WorldWideScience

Sample records for schools nursing

  1. Marginalization and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia Ann

    2004-01-01

    The concept of marginalization was first analyzed by nursing researchers Hall, Stevens, and Meleis. Although nursing literature frequently refers to this concept when addressing "at risk" groups such as the homeless, gays and lesbians, and those infected with HIV/AIDS, the concept can also be applied to nursing. Analysis of current school nursing…

  2. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  3. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  4. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  5. Ethical Problems Experienced by School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solum, Linda L.; Schaffer, Marjorie A.

    2003-01-01

    This study explored school nurses' experience of ethical conflict in school nursing through interviews with six school nurses. The study examined how school nurses resolved ethical problems and the rationale used to resolve them. Emergent themes of ethical problems were professional relationship conflicts, delegation to and supervision of health…

  6. Managing Food Allergies at School: School Nurses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-20

    This podcast highlights the leadership role of school nurses in the management of food allergies in schools. It also identifies CDC food allergy resources for schools.  Created: 1/20/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/20/2015.

  7. The Power of Influence: School Nurse Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazyck, Donna; Cellucci, Margaret; Largent, Piper

    2015-07-01

    School nurses have influence, and this influence is ignited with school nurse stories. School nurses must tell school staff, leaders, families, and students what they do to help students access their education. School boards, city councils, and legislators need to know the knowledge, skills, and judgment school nurses use daily. NASN understands that school nurses benefit from a "how to" kit and has developed tools to empower school nurses in advocating for their important role in supporting the health and learning of students. This article provides an overview this newly developed electronic toolkit while at the same time reinforcing the power of influence when sharing your stories. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. School Nurses Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchell, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Susan Kitchell decided to become a school-based healthcare provider after working for more than twenty years in pediatrics and pediatric critical care at Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. She needed a position with daytime hours within her field of expertise that allowed her time to spend with her family. She began working as a school nurse in…

  9. A Mentoring Program for New School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Connie

    2003-01-01

    Until recent years, school nursing practice consisted mainly of screenings and first aid. However, the changing health, social, and emotional needs of children in the school setting have brought about an expansion of school nursing services. Now school nurses must not only perform routine first aid and screenings, but they must also carry out…

  10. School nurse intention to pursue higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-10-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's degree. In many states, the bachelor's degree is required for all school nurses, and many school nurses are prepared at the masters' and doctoral levels. The purpose of this study was to examine the intention of Louisiana school nurses to pursue higher education in nursing. A survey was distributed to all members of the Louisiana School Nurses Organization, and results indicated that 65% of the participants were motivated to return to school. Incentives and barriers to pursuing higher education were identified, and strategies for overcoming these barriers were proposed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. The perceived perceptions of head school nurses in developing school nursing roles within schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morberg, Siv; Lagerström, Monica; Dellve, Lotta

    2009-11-01

    To gain a deeper understanding of how Swedish head school nurses perceive their leadership in developing school health care. A well-functioning school health care is important for promoting the health of children and young people. Constructivist-grounded theory was used to analyse 11 individual interviews with nine head school nurses. Head school nurses strive to find a balance between what they experience as vague formal goals and strong informal goals which leads to creating local goals in order to develop school health care. The head school nurse's job is experienced as a divided and pioneering job in which there is uncertainty about the leadership role. They provide individual support to school nurses, are the link between school nurses and decision makers and highlight the importance of school nurses' work to organizational leaders. This study shows that school health care needs to be founded on evidence-based methods. Therefore, a structured plan for education and training in school health care management, based on research and in cooperation with the academic world, would develop the head school nurses' profession, strengthen the position of school health care and advance the school nurses' work.

  12. Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ane; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    and children of different ages. When used for child obesity prevention, motivational interviewing was connected with dilemmas which should not be left to the individual nurse but be handled in practice by the school health service management. It is suggested to distinguish carefully between obesity prevention...... a prevention strategy targeting children with a high risk of obesity with an intervention conducted by school nurses using motivational interviewing.Motivational interviewing is a counselling method to bring about behavioural change (Miller and Rollnick 1995). Effect has been documented for a range of problem...... for what data told about motivational interviewing. Next, specifically according to the keywords of the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques. Key results : The study showed that the motivational interviewing spirit and techniques are integrated, inseparable, and adapted by the school nurses...

  13. School Nurse Intention to Pursue Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa; White, Debra

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the Institute of Medicine recommended that 80% of the nurses possess a minimum of a bachelor of science in nursing by 2020 and double the number of doctorally prepared nurses. This has prompted a significant number of registered nurses to advance their educational level. School nurses in Louisiana are not required to have a bachelor's…

  14. Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and Midwifery. Education in ... 1 University of Rwanda, College of medicine and health sciences Kabgayi school of Nursing and Midwifery,. 2&4 University of ... Lack of knowledge and access to current clinical practice guidelines were identified as barriers to integration.

  15. School Nurse Role in Electronic School Health Records. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltz, Cynthia; Johnson, Katie; Lechtenberg, Julia Rae; Maughan, Erin; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that Electronic Health Records (EHRs) are essential for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) to provide efficient and effective care in the school and monitor the health of the entire student population. It is also the position of…

  16. School Nurse Perspectives regarding Their Vocational Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shirley G.; Firmin, Michael W.

    2009-01-01

    This is a phenomenological, qualitative study of 25 school nurses employed in a large, urban school district in the Midwestern section of the United States. The study's participants possess histories of professional work experiences in nursing specialties other than school nursing. Thematic analysis of the data revealed three prominent factors…

  17. Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Duke University School of Nursing's Impact on Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda. Patricia Moreland, Isabelle Soule, Linda Vanhook, Linda Baxter, Claire McKinley Yoder, Michael V Relf ...

  18. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  19. Comparison of Administrators' and School Nurses' Perception of the School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Rebecca; Reffel, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The current tenuous status of public education funding requires that school nurses be proactive in advocacy efforts on behalf of their school nursing programs. Advocating for nursing practice within an educational setting presents unique challenges. Lack of state or national consensus for support of school nurse services creates an opportunity for…

  20. School Nurses: Positive Deviant Leaders in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Victoria J.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of leadership theories are examined to support the idea that school nurses can be positive deviants in the school setting. Transformational leadership, situational leadership, and complexity theory can all be used by school nurses to create positive change in the school environment because all recognize the need for flexible leadership…

  1. School nurses: positive deviant leaders in the school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Victoria J

    2009-02-01

    A variety of leadership theories are examined to support the idea that school nurses can be positive deviants in the school setting. Transformational leadership, situational leadership, and complexity theory can all be used by school nurses to create positive change in the school environment because all recognize the need for flexible leadership in a changing environment. The complex and chaotic nature of the school setting requires organizational leaders to be flexible and to have the ability to recognize and address its changing needs. The school nurse can develop personal power to be used as an appropriate agent for change using Benziger's 12-step process. Conflict and cultural consonance promotion provide opportunities for the school nurse to demonstrate leadership skills within the school community. Positive deviants can be found in any setting. They demonstrate winning behaviors that can be adopted by their peers. School nurses, in their unique role, can use their leadership behaviors to promote the health of their school environment.

  2. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Anderson, Linda J W; Rising, Shannon

    2016-06-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic survey on their use of public health interventions as defined by the wheel. Although 67% of the participants were not familiar with the Public Health Intervention Wheel, respondents reported conducting activities that were consistent with the Wheel interventions. Screening, referral and follow-up, case management, and health teaching were the most frequently performed interventions. Intervention use varied by educational level, age of nurse, years of practice, and student population. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a relevant and useful framework that provides a language to explain population-based school nursing practice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. The Smallpox Threat: The School Nurse's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary E.; Didion, Judy

    2003-01-01

    Today, with the threat of bioterrorism and war, there is a new dimension to the traditional role of the school nurse. The smallpox threat to public health will invoke the school nurse's role as an educator, liaison, and consultant in the community. This article discusses smallpox, the vaccination process, adverse effects, and postvaccination care.…

  4. Rural school nurses' asthma education needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, K; Winkelstein, M; Calabrese, B; Nanda, J; Quartey, R; Butz, A; Resto, M; Huss, R; Rand, C S

    2001-05-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying children with asthma and providing care during school hours. Educational programs designed to improve nurses' asthma knowledge and practices have concentrated on urban settings. The purpose of this investigation was to determine asthma-related practices and educational needs of rural school nurses. A survey about asthma was mailed to school nurses in all counties of the state of Maryland and in Washington, D.C. Responses were compared between rural Maryland counties and counties from the remainder of Maryland and Washington, D.C. The survey addressed attitudes and beliefs, function and roles, medication administration, and educational needs about asthma. We found that rural nurses used peak flow meters less often to assess and monitor asthma, requested fewer referrals for asthma, had fewer interactions with health room assistants, and had reduced access to asthma educational resources. Also, they provided less asthma education in the schools than other school nurses. These results suggest a need for comprehensive asthma educational programs in rural areas that are based on national guidelines, and that address the unique needs of rural school nurses. These programs should also emphasize the need for open communication between rural school nurses, health room assistants, primary care providers, and parents/caregivers.

  5. Concussions--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Anne L.; Wyckoff, Leah J.

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is an essential member of the team addressing concussions. As the school-based clinical professional on the team, the school nurse has the knowledge and skills to provide concussion prevention…

  6. Advantages of Re-Establishing Hospital Based Schools of Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Dahl, Susan

    2006-01-01

    This study examined perceptions of hospital-based nursing schools among nursing professionals to determine whether this type of nursing education model is viable in the modern nursing context. Nursing education is faced with the twin problems of insufficient nurses, which creates a demand for rapid education of nurses, and ensuring adequate clinical quality of nurses, which creates a demand for more extensive undergraduate clinical training. Hospital-based nursing schools are three-year progr...

  7. School nurses' perceptions of empowerment and autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSisto, Marie C; DeSisto, Thomas Patrick

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore Kanter's Theory of Structural Power in Organizations, using school nurses and to answer the research question of whether there is a relationship between empowerment and autonomy in school nurses. This study found a positive relationship between the nurses' perceptions of empowerment and autonomy. The school nurses surveyed perceived themselves to have a high degree of autonomy and a moderate degree of empowerment, and they reported that their access to informal power structures was higher than their access to formal power structures in their school systems. School nurses can benefit by understanding factors that can increase their empowerment in the workplace. They need to understand the organizational structure of their workplace to increase their effectiveness and job satisfaction.

  8. Educational Preparation for the Role of the School Nurse: Perceptions of School Nurses in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify the perceptions of currently practicing school nurses regarding their baccalaureate nursing education and determine if they felt adequately prepared to effectively practice in the role of a school nurse. A descriptive, quantitative on-line survey was conducted of Washington State…

  9. Demystifying pediculosis: school nurses taking the lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, Deborah J

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of Pediculosis capitis, or head lice, is fraught with misinformation, myths, and mismanagement. Common myths include the need to exclude children from school, the need to remove all visible nits ("no-nit" policies), the need for massive environmental cleaning, that head lice live for long periods of time, and that schools are a common location for lice transmission. Head lice are a common childhood nuisance, causing embarrassment and emotional trauma in both children and families. This article explores and challenges the commonly held beliefs about the identification, management, and treatment of Pediculosis by presenting current recommended evidence-based practice. It also challenges pediatric nurses, and school nurses in particular, in alignment with the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) Position Statement on Pediculosis Management in the School Setting, to act as change agents for reasonable and effective school policies and practices.

  10. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

  11. Behind Closed Doors: School Nurses and Sexual Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, Dorothy; Koren, Ainat; Morgan, Betty; Shipley, Sara; Hardy, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    School nurses can play a key role in providing sexual education in schools. However, they often face barriers from the school administration and concerned parents. Additionally, school nurses may have limited formal preparation in managing sexual health issues. This study used a descriptive qualitative method to explore the school nurses'…

  12. School Nurse Workload: Staffing for Safe Care. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatowski, Rosemary; Endsley, Patricia; Hiltz, Cynthia; Johansen, Annette; Maughan, Erin; Minchella, Lindsey; Trefry, Sharonlee

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that daily access to a registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as a school nurse) can significantly improve students' health, safety, and abilities to learn. To meet the health and safety needs of students, families, and school communities, school nurse…

  13. Empowerment in School Nursing Practice: A Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Professional empowerment is vital to nurses' productivity and job satisfaction. A grounded theory study was conducted to describe the basic social process experienced by school nurses in relation to professional empowerment. Interviews with 10 school nurses led to the development of a situation-specific theory of school nurse empowerment,…

  14. The Complementary Roles of the School Nurse and School Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Baszler, Rita; Wright, Janet

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the unique combination of school nursing services and school-based health centers (SBHCs) facilitate positive health outcomes for students. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is responsible for management of the daily health…

  15. Hemophilia: The Role of the School Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Mary Lou; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Care of the school student with hemophilia requires a cooperative effort by the health care team. A multidisciplinary approach is suggested for the team, whose members include a hematologist, orthopedist, oral surgeon, geneticist, physical therapist, social worker, and school nurse. (JD)

  16. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: School Nurse Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Initial symptoms and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually occur between 10 and 20 years of age, although younger cases are reported. The complicated nature of IBD diagnosis and treatment can interfere with physical and emotional development that normally occurs in school-age children and adolescents. The school nurse should be…

  17. Tourette Syndrome and the School Nurse. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ort, Sharon I.; And Others

    Information on Tourette Syndrome (TS), as well as transient and chronic tic disorders, is provided in this pamphlet for the school nurse, who can support and educate the child, family, and other school personnel. Information is included on genetic factors and behaviors that may be connected to TS: obsessive-compulsive symptoms, hyperactivity,…

  18. Administrator Leadership Styles and Their Impact on School Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles R

    2018-01-01

    In comparison to other professional staff in an educational based setting, the registered professional school nurse has unique roles, responsibilities, education, training, and scope of practice. In carrying out this unique and specialized role, school nurses operate under a building administrator, the leader of the building and often the immediate supervisor of the school nurse. In addition, many school nurses in small districts are the only registered professional nurse employed by the school. The building administrator's leadership style not only sets the tone for the day-to-day operations in the school but also impacts the school nurse functioning and program implementation. This article reviews the three most common types of leadership styles as defined by Kurt Lewin-laissez-faire, democratic, and coercive/authoritarian-and their potential impact on school nursing practice. In addition, the article provides recommendations for school nurses for successful practice with regard to supervisor leadership styles.

  19. Innovation and effectiveness: changing the scope of school nurses in New Zealand secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Bridget; Thomas, David; Moore, Dennis; Anderson, Angelika; Bennetts, Phillipa; Earp, Karlynne; Dawson, Dianne; Treadwell, Nicky

    2008-04-01

    To describe the changing role of school nurses in eight New Zealand (NZ) secondary schools from low socio-economic areas with high Pacific Island and Māori rolls. An evaluation of a pilot addressing under-achievement in low-decile schools in Auckland, NZ (2002-05). Annual semi-structured school nurse interviews and analysis of routinely collected school health service data were undertaken. Two patterns of school nurse operation were identified: an embracing pattern, where nurses embraced the concept of providing school-based health services; and a Band-Aid pattern, where only the basics for student health care were provided by school nurses. School nurses with an embracing pattern of practice provided more effective school-based health services. School health services are better served by nurses with structured postgraduate education that fosters the development of a nurse-practitioner role. Co-ordination of school nurses either at a regional or national level is required.

  20. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  1. Delivery of nursing care in Alabama public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Allison J

    2009-02-01

    Many states, including Alabama, allow registered nurses (RNs) in school settings to delegate procedures such as assistance with medication to unlicensed assistive personnel. In Alabama, the Board of Nursing(the Board) is accountable for enforcing the regulations that allow for this action. The Alabama Board of Nursing Administrative Code addresses delegation by school nurses and lists specific tasks that cannot be delegated because they require nursing judgment. As a result of this reporting requirement, Alabama's Center for Nursing, a division of the Board of Nursing, implemented an annual survey of school nurses to determine how nursing care is delivered to students in Alabama public schools. This study investigates the results of this survey and its implications for school nursing both in Alabama and in other states.

  2. School Nurses' Experiences with Motivational Interviewing for Preventing Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Ane Høstgaard; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interviewing is a counseling method used to bring about behavior change; its application by school nurses for preventing obesity in children is still new. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses, shows how school nurses adapted motivational interviewing and integrated it into their daily practice along with…

  3. New Dimensions in School Nursing Leadership. Proceedings of the Conference on New Dimensions in School Nursing Leadership Sponsored by the National Council for School Nurses, School Health Division of the AAHPER (Washington, D.C., Aug. 3-5, 1968).

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, Washington, DC.

    This report contains the proceedings of the first National Conference for School Nurses. The 68 school nurses who participated in the conference represented 38 States, U.S. Territories, and Canada. The following papers are included: "Purposes and Plan of the Conference,""Overview of School Nursing Today,""The School Nurse in Mental Health,""The…

  4. The United Kingdom National Healthy School Standard: A Framework for Strengthening the School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklander, Molly K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze the school nursing role within the National Healthy School Standard (NHSS) in the United Kingdom with a view toward clarifying and strengthening the role of school nurses globally. Within the National Healthy School Standard framework, school nurses serve an integral role in linking health and education…

  5. School nurses' perceptions of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J H; Desmond, S M; Ruppert, E S; Stelzer, C M

    1987-10-01

    A random sample of 250 nurses from the American School Health Association membership were sent a questionnaire concerning childhood obesity; 88% responded. Most (85%) believed normal weight was important to children's health and that school nurses should be role models by maintaining normal weight (77%). Most also believed counseling children and their parents about weight loss was difficult (71%) and that schools need to do more to alleviate childhood obesity (65%). At least 75% believed all schools should offer a comprehensive health curriculum with units on nutrition and weight control. Likewise, all schools should eliminate "junk food" machines and make special low-calorie lunches available. Only 25% felt competent to prescribe weight loss programs for children, and only 30% found counseling about weight loss professionally gratifying. One-fourth believed, that with proper guidance, children could lose significant amounts of weight or maintain that weight loss. The nurses believed in the importance of normal weight, but appeared skeptical of children's abilities to lose weight as well as their own abilities to provide children with guidance to do so. Finally, they perceived a need for schools to be more active and involved in dealing with childhood obesity.

  6. School Nurses Avoid Addressing Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh Kraft, Lisbet; Rahm, GullBritt; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2017-01-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a global public health problem with major consequences for the individual child and society. An earlier Swedish study showed that the school nurses did not initially talk about nor mention CSA as one form of child abuse. For the child to receive adequate support, the disclosure is a precondition and is dependent on an…

  7. The impact of school nursing on school performance: a research synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin

    2003-06-01

    School nurses work in an educational setting. Due to budget cuts, different goals, and confusion between educators and nurses regarding the school nurse role, school nurses are being asked to demonstrate their effectiveness and justify their presence in elementary and secondary schools. Although school nursing was first initiated 100 years ago, a review of the literature published since 1965 indicates that 15 studies have been conducted that examine the impact of school nurses on academic performance. However, today many articles have recommended more research linking school nursing to educational outcomes. This article synthesizes the results of 15 research articles. Findings from these studies indicate that nursing interventions targeted at specific populations, including parents, have had significant effects. A relationship between school nurses' interventions and absenteeism is also suggested. Limitations of these studies are discussed, along with suggestions for future research.

  8. School Nurse Evaluations: Making the Process Meaningful and Motivational

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Kathryn H.; Overman, Muriel; Guttu, Martha; Engelke, Martha Keehner

    2013-01-01

    The professional standards of school nursing practice provide a framework to help school nurses focus on their unique mission of promoting health and academic achievement for all students. Without the standards, the nurse’s role can become task oriented and limited in scope. By using an evaluation tool that reflects the standards, nurses not only…

  9. Adolescent Smoking Cessation: Development of a School Nurse Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Greg; O'Connell, Meghan; Cross, Donna

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of a range of strategies to engage and to enhance secondary school nurse involvement in teenage smoking prevention and cessation. School nurses were willing to assist students to quit smoking, but they felt unprepared. Information provided by nurses involved in a three-stage review,…

  10. Nursing Delegation to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in the School Setting. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagginello, Joan; Blackborow, Mary; Porter, Jessica; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting can be a valuable tool for the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), when based on the nursing definition of delegation (American Nurses Association [ANA], 2012) and in…

  11. School-Sponsored Before, After and Extended School Year Programs: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Elizabeth; Buswell, Sue Ann; Morgitan, Judith; Compton, Linda; Westendorf, Georgene; Chau, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) has the educational and clinical background to coordinate the necessary school health services to provide students with the same health, nutrition, and safety needs while attending…

  12. Ethics and the HPV Vaccine: Considerations for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mary P.

    2008-01-01

    School nurses are at the forefront of health care providers for many families of junior high and high school students and are used as primary sources of information and guidance about recommended student vaccinations. In the case of the relatively new vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV), school nurses must be both knowledgeable about the…

  13. Sports Trauma Management and the High School Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Richard J.; Shute, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    The hypotheses that school nurses would not be able to pass a standardized test of sports trauma management and that certified athletic trainers would score higher on this test were investigated. Results revealed that athletic trainers were indeed more knowledgeable than school nurses regarding athletic injuries among the high school population.…

  14. Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

    2006-01-01

    Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory…

  15. Refocusing research priorities in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M; Ardizzone, Laura; Enlow, William; Hickey, Kathleen; Jeon, Christie; Kearney, Joan; Schnall, Rebecca; Larson, Elaine L

    2013-01-01

    It is critical for schools of nursing to periodically reassess their scholarly programs to ensure that their conceptual framework and approaches address current challenges and enhance productivity. This article describes the process undertaken at Columbia University School of Nursing to evaluate scholarly enterprise so that it remains relevant and responsive to changing trends and to revise our research conceptual model to be reflective of the foci of our clinicians and researchers. As part of a larger strategic initiative, a two-phase Research Excellence Planning and Implementation Workgroup was convened, consisting of a broad representation of faculty and administrative staff, with an overall goal of expanding scholarly capacity. During Phase I, members developed measurable outcomes and tactics and revised the school's conceptual research model. In Phase II, the workgroup implemented and monitored tactics and presented final recommendations to the dean. To measure progress, faculty members completed a survey to establish baseline scholarship and collaboration with results indicating room for growth in interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaboration. Ongoing assessment of outcomes includes Web-based tracking of scholarly activities and follow-up surveys to monitor expansion of faculty collaboration. We recommend this process to other schools committed to sustainable, increasingly relevant scholarship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rethinking the admission criteria to nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulruf, Boaz; Wang, Ying Grace; Zhao, Yipin Jessica; Baker, Heather

    2011-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify the best predictors for student achievements (Undergraduate Grade Point Average (UGPA)) in their first year in an undergraduate nursing programme. Data were acquired from the Tracking Project database which is held by the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. The data (n=134) included information on student demographics, final year secondary school achievements (National Certificate of Educational Achievement Grade Point Average (NCEAGPA) & NCEA Credits), university admission ranking scores, and achievements in first year in the undergraduate nursing programme (UGPA). Linear regression models were used to identify the best predictors for first year students' UGPA in the nursing programme. The regression models suggest that the best predictor for the first year GPA is the NCEAGPA (beta=.488; R(2)(for the entire model)=.53), followed by the admission ranking scores (beta=.308; R(2)=.40). Based on these findings, it is suggested that a Dual Admission Model (DAM) be utilised whereby students could be admitted either by the current university admission criteria or by an alternative model, which is purely based on the predictability of achievement within the nursing programme. Application of the DAM to other institutions/countries was discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Emergency Preparedness and Response in the School Setting--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Christine M.; Haynie, Kathey; Davis, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) provides leadership in all phases of emergency preparedness and response. School nurses are a vital part of the school team responsible for developing emergency response procedures for the…

  18. Rural-urban disparities in school nursing: implications for continuing education and rural school health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M; Fullerton, Lynne; Sapien, Robert; Greenberg, Cynthia; Bauer-Creegan, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the professional and educational challenges experienced by rural school nurses. We conducted this study to describe disparities between the urban and rural professional school nurse workforce in New Mexico and to identify how best to meet the continuing education needs of New Mexico's rural school nurse workforce. We analyzed state data from a 2009 New Mexico Department of Health school nurse workforce survey (71.7% response rate). We included all survey respondents who indicated working as a school nurse in a public school setting in any grade K-12 and who identified their county of employment (N = 311). Rural school nurses were twice as likely as metropolitan nurses to provide clinical services to multiple school campuses (67.3% compared to 30.1%, P Rural school nurses were less likely than metropolitan nurses to have received recent continuing education on anaphylaxis (P health (P = .0004), and suicide risk identification and prevention (P = .015). Online courses and telehealth were identified by rural school nurses as among the preferred means for receiving continuing education. Our findings support the provision of online courses and telehealth content to address urban-rural disparities in school nursing education and support rural school health. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  19. Identification and Comparison of Interventions Performed by Korean School Nurses and U.S. School Nurses Using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjoo; Park, Hyejin; Nam, Mihwa; Whyte, James

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) interventions performed by Korean school nurses. The Korean data were then compared to U.S. data from other studies in order to identify differences and similarities between Korean and U.S. school nurse practice. Of the 542 available NIC interventions, 180 were…

  20. The Role of the School Nurse in Providing School Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Nursing, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The school nurse has a crucial role in the seamless provision of comprehensive health services to children and youth. Increasing numbers of students enter schools with chronic health conditions that require management during the school day. This policy statement describes for pediatricians the role of the school nurse in serving as a team member…

  1. School Nurse Case Management: Achieving Health and Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaiuto, Maria M.

    2007-01-01

    Educators and health care professionals alike understand that healthy students are likely to be successful learners. The goal of school nurse case management is to support students so that they are ready to learn. This article describes the outcomes of a 4-year process improvement project designed to show the impact of school nurse case management…

  2. School Nurse-Delivered Adolescent Relationship Abuse Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, Claire A.; Dick, Rebecca; Gilkerson, Fern; Mattern, Cheryl S.; James, Lisa; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background: Project Connect is a national program to build partnerships among public health agencies and domestic violence services to improve the health care sector response to partner and sexual violence. Pennsylvania piloted the first school nurse-delivered adolescent relationship abuse intervention in the certified school nurses' office…

  3. Academic dishonesty in schools of nursing: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocko, Marilyn N

    2014-03-01

    Academic dishonesty in schools of nursing is surprisingly common. The following literature review defines academic dishonesty, describes the scope of the problem, and sheds light on factors that affect student behaviors that lead to academic dishonesty in schools of nursing. Finally, barriers to and best practices for solutions to the problem will be reviewed as they appear within the literature. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. School Nurse Resilience: Experiences after Multiple Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Lisa; Myers, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative descriptive study explored the experiences of school nurses in coastal Louisiana, who were affected by Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in 2008 and who had also been in the path of destruction caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences of school nurses affected by repeated…

  5. Behavioral Health Emergencies Managed by School Nurses Working with Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M.; Greenberg, Cynthia; Sapien, Robert; Bauer-Creegan, Judith; Hine, Beverly; Geary, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Background: As members of interdisciplinary teams, school nurses provide behavioral health services. Studies indicate that school nurses may lack sufficient continuing education in adolescent behavioral health and in the management of behavioral health emergencies, specifically. We conducted this study to describe the adolescent behavioral health…

  6. Business Continuity Planning for Nursing Schools: Preparation for Potential Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerwic, Julie J; Rosen, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Nursing schools are vulnerable to disasters, ranging from pandemics to weather emergencies, fires, and acts of terrorism. To ensure minimal disruptions to teaching, provision of care, research, and other critical missions, nursing faculty and administrative leaders should develop a business continuity plan. The business continuity plan can help faculty, students, and administration identify critical functions and alternative plans if an emergency occurs. We offer our experience as a guide for other nursing schools.

  7. Frequent Visitors: Somatization in School-Age Children and Implications for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Matthews, Alicia

    2010-01-01

    There is a gap in the nursing literature regarding children who frequently visit school nurses' offices with recurrent unexplained physical symptoms. A review of the scientific health literature was undertaken to examine the clinical presentation, associated variables, and implications for school nurses regarding children who are frequent school…

  8. Team Crisis: School Psychologists and Nurses Working Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Kevin P.; Osher, David; Maughan, Erin D.; Tuck, Christine; Patrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Schools are often the geographic and sociological center of a community. Given modern community emergencies and challenges, schools should make the most of this role and best allocate their resources to maximize the positive impact they have during difficult times. This article uses the vantage point of school psychologists and school nurses from…

  9. Educators' and Parents' Perception of What School Nurses Do: The Influence of School Nurse/Student Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin; Adams, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine how ratios influenced relationships between school nurses and the educators and parents with whom they work; and how the relationships influenced the understanding and value of the school nurse. A purposeful sampling of 33 participants from four states (New Hampshire, Vermont, Michigan, and…

  10. School nurse experiences with prescription opioids in urban and rural schools: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison-Sharp, Ella; Estrada, Robin Dawson; Elio, Alice; Prendergast, Melissa; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the use of prescription opioids in schools. The current study aimed to: (1) describe the context within which school nurses encounter student opioid prescriptions; (2) assess school nurses' preferences for training and student education; and (3) explore urban-rural differences in school nurses' experiences and training preferences. A convenience sample of school nurses (n = 633) from North Carolina and South Carolina participated in a brief, anonymous, online survey. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically and statistical tests (t-tests and Chi-square tests) were performed to investigate urban-rural differences. Many school nurses (40.3%) had encountered a student with an opioid prescription, but only 3.6% had naloxone available in case of an overdose. Most school nurses (69.9%), especially rural school nurses, believed students would benefit from opioid education (74.9 versus 66.6%, p = 0.03). The majority of school nurses (83.9%) were interested in opioid-related training. Many school nurses encounter students with prescription opioids and would like additional opioid-related training. The potential benefits of providing naloxone access to prevent opioid-related deaths at schools should be explored.

  11. A Strategy to Promote Successful Transition to School Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon-Jones, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share the findings of implementing a standardized, blended approach to school nurse orientation. This includes using classroom training, mentor/supervisory support, and skills labs to assure specific competencies that are needed for new nurses to successfully transition into this independent setting. This includes a description of the specialized skills and knowledge that are needed to successfully transition into this nursing specialty. School nurses are caring for more complex students. For example, students who were once homebound requiring tube feedings, ventilator, and tracheostomy care are now attending schools. They are responsible for triaging students with diverse needs which requires critical thinking skills. They case manage students with chronic diseases including: diabetes, asthma, life threatening food allergies and seizures. Lastly, school nurses manage students with risky behaviors related to drug usage, bullying and unprotected sex resulting in pregnancy.

  12. School Nurses' Role in Asthma Management, School Absenteeism, and Cost Savings: A Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eunice; Rivera, Diana Austria; Perlroth, Daniella; Becker, Edmund; Wang, Nancy Ewen; Landau, Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Background: With increasing budget cuts to education and social services, rigorous evaluation needs to document school nurses' impact on student health, academic outcomes, and district funding. Methods: Utilizing a quasi-experimental design, we evaluated outcomes in 4 schools with added full-time nurses and 5 matched schools with part-time nurses…

  13. Supporting Student Mental Health: The Role of the School Nurse in Coordinated School Mental Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, Jill H.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Bobo, Nichole

    2015-01-01

    School nurses play a critical role in the provision of mental health services in the school environment and are valuable members of the coordinated student mental health team. They possess expertise to navigate in today's complicated educational and health care systems, and it is estimated that school nurses spend 33% of their time addressing…

  14. Development of a School Nursing Research Agenda in Florida: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Barry, Charlotte D.

    2006-01-01

    Research is important to the image, visibility, and viability of school nursing. Each state school nursing association should evaluate member commitment to school nursing research based on their unique set of financial, educational, and organizational resources. A 3-round Delphi study was conducted in which Florida school nurses identified…

  15. School nurse perceptions and knowledge of pediatric toileting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlen, Angela M; Boyt, Margaret A; Cooper, Christopher S

    2012-04-01

    We surveyed school nurses on toileting conditions in schools, their level of understanding related to normal toileting patterns in school-age children, and whether they are in need of additional resources to promote healthy toilet habits for their students. An Institutional Review Board approved web-based survey with 34 questions was employed; 562 nurses completed the survey and 97% were currently employed as school nurses. Participants were invited via email blasts through national school nursing associations and the Iowa Department of Education. Only 48% and 33% of respondents suspected an underlying health problem in children with frequent urination and bladder or bowel accidents, respectively. Despite 61% reporting never receiving information about children's normal elimination patterns, 43% had been asked to provide such information to teachers. Only 42% felt they had adequate resources to respond to such requests. School nurses requested information about treatment of dysfunctional elimination (67%), health effects of childhood toileting habits (65%), fluid intake guidelines (44%) and improvement of bathroom facilities (39%); 70% were unaware of local providers specially trained to treat children with these problems. Our survey results suggest that school nurses need additional information and resources in order to promote healthy elimination patterns in school children. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Planning for a Violent Intruder Event: The School Nurse's Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selekman, Janice; Melvin, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    School shootings occur too frequently and often with devastating results. The key to prevention and mitigation of these events is to have a plan that is simple, up-to-date, disseminated, and practiced. This article discusses the steps that school nurses can take to work with school administration to prepare themselves, their staff, and their students.

  17. Barriers to Asthma Management as Identified by School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma rates are increasing in children. School nurses have opportunities to care for children with asthma but need to overcome barriers impacting their ability to manage asthma in the school setting. This study (a) assessed barriers present in the school setting, (b) determined the impact of barriers on performance of asthma management behaviors,…

  18. Nurse-Led School-Based Child Obesity Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sharon; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M.

    2015-01-01

    School-based childhood obesity prevention programs have grown in response to reductions in child physical activity (PA), increased sedentariness, poor diet, and soaring child obesity rates. Multiple systematic reviews indicate school-based obesity prevention/treatment interventions are effective, yet few studies have examined the school nurse role…

  19. Who enters nursing schools and why do they choose nursing? A comparison with female non-nursing students using longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hyun; Jung, So Young; Jang, Sunyoung

    2010-02-01

    Understanding who enters nursing schools and why they choose nursing is essential for the nursing profession to recruit and retain their successors. This study was conducted to examine the characteristics of nursing students and factors influencing their career decision, as compared with non-nursing students. We used public databases of the Korean Education & Employment Panel that followed 4000 high school students in their final year of school. Out of those students, 2456 students entered a college or university and 40 students (39 females and one male) entered a nursing school. Nursing students were compared with 1011 female non-nursing students. Nursing students had lower household income. Nursing students had better high school academic achievement overall and in science. A more studious attitude and lower absenteeism were found among nursing students. For nursing students, employability (55%) followed by aptitude (20%) were the most influential factors in choosing a nursing major, while conversely, aptitude (48%) followed by employability (23%) were most important to non-nursing students. About half of nursing students answered "herself/himself" as the most influential person in choosing nursing, whereas three quarters of non-nursing students did. Nursing students had a higher rate (75%) of satisfaction with their major than non-nursing students (60%). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Baccalaureate education and American nursing homes: a survey of nursing schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-li; Brown, Janet W; Groves, Marni L; Spezia, Alicia M

    2007-11-01

    Approximately one-third of the people in the United States will pass through a long-term care facility before they die. However, the learning opportunities in this unique setting for baccalaureate nursing education remain unclear. This regional survey examined the use of nursing homes within baccalaureate nursing programs in nine southeastern states of the United States of America. A descriptive exploratory method and mailed questionnaires were used for data collection. Fifty-three nursing schools were included in the study. According to the survey, 83% of the nursing schools have used nursing homes as clinical sites to teach fundamental psychomotor skills, communication skills and physical assessment. Identified advantages of using nursing homes in baccalaureate education include: learning basic nursing skills, working with willing and helpful nursing home residents and staff, and developing positive attitude toward aging. On the other hand, the major problem encountered was lack of appropriate role models in nursing home staff. As the world population continues to age rapidly, nurse educators need to consider the advantages of clinical experiences for students in long-term care facilities.

  1. Structural Intervention With School Nurses Increases Receipt of Sexual Health Care Among Male High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, Patricia J; Harper, Christopher R; Becasen, Jeffrey S; Donatello, Robin A; Ethier, Kathleen A

    2018-01-01

    Adolescent males are less likely to receive health care and have lower levels of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) knowledge than adolescent females. The purpose of this study was to determine if a school-based structural intervention focused on school nurses increases receipt of condoms and SRH information among male students. Interventions to improve student access to sexual and reproductive health care were implemented in six urban high schools with a matched set of comparison schools. Interventions included working with school nurses to improve access to sexual and reproductive health care, including the provision of condoms and information about pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease prevention and services. Intervention effects were assessed through five cross-sectional yearly surveys, and analyses include data from 13,740 male students. Nurses in intervention schools changed their interactions with male students who visited them for services, such that, among those who reported they went to the school nurse for any reason in the previous year, those in intervention schools reported significant increases in receipt of sexual health services over the course of the study compared with students in comparison schools. Further, these results translated into population-level effects. Among all male students surveyed, those in intervention schools were more likely than those in comparison schools to report increases in receipt of sexual health services from school nurses. With a minimal investment of resources, school nurses can become important sources of SRH information and condoms for male high school students. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. DEVELOPING INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ON ENGLISH ORAL COMMUNICATION FOR NURSING SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sismiati Sismiati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The needs survey shows that English communication skill of the students in nursing school speaking classes is not well developed. Consequently, the speaking instructional materials used in the classes need to be advanced. Yalden’s (1987 Language Program Development covering Needs Analysis, Syllabus and Materials Development, Expert Validation, and Try-out is used to produce a speaking syllabus and textbook for nursing students preparing to work at hospitals abroad with the following characteristics: (1 the topics are based on the activities of nurses in hospitals; (2 the vocabulary exercises are based on the nurses’ needs in under- standing the nursing context; (3 the speaking activities are based on the needs to communicate in nursing settings using the principles of CTL; (4 the language functions are explained to support the nursing students to form their own sentences in their speaking practice. The product is found acceptable for nursing students.

  3. Making a Difference for Overweight Children: The School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Nancy W.

    2005-01-01

    This manual discusses the school nurse's role in prevention and management of overweight children from an individual student perspective and, perhaps more important, from a system perspective. Manual includes the BMI (Body Mass Index) Wheel.

  4. Developing a school nursing activity demand model Staffordhire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Jo; Patel, Divya; Hansford, Karen; Sutcliffe, Kate; Forbes-Westlake, Andrea

    2014-02-01

    Activity demand models for delivery of the Healthy Child Programme (HCP) through the school nursing workforce are limited. This paper describes the application of a potentially new activity demand model for school nursing. The model identifies what the demand for school nursing is in Staffordshire, using estimated delivery times of universal and targeted components from the HCP, numbers of children and local information around targeted activity, eg, numbers of looked after children. The model suggests that the school nursing service would spend around 60% of time on individual face to face activity, 30% on public health leadership, management and evaluation and the 10% on travel in Staffordshire. It also suggests a shortfall in workforce capacity. The model can be used to underpin commissioning decisions and service redesign and changes in practice would be required to meet the full requirements of the HCP.

  5. Emergency Preparedness--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagginello, Joan B.; Clark, Sandra; Compton, Linda; Davis, Catherine; Healy, Marilyn; Hoffmann, Susan; Tuck, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that school nurses provide leadership in all phases of emergency preparedness and management and are a vital part of the school team that develops emergency response procedures for the school setting, using an all-hazards approach. The school nurse is a vital school…

  6. The views of heads of schools of nursing about mental health nursing content in undergraduate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-05-01

    Criticisms about the mental health nursing content of Bachelor of Nursing programs have been common since the introduction of comprehensive nursing education in Australia. Most criticism has come from the mental health nursing sector and the views of key stakeholders have not been systematically reported. Heads of Schools of Nursing have considerable influence over the content of nursing programs, and their perspectives must be part of ongoing discussions about the educational preparation of nurses. This article reports the findings of a qualitative exploratory study, involving in-depth interviews with Heads of Schools of Nursing from Queensland, Australia. Thematic data analysis revealed two main themes: Realising the Goal? and Influencing Factors. Overall, participants did not believe current programs were preparing graduates for beginning level practice in mental health settings. In particular, participants believed that the quality of mental health content was influenced by the overcrowded curriculum, the availability of quality clinical placements, the strength of the mental health team, and the degree of consumer focus. The findings suggest the current model of nursing education in Australia does not provide an adequate foundation for mental health nursing practice and alternative approaches should be pursued as a matter of urgency.

  7. Individualized Healthcare Plans: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Bernadette Moran; Buswell, Sue A.; Mattern, Cheryl; Westendorf, Georgene; Clark, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse), in collaboration with the student, family and healthcare providers, shall meet nursing regulatory requirements and professional standards by developing an Individualized Healthcare Plan…

  8. Collaborative learning and competence development in school health nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Wistoft, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the process and learning outcomes of peer collaboration in a Danish health developmental project in school health nursing. The paper explores how peer collaboration influences the school nurses’ collaborative learning and competence development...... subprojects after the project was over. In the workshops, the questionnaire surveys and the focus group interviews the school nurses were asked to reflect on the developmental process, their collaboration, own and mutual pedagogical competence development. Findings Systematic peer collaboration between school...... nurses’ qualify a) their learning and ability to reflect on practice b) their communication with colleagues and children c) the development of new and innovative approaches to school health nursing. The introduction of peer collaboration, however, takes time and energy and it can be challenge...

  9. Faculty Bullying: An Exploration of Leadership Strategies to Reduce Relational Violence in Nursing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Melody F.

    2010-01-01

    Nurses eat their young. Bullying in nursing is well documented and an almost inherent part of the nursing subculture. There is no research exploring the origin of bullying in nursing. The basic premise of the study was that bullying is a learned behavior that begins in nursing school when nurse educators bully their students. With the…

  10. School Nurses Vis-a-Vis Athletic Trainers in Secondary School Sports Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews past and present views of the working relationship between a school's nurse and athletic trainer and discusses the author's own study which revealed that, compared to trainers, school nurses possess insufficient knowledge to assume adequate injury management. Offers a sample job description for a head athletic trainer. (WD)

  11. [A comparison on general education curriculum of 4-year and 3-year nursing schools in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Young; Joung, Sun-Ei; Hwang, Chung-Il

    2011-02-01

    This study was done to comparatively analyze the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea. Ten university 4-yr nursing schools were selected based on universities in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010 or "2009 Korea's Best Universities-Top 10" published by Joong-Ang Daily. Ten college 3-yr nursing schools were selected based on colleges in Korean Accreditation Board of Nursing 2010. 1) Generally 4-yr nursing schools maintained the relationships between organizational philosophy/purposes and subjects in the general education curriculum. But 3-yr nursing schools did not. 2) In 4-yr nursing schools there was a relatively higher credits ratio of general education curriculum and selective courses than in 3-yr nursing schools. 3) In 4-yr nursing schools variety of courses was relatively higher than 3-yr nursing schools. 4) In 4-yr nursing schools, operating conditions were relatively better (number of tenure professors, ratio of professors to students, Identification of exclusive organization in charge of the general education curriculum) for the general education curriculum than 3-yr nursing schools. The results identify significant differences in the general education curriculum of 4-yr and 3-yr nursing schools in Korea, indicating that 3-yr nursing schools should make efforts to improve the good quality of general education curriculum.

