their effectiveness is sometimes not lasting for long periods of time but considering the low associated risk when performed by trained personnel, they can be easily repeated.

  9. Cavernous angioma of the cauda equina: case report Angioma cavernoso de cauda equina: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of cavernous angioma of the cauda equina and review the eleven cases available in the literature. A 44-year-old woman presented with low back pain and sciatica associated with bowel and bladder dysfunction and motor weakness of the lower extremity. The MRI revealed an enhancing, heterogeneous and hyperintense intradural lesion compressing the cauda equina roots at the L4 level. Laminectomy at L3-L4 and total removal of the tumor were performed without additional neurological deficit. Pathology revealed a cavernous angioma. The literature, clinical presentation, technical examinations, and treatment are reviewed.Relatamos um caso de angioma cavernoso de cauda equina em mulher de 44 anos de idade com sintomas de lombociatalgia associada a fraqueza de membros inferiores e disfunção esfincteriana vesical e anal. Exame de ressonância magnética evidenciou lesão expansiva intradural heterogênea e hiperintensa na cauda eqüina. Indicado tratamento cirúrgico com remoção completa através de laminectomia L3 e L4. O exame anatomopatológico foi compatível com angioma cavernoso. Os onze casos encontrados na literatura são revisados correlacionando a apresentação clínica, tratamento proposto e prognóstico.

  10. Analysis of lower back pain disorder using deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritwik Kulkarni, K.; Gaonkar, Abhijitsingh; Vijayarajan, V.; Manikandan, K.

    2017-11-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is caused because of assorted reasons involving body parts such as the interconnected network of spinal cord, nerves, bones, discs or tendons in the lumbar spine. LBP is pain, muscle pressure, or stiffness localized underneath the costal edge or more the substandard gluteal folds, with or without leg torment for the most part sciatica, and is characterized as endless when it holds on for 12 weeks or more then again, non-particular LBP is torment not credited to an unmistakable pathology such as infection, tumour, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, fracture, or inflammation. Over 70% of people usually suffer from such backpain disorder at some time. But recovery is not always favorable, 82% of non-recent-onset patients still experience pain 1 year later. Even though not having any history of lower back pain, many patients suffering from this disorder spend months or years healing from it. Hence aiming to look for preventive measure rather than curative, this study suggests a classification methodology for Chronic LBP disorder using Deep Learning techniques.

  11. Patterns of mind-body therapies in adults with common neurological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin Wells, Rebecca; Phillips, Russell S; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2011-01-01

    Over 40% of adults with common neurological conditions use complementary and alternative medicine, and mind-body therapies are the most commonly used form. Our objective was to describe mind-body use in adults with common neurological conditions. We compared mind-body use between adults with and without common neurological conditions (regular headaches, migraines, back pain with sciatica, strokes, dementia, seizures or memory loss) using the 2007 National Health Interview Survey of 23,393 sampled American adults. Adults with common neurological conditions used mind-body therapies more frequently than those without (24.5 vs. 16.6%, p after adjustment. Deep breathing exercises, meditation and yoga were used most frequently. Nearly 70% of the adults with common neurological conditions did not discuss their mind-body use with their health care provider. Those with neurological conditions used mind-body therapies more than those without these conditions because of provider recommendation (26 vs. 13%) or because conventional treatments were perceived ineffective (12 vs. 4%) or too costly (7 vs. 2%), respectively. Mind-body therapies are used more frequently among adults with common neurological conditions, more often when conventional treatments were perceived ineffective. More research is warranted on the efficacy of mind-body use for common neurological conditions. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Conservatively treated massive prolapsed discs: a 7-year follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, RT; Tavares, SP; Robertson, SC; Sharp, R; Marshall, RW

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The natural history of a lumbar hernia of the nucleus pulposus (HNP) is not fully known and clear indications for operative intervention cannot be established from the literature. Several studies have shown that the largest discs appear to have the greatest tendency to resolve. The aim of this study was to investigate whether massive prolapsed discs can be safely managed conservatively once clinical improvement has occurred. PATIENTS AND METHODS Thirty-seven patients were studied by clinical assessments and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over 2 years. Patients had severe sciatica at first, but began to show clinical improvement despite the large disc hernia-tions. Clinical assessment included the Lasegue test and neurological appraisal. The Oswestry Disability Index was used to measure function and changes in function. Serial MRI studies allowed measurement of volume changes of the herniated disc material over a period of time. RESULTS Initial follow-up at an average of 23.2 months revealed that 83% had a complete and sustained recovery at the initial follow-up. Only four patients required a discectomy. The average Oswestry disability index improved from 58% to 15%. Volumetric analysis of serial MRI scans found an average reduction of 64% in disc size. There was a poor correlation between clinical improvement and the extent of disc resolution. CONCLUSIONS A massive disc herniation can pursue a favourable clinical course. If early progress is shown, the long-term prognosis is very good and even massive disc herniations can be treated conservatively. PMID:19887021

  13. Transforaminal epidural steroid injections followed by mechanical diagnosis and therapy to prevent surgery for lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helvoirt, Hans; Apeldoorn, Adri T; Ostelo, Raymond W; Knol, Dirk L; Arts, Mark P; Kamper, Steven J; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2014-07-01

    Prospective cohort study. To report the clinical course of patients with MRI-confirmed lumbar disc herniation-related radicular noncentralizing pain who received transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) and mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT). Noncentralizing symptoms in patients with lumbar disc herniation are associated with poor outcome. Commonly used treatments for these patients include TESIs and MDT. No study has evaluated the outcome of combining both strategies. Consecutive candidates for herniated lumbar disc surgery with noncentralizing chronic pain were eligible. Patients received TESIs followed by MDT. The primary outcomes were pain severity in the leg, disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica), and global perceived effect (GPE). Outcomes were measured at baseline, discharge, and 12 months. Linear mixed-models and McNemar's tests were used to analyze outcome data. Sixty-nine patients receive TESIs. After TESIs, symptoms were resolved completely in 11 patients (16%). In these patients, symptom resolution was maintained at 12 months. A second subgroup of 32 patients (46%) reported significantly less pain after TESIs and showed centralization with MDT reassessment (significant reductions in leg pain and disability [P TESIs but still showed noncentralization with MDT reassessment (significant reductions in leg pain and disability [P TESIs and received an operative intervention. The results indicate that a course of TESIs followed by MDT may be able to avoid surgery in a substantial proportion of candidates for herniated lumbar disc surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Putting pain out of mind with an 'out of body' illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamment, J; Aspell, J E

    2017-02-01

    Chronic pain is a growing societal concern that warrants scientific investigation, especially given the ineffectiveness of many treatments. Given evidence that pain experience relies on multisensory integration, there is interest in using body ownership illusions for reducing acute pain. In the present study, we investigate whether patients' experience of chronic pain could be reduced by full body illusions (FBIs) that cause participants to dissociate from their own body. Participants with chronic pain (including sciatica, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, muscular pain, IBS and back pain) viewed their own 'virtual' bodies via a video camera and head-mounted display for two minutes. In the 'back-stroking FBI', their backs were stroked with a stick while they viewed synchronous or asynchronous stroking on the virtual body and in the 'front-stroking FBI', they were stroked near their collarbone while viewing the stick approach their field of view in a synchronous or asynchronous fashion. Illusion strength and pain intensity were measured with self-report questionnaires. We found that full body illusions were experienced by patients with chronic pain and further, that pain intensity was reduced by an average of 37% after illusion (synchronous) conditions. These findings add support to theories that high-level multisensory body representations can interact with homeostatic regulation and pain perception. Pain intensity in chronic pain patients was reduced by 37% by 'out of body' illusions. These data demonstrate the potential of such illusions for the management of chronic pain. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  15. Herniated disks unchanged over time: Size reduced after oxygen-ozone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Matteo; Zambello, Alessio; Leonardi, Marco; Princiotta, Ciro

