WorldWideScience

Sample records for schools nursery

  1. Nursery School

    CERN Multimedia

    Nursery School

    2016-01-01

    Enrolments 2016-2017 Enrolments for the school year 2016-2017 to the Nursery, the Nursery school and the school will take place on 7, 8 and 9 March 2016 from 8 to 10 am at the Nursery School. Registration forms will be available from Thursday 3rd March. More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/.

  2. Nursery School

    CERN Multimedia

    Jardin d'enfant

    2012-01-01

      Enrollments 2012-2013  Monday 5, Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 March From 8.00 to 10.00 at the Nursery School  Registration forms will be available from 2nd March onwards: – At the Nursery School, from Catherine Regelbrugge, Secretary   Catherine.Regelbrugge@cern.ch, tel : 73604. – At the Nursery School, from Brigitte Pillionnel, Headmistress    Brigitte.Pillionnel@cern.ch, tel : 77925. – On the pages of the Nursery School website    http://kindergarten.web.cern.ch/kindergarten/docs/cond%20gales%2012-2013%20EN.pdf

  3. Nursery school

    CERN Multimedia

    Jardin d'enfants

    2010-01-01

    * * * * * Enrollments 2010-2011 Monday 8, Tuesday 9 and Wednesday 10 March From 8:00 to 10:00 at the Nursery School   Registration forms will be available from 5th March onwards: At the Nursery School, from Catherine Regelbrugge, Secretary tel: 73604, Catherine.Regelbrugge@cern.ch At the Nursery School, from Brigitte Pillionnel, Headmistress tel: 77925, Brigitte.Pillionnel@cern.ch On the pages of the Nursery School website http://kindergarten.web.cern.ch/kindergarten/docs/cond%20gales%2010-2011%20EN.pdf  

  4. Nursery School

    CERN Multimedia

    Nursery School

    2015-01-01

    Enrolments 2015-2016 Enrolments for the school year 2015-2016 to the Nursery, the Nursery school and the school will take place on: Monday 2, Tuesday 3 and Thursday 4 March 2015 More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/

  5. Nursery School

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Registration of school year of 2014-2015 at the Nursery school of Cern Staff Association     Dear parents, We would like to inform you that the dates of enrolments will be 3, 4 and 5th March 2014 from 8:00 a.m to 10:00 a.m at the nursery school Bulding 562. Reminder : From 0-2 years, your child goes to the nursery, from 2-4 to the kindergarten, and from 4 years onwards, your child will join the school, following the program of first and second year of primary school (première and deuxième primaire in the Swiss system), which corresponds to the moyenne and grande section in France.

  6. Nursery school

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Nursery school was founded in 1961 in Meyrin, before it found a new home on the CERN site in 1965. It expanded from a “garderie” in the morning-only with 30 children, to the Crèche/Kindergarten/School with 147 children and 42 staff we have today. Every year the Nursery school makes an art exhibition in the main building. In 2000 the theme was “Monet’s garden” and it was complete, not even the little bridge was missing! This year, the theme of the exhibition was transport. We could see a garbage truck, a train, and much more.

  7. Nursery School - ENROLMENTS 2011-2012

    CERN Multimedia

    Jardin d'enfants

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 8, Wednesday 9 and Thursday 10 March From 8.00 to 10.00 at the Nursery School Registration forms available from 4th March onwards: At the Nursery School, from Catherine Regelbrugge, Secretary, tel: 73604, Catherine.Regelbrugge@cern.ch At the Nursery School, from Brigitte Pillionnel, Headmistress, tel: 77925, Brigitte.Pillionnel@cern.ch On the pages of the Nursery School website

  8. Nursery School - Enrollments 2011-2012

    CERN Multimedia

    Jardin d'Enfants

    2011-01-01

    Tuesday 8, Wednesday 9 and Thursday 10 March From 8.00 to 10.00 at the Nursery School Registration forms will be available from 4th March onwards: At the Nursery School, from Catherine Regelbrugge, Secretary tel: 73604, Catherine.Regelbrugge@cern.ch    At the Nursery School, from Brigitte Pillionnel, Headmistress tel:77925, Brigitte.Pillionnel@cern.ch    On the pages of the Nursery School website

  9. [Sound levels in nursery schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysel-Gosepath, K; Pape, H G; Erren, T; Thinschmidt, M; Lehmacher, W; Piekarski, C

    2010-10-01

    Children and teenagers often suffer from hearing loss because of exposure to sound levels above 100 dB generated by toys, portable music players and stereo equipment in discotheques. Even in nursery schools and schools, considerable noise levels are produced by children's voices. Sound levels were measured in a nursery school in Cologne in four different rooms, each with 22 children aged between 3 and 6 years and two teachers. Sound dosimeters detected sound levels in each room for 5 days of the week. These were positioned in the room above the playing children as well as near the teachers' ears. The same measurements were repeated after the children had been instructed about noise and possible noise damage. In addition, the children were now able watch the "noise lights", an instrument resembling traffic lights which translated the sound levels actually measured in their room into optical signals. A questionnaire containing 13 questions about noise and sensitivity to noise was distributed to 35 teachers at nursery schools in the Cologne municipal area. Mean sound levels of an 8-h/day measuring period (L(eq)) were 80.1 ± 2.3 dB(A) near the ear of the teacher and 70.87 ± 2.5 dB(A) measured in the room. The maximal sound level for 1 s, L(max) dB(A), was 112.55 ± 2.3 dB(A) near the ear and 103.77 ± 8.1 dB(A) in the room. After the children had learned about noise and were able to check the sound level they produced with the help of the "noise lights", a tendency towards a reduction of sound levels in the room and near the teachers' ears could be seen. An evaluation of the questionnaire revealed the high physical strain and emotional stress the teachers were subjected to due to noise. Children and teachers in nursery schools are subjected to high sound levels. Therefore, the education and early sensitization of children to noise in order to prevent prospective hearing damage, e.g. using the "noise light", should be set as a goal. Soundproofing measures are also

  10. Nursery School Headteacher Leadership Behaviour Correlates of Nursery School Teachers Job Satisfaction in Akoko North, Ondo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clara, Okoroafor Nnenna

    2016-01-01

    The present study focuses on nursery school head teacher leadership behaviour as it correlates to nursery school teacher's job satisfaction. Data were collected through a scale and returned by sample of two hundred and fifty nursery school teacher's in Akoko North, Ondo State, Nigeria.Data collected were analyzed using mean and standard deviation…

  11. A canteen for the Nursery School A project for CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    For a number of years a minimum service has been offered at lunchtime between 12.15 and 13.30 for children enrolled for the full day at the CERN Nursery School. This service is provided by qualified staff at the Nursery School, on the premises, the meals being supplied by the parents.

  12. Bacteriological Evaluation of Water Bottles Used by Nursery School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriological evaluation of water bottles used by nursery school pupils in Owerri metropolis was carried out. Eleven bacterial genera were isolated from the water bottle samples. These included Bacillus, E. coli, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Micrococcus, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, Shigella and ...

  13. Dietary patterns and dental caries in nursery school children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary patterns and dental caries in nursery school children in Nairobi, Kenya. E. M. Ngatia, J. K. Imungi, J. W. G Muita, P. M. Ng'ang'a. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal, 2001: 78 (12): 673-677). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  14. Caries experience in the primary dentition of nursery school children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To measure the prevalence and pattern of distribution of dental caries in suburban Nigerian children attending nursery school in Ile – Ife, Nigeria. Methods: A cross sectional survey of 423 children (225 boys, 198 girls) aged 3 – 6 years using dmft index. WHO recommendations for oral health survey were used for ...

  15. [Hearing screening at nursery schools: results of an evaluation study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichbold, Viktor; Rohrer, Monika; Winkler, Cornelia; Welzl-Müller, Kunigunde

    2004-07-31

    This study aimed to evaluate the hearing screening of pre-school children at nursery schools in Tyrol, Austria. 47 nursery schools with a total of 2199 enrolled children participated in the study. At the screening, the children were presented a series of tones at frequencies 0.5 kHz (25dB), 1 kHz, 2 kHz, 3 kHz, and 4 kHz (20 dB each) from portable audiometers. The tones were presented over headphones for each ear separately and at irregular intervals. Failure to respond to any of the frequencies was considered failure of the screening. Parents were then advised in written form to have the child examined by an ENT-specialist. 1832 individuals were screened (coverage: 83% of nursery school children; corresponding to at least 63% of all Tyrolean children aged 3 to 5 years). Of these, 390 failed the test (referral rate: 21% of all screened). Examination through an ENT-specialist occurred with 217 children, and this confirmed the positive test in 139 children (hit rate: 64%). In most cases, a temporary conductive hearing loss due to external or middle ear problems (glue ear, tube dysfunction, cerumen, otitis media) was diagnosed. A sensorineural hearing loss was found in 4 children (in 3 of them bilateral). The need for therapy was recognized in 81 children (4% of all screened). Pre-school hearing screening identifies children with ear and hearing problems that need therapeutical intervention. Although the hearing problems are mostly of a temporary nature, some may require monitoring over some period. Also some children with permanent sensorineural hearing loss may be detected through this measure. Hearing screening is an efficient means of assessing ear and hearing problems in pre-school children. However, the follow-up rate needs to be improved for optimizing the efficacy.

  16. An Examination of the Role of Nursery Education on Primary School Pupils in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniwon, H. O. Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the role of Nursery education among primary school pupils. The sole objective of the study was to find out the differences in academic achievement between primary school pupils who received nursery education and those who did not. Descriptive survey research design was adopted to achieve the study objective. Consequently, 20…

  17. French Nursery Schools and German Kindergartens: Effects of Individual and Contextual Variables on Early Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazouti, Youssef; Viriot-Goeldel, Caroline; Matter, Cornelie; Geiger-Jaillet, Anemone; Carol, Rita; Deviterne, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    The present article investigates the effects of individual and contextual variables on children's early learning in French nursery schools and German kindergartens. Our study of 552 children at preschools in France (299 children from French nursery schools) and Germany (253 children from German kindergartens) measured skills that facilitate the…

  18. Thoughts from Sweden: The Blind Child at Nursery School with Sighted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisler, Gunilla; Palmer, Christina

    1989-01-01

    Blind children in Sweden are integrated with sighted children in nursery school from the age of two-three years. This paper describes the child's transition to the nursery school environment, play activities, parents' and teachers' reactions to the blind child's behavior, and use of videorecordings to provide feedback to teachers. (JDD)

  19. Obesity in Nursery School Children in Corum, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akca, Selen Ozakar; Uysal, Gulzade; Aysegul Buyukgonenc, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Background Regular body mass index (BMI) screenings in schools is important to ensure that 3- to 6-year-old children are not negatively affected by obesity in terms of their current and future health. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the overweight and obesity results of 3- to 6-year-old children and to guide children and their family in making healthier dietary choices by informing them. Methods This analytical-descriptive study was conducted in Corum, Turkey, in the year 2011. The study’s sample consisted of all available 3- to 6-year-old children entering nursery school (specifically, the Buharaevler, Karsıyaka, Nasrettin Hoca, Ulukavak, Mimar Sinan, and Sevgi nursery schools). Findings from the study were statistically analyzed using the SPSS 15.0 program. The Chi-square test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) program were used in the comparison of study data. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results It was determined that 9.5% of the participating female children and 5.2% of the male children were underweight and that the boys were more obese than the girls in general. The correlation between the child’s gender and their BMI was not found to be statistically significant (P-value > 0.05). The overweight frequency of the children was 12.1%, and the obesity frequency was 14.3%. Furthermore, it was determined that the obesity rates of the children increased with their age. Accordingly, the correlation between the child’s age and BMI was found to be statistically significant (P-value < 0.05). Conclusions An approach to preventing obesity must not be enacted only in health centers. Schools should also offer information and resources for families in order to prevent obesity in children. PMID:28180017

  20. Relationship between institutional food service in Nursery Schools and Household feeding with the nutritional status of preschool children attending two Nursery Schools in Valparaiso, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta Crovetto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity in children under 6 years of age, who attend Nursery Schools belonging to INTEGRA Foundation (Chile, may be associated with the diet received at school, their home or both. Objectives: To determine if there is a relationship between children’s dietary patterns and their nutritional status. Material and Methods: A descriptive, associative, cross-sectional method was used. Sample (n=33 was children 4 and 5 years old from two Nursery Schools from Valparaiso. It was assessed: i energy intake provided by nursery school and household’s diets, according to the recommendations of the Chilean dietary guidelines and ii nutritional status, W/A; W/H; H/A; body mass index, growth charts for children under 6 years of age, World Health Organization (Standards of the National Chilean Health Program for Children. Fisher’s exact test was used in order to associate food consumption patterns with nutritional status. Results: Nursery school provided the expected caloric contribution, while household provided 67% over the expected percentage (354 additional kcal per capita/day. From 21.2% to 27% of the children were overweight (W/H and BMI. Children with food consumption pattern 1 had normal nutritional status. Those with pattern 2 presented a 50% of malnutrition related to overconsumption. Fisher’s exact test was p=0.001. Conclusions: There is an association between dietary pattern and nutritional status of preschool children attending two INTEGRA Nursery Schools. This study is limited due to sample size.

  1. Evaluation of an oral health promotion program after one year of implementation in a nursery school

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tubert-Jeannin, Stéphanie; Lecuyer, Marie-Maxence; Manevy, Rachel; Pegon-machat, Estelle; Decroix, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    An oral health promotion programme and study are currently being carried out in 9 nursery schools with children at high risk for cavities located in the deprived neighbourhoods of the city of Clermont-Ferrand (France...

  2. [Stress and Burnout Risk in Nursery School Teachers: Results from a Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, J; Ehlen, S

    2015-06-01

    This article presents results from a study of 834 nursery school teachers in Germany, investigating working conditions, stress, and stress-related health problems. In order to evaluate the extent of mental and psychosomatic troubles, as well as the risk of burnout, we used the standardised questionnaire "Burnout Screening Scales" (BOSS I). Data analysis yielded a high percentage of nursery school teachers who reported a remarkably high stress level; nearly 20% can be considered as a high-risk group for burnout. Poor staff conditions in many nurseries turned out to be the crucial stress source, along with large groups, insufficient teacher-child ratio, time pressure and multitasking. In the concluding discussion of the study results, we consider possible measures to reduce stress and to improve working conditions for nursery school teachers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Let’s focus on our Nursery school!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    In the 241st issue of Echo, the Staff Association shared its concerns about the future of the CERN Nursery school. Indeed, the EVEE ‘Espace de vie Enfantine et École’ has faced significant financial difficulties in the last few years. According to an audit carried out in 2015, overall the management is sound, but the report shows that the potential gains are not sufficient to restore budgetary balance. Naturally, the EVEE is turning to CERN in order for the Organization to increase its commitment to ensure the sustainability of this structure which is crucial for the lives of many CERN families. To this end, a joint working group has been set up by Martin Steinacher, Director for Finance and Human Resources, who has given the mandate (see below) and established the composition of the group. This joint working group being technical in nature, it will also be necessary to hold political discussions between the Staff Association and the Management. An internal working group of t...

  4. "I Have F-rien-d Now": How Play Helped Two Minority Children Transition into an English Nursery School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengling; Adams, Leah D.

    2010-01-01

    Nursery schools in the United Kingdom have increasingly diverse populations, in part, because of newly arrived migrants from within and outside of the European Union. This article aims to explore the role of play in helping newly arrived children with minority ethic backgrounds to gain positive learning experiences in a nursery school setting in…

  5. An Investigation of Emotional Skills of Six-Year-Old Children Attending Nursery School According to Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmusoglu-Saltali, Neslihan; Arslan, Emel

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is for the emotional skills of six-year-old children attending nursery school according to some variables. The participants were 306 (135 girls and 171 boys) six-year-old children attending nursery school. Data were collected from Assessment of Children's Emotional Skills and personal information form. In order to analyze…

  6. Examining the Effect of Social Values Education Program Being Applied to Nursery School Students upon Acquiring Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapsaglam, Özkan; Ömeroglu, Esra

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted in an attempt to develop Social Values Education Program aimed at nursery school students and examine the effect of Social Values Education Program upon the social skill acquisition of nursery school students. The effect of the education program that was developed within the scope of the study upon the social skill…

  7. [Health recommendations for nursery schools (day care centers)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de Aledo Linos, A; Bonilla Miera, C

    1989-05-01

    A review is made of the health and sanitary conditions, preventive pediatrics, infraestructure, staff and material support as well as safety measures that should be available in day nurseries (creche). This review is made bearing in mind the absence of legislation on a national level to regulate this matters.

  8. Assessment of the BTEX concentrations and health risk in urban nursery schools in Gliwice, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Mainka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Indoor air quality (IAQ in nursery school is believed to be different from elementary school. Moreover, younger children are more vulnerable to air pollution than higher grade children because they spend more time indoors, and their immune systems and bodies are less mature. The purpose of this study was to compare the concentrations of the monoaromatic volatile benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene m,p-xylene and o-xylene (BTEX in urban nursery schools located in Gliwice, Poland. The nursery schools were chosen to include areas with different urbanization and traffic density characteristics in order to gather a more diverse picture of exposure risks in the various regions of the city. BTEX were sampled during winter and spring seasons in older and younger children classrooms. The samples were thermally desorbed (TD and then analyzed with use of gas chromatography (GC. In addition, outdoor measurements were carried out in the playground at each nursery school. BTEX quantification, indoor/outdoor concentration, and correlation coefficients were used to identify pollutant sources. Elevated levels of o-xylene and ethylbenzene were found in all monitored classrooms during the winter season. Outdoor concentrations were lower than indoors for each classroom. Indicators based on health risk assessment for chronic health effects associated with carcinogenic benzene or non-carcinogenic BTEX were proposed to rank sites according to their hazard level.

  9. Exploring Letters in a Bimodal, Bilingual Nursery School with Deaf and Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    For young deaf children a co-enrolment setting with hearing children in nursery school is recognised as a useful provision for inclusive education. The aim of the study reported in this article was to gain knowledge about pathways into literacy for young deaf children in a co-enrolment setting. The questions raised in this article are: How are…

  10. Interaccion adulto-nino en la escuela infantil (Adult-Child Interaction in Nursery School).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined teacher-child interactions in 2 nursery schools in Barcelona, Spain, when the children (15 2-year olds and 15 4-year olds) were alone or in a group, observing a group in which they were a member, and not part of a group. For these conditions, compared differences in age, gender, and the forms of verbal and nonverbal communication used.…

  11. The Contribution of Verbal Descriptions to Visual Memory in Nursery-School Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lee R.

    Giving names for pictures of familiar objects to nursery school children improves their later recognition of those pictures. This improvement occurs even though the children can easily name the pictures when asked. The present research eliminated the sufficiency of several possible explanations. The names might have provided a response to rehearse…

  12. Assessment of the Psychosocial Development of Children Attending Nursery Schools in Karen Refugee Camps in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akiko

    2013-01-01

    The Karen, an ethnic minority group in Burma, have experienced a prolonged state of exile in refugee camps in neighboring Thailand because of ethnic conflict in their home country. Nursery schools in the three largest Karen refugee camps aim to promote the psychosocial development of young children by providing a child-centered, creative,…

  13. Playful and Creative ICT Pedagogical Framing: A Nursery School Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Holmes, Guy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a one-year qualitative study in which a nursery school used information and communication technology (ICT) and a digital media consultant as a catalyst for cultural change leading to teachers' improved pedagogical framing and children's enhanced learning dispositions. The pedagogic framing included the…

  14. Issues in the Development of Children's Centres on Nursery and Primary School Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jane; Finnegan, Cathy; West, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the development of children's centres in England between 2004 and 2008, focusing on the newly created centres that have been located on primary and nursery school sites. Using both an analysis of policy documents and interview data from three urban local authorities, we examine the use of premises and the differing priorities…

  15. Combining Technical Competence and Stakeholder Impact in Environmental Education: The Gambia All Schools Nursery Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulete, Francisca E.; Orr, Blair

    2010-01-01

    Under the guidance of the Department of Forestry, the Regional Education Directorate, and Peace Corps/The Gambia, the Gambia All Schools Tree Nursery Competition, an environmental education program, was developed to introduce practical environmental education in The Gambia. Data for this report were collected using a rapid appraisal approach.…

  16. An Early Start: WPA Emergency Nursery Schools in Texas, 1934-1943

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlbaw, Lynn Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This paper begins with an overview of the location and types of nursery schools reported to be operating in Texas between 1934 and 1943. The author reports on the results of the analysis of the photographs used in this study. The analysis is supported and contextualized by the use of references from federal documents and other publications…

  17. Nursery Schools for the Few or the Many? Childhood, Education and the State in Mid-Twentieth-Century England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Prior to the outbreak of the Second World War, successive presidents and officials at the Board of Education made it clear that they believed there were three types of children in Britain--those who needed nursery schools to rescue them from degradation, those for whom a less expensive nursery class would do the job adequately and those who would…

  18. Lady Astor's Campaign for Nursery Schools in Britain, 1930-1939: Attempting to Valorize Cultural Capital in a Male-Dominated Political Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehony, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the work of Lady Nancy Astor (1879-1964) in campaigning for nursery education and nursery schools in Britain from the late 1920s until the Second World War. Arguably no elected politician in England at any time, including the present, has identified themselves more closely with the cause of nursery schooling in Britain.…

  19. Administration of the adrenaline auto-injector at the nursery/kindergarten/school in Western Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korematsu, Seigo; Fujitaka, Michiko; Ogata, Mika; Zaitsu, Masafumi; Motomura, Chikako; Kuzume, Kazuyo; Toku, Yuchiro; Ikeda, Masanori; Odajima, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In view of the increasing prevalence of food allergies, there has been an associated increase in frequency of situations requiring an emergency response for anaphylaxis at the home, childcare facilities and educational institutions. To clarify the situation of adrenaline auto-injector administration in nursery/kindergarten/school, we carried out a questionnaire survey on pediatric physicians in Western Japan. In 2015, self-reported questionnaires were mailed to 421 physicians who are members of the West Japan Research Society Pediatric Clinical Allergy and Shikoku Research Society Pediatric Clinical Allergy. The response rate was 44% (185 physicians) where 160 physicians had a prescription registration for the adrenaline auto-injector. In the past year, 1,330 patients were prescribed the adrenaline auto-injector where 83 patients (6% of the prescribed patients) actually administered the adrenaline auto-injector, of which 14 patients (17% of the administered patients) self-administered the adrenaline auto-injector. "Guardians" at the nursery/kindergarten and elementary school were found to have administered the adrenaline auto-injector the most. Among 117 adrenaline auto-injector prescription-registered physicians, 79% had experienced nonadministration of adrenaline auto-injector at nursery/kindergarten/school when anaphylaxis has occurred. The most frequent reason cited for not administering the adrenaline auto-injector was "hesitation about the timing of administration." If the adrenaline auto-injector was administered after the guardian arrived at the nursery/kindergarten/school, it may lead to delayed treatment of anaphylaxis in which symptoms develop in minutes. Education and cooperation among physicians and nursery/kindergarten/school staff will reduce the number of children suffering unfortunate outcomes due to anaphylaxis.

  20. Administration of the adrenaline auto-injector at the nursery/kindergarten/school in Western Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Korematsu, Seigo; Fujitaka, Michiko; Ogata, Mika; Zaitsu, Masafumi; Motomura, Chikako; Kuzume, Kazuyo; Toku, Yuchiro; Ikeda, Masanori; Odajima, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Background In view of the increasing prevalence of food allergies, there has been an associated increase in frequency of situations requiring an emergency response for anaphylaxis at the home, childcare facilities and educational institutions. Objective To clarify the situation of adrenaline auto-injector administration in nursery/kindergarten/school, we carried out a questionnaire survey on pediatric physicians in Western Japan. Methods In 2015, self-reported questionnaires were mailed to 42...

  1. [Work-related stress in nursery school educators in the Venice and Marghera districts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Donatella; Fichera, G P; Punzi, Silvia; Campanini, P; Conway, P M; Prevedello, Laura; Costa, G

    2011-01-01

    Based on an investigation on organizational well-being in the Municipality of Venice (2009), we examined 110 public nursery school and preschool teachers working in the Venice and Marghera districts. The aim of this study was to develop and implement a procedure for work-related stress assessment and management in Municipality of Venice, in the light of Law 81/2008. Occupational stress and its impact on teachers' well-being and health were assessed by means of self-administered questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Descriptive analyses were conducted to compare teachers' data with those concerning employees operating in other services in the Venice and Marghera districts. According to the results, while nursery school and preschool teachers work with considerable commitment, vigor, dedication and involvement, problems were observed related to: assignment of administrative tasks without appropriate support from the district offices; difficult access to support services; shortage of temporary teachers and auxiliary personnel and, limited to some facilities, lack of adequate physical space devoted to teaching activities. Such adverse conditions result in an increase in vigilance levels required to ensure children's safety. Personnel also suffer from a lack of career prospects, with scarce opportunities for contact with other facilities in the area and inadequate involvement in the decisional processes at Municipality level. Improving such adverse conditions could solve the current marginalization of public nursery school and preschool teachers and encourage mutual exchange of information, which would in turn favour more appropriate methods of managing each single facility.

  2. Obesity in Nursery School Children in Corum, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Akca,Selen Ozakar; Uysal, Gulzade; Aysegul Buyukgonenc, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Background Regular body mass index (BMI) screenings in schools is important to ensure that 3- to 6-year-old children are not negatively affected by obesity in terms of their current and future health. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the overweight and obesity results of 3- to 6-year-old children and to guide children and their family in making healthier dietary choices by informing them. Methods This analytical-descriptive study was conducted in Corum, Turkey, in the year 20...

  3. Indoor air pollution on nurseries and primary schools: impact on childhood asthma – study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa Sofia I V

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated an association between the exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP and childhood asthma. Evidence is suggesting that several air pollutants may contribute to both exacerbation and development of asthma, but some uncertainty remains concerning the specific causative role of IAP. This paper reports an epidemiologic study aiming to reduce the existing lacks on the association between long-term exposure to pollution mixtures and the development and exacerbation of childhood asthma. Methods/design Based on the implementation of the study in 8 nurseries and 8 primary schools, from which, 2 nurseries and 2 primary schools in sites influenced by traffic and other 2 nurseries and 2 primary schools in background sites at urban and rural areas, the study will analyse the exposure to both urban and rural pollution as well as to traffic emissions (some homes of the children will be included in the study. Furthermore, based on the answers to validated questionnaires (as those used in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood - ISAAC filled in by the parents and on medical exams, the study will assess the prevalence, incidence and exacerbation of asthma, thus considering both short and long-term effects. The approximate number of children in the study will never be less than 600, guaranteeing 80% of study power (significant at a 5% level. Discussion This study intends to contribute for the understanding of the role of environmental factors, namely indoor air pollution, on asthma considering a risk group of different ages, and for the development of preventive measures, which are considered priority issues by the European Commission, according to the European Environmental Agency and the World Health Organization.