  12. Student views of the school nurse's role in a secondary school condom availability program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, S

    1993-10-01

    In Massachusetts, the school committee of a Boston suburb's school board agreed to start a condom availability program at the community's 2 high schools. A nurse researcher conducted 11 focus groups with 112 students to determine students' attitudes and feelings, so they can be incorporated in designing the program. Most students were White, college-bound, and professional-class. The nurse grouped most students by age, gender, and academic tracking into homogeneous groups. A common thread throughout the discussions was a need for respect from adults. Every focus group talked a lot about the risk of humiliation and loss of respect of adults if they took condoms. Students suggested that they would not use the program if it required individual counseling. Overall, the students were concerned about the school nurse's role in safer sex counseling. Sexually active females conveyed a positive relationship with the school nurse, however. The lack of consistent nursing staff contributed to students' doubts about building a relationship with the nurse. Students clearly identified an adult with whom they could feel comfortable talking about sexual matters as someone who would be relaxed, nonjudgmental, knowledgeable, and available for discussion. Based on these findings, the nurse researcher recommended that school nurses have more time to enhance skills in effective and sensitive sexuality counseling and devote more time to counseling and HIV prevention education. She also suggested that schools include more parent and student sexuality education. Developmentally appropriate HIV prevention education should be provided to all students in both junior and senior high schools each year. Final recommendations were intensive inservice education for school nurses, anonymous condom availability, and identification of other school and community personnel to support school nurses.

  13. School Nurses: Coordinating Care Through a Community/School Health Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Carolyn L; Poole, Cynthia R

    2016-11-01

    School nurses coordinate student health care for prevention and treatment to remove health barriers to learning and to school attendance. They use a team approach to manage students with chronic conditions as they transition among home, school and healthcare settings, working to develop competent self-care aligned with developmental ages of students. Care coordination ensures the continuum of care is unbroken. Meeting the health needs of low-income students can be challenging, because those students are likely to be uninsured or underinsured and often lack necessary resources, such as transportation, to access primary health care. Care coordination is a tenet of school nursing and to optimally serve low-income students, school nurses form partnerships in the community. One innovative and successful partnership is Healthy Learners, an organization that works with community healthcare providers and school district nurses to connect eligible students to needed healthcare services. Always, the goal is to keep students in school, healthy, and ready to learn.

  14. Why is psychiatric nursing not the preferred option for nursing students: A cross-sectional study examining pre-nursing and nursing school factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui Lin; Seow, Esmond; Chua, Boon Yiang; Xie, Huiting; Wang, Jia; Lau, Ying Wen; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2017-05-01

    There is a shortage of nurses working in the mental health field globally. The aim of the present study was to examine Singapore nursing students' attitudes towards specializing in psychiatric nursing by examining the pre-nursing and nursing school factors as well as attitudes towards psychiatry and personality traits. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted with 500 nursing students from four nursing institutions in Singapore. Students' attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP-18), perception of psychiatric nursing career aspects relative to other fields, and personality traits (mini-IPIP) were assessed. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression was used to examine the combined effect of factors upon the outcome. Twenty-six students (5.2%) rated "definitely decided to do" psychiatric nursing. Pre-nursing school factors associated with choosing psychiatry included ethnicity, current education, parents' wishes, having personal/family experience of mental illness, prior work experience, interest in psychiatric nursing and psychology module taken prior to current school admission. Nursing school factors such as teaching methods and clinical exposure were not associated with choosing psychiatric nursing. Positive attitudes towards psychiatry, perception of better career aspects in psychiatric nursing relative to other fields, and the personality traits of extraversion and intellect/imagination were associated with likelihood of choosing psychiatric nursing. Logistic regression revealed Malay (OR: 1.90, 1.14-3.16, p=0.013) and Indian ethnicity (OR: 2.56, 1.32-4.96, p=0.005), interest in psychiatry (OR: 22.56, 8.22-61.92, pnursing than other fields (OR: 1.91, 1.21-3.04, p=0.006), extraversion (OR: 1.09, 1.02-1.17, p=0.012) and positive attitude towards psychiatry (OR: 2.72, 1.75-4.23, pstudents choosing psychiatric nursing. The selection of psychiatry as a specialty by nursing students was affected by pre-nursing

  15. Parent Interest in a School-Based, School Nurse-Led Weight Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lee, Jiwoo

    2014-01-01

    Because one in three children is already overweight or obese, school-based interventions targeting secondary obesity prevention merit consideration. This study assessed parent interest in participating in a school-based, school nurse-led weight management program for young school-aged children. A random sample of parents ("n" = 122) of…

  16. School Nurse Summer Institute: A Model for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Marianne; Barta, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The components of a professional development model designed to empower school nurses to become leaders in school health services is described. The model was implemented during a 3-day professional development institute that included clinical and leadership components, especially coalition building, with two follow-up sessions in the fall and…

  17. Doctor of nursing practice by 2015: an examination of nursing schools' decisions to offer a doctor of nursing practice degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, Grant R; Auerbach, David I; Spetz, Joanne; Pearson, Marjorie L; Muchow, Ashley N

    2015-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing recommends that nursing schools transition their advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) programs to doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs by 2015. However, most schools have not yet made this full transition. The purpose of this study was to understand schools' decisions regarding the full transition to the DNP. Key informant interviews and an online survey of nursing school deans and program directors were performed. The vast majority of schools value the DNP in preparing APRNs for the future of the health care system. However, other important factors influence many schools to fully transition or not to the postbaccalaureate DNP, including perceived student and employer demand, issues concerning accreditation and certification, and resource constraints. Multiple pathways to becoming an APRN are likely to remain until various factors (e.g., student and employer demand, certification and accreditation issues, and resource constraints) yield a more favorable environment for a full transition to the DNP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilization of School Nurses during the Evaluation and Identification of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintosh, Constance E.; Thomas, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored school nurses' involvement during the identification and treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The extent of school nurses' collaboration with school psychologists and other educators also was studied. Participants included 100 school nurses, representing 18 states, who completed a survey on ASD. The…

  19. The Effects of Budget, Delegation, and Other Variables on the Future of School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetuan, Theresa M.; Akagi, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory research study was to survey Kansas school nurses to determine the impact of budget, delegation, and other variables on the future of school nursing. Issues of education and certification status, educational budget, delegation, school nurse-to-student ratio, number of school buildings assigned, Metropolitan…

  20. Social responsibility: conceptualization and embodiment in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen A; Connor, Ann; Kun, Karen E; Salmon, Marla E

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how a school of nursing has conceptualized and embodied social responsibility in its core values, curricular design, admission standards, clinical practice, and service learning opportunities. The school's engagement in the process of practicing social responsibility and clarifying its meaning and application has made apparent the natural linkage between social responsibility and professionalism and the deep and complex relationship between social responsibility and nursing itself. It has also revealed how a commitment to social responsibility impacts and determines for whom nurses care. Claiming social responsibility as a core value and working to refine its meaning and place has increased the school's commitment to it, concomitantly impacting education, practice, and recruitment and evaluation of faculty and students. The school views the conceptualization of social responsibility as a deepening and unfolding evolution, rather than as a formulaic understanding, and expects that its ongoing work of claiming social responsibility as a core value will continue to be enriching.

  1. Correlates of cyberbullying and how school nurses can respond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ouytsel, Joris; Walrave, Michel; Vandebosch, Heidi

    2015-05-01

    Cyberbullying is one of many online risks that affect an increasing number of children and teenagers. This form of abuse often occurs under the radar of adults as it usually takes place outside of school and away from adult supervision. Moreover, bystanders and victims are often reluctant to report what they have experienced. School nurses might be among the first to witness the real-life consequences of this virtual behavior, as involvement in cyberbullying is often correlated with psychological and behavioral problems. For this reason, school nurses should know how to recognize the warning signs so that they can respond and intervene appropriately. This article provides a discussion of what cyberbullying is and a summary of research on factors associated with cyberbullying, in terms of both victimization and perpetration. It also provides school nurses with evidence-based strategies for responding effectively. © 2014 The Author(s).

  2. There's a New Alphabet in Town: ESSA and Its Implications for Students, Schools, and School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackborow, Mary; Clark, Elizabeth; Combe, Laurie; Morgitan, Judith; Tupe, Anna

    2017-12-01

    The 2015 passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) provides state education agencies with more local control over educational planning, requires development of state accountability plans, and provides opportunities for advocacy surrounding school nursing sensitive indicators of student success. Federal Title I, II, and IV funds are available for state and local education agency utilization in meeting educational needs of impoverished students and for development of high-quality instructional and support personnel. As Specialized Instructional Support Personnel, school nurses can utilize ESSA Title funding to positively impact chronic absenteeism, school climate, and school nurse staffing. ESSA can be a resource for funding school health services and professional education. This article will assist school nurses in better understanding ESSA and how funding is allocated to states and local education agencies.

  3. Nurses Returning to School: Motivators, Inhibitors and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick W; Burman, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Health care employers and national nursing organizations are placing increased emphasis on nurses earning a baccalaureate degree or higher. This study examines the impact of motivators (professional and personal motivation), inhibitors (time constraints and employer discouragement), and job satisfaction on intent to return to school. Approximately half of the employed nurses in Wyoming were surveyed using a mailed questionnaire in the summer of 2013. Perceived employer discouragement and time constraints continued to play a direct role on intent to return to school regardless of nurse motivation or job satisfaction. However, motivation and job satisfaction also contributed to a nurse's intent to return to school. These results suggest that motivation and job satisfaction are significant regarding intent to return to school but can be limited by both perceived discouragement of one's employer and perceived time constraints. In order to meet the increasing demands of a better-educated nursing workforce, a shift in workplace dynamics may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The provision of nurse-led school based health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah; Dickinson, Annette

    2017-07-12

    Internationally, nurses have been in the forefront of delivering health care services in the school environment and whilst health care delivery in secondary and high schools is evaluated, this is not the case for services delivered in primary/elementary schools. In countries such as New Zealand there is no significant inter-service collaboration between health and education; therefore, the delivery of health services remains fragmented and underdeveloped. This discussion paper reviews the history and development of nurse-led school-based health services internationally and provides an insight into the current provision of primary school-based health services in New Zealand. The initial approach to this paper was to gain an understanding of the history of school-based health services internationally and to explore the relationship between health and education in relation to this. This assisted in providing some context and comparison with the current provision of school-based health services in New Zealand. Discussion outcome: Internationally, it is acknowledged that schools provide not only a location to deliver health services to children but also the opportunity to reach entire families and communities yet surprisingly, the development of school-based health services within the primary/elementary school sector has received minimal attention in New Zealand and worldwide. This paper supports the need for further research concerning the feasibility, provision and effectiveness of school-based health services in primary/elementary schools. In order to be effective, this should incorporate the shared needs and values of all stakeholders. The authors argue the need to develop an inter-service, collaborative, national framework for the delivery of school nursing services within the primary school sector in New Zealand. Impact statement: A collaborative framework for health service delivery into primary schools can enable early establishment of supportive health

  5. Incorporating gerontological content in the nursing curriculum. The case of AUB School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Hala; Adra, Marina; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad

    2015-01-01

    In Lebanon, the proportion of older adults (over 65 years) is on the rise. This rise is associated with increased morbidity rates and the need for age-specific medical and nursing care. The number of nurses specializing in geriatric care remains very small despite the increased need for this specialty. The nursing curriculum at the Hariri School of Nursing at the American University of Beirut (AUB) has integrated gerontological content in both undergraduate and graduate programs as an essential step to prepare future nurses for the care of the growing population of older adults and consequently to support the health care system. In line with the essential competencies proposed by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), the school of nursing at AUB is preparing entry level and advanced practice nurses to care for the geriatric population. Furthermore, developing specialists in the field of gerontology and launching an interdisciplinary graduate program on 'Care of the Older Adult' is more and more becoming a desired development for the future.

  6. School nurses' role in asthma management, school absenteeism, and cost savings: a demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eunice; Rivera, Diana Austria; Perlroth, Daniella; Becker, Edmund; Wang, Nancy Ewen; Landau, Melinda

    2013-12-01

    With increasing budget cuts to education and social services, rigorous evaluation needs to document school nurses' impact on student health, academic outcomes, and district funding. Utilizing a quasi-experimental design, we evaluated outcomes in 4 schools with added full-time nurses and 5 matched schools with part-time nurses in the San Jose Unified School District. Student data and logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of illness-related absenteeism for 2006-2007 and 2008-2009. We calculated average daily attendance (ADA) funding and parent wages associated with an improvement in illness-related absenteeism. Utilizing parent surveys, we also estimated the cost of services for asthma-related visits to the emergency room (ER; N = 2489). Children with asthma were more likely to be absent due to illness; however, mean absenteeism due to illness decreased when full-time nurses were added to demonstration schools but increased in comparison schools during 2008-2009, resulting in a potential savings of $48,518.62 in ADA funding (N = 6081). Parents in demonstration schools reported fewer ER visits, and the estimated savings in ER services and parent wages were significant. Full-time school nurses play an important role in improving asthma management among students in underserved schools, which can impact school absenteeism and attendance-related economic costs. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  7. The International School Nurse Asthma Project: Barriers Related to Asthma Management in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Garwick, Ann W.; Anderson, Lori S.; Looman, Wendy S.; Seppelt, Ann; Orlygsdottir, Brynja

    2014-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of an international study of barriers to asthma care from the perspectives of school nurses in Reykjavik, Iceland and St. Paul, Minnesota, in the context of their schools, communities and countries. Background Globally, asthma affects the health and school performance of many adolescents. School nurses play a key role by providing care to adolescents with asthma in school settings. Understanding universal barriers to asthma management in schools is important for developing interventions that are effective in multiple societal contexts. Design Exploratory, descriptive study. Methods Parallel studies were conducted from September 2008 - January 2009, through six focus groups among school nurses (N=32, in Reykjavik n=17 and St. Paul n=15) who were managing asthma in adolescents. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim in English or Icelandic. The Icelandic transcripts were translated into English. Descriptive content analytic techniques were used to systematically identify and categorize types of barriers to asthma care. Results School nurses in both countries identified common barriers such as time constraints, communication challenges and school staff barriers. The primary difference was that St. Paul school nurses identified more socioeconomic and health access barriers than school nurses in Reykjavik. Conclusion Greater cultural and linguistic diversity and socioeconomic differences in the student population in St. Paul and lack of universal health care coverage in the U.S. contributed to school nurses’ need to focus more on asthma management than school nurses in Reykjavik, who were able to focus more on asthma prevention and education. PMID:22897444

  8. Effective Recruitment of Schools for Randomized Clinical Trials: Role of School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R L; Smith, L

    2017-01-01

    In school settings, nurses lead efforts to improve the student health and well-being to support academic success. Nurses are guided by evidenced-based practice and data to inform care decisions. The randomized controlled trial (RCT) is considered the gold standard of scientific rigor for clinical trials. RCTs are critical to the development of evidence-based health promotion programs in schools. The purpose of this article is to present practical solutions to implementing principles of randomization to RCT trials conducted in school settings. Randomization is a powerful sampling method used to build internal and external validity. The school's daily organization and educational mission provide several barriers to randomization. Based on the authors' experience in conducting school-based RCTs, they offer a host of practical solutions to working with schools to successfully implement randomization procedures. Nurses play a critical role in implementing RCTs in schools to promote rigorous science in support of evidence-based practice.

  9. School Nurses' Experiences in Dealing With Bullying Situations Among Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigozi, Pamela Lamarca; Jones Bartoli, Alice

    2016-06-01

    School nurses have an important role in helping students to deal with bullying. However, most of the previously undertaken studies do not have nurses as the subjects, considering their experiences around this theme. This study used a qualitative approach through in-depth interviews with 12 school nurses (SNs). The thematic analysis was employed and supported by NVivo 10 software. Five main themes arose from the analysis: (1) understanding about bullying, (2) how they identified bullying, (3) strategies, (4) support at the workplace, and (5) SNs' role. SNs have a reasonable knowledge about this issue and are capable of helping students through dialogue. However, there is a need to be trained and have more time to be able to give proper help to the students, also using other different strategies. SNs must work more actively on this issue with schools and be supported in terms of staff numbers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Creating a Fair and Just Culture in Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnsteiner, Jane; Disch, Joanne

    2017-11-01

    : In recent years, health care organizations have been moving away from a culture that responds to errors and near misses with "shame and blame" and toward a fair and just culture. Such a culture encourages and rewards people for speaking up about safety-related concerns, thus allowing the information to be used for system improvement. In part 1 of this series, we reported on findings from a study that examined how nursing schools handled student errors and near misses. We found that few nursing schools had a policy or a reporting tool concerning these events; and that when policies did exist, the majority did not reflect the principles of a fair and just culture. This article, part 2 of the series, describes several strategies that nursing schools can use for creating such a culture.

  11. Nurse teachers' working lives: a questionnaire survey of nursing schools in Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, L; While, A E; Chen, G; Barriball, K L; Gu, S

    2011-12-01

    The study aimed to explore Chinese nurse teachers' views and experience regarding different components of their working lives. A cross-sectional survey of 18 schools of nursing offering nationally accredited baccalaureate nursing programmes across Mainland China was conducted. A total of 227 nurse teachers completed questionnaires yielding a response rate of 72%. The sample comprised mainly female, married lecturers younger than 44 years with an average teaching experience of about 10 years. The respondents were satisfied with their overall job, work, supervision and co-workers, but dissatisfied with their pay and promotion opportunities. There were statistically significant differences in several facets of job satisfaction across the respondents of different age groups, education levels, job titles and those working in the schools of different sizes. The respondents perceived their work environment to be only somewhat empowering. Their average level of professional identification was relatively high, but their overall role conflict, role ambiguity and sense of coherence were relatively low. Chinese nurse teachers had a positive feeling towards their working lives, but strategies should be developed to enhance their sense of coherence and professional commitment. It is worth noting that there is still much adjustment to be made towards the new higher education roles, but the findings may only be generalizable to similar settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  12. Challenges of Asthma Management for School Nurses in Districts with High Asthma Hospitalization Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatos, Penny; Leone, Jennifer; Craig, Ann Marie; Frei, Elizabeth Mary; Fuentes, Natalie; Harris, India Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background: School nurses play a central role in assisting elementary school children in managing their asthma, especially those in higher-risk school districts that are at increased risk of uncontrolled asthma. Study purposes are to (1) identify barriers to asthma management by school nurses in higher-risk school districts; and (2) assess the…

  13. Care of Victims of Child Maltreatment: The School Nurse's Role. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Feeser, Cindy Jo; King, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that prevention, early recognition, intervention and treatment of child maltreatment are critical to the physical well-being and academic success of students. Registered professional school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) serve a vital role in the recognition…

  14. A Qualitative Study of Egyptian School Nurses' Attitudes and Experiences toward Sex and Relationship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Shewikar; Hayter, Mark

    2014-01-01

    School nurses play a vital role in the promotion of sexual health. However, there is very limited evidence of how school nurses experience this topic in an Islamic cultural setting. Using an exploratory qualitative design, 13 in-depth interviews were conducted with Egyptian school nurses. Data were subject to thematic analysis. Four themes emerged…

  15. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combe, Laurie G.; Sharpe, Susan; Feeser, Cynthia Jo; Ondeck, Lynnette; Fekaris, Nina

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) serves a vital role in the delivery of health care to our nation's students within the healthcare system reshaped by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, commonly known as…

  16. School Nurses' Descriptions of Concerns Arising during Pupils' Health Check-Ups: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Holopainen, Arja; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the concerns and modes of action of Finnish school nurses during pupils' health check-ups. Methods: Focus group interviews with 17 school nurses were performed in 2011 and again in 2013. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: School nurses' concerns were mostly associated with the psychosocial…

  17. Providing Assistance to the Victims of Adolescent Dating Violence: A National Assessment of School Nurses' Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Hendershot, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the perceptions and practices of school nurses regarding adolescent dating violence (ADV). Methods: The membership list of the National Association of School Nurses was used to identify a national random cross-sectional sample of high school nurses in the United States (N?=?750). A valid and reliable survey…

  18. Sudden cardiac arrest in schools: the role of the school nurse in AED program implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Sharon; Broussard, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A school nurse has many obstacles to overcome when providing emergency care for an age group ranging from four to adulthood. The 21st century school nurse faces the challenges of providing care to medically fragile children at multiple sites, with high student-nurse ratios. The implementation of an Automated External Defibrillation (AED) program can assist the school nurse and staff in providing necessary life-saving services for Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) victims of all ages. The purpose of this article is to describe AED program implementation in a school setting, including the need, essential elements, benefits, and potential concerns related to this vital component of the American Heart Association five-link chain of survival.

  19. The occupational status of the graduates of Semnan Nursing School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saberlan M

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the main missions of higher education is to train the professional manpower the society needs. Higher education institutes should know the fate of their students after graduation and that how they use their expertise. Purpose: To determine the occupational status of the graduates of Semnan Nursing School. Methods: The graduates of thefirst 11 years since thefoundation of the school were included in this study. The datagathering tool was a questionnaire consisting of 7 demographic questions and 10 questions about the place of occupation, nature of the job, continuing education and scientific activities. The questionnaires were mailed to the study group addresses and the data were analyzed after receiving the answers. Results: Of the respondents, 60.22% were female. Most of them were working in hospitals and 43.01% were practicing in fields other than nursing. Only 24.72% of the respondents were unemployed for one ye9r after graduation. Most of the graduates did not continue their education, 2.61% have continued their study infields other than nursery and 6.45% have changed their field of profession. The majority showed no interest in research and writing or translating books. Also, 77.42% have not tried to publish an article in any journal and 80.64% have not participated in any scientific conference. Of the respondents, 80.64% had no contact with their prior university and only 17.2% were employed in university-affiliated hospitals. Conclusion: Long-term unemployment after graduation, unstable occupational status, practicing infields other than nursing, showing no interest in continuing education or participating in research projects, having no contact with scientific centers and not participating in national or regional health programs indicate that the enrol/ment of students in nursing schools is not consistent with their personal interests and capabilities. It is recommended to interview the students in order to determine

  20. Teaching of communication skills in Spanish nursing schools: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, G; Tazon, P; Aseguinolaza, L; Garcia-Campayo, J J

    1998-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to review the teaching of communication skills in Spain as part of the nursing curriculum. A survey was carried out to identify the practical and theoretical issues pertinent to this question. Forty Spanish Nursing Schools took part. Our survey discovered that communication skills are not generally considered in the selection process of the students because personal interviews are rarely used. Communication skills are taught in the first and second years, mainly in Fundamentals of Nursing and subjects related to Psychology and Mental Health. Nursing and psychology were the predominant professional background of the teachers. Lectures, discussion groups and workshops were the main teaching methods. The assessment, when it existed, was often theoretical and, occasionally, using a real patient or a written case report. The authors propose that the knowledge of the teaching situation in Spain is the starting point for any future projects on communication.

  1. Understanding HPV Disease and Prevention: A Guide for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood-Rayermann, Suzy; McIntyre, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) causes 99.7% of all cervical cancers. HPV Types 16 and 18 are responsible for approximately 77% of cases, and peak prevalence occurs in females younger than 25 years of age. The recent implementation of HPV vaccination provides females with the opportunity to prevent infection. School nurses are advocates of…

  2. Developing Instructional Materials on English Oral Communication for Nursing Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismiati; Adnan Latief, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The needs survey shows that English communication skill of the students in nursing school speaking classes is not well developed. Consequently, the speaking instructional materials used in the classes need to be advanced. Yalden's (1987) Language Program Development covering Needs Analysis, Syllabus and Materials Development, Expert Validation,…

  3. Multimedia technology for diabetes education of school nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require school nurses (SN) with specific diabetes training. Multimedia learning can facilitate cost-effective, convenient education of SN by diabetes educators (DE). We conducted formative research to gather qualitative and quantitative data to inform the interven...

  4. [Addictions in schools, the role of the nurse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorraine S

    2017-06-01

    The school nurse, as the health expert, must establish a climate of trust in order to help prevent addictions and implement health education actions. She draws on the experience of the young students with regard to the demands and risks of their daily life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. School Nurses and Health Education: The Classroom Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Julie; Sendall, Marguerite C.; Fleming, Marylou; Lidstone, John; Domocol, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study is to explore school nurses' experience of health education. Design: A qualitative approach, phenomenology was used to answer the question. Method: Sixteen participants were recruited through purposeful and snowball sampling. Participants undertook an audio-recorded interview which was transcribed and analysed.…

  6. Structure and Change of Some Role Perceptions in Nursing School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Arnold

    Are new values and norms learned and internalized in professional school? This question and other related ones will be considered in the study of which this paper is a preliminary report. To specify norms and to consider the structure of relations in a set of norms, nursing students' prescriptions of what various kinds of personnel in a hospital…

  7. Enhancing Geriatric Curriculum in Nursing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    People are living longer. The average age of the population is increasing, and is expected to keep growing. Any person age 65 and older is now considered "geriatric." However, although growing, this population is not receiving adequate nursing care, and results in increased pain, falls, and even death. Geriatric curriculum is becoming…

  8. Redesigning School Nursing Education in New Jersey to Address the Challenges and Opportunities of Population Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Robin M; Conway, Sharon M; Atkins, Joy D

    2017-03-01

    School health is a specialty practice of nursing positioned at the intersection of public health and population health. This article discusses the redesign of a program's curriculum with the hope of advancing and elevating the practice of school nursing. The redesign is based on NASN's Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice and is the result of a New Jersey Nursing Initiative grant awarded to a trio of adjunct faculty from Rutgers University Camden in July 2016.

  9. What Barriers and Facilitators Do School Nurses Experience When Implementing an Obesity Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Krista; Smaldone, Arlene

    2017-12-01

    A recent evaluation of a school nurse-led obesity intervention demonstrated a 5% implementation rate. The purpose of this study was to explore school nurses' perceived barriers to and facilitators of the intervention in order to understand reasons for the low implementation rate. Methods included semi-structured individual interviews with school nurses. Data were analyzed using content analysis and heat mapping. Nineteen nurses participated and eight themes were identified. Parental and administrative gatekeeping, heavy nurse workload, obesogenic environments, and concerns about obesity stigma were barriers to implementation. Teamwork with parents and school staff was a key facilitator of implementation. Nurses also noted the importance of cultural considerations and highlighted the need to tailor the intervention to the unique needs of their school environment and student population. These findings suggest that for school nurses to play a key role in school-based obesity interventions, barriers must be identified and addressed prior to program implementation.

  10. Personal Information Management for Nurses Returning to School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Katherine

    2015-12-01

    Registered nurses with a diploma or an associate's degree are encouraged to return to school to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. Until they return to school, many RNs have little need to regularly write, store, and retrieve work-related papers, but they are expected to complete the majority of assignments using a computer when in the student role. Personal information management (PIM) is a system of organizing and managing electronic information that will reduce computer clutter, while enhancing time use, task management, and productivity. This article introduces three PIM strategies for managing school work. Nesting is the creation of a system of folders to form a hierarchy for storing and retrieving electronic documents. Each folder, subfolder, and document must be given a meaningful unique name. Numbering is used to create different versions of the same paper, while preserving the original document. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiental learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialogue, school health nurse...

  12. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses assessment of the health dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, HBSC, health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children, adolescents, health dialouge, school health nurse...

  13. Developing and Establishing School-Based Sexual Health Services: Issues for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayter, Mark; Owen, Jenny; Cooke, Jo

    2012-01-01

    School-based sexual health clinics are emerging as one of the key ways to promote sexual health among young people, and school nurses play an important role in developing and delivering these services. This study used a qualitative design to explore the experiences of health professionals and policy makers involved in setting up such services in…

  14. School Nurses and Teachers: Attitudes regarding Inclusion of Breastfeeding Education in School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J.

    2010-01-01

    School nurses and middle and high school teachers (N = 107) participated in a survey that explored their attitudes and behaviors related to the inclusion of breastfeeding content to highlight the scientific and exceptional health advantages of breastfeeding and to promote a breastfeeding culture. Although some participants believed that…

  15. The challenges of undergraduate mental health nursing education from the perspectives of heads of schools of nursing in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The shortage of a skilled mental health nursing workforce is persistent and worsening. Research consistently demonstrates the inability of the comprehensive model of nursing education to meet nursing workforce needs in mental health. Introducing specialisation in mental health at undergraduate level has been suggested as a strategy to address this problem. Exploration of barriers to this educational approach is essential. The aim of this research is to examine with Queensland Heads of Schools of Nursing, the perceived barriers to a specialist mental health nursing stream within an undergraduate nursing programme. Qualitative exploratory methods, involving in-depth telephone interviews with Heads of Schools of Nursing in Queensland, Australia. Data were analysed thematically. Participants encountered a number of barriers revealed in five main themes: academic staffing; staff attitudes; funding and resource implications; industry support; entry points and articulation pathways. Barriers to the implementation of mental health nursing specialisation in undergraduate programmes are evident. While these barriers pose real threats, potential solutions are also evident. Most notably is the need for Schools of Nursing to become more co-operative in mounting mental health nursing specialisations in a smaller number of universities, where specialist expertise is identified. Quality mental health services rely on a sufficiently skilled and knowledgeable nursing workforce. To achieve this it is important to identify and implement the educational approach best suited to prepare nurses for practice in this field.

  16. Transition from High School to Associate Degree Nursing Education: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy Jessee

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is facing a critical shortage and retention of nursing students is of paramount importance. Much research has been completed related to retention in nursing education and student success, but there is very little in current literature related to issues associated with the transition from high school to associate degree nursing (ADN)…

  17. From Vocational Training to Academic Education: The Situation of the Schools of Nursing in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ewa Pilhammar

    1999-01-01

    The success of the change from vocational training to academic education for nurses in Sweden depends on faculty competence. Observations at three Swedish nursing schools and interviews with 59 nurse educators identified strategies educators used to maintain teaching competence: being "real" nurses, being prepared in different subjects,…

  18. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, leading through task force initiatives, working together to advance nursing education,…

  19. American Association of Colleges of Nursing Annual State of the Schools, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    This annual report highlights the initiatives of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing to help member schools meet the nation's demand for innovative and expanded nursing care. Information is provided in the broad areas of: the state of the schools, setting curriculum standards, working together to advance nursing education, pursuing…

  20. Delegation Guided by School Nursing Values: Comprehensive Knowledge, Trust, and Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shirley C.; Barry, Charlotte D.

    2009-01-01

    As health care institutions in the United States respond to shrinking budgets and nursing shortages by increasing the use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP), school nursing practice is changing from providing direct care to supervising activities delegated to UAP. Therefore, delegation is a critical area of concern for school nurses. The…

  1. Comparing the Number of Ill or Injured Students Who Are Released Early from School by School Nursing and Nonnursing Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Linda L.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing demand for research linking specific educational services with positive student outcomes. Little empirical evidence exists to show that school nursing services improve student success. School attendance is one of many factors that has been associated with improved learning; school nurses can affect that factor. This study…

  2. The preparedness of schools to respond to emergencies in children: a national survey of school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Wan, Eric; Avner, Jeffrey R

    2005-12-01

    Because children spend a significant proportion of their day in school, pediatric emergencies such as the exacerbation of medical conditions, behavioral crises, and accidental/intentional injuries are likely to occur. Recently, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association have published guidelines stressing the need for school leaders to establish emergency-response plans to deal with life-threatening medical emergencies in children. The goals include developing an efficient and effective campus-wide communication system for each school with local emergency medical services (EMS); establishing and practicing a medical emergency-response plan (MERP) involving school nurses, physicians, athletic trainers, and the EMS system; identifying students at risk for life-threatening emergencies and ensuring the presence of individual emergency care plans; training staff and students in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); equipping the school for potential life-threatening emergencies; and implementing lay rescuer automated external defibrillator (AED) programs. The objective of this study was to use published guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association to examine the preparedness of schools to respond to pediatric emergencies, including those involving children with special care needs, and potential mass disasters. A 2-part questionnaire was mailed to 1000 randomly selected members of the National Association of School Nurses. The first part included 20 questions focusing on: (1) the clinical background of the school nurse (highest level of education, years practicing as a school health provider, CPR training); (2) demographic features of the school (student attendance, grades represented, inner-city or rural/suburban setting, private or public funding, presence of children with special needs); (3) self-reported frequency of medical and psychiatric emergencies (most common reported school

  3. Nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people, after one year in nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österlind, Jane; Prahl, Charlotte; Westin, Lars; Strang, Susann; Bergh, Ingrid; Henoch, Ingela; Hammarlund, Kina; Ek, Kristina

    2016-06-01

    To describe Swedish nursing students' perceptions of caring for dying people after the first year of a three year in a nursing programme at three university nursing schools in Sweden. Interviews (n=17) were undertaken with nursing students at the end of their first year. A phenomenographic approach was used to design and structure the analysis of the nursing students' perceptions. The analysis resulted in five categories: 1) from abstract to reality, 2) from scary to natural, 3) increased knowledge can give bad conscience, 4) time limits versus fear of end-of-life conversations, and 5) meeting with relatives. Nursing students need to be prepared both theoretically and within practice to encounter death and dying and to care for dying persons. By combining their theoretical knowledge of dying and death with their own encounters of death and dying people in practice, the students can be supported to develop an understanding of dying and death as a natural part of life rather than something frightening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Portfolio in nursing school: myth or reality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, Chantal; Marchand, Claire

    2012-09-01

    The portfolio is a new tool that has been introduced for the setting up of a new program concerning the nurse training. It aims at the would-be nurse to improve their self-reliance and make them assess themselves through a critical and reflexive approach. Indeed, the portfolio is mostly made up of sheets that the student has to fill in when describing and analysing several professional conditions. This study is about the assessment of the relevance in the portfolio that each nurse student owns in order to make them improve their reflexive practical. The work will, thus, suggest different ways of thinking and improving the use of the tool. 30 portfolios were chosen randomly among the 2nd year students, because 180 analysis were assessed thanks to a grid. 10 viewpoints from volunteer students were gathered after several semi directive interviews. The qualitative and evaluative analysis shows that the students develop the reflexive practical throughout their trainings. It seems, indeed, relevant to choose the portfolio in order to help the students to develop this way of working. According to them, there are several positive points such as the distance towards an event, an awareness-raising of the acquisition, feedbacks about the quality of the text by the trainer and an ability to assess oneself. Yet, even though it was created 18 months ago, there are some limits such as the too short period of mentoring and feedback, the lack of time for the students to write their analysis, the fact that it is not a practical tool, and the unclear description of assessment criteria. In order to fulfil the needs, some solutions are to be found. The portfolio is clearly helpful for the students who wish to increase/improve gradually their reflexive practice. Thus, the trainer's role is crucial, when he is a supervisor.

  5. Mediating Effect of School Nurses' Self Efficacy between Multicultural Attitude and Cultural Sensitivity in Korean Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hyun Suk, PhD, RN

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Given the meaningful influence of positive multicultural attitude on cultural sensitivity and significant mediator effect of self efficacy as a school nurse between the two variables, the strategies to cultivate a positive multicultural attitude and enhance school nurses' self efficacy in their unique role should be considered in a training program. School nurses' health care services will benefit from the improvement of cultural sensitivity toward young children from multicultural families.

  6. Faculty perception of bullying in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Claudia A; Cannella, Barbara L; Wantland, Dean

    2013-01-01

    This article is a report of a study conducted to determine the prevalence of bullying among faculty members in schools or colleges of nursing. The issue of bullying of nursing faculty in the academic setting is of interest in terms of recruitment, retention, job satisfaction, and the overall quality of the work environment. This cross-sectional, descriptive study of faculty in three northeastern states of the United States was carried out in 2010. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) was used to survey faculty members in schools of nursing who award a baccalaureate degree (or higher) in nursing. A total of 473 faculty members met the inclusion criteria and responded to the NAQ-R. An iterative exploratory principal components analysis with orthogonal rotation was performed. Of the original 22 items, 13 were retained to measure the experiences of negative acts in the nursing faculty workplaces. The mean total score for the 13-item instrument was 17.90 (SD = 6.07) and ranged from 13 to 56. The resulting components structure produced three clear subscales identifying the experiences of verbal abuse, physical abuse, and devaluing. The revised 13-item instrument had a Cronbach's alpha value of .88. Experiences of bullying were reported in 169 of the 473 (36%) respondents. A significant correlation was found between meeting frequency and the report of bullying (r = .18, P ≤ .001). Administrators and senior faculty were more likely than expected to be the perpetrators of bullying. If the leaders are identified as bullies, the environment cannot be perceived as supportive and healthy. These unhealthy environments may have serious consequences related to retaining nursing faculty. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The school nursing profession in relation to Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus and field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morberg, Siv; Lagerström, Monica; Dellve, Lotta

    2012-06-01

    The aim was to define the work and professional role of school nurses, in terms of Bourdieu's key concepts of capital and habitus. A qualitative study with a deductive approach, based on data from six focus-group interviews with 24 school nurses and 15 individual interviews with school nurses. Thus, a total of 39 school nurses participated in the study. The data were analysed using content analysis. The results explain, in terms of Bourdieu's key concepts of capital and habitus, how school nurses experience their work in the educational setting. A model including different aspects of school nurses' work is shown. The new Swedish Education Act focuses on promoting students' general health, so that they are able to reach their academic potential. In this task, the school nurse is to be one of a group of several professionals working together. The present study shows how school nurses experience their professional role and their work in relation to Bourdieu's concepts of capital, habitus and field. To strengthen the school nursing profession, school nurses need to show their competence in promoting students' health. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2011 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  8. Teachers' Utilization of School Facilities and Academic Achievement of Student Nurses in Human Biology in Schools of Nursing in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usen, Onodiong Mfreke

    2016-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between teachers' utilization of school facilities and academic achievement of student nurses in Human Biology in schools of Nursing in Akwa Ibom State. Four (4) specific objectives, four (4) research questions and four (4) null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. Ex-post facto survey design was…

  9. Historical trajectory of nursing school at Technical University of Babahoyo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cecibel Vera Marquez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bachelors of the province of the Rivers, to study the careers of health had to travel to other sectors of the country, and before this necessity the Technical University of Babahoyo opened academic spaces in formation in areas of the health creating the School of Nursing with the The mission of training nurses that meet the needs of the population is in the hospital or community, and thus contribute to the improvement of the quality of life of the population of Rio de Janeiro, acting under the ethical and moral principles that society demands. This remembrance describes its historical trajectory, and its spaces of institutional growth, as well as the population coverage, being one of the races with greater demand in the university, the statistical data delivered by the Center of Leveling and Admission of the UTB, shows a Historical evolution of the UTB academic offer of the ENES processes of September 2013 and March 2015, the nursing career is among the first five races most offered among the four periods (Equipo de Apoyo y Seguimiento Acad´emico, 2015. In this way the Nursing career of the Faculty of Health Sciences, has become a space of knowledge and lucubraci´on inspired by the desire to overcome and the permanent work of a practice that strengthens the knowledge, skills and skills that Consolidate the competencies of the nurse profile.

  10. Mental Health First Aid: A Useful Tool for School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Joy

    2017-11-01

    School nurses address mental health issues of youth on a daily basis. These mental health issues include substance abuse, anxiety, depression, and even suicidal ideation. Mental health first aid is a process that seeks to help medical professionals and laypeople recognize and address someone that is having a mental health or substance abuse crisis. This article will describe an experience with a student having suicidal ideations and how the mental health action plan was used.

  11. Relationship between Emotional Intelligence and Clinical Competencies of Nursing Students in Tabriz Nursing and Midwifery School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahkar Farshi Mahni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preparing students to take over job responsibilities is one of the most challenging duties of nursing schools. The focus of nursing education should be on helping students to achieve high levels of competence in nursing care and identify factors for reinforcing it. Since desirable results have not been reported on clinical competencies of nursing students, achieving skills to control their emotions could be effective. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI and clinical competencies. Methods: In this correlational study, all nursing students in semesters 6, 7 and 8 were studied after determining the sample size in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The data were collected using three questionnaires of demographic data, the Emotional Intelligence Sharing – Sybrya and a short clinical competence. The data analysis was done through descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS 18. Results: The results of the present study showed that the total EI score and clinical competence of students was more than moderate. The relationship between total EI and clinical competence was significant. Among the subscales of EI, there was a significant relationship between social skills and clinical competence. Conclusion: The relationship between the total emotional intelligence score and clinical competence of students in this study indicated the necessity and importance of emotions in decision-making to act properly within a clinical setting. Therefore, taking part in courses designed for learning skills of emotion perception and stress management in the workplace seem to be essential.

  12. Substance abuse prevention: the role of the school nurse across the continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patestos, Chrysanthe; Patterson, Kristen; Fitzsimons, Virginia

    2014-11-01

    As a health care provider, health educator, and school/family/community liaison, the school nurse is in a unique position to act as a change agent for youth substance abuse prevention. This article discusses the roles of the school nurse as they apply to the prevention of substance abuse among school-age children, across a continuum of care model first introduced by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1994. Through careful assessment, identification of substance abuse risk factors, and promoting the enhancement of protective factors of students, both in and out of the school setting, the school nurse can play a vital role in the prevention of substance abuse. Existing tools, including the IOM Mental Health Intervention Spectrum Model, can be easily adapted to nursing practice and may prove helpful in assisting school nurses in the evaluation and implementation of effective prevention interventions in the school setting.

  13. Pregnant and Parenting Students--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Alldritt, Linda; Bushmiaer, Margo; Desisto, Marie; Lambert, Patrice; Murphy, M. Kathleen; Roland, Sharon; Selser, Kendra; Wyckoff, Leah

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses (NASN) believes that the school nurse is in a prime position to support the health and wellbeing of pregnant and parenting students and contribute to their lifelong success by linking them to resources and advocating for policies and practices that promote high school graduation. It is the position of NASN…

  14. School Nurses' Perceived Prevalence and Competence to Address Student Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Sharon H.; Connors, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to under-identification of student mental health problems and limited specialty mental health providers in schools, school nurses are often faced with identifying and addressing student mental health needs. This exploratory study assessed prevalence and types of student mental health problems encountered by school nurses, as well as their…

  15. Teacher Time Spent on Student Health Issues and School Nurse Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nina Jean; Hollis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Elementary school teacher time spent on student health issues and the relationship to school nurse services was the focus of this 2-year study. A cross-sectional design was used to survey traditional and exceptional (special needs) classroom teachers about the time they spent on health issues and their perception of school nurse presence. The…

  16. Teachers' Perceptions of Full- and Part-Time Nurses at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biag, Manuelito; Srivastava, Ashini; Landau, Melinda; Rodriguez, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    Teachers and school nurses partner together to help ensure students stay healthy and engaged in school. The purpose of this study is to generate a deeper understanding of teachers' perceptions on the benefits and challenges of working with full- or part-time school nurses. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended survey responses from 129…

  17. Presenteeism Attitudes and Behavior among Missouri Kindergarten to Twelfth Grade (K-12) School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Turner, James Austin; Kunerth, Allison K.

    2016-01-01

    Working while ill (presenteeism) with symptoms of influenza-like illness can contribute to outbreaks, but little is known about school nurse presenteeism. Missouri Association of School Nurses members (N = 396) were sent a survey in 2013/2014. A chi square test was conducted to compare having a school culture that encourages presenteeism versus…

  18. The Integration of Counseling and Nursing Services into Schools: A Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin; Troup, K. D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this comparative review was to examine the legislative evolution of school guidance and school nursing over the past century, in hopes of identifying reasons why guidance counselors have been more successful in compliance to recommended ratios than school nurses. A literature review was conducted including CINAHL, MEDLINE, ERIC and…

  19. The New Mexico School Nurse and Emergency Medical Services Emergency Preparedness Course: Program Description and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Robert; Sapien, Robert E.; Fullerton-Gleason, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    Illness and injuries are common among students and school staff. Therefore, school nurses must be prepared. In this study, a 16-hour scenario-based emergency preparedness course for school nurses was evaluated for its effectiveness. Effectiveness was measured by (a) traditional methods (written exams and confidence surveys) and (b) skills and…

  20. Connecting Students to Mental Health Care: Pilot Findings from an Engagement Program for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Rachel E.; Becker, Kimberly D.; Stephan, Sharon H.; Hakimian, Serop; Apocada, Dee; Escudero, Pia V.; Chorpita, Bruce F.