    2016-08-01

    The spontaneous regression of disk herniation secondary to dehydration is a much-debated topic in medicine. Some physicians wonder whether surgical removal of the extruded nucleus pulposus is really necessary when the spontaneous disappearance of a herniated lumbar disk is a well-known phenomenon. Unfortunately, without spontaneous regression, chronic pain leads to progressive disability for which surgery seems to be the only solution. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated the utility of oxygen-ozone therapy in the treatment of disk herniation, resulting in disk shrinkage. This retrospective study evaluates the outcomes of a series of patients with a history of herniated disks neuroradiologically unchanged in size for over two years, treated with oxygen-ozone therapy at our center over the last 15 years. We treated 96 patients, 84 (87.5%) presenting low back pain complicated or not by chronic sciatica. No drug therapy had yielded significant benefits. A number of specialists had been consulted in two or more years resulting in several neuroradiological scans prior to the decision to undertake oxygen-ozone therapy. Our study documents how ozone therapy for slipped disks "unchanged over time" solved the problem, with disk disruption or a significant reduction in the size of the prolapsed disk material extruded into the spinal canal. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Apparent diffusion coefficient in normal and abnormal pattern of intervertebral lumbar discs: initial experience☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Gang; Yu, Xuewen; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Shaojuan; Guo, Youmin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the relationship of morphologically defined non-bulging/herniated, bulging and herniated intervertebral lumbar discs with quantitative apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Thirty-two healthy volunteers and 28 patients with back pain or sciatica were examined by MRI. All intervertebral lumbar discs from L1 to S1 were classified according to morphological abnormality and degenerated grades. The ADC values of nucleus pulposus (NP) were measured and recorded. The significant differences about mean ADC values of NP were found between non-bulging/herniated discs and bulging discs as well as herniated discs (P herniated discs (P > 0.05). Moreover, statistically significant relationship was found in the mean ADC values of NP between “non-bulging/herniated and non-degenerated discs” and “non-bulging/herniated degenerated discs” as well as herniated discs (P disc level revealed an inverse correlation (r = -0.18). The ADC map of the NP is a potentially useful tool for the quantitative assessment of componential and molecular alterations accompanied with lumbar disc abnormalities. PMID:23554690

  17. Oxygen-ozone therapy for herniated lumbar disc in patients with subacute partial motor weakness due to nerve root compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olio, Massimo; Princiotta, Ciro; Cirillo, Luigi; Budai, Caterina; de Santis, Fabio; Bartolini, Stefano; Serchi, Elena; Leonardi, Marco

    2014-10-31

    Intradiscal oxygen-ozone (O2-O3) chemonucleolysis is a well-known effective treatment for pain caused by protruding disc disease and nerve root compression due to bulging or herniated disc. The most widely used therapeutic combination is intradiscal injection of an O2-O3 mixture (chemonucleolysis), followed by periradicular injection of O2-O3, steroid and local anaesthetic to enhance the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. The treatment is designed to resolve pain and is administered to patients without motor weakness, whereas patients with acute paralysis caused by nerve root compression undergo surgery 24-48h after the onset of neurological deficit. This paper reports on the efficacy of O2-O3 chemonucleolysis associated with anti-inflammatory foraminal injection in 13 patients with low back pain and cruralgia, low back pain and sciatica and subacute partial motor weakness caused by nerve root compression unresponsive to medical treatment. All patients were managed in conjunction with our colleagues in the Neurosurgery Unit of Bellaria Hospital and the IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences, Bologna. The outcomes obtained are promising: 100% patients had a resolution of motor weakness, while 84.6% had complete pain relief. Our results demonstrate that O2-O3 therapy can be considered a valid treatment option for this category of patients.

  18. The Strategy and Early Clinical Outcome of Percutaneous Full-Endoscopic Interlaminar or Extraforaminal Approach for Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weijun; Liao, Wenbo; Ao, Jun; Cao, Guangru; Qin, Jianpu; Cai, Yuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective is to analyze the surgical strategy, safety, and clinical results of percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through interlaminar or extraforaminal puncture technique for LDH. Preoperative CT and MRI were analyzed, which were based on the main location of the herniated disc and its relationship with compressed nerve root. Sixty-two patients satisfied the inclusion criteria during the period from August 2012 to March 2014. We use percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through different puncture technique to remove the protrusive NP for LDH. Sixty patients completed the full-endoscopic operation successfully. Their removed disc tissue volume ranged from 1.5 mL to 3.8 mL each time. Postoperative ODI and VAS of low back and sciatica pain were significantly decreased in each time point compared to preoperative ones. No nerve root injury, infection, and other complications occurred. The other two patients were shifted to open surgery. No secondary surgery was required and 91.6% of excellent-to-good ratio was achieved on the basis of Macnab criteria at postoperative 12 months. Acquired benefits are fewer complications, rapid recovery, complete NP removal, effective nerve root decompression, and satisfactory cosmetic effect as well. This is a safe, effective, and rational minimally invasive spine-surgical technology with excellent clinical outcome.

  19. Medicinal plants and food medicines in the folk traditions of the upper Lucca Province, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieroni, A

    2000-06-01

    An ethnopharmacobotanical survey of the medicinal plants and food medicines of the northern part of Lucca Province, north-west Tuscany, central Italy, was carried out. The geographical isolation of this area has permitted the survival of a rich folk phytotherapy involving medicinal herbs and also vegetable resources used by locals as food medicine. Among these are the uncommon use of Ballota nigra leaves as a trophic protective; the use of Lilium candidum bulbs as an antiviral to treat shingles (Herpes zoster); Parmelia sp. as a cholagogue; Crocus napolitanus flowers as antiseptic; Prunus laurocerasus drupes as a hypotensive; and the consumption of chestnut flour polenta cooked with new wine as bechic. Many wild gathered greens are eaten raw in salads, or in boiled mixtures, as 'blood cleansing' and 'intestine cleansing' agents. Of particular interest is the persistence of the archaic use of Bryonia dioica root against sciatica, and the use of ritual plant therapeuticals as good omens, or against the 'evil eye.' Over 120 species represent the heritage of the local folk pharmacopoeia in upper Garfagnana. Anthropological and ethnopharmacological considerations of the collected data are also discussed.

  20. Laparoscopic neurolysis of the sacral plexus and the sciatic nerve for extensive endometriosis of the pelvic wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possover, M; Baekelandt, J; Flaskamp, C; Li, D; Chiantera, V

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study is to report on the feasibility of laparoscopic neurolysis of the plexus sacralis and the sciatic nerve in deep endometriotic infiltration of the lateral pelvic wall. A transperitoneal approach to the pelvic nerves combined with the LANN technique for intraoperative assessment of the function of the exposed nerves permit exposure and sparing of all somatic nerves during resection of the endometriotic lesion. We report on our short experience with 21 patients who underwent this technique for the treatment of endometriotic infiltration of the sacral plexus at different levels. In young patients with chronic unilateral sciatica or unilateral pudendal neuralgia - Alcock's canal syndrome - where no neurological/orthopedic etiologies have been found, endometriotic infiltration of the lateral pelvic wall has to be implicated as a potential etiology and an indication for laparoscopy must be discussed. Laparoscopic neurolysis of the pelvic somatic nerves is a feasible procedure for trained laparoscopic surgeons who have a good knowledge of the retroperitoneal pelvic (neuro)anatomy.

  1. A Movement system impairment approach to evaluation and treatment of a person with lumbar radiculopathy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eileen; Sahrmann, Shirley A; Avers, Dale

    2017-03-01

    There are several systems of classification and treatment of patients with low back pain (LBP) based on assessment of the effect of lumbar postures and movements on symptoms. The efficacy of one of these systems, The Movement System Impairment (MSI) method, has not yet been demonstrated in the literature. The purpose of this case report is to describe the approach of the MSI method for an individual with lumbar radiculopathy. A 79-year-old woman with a history of chronic LBP was referred to PT with a physician's diagnosis of sciatica. The patient was classified utilizing a standardized MSI evaluation. She was instructed to modify her daily postures and movements, as well as perform specific exercises to address these impairments. Her Oswestry LBP disability score improved by over 30% and pain level per the NPRS improved by 3 out of 10 points. Despite the challenges of advanced joint degeneration and neurological involvement, this approach of identifying and addressing specific movement impairments appeared helpful for this older individual.

  2. Comparison of Epidural Steroid Injections with conservative management in patients with lumbar radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiq, Nasreen; Khan, Mohammad Naeem; Iqbal, Malik Javaid; Khan, Shahid

    2009-09-01

    To determine the difference in short- and long-term pain improvement between lumbar Epidural Steroid Injections (ESIs) and conservative management in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Quasi-experimental study. The Postgraduate Medical Institute of Hayatabad Medical Complex, Peshawar, from April 2005 to March 2007. Fifty elective patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in the steroid group were treated with 80 mg of methylprednisolone injected in combination with 3 ml of 2% plain xylocaine and 3 ml of normal saline in the lumbar epidural space, while patients in the conservative group were treated with bed rest, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, muscle relaxants, and opioids. All the 50 patients in the two groups were regularly assessed at 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months of periods for pain score by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), patients satisfaction score and any unwanted side effects. A marked improvement of the pain score and patients satisfaction score were noticed in the steroid group. Less significant improvement was seen in the conservative group during the initial period i.e 2 weeks and 1 month (p 0.05). Epidural steroid injections in acute symptoms of sciatica are considered to be a better option compared to conservative treatment.