  4. A cluster of Enterovirus 71 subgenogroup C2 in a nursery school, Italy, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Dodi, Icilio; Calderaro, Adriana

    2016-10-01

    During October 2014, enterovirus (EV) RNA was detected in the stools of four children attending the same class in a nursery school, and hospitalized with mild febrile and vomiting disease in Parma, Italy. Upon sequencing, the viruses were characterized as EV71 subgenogroup C2. Phylogenetic analysis of the four EV71 C2 viruses allowed the distinction of a diverging lineage within subgenogroup C2, containing the Italian EV71 C2 strains and viruses detected in France in 2013. The identification of an outbreak of EV71 C2 in Italy extended information on the geographic diffusion and clinical relevance of these viruses in Europe.

  5. Investigation of air pollutants in rural nursery school - a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainka, Anna; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Kozielska, Barbara; Brągoszewska, Ewa

    2018-01-01

    Children's exposure to air pollutants is an important public health challenge. Indoor air quality (IAQ) in nursery school is believed to be different from elementary school. Moreover, younger children are more vulnerable to air pollution than higher grade children because they spend more time indoors, and their immune systems and bodies are less mature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the indoor air quality (IAQ) at naturally ventilated rural nursery schools located in Upper Silesia, Poland. We investigated the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), bacterial and fungal bioaerosols, as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in younger and older children's classrooms during the winter and spring seasons. The concentration of the investigated pollutants in indoor environments was higher than those in outdoor air. The results indicate the problem of elevated concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 inside the examined classrooms, as well as that of high levels of CO2 exceeding 1,000 ppm in relation to outdoor air. The characteristics of PM and CO2 levels were significantly different, both in terms of classroom occupation (younger or older children) and of season (winter or spring).

  6. [Activities of medical practitioners in nursery schools for children under 6 years-old: the expectations of the facilities' directors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanello, Serge; Dagorne, Carole; Perrier, Christophe; Parot, Elsa

    2007-01-01

    This work aims to describe the activities of nurseries' medical practitioners and the expectations of the nurseries' supervisors. It is based on the analysis of 139 questionnaires received from nursery schools' managers from the Pays de Loire region in 2005. Ninety percent of the nurseries that accommodate children less than six years-old, do employ a medical practitioner. She or he is often a salaried paediatrician with a full-time job or clinical practice, who consults twice a month for two hours and forty minutes in each nursery which employs him/her. Her/his main activity consists of conducting standard medical examinations when children are admitted into the nursery and on-going follow-up of their adaptation and healthy early childhood development. She or he also ensures that hygienic preventive measures are respected in case of an epidemic or other potentially hazardous health situations. Moreover, two-thirds of the establishments offer prevention follow-up for the children, whereas health promotion programmes and interventions are only carried out in just over half of them. Emergency medical procedures are conducted in a quarter of them only. Most of the nursery directors are satisfied with the medical services provided, despite some criticism. They mainly wish that practitioners were more available and more regularly present on-site in order to supply further preventive care, to develop training programmes for other staff members, and to participate in thematic meetings. Encouraging improved synergy between the professionals working in the nurseries, placing child psychologists to work in the facilities and fostering better relationships with the independent medical practitioners would all help the process of development and the evolution of the operational function of the medical practitioners in these structures.

  7. Career choice motivation and value priorities of future nursery and elementary school teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušić-Jablanović Milica V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study that aimed to establish the nature of the link between the value orientation of future nursery and elementary school teachers and the motivation for their career choice. Two instruments were used - the Schwartz Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ-21 and the Career Choice Scale. The findings suggest that the motivation for the respondents' career choice and their value orientation are relatively homogeneous, but also that two groups of students can be distinguished according to dominant motivating factors, and that these two groups also differ in their value priorities. Non-parametric correlation showed that each type of motivation reflected different values - in individuals whose dominant motivation was intrinsic, the values of benevolence, self-direction and achievement were more pronounced, while stronger altruistic motivation correlated with more pronounced values of benevolence and universalism. On the other hand, extrinsic motivation correlated with the values of hedonism and power, which the initial theoretical model locates at the opposite end to the values corresponding to altruistic motivation. The research findings are important for understanding the reasons behind nursery and elementary school teachers' career choice and the goals they are guided by in their life and work, and are also important for the career guidance process.

  8. Visiting nursery, kindergarten and after-school day care as astronomy for development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Akihiko

    2015-08-01

    One of the frontiers of astronomy for development is astronomy education for young children. Note that it is not too-much-going-ahead education nor education for so-called gifted children. It is for all children in various situations. As an example, I present "Uchu no O-hanashi," a visiting activity which includeds slide show, story telling, and enjoying pictures on large sheets for children. Not only just for young children, but this activity also aims at intercultural understanding. Sometimes guest educator from abroad join the activity. Video letter exchange was successful even though there is a language barrier. For assessment of the activity, I have recorded the voice of children. I will present various examples of written records and their analysis of activites, at nursery, kindergarten, preschool, after-school day care for primary school children, and other sites. I hope exchanging the record will make a worldwide connection among educators for very young children.

  9. Interaction Of Verbal Communication Of The Teacher From The Philippines In The Teaching Activity For Nursery II Students At The Singapore International School Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Tetti Nauli Panjaitan; Irma Suryani; Sri Wanasari; Syarifah Chairunisak

    2017-01-01

    The title of the research was Interaction of Verbal Communication of the Teacher from thePhilippines in the Teaching Activity for Nursery II Students at the Singapore International School Medan. The objective of the research was to find out the verbal Interaction communicationin the teaching activity of the teacher from the Philippines in Nursery II Class at the Singapore International School Medan. The school is one of the international schools with foreign teachers. It uses English as the t...

  10. Meal services after the Great East Japan Earthquake at nursery schools in a tsunami-affected town: focus group observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitani, Yukiko; Sudo, Noriko; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Ishikawa, Fumiko; Sako, Kazuko

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to collect information on experiences in the Great East Japan Earthquake (hereafter, 3.11), current preparedness, and barriers to building up stockpiles in nursery schools in affected areas. Based on the needs heard from the staff, we decided what contents should be included in our manual developed with the Japan Dietetic Association. A group interview was held in September 2012. We interviewed a principal, nurses, and registered dietitians working for a public and a private nursery school in Town A. We also invited an administrative dietitian who was an employee of Town A. One of the barriers to building up stockpiles was that they did not have any idea of what and how many items they should store. To deal with this situation, we developed a formula that could be used to calculate the quantity of stockpiles for their facilities in a newly developed feeding manual. In terms of current preparedness, the registered dietitians were not prepared for alternative menus in emergencies or how to manage garbage when the garbage collection was disrupted by disasters. The manual recommends to obtain the services of at least two food service personnel and spare space for storing filled garbage bags until garbage collection resumes. Some improvements in stocks were found in both of the public and private nursery schools. To improve the situation further, more financial support and detailed guidelines should be provided by the local government and authoritative organizations. Our manual should be a great asset for all nursery schools to improve their stockpiles.

  11. Morning and Afternoon Nursery Sessions: Can They Be Equally Effective in Giving Children a Positive Start to School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Julie; Brember, Ivy

    1994-01-01

    Examined the effects of gender, attendance period, and age on 820 children's adjustment to nursery classes. Found that boys and afternoon attenders appeared to be less well adjusted to school than girls and morning attenders, and older children appeared better adjusted than the younger children. Results suggest strategies to help children adjust…

  12. "School Doesn't Feel as Much of a Partnership": Parents' Perceptions of Their Children's Transition from Nursery School to Reception Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Polly

    2009-01-01

    This small-scale study explores a group of English parents' perceptions of their relationships with their child's nursery school and, after the transition to Reception class, their primary school. It references current research and literature on the issues of transition and the role of parents in their children's education. Findings from…

  13. La asesoría del psicopedagogo y la dirección del círculo infantil Psychological counseling and nursery school management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laritza Raquel del Risco López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers the impact of psychological counseling on improving nursery school management. By studying the actual practices of these professionals and institutions, constructing a theoretical framework, and exchanging with specialists, the authors attain to rethink, improve and update educational practice. The researchers make extensive use of theoretical methods for constructing a framework, observe psychologist performance at nursery schools, and conduct interviews and survey on related issues. The effectiveness of the proposal was assessed on the basis of experts’ criteria (nursery school professionals and psychologists. The findings include a description of psychological counseling in nursery schools viewing the process as a dynamic interchange of ideas and mutual professional support. Likewise, the highlights of the process of articulating psychologists and principal performances are given. ,

  14. PM2.5 in Urban and Rural Nursery Schools in Upper Silesia, Poland: Trace Elements Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainka, Anna; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Kaczmarek, Konrad

    2015-07-14

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in nursery schools is an emerging public health challenge. Particular attention should be paid to younger children, because they are more vulnerable to air pollution than older children. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its strong association with acute and chronic effects on children's health. In this paper, we present concentrations of PM2.5 and the composition of its trace elements at naturally ventilated nursery schools located in the area of Gliwice, Poland. The nursery schools were selected to characterize areas with different degrees of urbanization and traffic densities during the winter and spring seasons. The results indicate there is a problem with elevated concentrations of PM2.5 inside the examined classrooms. The children's exposure to trace elements was different based on localization and season. PM2.5 concentration and its trace element composition have been studied using correlation coefficients between the different trace elements, the enrichment factor (EF) and principal component analysis (PCA). PCA allowed the identification of the three components: anthropogenic and geogenic sources (37.2%), soil dust contaminated by sewage sludge dumping (18.6%) and vehicular emissions (19.5%).

  15. PM2.5 in Urban and Rural Nursery Schools in Upper Silesia, Poland: Trace Elements Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainka, Anna; Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Kaczmarek, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in nursery schools is an emerging public health challenge. Particular attention should be paid to younger children, because they are more vulnerable to air pollution than older children. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is of the greatest interest mainly due to its strong association with acute and chronic effects on children’s health. In this paper, we present concentrations of PM2.5 and the composition of its trace elements at naturally ventilated nursery schools located in the area of Gliwice, Poland. The nursery schools were selected to characterize areas with different degrees of urbanization and traffic densities during the winter and spring seasons. The results indicate there is a problem with elevated concentrations of PM2.5 inside the examined classrooms. The children’s exposure to trace elements was different based on localization and season. PM2.5 concentration and its trace element composition have been studied using correlation coefficients between the different trace elements, the enrichment factor (EF) and principal component analysis (PCA). PCA allowed the identification of the three components: anthropogenic and geogenic sources (37.2%), soil dust contaminated by sewage sludge dumping (18.6%) and vehicular emissions (19.5%). PMID:26184269

  16. [Research on health education and promotion in Spanish nursery and primary schools. A systematic review of studies published between 1995 and 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davó, Mari Carmen; Gil-González, Diana; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; La Parra, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    To identify the characteristics of health education and promotion interventions in Spanish nursery and primary schools, through the studies published in scientific journals. We performed a review of studies on health education and promotion interventions in Spanish nursery and primary schools, published from 1995 to 2005. The information sources were Medline (through Pubmed), Cinhal, Eric, Sociological Abstracts, Science Citation Index, and Isooc (CSIC). Studies performed in Spanish nursery and primary schools that incorporated health education and promotion interventions were selected. The studies' general features, main subject and aims, methodology, the kind of intervention described, and compliance with the criteria for Healthy Schools were analyzed. Only 26 of the 346 articles identified met the inclusion criteria. Health education programs focussed more on disease prevention than on health promotion and only a few studies were performed in nursery and primary schools. The criteria for health promotion in schools were included in 5 articles (19.2%). The importance of health institutions (n = 7; 26.9%) and universities (n = 8; 30.8%) as promoters of programs was notable. The most frequent subject was smoking (n = 11; 42.3%). Teachers play a lesser role in health promotion in schools than health institutions in the implementation and dissemination of health programs. Research into health promotion in nursery and primary schools is scarce.

  17. Supporting the moral development of pre-school aged[sic] children at nursery schools

    OpenAIRE

    Batistová, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The aim of my dissertation was to describe the responsibilities of teachers in institutional pre-school education and how they bolster the moral development of pre-school age children, which takes place in the context of the children's mental progress and the formation of moral values gained from their families. The thesis is divided into two parts. The theoretical part describes the moral progress of pre-school age children, educational and institutional strategies to develop the moral consc...

  18. [Epidemiological study of oral dental health of 4-year-old children in french nursery schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, D; Guéguen, R; Bruncher, P; Gerhard, J-L; Roland, E

    2006-09-01

    The departmental service of maternal and infantile protection (PMI) of Moselle (Lorraine region), together with the Paediatric Dentistry Department from Nancy University, organized a study of the dental health of 4-year-old children. To assess the children dental health; to evaluate parental knowledge of dental health; to identify the factors associated with caries amongst children. The study was a cross sectional observation. A random sample of 4-year-old children was selected among 11 586 children in nursery schools. The study was based on a clinical examination performed by a dentist and a structured questionnaire completed by parents. The overall proportion of children affected by caries was 37.5%. The mean dmft score was 1.51 (sd = 2.82) and 11.6% of the children had caries which affected their upper incisors, a sign of early childhood caries. Only 6.2% had received dental treatment on at least 1 occasion. There was a clear disparity in dental health: 1 child out of 3 suffered from caries but 1 out of 2 children in priority education districts was affected, compared with only 1 out of 4 children coming from a rural area. The questionnaires completed by parents showed a lack of knowledge of dental health and inadequate use of current prevention facilities. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the variables that were significantly associated with caries in 4 year-old children were the mother's education, the low social background, the level of consumption of drinks containing sugar by both children and parents, the consumption of fluoride, and the level of knowledge about fluoride. Preventive measures must be developed in close relationship between pediatricians and dentists. Initial training of health care professionals has to be reinforced. Health care professionals in paediatrics are far more likely to meet mothers and young children than are dentists.

  19. [Hip rotation degrees, intoeing problem, and sitting habits in nursery school children: an analysis of 1,134 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinel, Levent; Köse, Kamil Cağri; Aksoy, Yusuf; Işik, Cengiz; Erğan, Volkan; Ozdemir, Aykut

    2007-01-01

    We investigated hip rotation degrees, frequency of intoeing problems, and sitting habits in nursery school children and the relationship between these parameters. The study included 1,134 children (612 boys, 522 girls), aged between three to six years, attending 26 nursery schools in the central area of Afyon. First, informed consent was obtained from the parents and a questionnaire was administered about demographic data and sitting habits of the children. Then, the children were examined in lower underwear. Foot progression angles were determined and progression to midline during walking was evaluated as intoeing. Internal and external rotation degrees of the hips were measured using a goniometer in prone and supine positions. In girls, internal rotation of the hip was nearly 13 degrees greater in the prone position, and 9 degrees greater in the supine position compared to those of the boys. Intoeing was detected in 67 children (5.9%), 76.1% being bilateral. The girl-to-boy ratio was 2.4/1. Intoeing problem originated from the femur in 74.6%, and from the tibia in 25.4%. Compared to normal children, intoeing was associated with a greater internal rotation and a smaller external rotation of the hip. Overall, 36.7% had a crossed-leg sitting habit, and 63.3% had a television sitting habit. The latter was more frequent in intoeing children (p=0.001). Although hip rotation degrees in our study were similar to those reported in the literature, higher hip internal rotation degrees were found especially in girls. Television sitting which is a frequently preferred position among nursery school children was significantly prevalent in intoeing children.

  20. "People at the Heart of Our Processes", a Case Study of How a Nursery School and Children's Centre Promotes Community Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan Bio, Martine

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a doctoral case study of how an English integrated nursery school and children's centre fulfils its legal duty to promote community cohesion. The provocation for the enquiry derives from the author's growing unease over the perceived limitations of a target-driven culture currently pervading English schools. A case is made…

  1. Determination of the level of noise in nurseries and pre-schools and the teachers′ level of annoyance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan Gokdogan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article is to determine the level of noise in nurseries and pre-schools and also to compare measured levels with standard levels and evaluate the teachers’ level of annoyance. Materials and Methods: The level of noise was measured in three different schools. A total of 162 students, whose ages were between 3 and 6 years, and 12 teachers were included the study. Every age groups’ level of noise was measured during sleeping, gaming, and eating activity. In addition, teachers’ annoyance was assessed in different age groups. Results: The 4- to 6-year-old groups were found to have higher level of sounds than 3-year-old group. Eating period was found to be the highest level of sound whereas sleeping was found the lowest. Furthermore, teachers’ annoyance was found higher as the age decreased. Conclusion: Nurseries and pre-schools have noisy environment both for the students and the teachers. High level of noise, which has bad effects on health, is a public health problem. Both the students’ families and teachers must be aware of this annoying situation.

  2. Development and evaluation of a basic physical and sports activity program for preschool children in nursery schools in iran: an interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Ramin; Nourian, Ruhollah; Ghayour, Mahboubeh; Kordi, Mahboubeh; Younesian, Ali

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were a) to develop a physical activity program for nursery schools, and b) to evaluate the effects of this program on fundamental movement skills of preschool age children in Iran. In this quasi-experimental study 147 children from five nursery schools in five different cities in Iran were enrolled. A physical activity program was developed for nursery children. Trained nursery physical activity instructors conducted the program for 10 weeks for all subjects. The levels of gross motor development of all subjects were measured before intervention and after 10 weeks physical activity program employing the Test of Gross Motor Development-edition 2 (TGMD-2). The participants in this study had a mean (SD) age of 4.95 (0.83) years. At the end of the study, scores of subjects at all components of TGMD-2 (including locomotor, object control, sum of standard scores and gross motor quotient) were significantly improved compared to the baseline scores (P120) and after 10 weeks intervention this rate was increased to 49.7% of all subjects. It seems that the developed physical activity program conducted by trained nursery physical activity instructors could be an effective and practical way of increasing levels of fundamental movement skills of preschool children in Iran.

  3. What do nursery teachers think about the influence of family and school on the construction of gender identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª del Carmen Rodríguez Menéndez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We present in this paper some of the results of a research which took place in the Principality of Asturias with the purpose of analyzing the gender socialization processes in nursery education, using the points of view narrated by the teachers. Although we will not be providing an exhaustive list of conclusions reached so far, we do put forward one of the aspects which has been developed throughout the research; that is, the comments and opinions of the teachers about the influence that the family and the school have on the process of gender construction. The discourse developed about this field will allow us to elucidate if a system based on opinion and belief that legitimizes the postulates of mixed school and dulls the implementation of coeducation processes still persists.

  4. Cleaning practices and cleaning products in nurseries and schools: to what extent can they impact indoor air quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W; Boumier, J; Wyart, G; Ramalho, O; Mandin, C

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of a nationwide survey on indoor air quality conducted from September 2009 to June 2011 in 310 nurseries, kindergartens, and elementary schools in all regions of France, cleaning practices and products were described through an extensive questionnaire completed on-site by expert building inspectors. The questionnaire included the cleaning frequencies and periods, cleaning techniques, whether windows were open during cleaning, and the commercial names of the products used. Analysis of the questionnaire responses showed that cleaning was generally performed daily for furniture and floors. It was performed mostly in the evening with wet mopping and with one or more windows open. Five hundred eighty-four different cleaning products were listed, among which 218 safety data sheets (SDSs) were available and analyzed. One hundred fifty-two chemical substances were identified in the SDSs. The typical substances in cleaning products included alcohols, chlorides, terpenes, aldehydes, and ethers; more than half of them are irritants. Two endocrine disruptors, 2-phenylphenol and Galaxolide, were identified in two cleaning products used every day to clean the floors, in seven kindergartens and in a nursery respectively. Eleven reactive substances containing C=C double bonds, mostly terpenes, were identified in a wide variety of cleaning products. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Transitory Connections: The Reception and Rejection of Jean Piaget's Psychology in the Nursery School Movement in the 1920s and 1930s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In 1927, nursery school educator Lucy Sprague Mitchell heralded Jean Piaget's psychology as of "outstanding interest" and wrote in "Progressive Education" that it should be of "immense service" to psychologists, teachers, and parents. In 1929, psychologist Lois Meek praised Piaget's research in the National Society for the Study of Education's…

  6. Interaction Of Verbal Communication Of The Teacher From The Philippines In The Teaching Activity For Nursery II Students At The Singapore International School Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetti Nauli Panjaitan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The title of the research was Interaction of Verbal Communication of the Teacher from thePhilippines in the Teaching Activity for Nursery II Students at the Singapore International School Medan. The objective of the research was to find out the verbal Interaction communicationin the teaching activity of the teacher from the Philippines in Nursery II Class at the Singapore International School Medan. The school is one of the international schools with foreign teachers. It uses English as the teaching medium in the teaching-learning process. The teacher in this class comes from the Philippines and the students are from 3 to 4 years old.The result of the research showed that the teaching activity in the Nursery II class at the Singapore International School Medan was done in two ways between teacher and students the teacher used more verbal communication while non-verbal communication was used as a supporting method. The learning process was done through singing telling stories games and using teaching tools like television pictures and toys in the communication process in order to make the students easier to understand what had been conveyed by the teacher.

  7. Factors in the management of feeding in nursery school children as perceived by their mothers in rural Bondo County, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Were, Allan R; Kioli, Felix N; Onkware, Kennedy; Onyango, Elizabeth O; Gumo, Sussy; Ouma, Collins

    2013-11-15

    The effects of malnutrition on health status and survival of children has been the subject of extensive research for several decades. Malnutrition affects physical growth, cognitive development of children, morbidity and mortality. The current study was an exploratory survey that focused on factors affecting feeding of nursery school children as perceived by their mothers in a rural setting in Usigu Division of Bondo County, Kenya. The sampling frame was mothers whose children were in Kanyibok, Sanda and Usenge nursery schools. Purposive sampling methods were used to draw a total of 108 respondents. In a logistic regression model, bad management of feeding was the dependent variable while factors perceived to affect management of feeding were the independent variables. Married mothers were more likely to manage good feeding practices (OR, 0.34, 95% CI, 0.21-0.76; P = 0.022) relative to those who were single or widowed. Additional analyses showed that low education levels (OR, 7.33, 95% CI, 3.37-12.91; P = 0.023), younger mothers (OR, 6.04, 95% CI, 3.22-9.68; P = 0.029) and mothers engaged in business (OR, 4.02, 95% CI, 2.11-7.85; P = 0.027) increased their likelihood of not feeding the pre-school children. Majority of the children who ate the main meals in other houses belonged to young mothers in the age category of 15-29 years. Further analyses demonstrated that if the order of serving food was to the children first, then they had high likelihood of having good feeding relative to when the father was served first (OR, 0.22, 95% CI, 0.14-0.61; P = 0.011). Based on these findings, there is an urgent need for sensitization of the mothers on the management of feeding of these pre-school children in Bondo County. It is hoped that relevant interventions would then be designed with the view of managing children feeding in such rural settings as in Bondo County in Kenya.

  8. Surveillance study in collaboration with a university-daycare center for elderly people and nursery school for children on the use of over-the-counter drugs and health food in Fukuyama

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anraku, Makoto; Inoue, Hirofumi; Sato, Eiji; Hata, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Daiju; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshitomi, Hironori; Kondo, Yuko; Tanaka, Masataka; Tomida, Hisao

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the extent of use of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and health food, we administered a questionnaire to the parents of children in a nursery school and to elderly people in a daycare center in Fukuyama city...

  9. Life Cycle Analysis of a Geothermal Heatpump Installation and Comparison with a Conventional Fuel Boiler System in a Nursery School in Galicia (Spain)

    OpenAIRE

    Castro M.; Bangueses I.; Rodriguez J

    2012-01-01

    Within the work lines in sustainable energy field of the EnergyLab Technology Centre (Vigo, Spain), associated with the technologies that are under investigation by this centre, it is developed a study about the Life Cycle Analysis (hereinafter, LCA) over a geothermal heatpump (hereafter, GSHP) installation in a nursery school in the province of Pontevedra (Galicia, Spain), and its comparison with the fuel boiler system prior to GHP. Thus, with the use of computer tools and following specific...

  10. Evaluation of Low-Cost Mitigation Measures Implemented to Improve Air Quality in Nursery and Primary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Juliana P; Branco, Pedro T B S; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C M; Martins, Fernando G; Sousa, Sofia I V

    2017-05-31

    Indoor air pollution mitigation measures are highly important due to the associated health impacts, especially on children, a risk group that spends significant time indoors. Thus, the main goal of the work here reported was the evaluation of mitigation measures implemented in nursery and primary schools to improve air quality. Continuous measurements of CO₂, CO, NO₂, O₃, CH₂O, total volatile organic compounds (VOC), PM₁, PM2.5, PM10, Total Suspended Particles (TSP) and radon, as well as temperature and relative humidity were performed in two campaigns, before and after the implementation of low-cost mitigation measures. Evaluation of those mitigation measures was performed through the comparison of the concentrations measured in both campaigns. Exceedances to the values set by the national legislation and World Health Organization (WHO) were found for PM2.5, PM10, CO₂ and CH₂O during both indoor air quality campaigns. Temperature and relative humidity values were also above the ranges recommended by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). In general, pollutant concentrations measured after the implementation of low-cost mitigation measures were significantly lower, mainly for CO₂. However, mitigation measures were not always sufficient to decrease the pollutants' concentrations till values considered safe to protect human health.

  11. Evaluation of Low-Cost Mitigation Measures Implemented to Improve Air Quality in Nursery and Primary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana P. Sá

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Indoor air pollution mitigation measures are highly important due to the associated health impacts, especially on children, a risk group that spends significant time indoors. Thus, the main goal of the work here reported was the evaluation of mitigation measures implemented in nursery and primary schools to improve air quality. Continuous measurements of CO2, CO, NO2, O3, CH2O, total volatile organic compounds (VOC, PM1, PM2.5, PM10, Total Suspended Particles (TSP and radon, as well as temperature and relative humidity were performed in two campaigns, before and after the implementation of low-cost mitigation measures. Evaluation of those mitigation measures was performed through the comparison of the concentrations measured in both campaigns. Exceedances to the values set by the national legislation and World Health Organization (WHO were found for PM2.5, PM10, CO2 and CH2O during both indoor air quality campaigns. Temperature and relative humidity values were also above the ranges recommended by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE. In general, pollutant concentrations measured after the implementation of low-cost mitigation measures were significantly lower, mainly for CO2. However, mitigation measures were not always sufficient to decrease the pollutants’ concentrations till values considered safe to protect human health.