    2015-01-01

    Schools function as the major provider of mental health services (MHS) for youth, but can struggle with engaging them in services. School nurses are well-positioned to facilitate referrals for MHS. This pilot study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of an engagement protocol (EP) designed to enhance school nurses'…

  1. Influence of Perceptions on School Nurse Practices to Prevent Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quelly, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive childhood obesity prevention (COP) strategies should include increasing school nurse involvement. This study was conducted to determine the influence of key school nurse perceptions (self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers) on participation in COP practices at the individual child and school level. Florida…

  2. Using the Health Belief Model to Understand School Nurse Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Judith E.; Spencer, Gale A.

    2015-01-01

    Ten million children in the United States have asthma. Since children are in school about 6 hr a day, school nurses are positioned to intervene and influence asthma outcomes. A descriptive correlational study was designed to investigate performance of school nurses' asthma management behaviors in relationship to asthma knowledge, asthma attitude,…

  3. Delegation of School Health Services to Unlicensed Assistive Personnel: A Position Paper of the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of School Health, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents the position of the National Association of State School Nurse Consultants regarding delegation of school health services to unlicensed personnel, explaining what school health means, what safe delegation of school nursing activities requires, and how the nurse uses professional judgment to determine which activities may be delegated and…

  4. School Nurse Workload: A Scoping Review of Acute Care, Community Health, and Mental Health Nursing Workload Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the most recent (5 years) acute care, community health, and mental health nursing workload literature to understand themes and research avenues that may be applicable to school nursing workload research. The search for empirical and nonempirical literature was conducted using search engines such as…

  5. Misunderstandings in multilingual counselling settings involving school nurses and obese/overweight pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Maria B; Hulthén, Lena; Kjellgren, Karin I

    2009-01-01

    School nurses' counselling is pivotal in stemming the obesity epidemic. Barriers for good counselling such as nurses' misunderstandings and ambiguities when relating to overweight and obesity need to be addressed. In this study, we explored misunderstandings in school nurses' counselling of overweight pupils in multilingual settings, together with how school nurses talk about the condition. Counselling sessions involving eight nurses and 20 pupils (aged 8-16 years) were audio-recorded and analysed using theme-oriented discourse analysis. Statistical methods were used as a complement. The focal themes were misunderstandings and nurses' talk about overweight and obesity. Analytical themes were framing, footing and facework. Data analyses revealed three main origins of misunderstandings occurring in school nurses' counselling of obese and overweight pupils: (1) nurses' illusion that they know what advice the pupils need; (2) nurses' insensitivity to the pupils' and parents' concerns; and (3) lack of lingual understanding. School nurses' apparent difficulties to talk about overweight and obesity suggest a need to reflect on how to name these issues during counselling. School nurses' dominance and pupils'passivity were obvious. We suggest that counselling should be regarded as learning contexts and be subjected to possible quality assurance in the future.

  6. Mental health work in school health services and school nurses' involvement and attitudes, in a Norwegian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skundberg-Kletthagen, Hege; Moen, Øyfrid Larsen

    2017-08-09

    To explore school nurses' experiences with and attitudes towards working with young people with mental health problem in the school health services. Worldwide, 10%-20% of children and adolescents are affected by mental health problems. When these occur during youth, they constitute a considerable burden and are one of the main causes of disability among adolescents. School nurses are at the forefront of care for children and adolescents, identifying pupils struggling with physical, mental, psychosocial or emotional issues. A qualitative, explorative study was performed based on open-ended questions in a cross-sectional study of 284 school nurses in Norway. Inclusion criteria were as follows: working as a school nurse in the school health services with children and adolescents between the ages of 11-18 years. A qualitative inductive content analysis was conducted. Three generic categories emerged: perception of their role and experiences with mental health: the school nurses acknowledge their important role in work with adolescents focusing on their mental health. Perception of their professional competence: the school nurses described a lack of confidence and unmet training needs concerning mental health problems. Experiences with collaboration: the school nurses requested more knowledge about inter- and multidisciplinary cooperation regarding follow-up of pupils with mental health problems. The school nurses lacked knowledge and confidence in respect of working with children and adolescents suffering from mental health problems. This may be a barrier to giving pupils adequate aid. Nurses need to acquire more knowledge about mental health problems among children and adolescents as this is a growing public health issue. Educational programmes for school nurses need to be revised to achieve this. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Does poor school satisfaction inhibit positive outcome of health promotion at school? A cross-sectional study of schoolchildren's response to health dialogues with school health nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2006-01-01

    Students with high school satisfaction were more likely to reflect on and discuss the content of health dialogues with school health nurses, and more likely to follow the nurse's advice. This was demonstrated among 5205 students ages 11-15-years, in a random sample of schools in Denmark....

  8. Preliminary testing of an asthma distance education program (ADEP) for school nurses in Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman-Casdorph, Heidi; Pinto, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Asthma remains one of the most challenging chronic illnesses faced by school nurses both nationally and in the State of West Virginia. There is a clear need to provide ongoing continuing asthma education to school nurses. However, nurses face many barriers to receiving this education. The purpose of this pilot project was to develop and evaluate distance learning technology as a method to deliver continuing asthma education to school nurses in West Virginia. A sample of 20 school nurses from 2 counties in West Virginia participated in the study using the Wimba live classroom distance learning program. Significant modest improvements were found in both the intervention groups compared to a control group postintervention. The results of this pilot study are promising and show that distance learning technology could be a viable solution for school nurses to receive asthma continuing education.

  9. A Study of the Influence of the New Careers in Nursing Program on the Culture of Participating Schools of Nursing. New Careers in Nursing. Research Report. ETS RR-15-28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Catherine M.; Kevelson, Marisol J. C.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, ETS conducted a study investigating how the New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) program may have influenced the culture of participating schools of nursing. Select schools of nursing received grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to provide scholarships and support services for students in accelerated nursing programs. Case studies…

  10. Experiences of Sexual Harassment among Elementary School Students in Taiwan: Implications for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Hayter, Mark; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Sexual harassment is a significant issue in the lives of students. Understanding how young adolescents feel about sexual harassment and their coping strategies is a central element to guide school nursing interventions promoting sexual health. This study explored the sexual harassment experiences of young adolescents in Taiwan. A qualitative…

  11. The School Nurse Role in Preparing for Sudden Cardiac Arrest in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Warna K.; Ficca, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) were introduced for first responders in 1992 to manage adult cardiac arrest and are now common in many public places. Today AEDs are capable of shocking children under 8 years of age, or less than 55 pounds. This presents a challenge for school nurses, particularly as the prevalence of chronic medical…

  12. Mental Health in Schools: New Roles for School Nurses. Addressing Barriers to Student Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    This set of three continuing education units is designed to be used as a professional development tool for school nurses. Each unit consists of several sections designed to stand alone. Thus, the total set can be used and taught in a straightforward sequence, or one or more units and sections can be combined into a personalized course. Each…

  13. Mediating Effect of School Nurses' Self Efficacy between Multicultural Attitude and Cultural Sensitivity in Korean Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Min Hyun; Oh, Won Oak; Im, Yeo Jin; Cho, Hun Ha

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the mediating effect of school nurses' self efficacy, which is one of the significant cognitive factors influencing cultural sensitivity, on the mutual relationships between multicultural attitude and cultural sensitivity in Korean elementary schools. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Participants were 157 school nurses in elementary schools located in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. The survey instruments included Teacher Multicultural Attitude Survey, Teacher Efficacy Scale, and Multicultural Sensitivity Scale. Data were analyzed using three regression equations to test the mediation model. The mean score of the school nurses' cultural sensitivity was relatively low. A positive correlation among multicultural attitude, self efficacy, and cultural sensitivity was noted. Self efficacy of school nurses showed a significant mediating effect on the relationships between multicultural attitude and cultural sensitivity. Given the meaningful influence of positive multicultural attitude on cultural sensitivity and significant mediator effect of self efficacy as a school nurse between the two variables, the strategies to cultivate a positive multicultural attitude and enhance school nurses' self efficacy in their unique role should be considered in a training program. School nurses' health care services will benefit from the improvement of cultural sensitivity toward young children from multicultural families. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Creating effective advisory boards for schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Noël; Campbell, Suzanne Hetzel; Lynch, Nancy; Novotny, Jeanne M

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, a significant priority for the dean and faculty in schools of nursing is fundraising. Raising financial resources is highly competitive and requires sophisticated approaches to building relationships with individual donors, government agencies, private foundations, and corporations. Fundraising efforts need to be designed to cultivate alumni, parents, and friends as key leaders educated in the work of the school, its vision for the future, and the nursing profession. Advisory boards, with an emphasis on development, can effectively nurture such leaders who are fully versed in the strategic vision of the school and who are willing to provide financial support and access to a broad community of interest. An integrated approach that capitalizes on the expertise and knowledge of the dean, the faculty, advancement officers, and a carefully selected board chair forms the foundation of a successful model for development-focused advisory boards. Advisory board implementation is discussed from the perspective of a clearly articulated board charge, selection and recruitment, board retreat, assessment of interest and inclination through an annual board-planning process, engagement in priority project planning with the faculty, and careful cultivation toward deepened relationships and funding.

  15. Historic Leadership: One Courageous School Nurse's Heroic Journey-Part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Ellen F; Pohlman, Katherine J

    2017-05-01

    School nursing practice establishes itself in the midst of both education and nursing philosophies, ethics, standards, laws, and regulations. Treading these two worlds is difficult at times and requires that a school nurse possess a strong foundational knowledge base, seek professional collaboration, and navigate conflicting professional demands in order to promote student and public safety. This article is Part 3 of a four-part series that recounts the inspiring story of a school nurse, Ellen Johnsen, who did just that back in the 1980s in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Part 3 describes the publication of the Attorney General's opinion validating the illegality of the school district's medication administration policy, the lawsuit Ellen brought against the Broken Arrow Public Schools, and the appeal of the final decision in that lawsuit. The purpose of this series is to enhance understanding of the legal parameters governing school nurse practice, provide examples of ethical decision making, and review the challenges associated with serving as a leader.

  16. High School Counselors' Knowledge of Professional Nursing as a Career Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignon, Deolinda; Cadenhead, Gerry; McKee, Adam

    2002-01-01

    A survey completed by 189 high school counselors assessed their knowledge of professional nursing in terms of educational preparation, career opportunities, and salary and mobility potential. Most felt well informed about nursing careers. Females and whites rated nursing higher as a profession than did males and African Americans. (SK)

  17. School Nurses Who Only Care for Children with Special Needs: Working in a Teacher's World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Barbara J.; Radjenovic, Doreen; Toker, Karen H.; Comeaux, Judy M.

    2009-01-01

    Published qualitative studies have not focused on nurses who solely care for children with special health care needs. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe (a) the work of school nurses who care exclusively for these children, (b) nurses' interaction with parents, staff, or providers, and (c) the challenges, benefits, and support…

  18. Role development of nurses for technology-dependent children attending mainstream schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Suzuki, Machiko

    2015-04-01

    To describe the role development of nurses caring for medical technology-dependent children attending Japanese mainstream schools. Semi-structured interviews with 21 nurses caring for technology-dependent children were conducted and analyzed using the modified grounded theory approach. Nurses developed roles centered on maintaining technology-dependent children's physical health to support children's learning with each other, through building relationships, learning how to interact with children, understanding the children and the school community, and realizing the meaning of supporting technology-dependent children. These findings support nurses to build relationships of mutual trust with teachers and children, and learn on the job in mainstream schools. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice: Framing Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Johnson, Ann

    2017-05-01

    The NASN Code of Ethics upholds that it is the responsibility of the school nurse to maintain competency and pursue personal and professional growth. Designing professional development activities that are relevant and support the needs of the school nurse can be a challenge. The Framework for 21st Century School Nursing Practice provides a model rooted in evidence-based standards of practice that can be utilized to assess an existing professional development program and identify gaps in learning opportunities. Nurse leaders can use the Framework for 21st Century Nursing Practice to provide a roadmap toward a professional development program that will be meaningful to school nurse staff, help restore or maintain joy in their practice, and allow them to achieve the goal of advancing the well-being, academic success, and lifelong achievement and health of students.

  20. A School Nurse-Delivered Intervention for Anxious Children: An Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggeo, Michela A.; Stewart, Catherine E.; Drake, Kelly L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2017-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in children and severely impair their functioning. Because a hallmark symptom of anxiety is somatic complaints, anxious youth often seek help from their school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to identify anxious children and intervene early. This study assessed the feasibility of a brief…

  1. Defining, Delivering, and Documenting the Outcomes of Case Management by School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B.

    2009-01-01

    Case management is a component of school nurse practice that provides an opportunity to demonstrate the contribution that school nurses make to the health and academic success of children, particularly children with chronic health conditions. However, case management programs vary in their mission and scope, leading to confusion about what it…

  2. The School Nurse's Ability to Detect and Support Abused Children: A Trust-Creating Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Lisbet Engh; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse has negative health consequences. Early detection and preventive measures lead to avoidance of prolonged and more complex problems. School nurses have a child protection role and should pay attention to vulnerable children. Through health dialogues and other interactions with pupils, school nurses have the opportunity to detect child…

  3. School Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Discussing Weight with Children and Their Families: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ric G.; Wu, Yelena P.; Jensen, Chad D.; Pankey, Sydni; Davis, Ann M.; Aylward, Brandon S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have documented the presence of specific barriers to school nurses' communications with families about weight-related health. The purpose of the present study was to contribute to the literature by further analyzing, using focus group methodology, school nurses' perceived barriers to addressing weight-related health…

  4. The Transformation of a Private University's School of Nursing, 1999-2009: An Historical Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selick, Sandra A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the transformation of the School of Nursing at a private university in a Middle Atlantic state during the years 1999 to 2009. The secondary purpose of this study was to determine the leadership style of the Director of the School of Nursing at this private university in a Middle Atlantic state that led this…

  5. School Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Efficacy in Providing Diabetes Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kelly L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure school nurses' perceived self-efficacy in providing diabetes care and education to children and to identify factors that correlate with higher self-efficacy levels in the performance of these tasks. The results of this study revealed that the surveyed school nurses perceived a moderate level of…

  6. Outcomes of an Australian Nursing Student-Led School Vision and Hearing Screening Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolchard, Barry; Stuhlmiller, Cynthia M.

    2018-01-01

    Nursing students typically do not undertake clinical training in school settings. However, they are well placed to have a role in providing health screening and education in schools or community health venues under supervision of qualified nurses. This study provides a description and outcomes of a vision and hearing screening programme delivered…

  7. What Barriers and Facilitators Do School Nurses Experience When Implementing an Obesity Intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Krista; Smaldone, Arlene

    2017-01-01

    A recent evaluation of a school nurse-led obesity intervention demonstrated a 5% implementation rate. The purpose of this study was to explore school nurses' perceived barriers to and facilitators of the intervention in order to understand reasons for the low implementation rate. Methods included semi-structured individual interviews with school…

  8. Perceptions of School Nurses in the Care of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Many children are surviving prematurity and serious childhood illnesses due to advances in technology and medical care. As a result, more children are entering public school systems with complex health care needs and intellectual and developmental disabilities. School nurses are responsible for caring for these children; however, many nurses feel…

  9. School Nurse Online Emergency Preparedness Training: An Analysis of Knowledge, Skills, and Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Robert; Sapien, Robert; Fullerton, Lynne; Moore, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-assisted emergency preparedness course for school nurses. Participants from a convenience sample (52) of school nurses from New Mexico were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups in an experimental after-only posttest design. Intervention group participants…

  10. Health among Schoolchildren from the School Nurse's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellertsson, Ann-Sofi; Garmy, Pernilla; Clausson, Eva K.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate Swedish school nurses' perceptions of schoolchildren's health. The study is based on two national surveys in which school nurses responded to questions about schoolchildren's health in 2015 (n = 181) and 2005 (n = 129). A statistical comparison showed that physical and mental health of schoolchildren in…

  11. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: A Student With Fever and Sore Throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P

    2016-05-01

    Fever and sore throat are common chief complaints encountered by school nurses. This article explains the etiology of both fever and sore throat in children, describes the office assessment, and delineates life-threatening complications associated with fever and sore throat that may prompt the school nurse to transfer the child to a local emergency department. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Developing a Policy for Delegation of Nursing Care in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriggle, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are in a unique position to provide care for students with special health care needs in the school setting. The incidence of chronic conditions and improved technology necessitate care of complex health care needs that had formerly been managed in inpatient settings. Delegation is a tool that may be used by registered nurses to allow…

  13. Historic Leadership: One Courageous School Nurse's Heroic Journey-Part 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Ellen F; Pohlman, Katherine J

    2017-07-01

    School nursing practice establishes itself in the midst of both education and nursing philosophies, ethics, standards, laws, and regulations. Treading these two worlds is difficult at times and requires that a school nurse possess a strong foundational knowledge base, seek professional collaboration, and navigate conflicting professional demands in order to promote student and public safety. This article is Part 4 of a four-part series that recounts the inspiring story of a school nurse, Ellen Johnsen, who did just that back in the 1980s in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma. Part 4 offers lessons to be learned by reflecting on Ellen Johnsen's experience when she challenged the illegal and unsafe medication administration policy in the Broken Arrow Public Schools. The purpose of this series is to enhance understanding of the legal parameters governing school nurse practice, provide examples of ethical decision making, and review the challenges associated with serving as a leader.

  14. Implementation of a School Nurse-led Intervention for Children With Severe Obesity in New York City Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Krista; Jia, Haomiao; Wang, Y Claire; Smaldone, Arlene

    The Healthy Options and Physical Activity Program (HOP) is a school nurse-led intervention for children with severe obesity. HOP was developed by experts at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and implemented in New York City schools beginning in 2012. The purpose of this study was to evaluate HOP implementation with the goal of informing HOP refinement and potential future HOP dissemination. This study entailed a retrospective analysis of secondary data. Analytic methods included descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon rank sum and Chi square tests, and multivariate logistic regression. During the 2012-2013 school year, 20,518 children were eligible for HOP. Of these, 1054 (5.1%) were enrolled in the program. On average, enrolled children attended one HOP session during the school year. Parent participation was low (3.2% of HOP sessions). Low nurse workload, low school poverty, higher grade level, higher BMI percentile, and chronic illness diagnosis were associated with student enrollment in HOP. As currently delivered, HOP is not likely to be efficacious. Lessons learned from this evaluation are applicable to future nurse-led obesity interventions. Prior to implementing a school nurse-led obesity intervention, nursing workload and available support must be carefully considered. Interventions should be designed to facilitate (and possibly require) parent involvement. Nurses who deliver obesity interventions may require additional training in obesity treatment. With attention to these lessons learned, evidence-based school nurse-led obesity interventions can be developed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tools for Prevention: Building Healthy Youths. A Training Program for: School Counselors, School Nurses, School Psychologists. Trainer Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Maxie P.; Collins, Charles B., Jr.

    This training program instructor's manual is designed to assist K-12 school counselors, nurses, and psychologists in offering aid to youths at risk for substance abuse. The training objectives for participants in the workshop are to be able to demonstrate: (1) competence in knowledge of basic substance abuse information to include age-appropriate…

  16. Tools for Prevention: Building Healthy Youths. A Training Program for: School Counselors, School Nurses, School Psychologists. Participant Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Maxie P.; Collins, Charles B., Jr.

    This training program participants' manual is designed to assist K-12 school counselors, nurses, and psychologists in offering aid to youths at risk for substance abuse. The training objectives for participants in the workshop are to be able to demonstrate: (1) competence in knowledge of basic substance abuse information to include age-appropriate…

  17. School Nurses' Familiarity and Perceptions of Academic Accommodations for Student-Athletes Following Sport-Related Concussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michelle L.; Welch, Cailee E.; Parsons, John T.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate school nurses' familiarity and perceptions regarding academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion. School nurses (N = 1,246) accessed the survey School Nurses' Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-SN). The BAKPAC-SN contained…

  18. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: Emergencies 101 Ask the E.R. Pediatrician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P

    2016-03-01

    Pediatric emergencies, such as the exacerbation of medical conditions and injuries, may occur in the school setting. This article introduces the "School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine" series by discussing the incidence and the most common emergencies that occur in schools as well as published guidelines for school emergency preparedness. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Not choosing nursing: work experience and career choice of high academic achieving school leavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, James G

    2010-01-01

    Work experience has been a feature of the secondary school curriculum in the United Kingdom for a number of years. Usually requested by the pupil, it aims to provide opportunities for school pupils to enhance their knowledge and understanding of an occupation. The main benefits are claimed to be that it can help pupils develop an insight into the skills and attitudes required for an occupation and an awareness of career opportunities. However the quality and choice of placements are considered to be of great importance in this process and in influencing career choice [Department for Education and Skills (DfES), 2002a. Work Experience: A Guide for Employers. Department for Education and Skills, London]. As university departments of nursing experience a decline in the number of school pupils entering student nurse education programmes, and with the competition for school leavers becoming even greater, it is important to consider whether school pupils have access to appropriate work placements in nursing and what influence their experience has on pursuing nursing as a career choice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving fifth and sixth year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger survey sample (n=1062), who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. This was partly reported by Neilson and Lauder [Neilson, G.R., Lauder, W., 2008. What do high academic achieving school pupils really think about a career in nursing: analysis of the narrative from paradigmatic case interviews. Nurse Education Today 28(6), 680-690] which examined what high academic achieving school pupils really thought about a career in nursing. However, the data was particularly striking in revealing the poor quality of nursing work experience for the pupils, and also their proposal that there was a need

  20. Does contact by a family nurse practitioner decrease early school absence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jill; Price, Marva; Kotch, Jonathan; Willis, Stephanie; Fisher, Michael; Silva, Susan

    2012-02-01

    Chronic early school absence (preschool through third grade) is associated with school failure. The presence of school nurses may lead to fewer absences, and nurse practitioners in school-based health centers (SBHCs) can facilitate a healthier population resulting in improved attendance. Efforts to get students back to school are unexplored in nursing literature. This article describes a nursing intervention to decrease early school absence in two elementary schools K-3 (N = 449) and a Head Start program (N = 130). The Head Start Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) contacted families of chronically and excessively absent students by telephone, clinic visit at school, or home visit. The aggregate percentage attendance was evaluated by grades (preschool to third grade), schools (Head Start, Elementary Schools 1 and 2), and grades and schools and compared with publicly available school district aggregate data. There were statistically significant increases in attendance from Year 1 to Year 2 at p < .05 at the elementary level but not at the Head Start level. Student demographics, types of contacts, absence reasons (including sick child), and medical diagnoses are described.

  1. Shared responsibility: school nurses' experience of collaborating in school-based interprofessional teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuterswärd, Marina; Hylander, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    The Swedish Education Act (2011) mandated a new combination of services to boost students' physical health, their mental health and special education through interprofessional pupil health and well-being (PH) teams. For Swedish school nurses, providing these services presents new challenges. To describe how Swedish school nurses experience their work and collaboration within the interprofessional PH teams. Twenty-five school nurses (SNs) were interviewed in five focus groups. Content analysis was used to examine the data and to explore SNs' workplace characteristics by using the components of the sense of coherence (SOC) framework. SNs' experiences of work and collaboration within PH teams can be described using three domains: the expectations of others regarding SNs' roles, SNs' contributions to pupils' health and well-being, and collaboration among SNs within PH teams. The results indicate a discrepancy between SNs' own experiences of their contribution and their experiences of other professionals' expectations regarding those contributions. Some duties were perceived as expected, comprehensible, manageable and meaningful, while other duties - though expected - were perceived as less meaningful, taking time away from school-related matters. Other duties that were not explicitly expected - promoting general health and creating safety zones for pupils, teachers and parents, for example - were nonetheless perceived as meaningful. Collaboration within PH teams was considered meaningful, comprehensible and manageable only if the objectives of the team meetings were clear, if other professionals were available and if professional roles on the team were clearly communicated. The SNs reported a lack of clarity regarding their role in PH and its implementation in schools, indicating that professionals in PH teams need to discuss collaboration so as to find their niche given the new conditions. SOC theory emerged as a useful framework for discussing concrete work

  2. Attitudes of Hong Kong high school students towards the nursing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, J C; Foong, A; Chan, P T

    1999-08-01

    The increased development of hospital services in Hong Kong over the last decade has given rise in the demand for more recruits to join the nursing profession. Despite the advancement in education and the improvement in the working conditions, the problems of attracting sufficient new recruits remain critical. This study aimed to examine high school students' attitudes towards the nursing profession and to identify the contributing factors affecting shortage of nurses within the context of Hong Kong. A convenience sample of 375 high school students was recruited. A questionnaire was used to measure their knowledge, attitudes and intention to study nursing. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to describe their career preferences and to compare knowledge, attitudes and intention scales between gender and nursing exposure groups. Results indicated that the students were generally knowledgeable about nursing but were reluctant to pursue nursing as a career. However, students who were socially acquainted with a nurse demonstrated a slightly more positive attitude towards nursing and slightly higher intention to pursue nursing as a career compared with those having no social acquaintance with a nurse. Implications for promotion of nursing profession and limitations of the study were discussed.

  3. Military nursing research by students at the Graduate School of Nursing Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellah, Faye G; Levine, Eugene; Sylvia, Barbara; Kelley, Patricia W; Saba, Virginia; Tenenbaum, Samantha

    2005-03-01

    Military nursing research has had a long and productive history. Today, much of this research is conducted under two programs, the TriService Nursing Research Program and the Graduate School of Nursing (GSN), both located at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. This article will discuss the 150 military nursing research projects carried out by students at the GSN since its founding in 1992. Although most projects have been small in scope, they have obtained useful results. Some projects have served as the basis for larger-scale research studies, receiving funding from the TriService Nursing Research Program. Reports of all projects are available in an online database and some have been published in professional journals. This review concludes that the research produced by GSN students has been beneficial to students and to the military health system.

  4. Programs that Internationalize Nursing Curricula in Baccalaureate Schools of Nursing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Gay J.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a national survey of baccalaureate nursing programs are presented concerning programs for study abroad, international exchange programs, and other approaches to internationalizing nursing curricula, including courses dealing with health care and nursing in foreign countries. (Author/MSE)

  5. CE: Original Research: Exploring How Nursing Schools Handle Student Errors and Near Misses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disch, Joanne; Barnsteiner, Jane; Connor, Susan; Brogren, Fabiana

    2017-10-01

    : Background: Little attention has been paid to how nursing students learn about quality and safety, and to the tools and policies that guide nursing schools in helping students respond to errors and near misses. This study sought to determine whether prelicensure nursing programs have a policy for reporting and following up on student clinical errors and near misses, a tool for such reporting, a tool or process (or both) for identifying trends, strategies for follow-up with students after errors and near misses, and strategies for follow-up with clinical agencies and individual faculty members. A national electronic survey of 1,667 schools of nursing with a prelicensure registered nursing program was conducted. Data from 494 responding schools (30%) were analyzed. Of the responding schools, 245 (50%) reported having no policy for managing students following a clinical error or near miss, and 272 (55%) reported having no tool for reporting student errors or near misses. Significant work is needed if the principles of a fair and just culture are to shape the response to nursing student errors and near misses. For nursing schools, some essential first steps are to understand the tools and policies a school has in place; the school's philosophy regarding errors and near misses; the resources needed to establish a fair and just culture; and how faculty can work together to create learning environments that eliminate or minimize the negative consequences of errors and near misses for patients, students, and faculty.

  6. The Impact of Comprehensive School Nursing Services on Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocoglu, Deniz; Emiroglu, Oya Nuran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: School nursing services should be evaluated through health and academic outcomes of students; however, it is observed that the number of studies in this field is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of comprehensive school nursing services provided to 4th grade primary school students on academic performance of students. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted with 31 students attending a randomly selected school in economic disadvantaged area in Turky. Correlation analysis, repeated measures analyses of variance, multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data with SPSS software. Results: At the end of school nursing practices, an increase was occurred in students’ academic achievement grades whereas a decrease was occurred in absenteeism and academic procrastination behaviors. Whilst it was determined that nursing interventions including treatment/ procedure and surveillance was associated to the decrease of absenteeism, it also was discovered that the change in the health status of the student after nursing interventions was related to the increase of the academic achievement grade and the decrease of the academic procrastination behavior score. Conclusion: In this study, the conclusion that comprehensive school nursing services contributed positively to the academic performance of students has been reached. In addition, it can be suggested that effective school nursing services should include services such as acute-chronic disease treatment, first aid, health screening, health improvement-protection, health education, guidance and counseling and case management. PMID:28299293

  7. The Impact of Comprehensive School Nursing Services on Students' Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kocoglu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: School nursing services should be evaluated through health and academic outcomes of students; however, it is observed that the number of studies in this field is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of comprehensive school nursing services provided to 4th grade primary school students on academic performance of students. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted with 31 students attending a randomly selected school in economic disadvantaged area in Turky. Correlation analysis, repeated measures analyses of variance, multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data with SPSS software. Results: At the end of school nursing practices, an increase was occurred in students’ academic achievement grades whereas a decrease was occurred in absenteeism and academic procrastination behaviors. Whilst it was determined that nursing interventions including treatment/ procedure and surveillance was associated to the decrease of absenteeism, it also was discovered that the change in the health status of the student after nursing interventions was related to the increase of the academic achievement grade and the decrease of the academic procrastination behavior score. Conclusion: In this study, the conclusion that comprehensive school nursing services contributed positively to the academic performance of students has been reached. In addition, it can be suggested that effective school nursing services should include services such as acute-chronic disease treatment, first aid, health screening, health improvement-protection, health education, guidance and counseling and case management.

  8. The Impact of Comprehensive School Nursing Services on Students' Academic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocoglu, Deniz; Emiroglu, Oya Nuran

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: School nursing services should be evaluated through health and academic outcomes of students; however, it is observed that the number of studies in this field is limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of comprehensive school nursing services provided to 4th grade primary school students on academic performance of students. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted with 31 students attending a randomly selected school in economic disadvantaged area in Turky. Correlation analysis, repeated measures analyses of variance, multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data with SPSS software. Results: At the end of school nursing practices, an increase was occurred in students' academic achievement grades whereas a decrease was occurred in absenteeism and academic procrastination behaviors. Whilst it was determined that nursing interventions including treatment/ procedure and surveillance was associated to the decrease of absenteeism, it also was discovered that the change in the health status of the student after nursing interventions was related to the increase of the academic achievement grade and the decrease of the academic procrastination behavior score. Conclusion: In this study, the conclusion that comprehensive school nursing services contributed positively to the academic performance of students has been reached. In addition, it can be suggested that effective school nursing services should include services such as acute-chronic disease treatment, first aid, health screening, health improvement-protection, health education, guidance and counseling and case management.

  9. Examining childhood bullying and adolescent suicide: implications for school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Gregory D; Clements, Paul Thomas; Holt, Karyn E

    2012-08-01

    Adolescent suicide is a preventable tragedy yet is still the third leading cause of death in young people of age 10-24. Contrary to the idea that childhood bullying is a normal part of growing up or a rite of passage, it is now correlated with adolescent suicidality. An integrative review of the contemporary, extant literature was conducted to examine the following question: Are adolescents who have been involved in childhood bullying or cyberbullying as victim, offender, or victim/offender at greater risk for suicidality than those who have not. It is important to empower school nurses with current and evidence-based information regarding childhood bullying and examine empirical science and tools to effectively address the current serious problem of adolescent suicide risk assessment and intervention.

  10. What factors influence Hong Kong school students in their choice of a career in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, W; Arthur, D

    2003-01-01

    Chronic and recurrent shortages of nurses, coupled with the increasing demand for high quality and motivated nurses and competition for secondary school leavers from other professions, are issues which prompted this investigation of senior school students' career choice. Using a descriptive survey design, and a questionnaire developed for the study, 1246 Form 6 students in Hong Kong were surveyed, of these 28% respondents reported that they were interested in studying nursing. The findings indicated that students' decision to choose or not choose nursing was significantly influenced by the demographic factors: gender (chi(2) = 42.72, p career score (t = 14.21, df = 1237, p Students' intention to study nursing was also significantly affected by social influence: parents (chi(2) = 11.53, p = 0.001), school career masters (chi(2) = 5.52, p = 0.019) and friends (chi(2) = 4.83, p = 0.028); past experience with career activities (chi(2) = 84.479, p career activities (p students' intention to study nursing. Results of this study can be used by nurse leaders and recruiters to develop strategies and help school leavers perceive nursing in a more positive way. Expanding the informational sources about nursing can facilitate the recruitment process. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  11. School-based blood drive: successful nurse collaboration with parents, students, and the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Diane Cody; Taylor, Mary Ellen; Pyle, Audrey

    2015-05-01

    The nurses at an independent Pre-K through 12 educational institution in Houston, Texas (The Kinkaid School), expanded the blood drive program to include innovative collaboration with high school student leaders, parents, and school faculty. Methods implemented in this endeavor included technology utilization, science education, and an enhanced parent workforce. By focusing on community involvement and an altruistic reason for donating, the Kinkaid school nurses helped their community break school donation records 2 years in a row. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Striving to Make a Positive Difference: School Nurses' Experiences of Promoting the Health and Well-Being of Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Margaretha; Björk, Maria; Ekebergh, Margaretha; Sundler, Annelie Johansson

    2014-01-01

    In Sweden, school nurses are part of the School Health Service with the main objective of health promotion to support students' health and attainment of educational goals. The aim in this phenomenological study was to illuminate the experiences of school nurses in promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls. Seventeen school nurses…

  13. Sadness, socialisation and shifted perceptions: school pupils' stories of a pre-nursing scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Michelle; Smith, Annetta; Kyle, Richard G

    2014-06-01

    Providing opportunities for aspirant nurses to obtain pre-nursing experience features prominently in the UK Government's response to The Francis Inquiry. Evidence from the USA suggests that pre-nursing experiences, such as summer camps, have the potential to contribute to effective nurse recruitment, selection and retention strategies. However, few similar pre-nursing experiences exist in the UK, and none have been evaluated. This paper reports the experiences of participation in a pilot pre-nursing scholarship among secondary school pupils in Scotland. To explore pupils' experiences of a pre-nursing scholarship to inform future design and delivery of similar programmes in the UK and internationally. Qualitative focus group study. Two university campuses in Scotland. Twenty-two secondary school students (all female, aged 15-18 years). Two focus groups were facilitated through the use of 'anecdote circles' to elicit pupils' stories of their scholarship experience. Anecdote circles allowed each pupil to share their story in turn and then collectively assemble, figuratively and physically through interlocking written cards, shared stories of the scholarship. Discussions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed thematically. Three stories emerged: 1) sadness; 2) socialisation; and, 3) shifted perceptions. Sad stories were transformative affirming the pupils' desire to become a nurse. Stories of socialisation revealed how demonstrating practical skills affirmed the pupils' ability and suitability to nurse. Perceptions of the life and work of a (student) nurse, their future career, and the lives of older adults, shifted through the scholarship, especially during practice learning experience. Storytelling revealed how a pre-nursing scholarship helped secondary school pupils to decide whether to pursue a nursing career by providing an opportunity to explore their ability, suitability and desire for nursing. The practice learning experience emerged

  14. Academic-related stress among graduate students in nursing in a Jamaican school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kimarie; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline; McPherson, Andrea Norman

    2016-09-01

    Graduate students perceive their education as highly stressful, have consistently rated their stress levels as above average and have consistently scored above average on stress scales. The consequences of stress include negative academic outcomes, reduction in cognitive ability, impaired coping and incompletion of graduate studies. Stress is also associated with physical and psychological symptoms such as altered appetite, sleep pattern disturbances and headache. A descriptive correlational design was used to determine the perceived levels and sources of academic-related stress among students enrolled in a Master of Science in Nursing (MScN) degree programme at school of nursing in urban section of Jamaica. The Perceived Stress Scale-14 and Stress Survey were used to collect data from the 81 students enrolled in full or part time study in the MScN programme. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted using SPSS version 20. The majority (50.9%) were moderately stressed while 22.8% and 24.6% had high and low levels of stress respectively. Stress associated with the preparation for and prospect of final examinations received the highest overall mean stress rating, causing "a lot of stress". Attendances at classes and relationships with lecturers received the lowest mean stress rating. Research was not listed as a stressor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Peace and Power Conceptual Model: An Assessment Guide for School Nurses Regarding Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraley, Hannah E; Aronowitz, Teri

    2017-10-01

    Human trafficking is a global problem; more than half of all victims are children. In the United States (US), at-risk youth continue to attend school. School nurses are on the frontlines, presenting a window of opportunity to identify and prevent exploitation. Available papers targeting school nurses report that school nurses may lack awareness of commercial sexual exploitation and may have attitudes and misperceptions about behaviors of school children at risk. This is a theoretical paper applying the Peace and Power Conceptual Model to understand the role of school nurses in commercial sexual exploitation of children.

  16. Does the School Nurse-to-Student Ratio Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttu, Martha; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin

    2004-01-01

    Public schools must provide an appropriate education for students with complex health needs. Chronic illnesses such as asthma and diabetes, social morbidities, injuries, and conditions that limit learning such as poor vision commonly affect school-aged children. School nurses often assume a leadership role in providing services for these children.…

  17. Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity/Expression (Sexual Minority Students): School Nurse Practice. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that all students, regardless of their sexual orientation or the sexual orientation of their parents and family members, are entitled to a safe school environment and equal opportunities for a high level of academic achievement and school participation/involvement. Establishment of…

  18. Cultural competence and cultural safety in Canadian schools of nursing: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Margo S; Rukholm, Ellen; Bourque-Bearskin, Lisa; Baker, Cynthia; Voyageur, Evelyn; Robitaille, Annie

    2013-04-23

    Cultural competence and cultural safety are essential knowledge in contemporary nursing care. Using a three-phase, mixed methods sequential triangulation design, this study examines the extent to which Anglophone Schools of Nursing in Canada have integrated cultural competence and/or cultural safety into the undergraduate nursing curricula. Factors that influence successful integration are identified through the lens of Donabedian's structure, process, and outcome model. Results suggest that several facilitating factors are present, such as leadership, partnerships and linkages, and educational supports for students. Of particular concern is the lack of policies to recruit and retain Aboriginal faculty, financial resources, and outcome evaluation indicators. A conceptual model of integration is offered to explain how Schools of Nursing function to support the implementation of these concepts into their curriculum. This study provides theoretical and practical implications for initiation and improvement of cultural competence and/or cultural safety integration strategies in Schools of Nursing.

  19. Back to the future? Views of heads of schools of nursing about undergraduate specialization in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; McAllister, Margaret

    2014-12-01

    Preparation of nursing students for practice in mental health settings in Australia has been criticized since comprehensive education replaced preregistration specialist education. Current and projected workforce shortages have given rise to considering the reintroduction of specialization at preregistration level as a potential solution. Support of heads of schools of nursing would be essential for such an initiative to be considered. A qualitative exploratory study was undertaken involving in-depth telephone interviews with heads of schools of nursing in Queensland. Participants generally favoured the concept of specialization in mental health nursing at undergraduate level. Data analysis revealed the following themes: meeting workforce needs, improving quality of care, employability of graduates, an attractive option for students, and what would have to go. Participants identified many benefits to mental health service delivery and consumer outcomes. How the initiative could be developed within an already overcrowded curriculum was identified as the major barrier. This level of support is encouraging if necessary changes to the educational preparation for mental health nursing practice are to be considered. © 2014 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Achieving transformational change: using appreciative inquiry for strategic planning in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Rebecca Bouterie; Fontaine, Dorrie; Plews-Ogan, Margaret; Williams, Anne

    2012-01-01

    To achieve transformational change, a transformational approach is needed. The Appreciative Inquiry (AI) summit is a method that has been used to achieve transformational change in business for at least 20 years, but this innovative alternative approach is unknown to nursing. At the University of Virginia School of Nursing, an AI Summit was designed to bring all staff, faculty, student representatives, and members of the community together to rewrite the school's strategic plan. New connections within the school, the university, and the community were made when 135 participants engaged in the appreciative, 4-step AI process of discovering, dreaming, designing, and creating the school's future. During the summit, 7 strategic teams formed to move the school toward the best possible future while building on the existing positive core. This article describes 10 steps needed to design an AI summit and implications for using this method at other schools of nursing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Educator Preparedness for Mental Health in Adolescents: Opportunities for School Nurse Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Fromm, Tiffany; Evans-Agnew, Robin A

    2017-11-01

    One in five adolescents will experience a mental health event in their lifetime. If left untreated, depression, anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity, and anorexia/bulimia can elevate the risk of dropping out of high school. As a key principle of 21st-century nursing practice, school nurses must provide leadership in educating school staff in identifying and responding to mental health issues in high school settings. This article describes the results of an online survey assessing secondary educators' knowledge of and experience with mental health issues in one school district. Resources are suggested to assist nurses in educating school staff, providing them with ways to decrease stigma in the classroom, and partnering with the community to improve services.

  2. Using the School Nurse to Support Your Elementary Physical Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozub, Mary L.; Kozub, Francis M.

    2012-01-01

    The roles of teachers, nurses, and other educational personnel are changing. In the case of the school nurse, the responsibilities have expanded to include health promotion and various other roles outside of the traditional duties of providing first aid, administrating medications, and monitoring the daily health status of students (Broussard,…

  3. A Research Collaboration between a Catholic University School of Nursing and Healthcare System: Process and Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Jane M.; Gonzales, Lucia; Aube, Patti; Connelly, Cynthia D.

    2013-01-01

    Collaborations between diverse Catholic organizations will be important in fulfilling the goals contained in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2010 document, "The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health." This article describes a qualitative research study examining the partnership between a graduate-level school of nursing in…

  4. Having influence: faculty of color having influence in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouneh, Dena; Lutz, Kristin F

    2013-01-01

    Faculty of color (FOC) play an important role in mentoring students and other FOC in schools of nursing. However, the unique nature of mentoring that FOC provide, which includes transmission of expert knowledge of the operations of racism in nursing academe, is not well understood. Furthermore, the influence FOC have on school cultures has not been well documented. To address this gap in knowledge we conducted a critical grounded theory study with 23 FOC in predominately Euro-American schools of nursing. Findings indicate that FOC Having Influence is a key process that explicates the influence FOC wield, exposing their work, which is often taken for granted, hidden, and, unacknowledged. FOC Having Influence occurred in two areas: 1) the survival and success of students and FOC and 2) shaping practices in schools of nursing and impacting health in communities. Implications for educational practice and future research are presented, based on study findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. School nurses' perspectives on managing mental health problems in children and young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryjmachuk, Steven; Graham, Tanya; Haddad, Mark; Tylee, Andre

    2012-03-01

    To explore the views of school nurses regarding mental health problems in young people and their potential for engaging in mental health work with this client group. Mental health problems in children and young people are an important public health issue. Universal children's services play a key role in identifying and managing these problems and, while school nurses have an important function in this work, little is known about their views on this aspect of their role. A qualitative research design employing focus group methodology. School nurses (n = 33) were purposively sampled from four school nursing teams in two English cities for a series of focus groups. The focus group data were audio-recorded, transcribed and subsequently analysed using 'framework'. Four principal themes emerged from the data. In these themes, school nurses were found to value their involvement with the mental health of young people, recognising this as an important area of practice. Several obstacles to their work in this area were identified: heavy workloads, professional rivalries, a lack of confidence and limited education and training opportunities. The importance of support from local specialist mental health teams was emphasised. School nurses can be engaged in mental health work though, as public health specialists, their role should focus on health promotion, assessment, signposting and early intervention activities. To facilitate mental health work, school nurses are able to draw on established interpersonal skills and supportive networks; however, workload and a lack of confidence need to be managed and it is important that they are supported by constructive relationships with local specialist mental health teams. This study has implications for nurses and healthcare practitioners interested in enhancing the mental health of children and young people in school settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The process of implementing an ISO 9001 quality management system in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents the process undertaken during the establishment of an ISO 9000 series quality management system by a School of Nursing. Further discussion centres around the reasons why an ISO quality management system was implemented, the lessons learnt during the process and the benefits that accreditation has brought to the School of Nursing. The lessons learnt during the process could be of help to other organisations wishing to achieve a similar accreditation status.