  3. [Rare medico-surgical emergency: spinal epidural abscess (about 3 cases)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqui, Abderrazzak El; Aggouri, Mohamed; Benzagmout, Mohamed; Chakour, Khalid; Chaoui, Mohamed El Faiz

    2017-01-01

    The awareness about infections in the epidural space is increasing thanks to the development of neurosurgery, including MRI. Spinal epidural abscess is a rare pathology but extremely serious from a functional point of view and potentially life threatening. We report three cases of male patients (the first one aged 52 years, the second 57 years and the third 63 years) with diagnosed spinal epidural abscess. Two patients were admitted to the Neurosurgical Emergencies with slow progressive spinal cord compression evolving in the context of infection. The last patient complained of S1 sciatica pain in his right leg resistant to treatment associated with urinary incontinence. Entrance door of the infection wasn't identified during the initial assessment. All patients underwent spinal cord/radicular decompression surgery and evacuation of the epidural abscess via posterior approach. Bacteriological examination showed pyogenic germ justifying adequate prescription of antibiotic therapy in the three cases. The evolution was favorable in two cases. However one patient died three days after surgery due to severe sepsis.

  4. Intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma leads to sciatic nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichikawa Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soft tissue metastases, in particular intraneural metastasis, from any carcinomas seldom occur. To our knowledge, no case of sciatic nerve palsy due to intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma is reported in the literature. Case presentation A case is reported of a 82-year old woman with sciatic nerve palsy with intraneural metastasis of gastric carcinoma. Although she had undergone partial gastrectomy with T2b, N0, M0 two years ago and primary site was cured, she developed sciatic nerve palsy from the carcinoma metastasis directly to the nerve. Operative resection and Histological examination revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, the same as her primary site adenocarcinoma. Conclusions Sciatica is usually caused by a herniated disc or spinal canal stenosis. Sciatic nerve palsy may be caused by nondiscogenic etiologies that may be either intrapelvic or extrapelvic. It is important to image the entire course of the nerve to distinguish these etiologies quickly. The longer the nerve compression the less likely a palsy will recover. Surgery is a good intervention that simultaneously obtains a tissue diagnosis and decompresses the nerve.

  5. Epidemiological surveillance of lumbar disc surgery in the general population: a pilot study in a French region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquelaure, Yves; Fouquet, Natacha; Ha, Catherine; Bord, Eric; Surer, Nathalie; Manach, Audrey Petit Le; Leclerc, Annette; Lombrail, Pierre; Goldberg, Marcel; Imbernon, Ellen

    2011-05-01

    Disc-related sciatica (DRS) is a significant and costly health problem in the working population. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the feasibility of a surveillance system for DRS using hospital databases for lumbar disc surgery (LDS). A total of 272 inpatients (119 men and 153 women) living in a French region and discharged in 2002-2003 from a spine center of a large University Hospital following LDS were compared with demographic and socioeconomic data on the population of the same region. Medical and occupational histories were gathered using a mailed questionnaire. The age-adjusted relative risks and population attributable fraction of risk (PAF) were calculated in relation to occupations and industries. Information on employment was available for the 75 women and 71 men. The risk of LDS varied according to occupations and industries. PAFs ranged between 30% (12-48) for male blue collar workers and 22% (4-40) for female lower white collar workers. PAFs ranged between 7 and 17% in the economic sectors at high risk. The surveillance of LDS can identify occupations and industries at risk. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Neurological aspects described in The treasure of medicines for all illnesses by Gregorio López].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carod-Artal, F J; Vázquez-Cabrera, C B

    Latin American medicine in the 16th century produced the first collections of herbs with native plants from the New World. Treatises on popular therapies appeared, which included gallenic remedies as well as incorporating autochthonous plants. We review the main neurological diseases and their treatments described in The Treasure of Medicines for All Illnesses by Gregorio Lopez (1542-1596). Some critics claim that his work was an enumeration of empirical prescriptions, sometimes with a magico-religious influence, which was extended in successive reprints. Yet, this manuscript is probably the first treatise on therapeutics written by a European in the New World to describe the native remedies employed in the treatment of diseases. In the section entitled Remedies in alphabetical order the following neurological ailments and appropriate remedies to treat them are described: abscess, apoplexy, brain, chilling, cramp, gota coral or epilepsy, headache, melancholy, memory, migraine, nerves, palsy, paralysis, sciatica, stupor and vertigo. The list of diseases is very complete and includes syndromes ranging from fevers, colics and bruises to phthisis, scabs or burns. The copy of the manuscript in the Vatican contains a final section on Indian medicines, which includes a list of medicinal plants used at that time, with the names given in Nahuatl language. Headaches, epilepsy and conditions affecting the peripheral nerves were the neurological pathologies that were described at greatest length in The Treasure of Medicines for All Illnesses, and for which a greater number of natural prescriptions were compiled.

  7. Acupuncture: a first approach on pain relief using a 617 nm LED device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J. M.; Corral-Baqués, M. I.; Amat, A.

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a preliminary approach for pain relief using a novel pulsated LED device was conducted. 12 patients were treated with a Photopuncture device designed by SORISA, which consisted in a 10-channel LED system at 617 nm. 15 patients with different pain localizations were treated: cervicobrachialgia (3 cases), lumbago / sciatica (4 cases), gonalgia (3 cases), cephalalgia (2 cases), talalgia (1 case), epicondylitis (1 case) and trigeminal neuralgia (1 case). To characterize the pain level, the Categorical Pain Scale (none (0), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6) and severe (7-10)) was used. Just patients with severe pain (7-10) were treated. Patients were treated twice a week for 25 minutes; 5 to 8 sessions were given at the following treatment parameters: 10 mW per channel pulsed at 60 Hz with a 50 % duty cycle. The total dose for point was 7.5 J. To characterize the response to the treatment, the results were classified as: "no result", no changes in pain degree; "poor", pain decreased one category; "good", pain decreased two categories; "very good", complete healing (no pain). The results were: 1 case with "very good" result; 11 cases with "good" result; 3 cases with "poor" result; and 0 cases with "no result". We conclude that the Photopuncture led device may be a good alternative to classical Acupuncture in pain relief, although further experimentation is required.

  8. Diagnosis and surgical strategy for sacral meningeal cysts with check-valve mechanism: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoto, Shunji; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Nishiyama, Makoto; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Satoshi; Muto, Jun; Shiono, Yuta; Doi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Motoo; Ishii, Kazuhiko

    2013-02-01

    There is agreement that symptomatic sacral meningeal cysts with a check-valve mechanism and/or large cysts representing space-occupying lesions should be treated surgically. This study investigated factors indicating a need for surgical intervention and surgical techniques for sacral meningeal cysts with a check-valve mechanism. In ten patients presenting with sciatica and neurological deficits, myelography, computed tomography (CT) myelography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) detected sacral meningeal cysts with a check-valve mechanism. One patient had two primary cysts. Ten cysts were type 2 and one cyst was type 1. Nine of the ten patients had not undergone previous surgery, while the remaining case involved recurrent cyst. For the seven patients with normal (i.e., not huge or recurrent) type 2 cysts and no previous surgery (eight cysts), suture after collapse of the cyst wall was performed. For the recurrent type 2 cyst, duraplasty and suture with collapse of the cyst wall were performed to eliminate the check-valve mechanism. For the remaining type 2 cyst, a primary root was sacrificed because of the huge size of the cyst. For the type 1 cyst, the neck of the cyst was ligated. In all cases, chief complaints disappeared immediately postoperatively and no deterioration of clinical symptoms has been seen after a mean follow-up of 27 months. The presence or absence of a check-valve mechanism is very important in determining the need for surgical intervention for sacral meningeal cysts.

  9. Staged decrease of physical ability on the locomotive syndrome risk test is related to neuropathic pain, nociceptive pain, shoulder complaints, and quality of life in middle-aged and elderly people - The utility of the locomotive syndrome risk test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Shiro; Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-11-01

    A locomotive syndrome (LS) risk test for evaluation of physical ability is recently proposed. The objective of this study is to evaluate the utility of this test by examining physical ability, neuropathic pain, nociceptive pain, shoulder complaints, and quality of life (QOL). A prospective cohort study was conducted in 523 subjects (240 males, 283 females; mean age: 63.3 years) at a health checkup. Data collected using visual analog scales (VAS) for shoulder pain, low back pain, sciatica, and knee pain, neuropathic pain, shoulder complaint, body mass index (BMI), osteoporosis, and SF-36 were compared among three LS risk stages. Subjects in LS risk stage 1 (24%) had significantly more osteoporosis, slower gait speed, weaker muscle strength and higher VAS, with no difference in age and BMI compared to those with no LS risk (50%). Subjects in stage 2 (26%) had significantly poorer results for all items. Shoulder complaint, neuropathic pain and QOL differed significantly among all three groups and worsened with decline in mobility on the LS risk test. LS risk test is easy and useful screening tool for evaluation of mobility and for screening for pain and complaint associated with activity of daily living and QOL.