  12. Evaluation of Low-Cost Mitigation Measures Implemented to Improve Air Quality in Nursery and Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Juliana P.; Branco, Pedro T. B. S.; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C. M.; Martins, Fernando G.; Sousa, Sofia I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Indoor air pollution mitigation measures are highly important due to the associated health impacts, especially on children, a risk group that spends significant time indoors. Thus, the main goal of the work here reported was the evaluation of mitigation measures implemented in nursery and primary schools to improve air quality. Continuous measurements of CO2, CO, NO2, O3, CH2O, total volatile organic compounds (VOC), PM1, PM2.5, PM10, Total Suspended Particles (TSP) and radon, as well as temperature and relative humidity were performed in two campaigns, before and after the implementation of low-cost mitigation measures. Evaluation of those mitigation measures was performed through the comparison of the concentrations measured in both campaigns. Exceedances to the values set by the national legislation and World Health Organization (WHO) were found for PM2.5, PM10, CO2 and CH2O during both indoor air quality campaigns. Temperature and relative humidity values were also above the ranges recommended by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). In general, pollutant concentrations measured after the implementation of low-cost mitigation measures were significantly lower, mainly for CO2. However, mitigation measures were not always sufficient to decrease the pollutants’ concentrations till values considered safe to protect human health. PMID:28561795

  13. Literacy Education for Nursery School Children of Cross-National Marriages in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-ching

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, more and more Taiwanese men have married women from Southeast Asian countries and China. Children of cross-national marriages now account for one-tenth of primary school pupils. Previous research on primary and secondary school pupils' performance in different subjects has indicated that the children of cross-national marriages…

  14. [Nutritional assessment of the menus served in municipal nursery schools in Granada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiquer, Isabel; Haro, Ana; Cabrera-Vique, Carmen; Muñoz-Hoyos, Antonio; Galdó, Gabriel

    2016-10-01

    The school canteen plays today an essential role in child nutrition and for consolidating appropriate eating habits. In Spain, the guidelines for school meals have been established by the NAOS strategy and the Perseus program, and are especially aimed at school children of 6-10 years. However, there is a lack of information on menus offered in pre-school education centres, which take in children of pre-school age. The aim of this study was to evaluate the composition and the food supplied in pre-schools of the province of Granada. A study was conducted on the menus offered in public pre-schools in Granada, with a population of 420 children aged 2-6 years old. A total of 20 menus were analysed, and details were collected including direct information on the ingredients used, the proportion of these in each dish, and the form of preparation. The daily intake of energy and nutrients, as well as the frequency of weekly supply of the different food groups were studied. The average energy content of the menus was 512.5kcal, distributed into protein (17.3%), carbohydrates (48.8%), and lipids (33.9%). A suitable supply of fibre (7.8g/day) was observed, but content of calcium and zinc did not reach recommended levels. The supply of vegetables was adequate, with a daily presence of salad, as well as vegetables, meat, fish and fruit. Menus evaluated represent an adequate content of energy, and proper supply of the different groups of foods, especially vegetables, fruits and salads. A great effort is observed in the centres to adapt meals to nutritional recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Footprints in the Woods:"Tracking" a Nursery Child through a Forest School Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinder, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Forest School has become increasingly popular in the UK, although little is known about what actually happens in sessions and how these sessions are planned. Using observations of two sessions and semi-structured interviews with two adult leaders this article sets out to explore how the sessions are planned, alongside a young child (aged 2-4…

  16. Getting Started in the Nursery Business: Nursery Production Options

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Gregory Kent; Appleton, Bonnie Lee, 1948-2012

    2009-01-01

    Summarizes factors, such as nursery design and capitalization, that individuals in Virginia's nursery industry should consider when deciding whether to grow nursery stock in the field verses containers.

  17. RF personal exposimetry on employees of elementary schools, kindergartens and day nurseries as a proxy for child exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Péter; Bakos, József; Nagy, Noémi; Jánossy, Gábor; Finta, Viktória; Thuróczy, György

    2011-12-01

    Personal RF exposimetry has been in the focus of the bioelectromagnetics community in the last few years. With a few exceptions, exposimetry studies focused on adults, because measuring the exposure of children, one of the most important target groups, introduces many complications. The main feature of our study is to select teachers and kindergarten caretakers as volunteers. They are expected to receive similar exposure patterns as the children because they spend the workday close to them. Thus they can stand as proxies for estimation of exposures of children. Volunteers belonging to one of two groups (elementary school teachers, n=31; employees of kindergartens and day nurseries, n=50) in Hungarian cities received a Personal Exposimeter (PEM) for 24h each. Only workdays, when the volunteers worked near children, were considered. 51 additional volunteers (office workers) were measured as controls. The volunteers wore the PEMs on their bodies. Those activities marked in the exposure diaries as work were further classified into 5 categories based on the level of certainty that they actually worked near children during that activity. Subsets of the full dataset were derived and compared based on this categorization. It was found that relaxation of the selection criteria often under- or overestimates exposure. The differences of estimation depend on the frequency band and sub-population: the kindergarten and teacher groups differ in this regard. For most frequency bands the majority of data points was below the detection limit. Derived child exposures are comparable to the worktime exposure of adults (control group). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Iceberg Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Almost an iceberg 'nursery,' icebergs continue to break away from the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica. This image from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra spacecraft, shows the level of activity along the shelf near Ross Island on September 21, 2000. The B-15 fragments are remnants of the huge iceberg (nearly 4,250 sqare miles) which broke away from the Antarctic shelf in late March 2000. Slightly visible is the line where iceberg B-20 broke away from the shelf in the last week of September. Cracks in the Antarctic ice shelf are closely observed by satellite and are of interest to scientists studying the potential effects of global warming. This true-color image was produced using MODIS bands 1, 3, and 4. Image by Brian Montgomery, NASA GSFC; data courtesy MODIS Science Team

  19. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools-Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Konstanze; Scharf, Thomas; Baumann, Uwe; Groneberg, David A; Bundschuh, Matthias

    2016-07-04

    Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax) as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam) were investigated. The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of "metal grid" (90.71 dB) or of a woven willow "basket" (91.61 dB), whereas a case of "aluminium" (103.34 dB) generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs "metal grid" and "basket". The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (-13.88 dB) and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven "basket" with an insert of PU-foam.

  20. Spatial distribution and risk assessment of metals in dust based on samples from nursery and primary schools of Xi'an, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Lu, Xinwei; Li, Loretta Y.

    2014-05-01

    The spatial distribution of metal (Cu, Pb, Zn, As, Ba, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni and V) concentrations in urban dust of Xi'an, China was determined using the geographical information system method on dust from nursery and primary schools. The health risk of these metals in campus dust to children was assessed based on the EPA heath risk model. The results indicate elevated metal concentrations, especially of Cu, Pb, Zn, Co, Cr and Ba, which are 1.5-10.2, 2.6-73.0, 2.1-26.5, 2.0-10.9, 1.2-10.2 and 1.1-10.4 times the background values of Shaanxi soil, respectively. Pb, Cr, Cu and Ba have similar distribution patterns. The hot-spot areas of Pb, Zn, Cu, Co, Cr and Ba are mainly associated with industrial activities and heavy traffic. Their spatial distributions in the Xi'an urban dust indicated that these metals mainly originate from vehicles and industrial activities. For As, Mn, Ni and V, natural factors are important in controlling their distributions. Health risk assessment shows that ingestion is the largest exposure route of metals in dust from nursery and primary schools to children. The mean hazard indices for non-cancer risk of all analyzed metals due to campus dust are within the safe range, while the maximum hazard indices of Pb, Cr and As are close to, or slightly higher than, safe levels. The cancer risks of As, Co, Cr and Ni to nursery and primary school children, considering only inhalation, are within the acceptable range.

  1. A Study of Directive Speech Acts Used by Iranian Nursery School Children: The Impact of Context on Children’s Linguistic Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Shahpouri Arani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at finding out the forms and functions of directive speech acts uttered by Persian-speaking children. The writer’s goal is to discover the distinct strategies applied by speakers of nursery school age children regarding three parameters: the choice of form, the negotiation of communicative goals within conversation, and the protection of face. The data collected for this purpose are based on actual school conversational situations that were audio recorded in four nursery schools during classroom work and playtime activities. Children, who are the subjects of this study, are of both sexes and various social backgrounds. The results revealed that (1 the investigation of children’s directive speech acts confirm the fact that they are aware of social parameters of talk (Andersen- Slosberg,1990; Ervin, Tripp et al., 1990; (2 they use linguistic forms that are different from what is used by adults as politeness marker, such as, polite 2nd plural subject-agreement on the verb, “please” and “thank you” words; (3 They use declaratives with illocutionary force in order to mark distance (Georgalidou, 2001. Keywords: Iranian children’s speech; Directive speech act; Politeness, Conversational analysis; Persian

  2. Educational quality in nursery schools. From procedures for evaluation to in-service training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Calzolari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a training-research project promoted by the Educational Coordination of Bologna Municipality and involving 15 Kindergarten sections in a district of Bologna city. The research was conducted in the school year 2009-2010. The project was planned as an Evaluation Research oriented to introduce some Quality Evaluation proceedings into the Kindergarten and to promote, into the group of the teachers that have been involved, some processes of in-service training and educational planning. The Scale for Observation and Evaluation of Kindergarten SOVASI has been used following the methodological suggestions given by M. Ferrari (1994 as a reference and an opportunity for critical reflexion on the scale itself. After a brief report of the theoretical framework of the research, the authors present an analysis of the results concerning the Quality Evaluation of the Kindergartens, some critical reflexions on the proceedings and on the tool that has been used and the ways the researches conducted the data restitution meetings with the teachers in order to promote their professionalism.

  3. Prevalence Of Intestinal Helminthiasis In Nursery And Primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Intestinal helminthiasis affect the nutritional status of school aged children. Objective: o determine the prevalence of intestinal helminthiasis in nursery and primary school children in Enugu. Methods: A cross-sectional survey on 460 nursery and primary school children from Enugu metropolis. The prevalence of ...

  4. Kreşlerde okul sağlığı hizmetleri ve hemşirelik/School health services and nursing in nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Bebiş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Özet Büyüme ve gelişmenin çok hızlı olduğu okul öncesi dönemde, çocuklar çok sayıda bedensel ve psikososyal riskle karşı karşıya kalmaktadır. Çocukların sağlığının korunması ve geliştirilmesi açısından kreşler etkili rol oynamaktadır. Kreşlerde uygulanan okul sağlığı hizmetleri, çocukların eğitime katılma potansiyelini ve yaşam kalitesini arttırır. Okul sağlığı hizmetleri disiplinler arası ve sektörler arası ilişkilerle yürütülür. Bu anlamda okul hemşireleri okul sağlık ekibinin temel üyelerindendir. Bu derleme yazıda, halk sağlığı ve eğitimin bir parçası olan okul sağlığı ve hemşirelik hizmetleri gözden geçirilmiştir. Anahtar Kelimeler: Okul sağlığı hizmetleri, kreş, hemşirelik.Abstract Preschool children face a large number of physical and psychosocial risks during the period when growth and development are rapid. Nurseries play an effective role for protection and development of the children’s health. School health services in nurseries increase the children’s full educational potential and improve their quality of life. School health services are carried out by interdisciplinary and intersectoral cooperation. In this situation the school nurse is the main member of the school health team. In the present review article, we have summarized school health and nursing services that are a part of public health and education. Key Words: School health services, nursery, nursing.  

  5. [Influence of inclusive child day-care on nursery school teachers: a questionnaire survey of teachers with experience in inclusive child day-care in K City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Shinobu; Fukuzawa, Yukiko; Hamada, Yuuko

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this survey questionnaire is to investigate the factors influencing how nursery school teachers perceive inclusive child day-care in K City in order to qualify what support we can provide. The questionnaire was sent to nursery school teachers with experience in inclusive child day-care in K City. Three hundred seventeen teachers provided sufficient data for analysis. The results of this survey suggest that teachers perceive inclusive child day-care to lead up to self-development and the pleasure of child-caring. On the other hand, they feel a burden of inclusive child day-care, with teachers in their 40 s feeling a stronger burden than teachers in their 20 s. And teachers with experience in taking care of emotionally disturbed children or teachers with experience in taking care of hearing-impaired children feel a stronger burden than teachers without experience in taking care of them. The results of our survey also suggest that it is necessary for support systems to have special knowledge about disabled children and special ways of caring, and to decrease teachers' burden or dissatisfaction with inclusive child day-care.

  6. Agriculture: Nurseries and Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurseries and Greenhouses. Information about environmental requirements specifically relating to the production of many types of agricultural crops grown in nurseries and greenhouses, such as ornamental plants and specialty fruits and vegetables.

  7. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY ON LIFESTYLE GUIDANCE AND USE OF MANAGEMENT FORMS FOR FOOD ALLERGY IN LICENSED NURSERY SCHOOLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Sato, Sakura; Murata, Junko; Seto, Akiko; Nishisako, Shin; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    There have been no reports on the use of "foods allergy disease lifestyle guidance and management forms at day care centers" (life management guidance forms) for understanding details of pupils with food allergies. The contents of lifestyle management guidance forms obtained in Sagamihara city from licensed nurseries were investigated prospectively. We compared and analyzed for the use of life management guidance forms initially in 2013 and in the fiscal year of 2014 in Sagamihara city licensed nurseries. In all, in 2013 and 2014, 9,567 and 10,069 pupils were included in licensed nurseries, and 426 (4.5%) and 447 (4.4%) pupils had food allergies, 61 (0.6%) and 61 (0.6%) had anaphylaxis, respectively.The causative foods in 2013 and 2014, respectively, included unheated hen's egg in 71.6% and 69.6%; heated hen's egg in 54.2% and 54.8%; milk in 23.0% and 23.3%; peanuts in 17.8% and 17.0%; buckwheat in 7.3% and 8.5%; and wheat in 6.3% and 8.3%. There are no significant differences in the distribution of causative foods between 2013 and 2014.Immediate-type food allergy was significantly more frequent in 2014 than in 2013 (73.0% and 78.8%, respectively; p=0.040). Using a life management guidance form will make it easier to manage food allergies in children.

  8. Structural And Microbiological Analysis Of Children´s Pacifiers In Public And Private Nursery Schools [análise Estrutural E Microbiológica De Chupetas De Crianças De Creches Públicas E Particulares

    OpenAIRE

    de Melo e Silva R.; de Paula J.F.; de Almeida-Marques R.V.D.; de Fatima Dantas de Almeida L.; Cavalcanti Y.W.

    2014-01-01

    Results: the analyzed pacifiers met the Brazilian standards (100%). Pacifiers were infected by the three groups of microorganisms studied (>15%), with higher prevalence (p 0.05).Conclusion: the morphological conditions and contamination of pacifiers did not vary between the types of nursery schools, verifying that the nec...

  9. Life Cycle Analysis of a Geothermal Heatpump Installation and Comparison with a Conventional Fuel Boiler System in a Nursery School in Galicia (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the work lines in sustainable energy field of the EnergyLab Technology Centre (Vigo, Spain, associated with the technologies that are under investigation by this centre, it is developed a study about the Life Cycle Analysis (hereinafter, LCA over a geothermal heatpump (hereafter, GSHP installation in a nursery school in the province of Pontevedra (Galicia, Spain, and its comparison with the fuel boiler system prior to GHP. Thus, with the use of computer tools and following specific rules about the calculation of LCA, assessing the environmental impact of each system, and perform the appropriate comparison in order to quantify the savings emissions and the improvement in sustainability related to the replacement of diesel boiler system by the GSHP system.

  10. Day Nurseries in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Khady

    1977-01-01

    Describes a village day nursery organized by peasant women in 1962 to provide care for preschool children whose mothers must work in the rice fields. Outlines the aims of the day nursery and the prerequisites for its establishment. Community and parent participation is stressed. (JK)

  11. 52 years of kindergarten – the structure has proved successful and must not disappear – let’s save our nursery and school together!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Since the beginning of 2016, the Staff Association has been in discussions with the Management to save and sustain our Nursery and School, located on the CERN site in Meyrin. Where are we now with the discussions and what does the future hold for our Children’s Day-Care Centre and School (EVEE)? A closer look at the creation of the Kindergarten and its management A group of parents founded the Kindergarten at CERN in the 1960s, and in 1969, the CERN Staff Association took the structure under its aegis. This change in management resulted in a partnership agreement between CERN and the Staff Association. The agreement defined the rights and duties of both parties with regard to the Staff Association operating a kindergarten on the CERN site. Since then, the Staff Association has been the employer and manager of the structure providing early childhood services. Development of the structure over time In 1977, the Kindergarten changed premises and a new agreement was signed between CERN and the Staff As...

  12. Comparison of the caries-protective effect of fluoride varnish with treatment as usual in nursery school attendees receiving preventive oral health support through the Childsmile oral health improvement programme - the Protecting Teeth@3 Study: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William; Turner, Stephen; Anopa, Yulia; McIntosh, Emma; Wu, Olivia; Conway, David I; Macpherson, Lorna M D; McMahon, Alex D

    2015-12-18

    The Scottish Government set out its policy on addressing the poor oral health of Scottish children in 2005. This led to the establishment of Childsmile, a national programme designed to improve the oral health of children in Scotland. One element of the programme promotes daily tooth brushing in all nurseries in Scotland (Childsmile Core). A second targeted component (Childsmile Nursery) offers twice-yearly application of fluoride varnish to children attending nurseries in deprived areas. Studies suggest that fluoride varnish application can reduce caries in both adult and child populations. This trial aims to explore the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of additional preventive value fluoride varnish application compared to Childsmile Core. The Protecting Teeth@3 Study is an ongoing 2 year parallel group randomised treatment as usual controlled trial. Three-year-old children attending the ante pre-school year are randomised (1:1) to the intervention arm (fluoride varnish & treatment as usual) or the control arm (treatment as usual). Children in the intervention arm will have Duraphat® fluoride varnish painted on the primary tooth surfaces and will continue to receive treatment as usual: the core Childsmile Nursery intervention. Children in the treatment as usual arm will receive the same series of contacts, without the application of varnish and will also continue with the Childsmile Core intervention. Interventions are undertaken by Childsmile trained extended duty dental nurses at six-monthly intervals. Participants receive a baseline dental inspection in nursery and an endpoint inspection in Primary 1 at the age of 5 years old. We will use primary and secondary outcome measures to compare the effectiveness of Duraphat® fluoride varnish plus treatment as usual with treatment as usual only in preventing any further dental decay. We will also undertake a full economic evaluation of the trial. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. Number: NCT

  13. [Assessment of Social-Communicative Behaviour Problems and Expression of Emotions in Three- to Six-Year Old Children in Nursery School and Kindergarten].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiese-Himmel, Christiane; von Steinbüchel, Nicole; Gibbons, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Developmental support and promotion of children with behavioural disorders received little attention in nursery school and kindergarten in the last years. Parents expect that their children exhibiting psychosocial deficits or problems in social-communicative competence will also get support by the said educational institutions. This requires a preliminary, but reliable and economic monitoring, estimation and evaluation of selected behaviour patterns. Therefore, we developed and validated a scale to rate social-communicative behaviour problems and expression of emotions. Factor analysis suggested two factors which corresponded to the intended measurement object and the defined taxonomy of behavioural problems (scale 1: mainly internalized behaviour; scale 2: externalized behaviour). Both internal consistency and split-half reliability proved to be good. High convergent criterion validity was found for scale 1 and still substantial, although lower, for scale 2. The rating is simple and can be performed within ten and scored within five minutes. The result is a reliable indicator for a step-by-step approach to recommend an expanded specific psycho-diagnostics, so that therapeutic interventions as well as prevention programmes for vulnerable children and appropriate social training programmes can start timely.

  14. Development and testing of a theory-based behavioural change intervention: a pilot investigation in a nursery school in a deprived area of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilinsky, A; Swanson, V; Merrett, M; Power, K; Marley, L

    2012-03-01

    Investigate the effect of a theory-based intervention on oral-health knowledge, attitudes and behaviours of early years staff (EYS), parents and nursery children. Qualitative research with staff and parents from eight nurseries through interviews/focus groups. An intervention was developed and piloted using pre-posttest design. Nurseries in deprived communities in Dundee, Scotland. 111 children aged 3-5 years attending nursery, including 79 parents and 8 nursery staff. Staff session targeted outcome expectancies, subjective norms and self-efficacy for tooth-brushing in nursery using information provision, modelling and goal-setting, followed by a three-week intervention. Parent-child dyads received a leaflet with instructions for goal-setting, planning and monitoring home brushing. Tooth-brushing self-monitoring materials (e.g. two-minute timer, diaries) were used and certificates provided in the nursery as rewards. EYS knowledge, attitudes and behaviours were assessed before and after the intervention using self-report questionnaires. Parents completed interviews assessing beliefs about tooth-brushing and their children's tooth-brushing behaviour at baseline and post-intervention follow-up. Significant improvements in staff knowledge, but not attitudes, self-efficacy, or nursery tooth-brushing were reported. Parent-child dyads completing the intervention were not more likely to report their child carried out twice-daily tooth-brushing at home. The intervention did not improve parents' intentions to brush their child's teeth twice a day or beliefs about the ease of twice-daily tooth-brushing. Only past behaviour significantly predicted posttest brushing. Parents who found brushing easier at baseline were more likely to complete the intervention. Recommendations are made regarding implementing psychological theory and methods into oral-health interventions.

  15. Nursery and nursery products in Beijing, Tianjin, Shandong and Shanghai

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.H.; Zhang XiaoYong, Xiaoyong

    2003-01-01

    The production and demand of nursery products is growing rapidly in China, particularly in big cities as Beijing, Tianjin, Shandong and Shanghai. The report describes the development and the prospects of production and demand of nursery products and the structure of the nursery sector in these

  16. Nursery management [Chapter 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim M. Wilkinson

    2009-01-01

    This handbook provides an overview of the factors that go into starting and operating a native plant nursery. Management includes all aspects of working with plants in all their phases of growth as described in Chapter 3, Crop Planning and Developing Propagation Protocols. Management also includes working with the community; organizing materials and infrastructure;...

  17. The opinions of the kindergarten teachers in relation to the introduction of computers to nursery schools: Preliminary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sivropoulou

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Computers were introduced in Greek kindergartens of our country with the new curricula for kindergarten (Inter-disciplinary Integrated Framework of Study Programs OFFICIAL JOURNAL OF THE HELLENIC REPUBLIC (376΄t.B/18-10-2001, article 6 in order to contribute to the spherical growth of children and to extend their learning. In other words it is intended that the computer will increase the interests and the motives for learning, to encourage active learning, to strengthen the dynamics of visualization, the importance of feedback, the possibility of monitoring and the possibility of connecting the school activities with extra curricula activities in order to strengthen the social and cultural dimension of kindergarten. Nevertheless technology cannot in itself, bring the sought after change in preschool education. Kindergarten teachers are the key for the successful use of computers in kindergarten. However, while kindergarten teachers in certain countries approve of the introduction and use of computers and believe that education with computers is developmentally suitable for small children, in other countries the attitude of kindergarten teachers towards computers is rather negative. This negative attitude of kindergarten teachers relates to their knowledge of computers and how often they use them or is it related to cultural factors and the prevailing educational philosophies? These questions led us to attempt to investigate the opinions of kindergarten teachers in Thessaloniki in regard to the introduction of new technologies in kindergarten. The research is made up of three interactive parts. It begins with the theoretical discussion about the introduction of computers in kindergarten, an investigation of the opinions of 122 kindergarten teachers using a questionnaire made up of 33 questions follows and it ends with the interpretative analysis.

  18. Nursery school at Vincennes: O.P.R.I. investigation; Ecole maternelle a Vincennes: l'investigation de l'Opri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, J.L.; Fouquet, G.; Linden, G

    2001-08-01

    After five children neoplasms at the nursery of Vincennes, the O.P.R.I. has realised two measurement campaigns during the year 2001. The track of a radioactive contamination, based on the private laboratory analysis has been denied by O.P.R.I. (N.C.)

  19. Planning a native plant nursery [Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim M. Wilkinson; Thomas D. Landis

    2009-01-01

    Every nursery is unique. The environmental, social, and economic context is different for each nursery. A wide variety of species and outplanting environments contributes to nursery diversity. In addition, each nursery has a distinct vision and purpose.The methods a nursery will use to bring people together, produce high-quality plants for the community, and share...

  20. Association between distance to nearest supermarket and provision of fruits and vegetables in English nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    Burgoine, Thomas; Gallis, John A.; L. Penney, Tarra; Monsivais, Pablo; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E

    2017-01-01

    With 796,500 places available for children in England, pre-school nurseries could serve as an important setting for population-wide dietary intervention. It is critical to understand the determinants of healthy food provision in this setting, which may include access to food stores. This study examined the association between objective, GIS-derived supermarket proximity and fruit and vegetable serving frequency, using data from 623 English nurseries. Overall, 116 (18%) nurseries served fruits...

  1. Establishing a mangrove nursery

    OpenAIRE

    Sinohin, Veronica; Baconguis, Santiago

    2000-01-01

    Mangroves play an important role in creating habitats for a diverse community of organisms ranging from bacteria and fungi to fishes and mammals. They grow in intertidal flats, estuaries and offshore islands. In the Philippines, mangrove forests have dramatically decreased in area since the start of the century, and therefore there is a need to reforest. However, first mangrove nurseries must be established since they serve as sources of planting materials for different mangrove species. Furt...

  2. Como andar sem poesia? a leitura de poemas na educação infantil / How to go without poetry? the reading of poetry in nursery school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Cogo Fronckowiak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo reflete sobre a fruição do gênero poético por crianças ainda não alfabetizadas a partir de momentos compartilhados com elas no cotidiano de escolas de Educação Infantil. Essa vivência, vinculada ao projeto de pesquisa Poesia e infância3, demonstrou a relevância de possibilitar às crianças um contato intenso com a poesia, texto singular que as capacita a expressar, na sua linguagem, o modo como interagem com o outro e com o mundo. Através de encontros semanais com crianças de 4 a 6 anos de duas escolas da região do Vale do Rio Pardo/RS, foi possível perceber uma extrema abertura da infância para os jogos vocabulares e sonoros. Na continuidade da pesquisa, pudemos estudar as características textuais mais valorizados pelas crianças na escuta de textos poéticos. Uma hipótese era a de que a audição regular de poemas potencializava a repercussão e a ressonância, aspectos apontados por Gaston Bachelard como intrínsecos ao devaneio poético, experiência oportunizada pelaleitura/audição da poesia e que faculta ao leitor encontrar “um não-eu meu que me permite viver minha confiança de estar no mundo” (BACHELARD, 1988, p. 134. Ancorado nos resultados obtidos, estetexto defende a rima e o discurso predominante do poema como fatores essenciais para os pequenos experimentarem a ressonância poética.Abstract The article reflects on the fruition of the poetic gender by illiterate children through the shared moments with them in the Nursery Schools’ daily. This living, linked to the Poesia e infância14 research project, demonstrated the relevance in giving children an intense contact with poetry, singular text that enables them to express, in their own language, the way they interact with the other and the world. By means of weekly meetings with children from 4 to 6 years-old of two schools in the Rio Pardo/RS Valley Region, we could perceive an extreme opening of the childhood to the word and sonorous games. In

  3. Nursery manual for native plants: A guide for tribal nurseries - Volume 1: Nursery management

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Tara Luna; Thomas D. Landis

    2009-01-01

    In 2001, the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), through its Virtual Center for Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetics Resources (RNGR), invited Native Americans from across the United States to attend the Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Association annual meeting. About 25 tribal members, representing 20 tribes, attended the meeting at Fort...