  7. Conflict in schools: student nurses' conflict management styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantek, Filiz; Gezer, Nurdan

    2009-01-01

    Unless conflicts between the students and the instructors can be successfully managed, they will certainly result in negative outcomes for the students. The conflict management styles of the students should be recognized in detail in order to attain positive outcomes in regard to the conflict management styles. The purpose of this study was to examine the conflict management styles used by nursing students in conflict with faculty members and the differences in use of style from the aspect of some variables. This study was conducted with 151 students in a public university nursing school. Data were collected using a personal information form and the Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory II (ROCI II). The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Tukey test, Kruskal Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test and Cronbach alpha coefficient analyses. The students were found to use integrating (X=3.82) and obliging (X=3.81) styles the most, and dominating style (X=3.02) the least. In addition there were differences determined in management style between classes, frequency of experiencing conflict, and feeling of success in the conflict (pstyles were used more by those who evaluated themselves as successful in conflict management, but the avoiding and compromising styles were used more by students who evaluated themselves as unsuccessful. It was determined that the students preferred to use styles that produced positive results in conflict resolution and that the frequency of experiencing conflict and the feeling of success in conflict had an effect on choice of style. It will be helpful to analyze the relationship between the causes of conflict between the student and the instructor in the practice field and the uses of conflict management styles.

  8. Communal child-rearing: The role of nurses in school health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaudzi, Fhumulani M; Peu, Mmapheko D

    2014-10-16

    Child-rearing remains a concern within our communities, especially because families of today lack primary parents due to multifaceted challenges such as working mothers, diseases and violence. Health-promoting school initiatives are necessary because they allow a multifaceted approach to child-rearing. They further provide a conducive environment for continued schoolchild-rearing moving from home to school. This study promotes an integrated approach to school care using the African concept of Ubuntu - solidarity and sense of community - as a point of departure. The socio-ecological model was used, which includes the work of the school healthcare nurse in contributing to holistic health services. An integrative review was conducted in January 2013, which included methodology studies, a theory review and a variety of studies related to school health. The studies were categorised according to school health, Ubuntu and the socio-ecological model. The role of school healthcare nurses entails acting as a liaison officer between a variety of stakeholders who work together to shape the future of children. Ubuntu, together with the socio-ecological model, can assist us to involve an entire community to raise children. This knowledge serves as a background to the planning of a school health programme. The role of the nurse in school health can also assist in collaborative efforts to formulate the programme and develop the competencies that will inform school health nurse training curricula.

  9. Communal child-rearing: The role of nurses in school health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fhumulani M. Mulaudzi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Child-rearing remains a concern within our communities, especially because families of today lack primary parents due to multifaceted challenges such as working mothers, diseases and violence. Health-promoting school initiatives are necessary because they allow a multifaceted approach to child-rearing. They further provide a conducive environment for continued schoolchild-rearing moving from home to school. Objectives: This study promotes an integrated approach to school care using the African concept of Ubuntu – solidarity and sense of community – as a point of departure. The socio-ecological model was used, which includes the work of the school healthcare nurse in contributing to holistic health services. Method: An integrative review was conducted in January 2013, which included methodology studies, a theory review and a variety of studies related to school health. The studies were categorised according to school health, Ubuntu and the socio-ecological model. Findings: The role of school healthcare nurses entails acting as a liaison officer between a variety of stakeholders who work together to shape the future of children. Conclusion: Ubuntu, together with the socio-ecological model, can assist us to involve an entire community to raise children. This knowledge serves as a background to the planning of a school health programme. The role of the nurse in school health can also assist in collaborative efforts to formulate the programme and develop the competencies that will inform school health nurse training curricula.

  10. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

  11. A road not taken: the proposal for a Harvard School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Frances

    2010-06-01

    The modernist orientation of nurse leaders in the late nineteenth century directly impacted the future of nursing in the USA. Their orientation is explored in this article as a factor that may have contributed to the failure of the Harvard School of Nursing proposal - a road not taken in nursing education, a road that would have afforded nursing an early central role within the Harvardization of American post-secondary education. The backlash resulting from the attention that was given to Alfred Worcester and Annette Fiske's radical call for contextualization is explored. Modernist tropes of thought that enabled early nurse leaders to weld nursing education to hospitals through the actions of nursing superintendents are described. Outcomes resulting from this welding are delineated, including idolatry of the hospital as nursing's icon, subservience to physicians, a monastic on-duty mantra, the development of a standardized curriculum linked to hospitals, and the framing of state registration within a philosophy that disenfranchised nurses. A non-teleological, narrative analysis of this case is offered to enable nursing to heighten the tensions between the tropes of modernism and those of contextualism, and thus, to empower leaders in the re-invention of America's twenty-first century healthcare delivery system.

  12. Determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a redefined role in health promotion at school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godin Gaston

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quest for greater efficiency in the provision of primary healthcare services and the implementation of a "health-promoting school" approach encourage the optimal redefinition of the role of school nurses. School nurses are viewed as professionals who might be significant actors in the promotion of youth health. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of the intention of elementary school nurses to adopt a new health-promotion role as a strategic option for the health-promoting school. Methods This study was based on an extended version of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB. A total of 251 respondents (response rate of 70% from 42 school health programs across the Province of Québec completed a mail survey regarding their intention to adopt the proposed health-promotion role. Multiple hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between key independent variables and intention. A discriminant analysis of the beliefs was performed to identify the main targets of action. Results A total of 73% of respondents expressed a positive intention to accept to play the proposed role. The main predictors were perceived behavioural control (β = 0.36, moral norm (β = 0.27, attitude (β = 0.24, and subjective norm (β = 0.21 (ps Conclusions Results suggest that leadership is a skill that should be addressed to increase the ability of school nurses to assume the proposed role. Findings also indicate that public health administrators need to ensure adequate nurse staffing in the schools in order to increase the proportion of nurses willing to play such a role and avoid burnout among these human resources.

  13. Making healthy connections: introducing nursing as a career choice to middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Margaret; Abdallah, Lisa; Findeisen, Mary; Melillo, Karen Devereaux; Dowling, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The current economic climate has resulted in many experienced nurses returning to the workforce. Despite this, the nursing shortage is looming in our future and the recruitment of a diverse nursing workforce reflective of the population remains a high priority. The Merrimack Valley in northeastern Massachusetts has two large cities, Lawrence and Lowell, in which the Hispanic and the Southeast Asian populations are disproportionately higher than state and national levels. Through the University of Massachusetts Lowell's Bring Diversity to Nursing Project, partnerships with both city school systems were developed and after-school programs aimed at highlighting nursing as a career choice were initiated. Mr. Thompson's Heart is the focus of a middle school, pre-entry program developed by faculty. Introducing career choices in middle school gives students fundamental information about careers and how to begin investigating them. Mr. Thompson's Heart introduces nursing as a career choice combining career information with a focus on developing healthy lifestyle habits. Multiple hands on activities create excitement and interest in the nursing profession. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Nutrition education in schools: potential resources for a teacher/nurse partnership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboix-Calas, France; Lemonnier, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition education in schools must be based on a collaborative approach between teachers and school nurses. The objective of this study was to compare the nutrition education representations and practices of primary school teachers and school nurses in the Languedoc-Roussillon region in the South of France. We used the theoretical framework of complexity, which is particularly suited to multifactorial phenomena such as nutrition education. We interviewed 112 primary school teachers and 33 school nurses about three aspects of their nutrition education representations and practices: actors, content and place of nutrition education at school. Nurses had a more comprehensive and complex approach to nutrition education, including a collaborative approach. However, teachers had a fairly simplistic view of nutrition education and their practice took little account of the psychosocial dimensions of nutrition and a collaborative approach. Nurses could be resources for teachers to help them change their approach to health by transforming a purely biomedical approach to health and nutrition into a more comprehensive approach, particularly taking into account in its psychological and social dimensions, which would be more appropriate to address the growing prevalence of diet-related chronic diseases in France today.

  15. Parent and Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of School Nurse Interventions on Children's Self-Management of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Annette I.; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this…

  16. Food Allergy Education for School Nurses: A Needs Assessment Survey by the Consortium of Food Allergy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Suzanna K.; Vargas, Perla A.; Noone, Sally; Steele, Pam; Sicherer, Scott H.; Burks, A. Wesley; Jones, Stacie M.

    2010-01-01

    Food allergy is increasing in school-age children. School nurses are a primary health care resource for children with food allergy and must be prepared to manage allergen avoidance and respond in the event of an allergic reaction. An anonymous survey was administered to school nurses attending their association meetings to determine their…

  17. Community-based health and schools of nursing: supporting health promotion and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Crystal

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the role of community-based schools of nursing in the promotion of public health and research in poverty-stricken areas. This was a three-phase study (questionnaire and key-informants' interviews) that surveyed representatives of prelicensure associate and baccalaureate nursing schools (n=17), nursing-school key informants (n=6) and community leaders (n=10). A 13-question web-based survey and semi-structured interview of key informants elicited data on demographics, nursing program design, exposure of faculty and students to various research and health promotion methods, and beliefs about student involvement. Nursing schools participated minimally in community-based health promotion (CBHP) and community-based participatory research saw reduced need for student involvement in such activities, cited multiple barriers to active community collaboration, and reported restricted community partnerships. CBHP was recognized to be a valuable element of health care and student education, but is obstructed by many barriers. This study suggests that nursing schools are not taking full advantage of relationships with community leaders. Recommendations for action are given. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Exploratory Research to Design a School Nurse-Delivered Intervention to Treat Adolescent Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellar, Lauren; Druker, Sue; Osganian, Stavroula K.; Gapinski, Mary Ann; LaPelle, Nancy; Pbert, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In preparation for a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a school nurse-delivered intervention, focus groups were conducted to gain insight into the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the design and implementation of the intervention. Setting and Participants: Fifteen focus groups at participating schools. One hundred subjects,…

  19. Process and Outcomes of School Nurse Case Management for Students with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin; Guttu, Martha

    2014-01-01

    There have been many studies that have examined the impact of school-based asthma programs on students with asthma. However, most studies do not provide adequate elaboration on the components of the program. Therefore, replication of these programs is difficult. This study examines the process of school nurse case management, which includes the…

  20. School Nurses' Experiences of Managing Young People with Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenna, Jean; Cleaver, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of mental health disorder is increasing among young people. It is recognized that early intervention is essential in supporting young people, and care provided within schools to support emotional well-being is recommended as part of this process. A scoping review was undertaken examining school nurses' experiences of supporting the…

  1. Overweight children's response to an annual health dialogue with the school nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina K; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare overweight and normal weight pupils' perceived outcome of the health dialogue with the school nurse. A random sample of schools in Denmark, where pupils age 11.6, 13.6 and 15.6 years old, answered a questionnaire (response rate 88%, n = 5205). The indepe...

  2. Re-Visit to the School Nurse and Adolescents' Medicine Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borup, Ina K.; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjorn E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine if students who re-visit the school nurse use medicines differently than other students when exposed to aches and psychological problems. Methods: The study includes all 11-, 13- and 15-year-old students from a random sample of schools in Denmark, response rate 87 per cent, n = 5,205. The data collection followed the…

  3. School Nurses' Perceptions and Practices of Assisting Students in Obtaining Public Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Megan L.; Hendershot, Candace; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H.; Thompson, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Background: From January through June 2009, 6.1 million children were uninsured in the United States. On average, students with health insurance are healthier and as a result are more likely to be academically successful. Some schools help students obtain health insurance with the help of school nurses. Methods: This study assessed public school…

  4. Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes among Youth: A Systematic Review, Implications for the School Nurse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackney, Dana E.; Cutshall, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obesity and the early development of type 2 diabetes (T2 DM) place students at risk for chronic health problems. The school nurse is uniquely situated to promote school health initiatives that influence health behavior. The purpose of this review was to determine effective nonpharmacological interventions for prevention of T2 DM in…

  5. Health Promotion Practices and Attitudes among Nurses in Special Education Schools in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandropoulou, Marianthi; Sourtzi, Panayota; Kalokerinou, Athena

    2010-01-01

    Published research concerning health promotion in Greek schools is limited. The aim of the study was to evaluate special education school nurses' involvement in health promotion activities, examine their attitudes toward it, and to explore the factors influencing their practices. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2005 by mailed…

  6. What predicts the selection of nursing as a career choice in 5th and 6th year school students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; Jones, Martyn C

    2012-07-01

    Demand for nursing care, and nurses, is growing in the United Kingdom given an increasingly ageing patient population with long-term co-morbidities. An ageing nursing workforce and fewer school leavers entering nursing are key barriers to student nurse recruitment. This paper aims to identify the socio-demographic and correlates nursing as a career choice in 5th and 6th year school students. This cross-sectional descriptive study gathered self-administered questionnaires from a total cohort of 5th and 6th year school students (n=1059) in one educational authority in Scotland. A response rate of 100% was achieved, with 702 students expressing a career choice. Some 71.7% (n=503) of students providing a full data set would never consider nursing, even if they obtained poor grades. Only 28.3% (n=199) would ever consider nursing. Students cited nursing as a career choice if they were female, of average to below average academic ability/achievement, expressed a positive attitude to nursing as a degree subject which was shared by their career guidance teacher. Each additional higher reduced the likelihood of nursing as a career choice by 22%. Nursing is an unpopular career choice amongst school students. Strategies are required to improve the occupational image of nursing in secondary education. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Gavin R; McNally, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The International Council of Nurses proposes that the shortage of nurses is global in scale and is expected to become much worse in the years ahead. A major factor impacting on the worldwide nursing shortage is the diminishing number of young people choosing nursing as a career (International Council of Nurses, 2008). One important dimension of the school pupils' career choice process is their interactions with significant others and the influence of these significant others (Hodkinson and Sparkes, 1997). As Schools/Departments of Nursing endeavour to attract more intellectual school leavers it is important to examine what advice and opinions are significant others giving regarding nursing as a career choice and how influential is this advice. This paper is based on interview data from 20 high academic achieving 5th and 6th year school pupils in Scotland, paradigmatic cases from a larger sample, who had considered nursing as a possible career choice within their career preference cluster, but then later disregarded nursing and decided to pursue medicine or another health care profession. The data was particularly striking in revealing the negative influence of significant others on high academic achieving school pupils' choice of nursing as a career. The influence of significant others, these being specifically parents, guardians, guidance teachers and career advisors was very apparent in the data in that they had a very negative view regarding nursing as a career choice for high academic achieving school pupils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Education and information for practicing school nurses: which technology-supported resources meet their needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lori S; Enge, Karmin J

    2012-10-01

    School nurses care for children with a variety of health-related conditions and they need information about managing these conditions, which is accessible, current, and useful. The goal of this literature review was to gather and synthesize information on technology-supported resources and to determine which met the educational needs of school nurses. Successful online educational programs were interactive and self-directed. The most common barriers were lack of time to find educational information, lack of knowledge about computers, technology, the Internet and specific programs, and lack of administrative support from school officials to use technology to access information and evidence for practice. Recommendations for successful use of technology to meet practicing school nurse's educational needs are offered.

  9. Understanding factors influencing foreign-born students' success in nursing school: a case study of East Indian nursing students and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Janelle

    2005-01-01

    The retention and graduation of foreign-born nursing students is essential to meet the needs of our growing racial and ethnic minority population in the United States with their health care needs. Little research has explored factors contributing to the high attrition rate of racial and ethnic minority nursing students. The author describes a case study of East Indian nursing students and examines factors influencing foreign-born students' success in nursing school. Culturally competent teaching strategies for all foreign-born nursing students are presented.

  10. Implementing school nursing strategies to reduce LGBTQ adolescent suicide: a randomized cluster trial study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Willging, Cathleen E; Green, Amy E; Ramos, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing youth suicide in the United States (U.S.) is a national public health priority, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth are at elevated risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorses six evidence-based (EB) strategies that center on meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth in schools; however, fewer than 6?% of U.S. schools implement all of them. The proposed intervention model, ?RLAS? (Implementing School Nursing Strate...

  11. Negative life events and school adjustment among Chinese nursing students: The mediating role of psychological capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Tian, Xiaohong; Zou, Guiyuan; Li, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Adjustment difficulties of college students are common and their school adjustment has gained wide concern in recent years. Negative life events and psychological capital (PsyCap) have been associated with school adjustment. However, the potential impact of negative life events on PsyCap, and whether PsyCap mediates the relationship between negative life events and school adjustment among nursing students have not been studied. To investigate the relationship among negative life events, PsyCap, and school adjustment among five-year vocational high school nursing students in China and the mediating role of PsyCap between negative life events and school adjustment. A cross-sectional survey design was conducted. 643 five-year vocational high school nursing students were recruited from three public high vocational colleges in Shandong of China. Adolescent Self-Rating Life Event Checklist (ASLEC), the Psychological Capital Questionnaire for Adolescent Students scale (PCQAS), and the Chinese College Student Adjustment Scale (CCSAS) were used in this study. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of PsyCap. Negative life events were negatively associated with the dimensions of school adjustment (interpersonal relationship adaptation, learning adaptation, campus life adaptation, career adaptation, emotional adaptation, self-adaptation, and degree of satisfaction). PsyCap was positively associated with the dimensions of school adjustment and negatively associated with negative life events. PsyCap partially mediated the relationship between negative life events and school adjustment. Negative life events may increase the risk of school maladjustment in individuals with low PsyCap. Interventions designed to increase nursing students' PsyCap might buffer the stress of adverse life events, and thereby, enhance students' positive adjustment to school. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Education related to organ donation and transplantation in undergraduate nursing schools: 1993 versus 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabalewski, Franki L; Ellis, James M; McGaw, Lin Johnson

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the change in the amount and type of content related to organ donation and transplantation in US nursing schools from 1993 to 2000. A survey of 700 nursing schools was conducted in 2000, and its results were compared with results of a similar survey conducted in 1993. Three hundred fifty schools (53.3%) completed the 2000 survey, and 426 (61%) completed the 1993 survey. Although the amount of time dedicated to donation (P = .82) and transplantation (P = .26) issues did not change significantly, the number and types of topics presented, such as minority concerns and cultural issues, increased significantly. There was also a significant increase (P = .002) in faculty ratings of whether it is important to expose new graduates to this content. A significant increase was also observed in the number of schools that reported that organ procurement professionals presented such content to students (31% to 42%, P = .006). Although the amount of time spent on these issues has not increased, the number of topics that are now included in the nursing curriculum has increased. In 2000, nursing faculty perceived such content as more important to include in the school's curriculum than in 1993. This change in perception may be a first step in creating a nursing workforce that is knowledgeable about organ donation and transplantation.

  13. Internationalising university schools of nursing in South Africa through a Community of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, L R; Middleton, L

    2011-03-01

    International nursing experiences in higher education have traditionally enabled and continue to enable nurses to appreciate '...the richness of the nursing mosaic...and the realities of nursing in many different cultural contexts'. This article describes a case study of the Collaboration for Higher Education of Nurses and Midwives in Africa in terms of its success in internationalising the nursing schools involved. Different types of international contact have led to a limited pattern of internationalization in the universities of Southern Africa, which often places African academics in a secondary or dependent position. Opportunities for truly equal international partnerships have been limited. A qualitative analysis of the views of participants from the consortium of universities was carried out based on the conceptual framework of communities of practice. An effective community of practice had been established, focused on the major knowledge domain of nursing and midwifery in Africa, and sharing the perception that their work was empowering and collaborative. The community had established its own ways of working, and articulated major institutional and individual benefits. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Newly graduated nurses' job satisfaction: comparison with allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mihyun; Lee, Ji Yun; Cho, Sung-Hyun

    2012-09-01

    The purposes of this study are to examine differences in job satisfaction among professional groups including nurses, allied hospital professionals, social workers, and elementary school teachers, and to identify specific characteristics of job satisfaction of nurses. The study design was a cross-sectional exploratory study using secondary data analysis with the 2009 Graduates Occupational Mobility Survey. The sample was female new graduates. The differences in job satisfaction among professional groups were analyzed using logistic regression (satisfied vs. not satisfied). Overall, 41.5% of nurses, 50.1% of allied hospital professionals, 58.2% of social workers, and 89% of elementary school teachers were satisfied with their job. Nurses were significantly less satisfied than the other professionals in 5 of the 11 job characteristics and had the lowest odds ratio (OR) when compared with elementary school teachers: work content (OR = 0.197, 95% CI [0.128, 0.304]), physical work environment (OR = 0.353, 95% CI [0.236, 0.529]), working hours (OR = 0.054, 95% CI [0.033, 0.088]), personal growth (OR = 0.242, 95% CI [0.160, 0.366]), and autonomy (OR = 0.188, 95% CI [0.123, 0.288]). Work content, physical work environment, interpersonal relationship, advancement system, and autonomy were significantly associated with the overall job satisfaction of nurses. Relatively dissatisfying job characteristics in nursing work environment that were significant predictors for nurses' job satisfaction should be improved. Newly graduated nurses are at risk for job dissatisfaction. This can result in high turnover rates and can exacerbate the nursing shortage. Efforts to improve the work environment are needed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Victimization, aggression, and visits to the school nurse for somatic complaints, illnesses, and physical injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernberg, Eric M; Nelson, Timothy D; Fonagy, Peter; Twemlow, Stuart W

    2011-05-01

    To examine how involvement in aggressor-victim interactions is linked to somatic complaints, illnesses, and physical injuries among elementary school-aged children. This study was composed of a school-based sample of 590 children in grades 3 through 5. Independent sources were used to assess victimization (self-report) and aggression (peer report) in the fall semester. School nursing logs for the entire school year were collected in May and coded for the number of times each child presented with a somatic complaint, illness, or injury. Both aggression and victimization were significantly related to all 3 reasons for nurse visits, controlling for demographic variables. Higher levels of aggression and victimization each were independently associated with more frequent visits to the school nurse for somatic complaints, illnesses, and injuries. A significant victimization-times-aggression interaction was found for illnesses, with nonaggressive victimized children presenting most frequently for illness visits. Involvement in aggressor-victim interactions, as either aggressor, victim, or both, is associated with more frequent health complaints, based on school nursing logs. Prevention, early identification, and treatment of problems with victimization and aggression may have important health implications for children.

  16. Using transformational change to improve organizational culture and climate in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Pamela J; Clark, Cynthia M; Strohfus, Pamela; Belcheir, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    A positive organizational culture and climate is closely associated with an affirming workplace and job satisfaction. Especially during a time of faculty shortages, academic leaders need to be cognizant of the culture and climate in schools of nursing. The culture of an organization affects employees, systems, and processes, and if the culture becomes problematic, transformational leadership is essential to create change. The purpose of this article is to describe an 8-year journey to change the culture and climate of a school of nursing from one of dissatisfaction and distrust to one of high employee satisfaction and trust. Kotter's model for transformational change was used to frame a longitudinal study using the Cultural and Climate Assessment Scale to transform the organizational culture and climate of a school of nursing. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Cyberbullying and Social Media: Information and Interventions for School Nurses Working With Victims, Students, and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elizabeth; Vessey, Judith A; Pfeifer, Lauren

    2018-02-01

    Social media has become an increasingly prevalent fixture in youths' lives, with over 90% of teenagers reporting daily usage. These online sites and applications have provided many positive opportunities for youths to connect and share ideas with others; however, social media has also become a major platform for cyberbullying. Victims often experience negative health outcomes directly related to cyberbullying. For this reason, it is critical that third parties, such as school nurses, are well versed in social media and the warning signs of those being victimized by cyberbullying. Therefore, this integrative review examines school nurses' knowledge of cyberbullying and social media and identifies the implications for school nursing practice regarding prevention and intervention processes.

  18. Building nurse leaders through the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School Student Quality Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Cattleya; Cutting, Katharine N

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement is an independent not-for-profit organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a leading innovator in health and health care improvement with a global following.One important part of the IHI is the development and evolution of the "Open School." Launched in September 2008, the online community currently includes hundreds of thousands of students worldwide. The goals of the Open School are consistent with the IHI initial concepts: to build will for change, seek out innovation, share expertise, and build leaders. Each year, the Open School awards scholarships to select students to attend a Leadership Academy.The Student Quality Leadership Academy allows students to network with other future nurses, physicians, and health care administrators and explores how they feel about leadership. This is important to nursing as we will need to replace many leadership positions in the future, but often new nurses are uncertain about leadership roles.

  19. Missouri K-12 school disaster and biological event preparedness and seasonal influenza vaccination among school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebmann, Terri; Elliott, Michael B; Artman, Deborah; VanNatta, Matthew; Wakefield, Mary

    2015-10-01

    School preparedness for bioevents, such as emerging infectious diseases, bioterrorism, and pandemics, is imperative, but historically has been low. The Missouri Association of School Nurses members were sent an online survey during the 2013-2014 school year to assess current bioevent readiness. There were 15 and 35 indicators of school disaster and bioevent preparedness, respectively. Multivariate linear regressions were conducted to delineate factors associated with higher school disaster and bioevent preparedness scores. In total, 133 school nurses participated, with a 33.6% response rate. On average, schools had fewer than half of the disaster or bioevent indicators. Disaster and bioevent preparedness scores ranged from 1-12.5 (mean, 6.0) and 5-25 (mean, 13.8), respectively. The least frequently reported plan components included bioterrorism-specific psychological needs addressed (1.5%, n = 2), having a foodservice biosecurity plan (8.3%, n = 11), and having a liberal sick leave policy for bioevents (22.6%, n = 30). Determinants of better bioevent preparedness include perception that the school is well prepared for a pandemic (P = .001) or natural disaster (P < .05), nurse being on the disaster planning committee (P = .001), and school being a closed point of dispensing (P < .05). Schools are underprepared for biological events and are not on track to meet state and national biological preparedness goals. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing the Capacity of School Nurses to Reduce Excessive Anxiety in Children: Development of the CALM Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kelly L.; Stewart, Catherine E.; Muggeo, Michela A.; Ginsburg, Golda S.

    2015-01-01

    Problem: Excessive anxiety is among the most common psychiatric problems facing youth. Because anxious youth tend to have somatic complaints, many seek help from the school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to provide early intervention. This study addresses this problem and describes the plans to develop and test a new…

  1. End-of-Life and Palliative Care Issues in Medical and Nursing Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Medical and nursing schools in the United States have traditionally had a limited emphasis on end-of-life care. The present study is a comparison of these 2 professional programs' current offerings on death education. Data were gathered via a mailed survey from the 122 medical schools in 2005 and the 580 baccalaureate nursing programs in 2006.…

  2. Barriers Identified by Swedish School Nurses in Giving Information about Testicular Cancer and Testicular Self-Examination to Adolescent Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudberg, Lennart; Nilsson, Sten; Wikblad, Karin; Carlsson, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent school nurses in Sweden inform adolescent men about testicular cancer (TC) and testicular self-examination (TSE). A questionnaire was completed by 129 school nurses from 29 randomly selected municipalities. All respondents were women, with a mean age of 42 years. The results showed that…

  3. [Training in patient safety in medical and nursing schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, J J; Guilabert, M; Vitaller, J; Ignacio, E

    2016-01-01

    To compare the information on patient safety received by students of medicine and nursing. Cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenience sample of medical and nursing students of 3 Universities. The Latin Patient Safety Student Information and a test of 5 questions with 5 options were used. A sample of 79 students in each group was enrolled to detect differences of .3 units (bilateral estimation), considering 80% statistical power and 95% confidence interval. A total of 144 students replied (74 nursing and 70 medicine students). Nursing students achieved higher scores in the communication with patients factor (3.8 vs 3.2, P<.001) and proactive attitude to identify risks for patient safety (4.3 vs 3.8, P<.001). Medical students were more aware of the inevitability of adverse events (2.3 vs 3.1, P<.001). Ten (7%) students had only one fault in the test, and only one (1%) answered all questions correctly. The training in patient safety should be improved both in nursing and medicine, although nursing students receive more information. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Educational audit on drug dose calculation learning in a Tanzanian school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Angela Ruth

    2015-06-01

    Patient safety is a key concern for nurses; ability to calculate drug doses correctly is an essential skill to prevent and reduce medication errors. Literature suggests that nurses' drug calculation skills should be monitored. The aim of the study was to conduct an educational audit on drug dose calculation learning in a Tanzanian school of nursing. Specific objectives were to assess learning from targeted teaching, to identify problem areas in performance and to identify ways in which these problem areas might be addressed. A total of 268 registered nurses and nursing students in two year groups of a nursing degree programme were the subjects for the audit; they were given a pretest, then four hours of teaching, a post-test after two weeks and a second post-test after eight weeks. There was a statistically significant improvement in correct answers in the first post-test, but none between the first and second post-tests. Particular problems with drug calculations were identified by the nurses / students, and the teacher; these identified problems were not congruent. Further studies in different settings using different methods of teaching, planned continuing education for all qualified nurses, and appropriate pass marks for students in critical skills are recommended.

  5. Polish school nurses' knowledge of the first-aid in tooth avulsion of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginska, Joanna; Rodakowska, Ewa; Milewski, Robert; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena; Kierklo, Anna

    2016-03-09

    The frequency of dental trauma in schools is secondary only to accidents at home. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of first aid in the avulsion of permanent teeth presented by Polish school nurses from different areas. A cross-sectional study with the use of a structured self-administrative questionnaire was conducted in 2014 on school nurses working in randomly selected Polish provinces. The instrument consisted of demographic questions, questions referring to nurses' experience and training in dental trauma and questions checking knowledge of first-aid in the avulsion of permanent teeth. The maximum number of points to be scored was eight. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis, the Mann-Whitney U and Chi(2) tests with the level of statistical significance at p nurses of which 70.1 % had experience with dental injuries and 45.7 % witnessed a tooth avulsion in pupils. 10.4 % nurses participated in training courses concerning tooth avulsion and 67.1 % of them independently broadened their knowledge. The knowledge of the first-aid management of an avulsed tooth was moderate (4.72 ± 1.95 points). 78.1 % of nurses chose a correct definition of the term of 'tooth avulsion'. Only 7.3 % of them were aware that the replantation could be conducted by any witness of an accident. Saline was most often chosen as a proper transport medium for an avulsed tooth (57.9 %), whereas 16.1 % of nurses indicated milk. 13.4 % of evaluated nurses showed readiness to conduct an immediate replantation. Most respondents preferred calling child's parents and advising them to bring the child to a dentist (63.4 %). The main factor influencing nurses' level of knowledge was self-education (p sports classes (p = 0.0423) were positive determinants of improved knowledge. Nurses from large agglomerations had significantly lower knowledge (p = 0.005). The main source of information for self-education was the Internet. The evaluated nurses were in need of education with regard

  6. Determinants of Social Accountability in Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools: A Delphi Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Salehmoghaddam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Revising the medical education programs to meet the needs of society has become both a necessity and an important priority due to the considerable increase of population, changing patterns of diseases, and new health priorities. While this necessity has been highlighted in Iran’s Fifth Development Plan as well as its National 2025 Vision Plan, the determinants of social accountability have not been explained yet. This study aimed to develop determinants of social accountability in the Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools. Methods: This classic Delphi study included thirty experts in Nursing and Midwifery Education, Research and Services selected based on purposive sampling and three rounds of Delphi technique and conducted in Nursing and Midwifery School of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The primary data were collected using an initial structured questionnaire prepared through extensive review of literature. SPSS 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. The interquartile deviation and percentage of agreement were also used to study the consensus of opinion by experts. Results: Finding obtained from the rounds of Delphi resulted in selecting 69 determinants out of the initial pool of 128 primary determinants of social accountability. The items were selected based on experts’ consensus and categorized under three main activities of Nursing and Midwifery School, namely education, research, and service. Conclusion: Social accountability determinants were explained by 69 items for Schools of Nursing and Midwifery in Iran. The proposed determinants can be used by managers and authorities of Nursing and Midwifery School, policy makers, and evaluating institutions associated with them to ensure realizing social accountability goals.

  7. Determinants of Social Accountability in Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehmoghaddam, Amir Reza; Mazloom, Seyed Reza; Sharafkhani, Mohammad; Gholami, Hassan; Emami Zeydi, Amir; Khorashadizadeh, Fatemeh; Emadzadeh, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Revising the medical education programs to meet the needs of society has become both a necessity and an important priority due to the considerable increase of population, changing patterns of diseases, and new health priorities. While this necessity has been highlighted in Iran's Fifth Development Plan as well as its National 2025 Vision Plan, the determinants of social accountability have not been explained yet. This study aimed to develop determinants of social accountability in the Iranian Nursing and Midwifery Schools. This classic Delphi study included thirty experts in Nursing and Midwifery Education, Research and Services selected based on purposive sampling and three rounds of Delphi technique and conducted in Nursing and Midwifery School of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. The primary data were collected using an initial structured questionnaire prepared through extensive review of literature. SPSS 11.5 software was used to analyze the data. The interquartile deviation and percentage of agreement were also used to study the consensus of opinion by experts. Finding obtained from the rounds of Delphi resulted in selecting 69 determinants out of the initial pool of 128 primary determinants of social accountability. The items were selected based on experts' consensus and categorized under three main activities of Nursing and Midwifery School, namely education, research, and service. Social accountability determinants were explained by 69 items for Schools of Nursing and Midwifery in Iran. The proposed determinants can be used by managers and authorities of Nursing and Midwifery School, policy makers, and evaluating institutions associated with them to ensure realizing social accountability goals.

  8. Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of service-learning through a school-based community project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    Service-learning (SL) is an experiential teaching method that combines instruction with community service, with the aim of enriching students' academic learning, interpersonal skills and sense of responsibility while making meaningful contributions to the community. However, measuring outcomes of service-learning projects is difficult. This article reports on the perceptions of 18 third-year undergraduate nursing students who took part in a pilot service-learning project targeting tobacco use in a local elementary school. Faculty members evaluated the program's outcomes by engaging students in structured reflection on the program about its relevance to their future careers as practicing professionals, especially in community-based settings. The students' perceptions were elicited through three sets of reflective assignments following the project. Findings from the reflective assignments suggest that the pilot program was successful in enhancing the students' academic, social, and personal development while building a partnership between the school of nursing and key players in the community, including school-based nurses, teachers, administrators, families, and community leaders. The author suggests that service-learning projects can help nursing students accomplish key developmental tasks of the college years (such as building their competence, autonomy, and integrity), while helping impart the skills and values they will need as they graduate and seek professional nursing roles.

  9. Lecturers' and students' perceptions of portfolios in an English School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Glenn A; Park, Jennifer R; Traynor, Victoria; Nairn, Stuart; O'Brien, Elisabeth; Chapple, Mary; Johnson, Stacy

    2009-04-01

    This study was aimed at comparing perceptions of portfolios between student nurses at the early and latter stages of their training and how they compare with their lecturers' perceptions. Portfolios are used widely in nurse education. There has been research into how portfolios are perceived and understood, but there is little evidence into how student nurses and lecturers compare quantitatively in perceptions of portfolio use. Survey. Forty-eight nursing lecturers and 413 nursing students, from a multi-centred School of Nursing in the UK, completed a questionnaire. Data were analysed with exploratory factor analysis, varimax rotation of the factor solution, internal consistency analysis, and analysis of variance. Five factors were extracted, which were labelled: (1) portfolios as a means of skills acquisition, (2) other means of teaching and learning beyond using portfolios, (3) processes of showing the portfolio to others, (4) having favourable attitudes towards portfolios and (5) lecturers' ability to share knowledge about portfolios. Scales developed from these five factors had high levels of internal consistency. Lecturers were the most positive of the three respondent groups in their views of portfolios, whereas third- and fourth-year students were the least positive. There were significant differences between student nurses and their lecturers, concerning how information on portfolios is communicated by the lecturer. There were significant discrepancies between lecturers and student nurses in their views on how portfolios are used. The value of portfolios becomes less salient to student nurses towards the end of their training. Lecturers and clinical mentors need to look at students' perceptions and why some nursing students' views on portfolios deteriorate. There could be regular discussions with students to see how and why the students begin to see portfolios as less useful for their education and continual professional development.

  10. Academic dishonesty in nursing schools: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Donald L

    2009-11-01

    Academic dishonesty, whether in the form of plagiarism or cheating on tests, has received renewed attention in the past few decades as pervasive use of the Internet and a presumed deterioration of ethics in the current generation of students has led some, perhaps many, to conclude that academic dishonesty is reaching epidemic proportions. What is lacking in many cases, including in the nursing profession, is empirical support of these trends. This article attempts to provide some of that empirical data and supports the conclusion that cheating is a significant issue in all disciplines today, including nursing. Some preliminary policy implications are also considered. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Underrepresented students' perspectives on institutional climate during the application and admission process to nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Giscombe, Cheryl L; Rowsey, Pamela Johnson; Kneipp, Shawn M; Owens, Clint W; Sheffield, Karen M; Galbraith, Kayoll V; Hammad, Sama; Fowler, Tamryn; Hodges, Eric A; Kowlowitz, Vicky; Alexander, G Rumay

    2015-05-01

    A growing body of literature has focused on issues related to recruitment and retention to enhance diversity in nursing. This study was designed to identify barriers and supports encountered by underrepresented students when applying to nursing school. Twenty-two underrepresented baccalaureate nursing students participated in two focus groups. Applied thematic analysis was used to organize the data and identify major themes. Students expressed the importance of having (a) navigators in the offices of admissions and student affairs to provide encouragement, support, and information during the application process; (b) tailored programming for underrepresented students; (c) financial aid guidance; (d) timely feedback about admissions decisions; (e) a clear and easily navigated Web site; and (f) negotiation and acculturation to know the right things to do and say during the application and admissions process. Findings provide direction for developing programming and collaborations to enhance the institutional climate for underrepresented nursing applicants. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(5):261-269.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Public health nurses' perceptions of mobile computing in a school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaitis, Ruta K; O'Mara, Linda M

    2005-01-01

    The use of mobile computing (MC) in healthcare practice has grown substantially in recent years, yet little is known about its impact. This descriptive, exploratory, qualitative study explored the perceptions of public health nurses (PHNs) in a school health program about their use of MC. Public health nurses participated in focus group interviews and completed weekly reflections. They perceived that MC (a) increased PHNs' flexibility although they were constrained by work rules, (b) increased peer and employer connectedness yet increased isolation, (c) and increased PHNs' status while creating a wider gap between PHNs and their clients. Public health nurses described their practice as being more efficient and client-focused with MC. Over time, PHNs grew more comfortable with the tool, developed a dependence on it, and learned to deal with technological problems. Although this new technology shows promise, there is a need for further research to examine its impact as a tool to promote public health nursing practice.

  13. International programs in United States schools of nursing: driving forces, obstacles, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Tamara H; McNelis, Angela M

    2013-01-01

    To understand the development of international programs in United States schools of nursing from the perspective of driving forces, obstacles, and opportunities. Despite increasing philosophical support for international programs, significant obstacles to their development, integration, and sustainability exist in schools of nursing across the United States. A National League for Nursing (NLN) survey collected information on the number and type of international programs being offered, with an emphasis on obstacles to integration. Driving forces for international programs, identified by 487 responding institutions, included valued program outcomes, a global focus, and limited availability of clinical sites. Obstacles, such as cost, safety, and lack of credit toward a major, were identified. Suggestions for addressing and overcoming the obstacles are proposed, including the sharing of resources and utilization of the NLN Faculty Preparation for Global Experiences Toolkit. More research is needed to understand the implications for curricula, logistics, development, costs, and sustainability.

  14. INTERNAL QUALITY SYSTEM PERFORMANCE: CASE STUDY AT THREE INDONESIAN NURSING SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Sundari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes internal quality system petformance at three Indonesian nursing schools and examines the match of the existing accreditation programmes with the developing internal quality system. A cross sectional study is used with self-administered questionnaires and applied to selected nursing schools. The questionnaire was designed according tocategories of framework of total quality management model. Interview and discussion with respondents including snowball sampling to other teachers and staffs were petformed to clarify and validate data and to enriched the information The activities measured were the enabling and the results factors. The enablers were including Leaderships, strategy, resources, human resources, educational management, teaching teaming process, research and development and also evaluation mechanism, while the results were covering students and personnel satisfaction and partnership.Results shows that some enabling factors were not included in the accreditation, while several indicators in the sub component of accreditation did not explicitly reflect internal quality system petformance. The school stratum as the outcome result of a quality measure is analogue to customer satisfaction, which would depend on direct influence of internal factors such as quality of schools leadership, strategy and educational management. Since the total accreditation score affects school strata and public recognition, it is necessary to use more objectives and relevant indicators by incorporating the internal and external factors as a measure of school quality petformances. Key words: accreditation, education, quality system evaluation, nursing

  15. Screening for Usher Syndrome: A Hands-On Guide for School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Joan; Coonts, Teresa; Jordan, Beth; Schafer, Jacqueline, Ed.

    This manual was written specifically to help school nurses conduct screenings for Usher syndrome, a genetic condition that involves deafness or hearing loss and the progressive loss of vision. It provides information on the step-by-step process of how to conduct a screening, the actual forms needed for a screening, and resources for referring…

  16. Perception and Needs in Health Education Curriculum among School Nurses as Health Teachers in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyu Young; Ham, Ok Kyung

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated perceived effectiveness and perceived barriers to health education curriculum targeting school nurses as health teachers in Korea. A total of 741 health teachers participated. The questionnaire included perceived effectiveness and perceived barriers to health education curriculum, future roles of health teachers, and needs…

  17. Teaching of Family Planning at Medical Nursing and Midwifery Schools in Certain Countries of the Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    A review is given of the status of family planning education at medical, nursing, and midwifery schools in seven European countries. The report is presented in 11 sections. Section one, an introduction, explains the scope of the study and defines family planning to include birth control, pregnancy and delivery, problems of adolescents, family life…

  18. Teaching Children about Mental Health and Illness: A School Nurse Health Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSocio, Janiece; Stember, Lisa; Schrinsky, Joanne

    2006-01-01

    A mental health education program designed by school nurses for children ages 10-12 was developed in 2000-2001 and expanded with broader distribution in 2004-2005. Six classroom sessions, each 45 minutes in length, provided information and activities to increase children's awareness of mental health and illness. Education program content included…

  19. image of nursing profession as viewed by secondary school

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    included 50 male and 50 female students who were opting for Physics, Chemistry and Biology from form III to form VI in the above ... Factors that were pointed out included: social, economical, educational and individual perceptions of different students. ... The perception of nurses being not as professional as the other ...