  10. Herniated disks unchanged over time: Size reduced after oxygen–ozone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Matteo; Zambello, Alessio; Princiotta, Ciro

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous regression of disk herniation secondary to dehydration is a much-debated topic in medicine. Some physicians wonder whether surgical removal of the extruded nucleus pulposus is really necessary when the spontaneous disappearance of a herniated lumbar disk is a well-known phenomenon. Unfortunately, without spontaneous regression, chronic pain leads to progressive disability for which surgery seems to be the only solution. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated the utility of oxygen–ozone therapy in the treatment of disk herniation, resulting in disk shrinkage. This retrospective study evaluates the outcomes of a series of patients with a history of herniated disks neuroradiologically unchanged in size for over two years, treated with oxygen–ozone therapy at our center over the last 15 years. We treated 96 patients, 84 (87.5%) presenting low back pain complicated or not by chronic sciatica. No drug therapy had yielded significant benefits. A number of specialists had been consulted in two or more years resulting in several neuroradiological scans prior to the decision to undertake oxygen–ozone therapy. Our study documents how ozone therapy for slipped disks “unchanged over time” solved the problem, with disk disruption or a significant reduction in the size of the prolapsed disk material extruded into the spinal canal. PMID:27066816

  11. VARIATIONS IN DIVISION OF SCIATIC NERVE: A CADAVERIC STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vino Victor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Sciatic nerve is the largest and thickest nerve in the body. It arises from the lumbar plexus within the pelvis. The nerve emerges from the pelvis to enter into its component nerves –tibial and common peroneal nerve. The division normally occurs at the lower apex of the superior angle of popliteal fossa of the thigh. However the division shows variations which may be inside the pelvis or outside the pelvis When outside, the division may occur anywhere from exit to apex of the popliteal fossa where nerve normally divides. These abnormal divisions of the may be aetiological factors for the pathologies related to the nerve. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was done on twenty cadavers used in routine dissection for the under graduate students from Kanyakumari Government Medical College, Asaripalam, Nagarcoil, Kanyakumari District, Tamilnadu. The cadavers were fixed in 10% in formalin, glycerine, isopropylol, and sodium chloride solution. Of these, two cadavers showed higher division of sciatic nerve. The division has occurred at the lower border of piriform is and divided nerve has emerged from the lower border of the pyriformis. Variations were seen on both the sides in these two bodies. CONCLUSION A thorough knowledge of division sciatic nerve helps in differential diagnosis of sciatica of various origins & its management by the different treatment methods.

  12. A review on the pharmacological and toxicological aspects of Datura stramonium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaire, Bhakta Prasad; Subedi, Lalita

    2013-03-01

    Datura stramonium L., a wild-growing plant of the Solanaceae family, is widely distributed and easily accessible. It contains a variety of toxic tropane alkaloids such as atropine, hyoscamine, and scopolamine. In Eastern medicine, especially in Ayurvedic medicine, D. stramonium has been used for curing various human ailments, including ulcers, wounds, inflammation, rheumatism and gout, sciatica, bruises and swellings, fever, asthma and bronchitis, and toothache. A few previous studies have reported on the pharmacological effects of D. stramonium; however, complete information regarding the pharmacology, toxicity, ethnobotany and phytochemistry remains unclear. Ethnomedicinally, the frequent recreational abuse of D. stramonium has resulted in toxic syndromes. D. stramonium, in the form of paste or solution to relieve the local pain, may not have a deleterious effect; however, oral and systemic administration may lead to severe anticholinergic symptoms. For this reason, it is very important for individuals, mainly young people, to be aware of the toxic nature and potential risks associated with the use of this plant. This comprehensive review of D. stramonium includes information on botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology and ethnomedicinal uses.

  13. [Hernia of the lumbar discs in persons at work. Results of a retrospective study in a series of 189 consecutive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo-Salvador, M B; Sabaté, C; Monteiro, A; Gil, A; Ruiz, R; Querolt, J; Morgenstern, R

    1998-10-01

    Owing to recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc pathology, the functional results obtained have improved, although there are still certain factors which affect this. The results in the work place are particularly problematic. With the aim of finding an answer to the problem of relapse of the sciatica syndrome in patients operated on for hernia of the lumbar discs, we describe a study carried out in a consecutive group of patients who had had operations for hernias of lumbar discs whilst at work, within the context of revindication involved in this situation. We describe the results obtained in a series of 189 patients who had been operated on for lumbar disc pathology. Conventional open surgery was performed in 105 cases. Percutaneous nucleotomy was done in the remainder. In 17.39%, operations were done at more than one level, making a total of 265 discs operated on. These were considered good when the patient returned to his former work. Good results were obtained in 72% of the patients treated by open surgery and 68% of those treated by percutaneous nucleotomy. The re-operation rate was 8.57% for open surgery and 32.14% for percutaneous nucleotomy (p disc protrusion. Good results were obtained in 80% of those reoperated. All reoperations were done using open surgery techniques. Overall assessment of the cases, including initial and re-operations, gave good results, reaching 83.59% in the current series.

  14. Conservatively treated massive prolapsed discs: a 7-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, R T; Tavares, S P; Robertson, S C; Sharp, R; Marshall, R W

    2010-03-01

    The natural history of a lumbar hernia of the nucleus pulposus (HNP) is not fully known and clear indications for operative intervention cannot be established from the literature. Several studies have shown that the largest discs appear to have the greatest tendency to resolve. The aim of this study was to investigate whether massive prolapsed discs can be safely managed conservatively once clinical improvement has occurred. Thirty-seven patients were studied by clinical assessments and serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over 2 years. Patients had severe sciatica at first, but began to show clinical improvement despite the large disc herniations. Clinical assessment included the Lasegue test and neurological appraisal. The Oswestry Disability Index was used to measure function and changes in function. Serial MRI studies allowed measurement of volume changes of the herniated disc material over a period of time. Initial follow-up at an average of 23.2 months revealed that 83% had a complete and sustained recovery at the initial follow-up. Only four patients required a discectomy. The average Oswestry disability index improved from 58% to 15%. Volumetric analysis of serial MRI scans found an average reduction of 64% in disc size. There was a poor correlation between clinical improvement and the extent of disc resolution. A massive disc herniation can pursue a favourable clinical course. If early progress is shown, the long-term prognosis is very good and even massive disc herniations can be treated conservatively.

  15. Lazar K. Lazarević, the author who first described the straight leg raising test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drača, Sanja

    2015-09-22

    To highlight the contributions of Lazar K. Lazarević (1851-1891), physician, scientist, writer, and translator in the field of neurology. During his brief period of professional activities, Lazar K. Lazarević published 78 articles in various branches of medicine. His most important contribution to neurologic science was his description of the straight leg raising test. The article "Ischiac postica cotunnii: one contribution to its differential diagnosis" was published in Serbian in the Serbian Archives of Medicine in 1880, and republished in German in Vienna in 1884. In this article, based on 6 patients from his medical practice, Lazarević correctly explained that stretching the sciatic nerve is the cause of pain during the straight leg raising test. He gave a full description of several maneuvers used to perform the test, and described the control test. Maneuvers described by Lazarević are known by other names. Analysis of the historical events and documentation indicates that Lazarević could have described the straight leg raising test in sciatica before Lasègue. He identified stretching of the sciatic nerve as the cause of pain and presented several maneuvers, which are now known by other names as labels for various diagnostic categories. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly (Castellvi type 2A) resulting in extraforaminal impingement of the spinal nerve: a pathoanatomical study of four specimens and report of two clinical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jochen; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo

    2010-04-01

    The spinal nerve can be pinched between the transverse process of the fifth lumbar vertebra and the sacral ala. The patients are divided into two types: elderly persons with degenerative scoliosis and somewhat younger adults with isthmic spondylolisthesis. For the first time, we describe extraforaminal impingement of the spinal nerve in transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly. Selective nerve root blocks were performed in two clinical cases. One patient underwent nerve root decompression via a posterior approach. One year after operation, this patient reported no radicular or lumbar pain. The pathoanatomical study demonstrated pseudoarthrosis between the transverse process and the ala of the sacrum and showed dysplastic facet joints at the level below the transitional vertebra in all specimens. Furthermore, we present the oldest illustration of this pathological condition, published in a book by Carl Wenzel in 1824. Extraforaminal entrapment of the spinal nerve in transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly can cause radiculopathy, and osteophytes are the cause of the entrapment. Dysplastic facet joints on the level below the transitional vertebra could be one reason for "micromotion" resulting in pseudoarthrosis with osteophytes. Sciatica relief was obtained by means of selective nerve root blocks or posterior decompression via a dorsomedial approach.