  4. 7 CFR 1437.305 - Ornamental nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ornamental nursery. 1437.305 Section 1437.305... Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.305 Ornamental nursery. (a) Eligible ornamental nursery stock is a... ornamental nursery stock is limited to field-grown and containerized decorative plants grown in a controlled...

  5. 7 CFR 701.55 - Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nursery. 701.55 Section 701.55 Agriculture Regulations... ADMINISTERED UNDER THIS PART § 701.55 Nursery. (a) Subject to the other eligibility provisions of this part... under this section for the cost of removing nursery debris such as nursery structures, shade houses, and...

  6. Towards Improving Nursery Education Programme In Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper therefore determines the areas of emphasis in nursery education, benefits from effective nursery education and the need to co-ordinate nursery education in Nigeria. Suggestions were made based on the conclusion. Keywords: Nursery Education, ogramme In Urban / Rural Areas. Journal of Technology and ...

  7. Streptococcal throat carriage in a population of nursery and primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a major cause of mortality in man. Regular disease surveillance can be achieved through evaluation of throat carriage. Objectives: To evaluate GAS throat carriage amongst nursery and primary schools pupils in Benin City, Nigeria. Method: This cross sectional study was carried ...

  8. Nursery profile: North Carolina Department of Forest Resources F.H. Claridge Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    James West

    2009-01-01

    North Carolina Department of Forest Resources F.H. Claridge Nursery in Goldsboro, was founded as the Little River Nursery in 1954, and was one of five nurseries in the Forest Resources Division at the time. The early focus of the nursery was on southern yellow pine species, predominantly loblolly (Pinus taeda) and longleaf (P. palustris...

  9. Forest Nursery Notes, Volume 30, Issue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Tom D. Landis

    2010-01-01

    Forest Nursery Notes (FNN) is a nursery news and literature service that is distributed free of charge to over 1,200 cooperators in the United States, Canada, and other foreign countries. This issue's topics include: fertigation, holdover nursery stock, late-season fertilization, and bird damage.

  10. Nursery of Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion). New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud. This image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years. Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars, depicted in green, can be seen surrounding the DR21 region

  11. Nursery nutrition in Liverpool: an exploration of practice and nutritional analysis of food provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Mike; Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Weston, Gemma; Macklin, Julie; McFadden, Kate

    2011-10-01

    To explore nutrition and food provision in pre-school nurseries in order to develop interventions to promote healthy eating in pre-school settings. Quantitative data were gathered using questionnaires and professional menu analysis. In the community, at pre-school nurseries. All 130 nurseries across Liverpool were a sent questionnaire (38 % response rate); thirty-four menus were returned for analysis (26 % response rate). Only 21 % of respondents stated they had adequate knowledge on nutrition for pre-school children. Sixty-one per cent of cooks reported having received only a 'little' advice on healthy eating and this was often not specific to under-5 s nutrition. Fifty-seven per cent of nurseries did not regularly assess their menus for nutritional quality. The menu analysis revealed that all menus were deficient in energy, carbohydrate, Fe and Zn. Eighty-five per cent of nurseries had Na/salt levels which exceed guidelines. Nurseries require support on healthy eating at policy, knowledge and training levels. This support should address concerns relating to both menu planning and ingredients used in food provision and meet current guidelines on food provision for the under-5 s.

  12. Rates of Computer and Internet Use by Children in Nursery School and Students in Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade: 2003. Issue Brief. NCES 2005-111

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBell, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    The use of computers and the Internet by students has increased rapidly in recent years. In 2001, computer and Internet use was more widespread among school-age children and adolescents than among adults. The now commonplace use of these technologies follows the installation of computers and Internet access in nearly all public schools and in a…

  13. Recirculation nursery systems for bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamermans, P.; Blanco Garcia, A.; Joaquim, Sandra; Matias, Domitilia; Magnesen, Thorolf; Nicolas, J.; Petten, Bruno; Robert, Rene

    2016-01-01

    n order to increase production of bivalves in hatcheries and nurseries, the development of new technology and its integration into commercial bivalve hatcheries is important. Recirculation aquaculture systems (RASs) have several advantages: high densities of the species can be cultured resulting in

  14. Programa de intervenção e atenção precoce com bebês na educação infantil Early intervention program in nursery school with babies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Santos Soejima

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa verificou se um programa de intervenção precoce tem efeitos positivos sobre o desenvolvimento (motor e mental de crianças entre um e três anos de idade que permaneciam em tempo integral na creche pública e apresentavam defasagem no desenvolvimento. Inicialmente, foram avaliadas 63 crianças por meio das Escalas Bayley II, sendo que 37 delas apresentaram defasagem no desenvolvimento em ambas as escalas, mental e motora. Destas 37 crianças, 20 foram sorteadas para participar de um programa de intervenção precoce. Após a realização desta intervenção, foram sorteadas, para a segunda aplicação das Escalas Bayley II, 15 crianças com defasagem e participantes da intervenção, 15 crianças com defasagem e não participantes da intervenção e 15 crianças sem defasagem. Os resultados evidenciaram visível progressão no desenvolvimento das crianças que apresentaram defasagem e participaram da intervenção precoce. Concluiu-se a viabilidade do emprego de uma intervenção de caráter preventivo nas creches públicas, na perspectiva da atenção precoce. Dessa forma, defasagens do desenvolvimento infantil podem ser prevenidas, identificadas, trabalhadas e superadas, evitando futuras deficiências ou transtornos no desenvolvimento infantil.The research examined whether a program of early intervention has positive effects on the development (motor and mental in children with ages from one to three who stay full-time in a public nursery school and present developmental delay. Initially 63 children were evaluated using the Bayley Scales II, being that 37 of them showed delay in both scales, mental and motor. Of these 37 children, 20 were randomly selected to participate in an early intervention program. After this intervention, three groups were formed for the second application of the Bayley Scales II, being that the groups were compounded of 15 children with developmental delay who had participated in the mentioned early

  15. [Surveillance study in collaboration with a university-daycare center for elderly people and nursery school for children on the use of over-the-counter drugs and health food in Fukuyama].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anraku, Makoto; Inoue, Hirofumi; Sato, Eiji; Hata, Toshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Daiju; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshitomi, Hironori; Kondo, Yuko; Tanaka, Masataka; Tomida, Hisao

    2010-08-01

    To estimate the extent of use of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and health food, we administered a questionnaire to the parents of children in a nursery school and to elderly people in a daycare center in Fukuyama city. The aim of the questionnaire was to determine the percentage of children and elderly people who use OTC drugs and health food, the purpose of using them, and the types of OTC drugs and health food used. Other questions concerned the person advising them on the use of OTC and health food, the side effects of OTC drugs and health food, and the awareness of children and elderly people regarding possible interactions between prescription drugs and OTC drugs. In children, the most frequently consumed OTC drugs were cold medicines (32.1%), followed by topical creams (22.6%) and eye lotion (14.3%). In elderly people, the most frequently consumed OTC products were eye lotion (18.0%), followed by laxatives (14.8%) and fomentation agents (13.1%). The purchase ratio of health food for children and elderly people were 4.8% and 11.5%, respectively. These results suggest that the need for OTC drugs and health food in children are very different from those in elderly people. In addition, in promoting self-medication, the demand for the opinion of a specialist occupied about 80% or 70% of the total specialist time among children and elderly people, respectively. Therefore, when providing information on health food and OTC drugs, the needs of each generation should be taken into account. The information obtained from the responses received will allow us to provide better pharmaceutical care for both children and elderly people in Fukuyama city.

  16. Shark nursery areas: concepts, definition, characterization and assumptions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelle R. Heupel; John K. Carlson; Colin A. Simpfendorfer

    2007-01-01

    .... Despite several descriptions of how shark species use nursery areas and what types of regions nurseries may be found in, no explicit definition of what constitutes a shark nursery area has been presented...

  17. Case studies of nurseries in Malawi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Namoto, M.; Likoswe, M.G.

    This study of 42 case studies of nurseries was made as part of a major sample survey of 360 nurseries in 6 districts in Malawi. The purpose of the study was to let the small nurseries in the country explain in their own words how they source seed, how and for whom they produce seedlings......, and to explain about their problems and opportunities in the nursery business. The assessment was made within the framework of Improved Seed Supply for Agroforestry in African Countries (ISSAAC), a Danida supported programme implemented in cooperation between Forest & Landscape Denmark and World Agroforestry...

  18. The Effects of Gender and Attendance Period on Children's Adjustment to Nursery Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Julie; Brember, Ivy

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes the effects of gender and time of attendance on children's adjustment to English nursery classes attached to primary schools. Results show boys were perceived as less well adjusted to school than are girls. Afternoon attendees were found to be less well adjusted than morning attendees. Discusses strategies to help those who are less well…

  19. Hot spots of Phytophthora in commercial nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina Junker; Patrick Goff; Stefan Wagner; Sabine Werres

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that nurseries are an important source for the spread of Phytophthora. Most surveys and studies focusing on the epidemiology of these pathogens in nurseries are based on sampling of symptomatic plants or on samples like water of different sources used for irrigation. There is little knowledge, however, on the survival and...

  20. Nursery practices, seedling sizes, and field performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William I. Stein

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented from a large cooperative study to determine the combined effects of nursery cultural practices on the initial size and subsequent field performance of 2+0 Douglas-fir seedlings. The study involved seven sources of stock produced in three different nurseries and field plantings made over 3 years on 28 sites in southwestern Oregon. Seedbed...

  1. Forest nursery pest management in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene Alberto Lopez Castilla; Angela Duarte Casanova; Celia Guerra Rivero; Haylett Cruz Escoto; Natividad Triguero Issasi

    2002-01-01

    A systematic survey of methods to detect pests in forest nurseries before they damage plants was done. These surveys recorded the most important forest nursery pests during 18 years (from 1980 to 1998) and their geographical and temporal distribution in the principal enterprises in Cuba. Approximately a dozen insect species and three fungi species responsible for the...

  2. APHIS Phytophthora ramorum regulatory strategy for nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Jones

    2006-01-01

    A review of the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) regulatory response to Phytophthora ramorum is presented as it impacts nurseries and the nursery industry. The Agency responded in 2004 with three Federal Orders, each more restrictive than the previous one because the appropriate response called...

  3. ¿Qué Efecto Tiene Asistir a Sala Cuna y Jardín Infantil Desde los Tres Meses Hasta los Cuatro Años de Edad?: Estudio Longitudinal en la Junta Nacional de Jardines Infantiles What Is the Effect of Attending Nursery School Between Three Months and Four Years of Age?: A Longitudinal Study in the National Preschool Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Seguel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio longitudinal cuasi-experimental con grupo de comparación examinó el efecto de asistir desde 1 a 4 años de edad a jardines de la Junta Nacional de Jardines Infantiles (JUNJI de Chile sobre el desarrollo/aprendizaje de los párvulos y el efecto diferencial de asistir a partir de los 3 años. El muestreo fue bietápico (41 jardines y 427 niños al inicio y estratificado por región del país. El grupo de comparación, con características socioeconómicas similares (184 niños al inicio, no asistía a sala cuna. Los niños fueron evaluados anualmente con el Inventario de Desarrollo Battelle. También se recogieron variables familiares y educativas con entrevistas semi-estructuradas y pautas de observación. Comparaciones usando Propensity Score Matching y análisis de Mínimos Cuadrados Ordinarios arrojaron que alrededor del 80% de los niños cursa un desarrollo normal, independientemente de que asistan a los jardines infantiles JUNJI o permanezcan en sus casas. Asistir desde los 3 años tendría un efecto positivo en el desarrollo infantil. La calidad de las prácticas pedagógicas en lactantes y la actitud didáctica familiar explicarían mayormente el desarrollo de los párvulos.This quasi-experimental longitudinal study with comparison group examined the effect on the learning and developmental levels of infants attending the National Preschool Association (JUNJI nursery schools in Chile (between 3 months and 4 years of age and the differential effect of attending them from 3 years of age onward. A two-stage (41 nurseries and 427 children at the beginning and stratified sample by region was used. The comparison group, with similar socioeconomic characteristics (184 children at the beginning, did not attend a nursery school. Children were assessed yearly with the Battelle Developmental Inventory. Family and educational variables were collected using semi-structured interviews and an observational guideline. Comparisons using

  4. Care of Preschoolers with Congenital Heart Disease by Kindergarten and Nursery Teachers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Hisae

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the involvement of kindergarten and nursery school teachers with young children with congenital heart disease. The study was designed as a qualitative descriptive study. Interviews of kindergarten and nursery school teachers with experience in the care and education of young children with congenital heart disease were conducted, during which they described their experience. Verbatim transcripts of the interviews were prepared, and the content was categorized. The study participants were 11 kindergarten and nursery school teachers. Extracted from the content of the interviews of the study participants were 282 codes, 33 subcategories, 6 categories, and 2 major categories. In their responses, the teachers indicated that they had been "Providing care for the children while seeking ways to avoid special treatment in a group setting." In addition, they established a "Framework for school-parent cooperation in order to promptly accommodate the wishes of parents" of these children. The study showed that the kindergarten and nursery school teachers involved other pupils and monitored the condition of children with congenital heart disease to avoid special treatment of the children in the group setting. In addition, the teachers established a framework for cooperation between the school and parents. In the future, these findings will be used to create a nursing support model for the group life of young children with congenital heart disease.

  5. Cárie dental e consumo de açúcar em crianças assistidas por creche pública Dental caries and sugar consumption in a group of public nursery school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Andrade LEITE

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo determinou o consumo médio de açúcar e sua relação com a experiência de cárie de um grupo de 51 crianças assistidas por creche pública (idade média = 48 meses. O índice ceo-d (número de dentes decíduos cariados, com extração indicada e obturados foi registrado para cada criança. Um registro da dieta consumida em quatro dias foi obtido através do método de observação direta e o consumo médio de açúcar foi computado. O índice ceo-d médio das crianças foi 2,75. Das 51 crianças acompanhadas, 15 estavam livres de cárie (29,4% e 36 tinham experiência de cárie (70,6%. O consumo médio de açúcar em quatro dias de observação foi 130 g/dia. Um maior consumo de açúcar associou-se significantemente com uma elevação do índice ceo-d.This study determined the sugar consumption and its relationship to caries development in a group of 51 public nursery school children (mean age = 48 months. The dmf-t score (number of decayed, missing and filled primary teeth was recorded for each child. A four-day diary was obtained using the local observation method and the average sugar consumption was calculated. The mean dmf-t score was 2.75. From the 51 children examined, 15 were caries free (29.4% and 36 (70.6% had caries development. The average sugar consumption was 130g/day. An increase in the sugar consumption has been associated with a significant increase in the dmf-t score.

  6. The Influence of Neonatal Nursery Design on Mothers' Interactions in the Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Liz; Peters, Kathryn; Rowe, Jennifer; Sheeran, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of neonatal nursery design on interactions between nurses and mothers of infants in the nursery. We used a natural quasi-experimental design, using semi-structured interviews and a structured measure of mothers' and nurses' perceptions of nursing care, to compare mothers (n=26 and n=40) and nurses (n=22 and n=29) in an open-bay (OB) nursery and a single family room (SFR) nursery. Thematic analysis was used to generate key themes from the interviews. Mothers and nurses in both nursery designs talked about Valuing interactions; the importance of interactions between mothers and nurses. Mothers and nurses described SFRs as providing a space, My/their room, which enhanced mothers' sense of control and connection with the infant. SFRs were also associated with Changing the norms of interactions with nurses and other mothers, which created challenges in the desired quantity and quality of interactions for mothers and nurses. Nurses in the SFR nursery also reported Enhanced interactions, including improved confidentiality and personalized communication. Mothers in the OB nursery reported more supportive mothering actions from nurses than mothers in the SFR nursery. Both mothers and nurses in the OB nursery also talked about Our nursery community, which captured the value of having other nurses and mothers in the rooms. Mothers and nurses perceived that the SFR nursery enhanced privacy and maternal closeness for mothers compared to the OB nursery. However, the SFR nursery design presented challenges to some interactions of value to nurses and mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. L. Haase; J. R. Pinto; K. M. Wilkinson

    2013-01-01

    These proceedings are a compilation of 20 papers that were presented at the regional meetings of the forest and conservation nursery associations and the Intertribal Nursery Council meeting in the United States in 2012. The Joint Meeting of the Southern Forest Nursery Association and Northeastern Forest and Conservation Nursery Association was held at the Sheraton Read...

  8. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. L. Haase; J. R. Pinto; L. E. Riley

    2012-01-01

    These proceedings are a compilation of 20 papers that were presented at the regional meetings of the forest and conservation nursery associations and the Intertribal Nursery Council meeting in the United States in 2011. The Joint Meeting of the Southern Forest Nursery Association and Northeastern Forest and Conservation Nursery Association was held at the Pullman Plaza...

  9. 29 CFR 780.205 - Nursery activities generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursery activities generally. 780.205 Section 780.205 Labor... as It Relates to Specific Situations Nursery and Landscaping Operations § 780.205 Nursery activities generally. The employees of a nursery who are engaged in the following activities are employed in...

  10. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. E Riley; D. L. Haase; J. R. Pinto

    2011-01-01

    These proceedings are a compilation of 25 papers that were presented at the regional meetings of the forest and conservation nursery associations and the Intertribal Nursery Council meeting in the United States in 2010. The Joint Meeting of the Southern Forest Nursery Association and Northeastern Forest and Conservation Nursery Association was held at the Peabody Hotel...

  11. 76 FR 78610 - Notice of Intent To Suspend the Nursery Production, the Nursery and Floriculture Chemical Use...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... National Agricultural Statistics Service Notice of Intent To Suspend the Nursery Production, the Nursery... Service (NASS) to suspend currently approved information collections for all Nursery and Christmas Tree Production Surveys along with the Nursery and Floriculture Chemical Use Survey approved under OMB 0535-0244...

  12. The Education of the Nursery School Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patty Smith

    2017-01-01

    Patty Smith Hill (1868-1946) was a leader in the kindergarten movement and an advocate of the value of free play in the education of young children. She was a founding member of the International Kindergarten Union, which eventually became the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI). She also served as ACEI President in 1909. She…

  13. The Significance of the Nursery School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesell, Arnold

    2017-01-01

    From the standpoint of mental health and perhaps even from the standpoint of human culture, the complete realization of the educational possibilities of the preschool child is of foundational significance. Normative and comparative studies performed at a psychological clinic at Yale examining norms of development in children from one month to five…

  14. Nursery Pest Management Final Environmental Impact Statement

    OpenAIRE

    United States Forest Service

    1994-01-01

    The Forest Service, in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, is presenting three alternative ways of managing pests (weeds, diseases, insects, and animals) at the Lucky Peak Nursery in the Intermountain Region.

  15. Dermatophytes and other fungi associated with scalp-hair of nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 2,117 nursery and primary school children aged 1-13 years were surveyed for scalphair infection in Awka, Nigeria between January and March 2004. Specimens for mycological investigations were confirmed by microscopic examinations in 100 cases (4.7%) and the causative agents was isolated and cultured in ...

  16. Association between distance to nearest supermarket and provision of fruits and vegetables in English nurseries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoine, Thomas; Gallis, John A; L Penney, Tarra; Monsivais, Pablo; Benjamin Neelon, Sara E

    2017-07-01

    With 796,500 places available for children in England, pre-school nurseries could serve as an important setting for population-wide dietary intervention. It is critical to understand the determinants of healthy food provision in this setting, which may include access to food stores. This study examined the association between objective, GIS-derived supermarket proximity and fruit and vegetable serving frequency, using data from 623 English nurseries. Overall, 116 (18%) nurseries served fruits and vegetables infrequently (supermarket proximity. In adjusted multivariable regression models, nurseries farthest from their nearest supermarket (Q5, 1.7-19.8km) had 2.38 (95% CI 1.01-5.63) greater odds of infrequent provision. Our results suggest that supermarket access may be important for nurseries in meeting fruit and vegetable provision guidelines. We advance a growing body of international literature, for the first time linking the food practices of institutions to their neighbourhood food retail context. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. IRRIGATION OF ORNAMENTAL PLANT NURSERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Aguiar do Couto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airports consume significant amounts of water which can be compared to the volume consumed by mid-size cities, thus practices aimed at reducing water consumption are important and necessar y. The objective of this study was to assess the reuse potential of sewage effluent produced at a mid-size international airport for nursery irri gation. The sewage treatment system consisted of a facultative pond followed by a constructed wetland, which were monitored during one hydrological year a nd the parameters COD, pH, solids, nitrogen, phosphorus and Escherichia coli we re analyzed. Removal efficiencies of 85% and 91% were achieved for C OD and solids, respectively. Removal efficiencies for ammonia nitrogen a nd total phosphorus were 77% and 59%, respectively. In terms of E. coli concen tration, the treated effluent met the recommendations by the World Health Organization for reuse in irrigation with the advantage of providing high levels of residual nutrient. The ornamental species Impatiens walleriana was irrigated with treated sewage effluent and plant growth characteristics were evalua ted. The experiment showed that reuse can enhance plant growth without signi ficantly affecting leaf tissue and soil characteristics. This study highlighted th e importance of simple technologies for sewage treatment especially in count ries which still do not present great investment in sanitation and proved that effluent reuse for landscape irrigation can provide great savings of water and financial resources for airport environments.

  18. [Nursery Teacher's Stress Scale (NTSS): reliability and validity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akada, Taro

    2010-06-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of the Nursery Teacher's Stress Scale (NTSS), which explores the relation between daily hassles at work and work-related stress. In Analysis 1, 29 items were chosen to construct the NTSS. Six factors were identified: I. Stress relating to child care; II. Stress from human relations at work; III. Stress from staff-parent relations; IV. Stress from lack of time; V. Stress relating to compensation; and VI. Stress from the difference between individual beliefs and school policy. All these factors had high degrees of internal consistency. In Analysis 2, the concurrent validity of the NTSS was examined. The results showed that the NTSS total scores were significantly correlated with the Job Stress Scale-Revised Version (job stressor scale, r = .68), the Pre-school Teacher-efficacy Scale (r = -.21), and the WHO-five Well-Being Index Japanese Version (r = -.40). Work stresses are affected by several daily hassles at work. The NTSS has acceptable reliability and validity, and can be used to improve nursery teacher's mental health.

  19. The Views of the Teachers Related to the Problems the Nursery Class Teachers Encounter in Personnel Services and General Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertör, Eren; Akan, Durdagi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to analyze the problems that the nursery school teachers, who worked in primary schools of Ministry of National Education in Agri city center in 2014-2015 academic years, experience in personnel services and general services according to the views of the teachers. In the direction of this purpose, phenomenology design,…

  20. Influências das relações intrafamiliares no comportamento de crianças que frequentam creches públicas de alfenas Influencias de las relaciones intrafamiliares en el comportamiento de niños en centros infantiles de Alfenas Influences of intra-family relationships on the behavior of children attending public nursery schools in Alfenas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelly Rodrigues Esteves

    2012-09-01

    , leading to an increase in the nursery school demand by the population. Our aim was to understand the influences of intra-family relationships on the behavior of children ages 0-3 years old who attend nursery schools through the experiences of their child care providers. A qualitative research, using Phenomenological Approach, in which 12 child care providers of six municipal nursery schools were interviewed. As categories: Reproduction of behaviors learned in the family atmosphere; Integration family-nursery school as a facilitator of the work carried out by the child care providers; Lack of hygienic care offered by the family. Future studies could promote improvements in the actions of caregivers towards the children's needs, leading to a better quality of life for the children and helping to develop their full potential.

  1. MEANING AND FORM IN NURSERY RHYMES TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikke Dewi Pratama

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MAKNA DAN BENTUK DALAM PENERJEMAHAN LAGU-LAGU ANAK Abstract Translating nursery rhymes is not an easy task. The problems of equivalence in meaning and form as well as in the harmony between the translated lyrics and the music are aspects that need to be considered by the translators. By considering nursery rhyme lyric as poetry text, this research analyzes the equivalence of meaning and form in nursery rhymes translation. This research focuses on five nursery rhymes. The meaning analysis was done by conducting particular procedures on translation quality assessment. Meanwhile, the analysis of the form was conducted by comparing the two versions of the nursery rhymes focusing on the sound values. From the equivalence of meaning, the result shows that most nursery rhymes are translated less accurately. On the other hand, the finding of the equivalence in form shows that most of the auditory devices are deleted while most of the rhymes are shifted. This research is expected to give a contribution to song translation activities especially those involving children as the target listeners. Keywords: equivalence, accuracy, sound values, auditory devices, rhymes Abstrak Menerjemahkan lagu anak bukanlah hal yang mudah. Masalah kesepadanan makna dan bentuk, serta harmonisasi antara lirik terjemahan dan musik adalah aspek-aspek yang harus dipertimbangkan oleh penerjemah. Dengan mempertimbangkan lirik lagu anak sebagai teks puisi, penelitian ini menganalisis kesepadanan antara makna dan bentuk dalam terjemahan lagu anak. Dengan menggunakan teknik sampling, penelitian ini berfokus kepada lima lagu anak. Analisis makna dilakukan dengan prosedur penelitian kualitas terjemahan sedangkan analisis bentuk dilakukan dengan membandingkan dua versi lagu anak dengan fokus kepada sound values (bunyi. Analisis kesepadanan makna menunjukkan bahwa sebagian besar lagu anak diterjemahkan dengan kurang akurat. Dari segi bentuk, sebagian besar auditory devices

  2. RNGR: A national resource for reforestation, restoration, and nursery professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase; Jeremiah R. Pinto; R. Kasten Dumroese; George Hernandez; Bob Karrfalt; Ron Overton

    2011-01-01

    The Forest Service developed the national Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetics Resources (RNGR) program to provide expert support to State, industrial, and private forest and conservation nurseries throughout the country. The RNGR program includes technical assistance to nurseries, research projects (to address seedling and field issues), and Internet sites. RNGR...

  3. 7 CFR 457.163 - Nursery peak inventory endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nursery peak inventory endorsement. 457.163 Section... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.163 Nursery peak inventory endorsement. Nursery Crop Insurance Peak Inventory Endorsement This endorsement is not continuous and must be...