  20. Developing a competency-based curriculum in HIV for nursing schools in Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knebel Elisa

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preparing health workers to confront the HIV/AIDS epidemic is an urgent challenge in Haiti, where the HIV prevalence rate is 2.2% and approximately 10 100 people are taking antiretroviral treatment. There is a critical shortage of doctors in Haiti, leaving nurses as the primary care providers for much of the population. Haiti's approximately 1000 nurses play a leading role in HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment. However, nurses do not receive sufficient training at the pre-service level to carry out this important work. Methods To address this issue, the Ministry of Health and Population collaborated with the International Training and Education Center on HIV over a period of 12 months to create a competency-based HIV/AIDS curriculum to be integrated into the 4-year baccalaureate programme of the four national schools of nursing. Results Using a review of the international health and education literature on HIV/AIDS competencies and various models of curriculum development, a Haiti-based curriculum committee developed expected HIV/AIDS competencies for graduating nurses and then drafted related learning objectives. The committee then mapped these learning objectives to current courses in the nursing curriculum and created an 'HIV/AIDS Teaching Guide' for faculty on how to integrate and achieve these objectives within their current courses. The curriculum committee also created an 'HIV/AIDS Reference Manual' that detailed the relevant HIV/AIDS content that should be taught for each course. Conclusion All nursing students will now need to demonstrate competency in HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, skills and attitudes during periodic assessment with direct observation of the student performing authentic tasks. Faculty will have the responsibility of developing exercises to address the required objectives and creating assessment tools to demonstrate that their graduates have met the objectives. This activity brought different

  1. Effectiveness of health education teachers and school nurses teaching sexually transmitted infections/human immunodeficiency virus prevention knowledge and skills in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borawski, Elaine A; Tufts, Kimberly Adams; Trapl, Erika S; Hayman, Laura L; Yoder, Laura D; Lovegreen, Loren D

    2015-03-01

    We examined the differential impact of a well-established human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) curriculum, Be Proud! Be Responsible!, when taught by school nurses and health education classroom teachers within a high school curricula. Group-randomized intervention study of 1357 ninth and tenth grade students in 10 schools. Twenty-seven facilitators (6 nurses, 21 teachers) provided programming; nurse-led classrooms were randomly assigned. Students taught by teachers were more likely to report their instructor to be prepared, comfortable with the material, and challenged them to think about their health than students taught by a school nurse. Both groups reported significant improvements in HIV/STI/condom knowledge immediately following the intervention, compared to controls. Yet, those taught by school nurses reported significant and sustained changes (up to 12 months after intervention) in attitudes, beliefs, and efficacy, whereas those taught by health education teachers reported far fewer changes, with sustained improvement in condom knowledge only. Both classroom teachers and school nurses are effective in conveying reproductive health information to high school students; however, teaching the technical (eg, condom use) and interpersonal (eg, negotiation) skills needed to reduce high-risk sexual behavior may require a unique set of skills and experiences that health education teachers may not typically have. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  2. School nurses' familiarity and perceptions of academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michelle L; Welch, Cailee E; Parsons, John T; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate school nurses' familiarity and perceptions regarding academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion. School nurses (N = 1,246) accessed the survey School Nurses' Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-SN). The BAKPAC-SN contained several questions pertaining to concussion management and academic accommodations. There were significant differences regarding personal experience as well as familiarity of academic accommodations (p academic accommodations (r = .210, p academic accommodations (p = .027) and 504 plans (p = .001) than school nurses employed at multiple schools. Health care professionals should collaborate to effectively manage a concussed patient and should consider academic accommodations to ensure whole-person health care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Exploratory research to design a school nurse-delivered intervention to treat adolescent overweight and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellar, Lauren; Druker, Sue; Osganian, Stavroula K; Gapinski, Mary Ann; Lapelle, Nancy; Pbert, Lori

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of a school nurse-delivered intervention, focus groups were conducted to gain insight into the perceptions of stakeholders regarding the design and implementation of the intervention. Fifteen focus groups at participating schools. One hundred subjects, including overweight and obese high school students, parents, high school nurses, and staff. Stakeholders' perceptions. Focus groups were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Theme instances related to the research aim were identified, coded, and sorted into theme categories. Major topics discussed included teen issues, family support, intervention implementation-related concerns, and curriculum content. Teen issues included dealing with peer pressure, avoiding emotional eating, and support from friends. Many participants thought it should be the teen's choice to involve parents. Confidentiality was the most commonly identified potential barrier to implementation. Recommendations for nutrition and physical activity curriculum content focused on concrete, practical strategies. Results of this research provided insight into stakeholder's needs and perceptions regarding the content and structure of a school nurse-delivered intervention to treat adolescent overweight and obesity. Findings were used in the design and implementation of intervention protocols and materials. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Examination of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Care Content in North Carolina Schools of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Judith B; Enweana, Ijeoma; Alston, Celeste Kaysha; Baldwin, Dee M

    2017-04-01

    Nursing students require academic and clinical training in preparation for the increased demand for culturally competent care. One group that is in need of culturally knowledgeable health care providers is lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. The purpose of this study was to examine how LGBT health care content is integrated into North Carolina schools of nursing curricula and to examine the existence of specific LGBT policies. A survey was mailed to 70 deans and directors of RN programs in North Carolina. Over 90% of the schools indicated that LGBT health care issues were taught in the curricula. The majority of the content was taught as an "other" course (37%). More than two thirds of the schools devoted less than 5 hours teaching LGBT content. LGBT health care content is being taught, yet the presence of specific LGBT practice policies is basically nonexistent. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):223-226.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. The Role of the School Nurse in the Special Education Process: Part 2: Eligibility Determination and the Individualized Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robin Adair; Yonkaitis, Catherine Falusi

    2017-07-01

    This is the second of two articles outlining the professional school nurse's role in the special education process for students with disabilities. The Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act of 2004 mandates the special education process: identification, full and individual evaluation, eligibility determination, and development of the individual education program (IEP), including special education placement. Part 1 focused on the importance of the school nurse's role in student identification, response to intervention, and the full and individual evaluation. Part 2 highlights the school nurse's vital and unique contribution to the subsequent special education steps of eligibility determination, IEP development, and special education services placement and minutes.

  6. Pure tone audiometry and impedance screening of school entrant children by nurses: evaluation in a practical setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Holtby, I; Forster, D P; Kumar, U

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Screening for hearing loss in English children at entry to school (age 5-6 years) is usually by pure tone audiometry sweep undertaken by school nurses. This study aimed to compare the validity and screening rates of pure tone audiometry with impedance screening in these children. METHODS: Two stage pure tone audiometry and impedance methods of screening were compared in 610 school entry children from 19 infant schools in north east England. Both procedures were completed by school...

  7. Community environmental quality knowledge and awareness among nurses: developing and piloting an assessment survey in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, Derek G; Alexander, Melannie S; Huang, Yuqi

    2010-01-01

    About one in five Americans spends a considerable number of hours in school each week, and thus, is exposed to a variety of environmental agents. Community health nursing professionals require resources and specific training to acquire the environmental knowledge needed to raise personal and community awareness as an enhancement of their practice. Given limited resources for schools and local public health education initiatives, identifying and prioritizing environmental concerns comes before actions to prevent or reduce exposures. With the rise in prevalence of childhood asthma, of special concern are those agents within the school environment that may serve as asthma triggers. This pilot project, within a larger study in a large school district in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, developed and piloted an environmental health priorities survey with school nurses and other school staff about indoor and outdoor microenvironments relevant to school-aged children. Findings indicate that participants (N = 34) could prioritize environmental issues to inform future intervention activities (such as continuing education training), and distinguish predominantly indoor from typical outdoor exposure agents and their major sources.

  8. Urban high school students' perceptions of nursing as a career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degazon, Cynthia E; Shaw, Holly K

    2007-07-01

    One hundred and fourteen high school students (n = 114) completed the Attitudes, Values, and Beliefs Questionnaire. A two-sided Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test revealed that students perceived an ideal career as having more power, more positive evaluation, and less activity than a career in nursing would. The areas of greatest perceived disparity and those that showed nursing less favorably were making decisions for one's self, always having a job, working in a safe place, making a lot of money, and earning appreciation and respect. Areas in which nursing appeared more favorable were working with one's hands and being very busy. Caring for others and working hard were valued equally for both careers. Students' perceptions of nursing may have been based on misinformation, on a lack of awareness about the options available within the profession, or based simply on a higher regard for a different career. Future endeavors to recruit these students into nursing must include exposure to the multiple opportunities that await them as experienced by contemporary nursing professionals.

  9. Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010: An Opportunity for School Nurses to Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jessica L.; Galon, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 will provide an opportunity for school nurses to intervene in the serious childhood obesity problem in the United States. Major changes in the management of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) will likely challenge schools yet may provide the impetus for a collaborative effort by the…

  10. Effectiveness of health instruction provided by student nurses in rural secondary schools of Zimbabwe: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munodawafa, D; Marty, P J; Gwede, C

    1995-02-01

    This demonstration project used student nurses (n = 12) on community deployment to provide health instruction among rural school-age populations in Zimbabwe. A quasi-experimental (pre- and post-test), non-equivalent control group design was used and consisted of 141 school pupils in the intervention group and 144 pupils in the comparison group (N = 285). The curriculum focused on prevention of STDs, HIV/AIDS and drugs (alcohol, tobacco and marijuana). A gain in health knowledge scores among the intervention group was reported at post-test. More than 70% of the pupils who received health instruction from student nurses gave a high approval rating of student nurses' performance. Further, student nurses, teachers and tutors all support school health instruction by student nurses although tutors and teachers differ on teaching about condoms.

  11. Multi-ethnic high school students' perceptions of nursing in the USA and Israel: a descriptive quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degazon, Cynthia E; Ben Natan, Merav; Shaw, Holly K; Ehrenfeld, Mally

    2015-01-01

    In order to target new recruits or future generation of ethnic minority nurses about their potential fit in nursing, it is necessary to understand their perceptions of the profession. Successful recruitment of high school students into nursing in part requires congruency between perceptions of an ideal career and perceptions of nursing as a career. The purposes of this study were to compare ethnic minority high school students in the USA and in Israel on their perceptions of nursing as a career, and to understand how those perceptions compare to their perceptions of an ideal career. A descriptive quantitative design was employed to study a sample of 330 ethnic minority high school students from the USA and from Israel. The Mann-Whitney U procedure was used to compare the groups' perceptions; a two-sided Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks test was used to determine the differences between their perceptions of an ideal career and of nursing as a career. The USA students had more positive perceptions of nursing as a career than did the Israeli students. Both groups of students did not perceive nursing as an ideal career: They perceived nurses as hard workers, performing arduous tasks and busy work, not academically challenged, with limited opportunity for leadership and autonomy, and earning less money than they would want in an ideal career. Caring for others was a highly valued attribute for an ideal career and for nursing as a career. A minority career development plan that underscores the positive attributes of nursing should be designed in both the USA and in Israel for ethnic minority high school students. The plan should effectively communicate nursing as a caring profession that is academically rigorous and intellectually challenging with available leadership opportunities in institutions and society. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enabling overweight children to improve their food and exercise habits--school nurses' counselling in multilingual settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Maria B; Kjellgren, Karin I; Winkvist, Anna

    2012-09-01

    The study aimed at analysing school nurses' counselling of overweight and obese children in settings with many immigrants, focusing on content concerning food and physical activity and how this was communicated. For people with a predisposition for overweight, the weight control process requires cognitive skills. School nurses' counselling of overweight children has the potential to support this process by enabling personal resources in the children and their families. However, there is uncertainty among nurses about how to conduct supportive counselling. An explorative design was used when collecting and analysing data. Twenty-two counselling sessions between eight school nurses and 20 overweight children were audio-recorded and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Most of the participating schools represented areas with low socioeconomic status and a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Less adequate skills in enabling resources in the children and their parents were observed. Concurrently, school nurses provided inadequate explanations about food and physical activity. Topics related to general nutrition models were frequently communicated as general advice instead of individually tailored counselling. Counselling families with other languages and food cultures than the traditional Swedish created additional difficulties. Improved nutritional knowledge for nurses may enhance their skills in enabling children's and families' resources. School nurses should be provided with opportunities to cooperate with other professions in counteracting overweight. Our findings demonstrate a relationship between content skills and person-centeredness in the counselling. This highlights the importance of inter-professional collaboration to ensure a high quality of lifestyle counselling. School health authorities should give high priority to facilitating school nurses' evidence-based continuing education. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. [A major game in the re-organization of the Professional Nursing School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Amorin, Wellington Mendonça; Barreira, Ieda de Alencar

    2007-01-01

    This is a historical-social description study supported on the thought of Pierre Bourdieu based on documental analysis. It describes the sanitarists and psychiatrists' actions from the reformulation of Education and Public Health Ministry into Education and Health Ministry in the beginning of New State and analyse the fight's strategies of the main agents to take advantage on their proposals of Professional Nursing School's reorganization. The fight's strategies that psychiatrists, sanitarists and certificated nurses had used to stake their projects, characterized a difficult battle inserted in a hard major game. The analyse of the ten course's months of the main document shows the conflict between those agents to impose a new rule to the school.

  14. Educational opportunities: a nursing school model for medical special-needs sheltering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, Belinda; Alfred, Danita; Fountain, Rebecca; Ford, Terri; Chilton, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The devastation of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina increased the awareness of persons who were unable to self-evacuate because of physical and/or mental disabilities. From that awareness, plans emerged to provide a safe haven for those who had special needs. In this article, we describe our efforts as a school of nursing to shelter medical special needs (MSN) evacuees in the wake of a hurricane. After the shelter closed, faculty and students involved in the shelter answered a short survey that included both open- and close-ended questions. The responses are summarized to encourage other schools of nursing to consider caring for MSN evacuees and to share our successes, our failures, and our plans for the future.

  15. [Analysis of nursing-related content portrayed in middle and high school textbooks under the national common basic curriculum in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myun Sook; Choi, Hyeong Wook; Li, Dong Mei

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze nursing-related content in middle, and high school textbooks under the National Common Basic Curriculum in Korea. Nursing-related content from 43 middle school textbooks and 13 high school textbooks was analyzed. There were 28 items of nursing-related content in the selected textbooks. Among them, 13 items were in the 'nursing activity' area, 6 items were in the 'nurse as an occupation' area, 2 items were in the 'major and career choice' area, 6 items were 'just one word' and 1 item in 'others'. The main nursing related content which portrayed in the middle and high school textbooks were caring for patients (7 items accounting for 46.5%), nurses working in hospitals (6 items accounting for 21.4%). In terms of gender perspective, female nurses (15 items accounting for 53.6%) were most prevalent.

  16. Image of nursing profession as viewed by secondary schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sample size included 50 male and 50 female students who were opting for Physics, Chemistry and Biology from form III to form VI in the above mentioned schools. Results: Awareness ... Factors that were pointed out included: social, economical, educational and individual perceptions of different students. Although ...

  17. Relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life in Turkish nursing school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Yasemin; Kilic, Serap Parlar; Akyol, Asiye Durmaz

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between life satisfaction and quality of life of nursing students. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted with a research population of 396 nursing students who received education at a school of nursing. The research data were collected between May and June of the 2007-2008 academic year. The data collection tools included "Student Description Form," Life Satisfaction Scale, and WHOQOL-BREF (TR) Quality of Life (QOL) Scale. The mean score of life satisfaction was 22.90 ± 5.74. Participants' QOL mean scores were 67.16 ± 15.29 in the physical domain, 64.33 ± 14.72 in the psychological domain, 62.81 ± 19.12 in the social relationships domain, and 60.59 ± 12.59 in the environmental domain. There was a significant correlation between life satisfaction and the four main domains of quality of life scores (P life satisfaction and quality of life among nursing students. In addition, it was determined that being a nursing student had a positive effect on students' life satisfaction and quality of life. Therefore, the education system is recommended to be redesigned in such a way as to make students more active and to improve their life satisfaction and quality of life. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Rapid Health Care Improvement Science Curriculum Integration Across Programs in a School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Brant J; Potter, Mertie; Pomerleau, Mimi; Phillips, Andrew; O'Donnell, Mimi; Cowley, Connie; Sipe, Margie

    This article describes the systematic efforts undertaken by a school of nursing in the Northeastern United States to foster innovation in health professions education. We present an application of modified team coaching and plan-do-study-act improvement methods in an educational context to rapidly integrate a quality and safety curriculum across programs. We discuss applications in generalist, advanced practice, doctoral, residency, and advanced fellowship programs and provide examples of each.

  19. Four Lessons Learned From School Nurses in New Jersey About Building a Culture of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Building a Culture of Health will give all members of our society the opportunity to lead healthier lives. To achieve this aim, more stakeholders in the community-residents, elected officials, community-based nonprofits, law enforcement, and schools-need to be engaged in addressing the health challenges in our communities. Moreover, all community stakeholders have to think and act "upstream" by addressing the social determinants of health in their communities. Discussed in this article are some of the lessons that are being learned from the "upstream" actions of school nurses in New Jersey about building a Culture of Health.

  20. Dimensions of leadership of assistant/associate deans in collegiate schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, M A

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether there were differences in the perceptions of deans, assistant/associate deans, and faculty of leadership styles, initiating structure and consideration, and position power of assistant/associate deans in selected collegiate schools of nursing. In addition, the effect of leadership styles on performance as perceived by the three groups related to the position power of assistant/associate deans was also examined. Collegiate schools of nursing, identified as having a hierarchal organization structure with persons identified by the title "assistant/associate dean," were invited to participate. Data were collected from a sample of 36 collegiate nursing schools. The tools used were the Ohio State Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire, and the Fiedler Position Power Scale. Three questions were posed. A multi-variate analysis of testing the three hypotheses showed a significant difference between the three groups' perceptions of initiating structure, consideration, and position power. A main effect for initiating structure was found in the deans' perceptions of position power. A main effect for consideration was found in the perception of the faculty sampled.

  1. Relationship between attendance at breakfast and school achievement among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Yen; Liao, Jenny C

    2002-03-01

    This survey by correlation study with partial qualitative design examined the effect of attendance at breakfast with school achievement in 710 first-year nursing students at a nursing institute in Northern Taiwan. Dietary attendance cards were scanned by computer before each meal. Since the school is located at a geographically isolated suburban area, this program was compulsory for all first-year nursing students and was included in the tuition fee. Comparison of attendance at breakfast over the four-month semester (from September 1999 to January 2000) and final semester class ranking showed a lower attending rate of breakfast (attendance at breakfast equal to or under 60% of mean times in a 4-month semester) was significantly associated with lower scores on tests in six individual classes and a class rank; while a higher frequency of breakfast attendance (attendance at breakfast equal to or over 85% of mean times in a 4-month semester) was significantly associated with higher scores on tests in six individual classes and a higher class rank (p breakfast and practicing health promotion behaviors, the Chinese Health Promoting Scale was used. We also found that those who skipped breakfast frequently had more negative health promotion behaviors than those who attended breakfast more regularly (p breakfast. The research outcome supports the importance of breakfast in school achievement.

  2. A Nurse-Led School-Based Sun Protection Programme in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkin, Özüm; Temel, Ayla Bayık

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a nurse-led school-based sun protection programme in Turkey. A randomized controlled trial was performed at two public schools between February and October 2014. Children with written consent from their parents were screened by nurses for skin type, and 80 children at moderate to high risk for skin cancer were included in the study. The sample was randomized by age, gender and skin type. Stratified and block randomizations were used. The participants were separated into an intervention group (n=40) and control group (n=40). Data were collected using a personal information form and two scales for sun protection behaviour and self-efficacy. In the intervention group, the pretest mean score for sun protection behaviour was 19.25±5.44 and increased significantly in the posttest assessment (33.05±4.23, pprotection behaviour or self-efficacy scores in the control group (p>0.05). A nurse-led school-based sun protection programme effectively promoted children's self-efficacy and sun protection behaviour.

  3. Consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year nursing students at the University of Guayaquil, school of nursing, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Nivia Pinos; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti; Tirapelli, Carlos Renato

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the consumption of benzodiazepines without prescription among first-year students from a nursing school of a public University in Ecuador. This is a descriptive, transversal and explanatory study with a quantitative approach. A questionnaire was used for data collection. The population studied was of 181 students. The results showed that 10.5% of the students had consumed benzodiazepine without prescription once in their lives. Of these, 6.1% consumed benzodiazepine in the last year, and 3.9% are currently consuming it. The diazepam was the most consumed BZD without prescription and pharmacies, were the place of higher access. The main reasons for the benzodiazepine consumption were: insomnia, anxiety, stress, depression, family and economical problems. The use of benzodiazepines with non-medicinal purposes is related to problems such as memory loss, retirement syndrome and sedation. When benzodiazepines are consumed jointly with alcohol or other drugs they can lead to coma or death. This study shows the serious consequences benzodiazepines cause when used by nursing students in Ecuador.

  4. Listening for commissioning: A participatory study exploring young people's experiences, views and preferences of school-based sexual health and school nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Coleman, Lester; Sherriff, Nigel S; Cocking, Chris; Zeeman, Laetitia; Cunningham, Liz

    2017-06-21

    To explore the experiences, views and preferences of young people aged 11-19 years regarding school-based sexual health and school nursing to inform commissioning and delivery for one local authority area in England during 2015. Promoting sexual health for young people remains a challenging, even controversial, but important public health issue. Concerns regarding accessibility, acceptability and efficacy in school-based sexual health and school nursing are evident in the literature. Additionally, a complex public health policy context now governs the funding, provision and delivery of sexual health and school nursing, which potentially presents further challenges. A qualitative, participatory design was used to explore sexual health and school nursing. Data were generated from 15 focus groups (n = 74), with young people aged 11-19 years, in educational-based settings in one local authority area in England. The resultant themes of visibility in relation to sexual health education and school nursing revealed both the complex tensions in designing and delivering acceptable and appropriate sexual health services for young people and the significance of participatory approaches. Our study shows the importance of participatory approaches in working with young people to clearly identify what they want and need in relation to sexual health. The findings also confirm the ways in which school-based sexual health remains challenging but requires a theoretical and conceptual shift. This we argue must be underpinned by participatory approaches. School nurses have always had a significant role to play in promoting positive sexual health for young people and they are exceptionally well placed to challenge the risk-based cultures that frequently dominate school-based sexual health. A shift of debates and practices towards the promotion of positive sexual health cultures though previously argued for now requires the active engagement and involvement of young people. © 2017

  5. Teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses: caring for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Katsuda, Hitomi

    2015-01-01

    This study explored special education teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses who specialize in providing nursing care to children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools. Semistructured interviews with 11 teachers were conducted, and data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The teachers surveyed thought that the most important role of nurses was to maintain good health and safety, as well as to support children's education as members of the educational team. Teachers desired that nurses give advice based on their professional knowledge to maintain the children's good health and safety. In supporting education, nurses were required to support the children's autonomy and education, and to act as members of the educational team. Study findings suggest that, for an optimal relationship with teachers, nurses who provide nursing care for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools need not only fulfill medical functions, but also support the education of children as members of the educational team. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  6. Implementing school nursing strategies to reduce LGBTQ adolescent suicide: a randomized cluster trial study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Cathleen E; Green, Amy E; Ramos, Mary M

    2016-10-22

    Reducing youth suicide in the United States (U.S.) is a national public health priority, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth are at elevated risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorses six evidence-based (EB) strategies that center on meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth in schools; however, fewer than 6 % of U.S. schools implement all of them. The proposed intervention model, "RLAS" (Implementing School Nursing Strategies to Reduce LGBTQ Adolescent Suicide), builds on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) conceptual framework and the Dynamic Adaptation Process (DAP) to implement EB strategies in U.S. high schools. The DAP accounts for the multilevel context of school settings and uses Implementation Resource Teams (IRTs) to facilitate appropriate expertise, advise on acceptable adaptations, and provide data feedback to make schools implementation ready and prepared to sustain changes. Mixed methods will be used to examine individual, school, and community factors influencing both implementation process and youth outcomes. A cluster randomized controlled trial will assess whether LGBTQ students and their peers in RLAS intervention schools (n = 20) report reductions in suicidality, depression, substance use, bullying, and truancy related to safety concerns compared to those in usual care schools (n = 20). Implementation progress and fidelity for each EB strategy in RLAS intervention schools will be examined using a modified version of the Stages of Implementation Completion checklist. During the implementation and sustainment phases, annual focus groups will be conducted with the 20 IRTs to document their experiences identifying and advancing adaptation supports to facilitate use of EB strategies and their perceptions of the DAP. The DAP represents a data-informed, collaborative, multiple stakeholder approach to progress from exploration to sustainment and obtain

  7. Implementing school nursing strategies to reduce LGBTQ adolescent suicide: a randomized cluster trial study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathleen E. Willging

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reducing youth suicide in the United States (U.S. is a national public health priority, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ youth are at elevated risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC endorses six evidence-based (EB strategies that center on meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth in schools; however, fewer than 6 % of U.S. schools implement all of them. The proposed intervention model, “RLAS” (Implementing School Nursing Strategies to Reduce LGBTQ Adolescent Suicide, builds on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS conceptual framework and the Dynamic Adaptation Process (DAP to implement EB strategies in U.S. high schools. The DAP accounts for the multilevel context of school settings and uses Implementation Resource Teams (IRTs to facilitate appropriate expertise, advise on acceptable adaptations, and provide data feedback to make schools implementation ready and prepared to sustain changes. Methods/Design Mixed methods will be used to examine individual, school, and community factors influencing both implementation process and youth outcomes. A cluster randomized controlled trial will assess whether LGBTQ students and their peers in RLAS intervention schools (n = 20 report reductions in suicidality, depression, substance use, bullying, and truancy related to safety concerns compared to those in usual care schools (n = 20. Implementation progress and fidelity for each EB strategy in RLAS intervention schools will be examined using a modified version of the Stages of Implementation Completion checklist. During the implementation and sustainment phases, annual focus groups will be conducted with the 20 IRTs to document their experiences identifying and advancing adaptation supports to facilitate use of EB strategies and their perceptions of the DAP. Discussion The DAP represents a data-informed, collaborative, multiple stakeholder

  8. Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of school nurses and personnel and associations with nonmedical immunization exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Daniel A; Moulton, Lawrence H; Omer, Saad B; Chace, Lesley M; Klassen, Ann; Talebian, Pejman; Halsey, Neal A

    2004-06-01

    We studied school personnel involved in the review of student's immunization status to determine whether personnel training, immunization-related knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs, use of alternative medicine, and sources of vaccine information were associated with the vaccination status of school children. Surveys were mailed to a stratified and random sample of 1000 schools in Colorado, Massachusetts, Missouri, and Washington. School personnel reported their training and perceptions of disease susceptibility/severity, vaccine efficacy/safety, key immunization beliefs, use of alternative medicine, confidence in organizations, sources, and credibility of vaccine information, and the rates of vaccine exemptors in their schools. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore associations between personnel factors and beliefs (independent variables) with the likelihood of a child having an exemption (dependent variable). Regression models were adjusted for clustering of children in schools, type of school (public versus private), and state. Surveys were returned by 69.6% of eligible participants. A child attending a school with a respondent who was a nurse was significantly less likely to be have an exemption than a child attending a school with a respondent who was not a nurse (odds ratio [OR]: 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.28-0.56). The majority of respondents believed that children (95.6%) and the community (96.1%) benefit when children are vaccinated. Nurses were more likely than nonnurses to hold beliefs supporting the utility and safety of vaccination. Greater perceived disease susceptibility and severity and vaccine efficacy and safety were associated with a decreased likelihood of a child in the school having an exemption. Vaccine misconceptions were relatively common. For example, 19.0% of respondents were concerned that children's immune systems could be weakened by too many immunizations, and this belief was associated with an increased likelihood

  9. Assessing the Awareness and Behaviors of U.S. High School Nurses with Respect to the Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Fischer, Anastasia N.; Nichols, Jeanne F.

    2015-01-01

    Female high school athletes are an at-risk population for the Female Athlete Triad--a syndrome including low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. School nurses can play an important role in reducing the health burden of this syndrome, by educating coaches and athletes, and by…

  10. Students' learning through Adult Nursing Practicum B experiences : An analysis of clinical practicum records : School of Nursing, Adult Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    柘野, 浩子; 塩見, 和子; 礒本, 暁子; 掛屋, 純子; 小野, 晴子

    2012-01-01

     本研究の目的は,成人看護学実習B における実習目標(5)に関する学生の学びを明らかにし,今後の効果的な教育方法を検討することである。自由記載された実習総括記録を分析の対象とし,記述された内容を質的・帰納的に分析した。分析の結果,【援助的人間関係の成立】【看護観の確立】【看護実践力】【看護の質】【看護マネジメント】の5 つのコアカテゴリーが抽出された。看護観の確立には体験の認識を意識化することが効果的であること,看護実践力の育成には看護実践の評価への指導が必要であること,臨床の知を得るために看護実践を振り返り洞察することが重要であることが示唆された。 This study aimed to identify students' learning and understanding of practicum objective No. 5 of Adult Nursing Practicum B, and examine effective teaching strategies. A qualitative and inductive approach was employed ...

  11. Addressing health inequalities in the delivery of the human papillomavirus vaccination programme: examining the role of the school nurse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy Boyce

    Full Text Available HPV immunisation of adolescent girls is expected to have a significant impact in the reduction of cervical cancer. UK The HPV immunisation programme is primarily delivered by school nurses. We examine the role of school nurses in delivering the HPV immunisation programme and their impact on minimising health inequalities in vaccine uptake.A rapid evidence assessment (REA and semi-structured interviews with health professionals were conducted and analysed using thematic analysis. 80 health professionals from across the UK are interviewed, primarily school nurses and HPV immunisation programme coordinators. The REA identified 2,795 articles and after analysis and hand searches, 34 relevant articles were identified and analysed. Interviews revealed that health inequalities in HPV vaccination uptake were mainly related to income and other social factors in contrast to published research which emphasises potential inequalities related to ethnicity and/or religion. Most school nurses interviewed understood local health inequalities and made particular efforts to target girls who did not attend or missed doses. Interviews also revealed maintaining accurate and consistent records influenced both school nurses' understanding and efforts to target inequalities in HPV vaccination uptake.Despite high uptake in the UK, some girls remain at risk of not being vaccinated with all three doses. School nurses played a key role in reducing health inequalities in the delivery of the HPV programme. Other studies identified religious beliefs and ethnicity as potentially influencing HPV vaccination uptake but interviews for this research found this appeared not to have occurred. Instead school nurses stated girls who were more likely to be missed were those not in education. Improving understanding of the delivery processes of immunisation programmes and this impact on health inequalities can help to inform solutions to increase uptake and address health inequalities

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association Releases New Guidelines for Exertional Heat Illnesses: What School Nurses Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanScoy, Rachel M; DeMartini, Julie K; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-05-01

    Exertional heat illnesses (EHI) occur in various populations and settings. Within a school setting, there are student athletes who take part in physical activity where the risk of EHI is increased. The National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) released an updated position statement on EHI in September of 2015. This article is a summary of the position statement. The sports medicine team, including school nurses and athletic trainers, provides quality health care to these physically active individuals. Thus, it is important for school nurses to understand the prevention, recognition, and treatment of EHI. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Recognition and Treatment of Anaphylaxis in the School Setting: The Essential Role of the School Nurse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoessler, Sally; White, Martha V.

    2013-01-01

    Since anaphylaxis is unpredictable, rapid in onset, and potentially life threatening, it is critical for school staff to recognize and respond to its symptoms quickly. The symptoms of anaphylaxis can be challenging to differentiate, particularly in school-age children who may have trouble explaining what they are experiencing. School staff must…

  14. Views of Bullying and Antibullying Working Styles among School Nurses and School Social Workers in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Linda; Hagquist, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Given the attention paid to bullying in Swedish schools, surprisingly few studies have addressed the antibullying work done by school health staff. This focus-group study is explorative and investigates the experiences of Swedish school health staff concerning bullying and their antibullying work with students. Two distinguishable views of…

  15. School nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of role as opinion leader, and professional practice regarding human papillomavirus vaccine for youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L; Goodson, Patricia; Thompson, Bruce; Wilson, Kelly L

    2015-02-01

    Because human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates remain low, we evaluated US school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, and professional practice regarding HPV vaccine, and assessed whether knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of being an opinion leader influenced their professional practice regarding the HPV vaccine. We used a cross-sectional design by recruiting members from the National Association of School Nurses. All participants (N = 505) were e-mailed a survey designed for this study. Structural equation modeling (SEM) tested direct and indirect effects. Overall, school nurses had knowledge about HPV and the vaccine, and positive attitudes toward the vaccine. They had less-than-enthusiastic perceptions of their role as opinion leaders regarding the vaccine and implemented few activities related to providing vaccine information. The model revealed a good fit (χ(2)=20.238 [df=8, popinion leaders. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  16. A recommendation to use the diffusion of innovations theory to understand school nurses' role in HPV vaccine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany; Goodson, Patricia

    Vaccinations represent one of the greatest public health achievements of the past century, but their success largely depends on populations' uptake. Seven years after its approval in 2006 for females, the HPV vaccination rates remain relatively low. Previous literature provides information about research examining U.S. physicians, pediatricians, and other healthcare providers' knowledge, attitudes, and professional practice toward the HPV vaccine. No research has yet investigated U.S. school nurses' role in educating the school community about the vaccine's benefits. Diffusion of Innovations theory is an appropriate perspective for examining school nurses as opinion leaders who can influence the uptake of the HPV vaccine for youth. This theory explains how innovations diffuse throughout a social system, and highlights the construct of opinion leadership. School nurses exhibit the characteristics of opinion leaders; therefore, Diffusion of Innovations can be a useful lens for assessing their role in efforts to promote HPV vaccination for youth.

  17. Healthy Skin: Cancer Education for School Teachers and Nurses Using a "Train and Equip" Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E Robert

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer, especially malignant melanoma, continues on the increase. Different interventions are attempting to impact on this problem. The approach used by the Partners in Health Sciences program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Science is to both "train" and, importantly, "equip" classroom teachers and school nurses in a "Healthy Skin" professional development curriculum. Each participant not only received face-to-face interactive content training in a workshop setting that lasted 6 h; each also received a resource kit of supplies, materials, and equipment used in the workshop and designed for the trainee to use with students in a classroom/school setting. This single "hit" professional development event then can be replicated by each trainee annually for the span of her/his teaching/school-nursing career. A total of 588 trainees participated in "Healthy Skin" workshops that were held in 17 communities throughout the state. Participants attended from 188 different towns/cities. Of those in attendance, 511 (87 %) were females, 77 (13 %) males, 81 % Caucasian, 16 % African Americans, and the remaining 3 % self-identified as "other". There were 471 teachers, 85 nurses, and 32 "others" (administrators, school counselors). Trainees completed anonymous pre/post test measures with an increase in knowledge of 28.5 %. A short-term evaluation was conducted at the end of the workshop. After a minimum of 6 months had elapsed, a long-term evaluation was used to capture data on how the workshop experience transferred into new curricular/learning activities for the students of the workshop participants. There was a high level of satisfaction with the workshop experience and use of workshop content and resource kits. Our experiences in this type of professional development outreach provide a model of how institutions of higher education could contribute to the professional development of K-12 teachers and their students in any content area.

  18. Maintaining the balance: New Zealand secondary school nurses' perceptions of skin infections in young people--a grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Catherine I; Hoare, Karen J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the perceptions of New Zealand secondary school nurses regarding skin infections in young people aged 14-18 years. A constructivist grounded theory method was adopted. Ten non-structured interviews were conducted with secondary school nurses working in Auckland, New Zealand, between January and July 2013. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analysed using all tenets of grounded theory that included writing memos, theoretical sampling and the constant comparative method. Analysis revealed the core category Maintaining the balance, which is presented as a grounded theory model. It represents the constant state of balancing the school nurse undergoes in trying to counter the risk to the student. The nurse attempts to tip the balance in favour of action, by reducing barriers to healthcare, providing youth-friendly, affordable and accessible healthcare, and following up until resolution is achieved. The nurse is aware that failing to monitor until resolution can again tip the fulcrum back to inaction, placing the young person at risk again. It is concluded that nurses are knowledgeable about the risks present in the communities they serve and are innovative in the methods they employ to ensure satisfactory outcomes for young people experiencing skin infections. School nursing is an evolving model for delivering primary healthcare to young people in New Zealand. The grounded theory model 'Maintaining the balance' describes a model of care where nursing services are delivered where young people spend time, and the nurse is immersed in the community. This model of care may be transferable to other healthcare situations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Nursing: promoting the health of overweight children and adolescents in the school context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Costa Gonzaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the nursing interventions related to the competencies of health promotion of overweight children and adolescents in the school context, in light of the Galway Consensus through an integrative review. Articles published between 1988 and June, 2013 were found in the databases CINAHL, SCOPUS, MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS and SciELO. A total of 139 publications were obtained from indexed descriptors. Ten articles were selected after reading. The most evident competencies for health promotion were: catalyzing change, needs assessment and impact assessment. The highlights were activities of health education and partnerships with other health professionals and the families of students. It was found that the skills of health promotion developed by nurses can contribute to the adoption of healthy habits by overweight children and adolescents.

  20. Interdisciplinary Education from a College of Nursing and School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Sarah; Nacht, Amy

    2015-01-01

    We examine a newly designed, interdisciplinary education program and clinical rotation for the first-year obstetrics and gynecology resident, implemented at the University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, between the College of Nursing midwifery faculty and the School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The barriers to program development, along with the advantages and disadvantages of collaboration between nursing and medical schools, are reviewed. The clinical experience, consisting of 5 clinical shifts, was designed using the conceptual model of collaborative intelligence. A formal rotation with the midwife was constructed for the first-year resident on the labor and delivery unit, providing care to intrapartum and postpartum women and families. The program included didactic and clinical teaching, with an emphasis on the normal physiologic process of birth and introduction to the midwifery scope of practice and philosophy of care. Formative evaluation of the clinical rotation demonstrated strong interest for continuation of the program and an ability to appreciate midwifery components of care in a limited exposure. Moreover, program development was successful without requiring large curricular changes for the resident. Future planning includes expansion of the program with increased emphasis on the postpartum and breastfeeding woman and continued program evaluation. The long-term success of such collaborations will depend on the continued support of the American College of Nurse-Midwives and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in developing and improving interdisciplinary educational teams. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health. © 2015 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  1. A case study of asthma care in school age children using nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary collaborative practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Susan; Brooks, Fiona; Wilson, Patricia; Crouchman, Carolyn; Kendall, Sally

    2015-01-01

    To describe the role of school nursing in leading and coordinating a multidisciplinary networked system of support for children with asthma, and to analyze the strengths and challenges of undertaking and supporting multiagency interprofessional practice. The growth of networked and interprofessional collaborations arises from the recognition that a number of the most pressing public health problems cannot be addressed by single-discipline or -agency interventions. This paper identifies the potential of school nursing to provide the vision and multiagency leadership required to coordinate multidisciplinary collaboration. A mixed-method single-case study design using Yin's approach, including focus groups, interviews, and analysis of policy documents and public health reports. A model that explains the integrated population approach to managing school-age asthma is described; the role of the lead school nurse coordinator was seen as critical to the development and sustainability of the model. School nurses can provide strategic multidisciplinary leadership to address pressing public health issues. Health service managers and commissioners need to understand how to support clinicians working across multiagency boundaries and to identify how to develop leadership skills for collaborative interprofessional practice so that the capacity for nursing and other health care professionals to address public health issues does not rely on individual motivation. In England, this will be of particular importance to the commissioning of public health services by local authorities from 2015.

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practice of school nurses in the United Arab Emirates about HPV infection and vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortashi, Osman; Shallal, Musa; Osman, Nawal; Raheel, Hina

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Health Authority in Abu Dhabi (the capital of the United Arab Emirates) introduced HPV vaccine free of charge for high school girls entering grade 11, becoming the first state in the Middle East to do so. The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of school nurses in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi about HPV infection and the vaccine. A quantitative study was designed and conducted from June to August 2012 in Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Data were collected through direct face to face interviews. from one hundred and twenty five nurses. Knowledge of HPV infection and HPV vaccine was almost universal among the school nurses (97%). The majority of the participants (71%) thought that the HPV vaccine was good. Cultural unacceptability (45%) and lack of women's concern about their own health (21%) were rated as the top barriers for the successful introduction of the vaccine in the UAE. More than half of the sampled nurses (58%) have either given this vaccine to school girls or taken it themselves. The majority (95%) did not come across any side effects from the vaccine. The level of qualification and the place of work did not significantly affect the correct knowledge of HPV infection or cervical cancer prevention methods. The knowledge and attitude of the sampled school nurses in Abu Dhabi State about HPV infection and vaccine is very good in both the public and private sectors. However, a knowledge gap in cervical cancer screening methods was identified.

  3. An Excel Spreadsheet Model for States and Districts to Assess the Cost-Benefit of School Nursing Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Yan; O'Brien, Mary Jane; Maughan, Erin D

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a user-friendly, Excel spreadsheet model and two data collection instruments constructed by the authors to help states and districts perform cost-benefit analyses of school nursing services delivered by full-time school nurses. Prior to applying the model, states or districts need to collect data using two forms: "Daily Nurse Data Collection Form" and the "Teacher Survey." The former is used to record daily nursing activities, including number of student health encounters, number of medications administered, number of student early dismissals, and number of medical procedures performed. The latter is used to obtain estimates for the time teachers spend addressing student health issues. Once inputs are entered in the model, outputs are automatically calculated, including program costs, total benefits, net benefits, and benefit-cost ratio. The spreadsheet model, data collection tools, and instructions are available at the NASN website ( http://www.nasn.org/The/CostBenefitAnalysis ).

  4. Psychiatric nursing teaching at the Ana Nery School in the first half of the 20th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique da Silva Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the teaching of psychiatric nursing at Ana Néri Nursing School (EAN, between 1925 and 1954. Methodology: Socio-historical research whose sources were written documents and the oral statement of an ex-professor. The documentary analysis technique was used for data treatment. Results: For 27 years, the EAN did not introduce students into the psychiatric field due to the mental illness stigma, offering only theoretical disciplines, which were taught by physicians. Later there were theoretical disciplines with practical training in the classroom, and then theoretical disciplines with practice in psychiatric hospitals, taught by nurses. In conclusion, the law 775/49 lead the EAN to qualify a professor and initiate the reformulation of the nursing care provided at the Institute of Psychiatry of the University of Brazil, so as to adjust it to serve as a practical field and a model for teaching psychiatric nursing in Brazil.

  5. A qualitative study to assess school nurses' views on vaccinating 12–13 year old school girls against human papillomavirus without parental consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter David

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK, parental consent for the routine vaccination of 12–13 year olds schoolgirls against human papillomavirus (HPV is recommended, although legally girls may be able to consent themselves. As part of a vaccine study conducted ahead of the National HPV Vaccine Programme we sought the views of school nurses on vaccinating girls who did not have parental consent. Methods HPV vaccination was offered to all 12 year old girls attending schools in two Primary Care Trusts in Greater Manchester. At the end of the study semi-structured, tape-recorded interviews were conducted with school nurses who had delivered the vaccine (Cervarix™. The interview template was based on concepts derived from the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Transcripts were analysed thematically in order to understand school nurses' intentions to implement vaccination based on an assessment of Gillick competency. Results School nurses knew how to assess the competency of under-16s but were still unwilling to vaccinate if parents had refused permission. If parents had not returned the consent form, school nurses were willing to contact parents, and also to negotiate with parents who had refused consent. They seemed unaware that parental involvement required the child's consent to avoid breaking confidentiality. Nurses' attitudes were influenced by the young appearance and age of the school year group rather than an individual's level of maturity. They were also confused about the legal guidelines governing consent. School nurses acknowledged the child's right to vaccination and strongly supported prevention of HPV infection but ultimately believed that it was the parents' right to give consent. Most were themselves parents and shared other parents' concerns about the vaccine's novelty and unknown long-term side effects. Rather than vaccinate without parental consent, school nurses would defer vaccination. Conclusion Health providers have a duty of care to

  6. The budget process in schools of nursing: a primer for the novice administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starck, P L; Bailes, B

    1996-01-01

    All administrators are expected to be competent in budget and financial management. Novice administrators of schools of nursing are expected to know about the budgetary process, budgeting techniques, and the various types of budgets that can be used, such as the open-ended budget, incremental budget, alternate-level budget, quota budget, formula budget, intramural budget, zero-based budget, and cost center budget. In addition, administrators are expected to know what key questions need to be asked about how the budget is structured and revenue sources and how to manage and evaluate their budgets.

  7. Nursing Students and Service Learning: Research From a Symbiotic Community Partnership With Local Schools and Special Olympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGahee, Thayer; Bravo, Maureen; Simmons, Lisa; Reid, Tom

    2017-08-24

    This research is an example of a service learning partnership between a prelicensure nursing program and local school district. Through this partnership, students participated in a thoughtfully organized project that met the needs of a community and promoted the humanizing of health care education. Nursing students, under the guidance of faculty, performed required physical examinations for Special Olympics athletes who represented a wide range of age, physical, social, and intellectual levels. Research findings indicated an increase in nursing students' affective and cognitive development after this activity.