  17. Distribution of Spinal Deformities/Diseases by Age and Sex in Aba and Owerri, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal deformity is an abnormal positioning /structure of the vertebral column. These deformities may be caused by degenerative spinal disease often followed by trauma. The study aimed at investigating the overall distribution of spinal deformities/diseases seen by orthopeadists in Aba and Owerri and to proffer preventive measures. The data for this work was source through hospital records and patients folder/files spanning a 5-year (2005-2009 period from selected orthopaedic specialist hospitals in Aba and Owerri metropolis. Information on patients\\' age, gender and diagnosis were collected, coded and analyzed descriptively. A total of 20901 orthopaedic cases were investigated out of which 1484 cases of spinal deformities/diseases were observed. Females (53.7% vs 46.3% were more affected compared to males. Among the spinal disorders studied, spondylosis/ spondylolisthesis (45.2% and low back pain (15.6% were found to be the most frequent occurring while spinal metastasis and osteoporosis of the vertebra each at 0.1% were the least occurring. Age distributions indicated that spondylosis/ spondylolisthesis, lumbago and Sciatica, featured more among age groups 41-60 years while scoliosis was more in 1-20 age groups. Early screening of these disorders in preschool and school children as well as the general population is necessary in other to appropriate adequate medical intervention since early onset of the disorders is evident. Proper ergonomic practice is also advocated.

  18. Back bugged: A case of sacral hydatid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak Patel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst of bone constitutes only 0.5 - 2% of all hydatidoses. The thoracic spine is the most common site of spinal hydatidoses. Primary hydatid cyst of the sacral spinal canal is rare. A 23-year-old gentleman had back pain five years ago. At that time he was evaluated and found to have a small cyst in S1 spinal canal, which was presumed to be a benign Tarlov′s cyst; and no treatment was offered. He continued to have back pain and also developed sciatica on the right side. Neurological examination presently revealed right S1 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large multiloculated cystic lesion extending from L5 to S2 spinal canal with bone erosion, both anteriorly and posteriorly. He underwent L5 to S2 laminectomy and excision of multiple cysts. The whole cyst was excised and cavity irrigated with sterilized formalin. A laparoscope was introduced in the cavity to look for extension into the pelvis and to confirm complete excision. Postoperatively, the patient received albendazole for two months. At 16 months follow-up the patient was asymptomatic. Hydatid cyst of sacrum is rare and can be missed at initial presentation. If the patient with a cystic lesion of sacral continues to have symptoms the diagnosis should be revaluated and prompt treatment should be offered.

  19. What do patients value about spinal manipulation and home exercise for back-related leg pain? A qualitative study within a controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiers, Michele; Hondras, Maria A; Salsbury, Stacie A; Bronfort, Gert; Evans, Roni

    2016-12-01

    Patient perceptions may influence the effectiveness and utilization of healthcare interventions, particularly for complex health conditions such as sciatica or back-related leg pain (BRLP). To explore BRLP patients' perceptions of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) and home exercise with advice (HEA). Qualitative study in a controlled clinical trial. Semi-structured interviews conducted after 12 weeks of treatment asked participants about satisfaction with care and whether treatment was worthwhile. An interdisciplinary research team conducted content analysis using qualitative data analysis software to identify and summarize themes. Of 192 trial participants, 174 (91%) completed interviews (66% female, age 57.0 ± 11.5 years). Participants identified interactions with providers and staff, perceived treatment effects, and information as key contributors to both their satisfaction and the worthwhile nature of treatment. HEA was liked for its convenience and ability to foster an exercise habit. SMT was liked for specific aspects of the modality (e.g. manipulation, stretching) and provider competency. Most participants reported no dislikes for SMT or HEA, but some noted the dose/time commitment for SMT and discipline of HEA as least liked aspects of the interventions. The quality of patient-provider interactions, perceived treatment effects, and information sharing influenced BRLP patients' satisfaction with care. Qualitative research describing patients' preferences can facilitate translation of study findings into practice and allow clinicians to tailor treatments to facilitate compliance and satisfaction with care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physical activity is associated with elevated arterial stiffness in patients with lumbar disk herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Gang; Cao, Zhi-gang; Zhang, Yi-na; Li, Ying; Shen, Bao-zhong

    2015-02-01

    A cross-sectional study in a general health examination. To investigate the relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and lumbar disk herniation (LDH). Lumbar disk herniation (LDH) is a major cause of low back pain and sciatica. Various vascular risk factors such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and smoking have been reported to be associated with LDH. BaPWV is an early indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis. A total of 490 participants with LDH and 490 participants without LDH were selected for the evaluation of baPWV. BaPWV was measured using an automatic device. The prevalence of LDH was calculated by the quartiles of baPWV levels. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the risk factors for baPWV. LDH patients had significantly higher readings of baPWV compared with non-LDH subjects (P<0.001). The prevalence rate of LDH gradually increased according to baPWV quartiles. In addition, the levels of baPWV tended to increase as the frequency of physical activity reduced. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, physical activity, and systolic blood pressure contributed to increased baPWV. The findings showed that LDH patients had higher baPWV levels. In addition, reduced physical activity was a risk factor contributing to increased baPWV. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of baPWV in LDH.

  1. [Stabilometric parameters associated with musculoskeletal diseases in a group of traffic policemen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centemeri, R; Vercellino, R; Taborelli, S; Latocca, R; De Vito, G; Molteni, G

    2005-01-01

    As reported by previous literature, the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders is high in population of local police officers, due to several risk factors, including awkward posture, jolt/vibrations and stress. The results of our study reveal that the most common musculoskeletal symptoms among local police officers are cervicobrachial pain, low back pain and sciatica. Low-back pain is associated with tasks exposing to awkward posture of the spine (traffic policemen and policemen involved in office-based duties); cervical and upper extremity disorders are related to the exposure to vibrations and to the upper limb posture held by motorcycle police. Among postural parameters, anterior scapular plane, flat back and Barre's vertical resulted possible predictive tests of adaptation of the postural system to the symptom pain in subjects with low back pain. In conclusion, it is necessary to adopt organizational, protective and preventive measures in order to occupational health of local police officers. They include: decrease of time periods during which an awkward posture is held, breaks between duties, prescription of ergonomic shoes, use of low-weight and low-volume duty-packs, and planning of periodical osteopathic check-ups as part of the health program, aimed to uncover initial postural alterations related to musculoskeletal disorders.

  2. Intervertebral disc degeneration: evidence for two distinct phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael A; Dolan, Patricia

    2012-12-01

    We review the evidence that there are two types of disc degeneration. 'Endplate-driven' disc degeneration involves endplate defects and inwards collapse of the annulus, has a high heritability, mostly affects discs in the upper lumbar and thoracic spine, often starts to develop before age 30 years, usually leads to moderate back pain, and is associated with compressive injuries such as a fall on the buttocks. 'Annulus-driven' disc degeneration involves a radial fissure and/or a disc prolapse, has a low heritability, mostly affects discs in the lower lumbar spine, develops progressively after age 30 years, usually leads to severe back pain and sciatica, and is associated with repetitive bending and lifting. The structural defects which initiate the two processes both act to decompress the disc nucleus, making it less likely that the other defect could occur subsequently, and in this sense the two disc degeneration phenotypes can be viewed as distinct. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  3. Development and validation of spectrophotometric method for simultaneous estimation of paracetamol and lornoxicam in different dissolution media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dasharath M; Sardhara, Bhavesh M; Thumbadiya, Diglesh H; Patel, Chhagan N

    2012-07-01

    Paracetamol and lornoxicam in combined tablet dosage form are available in the market. This combination is used to treat inflammatory diseases of the joints, osteoarthritis and sciatica. Spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been reported for their simultaneous estimation in tablet dosage form in specific solvent. This paper presents simple, accurate and reproducible spectrophotometric method for simultaneous determination of paracetamol and lornoxicam in tablet dosage form in different dissolution media. The reported method is helpful in determination of paracetamol and lornoxicam during dissolution study. Simple, sensitive, accurate and economical spectrophotometric method based on an absorption correction equation was developed for the estimation of paracetamol and lornoxicam simultaneously in tablet dosage form in different dissolution media at different pH. Paracetamol showed absorption maxima at 243 nm in 0.1N HCland phosphate buffer pH 6.8, while lornoxicam showed absorption maxima at 374 nm in 0.1N HCland phosphate buffer pH 6.8. The linearity was obtained in the concentration range of 4-12 μg/ml for paracetamol and 4-16 μg/ ml for lornoxicam. The concentrations of the drugs were determined by an absorption correction equation method. The results of analysis have been validated statistically by recovery studies.