  4. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. E. Riley; J. R. Pinto; R. K. Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    These proceedings are a compilation of 20 papers that were presented at the regional meetings of the Intertribal Nursery Council and the forest and conservation nursery associations in the United States in 2009. The Intertribal Nursery Council Meeting was held at the Best Western University Inn in Moscow, Idaho, on July 14, 2009. Subject matter for the technical...

  5. 7 CFR 457.164 - Nursery rehabilitation endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nursery rehabilitation endorsement. 457.164 Section... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.164 Nursery rehabilitation endorsement. Nursery Crop Insurance Rehabilitation Endorsement If you elect this endorsement and pay the...

  6. Soils and nutrition: A forest nursery perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell D. Briggs

    2008-01-01

    A brief review of the published proceedings from meetings of nursery managers over the past 30 years reveals a high level of consistency with respect to topics of interest from year to year. Seedling quality, defined as seedling capacity to effectively compete after outplanting, has been the unifying theme. Production issues, including collection, storage, and sowing...

  7. Epidemiological Study Of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Among Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bateriuria in preschool children of different age and sex groups and to isolate the organisms responsible for asymptomatic bacteriuria and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. A total of 475 children from 17 nurseries in Ahvaz city, Iran ...

  8. Studies in western yellow pine nursery practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald R. Brewster; J. A. Larsen

    1925-01-01

    In 1912 and 1913, when nursery experiments were started under direction of the then "Priest River'' Forest Experiment Station, at Priest River, Idaho, and elsewhere, western yellow pine (Pinus ponderosa) was one of the principal species being planted on a large scale in the northern Rocky Mountain region and millions of plants were being raised each year...

  9. Containerized Nursery Start-up Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike Edwards

    2002-01-01

    About 4 years ago, I seriously began to entertain the idea of opening a containerized forestry nursery. During this period, some of the timberland owned by American Forest Seed Service near Auburn University's Solon Dixon Forestry Center, located in Andalusia, AL, was being used for three out-planting test plots. The test plots compared growth rates between...

  10. Raising native plants in nurseries: basic concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2012-01-01

    Growing native plants can be fun, challenging, and rewarding. This booklet, particularly the first chapter that introduces important concepts, is for the novice who wants to start growing native plants as a hobby; however, it can also be helpful to someone with a bit more experience who is wondering about starting a nursery. The second chapter provides basic...

  11. Ambitious Survey Spots Stellar Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    -dimensional geometry of the Magellanic system. Chris Evans from the VMC team adds: "The VISTA images will allow us to extend our studies beyond the inner regions of the Tarantula into the multitude of smaller stellar nurseries nearby, which also harbour a rich population of young and massive stars. Armed with the new, exquisite infrared images, we will be able to probe the cocoons in which massive stars are still forming today, while also looking at their interaction with older stars in the wider region." The wide-field image shows a host of different objects. The bright area above the centre is the Tarantula Nebula itself, with the RMC 136 cluster of massive stars in its core. To the left is the NGC 2100 star cluster. To the right is the tiny remnant of the supernova SN1987A (eso1032). Below the centre are a series of star-forming regions including NGC 2080 - nicknamed the "Ghost Head Nebula" - and the NGC 2083 star cluster. The VISTA Magellanic Cloud Survey is one of six huge near-infrared surveys of the southern sky that will take up most of the first five years of operations of VISTA. Notes [1] VISTA ― the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy ― is the newest telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory in northern Chile. VISTA is a survey telescope working at near-infrared wavelengths and is the world's largest survey telescope. Its large mirror, wide field of view and very sensitive detectors will reveal a completely new view of the southern sky. The telescope is housed on the peak adjacent to the one hosting ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and shares the same exceptional observing conditions. VISTA has a main mirror that is 4.1 m across. In photographic terms it can be thought of as a 67-megapixel digital camera with a 13 000 mm f/3.25 mirror lens. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries

  12. An update on microsatellite genotype information of Phytophthora ramorum in Washington State nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Coats; Gary Chastagner; Norm Dart; Meg M. Larsen; Niklaus J.. Grunwald

    2010-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum was first detected in a Washington nursery in 2003 and has since been positively identified in 46 nurseries, three non-nursery water sites, and three landscape sites. Thirteen nurseries have tested positive for 2 consecutive years and four nurseries have been positive for 3 consecutive years, despite the completion of the U...

  13. Cactus Nurseries and Conservation in a Biosphere Reserve in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    María T Pulido; Consuelo Cuevas-Cardona

    2013-01-01

    Documenting how socio-ecosystem conservation knowledge and practice arise and are modified are issues of ethnobiological interest. In the Barranca de Metztitlán Biosphere Reserve (RBBM), plant nurseries, some of which were created as Environmental Management Units (UMAs), have been established to grow and conserve cacti. This paper describes these nurseries, their role in cactus conservation, and the benefits and limitations for the people managing them. The nurseries have helped decrease ill...

  14. The Consciousness of Food Preparers in Day Nurseries : A Questionnaire Survey on Small and Medium Day Nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    高木, 瞳; 青木, 好子; Hitomi, Takagi; Yoshiko, Aoki; 池内わらべ保育園

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to investigate the actual working condition of food preparers in both small and medium-size day nurseries and their consciousness regarding day nursery feeding. In spite of the importance of day nursery feeding, it has become clear that food preparers working condition as well as their status has been quite insufficient, and the importance of their work has not been highly esteemed. On the other hand, it has been recognized that food preparers enthusiasm regardin...

  15. Expectations of Parents with Food Allergic Infants in Day Nursery Feeding and Actual Conditions at Nurseries/Kindergartens

    OpenAIRE

    高木, 瞳; Hitomi, Takagi; 岐阜聖徳学園大学短期大学部; Gifu Shotoku Gakuen University Junior College

    2003-01-01

    A questionnaire was conducted at nurseries/kindergartens in order to obtain further research materials for the purpose of realizing the ideal day nursery feeding. At the same time, the questionnaire was administered to parents with food allergic infants through interviews. As a result, it can be concluded that there is a difference in outlook between the parents and the nurseries/kindergartens, which has been allowed to develop from a lack of communication with each other. Some parents find i...

  16. Applications of hydrogels in the nursery and during outplanting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; Diane L. Haase

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels have a variety of potential uses including application to plants in the nursery and at the time of outplanting. Absorptive capacity of these gels is influenced by their chemical and physical composition as well as the ion concentration of the liquid being absorbed. The most common uses for hydrogels in nurseries or during outplanting are incorporation or root...

  17. Nursery function of tropical back-reef systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, A.J.; Dahlgren, C.P.; Kellison, G.T.; Kendall, M.S.; Layman, C.A.; Ley, J.A.; Nagelkerken, I.; Serafy, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Similar to nearshore systems in temperate latitudes, the nursery paradigm for tropical back-reef systems is that they provide a habitat for juveniles of species that subsequently make ontogenetic shifts to adult populations on coral reefs (we refer to this as the nursery function of back-reef

  18. Pedagogy with Babies: Perspectives of Eight Nursery Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, Peter; Page, Jools

    2015-01-01

    The last 30 years have seen a significant increase in babies attending nursery, with corresponding questions about the aims and organisation of practice. Research broadly agrees on the importance of emotionally consistent, sensitive and responsive interactions between staff and babies. Policy objectives for nursery and expectations of parents and…

  19. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. K. Dumroese; L. E. Riley

    2009-01-01

    These proceedings are a compilation of 27 papers that were presented at the regional meetings of the forest and conservation nursery associations in the United States in 2008. The Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Association meeting was held at the DoubleTree Hotel in Missoula, Montana, on June 23 to 25. The meeting was hosted by the Montana Conservation...

  20. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. M. Wilkinson; D. L. Haase; J. R. Pinto

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings are a compilation of 14 papers that were presented at the regional meetings of the forest and conservation nursery associations in the United States in 2013. The Joint Northeast and Southern Forest Nursery Conference was held at the Holiday Inn City Centre, Lafayette, Indiana, July 22 to 25, 2013. Subject matter for the technical sections included...

  1. Growing media trials at the Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Justin

    2009-01-01

    The Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery (MCSN) in Missoula produces 750,000 container seedlings annually in containers ranging in size from 66 cm3 (4 in3) up to 61 L (16 gal) pots. The MCSN is a production facility with no research funding. When we encounter a promising idea for improving our seedlings or the efficiency of nursery operations, we rarely perform...

  2. Selected nursery projects at the Missoula Technology and Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Vachowski

    2007-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Missoula Technology and Development Center (MTDC) offers technical expertise, technology transfer, and new equipment development to federal, state, and private forest nurseries. Current and recently completed projects at MTDC include a container block steam sterilizer, shielded herbicide sprayer, time-domain reflectometry (TDR) nursery soil...

  3. Reef fishes recruited at midwater coral nurseries consume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each nursery consisted of a 6 m × 6 m PVC pipe frame, layered with a recycled 5.5-cm-mesh tuna net. Human cleaning effort was calculated based on daily dive logs. Nursery-associated fish assemblages and behaviour were video-recorded prior to harvesting corals after a 20-month growth period and seven months ...

  4. Using organic fertilizers in forest and native plant nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2012-01-01

    Since World War II, synthetic fertilizers have been used almost exclusively to grow forest and native plant nursery crops because they are quickly soluble and readily taken up by crops, producing the rapid growth rates that are necessary in nursery culture. In recent years, however, a wide variety of new organic fertilizers have become available. We divided these...

  5. National Proceedings: Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas Dumroese; L. E. Riley

    2008-01-01

    These proceedings are a compilation of the papers that were presented at the regional meetings of the forest and conservation nursery associations in the United States and Canada in 2007. The Northeastern Forest and Conservation Nursery Association meeting was held July 16 to 19 at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord, NH. The meeting was hosted by the New...

  6. Proactive approach to containment of enterovirus infection in the nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Inbal; Golan, Agneta; Borer, Abraham; Shemer-Avni, Yonat; Dagan, Ron; Greenberg, David

    2013-07-01

    Administration of prophylactic intravenous immunoglobulins to contacts of infants actively shedding enterovirus during a hospital nursery outbreak may attenuate severity of disease in those contacts and aid in containment of the outbreak. Four cases of neonatal enteroviral disease were treated in our hospital nursery in July and August 2011; 3 were presumed or proven vertical transmission cases and 1 was a presumed horizontal transmission. We aimed to prevent development of severe illness in contacts of affected neonates following a ministry of health advisory during the summer of 2011 warning of increased neonatal enteroviral morbidity and mortality in Israel. Strict infection control measures were implemented, including meticulous decontamination of the nursery environment and administration of intravenous immunoglobulin prophylaxis to contacts. No further horizontal transmission occurred after infection control interventions. Immunoglobulin prophylaxis to control enteroviral infection in the nursery should be considered as an auxiliary infection control intervention during a nursery outbreak.

  7. EVE and School - Enrolments

    CERN Multimedia

    EVE et École

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANT DATES Enrolments 2017-2018 Enrolments for the school year 2017-2018 to the Nursery, the Kindergarten and the School will take place on 6, 7 and 8 March 2017 from 10 am to 1 pm at EVE and School. Registration forms will be available from Thursday 2nd March. More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/.

  8. Optimalisatie van een nursery systeem voor de kweek van mosselbroed en een algenkweek systeem t.b.v. deze nursery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peene, F.

    2006-01-01

    Stage rapport van een leerling van Hogeschool Zeeland, opleiding Aquatische Ecotechnologie. De studie die tijdens deze stage uitgevoerd is, is een literatuurstudie naar systemen voor de nursery van mosselen en systemen voor grootschalige algenkweek ten behoeve van deze nursery. Ook zijn experimenten

  9. Chloropicrin, EPTC, and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria for managing soilborne pests in pine nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle M. Cram; Scott A. Enebak; Stephen W. Fraedrich; L. David Dwinell

    2002-01-01

    The effects of preplant soil treatments and seed treatment on seedling production and soilborne pests were evaluated on loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) at three forest nurseries. Treatments were applied in 1998 at the Flint River Nursery (Byromville, GA) and at the Hauss Nursery (Atmore, AL). In 1999, treatments were applied at the Carter Nursery (Chatsworth, GA) and...

  10. 29 CFR 780.216 - Nursery activities generally and Christmas tree production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursery activities generally and Christmas tree production... Nursery activities generally and Christmas tree production. (a) The employees of a nursery who are engaged... horticultural commodities such as the following are employed in agriculture: (1) Planting seedlings in a nursery...

  11. Four years experience with filtration systems in commercial nurseries for eliminating Phytophthora species from recirculation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Ufer; M. Posner; H.-P. Wessels; S. Wagner; K. Kaminski; T. Brand; Werres S.

    2008-01-01

    In a four year project, three different filtration systems were tested under commercial nursery conditions to eliminate Phytophthora spp. from irrigation water. Five nurseries were involved in the project. Slow sand filtration systems were tested in three nurseries. In the fourth nursery, a filtration system with lava grains (Shieer® Bio filtration)...

  12. Dental caries in the primary dentition in public nursery school children in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil Cárie dentária na dentição decídua de crianças assistidas em algumas creches públicas em Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Gonçalves Leite

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental caries in the primary dentition and associated variables in low socioeconomic preschool children enrolled in public nursery schools in Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Four public institutions were selected by geographic criteria (two in the central region and two in the peripheral region. The study population comprised 338 children (181 boys; 157 girls aged 2-6 years old. Dental caries was recorded using the decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmf-t index. Among the examined children, 50.6% were caries-free. The mean dmf-t index was 2.03. It was higher in the peripheral nursery schools (p O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a prevalência de cárie dentária em dentição decídua e variáveis a ela associadas em pré-escolares, de baixo nível sócio-econômico, assistidos em creches públicas da cidade de Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Quatro instituições públicas foram selecionadas por critérios geográficos (duas na região central e duas na região periférica. A população do estudo compreendeu 338 crianças (181 meninos; 157 meninas com idade de dois a seis anos. A cárie dentária foi registrada usando o índice ceo-d. Dentre as crianças examinadas, 50,6% estavam livres de cárie. A média do índice ceo-d foi 2,03, que foi maior na creches periféricas (p < 0,01, e uma tendência de diferença entre sexos foi observada (p = 0,06. A análise de regressão logística selecionou as variáveis visita prévia da criança ao dentista (p < 0,001, localização geográfica da creche pública (p < 0,01 e idade (p < 0,01 como preditoras do índice ceo-d. O estudo mostrou a necessidade de um programa de saúde bucal para essa população, incluindo medidas tanto curativas, quanto preventivas, com o objetivo de alcançar as metas da OMS/FDI para o ano 2000 (50% de crianças livres de cárie na faixa etária de cinco a seis anos.

  13. Caribou nursery site habitat characteristics in two northern Ontario parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L. Carr

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available To prevent further range recession, habitat features essential to the life-history requisites of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou such as calving and nursery sites need to be protected for the persistence of the species. Woodland caribou may minimize predation risk during calving by either spacing out or spacing away from predators in the forest to calve on islands, wetlands, or shorelines. Our objective was to determine the characteristics of shoreline habitats used as calving and nursery sites by female woodland caribou in northern Ontario. Detailed vegetation and other site characteristics were measured at nursery sites used by cow-calf pairs in Wabakimi and Woodland Caribou Provincial Parks for comparison with shoreline sites that were not used by caribou within each park. Differences in habitat variables selected by female caribou in the two study areas reflect broad ecoregional differences in vegetation and topography. In Wabakimi Provincial Park, understorey tree density and ground detection distance played key roles in distinguishing nursery sites from sites that were not used. In Woodland Caribou Provincial Park, groundcover vegetation and shrub density were important in the selection of nursery sites by female caribou. Generally, female caribou in both parks selected nursery sites with greater slope, lower shrub density but thicker groundcover vegetation, including greater lichen abundance, and higher densities of mature trees than shoreline sites that were not used. The identification of these important features for caribou nursery sites provides a basis for improving their protection in future management policies and legislation.

  14. Nutrition practices of nurseries in England. Comparison with national guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelon, Sara E Benjamin; Burgoine, Thomas; Hesketh, Kathryn R; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    Recent national guidelines call for improved nutrition within early years settings. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe foods and beverages served in nurseries, assess provider behaviors related to feeding, and compare these practices to national guidelines. We administered a mailed survey to a random sample of nurseries across England, stratifying by tertile of deprivation. A total of 851 nurseries returned the survey (54.3% response rate). We fitted separate multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the association of deprivation with each of the 13 food and beverage guidelines and the seven provider behavior guidelines. We also conducted a joint F-test for any deprivation effect, to evaluate the effect of the guidelines combined. After adjusting for confounders, we observed differences in the frequency of nurseries that reported serving healthier foods across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.02 for joint F test). These adjusted results were driven mainly by nurseries in more deprived areas serving more whole grains (OR 1.57 (95% CI 1.00, 2.46)) and legumes, pulses, and lentils (1.40 (1.01, 2.14)). We also observed differences in the frequency of nurseries reporting more provider behaviors consistent with national guidelines across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.01 for joint F test). Nurseries in more deprived areas were more likely to dilute juice with water (2.35 (1.48, 3.73)), allow children to select their own portions (1.09 (1.06, 1.58)), and sit with children during meals (1.84 (1.07, 3.15)). While nurseries in the most deprived areas reported serving more healthy foods, a large percentage were still not meeting national guidelines. Policy and intervention efforts may increase compliance with national guidelines in nurseries in more deprived areas, and across England. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Nutrition practices of nurseries in England. Comparison with national guidelines☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelon, Sara E. Benjamin; Burgoine, Thomas; Hesketh, Kathryn R.; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Recent national guidelines call for improved nutrition within early years settings. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe foods and beverages served in nurseries, assess provider behaviors related to feeding, and compare these practices to national guidelines. We administered a mailed survey to a random sample of nurseries across England, stratifying by tertile of deprivation. A total of 851 nurseries returned the survey (54.3% response rate). We fitted separate multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the association of deprivation with each of the 13 food and beverage guidelines and the seven provider behavior guidelines. We also conducted a joint F-test for any deprivation effect, to evaluate the effect of the guidelines combined. After adjusting for confounders, we observed differences in the frequency of nurseries that reported serving healthier foods across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.02 for joint F test). These adjusted results were driven mainly by nurseries in more deprived areas serving more whole grains (OR 1.57 (95% CI 1.00, 2.46)) and legumes, pulses, and lentils (1.40 (1.01, 2.14)). We also observed differences in the frequency of nurseries reporting more provider behaviors consistent with national guidelines across the tertiles of deprivation (p = 0.01 for joint F test). Nurseries in more deprived areas were more likely to dilute juice with water (2.35 (1.48, 3.73)), allow children to select their own portions (1.09 (1.06, 1.58)), and sit with children during meals (1.84 (1.07, 3.15)). While nurseries in the most deprived areas reported serving more healthy foods, a large percentage were still not meeting national guidelines. Policy and intervention efforts may increase compliance with national guidelines in nurseries in more deprived areas, and across England. PMID:25450898

  16. Desert bighorn sheep lambing habitat: Parturition, nursery, and predation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsch, Rebekah C.; Cain, James W.; Rominger, Eric M.; Goldstein, Elise J.

    2016-01-01

    Fitness of female ungulates is determined by neonate survival and lifetime reproductive success. Therefore, adult female ungulates should adopt behaviors and habitat selection patterns that enhance survival of neonates during parturition and lactation. Parturition site location may play an important role in neonatal mortality of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) when lambs are especially vulnerable to predation, but parturition sites are rarely documented for this species. Our objectives were to assess environmental characteristics at desert bighorn parturition, lamb nursery, and predation sites and to assess differences in habitat characteristics between parturition sites and nursery group sites, and predation sites and nursery group sites. We used vaginal implant transmitters (VITs) to identify parturition sites and capture neonates. We then compared elevation, slope, terrain ruggedness, and visibility at parturition, nursery, and lamb predation sites with paired random sites and compared characteristics of parturition sites and lamb predation sites to those of nursery sites. When compared to random sites, odds of a site being a parturition site were highest at intermediate slopes and decreased with increasing female visibility. Odds of a site being a predation site increased with decreasing visibility. When compared to nursery group sites, odds of a site being a parturition site had a quadratic relationship with elevation and slope, with odds being highest at intermediate elevations and intermediate slopes. When we compared predation sites to nursery sites, odds of a site being a predation were highest at low elevation areas with high visibility and high elevation areas with low visibility likely because of differences in hunting strategies of coyote (Canis latrans) and puma (Puma concolor). Parturition sites were lower in elevation and slope than nursery sites. Understanding selection of parturition sites by adult females and how habitat

  17. Tropical Nursery Manual: A guide to starting and operating a nursery for native and traditional plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim M. Wilkinson; Thomas D. Landis; Diane L. Haase; Brian F. Daley; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    This handbook was written for anyone endeavoring to start and operate a nursery for native and traditional plants in the tropics. Because the tropics cover a vast area of the world, however, the scope of the handbook is geared toward readers in the U.S. affiliated tropics. Specifically, the U.S. affiliated tropics are a diverse area spanning two oceans and half the...

  18. Mechanisms explaining nursery habitat association: how do juvenile snapper (Chrysophrys auratus benefit from their nursery habitat?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M Parsons

    Full Text Available Nursery habitats provide elevated survival and growth to the organisms that associate with them, and as such are a crucial early life-stage component for many fishes and invertebrates. The exact mechanisms by which these benefits are afforded to associated organisms, however, are often unclear. Here we assessed potential explanations of the nursery function of structurally complex habitats for post-settlement snapper, Chrysophrys auratus, in New Zealand. Specifically, we deployed Artificial Seagrass Units (ASUs and used a combination of video observation, netting and diet analysis of associated post-settlement snapper as well describing potential prey within the micro-habitats surrounding ASUs. We did not observe any predation attempts and few potential predators, suggesting that for snapper the nursery value of structurally complex habitats is not as a predation refuge. The diet of post-settlement snapper mostly consisted of calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, which were most commonly sampled from within the water column. Nearly all suspected feeding events were also observed within the water column. When considering the velocity of water flow at each ASU, plankton sampling revealed a greater availability of copepods with increasing current strength, while netting and video observation demonstrated that the abundance of snapper was highest at sites with intermediate water velocity. This study highlights that the interaction between water flow and food availability may represent an important trade-off between energy expenditure and food intake for post-settlement snapper. Structurally complex habitats may mediate this relationship, allowing snapper to access sites with higher food availability while reducing swimming costs. This mechanism may have broader relevance, potentially explaining the importance of estuarine nursery habitats for other species.

  19. Mechanisms explaining nursery habitat association: how do juvenile snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) benefit from their nursery habitat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Darren M; Middleton, Crispin; Spong, Keren T; Mackay, Graeme; Smith, Matt D; Buckthought, Dane

    2015-01-01

    Nursery habitats provide elevated survival and growth to the organisms that associate with them, and as such are a crucial early life-stage component for many fishes and invertebrates. The exact mechanisms by which these benefits are afforded to associated organisms, however, are often unclear. Here we assessed potential explanations of the nursery function of structurally complex habitats for post-settlement snapper, Chrysophrys auratus, in New Zealand. Specifically, we deployed Artificial Seagrass Units (ASUs) and used a combination of video observation, netting and diet analysis of associated post-settlement snapper as well describing potential prey within the micro-habitats surrounding ASUs. We did not observe any predation attempts and few potential predators, suggesting that for snapper the nursery value of structurally complex habitats is not as a predation refuge. The diet of post-settlement snapper mostly consisted of calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, which were most commonly sampled from within the water column. Nearly all suspected feeding events were also observed within the water column. When considering the velocity of water flow at each ASU, plankton sampling revealed a greater availability of copepods with increasing current strength, while netting and video observation demonstrated that the abundance of snapper was highest at sites with intermediate water velocity. This study highlights that the interaction between water flow and food availability may represent an important trade-off between energy expenditure and food intake for post-settlement snapper. Structurally complex habitats may mediate this relationship, allowing snapper to access sites with higher food availability while reducing swimming costs. This mechanism may have broader relevance, potentially explaining the importance of estuarine nursery habitats for other species.

  20. Campylobacter enterocolitis in a neonatal nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, M A; Norrish, B; Lior, H; Heyes, B; Monteath, A; Montgomery, H

    1984-06-01

    During a five-day period, four neonates in a neonatal nursery developed Campylobacter entercolitis. Investigations suggested that cross-infection or common-source infection were unlikely and that the neonates acquired their infection during delivery from their respective mothers, three of whom were also found to harbour Campylobacter jejuni in their stools. This suggestion was confirmed with use of the Lior serotyping system in a blind fashion. Each neonate was infected with a different serotype, and each of the three culture-positive mothers had the same serotype as her neonate. Examination of multiple colonies from the stools of five individuals showed that each was likely to have been infected by only one serotype. The presenting clinical features in the four neonates provides further evidence that neonatal Campylobacter entercolitis typically manifests as a benign, self-limited, nonfebrile, diarrheal illness with bloody stools.

  1. [An outbreak of legionellosis in a nursery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hideaki; Akaihata, Mitsuko; Niitsuma, Katsunao; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2004-05-01

    We experienced an outbreak of legionellosis in infants for the first time in Japan. In Fukushima Prefecture Wakamatsu Nursery, the patients who had respiratory symptoms of cough, wheeze and fever appeared one after another from the middle of June, 2002. We suspected that an outbreak of legionellosis had occurred and then carried out urinary antigen detection of Legionella pneumophila. As a result, 8 patients were positive. They consisted of 5 boys and 3 girls, and ranged in age from 11 months to 1 year 10 months. Underlying disease was observed in one patient, and 6 patients were hospitalized. All 8 patients had rhinorrhea, cough, fever and 7 patients had wheeze. The average duration of cough was 9.9 days and that of fever was 4.5 days. In the admitted 6 patients, WBC ranged in count from 7,500/microliter to 15,300/microliter and CRP ranged from 0.2 mg/dl to 2.5 mg/dl. Chest X-rays showed infiltrative shadows (right lower lobe, left lower lobe) in 2 patients. With regard to the treatment, macrolide or tetracycline antibiotics were administered in 4 of 8 patients, and beta-lactams were administered in others. Water samples were obtained from 12 locations at the nursery, including the shower head of the bathroom, the bathtub, the taps, the laundry and so on. But cultures of water samples failed to grow legionella. We suspected that the source of infection was the humidifiers or the nebulizer used for disinfection. Through this outbreak, it became obvious that the mild case of legionellosis really existed. Furthermore, we suggested that it was possible for the patient with mild legionellosis to cure without administration of macrolide or tetracycline antibiotics.