  8. Evaluation of an Educational Program to Improve School Nursing Staff Perceptions of Bullying In Pinellas County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmeron, Patricia A; Christian, Becky J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine if a bullying educational program for school nurses and certified nursing assistants/health technicians (CNAs/HTs) would increase knowledge of bullying, probability of reporting a bully, and probability of assisting a bullied victim. This educational program and evaluation employed a retrospective, post-then-pre-test design. Instruments used included a 17-item demographic questionnaire and the 12-item Reduced Aggression/ Victimization Scale Bullying Assessment Tool (BAT), a 5-point Likert Scale de - signed to assess school nurses’ and CNAs’/HTs’ understanding of bullying, the probability of reporting bullies, and the probability of assisting bullied victims before and after the educational presentation. Findings of this educational evaluation program indicated that the majority of school nurses and CNAs/HTs had an increased understanding of bullying, higher probability of reporting a bully, and assisting a bullied victim after the presentation.

  9. A case study of asthma care in school age children using nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary collaborative practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Procter S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Susan Procter,1 Fiona Brooks,2 Patricia Wilson,3 Carolyn Crouchman,1 Sally Kendall21Faculty of Society and Health, Buckinghamshire New University, High Wycombe, UK; 2Centre for Research in Primary and Community Care (CRIPACC, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK; 3Centre for Health Services Studies, University of Kent, Canterbury, UKAim: To describe the role of school nursing in leading and coordinating a multidisciplinary networked system of support for children with asthma, and to analyze the strengths and challenges of undertaking and supporting multiagency interprofessional practice.Background: The growth of networked and interprofessional collaborations arises from the recognition that a number of the most pressing public health problems cannot be addressed by single-discipline or -agency interventions. This paper identifies the potential of school nursing to provide the vision and multiagency leadership required to coordinate multidisciplinary collaboration.Method: A mixed-method single-case study design using Yin's approach, including focus groups, interviews, and analysis of policy documents and public health reports.Results: A model that explains the integrated population approach to managing school-age asthma is described; the role of the lead school nurse coordinator was seen as critical to the development and sustainability of the model.Conclusion: School nurses can provide strategic multidisciplinary leadership to address pressing public health issues. Health service managers and commissioners need to understand how to support clinicians working across multiagency boundaries and to identify how to develop leadership skills for collaborative interprofessional practice so that the capacity for nursing and other health care professionals to address public health issues does not rely on individual motivation. In England, this will be of particular importance to the commissioning of public health services by local authorities from

  10. Family characteristics and health behaviour as antecedents of school nurses' concerns about adolescents' health and development: a path model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Levälahti, Esko; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2015-05-01

    Family socio-economic factors and parents' health behaviours have been shown to have an impact on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Family characteristics have also been associated with school nurses' concerns, which arose during health examinations, about children's and adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development. Parental smoking has also been associated with smoking in adolescents. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent school nurses' concerns about adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development related to family characteristics are mediated through parents' and adolescents' own health behaviours (smoking). A path model approach using cross-sectional data was used. In 2008-2009, information about health and well-being of adolescents was gathered at health examinations of the Children's Health Monitoring Study. Altogether 1006 eighth and ninth grade pupils in Finland participated in the study. The associations between family characteristics, smoking among parents and adolescents and school nurses' concerns about adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development were examined using a structural equation model. Paternal education had a direct, and, through fathers' and boys' smoking, an indirect association with school nurses' concerns about the physical health of boys. Paternal labour market status and family income were only indirectly associated with concerns about the physical health of boys by having an effect on boys' smoking through paternal smoking, and a further indirect effect on concerns about boys' health. In girls, only having a single mother was strongly associated with school nurses' concerns about psychosocial development through maternal and adolescent girl smoking. Socio-economic family characteristics and parental smoking influence adolescent smoking and are associated with school nurses' concerns about adolescents' physical health and psychosocial development. The findings

  11. Support for At-Risk Girls: A School-Based Mental Health Nursing Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamshick, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Mental health problems often go undiagnosed or unaddressed until a crisis or extreme event brings the problem to the forefront. Youth are particularly at risk for lack of identification and treatment in regard to mental health issues. This article describes an advanced nursing practice mental health initiative for at-risk teenage girls based on Hildegard Peplau's nursing theory, group process, and healing through holistic health approaches. A support group, RICHES, was developed with focus on core components of relationships, identity, communication, health, esteem, and support. The acronym RICHES was chosen as the name of the support group. Selected themes and issues addressed in this school-based support group are illustrated in case vignettes. Through a collaborative approach with the community and school, this practice initiative presents a unique healing process that extends knowledge in the realm of intervention with at-risk teenage girls. Further research is needed on the efficacy of support groups to modify risk factors and to address goals for primary prevention in at-risk teenage girls. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Enhancing the Capacity of School Nurses to Reduce Excessive Anxiety in Children: Development of the CALM Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Kelly L; Stewart, Catherine E; Muggeo, Michela A; Ginsburg, Golda S

    2015-08-01

    Excessive anxiety is among the most common psychiatric problems facing youth. Because anxious youth tend to have somatic complaints, many seek help from the school nurse. Thus, school nurses are in an ideal position to provide early intervention. This study addresses this problem and describes the plans to develop and test a new intervention (Child Anxiety Learning Modules; CALM), delivered by school nurses, to reduce child anxiety and improve academic functioning. An iterative development process including consultation with an expert panel, two open trials, and a pilot randomized controlled study comparing CALM to usual care is proposed. Feedback will be solicited from all participants during each phase and data on outcome measures will be provided by children, parents, teachers, and independent evaluators. Data will be collected on intervention satisfaction and feasibility. Primary outcomes that include child anxiety symptoms, classroom behavior, and school performance (e.g., attendance, grades, standardized test scores) will be collected at pre- and post-interventions and at a 3-month follow-up evaluation. Pediatric anxiety is a common problem that school nurses frequently encounter. Consequently, they are well positioned to play a key role in enhancing access to behavioral health interventions to reduce anxiety and may therefore make a significant positive public health impact. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effectiveness of a first-aid intervention program applied by undergraduate nursing students to preparatory school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafik, Wagida; Tork, Hanan

    2014-03-01

    Childhood injuries constitute a major public health problem worldwide. First aid is an effective life-preservation tool at work, school, home, and in public locations. In this study, the effectiveness of a first-aid program delivered by undergraduate nursing students to preparatory school children was examined. This quasi-experimental study was carried out on 100 school children in governmental preparatory schools in Egypt. The researchers designed a program for first-aid training, and this was implemented by trained nursing students. The evaluation involved immediate post-test and follow-up assessment after two months. The results showed generally low levels of satisfactory knowledge and inadequate situational practice among the school students before the intervention. Statistically-significant improvements were shown at the post- and follow-up tests. Multivariate regression analysis identified the intervention and the type of school as the independent predictors of the change in students' knowledge score, while the intervention and the knowledge score were the predictors of the practice score. The study concluded that a first-aid training program delivered by nursing students to preparatory school children is effective in improving their knowledge and practice. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Novel Disaster Training Tool for School Nurses: Emergency Triage Drill Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rita V; Goodhue, Catherine J; Berg, Bridget M; Spears, Robert; Barnes, Jill; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    As children spend approximately 28% of their day in school and disasters may strike at any time, it is important for school officials to conduct emergency preparedness activities. School nurses, teachers, and staff should be prepared to respond and provide support and first aid treatment. This article describes a collaborative effort within the Los Angeles Unified School District to enhance disaster preparedness. Specifically, the article outlines the program steps and tools developed to prepare staff in mass triage through an earthquake disaster training exercise. © 2015 The Author(s).

  15. Use of eyeglasses among children in elementary school: perceptions, behaviors, and interventions discussed by parents, school nurses, and teachers during focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodjebacheva, Gergana Damianova; Maliski, Sally; Coleman, Anne L

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the perceptions, behaviors, and recommendations that parents, school nurses, and teachers have regarding children's use of eyeglasses. Focus groups with parents, school nurses, and teachers were conducted. The study took place in one Southern California school district. There were 39 participants, including 24 parents, seven school nurses, and eight teachers. An experienced moderator guided the focus group discussions. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Participants perceive visual impairment as a serious problem in the development of children. The lack of eyeglasses may lead to problems such as tiredness, headaches, inability to focus on school work, and decreased reading speed. Participants experienced disappointment, unhappiness, worry, and concern when they realized they needed eyeglasses at a young age. Negative societal perceptions toward eyeglasses, lack of eye doctors in minority communities, parental perceptions that children do not need eyeglasses, and peer bullying of children wearing eyeglasses are key obstacles to children's use of eyeglasses. Participants suggest school and national campaigns featuring respected public figures who wear eyeglasses to promote positive attitudes toward eyeglasses. Parents and teachers who closely follow the academic development of children have observed that visual impairment has negative consequences for the scholastic achievement of children. They recommend interventions to promote the attractiveness of eyeglasses in society. The participants discuss the need for a national preventative message for eye care similar to the message for dental care. The public health message should emphasize the importance of embracing and respecting differences among individuals.

  16. School Nurses Can Address Existing Gaps in School-Age Sleep Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willgerodt, Mayumi A.; Kieckhefer, Gail M.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep has been linked to a host of physical, behavioral, and emotional outcomes, and research has documented that youth across the globe are experiencing inadequate sleep. Despite this knowledge, however, very little research has been conducted on school-age children; much of the extant research has focused on infants, toddlers, preschoolers,…

  17. Bullying Prevention: A Call for Collaborative Efforts between School Nurses and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kub, Joan; Feldman, Marissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying among children and adolescents is recognized as a significant global public health problem, as it has serious health consequences. Schools are important sites in which to address violence prevention, specifically bullying prevention, and to promote positive youth development. The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion outlines five action…

  18. School Nurse Interventions in Managing Functional Urinary Incontinence in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Charisse L.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated urinary incontinence (UI) in school-age children is a prevalent yet underrecognized problem that has remained in the shadow of other concerns commonly perceived as more prominent or urgent. There is good evidence that functional UI in children can be treated and managed effectively. When there is no structural or neurologic…

  19. Perceptions of final-year nursing students on the facilities, resources and quality of education provided by schools in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güner, Perihan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the perceptions of final-year nursing students regarding the adequacy of education, resources and internships in preparation for graduation. The study design was a descriptive cross-sectional study of nursing students (n: 1804) in their final year of education and questionnaires were used to collect data. Information related to student-to-instructor ratios and internships was obtained from each institution. Most students reported receiving instruction or supervision by lecturers and clinicians who did not specialise in the field. Overall, students did not find the facilities, educational or technological resources and the quality of education offered by their respective schools adequate. The proportion of students who found the level of theoretical education, clinical practice and instructor support adequate was higher in state university colleges of nursing/faculties of health sciences than in state university schools of health sciences.

  20. Nursing Research at Malmo School of Education during the 1960's and 1970's: Results and Suggestions for Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjodahl, Lars

    1992-01-01

    This report presents some results from various empirical research projects within nursing education carried out during the late 1960's and the early 1970's at Malmo School of Education, University of Lund (Sweden). It is noted that a wide range of methods has been used in dealing with the following issues: curriculum analysis; construction of…

  1. "We Are the Ones that Talk about Difficult Subjects": Nurses in Schools Working to Support Young People's Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Jennifer; Philip, Kate; Shucksmith, Janet; Kiger, Alice; Gair, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    As health professionals in an educational setting, nurses in schools occupy a unique place in the spectrum of children's services. Yet the service is often overlooked and has been described as invisible. This paper draws on findings from a study, funded by the Scottish Government's National Programme for Improving Mental Health and Well-being,…

  2. A National Survey Exploring School Nurses Knowledge and Experience When Working with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Constance E.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored school nurses knowledge of the diagnostic criteria and secondary conditions related to Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), their involvement in the identification and treatment of ASD, their knowledge of medication used to treat ASD, and their overall medication management of children with ASD. Participants included 100 school…

  3. A qualitative study of science education in nursing school: Narratives of Hispanic female nurses' sense of identity and participation in science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensemer, Patricia S.

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to learn from Hispanic nursing students regarding their experiences as participants in science learning. The participants were four female nursing students of Hispanic origin attending a small, rural community college in a southeastern state. The overarching question of this study was "In what ways does being Hispanic mediate the science-related learning and practices of nursing students?" The following questions more specifically provided focal points for the research: (1) In what ways do students perceive being Hispanic as relevant to their science education experiences? (a) What does it mean to be Hispanic in the participants' home community? (b) What has it meant to be Hispanic in the science classroom? (2) In what ways might students' everyday knowledge (at home) relate to the knowledge or ways of knowing they practice in the nursing school community? The study took place in Alabama, which offered a rural context where Hispanic populations are rapidly increasing. A series of four interviews was conducted with each participant, followed by one focus group interview session. Results of the study were re presented in terms of portrayals of participant's narratives of identity and science learning, and then as a thematic interpretation collectively woven across the individuals' narratives. Portraitures of each participant draw upon the individual experiences of the four nursing students involved in this study in order to provide a beginning point towards exploring "community" as both personal and social aspects of science practices. Themes explored broader interpretations of communities of practice in relation to guiding questions of the study. Three themes emerged through the study, which included the following: Importance of Science to Nurses, Crossing with a Nurturing and Caring Identity, and Different Modes of Participation. Implications were discussed with regard to participation in a community of practice and

  4. Lifestyle and psychological factors related to irritable bowel syndrome in nursing and medical school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okami, Yukiko; Kato, Takako; Nin, Gyozen; Harada, Kiyomi; Aoi, Wataru; Wada, Sayori; Higashi, Akane; Okuyama, Yusuke; Takakuwa, Susumu; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Fukudo, Shin

    2011-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder comprising abdominal pain, abdominal discomfort, and disordered defecation. The prevalence of IBS is 10-15% in the general population. This study investigated the prevalence of IBS and the relationship between IBS and stress, lifestyle, and dietary habits among nursing and medical school students. A blank self-administrated questionnaire was used to survey 2,639 students studying nursing or medicine. This questionnaire asked about IBS symptoms, lifestyle, dietary intake, life events, anxiety, and depression. The questionnaires were collected from 2,365 students (89.6%) and the responses of 1,768 students (74.8%) were analyzed. The prevalence of IBS was 35.5% as a whole, 25.2% in males and 41.5% in females. Significantly higher stress scores (anxiety and depression) and life events were found in the IBS group than in the non-IBS group. Sleep disorders and the time spent sitting were also higher in males with IBS. In the IBS group, females ate less fish, fruit, milk, and green-yellow vegetables, and more processed food products than the non-IBS group (p = 0.001, p = 0.002, p = 0.032, p = 0.037, p < 0.001). The rates of missed meals and irregular mealtimes were significantly higher in females in the IBS group (p = 0.001, p = 0.013). The prevalence of IBS was higher among nursing and medical students, and further interventional studies are needed to improve IBS symptoms.

  5. Development of emergency medicine and critical care masters program for nurses at Addis Ababa University, School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W/Tsadik, Assefu; Azazh, Aklilu; Teklu, Sisay; Seyum, Nebiyu; Geremew, Haimaot; Rankin, Pete; Erschen, Mary Jean

    2014-07-01

    In Ethiopia, though all health care facilities have rooms available for ill and injured patients, emergency care has always remained suboptimal. Poor organization, lack of properly trained staff and lack of timely identification of the critically sick are the reasons. The role of nurses in the emergency rooms is very vital to im- prove patient survival. To address this pressing health care need and improve the emergency rooms (ER) nursing care, Addis Ababa University School of Medicine (AAU-SM) prioritized Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Nursing Training Program. The initial training began in September 2010 with a class of 20 students. Of these, 18 nurses successfully completed the Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Masters of Nursing program and graduated in 2012. To review the Emergency medicine and Critical Care Masters training program for nurses developed and implemented at AAU-SM in partnership with the University of Wisconsin (UW) and the University of Toronto (UT) and to evaluate the progress and challenges to date. An Emergency Medicine Task Force (EMTF) organized at AAU-SM developed a two years modular type of EM and Critical Care masters program curriculum for nurses that is co-implemented by faculty teachers from AAU-SM, UT and UW. In this article both the curriculum and other relevant materials are used as a resource. Thirty eight nurses have already graduated with Masters in Emergency Medicine and Critical Care. Equal number of trainees are currently in full-time training. Their skill and competency log book is going according to the curriculum expectation. This EM and Critical Care masters training program for nurses is successfully implemented. This program has also shown that the number and qualification of trained personnel capacity in low resource setting health care system can be effectively improved by partnership with developed training institutions.

  6. The learning experiences of mentees and mentors in a nursing school's mentoring programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Annemarie; de Villiers, Johanna

    2015-03-24

    A School of Nursing supports third-year undergraduate students (mentees) by means of a mentoring programme in which critical-care nursing students (mentors) are involved. However, the programme designers needed to find out what gaps were evident in the programme. The objectives of the study were to explore and describe the learning experiences of the mentees and mentors and to obtain recommendations for improving the programme. An action-research method was used to develop and to refine the student-mentoring programme and to identify student needs. However, for the purposes of this article a descriptive design was selected and data were gathered by means of a nominal-group technique. Fourteen mentees and five mentors participated in the research. The findings indicated that attention should be paid to the allocation and orientation of both mentors and mentees. Amongst the positive experiences was the fact that the mentees were reassured by the mentor's presence and that a relationship of trust developed between them. In consequence, the mentees developed critical thinking skills, were able to apply their knowledge and improved their ability to integrate theory and practice. Not only did the mentees gain respect for the mentors' knowledge and competence, but they also lauded the mentoring programme as a memorable and vital experience. The findings indicated that several changes would be needed to improve the structure of the mentoring programme before a new group of mentees could be placed in critical-care units.

  7. Scholarship reconsidered: implications for reward and recognition of academic staff in schools of nursing and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kylie M; Crookes, Patrick A; Else, Fabienne; Crookes, Ellie

    2012-03-01

    This paper discusses the issues facing the nursing academic workforce and the development of a project at the University of Wollongong in Australia which attempts to address this problem. The project draws on Boyer's work around 'scholarship reconsidered' to enable new ways of thinking about the nature of 'research' and how the work of a diversifying workforce can be recognized and rewarded within institutions. We conducted a series of interviews with senior university staff to identify key issues around academic promotion processes. Feedback from these interviews, along with extensive internal and external consultation and benchmarking, will be used to redraft promotion documentation that includes discipline-specific performance expectations. Interviews revealed a number of perceived and actual barriers to promotion of academic staff who did not conform to a 'traditional' view of research expectations. It was widely felt that unspoken expectations about research performance were being used to judge applications for promotion, and that this disadvantaged people from practice or professional backgrounds, or people who had heavy administrative or clinical roles. Internal university processes need to reflect the reality of a diversified workforce. Practice and professional disciplines have responsibilities beyond meeting traditional research output measurements. More flexible and transparent expectation guidelines and career development pathways are needed to build holistic schools and faculty and enable maximum staff productivity. By redefining scholarship, schools and faculties are able to meet the multiple demands of the government, the institution, individual staff, students and the profession. Not everyone can do traditional research all the time, and staff involved in other scholarly work should be able to rewarded and promoted. By taking the lead in this issue, nursing as a discipline can set its own agenda, and pave the way for other disciplines. It can also

  8. Effects of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support on burnout in Registered Nurses: a structural equation modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goong, Hwasoo; Xu, Lijuan; Li, Chun-Yu

    2016-11-01

    To examine the effects of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support (RRSS) on burnout of nurses pursuing an advanced degree. A predictive correlational cross-sectional study design was used. Nurses were found to be a high-risk group for burnout, even more so among nurses pursuing an advanced degree. When nurses with a professional career marry and decide to become students, inter-role conflicts and burnout are possible outcomes of the resulting multiple roles. Using convenience sampling, data were collected from October 2011-May 2012. A questionnaire about work-family-school role conflicts, RRSS, burnout and general information was completed by 286 nurses pursuing an advanced degree at 12 hospitals in Korea. Data were analysed using SPSS and structural equation modelling with the Analysis of Moment Structures program. The proposed model provided a good fit to the obtained data. Work-family-school role conflicts and social support exerted significant effects on burnout. Role-related social support was found to play a partial mediating role between work-family-school role conflicts and burnout. The findings of this study imply that RRSS significantly directly and indirectly influences burnout among the nurses pursuing an advanced degree. It is necessary for nursing managers to consider implementing family- and school-friendly policies (e.g. flexible work schedules) to help nurses to manage their multiple roles and thereby decrease their burnout rate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Newly Graduated Nurses' Job Satisfaction: Comparison with Allied Hospital Professionals, Social Workers, and Elementary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihyun Park, PhD, RN

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: Relatively dissatisfying job characteristics in nursing work environment that were significant predictors for nurses' job satisfaction should be improved. Newly graduated nurses are at risk for job dissatisfaction. This can result in high turnover rates and can exacerbate the nursing shortage. Efforts to improve the work environment are needed.

  10. Gender influence on nursing education and practice at Aga Khan university school of nursing in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooladi, Marjaneh M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was three fold: (1) increase the understanding of gender sensitivity in nursing education and practice; (2) explore male and female nursing student and faculty perceptions on effective classroom and clinical teaching; and (3) clarify the necessity of both bedside teaching and role modeling in a Pakistani nursing program. Five successive focus groups were held to explore perceptions and views of twenty undergraduate, four graduates, and five Pakistani faculty members through guided interviews. Thematic analysis of transcribed data from observation and shorthand notes reached saturation after two rounds of transcription. Triangulated thematic analysis corroborated faculty and student perceptions. Data extracted two major categories and four themes. The classroom teaching themes emerged as (1) feeling misplaced and disapproved, and (2) gendered teaching style. The clinical teaching themes were identified as (1) feeling bewildered, and (2) preferences for bedside teaching and role modeling. The findings highlighted the need for gender sensitivity and cultural awareness in teaching and practice of nursing. Innovative teaching strategies can effectively resolve the contributing barriers to learning among nursing students. Awareness of gender differences among the students in addition to faculty enthusiasm communicates positive professional attitudes. Role modeling at bedside requires balancing essential cultural issues in nursing education and practice.

  11. Using Tailored Videos to Teach Inhaler Technique to Children With Asthma: Results From a School Nurse-Led Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Delesha M; Alexander, Dayna S; Elio, Alice; DeWalt, Darren; Lee, Charles; Sleath, Betsy L

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose was to test whether a tailored inhaler technique video intervention: (1) could be feasibly implemented by school nurses and (2) improve the inhaler technique of children with asthma. School nurses recruited a convenience sample of 25 children with asthma (ages 7-17) and assessed their inhaler technique. Children then watched a tailored video that provided: (1) step-by-step feedback on which steps (out of 8) they performed correctly, (2) praise for correctly-performed steps, and (3) statements about why incorrectly-performed steps are important. Nurses reassessed the child's inhaler technique immediately after watching the video and again 1month later. Non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank tests were calculated to assess whether children's technique significantly improved from baseline to post-video and baseline to 1-month follow-up. A focus group with the school nurses was conducted post-intervention to discuss feasibility issues. Children's inhaler technique improved by 1.2 steps (with spacer; p=0.03) and 2.7 steps (without spacer; ptechnique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Planning and application of a valutation methodology in UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 quality system, for the analysis satisfaction level of third-year student University of Bologna, Bachelor of Nursing Course, CRI School of Nursing formative section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, M G; Scalorbi, Sandra; Burrai, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    The quality of nursing assistance is closely related to the quality of training. In the certification UNI EN ISO 9001:2000 in 2004 of the Bologna nursing school regarding Planning and performance of theoretical-practical nursing training a continual improvement of the product/service is implicit. A method was therefore devised to evaluate the degree of satisfaction in third-year nursing students in Bologna which demonstrated a medium/high level of satisfaction regarding all teaching-related procedures. By monitoring satisfaction levels , it is possible to identify any critical areas and to implement improvement where needed.

  13. Communicating With School Nurses About Sexual Orientation and Sexual Health: Perspectives of Teen Young Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Morris, Elana; Lesesne, Catherine A; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H; Robin, Leah

    2015-10-01

    Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. This study informs school-centered strategies for connecting YMSM to health services by describing their willingness, perceived safety, and experiences in talking to school staff about sexual health. Cross-sectional data were collected from Black and Latino YMSM aged 13-19 through web-based questionnaires (N = 415) and interviews (N = 32). School nurses were the staff members youth most often reported willingness to talk to about HIV testing (37.8%), STD testing (37.1%), or condoms (37.3%), but least often reported as safe to talk to about attraction to other guys (11.4%). Interviews revealed youth reluctance to talk with school staff including nurses when uncertain of staff members' perceptions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) people or perceiving staff to lack knowledge of LGBTQ issues, communities, or resources. Nurses may need additional training to effectively reach Black and Latino YMSM. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. The Role of the School Nurse in the Special Education Process: Part I: Student Identification and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonkaitis, Catherine F; Shannon, Robin A

    2017-05-01

    Every U.S. student is entitled to a free and appropriate education. School districts must identify and evaluate any child who they find is unable to engage fully in learning as a participant in the general education curriculum. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 requires that these students be assessed by qualified individuals in any areas that may be impacting learning, including health, vision, hearing, social and emotional status, communicative status, and motor abilities. The school nurse, as the health expert, has an important role to play as a member of the special education team in evaluating whether a student has health concerns that are impacting learning and how health barriers to learning might be reduced. As part of the full and individual evaluation, the school nurse composes a written report and makes recommendations to the team regarding necessary health services and other modifications the student may need. This article (Part 1 of 2) will outline the school nurse's role in identification and evaluation of students who may benefit from special education services.

  15. Is It PANS, CANS, or PANDAS? Neuropsychiatric Pediatric Disorders That Are Not Black and White--Implications for the School Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagian, Kathy; Hartung, Sheila Q

    2015-03-01

    The terms pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS), pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS), and childhood acute neuropsychiatric symptoms (CANS) have all been used to describe certain acute onset neuropsychiatric pediatric disorders. Additionally, controversy is ongoing concerning the diagnosis and etiology of the disorders. The school nurse, as a member of a multidisciplinary team, benefits from an awareness of these disorders, the resulting impact on school performance, and the recommended treatment. The school nurse assists the team through the development of an Individualized Healthcare Plan to help the student to achieve success in school. © 2014 The Author(s).

  16. Social class variations in schoolchildren's self-reported outcome of the health dialogue with the school health nurse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2004-01-01

    of the health dialogue and to examine the effect of social class on this response controlled for the effect of other relevant social factors. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study is a survey. The population were all pupils in the fifth, seventh and ninth grade (11, 13 and 15 years old) in a random sample of schools......INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE: School health services is an important element in many countries' health promotion activities but little is known about the pupils' acceptance and perception of these services and their effects. The objective of this paper was to examine the pupils' self-reported outcome...... the nurse's advice, 77% had made their own autonomous decisions based on the health dialogue, and 11% had returned to the nurse for further advice. Pupils from the lower social classes had more often followed the nurse's advice (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.99-1.37) and returned to the nurse (OR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1...

  17. [Understanding a hospitalized, school-aged child's stress in the PICU: the application of picture books in nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Ju; Feng, Jui-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Hospitalization in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can be a very stressful and sometimes traumatic experience for school-aged children due to illness, painful procedures, unfamiliar environment, and separation from family. We incorporated picture books into PICU nursing care to explore the stress response in a school-aged child with compartment syndrome who was hospitalized in the PICU. Observation, interview and communication with the patient were used to assess her psychological reactions and emotional and behavioral responses to stress related to hospitalization and medical treatment. Autonomy and control were provided and strengthened by giving the patient choices and purposive life plans. Picture books were used to establish rapport and help the patient express her feelings, needs, and desires for parental love and company. This case report highlights the importance of nurses' awareness of children's stresses and needs during hospitalization in the PICU as well as the value of picture books or other age-appropriate tools for this patient population.

  18. Participatory Action Research in Public Mental Health and a School of Nursing: Qualitative Findings from an Academic-Community Partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Mahone, Irma H.; Farrell, Sarah P.; Hinton, Ivora; Johnson, Robert; Moody, David; Rifkin, Karen; Moore, Kenneth; Becker, Marcia; Barker, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    An academic-community partnership between a school of nursing (SON) at a public university (the University of Virginia, or UVA) and a public mental health clinic developed around a shared goal of finding an acceptable shared decision making (SDM) intervention targeting medication use by persons with serious mental illness. The planning meetings of the academic-community partnership were recorded and analyzed. Issues under the partnership process included 1) clinic values and priorities, 2) re...

  19. Air for learning. School of healthcare and nursing of Vienna; Luft zum Lernen. Gesundheits- und Krankenpflegeschule der Stadt Wien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtblau, Andreas; Wagner, Susanna [lichtblauwagner architekten, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    Due to the generously and light volume of space, the self-regulating shading system as well as the energy efficient ventilation, the energy optimized school of healthcare and nursing of the Kaiser-Franz-Josef-Hospital (Vienna, Austria) provides significant innovative steps in school buildings. The heterogeneous space on offer as well as the four-story, open hall with a maximum natural lighting and acoustics, which is attuned to the classrooms, enable a learning and working in a friendly atmosphere. With the open space structure and the row of trees as a technical shading system the building upgrades the traffic-exposed environment.

  20. Pure tone audiometry and impedance screening of school entrant children by nurses: evaluation in a practical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtby, I; Forster, D P; Kumar, U

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Screening for hearing loss in English children at entry to school (age 5-6 years) is usually by pure tone audiometry sweep undertaken by school nurses. This study aimed to compare the validity and screening rates of pure tone audiometry with impedance screening in these children. METHODS: Two stage pure tone audiometry and impedance methods of screening were compared in 610 school entry children from 19 infant schools in north east England. Both procedures were completed by school nurses. The results of screening were validated against subsequent clinical assessment, including otological examination and actions taken by an independent assessor. RESULTS: Both methods produced broadly similar validation indices after two stages of screening: sensitivity was 74.4% for both methods; specificity was 92.1% and 90.0%; and predicted values of a positive test 43.2% and 37.6% respectively for pure tone audiometry and impedance methods. Single stage screening in both methods produced higher sensitivity but lower specificity and predictive values of a positive test than two stage screening. Screening rates were appreciably higher with impedance methods than with pure tone audiometry. CONCLUSIONS: In choosing the method to be used, it must be borne in mind that the impedance method is technically more efficient but takes longer than pure tone audiometry screening. However, the latter method allows opportunity for other health inquiries in these children. PMID:9519138

  1. [Assessment of the teaching-learning process: its meaning for students holding a high school diploma or equivalent and attending a nursing program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frias, Marcos Antonio da Eira; Takahashi, Regina Toshie

    2002-06-01

    This study aimed at gaining an understanding of what the assessment meant to students holding a high school diploma or equivalent and attending a nursing program. It was carried out at a private nursing school in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Data was gathered through a tool containing the following question: "what does assessment mean to you as a student of a nursing assistant program"? The essays received were classified qualitatively according to the BARDIN frame of reference. Results show that students perceive assessment as a set of meanings that converge toward what we call the TEACHING-LEARNING PROCESS, EMOTIONAL FACTORS and The ROLE OF THE TEACHER.

  2. Paired peer review of university classroom teaching in a school of nursing and midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul N; Parker, Steve; Smigiel, Heather

    2012-08-01

    Peer review of university classroom teaching can increase the quality of teaching but is not universally practiced in Australian universities. To report an evaluation of paired peer-review process using both paper and web based teaching evaluation tools. Twenty university teachers in one metropolitan Australian School of Nursing and Midwifery were randomly paired and then randomly assigned to a paper based or web-based peer review tool. Each teacher reviewed each other's classroom teaching as part of a peer review program. The participants then completed an 18 question survey evaluating the peer review tool and paired evaluation process. Responses were analyzed using frequencies and percentages. Regardless of the tool used, participants found this process of peer review positive (75%), collegial (78%), supportive (61%) and non-threatening (71%). Participants reported that the peer review will improve their own classroom delivery (61%), teaching evaluation (61%) and planning (53%). The web-based tool was found to be easier to use and allowed more space than the paper-based tool. Implementation of a web-based paired peer review system can be a positive method of peer review of university classroom teaching. Pairing of teachers to review each other's classroom teaching is a promising strategy and has the potential to improve teaching in teaching universities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Setting a benchmark for the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) V: striving for first-semester success in nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, Marie N; Blake, Barbara J; Long, Janice M; Yanosky, Daniel J

    2014-09-01

    Every nursing school strives to admit students who will be successful in completing their program and passing the NCLEX(®). Many schools use standardized testing, such as the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) V, as part of their admission criteria. This study was conducted to set an institutional benchmark of the TEAS V composite score, as recommended by the test developers. Having a benchmark would help the authors' school of nursing to identify students who were more likely to be successful during the first semester of their nursing studies. Using past students' composite TEAS V scores and ATI RN Fundamentals of Nursing 2010 Assessment results, a benchmark was identified. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. Standardized Nursing Languages. Position Statement. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Carolyn; Endsley, Patricia; Chau, Elizabeth; Morgitan, Judith

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that standardized nursing languages (SNL) are essential communication tools for registered professional school nurses (hereinafter, school nurses) to assist in planning, delivery, and evaluation of quality nursing care. SNL help identify, clarify and document the nature and…

  5. Skin infections in high school wrestlers: a nurse practitioner's guide to diagnosis, treatment, and return to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Krista R

    2015-01-01

    To provide nurse practitioners (NPs) with a current guide for the diagnosis and treatment of high school wrestlers who present with common skin infections and to familiarize NPs with the National Federation of High School Associations Sports Medicine Advisory Committee return to participation guide and medical release form. Literature review of evidence-based research, journal articles, and reference texts related to skin lesions and high school wrestlers. High school wrestlers with skin infections present in a variety of clinical settings. Improperly diagnosed and/or managed skin infections have the potential to get worse and continue to spread among teammates. Accurate diagnosis and treatment in combination with the use of a return to participation guide can improve outcomes and return the wrestler to participation sooner. NPs have a responsibility to accurately diagnose and treat skin lesions in a timely, safe, and efficient manner. In wrestling, athletes are exposed to unique opportunities to develop skin infections. With a working knowledge of the clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, and return to participation recommendations for common skin diseases, spread of skin infections to other wrestlers can be prevented and the athlete can return to play safely. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Stress, coping, and psychological health of vocational high school nursing students associated with a competitive entrance exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huey-Fen; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2005-06-01

    An important issue for the nursing education system in Taiwan is to reinforce nursing education to enhance competence levels for entry to nursing specialties. Consequently, to meet the prospective demands of technical manpower, not only do nursing students in college and vocational schools pursue further studies, but they also take competitive entrance exams. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, the study examined the following among nursing students in vocational high schools: (1) perception and sources of entrance exam stress and use of coping behaviors; (2) the effect of difference in entrance exam stress levels on coping behaviors used, and (3) measurement of coping function to determine which coping behavior works best for buffering the impact of stress on psychological health during a preparatory stage of a college and university entrance exam. The subjects were 441 third-year nursing students of vocational high schools in northern Taiwan, recruited by convenience sampling. Three measurements were adopted: Stress perceived scale, Coping behavior inventory, and a Chinese health questionnaire. Results showed that the five main stressors of entrance exam stress, in descending order, were taking tests, the student's own aspirations, learning tasks, teacher's aspirations and parent's aspirations. Students generally used problem-focused coping strategies including optimistic action and social support to deal with the entrance exam stress, but use of emotion-focused coping strategies including avoidance and emotional disturbance was significantly increased as perceived level of stress rose. Two-way analyses of variance (2-way ANOVA) revealed that problem-focused coping had a positive main effect of alleviating psychological distress. A significant interaction was observed between stress perceived and problem-focused coping used for psychological health. Further examination of the interaction effect showed that problem-focused coping behaviors were potentially

  7. [Humanization in nursing care: acting with respect in a school hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ingrid de Almeida; Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify the hospital routine aspects in which nurses see bioethic principles when giving attendance and verify in which situations the nurse understands that the respect concept is connected to their routine. An exploratory, decriptive and qualitative approach research was performed with 18. The categories found were: The interference of bioethic principles in the nursing practice; How to respect the patient despite the hospital routines; How to render care to the patient in a humanized way and How to put into practice the humanization theory. We concluded that nurses understand that the bioethic principles help them in their daily nursing routine because they can orient themselves in their actions, making respect to the patient happen very naturally. However, nurses also understand that the principles can have their link hindered by their own Hospital rules.

  8. Academy and health services in the consolidation of boarding school of nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Domingues Garcia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the perception of teachers and nurses on the structure of the nursing internship at a public university of Paraná. We used a qualitative methodology to the collection in the period from March to August 2012. We used the electronic tool Google Docs, which enables the use of open and closed questions as well as data storage. The 27 study participants were nurse teachers and from the services used as training field of nursing internship. Data analysis enabled the establishment of two categories: Partnership between academia and health services: the construction of the completion of the internship and nursing boarding rating: structuring effectiveness. The results showed that the basis of consolidation of the nursing internship is the partnership of academia with health institutions and the strengthening of innovative educational proposals, as the systematic participatory assessments among stakeholders guided by the required reality of the labor market.

  9. Factors Influencing the High School Students' Choice of a Nursing Career in Bahrain: Development of a Best Practice Model for Nursing Recruitment

    OpenAIRE

    Tawash, Eman A

    2016-01-01

    Background: In response to the shortage of nurses, the Kingdom of Bahrain continues to have high dependence on expatriate nurses to maintain the health services. Consistent with Bahrainization, the development and expansion of an indigenous nursing profession through increasing the number of Bahrainis working as nurses must be a health service priority. However, in attracting local candidates to study nursing, the public image of nursing in the Middle East continues to be of concern. The stud...

  10. The mediating role of psychological empowerment on job satisfaction and organizational commitment for school health nurses: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chun; Shih, Chia-Hui; Lin, Shu-Man

    2010-04-01

    The importance of the professional role of school health nurses in promoting children's health in their school environment is widely recognized. However, studies of their working experience have revealed feelings of disempowerment that appear to be related to insufficient support from school managers. In these unsupportive working environments, it seems possible that psychological empowerment may play a mediating role to strengthen employees' satisfaction and commitment to their employing organization. The aim of this study is to test an exploratory model of empowerment in a Taiwanese sample of school health nurses by examining the mediating role of psychological empowerment in the relationship between external factors and work-related attitudes, specifically job satisfaction and organizational commitment. A cross-sectional survey with self-reported questionnaires. Probability proportional sampling was used to generate a randomly selected sample of 500 school health nurses in elementary and junior high schools in Taiwan. A total of 330 valid questionnaires were returned, yielding a response rate of 66%. The exploratory model including all hypothesized variables provided an adequate fit (chi(2)=29.24; df=17; p=.052; adjusted goodness-of-fit index [AGFI]=.96; goodness-of-fit index [GFI]=.98; root-mean-square error of approximation [RMSEA]=.05) for the data and indicated that psychological empowerment did not fully mediate the relationship between organizational empowerment and job satisfaction because of the strong direct effects of organizational empowerment on job satisfaction. The influence of empowerment on organizational commitment was mediated through job satisfaction. Psychological empowerment did not mediate the relationship between external factors and work attitudes, and job satisfaction emerged as an important factor. If school leaders can improve the job satisfaction of school health nurses, this will help them achieve greater commitment and loyalty of

  11. Interdisciplinary approach to clinical placements within Charles Sturt University School of Nursing Midwifery and Indigenous Health. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Maree Biles

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The clinical placement environment can be challenging for many students, and for students enrolled in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Indigenous Health (SNMIH subject NRS194, Indigenous Cultures, Health and Nursing, being placed in an Aboriginal facility can be daunting and increase anxiety within a cohort.  A pilot project within the SNMIH for NRS194 sought to engage the local Aboriginal Health Service through Aboriginal staff and utilising the skills, knowledge and expertise of the Aboriginal Health workers as a conduit to the community.  The cross cultural engagement within the SNMIH and the community has meant the cohorts of discipline-specific programs are being exposed to a breadth and depth of diversity within the Australian Health context, with a specific focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and their communities.  This Practice Report discusses the core elements of this first year placement initiative and the outcomes from the academic lens.

  12. Online nephrology course replacing a face to face course in nursing schools' bachelor's program: a prospective, controlled trial, in four Israeli nursing schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Gad; Balik, Chaya; Hovav, Boaz; Mayer, Amit; Rozani, Violetta; Damary, Isana; Golan-Hadari, Dita; Kalishek, Shoshana; Khaikin, Rut

    2013-12-01

    Online learning is growing rapidly worldwide, especially in the health related sectors such as medicine and nursing. Our trial wished to measure the objective (i.e. final exam results, courseware usage patterns) and subjective (satisfaction) efficiency of online vs. face-to-face learning in a prospective, controlled trial, a first of its kind in Israel. The trial tested a blended online course, teaching introduction to clinical nephrology. The course was filmed and edited into a learning platform to fit computer based learning. 90 nursing students, from 4 bachelor's nursing programs in Israel participated in the study. The intervention group included 32 students who studied using the online course, accompanied by 3 frontal meetings dealing with technical and content issues. The reference group included 58 students from 3 nursing programs, studying in a traditional face-to-face course. The final exam results were significantly higher in the intervention group compared with the reference group (9.6 ± 2.57 vs. 8.4 ± 2.72; plearning process and 97% thought the teaching method contributed to the learning process. The average usage of the online course was 4:10h vs. 14 academic hours (10:30 h) in the traditional course. The daily usage habits of the courseware were also followed, indicating that most learning took place between 12 PM and 1 AM, peaking between 5 PM and 7 PM, and dipping between 3 AM and 10 AM. The online course had higher efficiency compared to the traditional face-to-face course. The subjective feedback of the intervention group proves high satisfaction with online learning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Journal of the Nursing School of the University of Sao Paulo -- 36 years looking after the quality of nursing care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes; Angelo, Margareth; Castilho, Valéria; Egry, Emiko Yoshikawa; Rocha, Semiramis Melani Melo; Trzeniak, Piotr

    2004-03-01

    REEUSP has been a trimestrial journal since 1998, which publishes 11 to 13 articles per issue on different nursing subareas; most of them on teaching, health technology, adult health (in its different specialties), mental and psychiatric health. The article and research emphasis keeps on the hospital. For being linked to a teaching unit, it presents quality on its publishing; many times produced from thesis and dissertations. It faces the challenge of stimulating the publishing of authors from other institutions; for not becoming endogenous. On the last 10 years, it received and published articles from 18 Brazilian states and several country cities from Sao Paulo State. Its graphic design was also remodeled for 2003, allowing higher clearness and easiness for reading. It accepts exchange with other journals and it is indexed on many basis. It was gotten a C international classification by CAPES.

  14. Internal Evaluation of the Department of Nursing of the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Qom University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Abedini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Internal evaluation is a kind of educational evaluation process, including information collection and judgment in order to improve educational activities. Application of principles related to educational measurement leads to better understanding of existing educational situation. Hence, this study was performed with the purpose of internal evaluation of the Department of Nursing of Qom University of Medical Sciences.Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in ten steps and eight domains, including department manager, educational courses, educational and non-educational programs, academic member, students, learning and teaching strategies, educational facilities and services, thesis, sabbatical leaves, seminars, and graduated students. Data analysis was done through comparing the present and the desired situation.Results: The lowest desirability was related to thesis, sabbatical leaves, and seminars” with the score of 2/2. Also, High desirability of "goals and organizational position, department management and organization", "teaching and learning strategies", and "educational services and facilities" were the strengths of the departments with the score of 2/6.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, employment of complementary education students, expansion of faculty members, and improvement of their employment situation is necessary for elimination of weaknesses and promotion of the department.

  15. Learning about health: The pupils' and the school health nurses' assessment of the health dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Ina K.

    Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC), health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children......Public health, health promotion, empowerment, experiential learning, health behaviour in school-aged children (HBSC), health survey, qualitative interviews, grounded theory, school children...

  16. Polish school nurses' knowledge of the first-aid in tooth avulsion of permanent teeth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baginska, Joanna; Rodakowska, Ewa; Milewski, Robert; Wilczynska-Borawska, Magdalena; Kierklo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    .... The instrument consisted of demographic questions, questions referring to nurses' experience and training in dental trauma and questions checking knowledge of first-aid in the avulsion of permanent teeth...