  4. Cauda equina syndrome secondary to lumbar disc herniation: Surgical delay and its relationship with prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foruria, X; Ruiz de Gopegui, K; García-Sánchez, I; Moreta, J; Aguirre, U; Martínez-de Los Mozos, J L

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether surgical treatment delayed for more than 48 hours in patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) influenced the clinical outcome. A retrospective study of 18 patients treated in our hospital from March 2000 to January 2012, after presenting with CES. The pre- and post-operative clinical status was determined: existence of back pain and/or sciatica, sensory disturbance in the perineum, sensory and motor deficits in the lower extremities, and the degree of sphincter incontinence (complete or incomplete CES). A clinical assessment was performed using the Oswestry disability index. As regards the onset of symptoms, 44% (8 of 18) of patients were treated at an early stage (within 48 hours). None of the patients with complete CES operated in the early stage had urinary incontinence, and also had greater motor recovery. Of the 5 patients with complete CES who underwent delayed surgery, 3 showed residual urinary incontinence. A mean of 12.55 was obtained on the Oswestry disability index scale at the end of follow-up. Although no statistically significant difference was found in our study, we observed greater motor and sphincter recovery in patients who were operated on within 48 hours. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Windt, Daniëlle Awm; Simons, Emmanuel; Riphagen, Ingrid I; Ammendolia, Carlo; Verhagen, Arianne P; Laslett, Mark; Devillé, Walter; Deyo, Rick A; Bouter, Lex M; de Vet, Henrica Cw; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2010-02-17

    Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care clinicians use patient history and physical examination to evaluate the likelihood of disc herniation and select patients for further imaging and possible surgery. (1) To assess the performance of tests performed during physical examination (alone or in combination) to identify radiculopathy due to lower lumbar disc herniation in patients with low-back pain and sciatica;(2) To assess the influence of sources of heterogeneity on diagnostic performance. We searched electronic databases for primary studies: PubMed (includes MEDLINE), EMBASE, and CINAHL, and (systematic) reviews: PubMed and Medion (all from earliest until 30 April 2008), and checked references of retrieved articles. We considered studies if they compared the results of tests performed during physical examination on patients with back pain with those of diagnostic imaging (MRI, CT, myelography) or findings at surgery. Two review authors assessed the quality of each publication with the QUADAS tool, and extracted details on patient and study design characteristics, index tests and reference standard, and the diagnostic two-by-two table. We presented information on sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for all aspects of physical examination. Pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity were computed for subsets of studies showing sufficient clinical and statistical homogeneity. We included 16 cohort studies (median N = 126, range 71 to 2504) and three case control studies (38 to100 cases). Only one study was carried out in a primary care population. When used in isolation, diagnostic performance of most physical tests (scoliosis, paresis or muscle weakness, muscle wasting, impaired

  6. Oral steroids for acute radiculopathy due to a herniated lumbar disk: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Harley; Firtch, William; Tyburski, Mark; Pressman, Alice; Ackerson, Lynn; Hamilton, Luisa; Smith, Wayne; Carver, Ryan; Maratukulam, Annu; Won, Lawrence A; Carragee, Eugene; Avins, Andrew L

    2015-05-19

    Oral steroids are commonly used to treat acute sciatica due to a herniated disk but have not been evaluated in an appropriately powered clinical trial. To determine if oral prednisone is more effective than placebo in improving function and pain among patients with acute sciatica. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted from 2008 to 2013 in a large integrated health care delivery system in Northern California. Adults (n=269) with radicular pain for 3 months or less, an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score of 30 or higher (range, 0-100; higher scores indicate greater dysfunction), and a herniated disk confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging were eligible. Participants were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive a tapering 15-day course of oral prednisone (5 days each of 60 mg, 40 mg, and 20 mg; total cumulative dose = 600 mg; n = 181) or matching placebo (n = 88). The primary outcome was ODI change at 3 weeks; secondary outcomes were ODI change at 1 year, change in lower extremity pain (measured on a 0-10 scale; higher scores indicate more pain), spine surgery, and Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores (0-100 scale; higher scores better). Observed baseline and 3-week mean ODI scores were 51.2 and 32.2 for the prednisone group and 51.1 and 37.5 for the placebo group, respectively. The prednisone-treated group showed an adjusted mean 6.4-point (95% CI, 1.9-10.9; P = .006) greater improvement in ODI scores at 3 weeks than the placebo group and a mean 7.4-point (95% CI, 2.2-12.5; P = .005) greater improvement at 52 weeks. Compared with the placebo group, the prednisone group showed an adjusted mean 0.3-point (95% CI, -0.4 to 1.0; P = .34) greater reduction in pain at 3 weeks and a mean 0.6-point (95% CI, -0.2 to 1.3; P = .15) greater reduction at 52 weeks. The prednisone group showed an adjusted mean 3.3-point (95% CI, 1.3-5.2; P

  7. Treinamento aeróbico prévio à compressão nervosa: análise da morfometria muscular de ratos Aerobic training previous to nerve compression: morphometry analysis of muscle in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisangela Lourdes Artifon

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Ciatalgia origina-se da compressão do nervo isquiático e implica em dor, parestesia, diminuição da força muscular e hipotrofia. O exercício físico é reconhecido na prevenção e reabilitação de lesões, porém quando em sobrecargas pode aumentar o risco de lesões e consequente déficit funcional. OBJETIVO: Avaliar efeitos de treinamento aeróbico prévio a modelo experimental de ciatalgia em relação a parâmetros morfométricos dos músculos sóleos de ratos. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: 18 ratos divididos em três grupos: simulacro (mergulho, 30 segundos; exercício regular (natação, dez minutos diários; e treinamento aeróbico progressivo (natação em tempos progressivos de dez a 60 minutos diários. Ao final de seis semanas de exercício, os ratos foram submetidos ao modelo experimental da ciatalgia. No terceiro dia após a lesão, foram eutanasiados e tiveram seus músculos sóleos dissecados, pesados e preparados para análise histológica. Variáveis analisadas: peso muscular, área de secção transversa e diâmetro médio das fibras musculares. RESULTADOS: Observou-se diferença estatisticamente significativa para todos os grupos quando se comparou músculo controle e aquele submetido à lesão isquiática. A análise intergrupos não apresentou diferença estatisticamente significativa para nenhuma das variáveis analisadas. CONCLUSÃO: Tanto o exercício físico regular quanto o treinamento aeróbico não produziram efeitos preventivos ou agravantes às consequências musculares da inatividade funcional após ciatalgia.INTRODUCTION: Sciatica stems from compression of the sciatic nerve and results in pain, paresthesia, decreased muscle strength and hypertrophy. Exercise is recognized in the prevention and rehabilitation of injuries, but when performed in overload, it may increase the risk of injury and subsequent functional deficit. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of aerobic training prior to an experimental model

  8. Physical workload, ergonomic problems, and incidence of low back injury: a 7.5-year prospective study of San Francisco transit operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Niklas; Rugulies, Reiner; Ragland, David R; Syme, S Leonard

    2004-12-01

    The etiologic role of biomechanical factors for low back injury (LBI) needs to be confirmed in prospective studies that control for psychosocial factors. Complete baseline information on 1,233 vehicle operators was gathered during medical examinations and by questionnaire. First LBI during 7.5 years of follow-up was ascertained from insurance records. Hazard ratios and etiologic fractions were analyzed with Cox regression models stratified by injury severity and controlling for age, sex, height, weight, ethnicity, and biomechanical and psychosocial job factors. Severe LBI was defined as medically diagnosed postlaminectomy syndrome, spinal stenosis, herniated lumbar disc, sciatica, or spinal instability. An exponential dose-response relationship was found between weekly driving hours and incidence of first LBI. Indicators of physical workload were more strongly associated with more severe low back injuries compared to less severe injuries. Rates of severe LBI increased 39% for every 10-hr increase in weekly driving (hazard ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.68). Higher risks of severe LBI were also found among operators performing heavy physical labor on cable cars (hazard ratio 2.76, 95% confidence intervals 1.24-6.14) or reporting more ergonomic problems at baseline (HR for upper quartile 1.65 (95% confidence interval 1.08-2.50). Estimates of etiologic fractions suggest that reduction of ergonomic problems to the low level currently experienced by 25% of drivers would result in a 19% reduction of severe LBI among all drivers. A change from full- (more than 30 hr) to part-time driving (20-30 hr) could reduce the number of severe LBI by 59%, although this gain would be reduced to 28% at the company level if injuries expected among additional employees, hired to maintain full service are included. Duration of professional driving and ergonomic problems are independent and preventable risk factors for LBI even after adjustment for psychosocial factors.