  2. Prevalence, Characteristics, and Perception of Nursery Antibiotic Stewardship Coverage in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Joseph B; Vora, Niraj; Sunkara, Mridula

    2017-09-01

    Prolonged or unnecessary antibiotic use is associated with adverse outcomes in infants. Antibiotic stewardship programs (ASPs) aim to prevent these adverse outcomes and optimize antibiotic prescribing. However, data evaluating ASP coverage of nurseries are limited. The objectives of this study were to describe the characteristics of nurseries with and without ASP coverage and to determine perceptions of and barriers to nursery ASP coverage. The 2014 American Hospital Association annual survey was used to randomly select a level III neonatal intensive care unit from all 50 states. A level I and level II nursery from the same city as the level III nursery were then randomly selected. Hospital, nursery, and ASP characteristics were collected. Nursery and ASP providers (pharmacists or infectious disease providers) were interviewed using a semistructured template. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for themes. One hundred forty-six centers responded; 104 (71%) provided nursery ASP coverage. In multivariate analysis, level of nursery, university affiliation, and number of full-time equivalent ASP staff were the main predictors of nursery ASP coverage. Several themes were identified from interviews: unwanted coverage, unnecessary coverage, jurisdiction issues, need for communication, and a focus on outcomes. Most providers had a favorable view of nursery ASP coverage. Larger, higher-acuity nurseries in university-affiliated hospitals are more likely to have ASP coverage. Low ASP staffing and a perceived lack of importance were frequently cited as barriers to nursery coverage. Most nursery ASP coverage is viewed favorably by providers, but nursery providers regard it as less important than ASP providers.

  3. Development of an intertidal mangrove nursery and afforestation techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A.G.

    of transplantation, financial estimations, etc. were considered as important factors for nursery establishment. The plan was implemented with the help of Forest Department of Goa at Chorao Island in the Mandovi Estuary, Goa, India. Afforestation was with 85...

  4. Cooperative Atlantic States Shark Pupping and Nursery (COASTSPAN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Survey of inshore areas used by sharks for pupping and nurseries. Various locations have been surveyed, from the U.S. Virgin Islands to Massachusetts, most in...

  5. Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries--Part II: Gaseous pollutants' assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, P T B S; Nunes, R A O; Alvim-Ferraz, M C M; Martins, F G; Sousa, S I V

    2015-10-01

    This study, Part II of the larger study "Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries", aimed to: (i) evaluate nursery schools' indoor concentrations of several air pollutants in class and lunch rooms; and (ii) analyse them according to guidelines and references. Indoor continuous measurements were performed, and outdoor concentrations were obtained to determine indoor/outdoor ratios. The influence of outdoor air seemed to be determinant on carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) indoor concentrations. The peak concentrations of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOC) registered (highest concentrations of 204 and 2320 µg m(-3) respectively), indicated the presence of specific indoor sources of these pollutants, namely materials emitting formaldehyde and products emitting VOC associated to cleaning and children's specific activities (like paints and glues). For formaldehyde, baseline constant concentrations along the day were also found in some of the studied rooms, which enhances the importance of detailing the study of children's short and long-term exposure to this indoor air pollutant. While CO, NO2 and O3 never exceeded the national and international reference values for IAQ and health protection, exceedances were found for formaldehyde and VOC. For this reason, a health risk assessment approach could be interesting for future research to assess children's health risks of exposure to formaldehyde and to VOC concentrations in nursery schools. Changing cleaning schedules and materials emitting formaldehyde, and more efficient ventilation while using products emitting VOC, with the correct amount and distribution of fresh air, would decrease children's exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Role for Intercept Traps in the Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) IPM Strategy at Ornamental Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) cause significant damage to ornamental nursery tree crops throughout the Eastern U. S. Depending on surrounding habitat, some nurseries can undergo large influxes of ambrosia beetles from the forest to susceptible nursery stock. Eth...

  7. Fluconazole use and safety in the nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagnola, E; Jacqz-Aigrain, E; Kaguelidou, F; Maragliano, R; Stronati, M; Rizzollo, S; Farina, D; Manzoni, P

    2012-05-01

    Fluconazole is a triazole antifungal agent that is widely used in the nursery. It is available in both intravenous and oral formulation, and is active against most of the fungal pathogens that require treatment when retrieved from culture samples in neonatal intensive care units. Although clinical use has been wide for over 15 years, there have been small safety and efficacy studies completed in young infants. Randomised clinical trials assessing effectiveness of this agent in prevention of systemic fungal infections in neonates have been published in the last decade, and one large additional randomised study has been recently completed. Nevertheless, a certain degree of uncertainty still exists regarding the kinetics and appropriate dosing of this agent in premature and term infants, as well as regarding safety. Areas of poignant debate include the feasibility of loading dose strategies, appropriate dosages in the early days of life in the different subgroups of preterm infants, and long-term safety of fluconazole administered in prophylaxis during the first weeks of life in extremely premature infants. This paper reviews the most recent evidence on fluconazole and its role in the NICU settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary studies on chemical weed control in eucalyptus (hybrid) nursery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.; Desappa; Singh, C.D.

    1985-12-01

    Weeds adversely affect the germination and growth of seedlings in the Eucalyptus hybrid nursery beds. Manual weeding which is generally followed is time consuming, difficult and less effective. In order to overcome this problem a study was undertaken for effective control of weeds in Eucalyptus hybrid nursery by means of preemergence weedicides viz. Baseline (profluralin), Pendimethaline (Stemp 30 EC), Ronster (Oxadiazen) and Simazine. They were applied to nursery beds as pre-emergence spray, at 1.5, 1.5, 0.5 and 1 kg/ha respectively. Basalin was most effective in controlling both dicot and monocot weeks followed by pendimethaline and Ronster. Simazine was lethal to both Eucalyptus and weed seed germination. Seedling of Eucalyptus in Basalin treated plots were more in number (153/sq ft.), taller (24 cm) and healthier compared to other weedicide treatments. Maximum number of dicot and monocot weeds were found in control plot, consequently, seedling growth was very much suppressed. The studies indicated that preemergence chemical weedicides could be effectively used to control nursery weeds and that Basalin weedicide is more effective in controlling both dicot and monocot weeds and appear to be a suitable chemical weedicide for Eucalyptus hybrid nurseries. 8 references, 3 tables.

  9. Recidivism after Release from a Prison Nursery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshin, Lorie S.; Byrne, Mary W.; Henninger, Alana M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze three-year recidivism after release from a prison nursery, a secure unit that allows imprisoned women to care for their infants. Design and Sample Descriptive study of 139 women who co-resided with their infants between 2001–2007 in X prison nursery. Measurement Administrative criminal justice data were analyzed along with prospective study data on demographic, mental health, and prison nursery policy-related factors. Results Results reflect a sample of young women of color with histories of clinically significant depressive symptoms and substance dependence, who were convicted of nonviolent crimes and had multiple prior arrests. Three years after release 86.3% remained in the community. Only 4% of women returned to prison for new crimes. Survival modeling indicated that women who had previously violated parole had a significantly shorter mean return to prison time than those who were in the nursery for a new crime. Conclusion Women released from a prison nursery have a low likelihood of recidivism. Innovative interventions are needed to address incarceration’s public health effects. Nurses can partner with criminal justice organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate programs to ensure the health needs of criminal justice involved people and their families are met. PMID:24588129

  10. Recidivism after release from a prison nursery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshin, Lorie S; Byrne, Mary W; Henninger, Alana M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze 3-year recidivism after release from a prison nursery, a secure unit that allows imprisoned women to care for their infants. Descriptive study of 139 women who co-resided with their infants between 2001 and 2007 in a New York State prison nursery. Administrative criminal justice data were analyzed along with prospective study data on demographic, mental health, and prison nursery policy-related factors. Results reflect a sample of young women of color with histories of clinically significant depressive symptoms and substance dependence, who were convicted of nonviolent crimes and had multiple prior arrests. Three years after release 86.3% remained in the community. Only 4% of women returned to prison for new crimes. Survival modeling indicated that women who had previously violated parole had a significantly shorter mean return to prison time than those who were in the nursery for a new crime. Women released from a prison nursery have a low likelihood of recidivism. Innovative interventions are needed to address incarceration's public health effects. Nurses can partner with criminal justice organizations to develop, implement, and evaluate programs to ensure the health needs of criminal justice involved people and their families are met. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Challenges in investigating transient rash illness in nursery children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranthaman, K; Pooransingh, S; McCarthy, N; Saunders, P; Haworth, E

    2010-06-01

    In October 2007, the Thames Valley Health Protection Unit (TVHPU) was notified by a parent that her child developed a transient rash after eating lunch at a nursery in Oxfordshire. An initial investigation undertaken by TVHPU was escalated when similar incidents were reported in nurseries in other parts of England. A detailed epidemiological and food tracing investigation was conducted to ascertain the aetiology. Investigations revealed 11 incidents affecting 164 children between July and November 2007 in six nurseries operated by two companies. The symptoms included a transient rash around the mouth and hands of children who ate meals prepared on site by the nurseries. Consumption of the lunch main course appeared to be a strong aetiological factor. Expert opinion pointed to biogenic amines (e.g. histamine) as a possible cause for the symptoms displayed, but there was insufficient evidence to support testing of food samples. The incident highlighted significant gaps in reporting of unexplained symptoms among children in nurseries, indicating that such incidents do not always come to the attention of public health authorities. Timely notification to HPUs will enable prompt investigation, increase the likelihood of identifying the cause and inform appropriate responses to prevent future incidents.

  12. Survival of Xanthomonas fragariae on common materials found in strawberry nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthomonas fragariae causes strawberry angular leaf spot, an important disease in strawberry nursery production. To identify potential inoculum sources, the ability of X. fragariae to survive was examined on 10 common materials typically associated with strawberry nurseries (cardboard, glass, latex...

  13. 75 FR 51245 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Durable Nursery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Durable Nursery... efforts on durable infant and toddler products. The draft Durable Nursery Products Exposure Survey...

  14. Prevalence of pediculosis and scabies in preschool nursery children of Afyon, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Semsettin; Dogru, Omer; Cetinkaya, Zafer; Kulac, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Scabies and pediculosis are ubiquitous, contagious, and debilitating parasitic dermatoses. The tendency of high prevalence of pediculosis and scabies among school and preschool age children has prompted us to conduct a head louse and scabies prevalence survey among preschool nursery children in our district. A school-based, crosssectional study was performed, with 1,134 children chosen for evaluation. All cases were evaluated by physical examination and a detailed, structured questionnaire. The infestation was found in 14 (1.2%) of 1,134 children; 9 (0.8%) with pediculosis capitis and 5 (0.4%) with scabies. We found that infestations were more frequent in children with mothers whose education levels were low. This indicates the necessity of an improvement in the economic and sociocultural status of the community and the promotion of hygiene concepts and practices in order to improve health of preschool age children. PMID:16514290

  15. Understanding, developing and evaluating home-school partnerships for children on the autism spectrum through home-school reading

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-methods study was set in a suburban local authority nursery and primary special school (3-11yrs) for children on the autism spectrum. The study consisted of four consecutive phases, designed to: • examine the factors which affect parent participation in, and teacher facilitation of, home-school reading for nursery and primary school aged children with autism; • develop a model of parent and teacher collaborative working to help parents carry out reading activities with their autist...

  16. Adult attention to infants in a newborn nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karraker, K H

    1986-01-01

    Six 3-hour observations of adult attention to infants in a newborn nursery were conducted to describe the amount and type of attention received by the infants and to determine if individual differences among infants were related to this attention. Most infants spent the majority of the observation time between feedings in the nursery and received attention from an adult in the nursery an average of 5.5% of the time. More infant crying was associated with longer adult attention, although this effect was largely attributable to a small group of particularly irritable infants in which circumcised males were overrepresented. A number of infant characteristics, including age, sex, race, physical attractiveness, degree of prematurity, crying, and eye opening, were associated with the content of the interaction between nurses' aides and newborns. These observations are discussed with respect to hospital practices concerning care of newborns and the potential effects on newborns of rooming-in with their mothers.

  17. Development of reagents for immunoassay of Phytophthora ramorum in nursery water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas G. Luster; Timothy Widmer; Michael McMahon; C. André Lévesque

    2017-01-01

    Current regulations under the August 6, 2014 USDA APHIS Official Regulatory Protocol (Confirmed Nursery Protocol: Version 8.2) for Nurseries Containing Plants Infected with Phytophthora ramorum mandates the sampling of water in affected nurseries to demonstrate they are free of P. ramorum. Currently, detection of

  18. Influence of cultural practices on edaphic factors related to root disease in Pinus nursery seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Juzwik; K. M. Gust; R. R. Allmaras

    1999-01-01

    Conifer seedlings grown in bare-root nurseries are frequently damaged and destroyed by soil-borne pathogenic fungi that cause root rot. Relationships between nursery cultural practices, soils characteristics, and populations of potential pathogens in the soil were examined in three bare-root tree nurseries in the midwestern USA. Soil-borne populations of ...

  19. Phytophthora community structure analyses in Oregon nurseries inform systems approaches to disease management

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.L. Parke; B.J. Knaus; V.J. Fieland; C. Lewis; N.J. Grünwald

    2014-01-01

    Nursery plants are important vectors for plant pathogens. Understanding what pathogens occur in nurseries in different production stages can be useful to the development of integrated systems approaches. Four horticultural nurseries in Oregon were sampled every 2 months for 4 years to determine the identity and community structure of Phytophthora...

  20. 29 CFR 780.209 - Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Agriculture as It Relates to Specific Situations Nursery and Landscaping Operations § 780.209 Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products. Employees of a grower of...

  1. Genetic bottlenecks in agroforestry systems: results of tree nursery surveys in East Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lengkeek, A.G.; Jaenicke, H.; Dawson, I.K.

    2005-01-01

    Seedlings sourced through tree nurseries are expected to form an important component of future tree cover on farms. As such, the genetic composition of nursery seedlings is expected to impact on the productivity and sustainability of agroforestry ecosystems. By surveying current practices of nursery

  2. Weed management at ArborGen, South Carolina SuperTree Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike Arnette

    2009-01-01

    Weed management is vital to producing healthy hardwood seedlings. Several methods are available to each nursery, and it is common knowledge that what works for one situation may not work for another. The weed control methods used in nursery beds of hardwood species at the South Carolina SuperTree Nursery (Blenheim) are listed below.

  3. Teacher Qualification and Teaching Techniques in Nursery Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amy Stambach

    A strong and effective teaching profession requires well trained teachers. Teachers need not only a depth of knowledge about the developmental stages of students they are teaching but also how to reach those students effectively using age appropriate pedagogy. The Rwandan education system has been focusing more.

  4. Teacher qualification and teaching techniques in nursery schools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The scarcity of qualified teachers in Early Childhood Education in Rwanda in general, and in Kicukiro District in particular, raised interest and curiosity to conduct this study. Its main purpose was to examine the relationship between the qualification of teachers and their teaching techniques in preschools in Kicukiro District.

  5. Occurrence of Indoor VOCs in Nursery School - Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasova Senitkova, Ingrid

    2017-10-01

    Children’s exposure to air pollutants is an important public health challenge. Particular attention should be paid to preschools because younger children are more vulnerable to air pollution than higher grade children and spend more time indoors. The concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in younger and older children’s classrooms during the winter season were studied. An electronic nose based on gas chromatography was used for the analysis of individual VOCs and a photoionization detector with a UV lamp was used for the determination of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) concentration. Continuous measurements of CO2 concentrations both inside classrooms and outside each building were performed using automatic portable monitors. Improving ventilation, decreasing the occupancy per room and completing cleaning activities following occupancy periods can contribute to alleviating high CO2 and VOCs occurrence levels.

  6. Grammatical Competence Development of Nursery School Children Acquiring Persian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Tayebipour

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study is conducted to answer four questions: First, whether there is a difference between the grammatical competence development of a group of children aged 2.6 (two years and six months and a group of children aged 3.6 (three years and six months. Second, whether there is a significant difference between the two age groups concerning their Mean Length of Utterance (MLU. Third, whether there is a relationship between the children’s MLU and that of the caretakers. Fourth, whether the normal limit proposed by Brown (1973 is observed in the acquisition of Persian. To this end, language samples of six children and their caretakers’ were recorded during a six-week period and studied afterwards. The results indicated neither an unequivocal yes nor a definitive no answer to the question of age difference and grammatical competence development, that is to say, in some cases there was a difference whereas in some other cases there was no difference at all. As for the difference between the two age groups concerning their MLU, there was a significant difference between the two. However, no significant relationship was found between the children’s MLU and their caretakers’. Finally, the limit proposed by Brown (1973 was observed in the acquisition of Persian.

  7. Skin Colour Awareness and Preference in London Nursery School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laishley, Jenny

    1971-01-01

    Study focuses on children aged 3 to 5 years from 3 London areas. Contrary to expectation, awareness of differences in skin color was not a simple function of age and contact with colored children and adults; no clear evidence of prejudiced thinking was found in the subjects studied. (RJ)

  8. An "Emic" Study of Children's Memory in the Nursery School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams-Price, Carolyn E.; Reese, Hayne W.

    The "emic" research method used in cultural anthropology is described and its usefulness in developmental psychology is illustrated. A distinction is made in cultural anthropology between "etic" and "emic" research methods. In etic research observers employ established categories, such as prior definitions of…

  9. 7 CFR 457.162 - Nursery crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... industry for the area as compatible with the nursery plant production practices and weather conditions in...) Deciduous Shrubs; (6) Broad-leaf Evergreen Shrubs; (7) Coniferous Evergreen Shrubs; (8) Small Fruits; (9... established; (g) Are grown in an appropriate medium; (h) Are not grown for sale as Christmas trees; (i) Are...

  10. Light-emitting diode lighting for forest nursery seedling production

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Anthony S. Davis

    2015-01-01

    Crop lighting is an energy-intensive necessity for nursery production of high-quality native plants and forest tree seedlings. During the winter months (especially in northern USA latitudes) or overcast or cloudy days, the amount of solar radiation reaching greenhouse crops is insufficient resulting in growth cessation, early terminal bud formation, and failure of...

  11. Alberta tree nursery and horticulture Centre: Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    Annual report of the Centre, which mainly produces trees and shrubs for the farm shelterbelt program and the Provincial Parks program. Information is given on various aspects of horticulture crop development, protected crops development, nursery crop development, farm services, and apiculture.

  12. Septoria Canker on Nursery Stock of Populus Deltoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. H. Filer; F. I. McCracken; C. A. Mohn; W. K. Randall

    1971-01-01

    Septoria musiva Peck is capable of establishing itself on unwounded first-year stems of eastern cottonwood. Natural infections have been observed since 1969 in three forest nurseries in Mississippi, and inoculations have confirmed that both conidia and ascospores are capable of causing stem infections.

  13. Developing native plant nurseries in emerging market areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott Duemler

    2012-01-01

    The importance of developing a market for quality native plant materials in a region prior to the establishment of a nursery is crucial to ensure its success. Certain tactics can be applied to help develop a demand for native plant materials in a region. Using these tactics will help create a new market for native plant materials.

  14. Seasonal water parameters of active and resting nursery ponds on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water quality parameters from active and resting nursery ponds were taken in both dry and wet seasons at the model fish farms, University of Ibadan. Temperature, turbidity, dissolved oxygen (D.O.), free carbon dioxide, pH, total alkalinity, total hardness and nitrite were examined to determine the suitable conditions of the ...

  15. Landscape Design and Nursery Operation for Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Richard C.; Glazener, Dennis

    Landforms, vegetation, water bodies, climate and solar radiation can be analyzed and used to design an energy-conserving landscape and horticulture operation. Accordingly, this course instructor's manual covers the use of the elements of the environment to make landscaping and nursery design and operation more energy-efficient. Five sections…

  16. Survey of plant seedling production by private nurseries in Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the viability of seedling production in Kano metropolis by private nursery operators with the purpose of assessing whether it is financially profitable for people to engage in such enterprises to reduce unemployment in the State. This survey was carried out to assess the socio-economic contribution of ...

  17. Results from six Pinus taeda nursery trials with the herbicide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pendimethalin is used by some nursery managers to control weeds in Eucalyptus and Pinus seedbeds and cutting beds of Pinus. Six trials were implemented in open-rooted seedbeds to test the response of Pinus taeda to postemergence (to the crop) applications of 2.2 kg ha–1 active ingredient of pendimethalin (the ...

  18. Effect on nursery and field performance of Pinus patula seedlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fusarium circinatum is an important fungal pathogen of Pinus species. In South Africa, it is the most significant pathogen of Pinus patula seedlings in forestry nurseries where it presents a substantial constraint to productivity and can continue to cause mortality in-field for up to two years after establishment. This study ...

  19. The Emotional Complexity of Attachment Interactions in Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Jools; Elfer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In a single intensive nursery case study, using in depth interviews, group discussion and self completed daily diaries, this article reports on staff accounts of the emotional aspects of their interactions with young children. The findings show how much the staff achieved through their empathy for children and families and the establishment of…

  20. Nursery Rhyme Knowledge and Phonological Awareness in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Laurie J.

    2011-01-01

    Phonological awareness is an important precursor in learning to read. This awareness of phonemes fosters a child's ability to hear and blend sounds, encode and decode words, and to spell phonetically. This quantitative study assessed pre-K children's existing Euro-American nursery rhyme knowledge and phonological awareness literacy, provided…

  1. Provenance variability in nursery growth of subalpine fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlie Cartwright; Cheng Ying

    2011-01-01

    Subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa [Hook] Nutt.) is a wide-ranging, high-elevation species in the interior of British Columbia. It is commonly harvested for lumber, but replanting of it is limited. Some reticence is based upon wood quality and rate of growth, but there are also seed and nursery culturing difficulties. This study investigated seedling growth traits of 111...

  2. Effect of revised nursery orders on newborn preventive services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlon-Kay, Diane J

    2011-01-01

    Aspects of neonatal care that are the subject of evolving guidelines include hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunization; discharge follow-up recommendations; and prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal (GBS) disease. In 2007, a university hospital's standardized newborn nursery orders were changed to reflect current recommendations in these areas. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of new nursery orders on the quality of care provided to these newborns. The study was a retrospective review of medical records, birth certificates, and a computer database of 857 infants. The nursery orders changed in the following ways: (1) physicians had to "opt out" of HBV immunization; (2) discharge follow-up recommendations were based on American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations; and (3) AAP recommendations for GBS were followed except blood cultures were not required for certain infants. The percentage of infants receiving HBV immunizations increased from 74% in 2007 to 83% in 2008 (P = .0018). The percentage of infants whose mothers received antibiotics for GBS less than 4 hours before delivery and who received a complete blood count increased from 36% to 83% (P nursery orders was associated with significant improvement in newborn care.

  3. Growing media alternatives for forest and native plant nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; Nancy Morgan

    2009-01-01

    The choice of growing medium, along with container type, is one of the critical decisions that must be made when starting a nursery. The first growing medium was called "compost" and was developed in the 1930s at the John Innes Horticultural Institute in Great Britain. It consisted of a loam soil that was amended with peat moss, sand, and fertilizers (Bunt...

  4. Sustainable management of waste in green nursery: the Tuscan experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Sarri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The green nursery sector in Europe involves 90,000 ha of cultivated land and 120,000 ha for the nurseries (MiPAAF, 2012, reaching 19.8 billions of Euros in 2011. Every year, nurseries produce waste about 4 kg of the residual biomass for each m2 of the potted plants cultivation. Nurseries waste make up a substantial quantity of organic materials e.g. wood biomass-substrate, which could be retrieved and valorized. With the expansion of potted plants cultivation and the resulting increase in discarded products a number of companies have begun to setting up solutions for the recovery of materials accumulated. Analysis led to the development of a separating system based on trunk vibration technology. To this end, two shaker yard were identified, developed and tested for the recovery of residual biomasses. With these solutions, green waste can be easily grasped by a clamp device able to convey strong vibrations to the trunk (or to the aerial part of the plant to the point that the soil materials are detached from the vegetable portions.

  5. Designing propagation environments in forest and native plant nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis

    2013-01-01

    Propagation environments are areas that have been modified for plant growth, and can be designed using the law of limiting factors. Identifying critical factors that are most limiting to optimal plant growth is helpful when developing both bareroot and container nurseries. Propagation environments can be categorized into minimally-controlled, semi-controlled, and fully...

  6. Early selection of Eucalyptus clones in retrospective nursery test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Within the framework of the eucalyptus breeding programme in the Congo, two retrospective tests were conducted using mature clones in the field and young cuttings under nursery conditions with two hybrids: 13 clones of Eucalyptus tereticornis* Eucalyptus grandis for the test TC 82-1B and 17 clones of Eucalyptus ...

  7. Preliminary Evaluation of Nursery and Early Field Propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 2 hectares of this plant have been successfully established in the University farm sourced from different locations (Ilorin, and Lafiagi in Kwara State and Mokwa in Niger State), all in Nigeria. So far, some nursery practices have been developed for this crop including the avoidance of heavy shades and seed dressing ...

  8. Nursery growing of some apple varieties using different grafting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out at the Eğirdir Horticultural Research Institute, between the years 2006 and 2007. The aim of this study was to investigate the advantages of apple nursery growing greenhouse rather than outdoor medium. Scions of Red Chief (dwarf), Braeburn (semi dwarf) and Mondial Gala (vigorous) apple ...

  9. Development of Intelligent Spray Systems for Nursery Crop Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two intelligent sprayer prototypes were developed to increase pesticide application efficiency in nursery production. The first prototype was a hydraulic vertical boom system using ultrasonic sensors to detect tree size and volume for liner-sized trees and the second prototype was an air-assisted sp...

  10. Predicting movement of nursery hosts using a linear network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve McKelvey; Frank Koch; Bill Smith

    2008-01-01

    There is widespread concern among scientists and land managers that Phytophthora ramorum may be accidentally introduced into oak-dominated eastern U.S. forests through the transfer of the pathogen from infected nursery plants to susceptible understory forest species (for example, Rhododendron spp.) at the forest-urban interface....

  11. Improved ventilation and temperature control in a nursery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.

    2011-01-01

    We performed an intervention study in a nursery. We have measured the air quality with as indicator CO2 and temperature in the original configuration. The maximum observed CO2 concentration during a three week monitoring period was 1834 ppm. The average CO2 concentration during the sleeping period

  12. Morbidity and Mortality Pattern of Neonates Admitted into Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neonatal outcome is an important indicator of obstetrics and health care. Few or no published data are available concerning neonatal morbidity and mortality in Sudan. Objectives: To study morbidity and mortality pattern amongst inborn neonates admitted into nursery unit in Wad Medani Hospital, Sudan ...

  13. Nursery Pest Management of Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) Attack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The establishment of plantations of Milicia excelsa has been constrained by the gall-forming psyllid Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) that causes extensive damage to young plants. We present findings of an experiment aimed at preventing Phytolyma attack on Milicia seedlings in the nursery using chemical control and ...