  17. Nurses' uniform color and feelings/emotions in school-aged children receiving health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Burke, Jane; Bena, James F; Morrison, Shannon M; Forney, Jennifer; Krajewski, Susan

    2013-04-01

    Children may fear nurses wearing white uniforms. When emotions and uniform color were studied in 233 children, many positive emotions were most often associated with blue, bold pink-patterned, or yellow-patterned tops (all p ≤ .002). Negative emotions were not associated with uniform top colors (all p emotions were most often associated with white uniform color (p emotions were associated with nurse uniform color. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Development and validation of the work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales among registered nurses with multiple roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijuan; Song, Rhayun

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales, and to validate the psychometrics of those scales among registered nurses with multiple roles. The concepts, generation of items, and the scale domains of work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales were constructed based on a review of the literature. The validity and reliability of the scales were examined by administering them to 201 registered nurses who were recruited from 8 university hospitals in South Korea. The content validity was examined by nursing experts using a content validity index. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to establish the construct validity. The correlation with depression was examined to assess concurrent validity. Finally, internal consistency was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficients. The work-family-school role conflicts scale comprised ten items with three factors: work-school-to-family conflict (three items), family-school-to-work conflict (three items), and work-family-to-school conflict (four items). The role-related social support scale comprised nine items with three factors: support from family (three items), support from work (three items), and support from school (three items). Cronbach's alphas were 0.83 and 0.76 for the work-family-school role conflicts and role-related social support scales, respectively. Both instruments exhibited acceptable construct and concurrent validity. The validity and reliability of the developed scales indicate their potential usefulness for the assessment of work-family-school role conflict and role-related social support among registered nurses with multiple roles in Korea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mathematical skills of the nursing and midwifery students of Sakarya University school of healht sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursan Çinar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out with the purpose of determining the Nursing and Midwifery students’ interest and skills in mathematics, and their skills in calculating the medication dosages. In the study, a survey form comprising 16 questions having the purpose of determining the students’ demographical characteristics and interest in mathematics, and the Medication Skill Test (MCS Test, which had been also prepared by the researchers, were used. The Medication Skill Test (MCS Test were developed, by the researchers, by means of reviewing the relevant literature, particularly the studies carried out by Grandell-Neime et al. and the pharmacology test books. The MCS Test consisted of 25 questions, of which eleven were about general mathematics and fourteen were about the calculation of the medication dosages. The answers the students gave to the questions were evaluated as correct or incorrect. The sampling of the research comprised totally 73 students from the 2nd, 3rd and 4th grades of the midwifery classes, and totally 142 students from the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th grades of the nursing classes. The survey form were applied to the students by providing the examination conditions and giving 20 minutes time. The data collected was evaluated in computer. It was determined that 96.5 % of the nursing students (n: 137 and 90.4 % of the midwifery students (n: 66 liked the mathematics. 90.1 % of the nursing students (n: 128 and 83.6 % of the midwifery students (n: 61 stated that they found mathematics enjoyable, and likewise, 35.2 % of the nursing students (n: 50 and 34.2 % of the midwifery students (n: 25 stated that they deemed the mathematics as necessary in nursing. 66.9 % of the nursing students (n: 95 and 63.0 % of the midwifery students (n: 46 stated that they had good mathematical skills. 60.6 % of the nursing students (n: 86 and 75.3 % of the midwifery students (n: 55 stated that they didn’t deem themselves as adequate in calculating the

  20. Pairing Nurses and Social Workers in Schools: North Carolina's School-Based Child and Family Support Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Elizabeth J.; Wells, Rebecca; Bai, Yu; Troop, Tony O.; Miller, Shari; Babinski, Leslie M.

    2010-01-01

    When children are struggling in school, underlying causes often include physical or behavioral health problems, poverty, abuse, and/or neglect. Children's poor physical health status has been linked to deficits in memory and reading ability. Children with behavioral problems are much more likely than others to have lower grades, miss school, be…

  1. Using Carl Rogers' person-centered model to explain interpersonal relationships at a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Venise D; Lindo, Jascinth; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline; Weaver, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Faculty members are viewed as nurturers within the academic setting and may be able to influence students' behaviors through the formation of positive interpersonal relationships. Faculty members' attributes that best facilitated positive interpersonal relationships according to Carl Rogers' Person-Centered Model was studied. Students (n = 192) enrolled in a 3-year undergraduate nursing program in urban Jamaica were randomly selected to participate in this descriptive cross-sectional study. A 38-item questionnaire on interpersonal relationships with nursing faculty and students' perceptions of their teachers was utilized to collect data. Factor analysis was used to create factors of realness, prizing, and empathetic understanding. Multiple linear regression analysis on the interaction of the 3 factors and interpersonal relationship scores was performed while controlling for nursing students' study year and age. One hundred sixty-five students (mean age: 23.18 ± 4.51years; 99% female) responded. The regression model explained over 46% of the variance. Realness (β = 0.50, P interpersonal relationship scores assigned by the nursing students. Of the total number of respondents, 99 students (60%) reported satisfaction with the interpersonal relationships shared with faculty. Nursing students' perception of faculty members' realness appeared to be the most significant attribute in fostering positive interpersonal relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effectiveness of hand hygiene education in a basic nursing school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelcíkova, Simona; Skodova, Zuzana; Straka, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Although hand hygiene (HH) is the cheapest and simplest tool for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections, poor HH compliance has been reported among health care professionals. A variety of factors influence the compliance with HH guidelines, the most important being the quality of the basic nursing education. The aims of this study were to analyze the effectiveness of the basic nursing education in relation to HH, and to explore the skills and attitudes toward HH among nursing students in praxis. A mixed-method approach using a cross-sectional survey combined with observation and curricular analysis was used. A total of 188 nursing students participated in the study. Content analysis revealed significant deficits in the quality of HH-related information in basic nursing educational programs. Our results correlate directly with the reported insufficient levels of HH knowledge and the associated poor HH compliance by students during their training in clinical settings; as shown in observation and questionnaire-based surveys. The lack of compliance with HH standards among students lead to poor compliance among health care professionals in praxis. Consequently, the role of educational institutions in the prevention of hospital-acquired infections is significant, if the effectiveness of HH education is to be improved. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Men student nurses: the nursing education experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadus, Robert J; Twomey, J Creina

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of being a male in a predominately female-concentrated undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program. Men remain a minority within the nursing profession. Nursing scholars have recommended that the profile of nursing needs to change to meet the diversity of the changing population, and the shortfall of the worldwide nursing shortage. However, efforts by nursing schools and other stakeholders have been conservative toward recruitment of men. Using Giorgi's method, 27 students from a collaborative nursing program took part in this qualitative, phenomenological study. Focus groups were undertaken to gather data and to develop descriptions of the experience. Five themes highlighted men students' experience of being in a university nursing program: choosing nursing, becoming a nurse, caring within the nursing role, gender-based stereotypes, and visible/invisible. The experiences of the students revealed issues related to gender bias in nursing education, practice areas, and societal perceptions that nursing is not a suitable career choice for men. Implications for nurse educators and strategies for the recruitment and retention of men nursing students are discussed. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Creating and sustaining a diverse student community in a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wros, Peggy; May, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    In response to national and state mandates to increase diversity in the nursing workforce, a small, liberal arts college in Oregon implemented a comprehensive program to recruit and retain students underrepresented in nursing, especially Hispanics. The goals of Ayudando Podemos were to increase enrollment of underrepresented and disadvantaged students, improve student retention and graduation rates, increase student participation in a mentorship program, improve cultural competence in the campus community, and increase the number of graduates working in medically underserved or health professional shortage areas (HPSAs). The program had four parts: institutional catalysts and commitment, relationship building and student connection, individualized academic coaching, and financial aid and scholarship coaching. Sixty-nine prenursing and nursing students participated over 6 years. The retention rate was 96.2%.

  5. School Nurses' Knowledge, Attitudes, Perceptions of Role as Opinion Leader, and Professional Practice Regarding Human Papillomavirus Vaccine for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Brittany L.; Goodson, Patricia; Thompson, Bruce; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Because human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine rates remain low, we evaluated US school nurses' knowledge, attitudes, perceptions of their role as opinion leaders, and professional practice regarding HPV vaccine, and assessed whether knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of being an opinion leader influenced their professional…

  6. An Extended Study on Students' Perceptions of Success and Failure in Nursing School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, Debra

    Changes in students' perceptions of success and failure as they progressed through a diploma hospital nursing program were studied, in a replication of a study by Davidhizar. Weiner's attribution theory was also assessed to determine students views of the following explanations of success: effort, ability, task ease, or luck. Effort was cited as…

  7. Education on Adult Urinary Incontinence in Nursing School Curricula: Can It Be Done in Two Hours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Lynne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Responses from 339 undergraduate nursing programs (74%) showed that 98% included urinary incontinence content in their curricula. Although most agreed the subject was important and felt their teaching was effective, the didactic component averaged two hours, and clinical experience was not systematic; few faculty are prepared to teach this…

  8. Implementing Web-based Instruction in a School of Nursing: Implications for Faculty and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Judith A.; Coudret, Nadine A.

    2000-01-01

    A description of web-based nursing education at the University of Southern Indiana is used to frame a discussion of changes distance education causes in the teacher role (instructional design, interaction, time and technology management, outcome evaluation) and student role (time and technology management, interaction, self-direction). (SK)

  9. Clinical Validation of the "Sedentary Lifestyle" Nursing Diagnosis in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Renato; da Silva, Viviane Martins; Guedes, Nirla Gomes; de Oliveira Lopes, Marcos Venícios

    2016-01-01

    This study clinically validated the nursing diagnosis of "sedentary lifestyle" (SL) among 564 Brazilian adolescents. Measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated for defining characteristics, and Mantel--Haenszel analysis was used to identify related factors. The measures of diagnostic accuracy showed that the following defining…

  10. Pubescent male students' attitudes towards menstruation in Taiwan: implications for reproductive health education and school nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ting; Hayter, Mark; Lin, Mei-Ling

    2012-02-01

    To explore male students' attitudes towards menstruation. Menstruation is a biological event that is often surrounded by secrecy and social stigma that causes anxiety amongst many young girls. A key element of this is the attitudes of young males towards this reproductive health issue. However, the literature around what young males think and feel about menstruation is limited. Qualitative. A sample of 27 male students aged between 10-12 years participated in five focus groups. Data were then subject to a thematic analysis. Five themes emerged from the data analysis that reflected the boys' feelings, experiences and attitudes towards menstruation: 'A silent topic', 'An unimportant issue', 'Errant information about menstruation'. In addition, according to their experience, participants gradually came to see menstruation from the 'menstrual stereotype' viewpoint. In their social life, they made choices that resulted in gradually regulating their behaviour that affected their 'relationships with girls'. Young boys have misguided knowledge about menstruation and this helps to perpetuate the stigma surrounding this element of reproductive health. Boys also express a desire to learn more but are often restricted in this by home and school. School nurses are the best placed professionals to address this issue. Menstrual education with boys should take a greater prominence than it often does in sexual health education in schools. Such inclusion will provide boys with a balanced and accurate knowledge base and therefore help towards reducing the social stigma around menstruation that is often experienced by young girls. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. [Nursing certification system in cancer nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kumi

    2008-04-01

    The Japanese Nursing Association (JNA) started an advanced nursing certification system and gave the first certification to certified nurse specialist (CNS) in cancer nursing in 1996. CNS is recognized for excellent nursing practice in a specific area, and for demonstrating six roles: excellent nursing practice, consultation, ethical coordination, education, coordination, and research activities. To receive CNS certification need nurse (or public health nurse or nurse midwife) qualification, master's degree, at least five-years clinical experience, and after that to pass a JNA certification examination. Certified nurse (CN) demonstrates three roles in high level of nursing practice by using matured nursing skills and knowledge, leadership, and consultation in a specific nursing area. CN need nurse qualification, at least fiveyears clinical experience, completing educational program at least 6 months, and passing a JNA certification examination. Both of CNS and CN requier certification renewal every five years. The number of people who get certification of CNS's in cancer nursing become 104, and of CN in cancer nursing area become 942 (chemotherapy 204, palliative care 420, cancer pain 267, breast cancer 51) in 2007. CNS's in cancer nursing activities are not understood broaden, because they have various work positions and activities, and are very few in Japan. But they are considered to be a change agent in cancer health care system. Also they will expand their activity setting. There is a prospect that CNS in cancer nursing will increase in number with nursing graduate school increasing. It shows that we will face some problems, for example educational contents or methods, certification system and so on.

  12. Bullying Prevention in Schools. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSisto, Marie C.; Smith, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is a crucial member of the team participating in the prevention of bullying in schools. School nurses are the experts in pediatric health in schools and, therefore, can have an impact on the…

  13. Exploring co-meditation as a means of reducing anxiety and facilitating relaxation in a nursing school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinski, Violet M; Todaro-Franceschi, Vidette

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore whether co-meditation, shared or cross-breathing, could reduce anxiety and enhance relaxation in a nursing school setting. The specific outcomes to be assessed in the quantitative component were blood pressure, pulse, respirations, and anxiety, both state and trait. A qualitative component explored participants' experiences with co-meditation following 1 month of practice. Rogers's Science of Unitary Human Beings formed the theoretical basis for this study. The study employed a pretest/posttest design with participants as their own controls. Quantitative data were collected from a convenience sample of 26 students, faculty, and staff aged 19 to 51 years, male and female. Fourteen participants returned for the qualitative component. Findings suggest that co-meditation may be useful in reducing anxiety, as measured by vital signs and the anxiety inventory forms. Participants reported feeling calmer and more relaxed, balanced, and centered following 1 month of practice. Findings suggest that co-meditation has potential to help transform a nursing educational environment from one that is potentially anxiety provoking to a calmer, more caring one.

  14. School Nurse Case Management for Children with Chronic Illness: Health, Academic, and Quality of Life Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, Martha Keehner; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B.; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with…

  15. Clinical evaluation and grading practices in schools of nursing: national survey findings part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Yarbrough, Suzanne S; Saewert, Karen J; Ard, Nell; Charasika, Margie E

    2009-01-01

    To better understand how nurse educators evaluate and grade students' clinical practice, the Evaluation of Learning Advisory Council of the National League for Nursing conducted a survey of faculty (N = 1,573) in all types of prelicensure RN programs. This article describes the findings of that survey in relation to clinical evaluation and grading clinical practice. Nearly all faculty used a clinical evaluation tool to rate students' performance in the clinical setting (n = 1,534, 98 percent); most programs had the same basic tool in all courses, but modified to reflect the unique aspects of each course (n = 1,095, 70 percent). Faculty (n = 1,116, 83 percent) reported using pass/fail for grading in clinical courses rather than a letter or numerical grade.

  16. Nursing Intervention in adolescence: an institution experience in Public Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martínez Esquivel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a key stage of life to the empowerment that must have health, but it has many needs that healthteams still have not resolved. This article presents an analysis of the health situation of a group of teenagersattending a public institution of higher education and intervention by nursing students, focused on creatingconditions for health promotion and disease prevention. This research was conducted from a quantitative,descriptive and was performed in an institution of secondary education in the period from September toNovember 2012. We worked with students and students of eighth and ninth year with a convenience sample. Themain results indicated needs in sexuality, healthy lifestyles and conflict resolution. To address these issuesevolved different strategies planned, organized, directed and controlled by the individual. We conclude that healtheducation in adolescents is a public health problem and that nurses must meet.

  17. Concept maps for home economics in the secondary school nursing programme

    OpenAIRE

    Goričar, Metka

    2012-01-01

    Concept maps are an effective learning tool in teaching, learning and knowledge testing. The key principle is quality learning where new concepts and subject matter are understood and linked to the existing knowledge. The purpose of the diploma work is examining and organizing concepts; creating concept maps for topics from the subject catalogue for Home Economics in the nursing education programme; finding out if concept maps could be used as a learning tool or learning technique, and w...

  18. "Headache Tools to Stay in School": Assessment, Development, and Implementation of an Educational Guide for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazdowsky, Lori; Rabner, Jonathan; Caruso, Alessandra; Kaczynski, Karen; Gottlieb, Sarah; Mahoney, Elyse; LeBel, Alyssa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Headache is the most common type of pain reported in the pediatric population, and chronic headache is an increasingly prevalent and debilitating pain condition in children and adolescents. With large numbers of students experiencing acute headaches and more students with chronic headache reentering typical school settings, greater…

  19. What Can Secondary School Students Teach Educators and School Nurses about Student Engagement in Health Promotion? A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Amy J.; Reilly, Sandra M.

    2017-01-01

    Student engagement represents a critical component of a comprehensive school health (CSH) approach to health promotion. Nevertheless, questions remain about its implementation. This scoping review updates the field of student engagement in health promotion. Of the 1,388 located articles, 14 qualify for inclusion in this study. An analysis reveals…

  20. Experiences of parents regarding a school-readiness intervention for pre-school children facilitated by Community Health Nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Prinsloo

    2015-01-01

    When CHN students engage with communities through service learning, a school-readiness intervention may serve as a powerful tool to provide parents with the support that is needed to empower them with the skills to contribute towards their children’s early childhood development. It may improve the parent–child relationship which is critical in the development of children.

  1. School Nurses and Their Role in Emergency Health Care at Schools in the Last Thirty Years (1982-2011 in Greece: a Systematic Review Based on Greek Legislation Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Siamaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: School Nursing embraces the pupil communities and school life in many a country across the world. This article focuses onGreek reality and analyses the Nurses’ role in emergency health care-related issues from a legal perspective in the last thirty years (1982-2011. Presented are the evolution of School Nursing in Greece, Legal Provisions pertaining to it, Professional Duties, and the work ofSchool Nurses, keeping abreast of existing legal bibliography including the latest Act, which introduces the description of duties vis-à-visemergency health care.Aim: This study links Greek School Nurses with Emergency Health Care in the School Environment. It is aimed at updating and raisingawareness about further legal regulation of emergency care procedures at Schools and constructing a model to be compared to the currentlegislation and practice in other countries.Methods: Systematic review of laws and review of articles published in the last 30 years (1982-2011 in scientific journals,academic databases included in HEAL-LING, SAGE, ELSEVIER, WILSON, SCIENCEDIRECT, MEDLINE, PUBMED,PsycINFO, Cochrane, EMBASE, SCOPUS and CINAHL having as search criteria and key words the terms of Greeklanguage «Σχολική Νοσηλευτική», (“School Nursing” [MeSH], «Ειδική Αγωγή» (“Special Education” [MeSH],«Επείγουσα Φροντίδα» (“Emergency Care” [MeSH], «Νοσηλευτική Νομοθεσία» (“Law and Nursing Ethics” [MeSH],«Άτομα με Ειδικές Ανάγκες» (“Children with Special Needs” [MeSH], «Πρώτες Βοήθεις» («First Aid» [MeSH].Discussion: School Nursing in Greece is only limited to Special Education whereas health care procedures are rather unclear from a legalpoint of view. Further clinical training, wider roles for nurses in emergency care, and the introduction of School Nurses in all Schools and ofa legal framework supporting them may be some of the

  2. Physical education Teachers' and public health Nurses' perception of Norwegian high school Students' participation in physical education - a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Stea, Tonje H; Berntsen, Sveinung; Omfjord, Christina S; Rohde, Gudrun

    2015-12-24

    High quality physical education programs in high schools may facilitate adoption of sustainable healthy living among adolescents. Public health nurses often meet students who avoid taking part in physical education programs. We aimed to explore physical education teachers' and public health nurses' perceptions of high school students' attitudes towards physical education, and to explore physical education teachers' thoughts about how to facilitate and promote students' participation in class. Prior to an initiative from physical education teachers, introducing a new physical education model in two high schools in the South of Norway, we conducted focus groups with 6 physical education teachers and 8 public health nurses. After implementation of the new model, we conducted two additional focus group interviews with 10 physical education teachers. In analyses we used Systematic Text Condensation and an editing analysis style. In general, the students were experienced as engaged and appreciating physical education lessons. Those who seldom attended often strived with other subjects in school as well, had mental health problems, or were characterized as outsiders in several arenas. Some students were reported to be reluctant to expose their bodies in showers after class, and students who seldom attended physical education class frequently visited the school health services. Although the majority of students were engaged in class, several of the students lacked knowledge about physical fitness and motoric skills to be able to master daily activities. The participants related the students' competence and attitude towards participation in physical education class to previous experiences in junior high school, to the competence of physical education teachers, and to possibility for students to influence the content of physical education programs. The participants suggested that high school students' attitudes towards participation in physical education is heterogeneous

  3. Iranian nursing students’ experiences of nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Farzaneh Gholami; Karimi, Mahboubeh; Hasanpour, Marzieh

    2012-01-01

    Background: The negative attitudes and behaviors of Iranian nursing students impede learning and threaten their progression and retention in nursing programs. The need to understand students’ perception and experiences of nursing provide knowledge about effectiveness of nursing education program as well as their professional identity. The purpose of this study was to discover experiences of nursing students. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive, exploratory and qualitative study, twelve senior nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (School of Nursing and Midwifery) were participated. Data was collected via unstructured in-depth interview, and thematic analysis method was used for analyzing the data. Findings: The findings from this study revealed that the nursing students in Iran experienced altered experiences during their education program as positive and negative. Two major themes were constructed from the thematic analysis of the transcripts: professional dimensions and professional conflicts. Conclusions: Regarding the findings, positive experiences of students have leaded them to acceptance and satisfaction of nursing and negative experiences to rejection and hating of nursing and lack of adaptation with their professional roles. Therefore, it is recommended that revision and improvement in nursing education program is essential to facilitate positive experiences and remove negative experiences of nursing student’s educational environment. PMID:23833591

  4. Graduate Education in Nursing Leadership through Distance Technologies: The Canada-Norway Nursing Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasiw, Carroll; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Moen, Anne; Ostbye, Truls; Davie, Lynn; Stovring, Turid; Buckland-Foster, Irene

    2000-01-01

    A collaborative project between Canadian and Norwegian nursing schools used computer- and videoconferencing to deliver nursing leadership content. Students gained global understanding of nursing and health care issues. (SK)

  5. School Nurses' Role in Identifying and Referring Children at Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendershot, Candace; Pakulski, Lori A.; Thompson, Amy; Dowling, Jamie; Price, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Young people are likely to experience noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), as the use of personal listening devices and other damaging factors (e.g., video games) increases. Little research has examined the role of school health personnel in the prevention and early identification of hearing impairment. A 32-item, valid and reliable survey was…

  6. School Nurses and Care Coordination for Children with Complex Needs: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Rachel; Weismuller, Penny C.

    2015-01-01

    Health care for students with chronic needs can be complex and specialized, resulting in fragmentation, duplication, and inefficiencies. Students who miss school due to chronic conditions lose valuable educational exposure that contributes to academic success. As health-related disabilities increase in prevalence so does the need for the…

  7. Nutrition in Today's Education--As A School Nurse Sees It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Regina M.

    This brief NEA newsletter addresses itself to the importance of good nutrition habits to the central nervous system which, in turn, exerts an effect on learning. Features include: (1) outlines for nutrition education in units for grades K-3, grades 4-6, grades 7-9, and grades 10-12; (2) a school breakfast project for a class of emotionally…

  8. What Can Secondary School Students Teach Educators and School Nurses About Student Engagement in Health Promotion? A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Amy J; Reilly, Sandra M

    2017-02-01

    Student engagement represents a critical component of a comprehensive school health (CSH) approach to health promotion. Nevertheless, questions remain about its implementation. This scoping review updates the field of student engagement in health promotion. Of the 1,388 located articles, 14 qualify for inclusion in this study. An analysis reveals four themes. CSH programs that incorporate student engagement promote a sense of belonging to a community, encourage meaningful involvement, give voice to student concerns, and advance supportive relationships. This study finds a lack of research regarding student engagement in health promotion but confirms that student participation in CSH initiatives contributes to a sense of ownership. Consequently, we can infer that student ownership of health promotion takes place through their meaningful engagement and can effect social change.

  9. Outcomes and lessons learned regarding the use of interviewing for baccalaureate nursing school admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce Splann

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the adoption, use, and outcomes of an admission interview process for selection into a large public baccalaureate nursing program between 2007 and 2011. This article reports the effects of implementation, including how interviews affected the grade point average of incoming students as well as student diversity, retention, and National Council Licensure Examination scores, over nine consecutive admission cycles. During the initial implementation cycles, reported satisfaction with the process was high; however, as implementation progressed, it became clear that the anticipated gains from the interview process related to ethnic and gender diversity were not being realized. Furthermore, implementation of the interview strategy created unforeseen difficulties. These two factors led to a decision to stop using this strategy for admission into the baccalaureate program. Lessons learned in the implementation of interviews as an admission criterion are included in the discussion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of Self-esteem and Academic Achievement among the Midwifery Students of Mashhad School of Nursing and Midwifery in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Farzaneh Rashidi Fakari; Mahin Tafazzoli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The students’ academic achievement is of paramount significance for their future accomplishments. Academic achievement is associated with various effective factors, one of which is self-esteem. The current study was conducted to assess the correlation between self-esteem and academic achievement of the midwifery students at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This analytical study was carried out on the midwifery students of Mashhad School of Nursing and...

  11. Interpersonal trust and empathy in nurse-nurse relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northouse, P G

    1979-01-01

    The specific purpose of a study that examined interpersonal communication in ongoing nurse-nurse dyads was to ascertain the nature of the relationship between interpersonal trust and empathy in nurse-nurse interaction. Analysis of questionnaire data collected from a sample of 36 diploma school nursing instructors indicated slight correlations between specific trust and general trust and between general trust and empathy. A strong negative correlation was found between specific trust and empathy. Discussion centered on an explanation for the inverse relationship between specific trust and empathy and a proposed model for how trust functions in ongoing nurse-nurse dyads.

  12. Building community partnerships to end interpersonal violence: a collaboration of the schools of social work, law, and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch-Armendariz, Noël Bridget; Johnson, Regina Jones; Buel, Sarah; Lungwitz, Jeana

    2011-09-01

    The article discusses the University of Texas at Austin's (UT Austin) Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (IDVSA), an institution that was established in 2001. IDVSA is a collaboration of the Schools of Social Work, Law, and Nursing, and 150 community affiliates. Recognizing that interpersonal violence does not occur in a vacuum, the IDVSA operates within an ecological framework in which explanations for interpersonal violence acknowledge that individuals and families are nested in larger mezzo and macro systems, and factors such as gender, poverty, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and immigration status play influential roles in our understanding of these issues. The overarching goal is to advance knowledge and meaningful practice in the field through partnerships with survivors and community practitioners. Specifically, the mission is to advance the knowledge related to domestic violence and sexual assault in order to end interpersonal violence. IDVSA seeks to achieve its mission by focusing on three key areas: (1) rigorous research and scholarship on domestic violence and sexual assault; (2) comprehensive training, technical assistance, and information dissemination to the practitioner community and the community at large; and (3) substantial collaboration with our community partners. This article summarizes the authors' pursuit.

  13. Molecular detection and characterization of Cryptosporidium species in household dogs, pet shop puppies, and dogs kept in a school of veterinary nursing in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Naoyuki; Oohashi, Yoshino; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Itagaki, Tadashi; Ito, Yoichi; Saeki, Hideharu; Kanai, Kazutaka; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Hori, Yasutomo; Hoshi, Fumio; Higuchi, Seiichi

    2014-03-01

    Members of Cryptosporidium species, which are protozoan parasites, are prevalent worldwide and can cause diarrhoea in both humans and animals, including dogs. In addition, the Cryptosporidium species harboured in dogs have the potential for zoonotic transmission. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species infection and perform molecular characterization of isolates in household dogs, pet shop puppies, and dogs kept in a school of veterinary nursing in Japan. Fresh faecal samples were collected once from 529 household dogs (aged from 2 months to 18 years old, from 9 veterinary clinics located in 6 different regions), 471 pet shop puppies (≤ 3 months old, from 4 pet shops located in 2 different regions), and 98 dogs (aged from 2 to 11 years old) kept in a veterinary nursing school. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene was employed for the detection of Cryptosporidium species, and 111 random samples of PCR amplicons (approximately 500-bp) were sequenced for the molecular characterization of the isolates. The prevalences of Cryptosporidium species in household dogs, pet shop puppies, and veterinary nursing school dogs were 7.2%, 31.6%, and 18.4%, respectively. In household dogs, no significant correlation was observed between the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and the age (≤ 6 months vs. >6 months), living conditions (indoor vs. outdoor), faecal conditions (formed vs. unformed), and location of residence. In pet shop puppies, the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species was not related to faecal condition; however, the prevalence significantly differed among the pet shops. All of the 111 sequence samples (26 from household dogs, 75 from pet shop puppies, and 10 from veterinary nursing school dogs) were identified as Cryptosporidium canis. The present study demonstrates a high prevalence of Cryptosporidium species infections in pet shop puppies and dogs of a veterinary nursing

  14. Using social network analysis to examine collaborative relationships among PhD and DNP students and faculty in a research-intensive university school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Jacqueline A; Yoon, Sunmoo; Larson, Elaine; Honig, Judy; Reame, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The nursing profession has seen a dramatic rise in the number of schools offering both DNP and PhD nursing programs. Information is limited on the impact of this parallel approach in doctoral education on the quality and scope of scholarly interactions or institutional culture.The authors studied collaboration characteristics across the DNP and PhD programs of a research-intensive university school of nursing, before and after programmatic enhancements. An IRB-approved online survey was delivered to faculty and students of both programs at baseline and one year after curricular changes. Response rates were 70% and 74%, respectively. The responses were analyzed by using social network analysis and descriptive statistics to characterize the number and strength of connections between and within student groups, and between students and faculty. At baseline, the flow of communication was centralized primarily through faculty. At Time 2, density of links between students increased and network centralization decreased, suggesting more distributed communication. This nonlinear quantitative approach may be a useful addition to the evaluation strategies for doctoral education initiatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between High School Mathematics Grade and Number of Attempts Required to Pass the Medication Calculation Test in Nurse Education: An Explorative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Alteren

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Norwegian nurse education, students are required to achieve a perfect score in a medication calculation test before undertaking their first practice period during the second semester. Passing the test is a challenge, and students often require several attempts. Adverse events in medication administration can be related to poor mathematical skills. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between high school mathematics grade and the number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test in nurse education. The study used an exploratory design. The participants were 90 students enrolled in a bachelor’s nursing program. They completed a self-report questionnaire, and statistical analysis was performed. The results provided no basis for the conclusion that a statistical relationship existed between high school mathematics grade and number of attempts required to pass the medication calculation test. Regardless of their grades in mathematics, 43% of the students passed the medication calculation test on the first attempt. All of the students who had achieved grade 5 had passed by the third attempt. High grades in mathematics were not crucial to passing the medication calculation test. Nonetheless, the grade may be important in ensuring a pass within fewer attempts.

  16. Authentication of Nursing 2: Reflective Processes in Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Cox, Helen

    This material has been reproduced and communicated on behalf of Deakin University pursuant to Part VB of the Copyright Act 1968. It is studymaterials produced for HNN706, Authentication of Nursing 2: Reflective Processes in Nursing, which is one of the units offered by the School of Nursing...

  17. [A framework for assessing essential public health nursing skills and achievement levels required for students graduating from schools that provide education for obtaining a license as a public health nurse in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahara, Kiyomi; Omori, Junko; Kobayashi, Maasa; Hirano, Yuko; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Arakida, Mikako; Oki, Sachiko; Okamoto, Reiko; Okuyama, Noriko; Kaihara, Itsuko; Sudo, Hiroko; Nagae, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Misako; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2010-03-01

    This study aimed to develop a framework for essential skills and the achievement levels necessary for students graduating from schools that provide education for obtaining a license as a public health nurse (PHN) in Japan. Two rounds of questionnaire-based investigations using the Delphi methodology were conducted. Subjects were 197 PHNs from municipalities or companies and 146 nurse educators from universities, colleges, junior colleges, or technical nursing schools. (1) The essential skills framework consisted of three (macro, intermediate and micro) levels. Macro-level items were based on the principle of justice, a primary pillar of health care: (A) community assessment to identify health problems; (B) solving and improving particular health problems in collaboration with people to enable them to promote their own health; (C) promoting equitable access and distribution of community resources for health and daily living. Micro-level items had four achievement levels: (I) independent; (II) instructor-guided; (III) laboratory exercise; (IV) theoretical understanding. Micro-level items for A and B had two domains for achievement: individual/family and group/community. (2) In the first round over 70% of respondents said "very important," "important" or "acceptable" for all micro-level items. In the second round, over 90% said all micro-level items fit within macro and intermediate-level items. (3) In the second round, micro-level items attained 70% consensus among PHNs and nurse educators were 71 of 93 (76.3%). Micro-level expression was used for adjustment and the final framework of essential skills yielded 3 macro, 8 intermediate and 59 micro-level items and 95 levels of achievement. (4) In the final framework, the level of achievement for "individual/family" (Macro-level A and B) was almost level I, and for "group/community" almost II or III. The number of micro-level items at level IV for C was 14 of 21 (66.7%). (5) Compared with PHNs, educators generally

  18. Gap between the Expectations and Perceptions of Students regarding the Educational Services Offered in a School of Nursing and Midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asefi, Fariba; Delaram, Masoumeh; Deris, Fatemeh

    2017-04-01

    Awareness of students' opinions about the various aspects of training provided is an essential factor to evaluate the quality of education. The aim of this study was to determine the gap between the students' expectations and perceptions from the educational services provided to them in the School of Nursing and Midwifery in Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences. In this cross-sectional study, 320 students were selected by stratified random sampling method and data were collected by SERVQUAL questionnaire to examine the areas of assurance, responsiveness, empathy, tangibles and confidence. Data analysis was conducted by descriptive (frequency, percentage, mean±SD) and analytical (paired t-test, independent t-test and One-Way ANOVA) statistics in SPSS 20. The mean scores of the students' expectations and perceptions of the educational services delivered to them were 4.34±0.63 and 3.56±0.68, respectively, with a significant, negative gap (-0.77±0.77, p<0.001). The lowest gap of quality was derived for assurance (-0.65) followed by reliability (-0.69), accountability (-0.74), and empathy (-0.81), and the greatest gap observed in tangibles (-0.96). A negative gap was observed between the students' expectations and perceptions of the quality of educational services delivered to them. This means that the quality of services delivered to students was less than what they expected. The highest gap was related to the tangibles. In order to improve the educational services, paying attention to different areas of quality of educational services, especially, the tangibles, is necessary.

  19. High Test Anxiety among Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Richard; Evans, Ginger; Ramsey, Gary; Wheeler, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Nursing programs can be highly stressful, and the investigation was undertaken to see if nursing students are more test anxious than students in other fields. The Westside Test Anxiety Scale has administered to 298 nursing students at two colleges, and to a comparison group of 471 high school and college students. Fully 30% of nursing students…

  20. 20 CFR 404.1029 - Student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student nurses. 404.1029 Section 404.1029 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950... Student nurses. If you are a student nurse, your work for a hospital or nurses training school is excluded...

  1. Kreşlerde okul sağlığı hizmetleri ve hemşirelik/School health services and nursing in nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Bebiş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Özet Büyüme ve gelişmenin çok hızlı olduğu okul öncesi dönemde, çocuklar çok sayıda bedensel ve psikososyal riskle karşı karşıya kalmaktadır. Çocukların sağlığının korunması ve geliştirilmesi açısından kreşler etkili rol oynamaktadır. Kreşlerde uygulanan okul sağlığı hizmetleri, çocukların eğitime katılma potansiyelini ve yaşam kalitesini arttırır. Okul sağlığı hizmetleri disiplinler arası ve sektörler arası ilişkilerle yürütülür. Bu anlamda okul hemşireleri okul sağlık ekibinin temel üyelerindendir. Bu derleme yazıda, halk sağlığı ve eğitimin bir parçası olan okul sağlığı ve hemşirelik hizmetleri gözden geçirilmiştir. Anahtar Kelimeler: Okul sağlığı hizmetleri, kreş, hemşirelik.Abstract Preschool children face a large number of physical and psychosocial risks during the period when growth and development are rapid. Nurseries play an effective role for protection and development of the children’s health. School health services in nurseries increase the children’s full educational potential and improve their quality of life. School health services are carried out by interdisciplinary and intersectoral cooperation. In this situation the school nurse is the main member of the school health team. In the present review article, we have summarized school health and nursing services that are a part of public health and education. Key Words: School health services, nursery, nursing.  

  2. Doctoral specialization in nursing informatics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gassert, C. A.; Mills, M. E.; Heller, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    A prototype program of doctoral study has been developed at the University of Maryland School of Nursing to prepare students with nursing expertise in the conceptualization and research of computer based information systems in hospitals, industry and other health care organizations. The graduate will be prepared to design effective nursing information systems; create innovative information technology; conduct research regarding integration of technology with nursing practice, administration, ...

  3. ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION OF IMPLEMENTATION OF UNDERGRADUATE NURSING CURRICULLUM FOR FAMILY NURSING IN WEST JAWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neti Juniarti

    2017-02-01

    This study used evaluation research design using BEKA framework as a tool to perform curriculum analysis which included Benchmarking, Evidencing, Knowing, and Applying stages. The international standards competency for family nursing and community health nursing, course study guide and samples of students reports were collected and analysed using content analysis. In addition participants from six nursing schools were interviewed to identify application of the curriculums. The results show that some of the competencies outlined in the course study guide were not aligned with international standards of family nursing from International Family Nursing Association. Four dimensional framework of family nursing and community health nursing curriculums were proposed to improve the alignment between international standards as well as local and government needs for family nursing and community health nursing curriculums. School of nursing can apply this framework as guidance to develop their own learning plans based on international standards, national, local and institutional needs. Keywords: curriculum analysis, evaluation, family nursing, community health nursing

  4. Nurses: advocates for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servodidio, C A

    1992-12-01

    Based on the nursing literature and my own ophthalmic nursing experience, there appears to be some confusion about how the general public, our colleagues, and physicians view the duties and responsibilities of the profession of nursing. We, as nurses, can serve as advocates for our own profession and educate the public about who we are, how we have achieved our current status and goals, and where we expect to be in the future.

  5. Service Animals in School. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garret, Jennifer; Teskey, Carmen; Duncan, Kay; Strasser, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that registered school nurses (hereinafter referred to as school nurses) are integral to the team planning process necessary to successfully integrate "service animals" into schools. A request to bring a service animal into the school setting presents questions due to…

  6. Priming the pipeline: creating aspirations for new graduate nurses to enter ambulatory care nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Sheila A

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and projected length of the nursing shortage coupled with the increasing demand for ambulatory care nurses requires that novel strategies to attract and recruit new ambulatory care nurses be implemented. Planning and implementation strategies aimed at the current pool of student nurses are discussed in detail. Initiatives to elicit support of current ambulatory care nurses, deans, directors and faculty of schools of nursing are also presented along with options for evaluation of such initiatives.

  7. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO) nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify the key difficulties involved with establishing and implementing a new nursing school, and which factors helped the project achieve its goals. Six themes emerged from the experiences that shaped the course of the project: 1) Motivation can be sustained if the rationale of the project is in line with its aims. Indeed, the project's primary health care focus was to strengthen the nursing workforce and build a public-private partnership with an FBO. All these were strengths, which helped in the midst of all the uncertainties. 2) Communication was an important and often underrated factor for all types of development projects. 3) Managing the unknown and 4) managing expectations characterised the project inception. Almost all themes had to do with 5) handling conflicts. With so many participants having their own agendas, tensions were unavoidable. A final theme was 6) the need to adjust to ever-changing targets. This retrospective auto-ethnographic manuscript serves as a small-scale case study, to illustrate how issues that can be generalised to other settings can be deconstructed to demonstrate how they influence health development projects in developing countries. From this narrative of experiences, key recommendations include the following: 1) Find the right ratio of stakeholders, participants, and agendas, and do not overload the project; 2) Be alert and communicate as much as possible with staff and do not ignore issues hoping they will solve themselves; 3) Think flexibly and do not stubbornly

  8. Experience and nursing needs of school-age children undergoing lumbar puncture during the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a descriptive and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Anwei; Shan, Yuying; Niu, Mei E; Chen, Yi; Wang, Xiya

    2017-11-01

    To describe experiences and nursing needs of school-age Chinese children undergoing lumbar puncture for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Lumbar puncture is an invasive procedure, causing psychological changes and physical discomfort in patients. In a previous study, it was proved that distraction intervention, such as music therapy, relieves pain and anxiety. There is limited evidence regarding the experience and needs of school-age children during lumbar puncture after being diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. To minimise their anxiety and pain during the procedure, it is important to collect information directly from these children. A descriptive qualitative research. Twenty-one school-age children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia participated in semi-structured interviews at a Children's Hospital in China. Data were collected by an experienced and trained interviewer. Qualitative content analysis was chosen to describe experiences of children undergoing lumbar puncture. While undergoing lumbar puncture for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, school-age Chinese children experienced complex psychological feelings (fear, tension, helplessness, sadness and anxiety). They also experienced physical discomfort. They had multipolar needs, such as information, communication, respect, self-actualisation, environment and equipment. This study identified important areas that must be closely monitored by healthcare staff, performing lumbar puncture on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia children. Thus, a successful and smooth procedure can be performed on these patients, and their quality of life can be improved. The experiences described in this study contribute to a better understanding of the needs of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia children undergoing lumbar puncture. They also provide valuable information to professional medical care staff that develops future nursing assessments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sexual Behaviour and Contraceptive Use Among Student Nurses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was a survey study designed to determine the sexual behaviour and contraceptive use among student Nurses, School of Nursing, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (U.M.T.H.), Maiduguri, Borno State. The population of this study was the entire 136 student Nurses, School of Nursing, U.M.T.H.), Maiduguri.

  10. [Critical reflexive education of nurses from the nursing undergraduate program offered by the School of Medicine of Marília - FAMEMA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirelli, Mara Quaglio; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2003-01-01

    The study aimed at learning with the undergraduate students enrolled at the Nursing Undergraduate Program offered by FAMEMA about how they are building their education with the purpose of forming a critical reflexive professional as well as identifying the differences perceived by the students with respect to the logic of the Pedagogical Political Plan. The subjects were students finishing the fourth year of the undergraduate program. Authors used the focal group and semi-structured interviews as research techniques. The empirical data were organized according to the technique of Collective Subject Discourse followed by thematic analysis. Authors evidenced that the students were able to elaborate a critique with respect to the Pedagogical Plan, discriminating and perceiving the problems, the changes that occurred and the conflicts generated in a Project of this nature. When they experience reality, students also have conflicts that permeate the relationships they build in their lives, questioning nurses' role, reflecting about their ethical posture, the basis for the argumentation and support to their practice working as a team.

  11. [Community health nursing: essential education elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Min

    2013-06-01

    Community health nursing has undergone significant reform over recent decades in response to ongoing advances in medical technology and increasing national living standards. Taiwan's nursing manpower projections indicate a strong and growing demand for nurses working in primary and tertiary settings. Can our nurses address social trends and face the new challenges of the 21st century? The baccalaureate nursing degree is the minimum preparation for entry-level professionals working in community health nursing in most advanced countries. Significant improvements are necessary in this degree track to improve the quality and quantity of community health nurses. This article introduces the Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry Level Community / Public Health Nursing proposed by the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE). It is hoped that nursing schools and community health nurses responsible for professional training in Taiwan will reference the ACHNE proposal and develop appropriate domestic curricula that will form an effective professional development consensus and further advance community care.