  9. MULLIGAN MOBILIZATION VERSUS STRETCHING ON THE MANAGEMENT OF PIRIFORMIS SYNDROME A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samahir Abuaraki Elbkheet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Piriformis syndrome is a commonly overlooked specific cause of low back pain. Apart from mimicking the sciatica-like symptoms, unilateral piriformis tightness can cause rotational dysfunction and pain in the lumbar region. This could lead to low back pain which is a common musculo skeletal problem and a major reason for activity limitation. Stretching the piriformis tightened muscle is a preferred choice of treatment against surgical intervention to release the muscle. Mulligan’s mobilization is based on movement with mobilization which is proven to be effective in many musculo skeletal dysfunctions including the lumbar spine. The purpose of this study is to explore and compare the two treatment methods in relieving the low back pain in clinical conditions with piriformis syndrome. Methods: In this experimental study, 40 patients with piriformis syndrome were selected and divided into two groups. One group was given only piriformis stretching for the tightened muscle and the other group given Mulligan mobilization for lumbo sacral joints. VAS and lower limb functional index were taken to compare before and after the treatment regime of 4 weeks. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in both pain scale and lower limb mobility and function. But there was significant improvement in pain relief and LLFI after the treatment regime in both groups compared to the pre-treatment status. Conclusion: Even as the piriformis syndrome is caused by the tightness of the muscle, the consequence in the lower back and lumbar spine mobility can be improved by a Mulligan mobilization as a single mode of intervention.

  10. CONSERVATIVE THERAPY VERSUS EPIDURAL STEROID INFILTRATION IN MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC LOW BACK ACHE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Roshan D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sciatica due to lumbar intervertebral disc herniation is one of the most common causes of radicular pain in an adult working population. This study aims at studying the effectiveness of conservative management of lumbar disc herniation as an alternative to surgical measures. METHODS: A prospective study of 100 patients with lumbar disc herniations who were treated conservatively were followed up at intervals of 1 month, 6 months and 1 year. Patients planned for conservative treatment were treated with pharmacological therapy, rest and physiotherapy. Those planned for epidural steroid injections were administered a single dose of steroid one level higher than the lesion in the epidural space. The collected data was analyzed by Chi square. RESULTS: Our results showed that in both genders, epidural steroid infiltration yielded better results than conservative treatment. Occupation had no discernible effect on the magnitude of disc herniation. People with sedentary lifestyle recovered better with epidural steroid infiltration as compared to the heavy physical labor group. Irrespective of disc bulge, protrusion or extrusion, the epidural steroid injection group showed significant improvement in symptoms as compared to conservative treatment. Smokers tended to show delay in the recovery as compared with the non-smoker group. The amount of disc herniation is not directly proportional to the outcome of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Epidural steroid infiltration showed significant improvement in symptoms of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation thereby avoiding disc surgery. Conservative management for atleast 4 to 6 weeks can be recommended followed by epidural steroid in those patients without improvement. Cessation of smoking should be an integral part of the treatment.

  11. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine: Feasibility of a new institutional protocol for improved patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner Juraj

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image guided spinal injections are successfully used in the management of low back pain and sciatica. The main benefit of CT-guided injections is the safe, fast and precise needle placement, but the radiation exposure remains a serious concern. The purpose of the study was to test a new institutional low-dose protocol for CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine to reduce radiation exposure while increasing accuracy and safety for the patients. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospective database during a 4-month period (Oct-Dec 2011 at a German University hospital using a newly established low-dose-CT-protocol for periradicular injections in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation and nerve root entrapment. Inclusion criteria were acute or chronic nerve root irritation due to lumbar disc hernia, age over 18, compliance and informed consent. Excluded were patients suffering from severe obesity (BMI > 30, coagulopathy, allergy to injected substances, infection and non-compliant patients. Outcome parameters consisted of the measured dose length product (mGycm2, the amount of scans, age, gender, BMI and the peri-interventional complications. The results were compared to 50 patients, treated in the standard-interventional CT-protocol for spinal injections, performed in June-Oct 2011, who met the above mentioned inclusion criteria. Results A total amount of 100 patients were enrolled in the study. A significant radiation dose reduction (average 85.31% was achieved using the institutional low-dose protocol compared to standard intervention mode in CT-guided periradicular injections in lumbar spine. Using the low-dose protocol did not increase the complications rate in the analyzed cohort. Conclusions Low-dose-CT-protocols for lumbar perineural injections significantly reduce the exposure to radiation of non-obese patients without an increase of complications. This increases long-time patient

  12. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthila Mahesha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy is the least invasive procedure for lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome, quality of life, neurologic function, and complications. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with lumbar disc prolapse who were treated with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy from May 2012 to January 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and at yearly interval thereafter. The outcome was assessed using modified Macnab′s criteria, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index. Results: The mean followup period was 2 years (range 18 months - 3 years. Transforaminal approach was used in 84 patients, interlaminar approach in seven patients, and combined approach in nine patients. An excellent outcome was noted in ninety patients, good outcome in six patients, fair result in two patients, and poor result in two patients. Minor complications were seen in three patients, and two patients had recurrent disc prolapse. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar disc prolapse. It has the advantage that it can be performed on a day care basis under local anesthesia with shorter length of hospitalization and early return to work thus improving the quality of life earlier. The low complication rate makes it the future of disc surgery. Transforaminal approach alone is sufficient in majority of cases, although 16% of cases required either percutaneous interlaminar approach or combined approach. The procedure definitely has a learning curve, but it is acceptable with adequate preparations.

  13. Preoperative motor deficit in lumbar disc herniation and its influence on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the impact of motor deficit (MD on pain, disability, depression and quality of life measures of patients with LDH prior to a specific treatment. Methods: A total of 254 consecutively enrolled patients with LDH associated to neurological impairment and sciatica who have not responded to conservative treatment were evaluated. After reviewing the exclusion criteria, 168 were included. Validated instruments were used in the preoperative period to evaluate: pain, disability, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Results: Normal motor strength was observed in 57 (33.9% patients and MD was observed in 111 (66.1% cases. No statistically significant differences were observed between patients with and without MD regarding gender, age, level of herniation, lateralization and workers' compensation. Regarding quality of life, no difference was detected in the eight domains of SF36 and between the PCS and MCS groups. The only difference observed was a higher disability rate in the MD group, with the mean ODI difference being 7.84 (CI 95%: 1.82â€"13.87; p=0.011. Motor weakness was observed in 35.1% (n=39/111 of patients who had abnormal results at the motor evaluation, being related to severity (X²: 46.058; p<0.0001. Conclusion: In patients with LDH without prior specific treatment, the presence of MD did not modify the pain, disability, depression measures and self-reported quality of life. The MD has no discriminative power for measures of quality of life in patients with LDH.

  14. Femoroacetabular impingement: bone marrow oedema associated with fibrocystic change of the femoral head and neck junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.L.J. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom) and Department of Radiology, Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jamesslj@email.com; Connell, D.A. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); O' Donnell, P. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, RNOH Stanmore, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    Aim: To describe the association of bone marrow oedema adjacent to areas of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction in patients with femoroacetabular impingement. Materials and methods: The clinical and imaging findings in six patients with bone marrow oedema adjacent to an area of fibrocystic change at the femoral head and neck junction are presented. There were five males and one female (age range 19-42 years, mean age 34.5 years). Three patients were referred with a clinical suspicion of femoroacetabular impingement, two with suspected osteoid osteoma and one with a clinical diagnosis of sciatica. The volume of bone marrow oedema (grade 1: 0-25%, grade 2: 26-50%, grade 3: 51-75% and grade 4: 76-100% of the femoral neck width), presence of labral and articular cartilage abnormality, joint effusion, and femoral head and neck morphology were recorded. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) identified fibrocystic change in the anterolateral aspect of the femoral head and neck junction in all cases (mean size 9 mm, range 5-14 mm, three multilocular and three unilocular cysts). The volume of oedema was variable (one grade 1, two grade 2, one grade 3 and two grade 4). All patients had abnormality of the anterosuperior labrum with five patients demonstrating chondral loss. An abnormal femoral head and neck junction was identified in five patients. Conclusion: The radiological finding of fibrocystic change at the anterosuperior femoral neck with or without bone marrow oedema should prompt the search for femoroacetabular impingement. Bone marrow oedema may rarely be identified adjacent to these areas of cystic change and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bone marrow oedema in the femoral neck.