  14. Mycorrhizas on nursery and field seedlings of Quercus garryana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dariene Southworth; Elizabeth M. Carrington; Jonathan L. Frank; Peter Gould; Connie A. Harrington; Warren D. Devine

    2009-01-01

    Oak woodland regeneration and restoration requires that seedlings develop mycorrhizas, yet the need for this mutualistic association is often overlooked. In this study, we asked whether Quercus garryana seedlings in nursery beds acquire mycorrhizas without artificial inoculation or access to a mycorrhizal network of other ectomycorrhizal hosts. We...

  15. An update on Phytophthora ramorum in European nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Slawson; Jennie Blackburn; Lynne Bennett

    2008-01-01

    Emergency phytosanitary measures to prevent the introduction into and spread within the European Union (EU) of Phytophthora ramorum Werres, De Cock & Man in 't Veld. have been in place since 2002. Surveillance across the EU, has confirmed the presence of P. ramorum on nurseries and retailers in 15 member states. ...

  16. Effects of marine reserves versus nursery habitat availability on structure of reef fish communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Grol, Monique G G; Mumby, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    No-take marine fishery reserves sustain commercial stocks by acting as buffers against overexploitation and enhancing fishery catches in adjacent areas through spillover. Likewise, nursery habitats such as mangroves enhance populations of some species in adjacent habitats. However, there is lack of understanding of the magnitude of stock enhancement and the effects on community structure when both protection from fishing and access to nurseries concurrently act as drivers of fish population dynamics. In this study we test the separate as well as interactive effects of marine reserves and nursery habitat proximity on structure and abundance of coral reef fish communities. Reserves had no effect on fish community composition, while proximity to nursery habitat only had a significant effect on community structure of species that use mangroves or seagrass beds as nurseries. In terms of reef fish biomass, proximity to nursery habitat by far outweighed (biomass 249% higher than that in areas with no nursery access) the effects of protection from fishing in reserves (biomass 21% lower than non-reserve areas) for small nursery fish (≤ 25 cm total length). For large-bodied individuals of nursery species (>25 cm total length), an additive effect was present for these two factors, although fish benefited more from fishing protection (203% higher biomass) than from proximity to nurseries (139% higher). The magnitude of elevated biomass for small fish on coral reefs due to proximity to nurseries was such that nursery habitats seem able to overrule the usually positive effects on fish biomass by reef reserves. As a result, conservation of nursery habitats gains importance and more consideration should be given to the ecological processes that occur along nursery-reef boundaries that connect neighboring ecosystems.

  17. Rates of Complications After Newborn Circumcision in a Well-Baby Nursery, Special Care Nursery, and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Mythili; Hamvas, Corrine; Coplen, Douglas

    2015-10-01

    To determine rates of complications after newborn circumcision by performing a retrospective chart review of patients circumcised at a well-baby nursery, neonatal intensive care units (NICU), and special care nursery (SCN) from 2007 to 2012. A total of 5129 babies (73%) were circumcised at the well-baby nursery and 1909 babies (27%) at the NICU and SCN. Forty-seven patients (0.67%, 95% CI 0.49% to 0.89%) had circumcision-related complications: 5 (0.07%) patients with acute and 42 (0.6%) with late complications. Babies in the NICU/SCN had increased odds of complication (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.23 to 7.19) compared with those in well-baby nursery. There were increased odds of complications in babies with Caucasian ethnicity (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.48 to 4.89) compared with African American babies and in babies with private insurance (OR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1 to 7.5) compared with nonprivate insurance. The rates of complications after newborn circumcisions were low. Babies in the NICU/SCN had increased odds of complication. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Both nursery and field performance determine suitable nitrogen supply of nursery-grown, exponentially fertilized Chinese pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiaxi Wang; Guolei Li; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Jiajia Liu; Wenhui Shi; Yong Liu

    2015-01-01

    Optimum fertilization levels are often determined solely from nursery growth responses. However, it is the performance of the seedling on the outplanting site that is the most important. For Pinus species seedlings, little information is known about the field performance of plants cultured with different nutrient rates, especially with exponential fertilization. In...

  19. Nursery Home Visits: Rhetoric and Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The importance of home-school relationships between parents and practitioners in early childhood settings is widely accepted. This article discusses the effects of the level of involvement and the nature of practitioner-parent relationships in early years settings in England on the basis of a two part study that examined parents' experience of…

  20. Leaf blight of eucalyptus in nurseries. [Phaeoseptoria eucalyptus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamaluddin; Soni, K.K.; Dadwal, V.S.

    1985-12-01

    A large number of seedlings of Eucalyptus are raised in forest nurseries for afforestation, road side and avenue plantations. Usually the sowing is done during February and the seedlings are maintained in polythene bags for the plantation during July. During the course of study of nursery diseases a severe leaf blight of Eucalyptus (E. camaldulensis E. tereticornis and E. hybrid) caused by Phaeoseptoria eucalyptus (Hansf.) Walker was recorded. Even the big trees of 10 to 15 years were found to be infected by this fungus. Phaeoseptoria eucalyptus (Hansf.) Walker was recorded on E. globulus from Mysore. Researchers also noticed this disease in Eucalyptus from Kerala. The present report indicated that the disease is being reported for the first time from Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Rajastan. 2 references, 1 table.

  1. Nursery words and hypocorisms among Germanic kinship terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Simmelkjær Sandgaard

    2018-01-01

    By using Jakobson’s (1960: 127-130) criteria for determining the nursery-word sta-tus of a given lexeme, I argue in this article that, even if we should no longer re-gard PG *aiþīn-/-ōn- ‘mother’ (Goth. aiþei), *aiþma- ‘daughter’s husband’ and *faþōn- ‘father’s sister’ as nursery words...... or hypocorisms (Hansen 2017: 207-220), we should certainly still do so with PG *ammōn- ‘parent’s mother; wet nurse’, *attan- ‘father’ (Goth. atta), *basōn- ‘father’s sister’ and *mōnōn-/mōmōn- ‘moth-er; mother’s sister’....

  2. Variation in Sepsis Evaluation Across a National Network of Nurseries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sagori; Taylor, James A; Von Kohorn, Isabelle; Flaherman, Valerie; Burgos, Anthony E; Phillipi, Carrie A; Dhepyasuwan, Nui; King, Elizabeth; Dhudasia, Miren; Puopolo, Karen M

    2017-03-01

    The extent to which clinicians use currently available guidelines for early-onset sepsis (EOS) screening has not been described. The Better Outcomes through Research for Newborns network represents 97 nurseries in 34 states across the United States. The objective of this study was to describe EOS risk management strategies across a national sample of newborn nurseries. A Web-based survey was sent to each Better Outcomes through Research for Newborns network nursery site representative. Nineteen questions addressed specific practices for assessing and managing well-appearing term newborns identified at risk for EOS. Responses were received from 81 (83%) of 97 nurseries located in 33 states. Obstetric diagnosis of chorioamnionitis was the most common factor used to identify risk for EOS (79 of 81). Among well-appearing term infants with concern for maternal chorioamnionitis, 51 of 79 sites used American Academy of Pediatrics or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines to inform clinical care; 11 used a published sepsis risk calculator; and 2 used clinical observation alone. Complete blood cell count (94.8%) and C-reactive protein (36.4%) were the most common laboratory tests obtained and influenced duration of empirical antibiotics at 13% of the sites. Some degree of mother-infant separation was required for EOS evaluation at 95% of centers, and separation for the entire duration of antibiotic therapy was required in 40% of the sites. Substantial variation exists in newborn EOS risk assessment, affecting the definition of risk, the level of medical intervention, and ultimately mother-infant separation. Identification of the optimal approach to EOS risk assessment and standardized implementation of such an approach could affect care of a large proportion of newborns. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Alleged nursery words and hypocorisms among Germanic kinship terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarne Simmelkjær Sandgaard

    2017-01-01

    By (re-)evaluating the etymologies of the three Proto-Germanic kinship terms *aiþīn-/-ōn- ‘mother’, *aiþma- ‘daughter’s husband’ and *faþōn- ‘father’s sister’ that are all claimed by at least some etymological handbooks to be nursery words or hypocorisms, I contend that we must abandon...

  4. Nutrition practices of nurseries in England. Comparison with national guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Neelon, Sara E. Benjamin; Burgoine, Thomas; Hesketh, Kathryn R; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This is the final published version. It first appeared at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666314005145#. Recent national guidelines call for improved nutrition within early years settings to enhance the quality of foods and beverages provided to children. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe foods and beverages served in nurseries, assess provider behaviors related to feeding, and compare these practices to national guidelines. We administered a maile...

  5. Cactus Nurseries and Conservation in a Biosphere Reserve in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María T. Pulido

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Documenting how socio-ecosystem conservation knowledge and practice arise and are modified are issues of ethnobiological interest. In the Barranca de Metztitlán Biosphere Reserve (RBBM, plant nurseries, some of which were created as Environmental Management Units (UMAs, have been established to grow and conserve cacti. This paper describes these nurseries, their role in cactus conservation, and the benefits and limitations for the people managing them. The nurseries have helped decrease illegal traffic in cacti and have enabled ex situ conservation of 22 cacti species. Cactus management has changed from extraction to cultivation, as a result of the knowledge and actions of multiple actors. The main limitation is marketing, a recurring problem for non-timber forest products (NTFP. Greater coordination among stakeholders is recommended, such as involvement by non-governmental organizations to improve their probability of success, as well as learning from the experience of other cactus UMAs. Improving the market for cacti is an issue that needs an immediate solution; otherwise conservation efforts could relapse.

  6. Biogenic reefs as structuring factor in Pleuronectes platessa (Plaice) nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabaut, M.; Van de Moortel, L.; Vincx, M.; Degraer, S.

    2010-07-01

    The structural distribution of juvenile flatfish in nursery areas is generally studied on a larger scale on which the effects of abiotic factors such as sediment characteristics, beach profile, tides, and turbidity dominate. The biotic structuring factor has never before been investigated from a very small scale-perspective. The latter is the subject of the present study. In an in situ experimental sampling design, the structuring effect of biogenic reefs on the distribution of Pleuronectes platessa (Plaice) in an intertidal nursery area is investigated. The density distribution of this flatfish species is significantly ( p structured by them as well. This structuring impact of small-scale benthic reefs creating a patchy environment in nursery areas potentially plays an important role in other marine environments and indicates the need for further research on the ecological function of benthic reef environments for several flatfish species. Further modification of these biogenic habitats may lead to a loss of one or more ecosystem functions which flatfish species depend on.

  7. SOIL TEMPERATURE MODIFICATIONS CAUSED BY SOLARIZATION IN NURSERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nereu Augusto Streck

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Solarization effects on soil temperature were evaluated during the autumn. The increase in soil temperature caused by the use of transparent polyethylene (PE low tunnels over solarized nurseries, in subtropical central region of the Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil, was also quantified. Treatments were: a solarization with 100µ thickness PE (T1, b solarization with 100µ thickness PE, covered with low tunnel (T2, c solarization with 50µ thickness PE (T3, d solarization with 50µ thickness PE, covered with low tunnel (T4, and e bare soil (T. The low tunnel consisted of a 100µ thickness PE and measured 0.5m height in the center of the nursery. The results showed that additional use of low tunnels have increased, on the average, 5.0ºC over the maximum temperature of the superficial layer of the soil in the solarized nurseries. In addition, it was observed several days in which the maximum temperature exceeded 45ºC.

  8. Integration of health service with electronic nursery care process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merih Yeliz Doğan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available You This study aims to provide to integrate the health service with electronic nursery care process and so do create lingua franca. This research has been done between April 2010 and January 2012 in a teaching and research hospital where is specialized on obstetrician and gynecology. 280 nurse are the sample of the study. The datas are collected by using a survey with 22 questions. After the observations and evaluations, in case of standards 40 nursery care process about most experienced problems in gynecology, obstetrician and pediatry clinics is formed and its infrastructure for integrating these flow diagrams to the data processing system is prepared. For working the new system, instructive sessions is done. After the applications, the using of process approach in nursery care service and the pleasure of the nurses are analysed. The datas are analysed by using percentage calculation, t-test and variant analysis test in case of SPSS programme. In this study, 3 different application for the usage of process approach is used. These applications are done in different 15 bedded clinics and in differrent times. In the first application, empty forms which have standard format, are given to the nurses to complete.In the second application, the forms which special nursery activity has been wrritten on, are given to the nurses to sign their own activity and in the third application, the standard process approach which has been integrated to electronic system and which is special to patient, is requested to use. After all aplications, according to analysation of the results, the usage of the process’ method rates are; 10% is for first method, 40% is for second method and 90% is for third method. Especially, the nursery process approach which has been integrated to electronic system is used more desirous. According to the nurses’ opinion, this system increases the creation of lingua franca, data security and effective time management. It is

  9. Maternal Separations During the Reentry Years for 100 Infants Raised in a Prison Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Mary W.; Goshin, Lorie; Blanchard-Lewis, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Prison nurseries prevent maternal separations related to incarceration for the small subset of children whose pregnant mothers are incarcerated in states with such programs. For a cohort of 100 children accepted by corrections into one prison nursery, subsequent separation patterns are analyzed. The largest numbers are caused by corrections’ removal of infants from the nursery and infants reaching a one-year age limit. Criminal recidivism and substance abuse relapse threaten continued mothering during reentry. Focused and coordinated services are needed during prison stay and reentry years to sustain mothering for women and children accepted into prison nursery programs. PMID:22328865

  10. Young children's food in Liverpool day-care settings: a qualitative study of pre-school nutrition policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Williams, Ffion; Bristow, Katie; Capewell, Simon; Mwatsama, Modi

    2011-10-01

    To explore nutrition and food provision in pre-school nurseries in order to develop interventions to promote healthy eating in early years settings, especially across deprived communities. An ethnographic approach was used combining participant observation with semi-structured interviews. Research participants were selected purposively using convenience sampling. Community pre-school nurseries. Nursery managers (n 9), cooks (n 6), staff (n 12), parents (n 12) and children at six nurseries (four private and two attached to children's centres) in Liverpool, UK. Private nurseries had minimal access to information and guidelines. Most nurseries did not have a specific healthy eating policy but used menu planning to maintain a focus on healthy eating. No staff had training in healthy eating for children under the age of 5 years. However, enthusiasm and interest were widespread. The level and depth of communication between the nursery and parents was important. Meal times can be an important means of developing social skills and achieving Early Years Foundation Stage competencies. Nurseries are genuinely interested in providing appropriate healthy food for under-5s but require support. This includes: improved mechanisms for effective communication between all government levels as well as with nurseries; and funded training for cooks and managers in menu planning, cost-effective food sourcing and food preparation. Interventions to support healthy eating habits in young children developed at the area level need to be counterbalanced by continued appropriate national-level public health initiatives to address socio-economic differences.

  11. Exposure to foods' non-taste sensory properties. A nursery intervention to increase children's willingness to try fruit and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Paul; Houston-Price, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    Activities that engage young children with the sensory properties of foods are popular with nursery schools, despite the lack of evidence for their efficacy in increasing children's consumption of healthy foods. This study provides the first empirical exploration of the effectiveness of a non-taste sensory activity program in a nursery school setting. Ninety-two children aged between 12 and 36 months were allocated either to an intervention group, who took part in looking, listening, feeling and smelling activities with unusual fruits and vegetables every day for 4 weeks, or to a non-intervention control group. In a subsequent mealtime taste test, children touched and tasted more of the vegetables to which they had been familiarized in their playtime activities than of a matched set of non-exposed foods. The results demonstrate that hands-on activities with unfamiliar fruits and vegetables can enhance children's willingness to taste these foods, and confirm the potential for such activities to support healthy eating initiatives. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. The Knowledge Attitude and Behaviorus of Nursery Students about Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Aslan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was performed in order to determine the knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nursery students about breast cancer. The study was performed between September 2006-November 2006. 100 nursery students of college out of 102 (98,0% participation rate were included in this study. A questionnaire was used to gather the data. Source of information was newspaper-tv in 47%, medical boks in 32% and internet in 32%. The answer to the question what the most common syptom was in breast cancer was growth in the breast in 54,6%, pain in the breast in 24,1% and nipple retraction in 12,8%. Of the students %63 performed self breast examination (SBE. Of the students who perform SBE 29 (46% perform it as they remember, 26 (41,3% perform it once a month and 6 (9,5% perform it once a week. SBE was learnt from school in 41.3% (26, from a doctor in 22,2% (14, from a nurse/midwife in 20,6% and from medical boks in 9,5% (6. Their answer to the question about the reason not to perform SBE was not having enough information in 51,4%(19, inattention in 24,3%(9, fear of finding a growth in 8,1%(3, not having any complaints about their breasts in 8,1% (3 and thinking that it is not essential in 8,1% (3. Of the students 95% had never had clinical breast examinayion (CBE. The reason not to have CBE was inattention in 53,7% (51, not having enough information in 18,9% (18, and thinking that it is not essential in 8,4% (8. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2007; 6(3: 193-198

  13. The Knowledge Attitude and Behaviorus of Nursery Students about Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Aslan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was performed in order to determine the knowledge, attitude and behaviours of nursery students about breast cancer. The study was performed between September 2006-November 2006. 100 nursery students of college out of 102 (98,0% participation rate were included in this study. A questionnaire was used to gather the data. Source of information was newspaper-tv in 47%, medical boks in 32% and internet in 32%. The answer to the question what the most common syptom was in breast cancer was growth in the breast in 54,6%, pain in the breast in 24,1% and nipple retraction in 12,8%. Of the students %63 performed self breast examination (SBE. Of the students who perform SBE 29 (46% perform it as they remember, 26 (41,3% perform it once a month and 6 (9,5% perform it once a week. SBE was learnt from school in 41.3% (26, from a doctor in 22,2% (14, from a nurse/midwife in 20,6% and from medical boks in 9,5% (6. Their answer to the question about the reason not to perform SBE was not having enough information in 51,4%(19, inattention in 24,3%(9, fear of finding a growth in 8,1%(3, not having any complaints about their breasts in 8,1% (3 and thinking that it is not essential in 8,1% (3. Of the students 95% had never had clinical breast examinayion (CBE. The reason not to have CBE was inattention in 53,7% (51, not having enough information in 18,9% (18, and thinking that it is not essential in 8,4% (8. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(3.000: 193-198

  14. Social skills levels on nursery students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Pades Jiménez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyse the social skills of a sample group of 3rd year nursing students who attended a social skills training programme. Materials and method: An outline is made of the results of a descriptive study that analyses the social skills of a sample group of 314 students from different academic years, studying at the Palma de Mallorca University School of Nursing. For assessment purposes, a Social Skills Scale (Gismero, 2000 was used. Results: The results show that the sample group’s social skills were not low. They only encountered problems when it came to upholding their own rights (Factors 2 or to engaging in interactions with the opposite sex (Factor 6. Even so, a social skills training programme is proposed in the form of a psycho-educational training course in order to improve the students’ social skills in these areas, provide them with stress prevention tools, train them in communication skills, and improve relations between patients/families and the medical team.

  15. Nursery Schools or Nursery Classes? Choosing and Failing to Choose between Policy Alternatives in Nursery Education in England, 1918-1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Amy

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses early years education policy in England from 1918 to 1972, applying the theoretical ideas of John Kingdon. Throughout this period, the educational needs of young children were a low political priority, but they did occasionally rise on the agenda. When the issue gained prominence, politicians considered two key policy…

  16. Nutrient removal by apple, pear and cherry nursery trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovambattista Sorrenti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Given that nursery is a peculiar environment, the amount of nutrients removed by nursery trees represents a fundamental acquisition to optimise fertilisation strategies, with economic and environmental implications. In this context, we determined nutrient removal by apple, pear and cherry nursery trees at the end of the nursery growing cycle. We randomly removed 5 leafless apple (Golden Delicious/EMLA M9; density of 30,000 trees ha–1, pear (Santa Maria/Adams; density of 30,000 trees ha–1 and cherry (AlexTM/Gisela 6®; density of 40,000 trees ha–1 trees from a commercial nursery. Trees were divided into roots (below the root collar, rootstock (above-ground wood between root collar and grafting point and variety (1-year-old wood above the grafting point. For each organ we determined biomass, macro- (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, and micro- (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, and B nutrient concentration. Pear trees were the most developed (650 g (dw tree–1, equal to 1.75 and 2.78 folds than apple and cherry trees, respectively whereas, independently of the species, variety mostly contributed (>50% to the total tree biomass, followed by roots and then above-ground rootstock. However, the dry biomass and nutrient amount measured in rootstocks (including roots represent the cumulative amount of 2 and 3 seasons, for Gisela® 6 (tissue culture and pome fruit species (generated by mound layering, respectively. Macro and micronutrients were mostly concentrated in roots, followed by variety and rootstock, irrespective of the species. Independently of the tissue, macronutrients concentration hierarchy was N>Ca>K> P>Mg>S. Removed N by whole tree accounted for 6.58, 3.53 and 2.49 g tree–1 for pear, apple and cherry, respectively, corresponding to almost 200, 107 and 100 kg N ha–1, respectively. High amounts of K and Ca were used by pear (130-140 kg ha–1 and apple trees (~50 and 130 kg ha–1 of K and Ca, respectively, while ~25 kg K ha–1 and 55 kg Ca ha–1 were

  17. Hand hygiene in the nursery during diaper changing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Koh Ni; Maznin, Nur Liyanna; Yip, Wai Kin

    2012-12-01

    This project aimed to improve hand hygiene practice during diaper changing among nurses working in the nursery. This project was conducted in one of the nurseries in a 935-bed acute care hospital with a sample of 15 nurses. A pre- and post-intervention audit was conducted utilising the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice module. A revised written workflow, which specified the occasions and process for hand hygiene during diaper changing, was introduced. Modifications to the baby bassinets and nursery were made after barriers to good hand hygiene were identified. The project was carried out over 4 months, from March to June 2011. The post-intervention audit results show an improvement in performing hand washing after changing diapers (20%) and performing the correct steps of hand rubbing (25%). However, the compliance rates decreased for the other criteria that measured whether hand rubbing or hand washing was performed prior to contacting the infant and after wrapping the infant, and whether hand washing was performed correctly. The improvement in compliance with hand washing--the main focus of the new workflow--after changing diapers was especially significant. The results indicated that having a workflow on the occasions and process for hand hygiene during diaper changing was useful in standardising practice. Pre- and post-implementation audits were effective methods for evaluating the effect of translating evidence into practice. However, this project had limited success in improving compliance with hand hygiene. This suggested that more effort is needed to reinforce the importance of hand hygiene and compliance to the proposed workflow. In addition, this project showed that for change to take place successfully, environmental modifications, increased awareness and adequate communication to every staff member are essential. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence

  18. Control of grapevine wood fungi in commercial nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rego

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous surveys conducted in commercial nurseries found that different wood fungi, namely Cylindrocarpon spp., Botryosphaeriaceae, Phomopsis viticola and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora infect grapevine cuttings. Two field trials were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of cyprodinil + fludioxonil, pyraclostrobin + metiram, fludioxonil and cyprodinil to prevent or reduce natural infections caused by such fungi. Rootstock and scion cuttings were soaked in fungicidal suspensions for 50 min prior to grafting. After callusing, the grafted cuttings were planted in two commercial field nurseries with and without a previous history of grapevine cultivation. After nine months in the nursery, the plants were uprooted and analysed for the incidence and severity of the wood fungi. Plants uprooted from the field without a previous history of grapevine cultivation were generally less strongly infected by wood fungi. Under this condition, only the mixture cyprodinil + fludioxonil simultaneously reduced the incidence of Cylindrocarpon and Botryosphaeriaceae fungi, as well as the severity of Cylindrocarpon infections. Treatments did not produce significant differences in the incidence and severity of P. viticola, and Pa. chlamydospora. For plants grown in the field with a grapevine history, all fungicides except cyprodinil significantly reduced the incidence and severity of Cylindrocarpon fungi. Also, the incidence and severity of Botryosphaeriaceae pathogens were significantly decreased both by cyprodinil + fludioxonil and by cyprodinil. No significant differences were noticed for P. viticola incidence and severity, and Pa. chlamydospora was not detected again. These results suggest that the practice of soaking grapevine cuttings in selected fungicides prior to grafting significantly reduces Cylindrocarpon spp. and Botryosphaeriaceae infections, thus improving the quality of planting material.

  19. Evaluation of different compound fertilizers for use in oil palm nursery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The standard NPKMg 12:12:17:2 compound fertilizer (SF) for oil palm nurseries is not always available when needed. Evaluation of other compound fertilizers – NKP 15:15:15 and NPK 20:10:10 – compared with the SF were carried out in the main nursery at NIFOR to ascertain their suitability and rates of application.

  20. A systems approach for management of pests and pathogens of nursery crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Parke; Niklaus J. Grünwald

    2012-01-01

    Horticultural nurseries are heterogeneous and spatially complex agricultural systems, which present formidable challenges to management of diseases and pests. Moreover, nursery plants shipped interstate and internationally can serve as important vectors for pathogens and pests that threaten both agriculture and forestry. Current regulatory strategies to prevent this...

  1. Spread of P. ramorum from nurseries into waterways-implications for pathogen establishment in new areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary Chastagner; Steven Oak; Daniel Omdal; Amy Ramsey-Kroll; Katie Coats; Yana Valachovic; Chris Lee; Jaesoon Hwang; Steven Jeffers; Marianne. Elliott

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, water and soil baiting have been part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS) Confirmed Nursery Protocol (CNP) to prevent the spread of Phytophthora ramorum from infected nursery stock since 2005. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USDA...

  2. Forest Research Nursery Waste Water Management Plan, Integrated Pest Management Plan, and pesticide safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas Dumroese; David L. Wenny

    1992-01-01

    The University of Idaho Forest Research Nursery was established in 1909 to grow bareroot (field-grown) tree and shrub seedlings for conservation. In 1982, the bareroot production was phased out and replaced by growing seedlings in containers in greenhouses. The nursery emphasizes teaching, research and service. Students learn about forest planting; scientists...

  3. Evaluation of Fumigants for Pest Management and Seedling Production in Southern Pine Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen W. Fraedrich; L. David Dwinell

    1998-01-01

    The South's forest-products industry, as well as nonindustrial private landowners throughout the region, depend on forest-tree nurseries for the continuing production of high quality seedlings that survive well and grow quickly when outplanted. In recent years, southern pine nurseries have produced 1.1 to 1.65 billion seedlings annually, a production level that...

  4. Restoration outplantings of nursery-origin Californian flora are heavily infested with Phytophthora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler B. Bourret; Heather K. Mehl; David M. Rizzo; Tedmund J. Swiecki; Elizabeth A. Bernhardt; Janell M. Hillman

    2017-01-01

    A survey of areas previously anthropogenically disturbed and revegetated with woody nursery-reared native Californian vegetation was conducted in Santa Clara County between August and December of Previous sampling of revegetation sites had found nursery-origin transplants to be infested withPhytophthora species. Samples of roots and soil were...