  12. An outcome-based evaluation of nursing competency of baccalaureate senior nursing students in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2013-12-01

    Limited literature is available for demographic and learning factors related to performance of baccalaureate nursing students. The study aimed at examining mean differences in nursing competency between the first week and the sixth week of a nursing clinical practicum as well as evaluating mean differences in nursing competency by demographic and learning factors at the sixth week of a nursing clinical practicum controlling for baseline scores of nursing competency. A comparative study design was conducted using the competency inventory for baccalaureate senior nursing students based on learning outcomes. Participants were surveyed at the first week and the sixth week of a nursing practicum with 95% mean response rate. Paired t test was used to compare within-subjects differences in mean nursing competency. ANCOVA and Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney U test were conducted to compare between-subjects differences in mean nursing competency. There are significant mean differences in nursing competency in general clinical skills, lifelong learning, clinical biomedical science, caring, and critical thinking and reasoning between the 1st week and the 6th week of nursing practicum. Likewise, type of nursing program, prior schooling, type of nursing license, interest in nursing, and extracurricular activity experience were significantly related to mean total nursing competency. Similarly, demographic attributes (location of school, type of nursing program, prior schooling, type of nursing license, a family member working as a medical practitioner or a nurse, interest in nursing, attributes of preferred workplace after college) and learning factors (extracurricular activity experience, played an active role in classroom discussions and asked questions, academic class rank, and English grade, clinical biomedical science, nursing science, and nursing practicum) were significantly related to six-subscale scores of nursing competency. There are mean differences in nursing

  13. Awareness and attitudes of Turkish nursing students towards research and development in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerçek, Emine; Okursoy, Algın; Dal, Nursel Alp

    2016-11-01

    The research course in nursing is included in almost all nursing curricula in national and international scales. To compare awareness and attitudes of Turkish nursing students towards research and development in nursing. This study had descriptive and cross-sectional research design. The research sampling is consisted of 390 senior students studying during the 2013-2014 academic year in six schools of health in six different geographical regions in Turkey. The Personal Identification Form and Nursing Students' Attitudes to and Awareness of Research and Development within Nursing Scale were utilized in data collection. It was determined that there is difference between awareness and attitude scores of nursing students from six different schools towards research and development in nursing according to their schools and background. It can be suggested that initiatives to increase awareness of students at nursing schools towards research course must be planned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spiritual Nursing Care Education An Integrated Strategy for Teaching Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Hand, Mikel

    The failure of nursing schools to integrate spiritual nursing care education into the curriculum has contributed to a lack in nurses' spiritual care ability. Developing, integrating, and testing a Spiritual Care Nursing Education strategy in an Associates of Science nursing program significantly increased the perceived spiritual care competence of student nurses. Utilizing a faculty team to develop learning activities to address critical spiritual care attributes offers a method to integrate spiritual nursing care content throughout the curriculum in ASN and BSN programs.

  15. Rural nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Rhonda L.; Usher, Kim

    2015-01-01

    that they align more closely to the developmental and social needs of young people with mental health problems. Design: A mixed methods case study design was used to explore the early mental health care needs of young rural people. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted and data were analysed...... to young people. Conclusions: Non-traditional venues such as community, school and justice settings are ideal places where more convenient first conversations about mental health with young people and their families, and rural nurses should be deployed to these settings. Relevance to Clinical Practice...

  16. Intersection of Re-Designated National League for Nursing Centers of Excellence(TM) and Quality in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Nursing education is challenged to meet a growing demand for nurses, while substantiating the quality of the educational experience as well as the achievement of desired student outcomes. The National League for Nursing (NLN) Centers of Excellence (COE) in Nursing Education(TM) program represents high performing nursing schools which utilize…

  17. Korean Nurses' Experience of Preparing for and Taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwi-Soon Choe, PhD

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that developing NCLEX-RN preparation programs is needed to promote global capabilities for nurses and nursing students. Further studies on the effect of exposure to the NCLEX-RN exam while nursing school for nurses is recommended.

  18. Second Year Associate Degree Nursing Students and Nursing Faculty Attitudes towards Clinical Educational Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFauci, Frances F.

    2009-01-01

    Professional registered nursing is an essential part of the health care system and student nurses need experimental learning with actual patients to learn to practice as a nurse. The health care system has changed dramatically and nursing schools have decreasing access to the health care agencies. The clinical educational experience develops…

  19. Nursing theories as nursing ontologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaming, Don

    2004-10-01

    By understanding the constructions of knowledge we currently label nursing theories as nursing ontologies, nurses can perceive these conceptualizations differently. Paul Ricoeur and Stephen White offer a conceptualization of ontology that differs from traditional, realist perspectives because they assume that a person's experience of a phenomenon (e.g., nursing) will change, but also maintain some stability. Discussing nursing ontologies, rather than nursing theories, might increase philosophy's status in nursing and may also more accurately reflect the experience of being a nurse.

  20. Global health education in Chinese universities and potential for collaboration with schools of nursing: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanlei Li

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Increasingly Chinese universities are promoting global health education through the platform of CCUGH. It is an ideal moment to promote and expand work across the fields of global health and nursing, specifically to highlight opportunities for collaboration across education, research and practice.

  1. The Lived Experience of Nursing Students Participating in High-Fidelity Simulation at a School Grounded in Caring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Gail Dove

    2016-01-01

    The education of nursing students in traditional clinical settings has become increasing challenging because of a multitude of factors affecting healthcare delivery. A decreasing number of clinical sites has precipitated a corresponding increase in the use of high-fidelity simulation-based learning experiences (HFSLEs). Because HFSLEs are being…

  2. Graduate education in oncology nursing for minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houldin, Arlene D; Reville, Barbara; Boland, Barbara A; Jacobs, Linda A; Hayes, Sandra L

    2002-01-01

    Cancer statistics reveal disturbing morbidity and mortality rates among minorities, especially African Americans. A program to recruit and train minority nurses as Oncology Advanced Practice Nurses was developed at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Since 1992, 30 African American, five Asian/Pacific Islander, and five Hispanic nurses have been supported during advanced oncology nursing study. Graduates have assumed positions of clinical and academic leadership in oncology nursing. This project strengthened the ability of a graduate program in oncology nursing to respond to needs related to the education of minority students and to the care of minority populations with cancer.

  3. Undergraduate nursing students' compatibility with the nursing profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianati Mansur

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high rate of attrition among nursing students has caused some nursing leaders to think about the necessity of considering students' personality during the process of admission into nursing schools. Due to the lack of studies on Iranian nursing students' personality traits, this study was designed to assess freshmen nursing students' personality characteristics and their compatibility with the demands of the nursing profession. Methods A descriptive study was conducted at Tehran and kashan medical universities and one of the branches of Azad University. Convenience sampling was used and 52 freshmen nursing students were assessed using Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory. Results From the total participants 63.5% were females and 36.5% were males. Based on the Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory 44% did not have appropriate personality characteristics for the nursing profession. 77% of the nursing students participating in the study reported that they lacked information about nursing. Conclusion It seems that personality tests can help to select the best students for nursing schools from those who show good academic capabilities. This would decrease the rate of attrition and could improve the quality of care.

  4. Nurse-led school-based clinics for rheumatic fever prevention and skin infection management: evaluation of Mana Kidz programme in Counties Manukau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philippa; King, Julian; Moss, Michelle; Light, Phil; McKee, Tracy; Farrell, Elizabeth; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana

    2016-01-08

    To evaluate registered nurse-led school clinics in 61 primary and intermediate schools in Counties Manukau. The evaluation (conducted August–December, 2014) collated evidence concerning service delivery, outcomes, value for money and effectiveness. 97% (23,756/24,497) of eligible children were consented, 11% (20,696/191,423) of throat swabs taken (February 2013–September 2014) were culture positive for Group A Streptococcus (GAS); 20,176 were treated. Mana Kidz teams treated (includes cleaning and covering alone) 17,593 skin infections and actioned 4,178 school health referrals. A pre-programme cross sectional GAS pharyngeal prevalence demonstrated a relative risk 1.8 (1.3–2.3) (95%CI) of being pharyngeal GAS positive in 2013 compared to 2014. Hospitalisations for acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and skin infections for children aged 5–12 years living in Counties Manukau are declining and this appears to be temporally related to the introduction of the Mana Kidz programme. Effective engagement with children, parents/ whānau and improved health literacy was demonstrated, especially knowledge about sore throats, ARF, medication adherence and skin infection. The programme was delivered at $280 per participating child in the 2013/14 financial year. Mana Kidz is an effective programme with a substantial contribution to health care for children, aged 5–12 years, identified at increased risk of poor health outcomes.

  5. Effective educator student relationships in nursing education to strengthen nursing students' resilience : original research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Froneman, Kathleen; Du Plessis, Emmerentia; Koen, Magdalena P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little research has been conducted in private nursing schools with regard to the educator student relationship to strengthen the resilience of nursing students and to improve the educator-student relationship...

  6. Effective Hand Washing in an Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hezel, Linda; Bartlett, Connie; Hileman, Judy Willis; Dillon, Lisa; Cessna, Tamara

    2000-01-01

    Elementary school is the perfect place to teach and reinforce the lifelong skill of effective handwashing for students and adults. One collaboration between an elementary school and a nursing education program to augment school health services without taxing the school budget is described. Nursing students spent 260 professional nursing service…

  7. Forecasting Nursing Student Success and Failure on the NCLEX-RN Using Predictor Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    A severe and worsening nursing shortage exists in the United States. Increasing numbers of new graduate nurses are necessary to meet this demand. To address the concerns of increased nursing demand, leaders of nursing schools must ensure larger numbers of nursing students graduate. Prior to practicing as registered nurses in the United States,…

  8. Stressors affecting nursing students in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, R; Rehman, S; Ali, P A

    2017-12-01

    To determine factors contributing to stress experienced by preregistration nursing students in Pakistan, using the Stressors in Nursing Students scale. The aim was to explore the psychometric properties of this instrument and to investigate the effect of a range of demographic variables on the perception of stressors in nursing students. Nursing is a stressful profession, and nursing students may experience more stress due to competing demands and challenges of nursing education, assessment, placements and worries about employment prospects. In this cross-sectional survey, data from 726 nursing students from 11 schools of nursing in Karachi, Pakistan, were collected using a questionnaire. Data were analysed using descriptive as well inferential statistics. An exploratory factor analysis was also conducted. There was no apparent factor structure to the Stressors in Nursing Students scale, unlike in previous studies. The total score on the Stressors in Nursing Students scale was related to gender with males scoring higher. The score generally increased over 4 years of the programme, and students in private schools of nursing scored higher than those in public schools of nursing. Nursing students in Pakistan do not appear to differentiate between different stressors, and this may be due to cultural differences in the students and to the structure of the programme and the articulation between the academic and clinical aspects. Likewise, cultural reasons may account for differences between stress experienced by male and female students. The fact that scores on the Stressors in Nursing Students scale increased over 4 years of the programme and males scored higher than females should alert nursing schools and policymakers related to nursing education and workforce to pay attention to prevent attrition from nursing programmes. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Duties and performance of academic advisors from the view of students of Tabriz School of Nursing and Midwifery in 2010

    OpenAIRE

    M. Jebreili; S. Valizadeh; Rahmani, A.; Ebrahimi, H. (BSc)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Support , advice and guidance of students during of study are one of the most important responsibilities of universities. They are responsible to solve students' problem about this matter. Thus, this study has been designed to determine the students' view about of the Duties and Performance of Academic advisors. Methods: This study which is a descriptive- analytical study. Is performed on 250 nursing and midwifery and operation room students selected using by census method. In o...

  10. A model for predicting academic procrastination based on personality traits and achievement goals among school of nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    Rastegar, A.; S. Talebi; MH Seif

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Identifying affecting factors on academic procrastination is considered as a common psychological trauma in academic environments. Thus, this study aimed to provide a model predicts academic procrastination on the basis of personality traits and achievement goals. Methods: This cross sectional analytic study consisted of 258 students of faculty of nursing, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who were chosen via randomized stratified ratio sampling and answered to a self-report...

  11. Implementation Science: New Approaches to Integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses Competencies in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolansky, Mary A; Schexnayder, Julie; Patrician, Patricia A; Sales, Anne

    Although quality and safety competencies were developed and disseminated nearly a decade ago by the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project, the uptake in schools of nursing has been slow. The use of implementation science methods may be useful to accelerate quality and safety competency integration in nursing education. The article includes a definition and description of implementation science methods and practical implementation strategies for nurse educators to consider when integrating the QSEN competencies into nursing curriculum.

  12. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  13. Delegation of Care: Overview for the RN Practicing in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ3), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This manual is intended to provide the school nurse, school staff, school administration, and parents with a general understanding of the legal and nursing considerations and responsibilities that accompany delegation of nursing tasks in the school setting. With the increased need for health services in school, nurses are increasingly using the…

  14. Letters from a Nightingale nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, E

    1996-01-01

    Mary Cadbury was one of six daughters in a wealthy Birmingham family, all of whom took up professional or unpaid philanthropic work. In 1873 Mary began nurse training at the Nightingale School, St Thomas's Hospital, and regularly sent letters to family and friends, which provide a graphic account of the experience of a nurse in the latter half of the nineteenth century.

  15. Promoting Innovation in Global Nursing Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Promoting Innovation in Global Nursing Practice. Petra Brysiewicz1* Tonda L. Hughes2, Linda L. McCreary2. 1School of Nursing and Public Health,University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. 2College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA. Abstract. Innovation can be thought of as taking two things that already ...

  16. It's time to reward nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-30

    The cover of this month's Nursing Management features Susie Scales and Amy Sims, who together won the leadership category of the prestigious RCNi Nurse Awards. The two nurses set up a school-age immunisation programme from scratch and launched it within six months. They are now responsible for vaccinations throughout Derbyshire .

  17. Nursing: Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nursing education programs, students take courses in anatomy, physiology, microbiology, chemistry, nutrition, psychology, and other social and ... for healthcare services will increase because of the aging population, given that older people typically have more ...

  18. Brazilian nursing history on the shoulders of giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguisso, T; de Freitas, G F

    2015-03-01

    This study describes the route followed by nursing in Brazil, through the foundation of nursing organizations and the emergence of nursing leaders and pioneers. To present the origins of modern nursing in Brazil, identifying the main nurse-leaders and analysing their performance for the creation and consolidation of the nursing organizations. It is a historical and social study with descriptive approach, to describe the process of Brazilian nursing professionalization and leadership through a literature review. The oldest nursing organization is the Brazilian Nursing Association that holds scientific and cultural activities. There are also nurses' unions and nursing specialty associations, such as the Brazilian Academy for the History of Nursing, and the Federal Nursing Council. The latter has compulsory membership for controlling nursing services according to the qualifications of the personnel. The very first school for nurses in the Nightingale system was created in São Paulo, 1894, at the Samaritan Hospital, and by the government in 1923, in Rio de Janeiro, for which American nurses, led by Ethel Parsons, sponsored by the Rockefeller Foundation, were essential for the creation of the Anna Nery Nursing School, still in operation within a federal university. Some nurses pioneered these works such as Edith Fraenkel, Maria Rosa Pinheiro, Amalia Carvalho and others. The work done by nursing leaders has brought to the profession a better status and made it more recognized by the society. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  19. Factors Affecting Applications to Professional Schools of Six Professions (Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, Law, Social Work, and Public Health).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Susan; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Future demand for professional education is examined through demographic trends, enrollment trends, professional manpower demands, the role of values and attitudes, and the current responses of the professional schools to change. (MSE)

  20. Transcultural Nursing and Nursing Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Elaine M.

    1991-01-01

    Points out the inadequacies of the nursing diagnoses officially sanctioned by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association for use with culturally diverse patients. Looks at the changes needed to make the defining characteristics more congruent with transcultural nursing. (JOW)

  1. Diabetes Management in the School Setting. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Sarah; Fekaris, Nina; Pontius, Deborah; Zacharski, Susan

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses that the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is the only school staff member who has the skills, knowledge base, and statutory authority to fully meet the healthcare needs of students with diabetes in the school setting. Diabetes management…

  2. Nursing instructors' and male nursing students' perceptions of undergraduate, classroom nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Jeff M; Oliffe, John; Phinney, Alison; Garrett, Bernie

    2009-08-01

    Attrition rates of male nursing students exceed those of females yet the experiences of male students in nursing school are poorly understood. This interpretive ethnographic study explored the experiences of male nursing students and female nursing instructors in the context of classroom education. Data collection consisted of participant observation of classroom teaching sessions followed by interviews with six male nursing students who were participants in the classes and six female nursing instructors who taught the classes. Themes resulting from data analysis addressed men's roles in the nursing classroom and the culture of nursing education. The theme of "nursing like a real man" was characterized by men's reliance on roles and behaviours associated with traditional masculinities including leadership, assertiveness and risk-taking. The theme of "masculinities in a feminine place" captured the gendered culture of nursing education which manifested in stereotypes and a sexualized identity, where men saw themselves as accommodated but not integrated. "Diversity between masculine and feminine" communicated the incongruity between men's educational preferences and the techniques that predominate in nursing education. These findings suggest that nursing instructors need to consider gender in their teaching practice, avoid parody or stereotypes of masculinities, and reject assumptions that male students are homogeneous.

  3. A model for predicting academic procrastination based on personality traits and achievement goals among school of nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rastegar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identifying affecting factors on academic procrastination is considered as a common psychological trauma in academic environments. Thus, this study aimed to provide a model predicts academic procrastination on the basis of personality traits and achievement goals. Methods: This cross sectional analytic study consisted of 258 students of faculty of nursing, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who were chosen via randomized stratified ratio sampling and answered to a self-report questionnaire consisted of achievement goals, personality traits, and academic procrastination. Results: Analyzing the data showed that a neurosis personality trait had an indirect and positive effect on students’ academic procrastination. Also, the personality traits such as extraversion, consciousness, agreeableness and openness to experience had an indirect and negative effect on students’ academic procrastination. Conclusion: According to the findings, planners of nursing courses should provide a fresh scientific environment to create a bed for formation of positive personality traits in students so that they can provide a context for adopting an appropriate goal-setting pattern, and in turn, reducing academic procrastination. As well, with the implementation of personality measures and deeper understanding of the inner characteristics of learners’ personality, they can be kept safe from exposure to psychological traumas such as academic procrastination.

  4. Delegation of Glucagon[R] in the School Setting: A Comparison of State Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Lori; Foley, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Delegation of nursing procedures and medication in school is fraught with legal and ethical concerns for the school nurse. Because nurses may be responsible for coordinating care for several school buildings, delegation of nursing care and medication administration has occurred out of necessity. Nurse Practice Acts in some states, but not all,…

  5. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... homes have nursing aides and skilled nurses on hand 24 hours a day. Some nursing homes are set up like a hospital. The staff provides medical care, as well as physical, speech and occupational therapy. There might be a nurses' station on each ...

  6. Nursing Students' Experiences of Learning Numeracy for Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Rachel; Hodgen, Jeremy; Coben, Diana; Bretscher, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines nursing students' experiences of the teaching and assessment of numeracy for nursing. Data from interviews with eight student nurses at a large school of nursing in the United Kingdom are analysed using a constructivist grounded theory approach to explore their perceptions of any disjunctures between the ways in which numeracy…

  7. Nursing and Midwifery Education in Rwanda: Telling our Story ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviewed the development of the education of nurses and midwives in Rwanda. Nursing and midwifery education started with missionaries providing general nursing education and later evolved into the integration of nursing education in public and private schools. The establishment of the Kigali Health Institute ...

  8. Nurse manager personal traits and leadership characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, H E; Woods, C Q; Boyle, D K; Bott, M J; Taunton, R L

    1995-01-01

    A portion of an Organizational Dynamics Paradigm provided the framework for examining urban hospital nurse managers' personality and staff nurses' perceptions of their leadership. Nurse managers' personality traits were comparable to American women in general. On motivation to manage they scored lower than business and health services managers and higher than female public school administrators. Staff nurses rated managers favorably on leadership style, power, and influence. Personality was linked modestly to motivation to manage and selected aspects of leadership.

  9. Turkish Version of the Student Nurse Stress Index: Validity and Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Sarikoc, PhD, RN

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Results showed that the SNSI had a satisfactory level of reliability and validity in nursing students in Turkey. Multicenter studies including nursing students from different nursing schools are recommended for the SNSI to be generalized.

  10. Student Nurses's Stigmatising Attitudes towards Persons with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    22. Student Nurses's Stigmatising Attitudes towards Persons with a Mental Disorder in a selected School of Nursing and Midwifery in Rwanda. Vedaste Baziga*. School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Rwanda. Abstract. Mental disorders (MD) contribute significantly to global burden of disease and this is the fourth ...

  11. Breast Examination Practices among Nursing Students in Warri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To ascertain influencing factors and breast examination practices among student nurses in Warri, Delta state. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: State School of Nursing, Warri, Delta State. Subjects: Two hundred and ninety six student nurses attending the school in 2010 with exclusion of introductory ...

  12. [Nurse anesthetist in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Ju; Yann, Douchy; De Almeida, Sylvie; Deckert, Christine; Gauss, Tobias; Bonneville, Claire Tae; Merckx, Paul; Mantz, Jean

    2006-12-01

    We present the system of nurse anesthetist (Infirmier Anesthésiste Diplômé d'Etat: IADE) in France to the community of Japanese anesthesiologists. This French system with 70 years' history is older than the Japan Society of Anesthesiologists itself. There are 7000 nurse anesthetists in France now and the number of nurse anesthetists increases by 450-500 each year. Training to become a nurse anesthetist requires at least two years' experience as a general nurse and the general nurse must pass an examination after two years' special training in an anesthetistic nurse school to acquire the national certification. The nurse anesthetist's profession is regulated by French law. They work in a team with certified anesthesiologists. They can perform many kinds of anesthetic tasks including tracheal intubation and insertion of arterial catheter under the responsibility and supervision of certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to perform spinal, epidural, conduction and local anesthesia, although they can maintain these anesthesia and control these methods, e.g., by injecting local anesthetic agents through epidural catheter, following a specified prescription. The nurse anesthetists are not allowed to insert central venous and pulmonary artery catheters, although they can manage them. They are allowed to administer inhalation anesthetic agents, and inject venous anesthetic agents, muscle relaxants, their antagonists, and opioids by their own initiatives, but the decision for the use of catecholamine and emergency drugs is reserved to certified anesthesiologists. The nurse anesthetists perform other tasks preparing and checking anesthetic agents and equipment such as anesthetic machine, monitor, and defibrillator everyday, and sometimes use autologous blood recovery systems. The relationship between the certified anesthesiologist and the nurse anesthetist is marked by mutual respect, confidence and cooperation at each step of the anesthetic

  13. State of the Art of the Research on Occupational Health Conducted at the Psychology and Nursing Schools of Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia between 1983 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy J. Chaparro P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the state of the art of the research on occupational health conducted at the schools of nursing and psychology of Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia (uptc – pedagogical andtechnological university of colombia between 1983 - 2010. Methodology: A non-experimental study with a quantitative approach and the document analysis technique. The population universe was formed by 497 units of analysis. The sample was selected through sampling by logical criteria. The sample consisted of 71 units of analysis, where 51 corresponded to occupational hazards, 14 to occupational health, and 6 to health education. Data collection was performed by means of a grid composed of two categories, namely: formal aspects and theoretical aspects. Results: The results show that 56% of the research is on nursing and 44% on psychology. The year with the greatest amount of academic production was 2007 for both schools, with a total of 15 dissertations, 7 for nursing, and 8 for psychology. Amongst the most studied risk factors is psychosocial risk; the most quoted author was Gloria Villalobos. Conclusions: Each discipline approaches and addresses the research questions from its own field of knowledge. In nursing, the main focus is the study of occupational health education, and physical and chemical risk factors. In psychology, on the other hand, the focus is rather on psychosocial risk factors, stress, mental load, and job satisfaction.

  14. [Hospice palliative care education for nursing students, nurses, and advanced nursing practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei-Shu; Ying, Wan-Ping; Chao, Co-Shi Chantal

    2009-02-01

    The aim of hospice palliative education care is to train nurses in hospice philosophy, terminal care skills, nursing care competencies, and professional reliability. Student nurses, staff nurses, and advanced practice nurses must be taught through a proper sequence, from novice to expert. Working together with patients and their families, nurses can educate and care for the physical, social and spiritual needs of terminally ill patients. Currently, problems faced in hospice palliative care education include: 1. The lack of a systematic plan focusing on hospice palliative care and terminal care in nursing schools; 2. The absence of comfort care, communications, ethics, and other relevant issues in extant education and training; 3. The limited number of institutes that currently provide in-service training; 4. The shortage of teachers proficient in both hospice care knowledge and practice; and 5. The current overdependence on traditional nursing education models, which hinders student nurse originality and delays staff nurse growth. Faced with the present issues, self-reflection, localization, and multiple teaching strategies should be the critical developmental directions of hospice palliative education. In order to improve terminal care quality, it is also important to integrate practice, education, and research in order to train more hospice palliative nurses.

  15. Factors associated with computer literacy among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Mei; Hsiao, Hui-Wen; Huang, I-Ju; Lin, I-Chun

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, many hospitals have adopted information technology (IT) to help nurses in their practice; therefore, computers have become critical instruments for nurses. Many researchers have studied what information literacy or computer competencies a nurse should possess, but less research has focused on the types of factors associated with computer literacy. The purpose of this study was to discover which variables influence the computer literacy of nurses. The questionnaire was the instrument for data collection. The respondents were 180 nurses in Taiwan. The results of this study revealed that computer experience of nurses and personal innovation in IT were both factors associated with computer literacy and computer anxiety. The findings could assist nursing managers to screen computer-literate nurses and course designers in nursing school or hospitals to add more practical trainings in courses.

  16. Workplace violence against nursing students and nurses: an Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, Nicola; Heponiemi, Tarja

    2011-06-01

    Nurses and nursing students are exposed to workplace violence. To compare the characteristics and effects of violence in nursing students and nurses in order to assess the phenomenon and take preventive action. A retrospective survey was conducted in three Italian university schools of nursing. At the end of a lecture, 346 of 349 students agreed to fill out a questionnaire that included domains on violence, mental health, job stress, and organizational justice. This group was compared with 275 nurses from a general hospital (94.2% participation rate). The prevalence of subjects reporting at least one upsetting episode of physical or verbal violence during their lifetime activity in clinical settings was 43% in nurses and 34% in nursing students. Nurses reported more physical assaults (odds ratio [OR] 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-6.18), threats (OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.39-5.79), and sexual harassment (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.15-5.54) during the previous 12 months than students. Nurses were mostly assaulted or harassed by patients or their relatives and friends ("external" violence), whereas students often reported verbal and also physical violence on the part of colleagues, staff, and others, including teachers, doctors, and supervisors ("internal" violence). Verbal violence was associated with high levels of psychological problems, as measured by the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire, in both students and nurses. Verbal violence was also associated with high job strain, low social support, and low organizational justice, but only among nursing students. Preventive action is urgently needed to control patient-to-worker and worker-to-worker violence in clinical settings. Not only nurses, but also nursing students, would benefit from multilevel programs of violence prevention. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. School's out for bullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Carol

    Homophobic bullying of school pupils has a devastating effect on students' physical, mental and emotional health. The RCN's Out group is working with Schools Out to tackle the problem. Schools Out was founded 31 years ago as the Gay Teachers' Group. Those who are bullied are at risk of mental health problems, which can lead to self-harm. A nurse--especially the school nurse--can be the first person a bullied child turns to for help.

  18. Nursing students' views of nursing education quality: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermansaravi, Fatihe; Navidian, Ali; Yaghoubinia, Fariba

    2015-01-13

    Nursing education is currently facing challenges related to the application of nursing knowledge in clinical environments and inability of students in application of nursing procedures in clinical settings. Nursing students themselves represent the best means of identifying these challenges. This study was conducted aimed to understand the nursing students' viewpoints and experiences concerning the challenges and deficiencies of the nursing education system. This qualitative study that has been carried out adopting conventional qualitative content analysis approach, 40 senior nursing students with sufficient experience of educational situations participated through purposive sampling. Eight focus group discussions were done with volunteer nursing students from School of Nursing and Midwifery in Zahedan (Iran). All of the interviews and discussions were recorded and then analyzed using the conventional content analysis approach. Three themes were emerged from data analysis including theoretical education, clinical skills, and the gap between theoretical education and clinical skills. The students' views and experiences of nursing education quality (theoretical, clinical, and the gap between theoretical education and clinical skills) demonstrated a need to pay careful attention to the selection and recruitment of clinical teachers, and the assessment and control of their educational performance and clinical skills, as well as to determination of standards and validation of education quality.

  19. Unlicensed Assistive Personnel: Their Role on the School Health Services Team. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kathleen C.; Disney, Jody; Andresen, Kathleen; Tuck, Christine; Porter, Jessica; Bobo, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that, where laws permit, unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) can have valuable and necessary roles as assistants to school nurses. It is the professional responsibility of the registered professional school nurse (herein after referred to as school nurse) to identify UAP in…

  20. Attributes of a good nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin Er, Rahime; Sehiralti, Mine; Akpinar, Aslihan

    2017-03-01

    The opinions of students regarding the attributes of a good nurse can make a major contribution to the planning and the conducting of professional education. There are few studies which aim at identifying the qualifications of a good nurse from the perspectives of nursing students. To determine the opinions of first- and fourth-year nursing students concerning the 'attributes of a good nurse', and whether and how their views change depending on their year of study. Descriptive research. Participants and research context: This study was conducted in the nursing department of a vocational school of health in the 2010/2011 academic year. The study participants consisted of first-year and intern students. A survey form was used to identify characteristics of participants, and students were asked the following open-ended question about their opinions related to the attributes of a good nurse. Ethical considerations: The permission was taken from the school administration. Informed consent was obtained, and anonymity was ensured for participating students. A total of 120 students participated in this study. Most frequently expressed attributes were 'professional competence' in first-year and 'responsibility' in fourth-year students. While first-year students placed a greater emphasis on the attributes of 'geniality', 'patience', 'calmness', 'love of nursing', 'loyalty to nursing' and 'not attaching importance to material values', fourth-year students emphasized the attributes of 'empathy', 'honesty', 'responsibility' and 'scientific curiosity' significantly more. Fourth-year students placed a greater emphasis on the attributes which the students are expected to acquire through a nursing program and clinical experience. However, they mentioned the attributes related to a good nurse-patient relationship and communication significantly less. Appropriate ethical training methods and good role models can help students acquire attributes that are important for the nursing

  1. Through the Looking Glass: The Labor Market for Registered Nurses in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Carol S.

    1997-01-01

    Demand for registered nurses is changing in a managed care environment and wages are likely to decrease. These trends will affect nursing school enrollments, and schools will need to monitor market conditions and adjust policies accordingly. (SK)

  2. Nurses who work outside nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Pallas, Linda O'Brien; Aitken, Leanne M

    2004-09-01

    The desire to care for people, a family history of professional health care work, and security in career choice are documented reasons for entering nursing. Reasons for leaving include workload, unsafe work environments and harassment. The relationship between these factors and the time nurses spend in the profession has not been explored. This paper reports a study with people who have left nursing, to investigate why they became a nurse, how long they stayed in nursing, and their reasons for leaving. A questionnaire was mailed to Registered Nurses currently working outside nursing, seeking respondents' reasons for entering and leaving nursing, and perceptions of the skills gained from nursing and the ease of adjustment to working in a non-nursing environment. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, correlational analysis and linear and multiple regression analysis. A model incorporating the factors 'altruistic reasons', 'default choice' and 'stepping stone' explained 36.2% of the variance in reasons for becoming a nurse. A model incorporating the factors 'legal and employer', 'external values and beliefs about nursing', 'professional practice', 'work life/home life' and 'contract requirements' explained 55.4% of the variance in reasons for leaving nursing. Forty-eight per cent of the variance in tenure in nursing practice was explained through personal characteristics of nurses (36%), reasons for becoming a nurse (7%) and reasons for leaving (6%). The reasons why nurses entered or left the profession were varied and complex. While personal characteristics accounted for a large component of tenure in nursing, those managing the nursing workforce should consider professional practice issues and the balance between work life and home life.

  3. A Multiple Case Study of Associate Degree Nursing Student Experiences on NCLEXRN Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Soosannamma

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge in the nursing education system is to assist nursing students to be successful in the program and on the National Council of Licensing Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). Nursing schools have a critical responsibility for contributing to the nation's need for more qualified nurses in order to reduce the impact of the…

  4. Duties and performance of academic advisors from the view of students of Tabriz School of Nursing and Midwifery in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jebreili

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Support , advice and guidance of students during of study are one of the most important responsibilities of universities. They are responsible to solve students' problem about this matter. Thus, this study has been designed to determine the students' view about of the Duties and Performance of Academic advisors. Methods: This study which is a descriptive- analytical study. Is performed on 250 nursing and midwifery and operation room students selected using by census method. In order to analysis of finding, Questionnaire has been used to determine the students' view of the duties and performance of academic advisors. SPSS 1 7 software and descriptive - inferential statistic has been used to analysis of finding. Results : The findings showed that, more than half of students were agree with academic advisors duties. From students' view "offering advice in terms of job and education" and "assessing the current academic status of students" were as main tasks of academic advisors. "Advisor' consult with other experts about the current problems" and the "introduction of relevant units to meet the needs of students" were the weakest cases of performance of academic advisors. And performance of academic advisors was good in students’ view about 31.6 percent. Conclusion: In this study views of students are well suited to the tasks of academic advisors. This issue indicated that, there is an appropriate potential to promote students consulting. According to the results on the performance of academic advisors need to make fundamental changes in the process of Supervisors is academic counseling

  5. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea.

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    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses.

  6. Current Status of Nursing Informatics Education in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eunjoo; Kim, Jeongeun; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jungha; Jin, Meiling; Ahn, Shinae; Jun, Jooyeon; Song, Healim; On, Jeongah; Jung, Hyesil; Hong, Yeong Joo; Yim, Suran

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study presents the current status of nursing informatics education, the content covered in nursing informatics courses, the faculty efficacy, and the barriers to and additional supports for teaching nursing informatics in Korea. Methods A set of questionnaires consisting of an 18-item questionnaire for nursing informatics education, a 6-item questionnaire for faculty efficacy, and 2 open-ended questions for barriers and additional supports were sent to 204 nursing schools via email and the postal service. Nursing schools offering nursing informatics were further asked to send their syllabuses. The subjects taught were analyzed using nursing informatics competency categories and other responses were tailed using descriptive statistics. Results A total of 72 schools (35.3%) responded to the survey, of which 38 reported that they offered nursing informatics courses in their undergraduate nursing programs. Nursing informatics courses at 11 schools were taught by a professor with a degree majoring in nursing informatics. Computer technology was the most frequently taught subject (27 schools), followed by information systems used for practice (25 schools). The faculty efficacy was 3.76 ± 0.86 (out of 5). The most frequently reported barrier to teaching nursing informatics (n = 9) was lack of awareness of the importance of nursing informatics. Training and educational opportunities was the most requested additional support. Conclusions Nursing informatics education has increased during the last decade in Korea. However, the proportions of faculty with degrees in nursing informatics and number of schools offering nursing informatics courses have not increased much. Thus, a greater focus is needed on training faculty and developing the courses. PMID:27200224

  7. Addressing Parental Vaccination Questions in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, Karlen E.; Burningham, Jana; Eden, Lacey M.; Macintosh, Janelle L. B.; Beckstrand, Renea L.

    2016-01-01

    School nurses work in a unique environment with key opportunities to address parental concerns and questions regarding their child's health. A common concern for parents during school enrollment is childhood vaccination safety and efficacy. As public health leaders, school nurses are well respected among parents, therefore school nurses are in a…

  8. [The Role of Nursing Education in the Advancement of the Nursing Profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Yeh, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The present article discusses the role of nursing education in the advancement of the nursing profession in the context of the three facets of knowledge: generation, dissemination, and application. Nursing is an applied science and the application of knowledge in practice is the ultimate goal of the nursing profession. The reform of the healthcare delivery model requires that nurses acquire and utilize evidence-based clinical knowledge, critical thinking, effective communication, and team collaboration skills in order to ensure the quality of patient care and safety. Therefore, baccalaureate education has become the minimal requirement for pre-licensure nursing education. Schools of nursing are responsible to cultivate competent nurses to respond to the demands on the nursing workforce from the healthcare system. Attaining a master's education in nursing helps cultivate Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) to further expand the roles and functions of the nursing profession in order to promote the quality of care in clinical practice. Nursing faculty and scholars of higher education institutions generate nursing knowledge and develop professional scholarship through research. Attaining a doctoral education in nursing cultivates faculties and scholars who will continually generate and disseminate nursing knowledge into the future.

  9. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: Uppers and Downers: The Approach to the Student With Altered Mental Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Kelly; Brady, Jodi; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-11-01

    Although a student presenting with altered mental status due to substance use may occur infrequently in the school setting, it is of utmost importance to develop a differential diagnosis and to initiate stabilization of the student. This article describes the initial assessment and management of a student presenting with altered mental status, focusing on the differential diagnosis of altered mental status, on the varying presentations associated with common intoxications and ingestions, and on the screening tools available for the detection of depression and substance use.

  10. [Physical improvements and rising motivation following the "school style" technique in the residents of a nursing home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Kozue; Goto, Shinichi; Tanenaga, Satoshi; Koyama, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    After five years of using our unique "school style" technique, we were able to increase the number of home discharges and decrease the number of days spent in the facility. In order to identify the factors underlying these results, a survey was conducted regarding changes of the physical and cognitive function while in the facility. The subjects included 41 patients who newly began using our facility. All subjects participated in both group and individual programs and were evaluated using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Frontal Assessment Battery at the bedside (FAB), Vitality Index and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) determined monthly starting the first day of entry into our facility. We compared the results using the Friedman test. The rate of participation in the group program was 81.9%. The average duration of participation in functional training as an individual program was 5.94 days, while that for Kumon learning therapy was 3.27 days. Effective improvements were noted in all four evaluation measurements: MMSE・FAB・Vitality Index・FIM. Improvements in the physical and cognitive function were obtained despite the status of the subjects as elderly individuals with chronic disease. Against this background, we applied interventions with rehabilitation using an intensive program for individuals and noted a pleasant experience during all activities in our unique "school style" protocol, which seeks to improve the subject's motivation. These factors are therefore important for improving the physical and cognitive function.

  11. Anger, aggression and violence in healthcare : material for nursing education

    OpenAIRE

    Hurskainen, Tanja; Katainen, Minni

    2015-01-01

    Anger can be found everywhere in our societies – homes, schools, workplaces, roads, shops, media, airplanes, places of worship, hospitals, and the list could be endless. These days anger and its expression also represent a significant problem in health care settings. As the nursing workplace settings expand constantly to a wider area, the anger is encountered between many groups. It is commonly expressed from patients to nurses, nurses to other nurses, family members to nurses, physicians to ...

  12. Nurses struggle to help pupils with long-term conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Chris

    2016-10-07

    Most school nurses are not confident they can give essential support to pupils with long-term health conditions. Research by the National Children's Bureau found that, due to heavy workloads and the need to work across several schools, nine out of ten school nurses were less confident they can help children with conditions such as diabetes and asthma.

  13. Pediatric nurse educator shortage: implications for the nursing care of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Barbara J; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Rose, Diane; Christy, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Maternal and child health (MCH) nurses are vital to caring for the nation's infants, children, and adolescents. A shortage of pediatric nursing educators has important consequences for the preparation of the next generation of MCH nurses. A Web-based survey of administrators and pediatric nursing faculty from U.S. schools of nursing with baccalaureate and advanced degree programs was conducted to assess perceptions of a pediatric nursing faculty shortage, and implications and solutions to such a shortage. Deans (n = 191) and pediatric faculty (n = 237) from schools of nursing responded to the survey. Institutions are representative of the 660 schools of nursing across the United States. Fifty percent of deans and 70% of pediatric nursing faculty members reported a shortage of pediatric nursing faculty. Large, public institutions (total school student enrollment over 15,000) expressed the most concern. The educational impact of the reported shortage included increased faculty workload, difficulty getting appropriate clinical practice settings, elimination of acute care clinical experiences, and reduction in pediatric content in curricula. Expected retirements of the current workforce (76% were over 45 years of age) without an increase in replacements will deepen the shortage in the coming decade. Pediatric faculty members focused on the need for competitive salaries (particularly compared to clinical salaries) and active mentoring programs as important factors in recruitment and retention of new faculty. Recommendations for stemming the decline in availability of pediatric nursing faculty are provided.

  14. Gerontological Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Tyra J. Withers

    2017-01-01

    The core idea of this literature is to explain a summarized point of view regarding the gerontological nursing and its present condition in our society. The literature will explain the clear definition and at the same time will point out the core ideas that can help the administrators to increase the interest of nursing students in gerontological nursing

  15. Empowerment and mentoring in nursing academia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mina D; Pilkington, F Beryl; Patrick, Linda

    2014-05-30

    In 2011, there was an expected shortage of 200 full-time faculty. While there are an estimated 322 graduate students in Nurse Practitioner and Masters/PhD programs in Canada today, the supply of potential new faculty falls short of the anticipated demand in the years ahead (Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing). This mixed method study explored how organizational culture and the perceived level of psychological and structural empowerment are associated with one's work environment among Canadian nursing faculty and to explore the state of mentorship in schools of nursing.

  16. Gerontology course in the nursing undergraduate curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira AlSenany

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explores nursing faculty members’ attitudes towards older people, their thoughts about gerontological nursing education. Method Five focus groups and a survey were used with nursing faculty members 132 at the three nursing schools to explore their attitudes towards the care of older people and the perceived status of gerontological nursing education. The survey was given to 132 faculty members, including 76 clinical instructors, 40 associate professors and 16 professors. The nursing faculty in general had a positive attitude toward older people (M=3.36, SD 0.25, and teachers’ attitudes were higher than those of their nursing students (M=3.18, SD0.29. Results This study results suggests that Saudi nursing curricula should include more extensive gerontology content and clinical experience with older people. Conclusion This is the first time in Saudi Arabia that research has listened to their voices and examined their commitments toward gerontology education.

  17. Attitudes toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration in Pediatric Workers and Undergraduate Medical/Nursing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of pediatric workers and undergraduate medical/nursing students toward collaboration. Attitude toward collaboration was measured using an adaptation of the Jefferson Scale of Attitude toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration. The 656 questionnaires were gathered from pediatrician, pediatric interns, and medical students (PIS and pediatric nurses, nursing interns, and nursing students (NIS. Results showed a statistically significant difference in the total mean scores in attitudes towards collaboration with NIS scoring higher. Among the participants of PIS, the pediatricians obtained the highest mean scores, while, among the participants of NIS, the pediatric nurses got higher mean scores than nursing interns. It is desirable that medical and nurse schools should include interprofessional education in their curriculum to increase the understanding of the complementary roles of physicians and nurses and to encourage establishment of an interdependent relationship between them.

  18. Teaching transcultural nursing in a transcultural setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S S; Burkhalter, N C

    1996-01-01

    The application of Leininger's Theory of Culture Care Diversity and Universality to the dialogue between students and faculty regarding nursing education and practice provides the theoretical framework for evaluating a transcultural nursing curriculum in a transcultural, transnational setting on the Texas-Mexico border. In evaluating the first semester of this cultural encounter between the nurse-patient-community system and baccalaureate nursing education, faculty and students at Texas A&M International University School of Nursing in Laredo identified some particular challenges and assessed the effectiveness of approaches to meeting these challenges within the context of Leininger's Culture Care Theory and its three modes of action: culture care preservation, accommodation, and repatterning.

  19. Nutrition for Nurses: Nursing 245.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Karen R.

    A description is presented of "Nutrition for Nurses," a prerequisite course for students anticipating entrance into the junior level of a state university registered nursing program. Introductory material highlights the course focus (i.e., the basics of good nutrition; nutrition through the life cycle; nursing process in nutritional care; and…

  20. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for kids. Nurse practitioners (also referred to as advanced practice nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification in their specialty. For example, a pediatric NP has advanced education, skills, and training in caring for infants, ...