  15. Surgical management of symptomatic low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent and young adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevski Svetoslav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present retrospective study is to draw attention to symptomatic low back pain in adolescent patients, in order to encourage earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment. The study assessed the radiological, clinical features and surgical outcomes of 13of this kind of patient. Materials and Methods: Out of a series of 983 consecutive cases (1999-2011 of lumbar disc excisions from our neurosurgical institution, 13-1,32% of the patients were between the ages of 15 and 20 mean 17,84. Fifteen operations, including two reoperations, were performed on this patient group, by a conventional microsurgical procedure. The indications for surgery were failure of conservative treatment, intractable pain and/or progressive neurological impairment. Results: Low back pain and monoradicular sciatica were the main complaints in 77%, but findings of neurological deficits were rare - 1 case. The surgical findings revealed a protruding disc in eleven cases, one lateral recess stenosis and one lumbar synovial cyst. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively by their physicians more than 3 months without success. On the day of discharge, Kirkaldy-Willis criteria results were excellent or good in 92% of patients. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years with an average of 1 year and 2 months. The results were excellent in 10 patients and good in 3 patients. Discussion: We demonstrate that the cause of low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent patients may not only be a cause of herniated lumbar disc or lateral recess narrowing. Very rarely these symptoms may be caused by lumbar synovial cysts. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of adolescent patients is able to relieve the clinical symptoms quickly. Clinical symptoms such as low back pain and leg pain and the neurologic deficit disappear within 3 months after surgery.

  16. Midline lumbar fusion using cortical bone trajectory screws. Preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Bielecki

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF using cortical bone trajectory is an alternative method of transpedicular spinal fusion for degenerative disease. The new entry points’ location and screwdriving direction allow the approach-related morbidity to be reduced. Aim: To present our preliminary experience with the MIDLF technique on the first 5 patients with lumbar degenerative disease and with follow-up of at least 6 months. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis was performed on the first 5 patients with foraminal (4 or central (1 stenosis operated on between December 2014 and February 2015. Three patients were fused at L4–L5 and two at the L5–S1 level. Results: No intra- or post-operative complications occurred with this approach. An improvement regarding the leading symptom in the early postoperative period (sciatica 4/4, claudication 1/1 was achieved in all patients. The mean improvements in the visual analogue scale for low back and leg pain were 2.2 and 4.8 respectively. The mean Oswestry Disability Index scores were 52% (range: 16–82% before surgery and 33% (range: 12–56% at 3-month follow-up (mean improvement 19%. At the most recent follow-up, 4 patients reported the maintenance of the satisfactory result. The early standing and follow-up X-rays showed satisfactory screw placement in all patients. Conclusions : In our initial experience, the MIDLF technique seems to be an encouraging alternative to traditional transpedicular trajectory screws when short level lumbar fusion is needed. Nevertheless, longer observations on larger groups of patients are needed to reliably evaluate the safety of the method and the sustainability of the results.

  17. SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF SYMPTOMATIC LOW BACK PAIN AND MONORADICULAR LEG PAIN IN ADOLESCENT AND YOUNG ADULT PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevski Svetoslav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present retrospective study is to draw attention to symptomatic low back pain in adolescent patients, in order to encourage earlier diagnosis and surgical treatment. The study assessed the radiological, clinical features and surgical outcomes of 13 of this kind of patient. Materials and Methods: Out of a series of 983 consecutive cases (1999–2011 of lumbar disc excisions from our neurosurgical institution, 13–1,32% of the patients were between the ages of 15 and 20 mean 17,84. Fifteen operations, including two reoperations,were performed on this patient group, by a conventional microsurgical procedure. The indications for surgery were failure of conservative treatment, in tractable pain and/or progressive neurological impairment. Results: Low back pain and monoradicular sciatica were the main complaints in 77%, but findings of neurological deficits were rare — 1 case. The surgical findings revealed a protruding disc in eleven cases, one lateral recess stenosis and one lumbar synovial cyst. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively by their physicians more than 3 months without success. On the day of discharge, Kirkaldy-Willis criteria results were excellent or good in 92% of patients. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years with an average of 1 year and 2 months. The results were excellent in 10 patients and good in 3 patients. Discussion: We demonstrate that the cause of low back pain and monoradicular leg pain in adolescent patients may not only be a cause of herniated lumbar disc or lateral recess narrowing. Very rarely these symptoms may be caused by lumbar synovial cysts. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of adolescent patients is able to relieve the clinical symptoms quickly. Clinical symptoms such as low back pain and leg pain and the neurologic deficit disappear within 3 months after surgery.

  18. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rounsaville, M.C.; Green, J.P.; Vaeth, J.M.; Purdon, R.P.; Heltzel, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: HandP, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients.

  19. The prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease with inflammatory low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lo Nigro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, are Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, are frequently complicated by joint complaints with prevalence that varies between 10 and 28 %. The IBD related arthropathy may be expressed as peripheral arthritis or axial one frequently indistinguishable from the classical ankylosing spondylitis (AS. According to ESSG criteria for spondyloarthropathy, the presence of synovitis or the inflammatory back pain (IBP in IBD patients is diagnostic for spondyloarthropathy, but for diagnosis of as also radiological criteria must be fulfilled. There are few studies regarding the radiological prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with IBD. We examined, by plain film radiograms of pelvis, 100 sacroiliac joints (SJ of 50 IBD patients with IBP. The New York (1984 SJ radiological score with gradation from 0 to 4 was applied. Total sacroiliac score (SJS was summarized between left and right side (from 0 to 8. Fourteen patients fulfilled New York modified criteria for AS and 8 patients had unilateral 2nd grade sacroiliitis. Only 4 of 14 AS patients (28% were HLA B27 positive. Thirty patients had localized IBP, 10 extended to buttock and 4 extended to sacrum. Sixteen patients had sciatica-like extension of back pain. A difference in SJS between left and right side were observed only in CD patients (1,3± 0,8 e 0,8± 0,9 respectively; p<0,05, but not in UC (1,5± 1,2 vs 1,5± 1,3; p=ns nor in total IBD patients (1,4± 1 vs 1,2± 1,2; p=ns. Total SJS was higher in UC respect CD, but not significantly (2,9± 2,3 vs 2,1± 1,5; p=ns. Our data confirm the importance of these symptoms in patients with IBD, who need to be carefully investigated also for these aspects.

  20. MR findings of degenerative changes of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine: sequential changes after disc herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Joon [Choong-Ang Gil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Yoo Mi; Hwang, Hee Young [College of Medicine, Dankook University, Chenoan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    To evaluate the relationship between MR changes of the nucleus pulposus and the time interval after traumatic disc herniation. T2-weighted MR images of 132 patients with back pain and/or sciatica were reviewed. The changes of signal intensity, central cleft and height of the nucleus pulposus were used as criteria of disc degeneration and they were graded as normal, mild, moderate and severe degree of degeneration. Putting these criteria together we provided integrated grade of degeneration of the nucleus pulposus(grade 0-3). To get the preliminary data for normal and age-related disc degeneration, we measured the disc height by age groups and disc levels and analyzed the relationship between the age of the patients and the signal intensity, cleft and height in normal disc levels of the 132 patients. In 68 patients of 88 levels disc herniation, we analyzed the relationship between symptom duration and the degree of degeneration. Among these 68 patients we selected 14 patients(16 levels) who were under 30 years of age and had history of recent trauma to minimize data distortion from age related degeneration and ambiguity of initiation point of degeneration. In this group we analyzed the relationship between the time period after traumatic disc herniation and the degree of degeneration. The age of the patient had close relationship with the grade of signal intensity, central cleft, and disc height and grade of degeneration of the nucleus pulposus in normal discs. In 88 levels of herniated discs, the duration of symptom and degree of degeneration showed moderate correlation. In 14 patients of disc herniation who were under 30 years old and had trauma history in recent 2 years, grade 1 disc degeneration occurred in average 3.7 months after trauma. Although it was difficult to proceed statistical analysis in the last group because of small patients number, the degree of degeneration of nucleus pulposus had close relationship with the duration after traumas or duration of