  5. Create a pollinator garden at your nursery: An emphasis on monarch butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; R. Kasten Dumroese; Matthew E. Horning

    2014-01-01

    We realize that this type of article is a departure for FNN readers but feel that it is important for forest, conservation, and native plant nurseries to be good environmental stewards. In addition, establishing a pollinator garden at your nursery can be good for business, too. Demonstrating the role and beauty of native plants and their pollinators, particulary in a...

  6. Analysis of the spatial pattern of strawberry angular leaf spot in California nursery production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthomonas fragariae is a bacterium that causes angular leaf spot of strawberry. In California, angular leaf spot (ALS) is a common disease in strawberry nursery production, and a major concern for nurseries wishing to export plants. The spatial pattern of disease is an ecological property whose ch...

  7. Emotional Aspects of Nursery Policy and Practice--Progress and Prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article argues for a turn in early years policy towards more serious attention to the emotional dimensions of nursery organisation and practice. The article describes three developing bodies of research on emotion in nursery, each taking a different theoretical perspective. The central argument of the article is that these three bodies of…

  8. Growing difficult hardwoods: Experiences at the George O. White State Forest Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greg Hoss

    2013-01-01

    This paper will describe techniques for growing bareroot seedlings of some of the “trickier” species that nursery managers often times have limited success growing. In addition, some information is provided about hardwood seed management and how that has improved nursery successes.

  9. Improvements for energy conservation at the Coeur d'Alene Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram Eramian

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, the USDA Forest Service Coeur d'Alene Nursery in Idaho began to evaluate ways to reduce energy consumption in lighting, refrigeration, and heating and cooling of facility workspace. The primary factor leading up to this was the inefficiency of the nursery's Freon(R)-based refrigeration system. Energy costs and maintenance of the system were becoming...

  10. Japanese Nursery and Kindergarten Teachers' Beliefs and Practices Regarding Developmentally Appropriate Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Archana V.; Sugita, Chisato; Crane-Mitchell, Linda; Averett, Paige

    2014-01-01

    This study explored Japanese day nursery and kindergarten teachers' beliefs and practices regarding developmentally appropriate practices. Data were collected using in-depth interviews. Teacher interviews provided insights into the merger of the childcare and education systems of Japan. Six themes emerged from the analysis of the day nursery and…

  11. Growth performances of juvenile sole Solea solea under environmental constraints of embayed nursery areas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laffargue, P.; Lagardere, F.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.; Fillon, A.; Amara, R.

    2007-01-01

    Tidal embayments in the Bay of Biscay (France) host nursery grounds where common sole, Solea solea, is the most abundant flatfish species. This study aimed to appraise the way those habitats function as nurseries through juvenile sole's responses in somatic growth and condition (Fulton's K) during

  12. The nursery role of a sheltered surf-zone in warm-temperate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marine fish nurseries such as surf-zones have usually been classified as nurseries based solely on the density of pre-adult fish, yet the full suite of developmental stages are seldom assessed because of difficulties associated with sampling these habitats. The larval and early juvenile fish assemblage was studied in a ...

  13. Importance of shallow-water bay biotopes as nurseries for Caribbean reef fishes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerken, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    Mangroves and seagrass beds can harbour high densities of mostly juvenile fishes. It has therefore long been assumed that these habitats function as nursery areas. In the present thesis the nursery function of mangroves, seagrass beds and other shallow-water biotopes, located in sheltered inland

  14. Panel Discussion: Cover Crops Used at Georgia Forestry Commission Flint River and Walker Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff Fields

    2005-01-01

    Flint River Nursery, located near Montezuma, Georgia, has used rye, wheat, brown top millet, and sorghum sudan grass for cover crops. Flint River has just begun to return to a summer cover crop situation. At Walker Nursery, located near Reidsville, Georgia, certified rye has been sown by the State Department of Corrections (DOC) for their harvesting, with a benefit to...

  15. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Verweij; O.K. Helder; Dr. A.L. van Staa

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five

  16. Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Nurseries in Lebanon: A Cross Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaaya, Monique; Saab, Dahlia; Maalouf, Fadi T.; Boustany, Rose-Mary

    2016-01-01

    In Lebanon, no estimate for autism prevalence exists. This cross-sectional study examines the prevalence of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in toddlers in nurseries in Beirut and Mount-Lebanon. The final sample included 998 toddlers (16-48 months) from 177 nurseries. We sent parents the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) for…

  17. Phomopsis and Sudden Oak Death: A Tale of Two Nursery Nuisances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce D. Moltzan

    2006-01-01

    Tree nurseries, by their very nature, provide key components of the disease triangle (pathogen, host, and environment) simply by the widespread planting of susceptible host(s) grown under optimal conditions. Pathogens can severely impact the quality and quantity of seedling stock, making pest management a high priority in successful nursery practice. Careful...

  18. National proceedings: forest and conservation nursery associations-1999, 2000, and 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. K. Dumroese; L. E. Riley; T. D. Landis

    2002-01-01

    The National Proceedings contains articles presented at regional meetings during 1999, 2000, and 2001. 1999: The joint meeting of the Northeastern and Western Forest and Conservation Nursery Associations was held at the Gateway Conference Center in Ames, Iowa, on July 12-15. Hosts were the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Cascade Forestry Nursery, and the USDA...

  19. Building and Registering the daily life in the nursery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Ribeiro de Carvalho Gonzaga Ramadan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available With this article stated that primary education is a level of education that has its own ideas, goals and characteristics. We report from our experiences, as we are building, in daily work in the nursery, with small children, what paths we tread, the way this work is recorded, since our objective is not to present an outcome or product end, but look for ways to present it as a daily experience and process, not only in view of the teacher, but having children as participants, strengthening the group in creating and building a co-educational work that firm's complicity.

  20. Evaluation of Factors that Influence School Readiness Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The preschool child is often confronted with adverse environmental influences that may affect his/her development and hence his readiness for schooling. The factors that affect school readiness were evaluated in 532 nursery school pupils using a proforma on perinatal problems and gross motor development of the pupils.

  1. African Literatures and Afro-Brazilian in the Early Childhood Education Nursery. Challenges to Diversity Etnicorracial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudionor Renato Da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available African and Afro-brazilian literature are rising in national educational practice mainly after the publication of the Laws 10.639/03 and 11.645/08 turning mandatory the teaching of African, Afro-arazilian and indigenous history and culture, offering the opportunity to treat racial ethnic relationships in basic education. The article aims to present a reflection based on the results of a weekly pedagogical practice, approaching the education of the racial ethnic relationships through African and Afro-brazilian infantile literature in a classroom of "maternal I" (2 and 3 year old children of a nursery school. Based on a qualitative approach, this research used the method of participant research with the elaboration of a research report. The observation registers in the report allowed us to confirm the resistence to treat racial questions in scholar space. It was also possible to verify that African and Afro-brazilian literatures are substitutes for some literatures that affirm and fortify the myth of racial democracy and are, therefore, obstacles for the laws 10.639/03 and 11.645/08 in schools of basic education.

  2. 75 FR 75169 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Update of Nursery Stock...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-02

    ... Approval of an Information Collection; Update of Nursery Stock Regulations AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... collection associated with regulations for the importation of nursery stock into the United States. DATES: We... regulations for the importation of nursery stock into the United States, contact Mr. Alex Belano, Branch Chief...

  3. Faecal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in asymptomatic nursery children in Lower Saxony (Germany), 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, M; Dreesman, J; Rettenbacher-Riefler, S; Mertens, E

    2016-09-09

    Children may be at higher risk for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria because of higher usage of antimicrobials. They also have higher rates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections than other population groups. Some infections, particularly in children, are asymptomatic, but still lead to the excretion of large numbers of bacteria and viruses that may cause clinical disease in other individuals. That is one reason why, in Lower Saxony as in other German federal states - asymptomatic carriers of STEC are excluded from nurseries and schools until three consecutive stool samples test negative in order to prevent secondary cases. The prevalence of children who are asymptomatic STEC carriers is unknown. But if it is high, this measure would have substantial socioeconomic effects on families. Infections with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are an increasing problem for public health, especially for hospitals. However, there are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of asymptomatic ESBL-E carriers in Lower Saxony, as there is no mandatory requirement to report these carriers. In order to discuss the exclusion policies for children attending nurseries and ascertain a baseline of ESBL-E carriers, we conducted a cross-sectional study. The aim was to determine the prevalence of ESBL-E and STEC and identify risk factors for carriage in nursery children without diarrhoea (asymptomatic) aged 0-6 years in four selected districts in Northern Germany. During April-September 2014, we collected stool specimens with the support of voluntarily participating nurseries. We tested for STEC by PCR and for ESBL-E on chromogenic agar. Questionnaires answered by parents contained data on eating and drinking habits, outdoor activities, prior antibiotic treatment and animal contact for each participating child. We compared the epidemiological characteristics of ESBL-E carriers vs. non-carriers by using univariable analysis (P

  4. The Mangrove Nursery Paradigm Revisited: Otolith Stable Isotopes Support Nursery-to-Reef Movements by Indo-Pacific Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimirei, Ismael A.; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Mgaya, Yunus D.; Huijbers, Chantal M.

    2013-01-01

    Mangroves and seagrass beds have long been perceived as important nurseries for many fish species. While there is growing evidence from the Western Atlantic that mangrove habitats are intricately connected to coral reefs through ontogenetic fish migrations, there is an ongoing debate of the value of these coastal ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific. The present study used natural tags, viz. otolith stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, to investigate for the first time the degree to which multiple tropical juvenile habitats subsidize coral reef fish populations in the Indo Pacific (Tanzania). Otoliths of three reef fish species (Lethrinus harak, L. lentjan and Lutjanus fulviflamma) were collected in mangrove, seagrass and coral reef habitats and analyzed for stable isotope ratios in the juvenile and adult otolith zones. δ13C signatures were significantly depleted in the juvenile compared to the adult zones, indicative of different habitat use through ontogeny. Maximum likelihood analysis identified that 82% of adult reef L. harak had resided in either mangrove (29%) or seagrass (53%) or reef (18%) habitats as juveniles. Of adult L. fulviflamma caught from offshore reefs, 99% had passed through mangroves habitats as juveniles. In contrast, L. lentjan adults originated predominantly from coral reefs (65–72%) as opposed to inshore vegetated habitats (28–35%). This study presents conclusive evidence for a nursery role of Indo-Pacific mangrove habitats for reef fish populations. It shows that intertidal habitats that are only temporarily available can form an important juvenile habitat for some species, and that reef fish populations are often replenished by multiple coastal habitats. Maintaining connectivity between inshore vegetated habitats and coral reefs, and conserving habitat mosaics rather than single nursery habitats, is a major priority for the sustainability of various Indo Pacific fish populations. PMID:23776658

  5. The Ethnic Composition of Nursery Classes and Its Effect on Children's Adjustment to Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J. A.; Brember, I.

    1992-01-01

    Reports details of a study of teacher perceptions of children's adjustment to preschool. Indicates teacher perceptions that girls, morning class attenders, and children in multiethnic classes adjusted better to school than did boys, all-white British classes, and afternoon attenders. Identifies induction policies, group make-up, and teacher…

  6. Coastal nurseries and their importance for conservation of sea kraits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Bonnet

    Full Text Available Destruction and pollution of coral reefs threaten these marine biodiversity hot stops which shelter more than two thirds of sea snake species. Notably, in many coral reef ecosystems of the Western Pacific Ocean, large populations of sea kraits (amphibious sea snakes have drastically declined during the past three decades. Protecting remaining healthy populations is thus essential. In New Caledonia, coral reefs shelter numerous sea krait colonies spread throughout an immense lagoon (24,000 km2. Sea kraits feed on coral fish but lay their eggs on land. However, ecological information on reproduction and juveniles is extremely fragmentary, precluding protection of key habitats for reproduction. Our 10 years mark recapture study on Yellow sea kraits (L. saintgironsi >8,700 individuals marked revealed that most neonates aggregate in highly localized coastal sites, where they feed and grow during several months before dispersal. Hundreds of females emigrate seasonally from remote populations (>50 km away to lay their eggs in these coastal nurseries, and then return home. Protecting these nurseries is a priority to maintain recruitment rate, and to retain sea krait populations in the future.

  7. Branch induction in spur-type Delicious apple nursery trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popenoe, J.

    1987-01-01

    Long sylleptic shoots produced on apple trees in the nursery result in increased early yields once the trees are planted in the orchard. Spur-type Delicious trees do not naturally produce branches in the nursery. To achieve branched spur-type Delicious trees, applications of combinations of growth regulators benzyladenine (BA) and gibberellic acid 4 + 7 (GA) and leaf removal (LR) techniques were tested. Spacings of 15, 25, 35, and 45 cm and MM.106, M.7, M.26 and seedling rootstocks were tested for their effects on branching. Carbon partitioning changes caused by these treatments were evaluated by dry weight analysis and for benzyladenine, leaf removal and tipping treatments by {sup 14}C-photoassimilate labelling. Possible involvement of roots produced cytokinins was examined by {sup 14}C-benzyladenine labeling through the xylem and by analyzing relationships between root mass and branching characteristics. Although partitioning of {sup 14}C-photoassimilate was increased to the top of the plant by BA sprays, and to the bottom of the plant by LR and tipping for up to six days after treatment, final plant weights were not different. No relationship between branching and root mass or {sup 14}C-benzyladenine mobilization was found. This evidence indicates branched trees possessed no greater dry weight than unbranched trees, only a redistribution of the dry weight into a form more suited to early fruit production in high density planting systems.

  8. An outbreak of enterovirus 71 in a nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang-Liang; Chen, Chao-Huei; Huang, Shui-King; Chen, Po-Yen

    2010-08-01

    In this article we report a nosocomial outbreak of enterovirus 71 (EV71) in a newborn nursery and describe the clinical presentations of infected infants. Community outbreaks of EV71 are quite common in epidemic areas, but a nosocomial outbreak of EV71 is a rare occurrence. A total of 7 out of 19 infants (37%) had symptoms. All infants had poor activity, 6 (86%) had fever, 4 (57%) had drowsiness, 3 (43%) had diarrhoea, and 2 (29%) had oral ulcers. Four infants (57%) suffered from encephalitis. There were no deaths. EV71 was isolated from 3 (43%) of the young infants, while all were positive when tested for EV71 using a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. A sequence analysis of the EV71 partial gene revealed a 98.6-100% nucleotide similarity. Control measures included staff hand washing, disinfecting all materials exposed to potentially infected biological fluid, increasing staff hygiene precautions in the kitchen, and using a different basin for bathing each baby. We conclude that it is difficult to diagnose EV71 infection in young infants by clinical presentation alone and, similar to other enteroviruses, EV71 can spread efficiently amongst young infants in a nursery unit.

  9. Impact of Nursery Rhymes on Iranian EFL Learners’ Listening Comprehension Skill Improvement-A Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Pourkalhor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was an attempt to investigate the effect of nursery rhymes on the young language learners listening comprehension ability. To do so, 30 elementary learners were selected as the potential participants of the study. The learners’ perceptions about using nursery rhymes in teaching listening as well as teachers’ perceptions about teaching listening comprehension through nursery rhymes were taken into account. The listening pre- and post-tests and teachers and learners’ interviews were employed for data collection procedures. Quantitative as well as qualitative methodologies were adapted for data analysis. Findings showed that the young learners could improve their listening comprehension ability as a result of using nursery rhymes. Interview data also indicated that the learners’ perceptions about nursery rhymes were found to be positive since the rhymes provided an interesting atmosphere for the learners to improve their listening comprehension while benefiting from peer interaction and teacher’s support in the listening classroom. Teachers’ perceptions were also realistic regarding using nursery rhymes in teaching listening, especially for young learners. As to the implication side, finding can contribute to the positive application of nursery rhymes in paving the way for young learners to improve their listening comprehension ability.

  10. Assessment of Diplodus spp. (Sparidae nursery grounds along the rocky shore of Marseilles (France, NW Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Cheminee

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at performing a large scale assessment of Diplodus spp. (Sparidae nurseries along the rocky shore of Marseilles (France, NW Mediterranean by locating and quantifying nursery microhabitats and estimating the settlement pattern along this shore in 2004. Nursery grounds of Diplodus spp. represented only 9% of the 52 km-long rocky shore of Marseilles. Their location, shallow rocky habitats sheltered within coves, made them vulnerable to human-induced habitat transformations. D. vulgaris settled along this coast at the end of February 2004 and D. puntazzo settled a couple of months earlier. Maximum densities observed reached 215 and 67 ind./100 m for D. vulgaris and D. puntazzo respectively. The settlement rates were spatially variable. At a regional scale, lower settlement rates were observed within the south and centre zones, compared to those observed in the west, east, and the Marseilles Bay zones. Suitable nurseries along this shore seem insufficient for the replenishment of adult assemblages, which suggests that they depend on the migration of adults from other areas. Along the Marseilles rocky shore, coastal development projects leading to the destruction of habitats would represent a major threat to the Diplodus life cycle, which could be even greater than usual given the vulnerability and small size of the nurseries. These results show that it is necessary to protect these scarce local nursery habitats and manage other nearby nurseries to ensure the survival of fish at a critical life stage and the replenishment of adult assemblages.

  11. L'Education Prescolaire et l'Apprentissage de la Lecture (Pre School Education and Introduction to Reading)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, M. B. Lourenco

    1969-01-01

    A series of tests measures the correct stage of mental maturity necessary for a child to learn to read and write. Purpose is to prevent children from being taught to read in nursery schools before they are ready. (JF)

  12. Pig characteristics associated with mortality and light exit weight for the nursery phase

    OpenAIRE

    Larriestra, A.J.; Wattanaphansak, S.; Neumann, E.J.; Bradford, J.; Morrison, R B; Van Deen, J.

    2006-01-01

    One thousand and ten weaned pigs that were reared in 1 nursery in Iowa from weaning (17 ± 2 days ) until 10 weeks of age were evaluated. A weaning weight threshold of 3.6 kg maximized the sensitivity and specificity to correctly predict the likelihood of dying or being light in weight at exit from the nursery (≤ 14.5 kg). Weaning weight ≤ 3.6 kg (OR = 2.92), barrow (OR = 1.75), and sow unit (A versus B, OR = 2.14) were significant predictors of mortality in the nursery. Birth weight ≤ 1.0 kg ...

  13. Occurrence of diarrhoea and intestinal pathogens in non-medicated nursery pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Nicolai; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Jakobsen, Alex Stricker; Pedersen, Lise-Lotte; Hansen, Christian Fink; Pedersen, Ken Steen

    2015-01-01

    Background Intestinal disease in nursery pigs is the most common cause of antibiotic usage in pigs in Denmark. The decision to initiate batch medication of intestinal diseases in nursery pigs is typically made by the stock personnel based on clinical assessments of pigs and counting of diarrhoeic faecal pools on the pen floor. The target population of this study was batches of nursery pigs (10–66 days after weaning) where the stock personnel assessed the pigs to be without signs of intestinal...

  14. Preschool Outcomes of Children Who Lived as Infants in a Prison Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshin, Lorie S.; Byrne, Mary W.; Blanchard-Lewis, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study examined long-term outcomes of children who spent their first one to eighteen months in a US prison nursery. Behavioral development in 47 preschool children who lived in a prison nursery was compared with 64 children from a large national dataset who were separated from their mothers because of incarceration. Separation was associated with significantly worse anxious/depressed scores, even after controlling for risks in the caregiving environment. Findings suggest that prison nursery co-residence with developmental support confers some resilience in children who experience early maternal incarceration. Co-residence programs should be promoted as a best practice for incarcerated childbearing women. PMID:26609188

  15. Effect of nursery intrasurgical intervention in postquirurgic pain level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Ureña Ceruelo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient who is admitted or is going to be operated, feels himself in a reality that might be perceived as a threat, and therefore, might cause an anxiety feeling. The anxiety level influences the perception of the pain the post-surgery period.There are several interventions to decrease the anxiety level, but they are not set on the same scientific evidence level.The aim of this study is to know if some specific interventions carried out by nurses during surgery reduce the patient’s pain during the post-surgery period.So, a randomised controlled trial has been designed, composed by two groups of patients who are will undergo a surgery with epidural anaesthesia. Pain intensity will be assessed during the first 48 hours after surgery, as well as the painkiller consumption and we will compare obtained data between the group who had received the nursery intervention and the control group.

  16. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools—Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanze Gebauer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. Methods: This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam were investigated. Results: The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of “metal grid” (90.71 dB or of a woven willow “basket” (91.61 dB, whereas a case of “aluminium” (103.34 dB generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs “metal grid” and “basket”. The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (−13.88 dB and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. Conclusion: The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven “basket” with an insert of PU-foam.

  17. Noise Exposure of Teachers in Nursery Schools—Evaluation of Measures for Noise Reduction When Dropping DUPLO Toy Bricks into Storage Cases by Sound Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Konstanze; Scharf, Thomas; Baumann, Uwe; Groneberg, David A.; Bundschuh, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although noise is one of the leading work-related health risk factors for teachers, many nursery schools lack sufficient noise reduction measures. Methods: This intervention study evaluated the noise exposure of nursery school teachers when dropping DUPLO toy bricks into storage cases. Sound analyses of the impact included assessment of the maximum sound pressure level (LAFmax) as well as frequency analyses with 1/3 octave band filter. For the purpose of standardization, a customized gadget was developed. Recordings were performed in 11 cases of different materials and designs to assess the impact on sound level reduction. Thereby, the acoustic effects of three damping materials (foam rubber, carpet, and PU-foam) were investigated. Results: The lowest LAFmax was measured in cases consisting of “metal grid” (90.71 dB) or of a woven willow “basket” (91.61 dB), whereas a case of “aluminium” (103.34 dB) generated the highest impact LAFmax. The frequency analyses determined especially low LAFmax in the frequency bands between 80 and 2500 Hz in cases designs “metal grid” and “basket”. The insertion of PU-foam achieved the most significant attenuation of LAFmax (−13.88 dB) and, in the frequency analyses, the best sound damping. Conclusion: The dropping of DUPLO bricks in cases contributes to the high noise level in nursery schools, but measured LAFmax show no evidence for the danger of acute hearing loss. However, continuous exposure may lead to functional impairment of the hair cells and trigger stress reactions. We recommend noise reduction by utilizing cases of woven “basket” with an insert of PU-foam. PMID:27384575

  18. Fish utilisation of wetland nurseries with complex hydrological connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Davis

    Full Text Available The physical and faunal characteristics of coastal wetlands are driven by dynamics of hydrological connectivity to adjacent habitats. Wetlands on estuary floodplains are particularly dynamic, driven by a complex interplay of tidal marine connections and seasonal freshwater flooding, often with unknown consequences for fish using these habitats. To understand the patterns and subsequent processes driving fish assemblage structure in such wetlands, we examined the nature and diversity of temporal utilisation patterns at a species or genus level over three annual cycles in a tropical Australian estuarine wetland system. Four general patterns of utilisation were apparent based on CPUE and size-structure dynamics: (i classic nursery utlisation (use by recently settled recruits for their first year (ii interrupted peristence (iii delayed recruitment (iv facultative wetland residence. Despite the small self-recruiting 'facultative wetland resident' group, wetland occupancy seems largely driven by connectivity to the subtidal estuary channel. Variable connection regimes (i.e. frequency and timing of connections within and between different wetland units (e.g. individual pools, lagoons, swamps will therefore interact with the diversity of species recruitment schedules to generate variable wetland assemblages in time and space. In addition, the assemblage structure is heavily modified by freshwater flow, through simultaneously curtailing persistence of the 'interrupted persistence' group, establishing connectivity for freshwater spawned members of both the 'facultative wetland resident' and 'delayed recruitment group', and apparently mediating use of intermediate nursery habitats for marine-spawned members of the 'delayed recruitment' group. The diversity of utilisation pattern and the complexity of associated drivers means assemblage compositions, and therefore ecosystem functioning, is likely to vary among years depending on variations in hydrological

  19. Protocols for sagebrush seed processing and seedling production at the Lucky Peak Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark D. Fleege

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the production protocols currently practiced at the USDA Forest Service Lucky Peak Nursery (Boise, ID) for seed processing and bareroot and container seedling production for three subspecies of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata).

  20. Integrated cropping systems : an answer to environmental regulations imposed on nursery stock in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, A.A.; Challa, H.

    2000-01-01

    Government regulations in the Netherlands are increasingly constraining and sometimes even banning conventional cultivation practices in nursery stock cropping systems. As a consequence, growers face problems concerning the use of manure, fertilisers and irrigation. In this study we analysed the

  1. Reflections on a Time-Limited Mother-Baby Yoga Program at the Wee Ones Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickholtz, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    This brief article discusses a yoga program offered to mothers and babies who were participating in a prison nursery. The author describes the goals and the sometimes unexpected effects of the program.

  2. Converging Streams of Opportunity for Prison Nursery Programs in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOSHIN, LORIE SMITH; BYRNE, MARY WOODS

    2009-01-01

    Prison nursery programs allow departments of correction to positively intervene in the lives of both incarcerated mothers and their infant children. The number of prison nurseries in the United States has risen dramatically in the past decade, yet there remains a significant gap between predominant correctional policy in this area and what is known about parenting and infant development. Using Kingdon’s streams metaphor, this article examines the recent convergence of problem, policy, and political events related to incarcerated women with infant children and argues that this has created a window of opportunity for development of prison nursery programs. Aday’s policy analysis criteria are also used to analyze available evidence regarding the effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of prison nursery programs as policy alternatives for incarcerated women with infant children. PMID:19865610

  3. Improving Orientation Outcomes: Implementation of Phased Orientation Process in an Intermediate Special Care Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Emily K; Shedenhelm, Heidi J; Gibbs, Ardyce L

    2015-01-01

    In response to changing needs of registered nurse orientees, the staff education committee in the Intermediate Special Care Nursery has implemented a phased orientation process. This phased process includes a mentoring experience postorientation to support a new nurse through the first year of employment. Since implementing the phased orientation process in the Intermediate Special Care Nursery, orientee satisfaction and preparation to practice have increased, and length of orientation has decreased.

  4. Variations in phytosanitary and other management practices in Australian grapevine nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    Helen WAITE; May, Peter; Bossinger, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic and costly failure of newly planted vines is an ongoing problem in the Australian wine industry. Failed vines are frequently infected with wood pathogens, including the fungi associated with Young Vine Decline. Hot water treatment (HWT) and other nursery practices have also been implicated in vine failure. We undertook a survey of Australian grapevine nurseries to develop an understanding of current propagation practices and to facilitate the development of reliable propagation proce...

  5. Economic Analysis of Recapturing and Recycling Irrigation Techniques on Horticulture Nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Nathaniel Klug

    2015-01-01

    The horticulture industry is facing limited water resources and public pressure to reduce non-point source pollution. In some circumstances, recapturing and recycling of irrigation water in horticultural nurseries can generate significant savings relative to the costs of alternative water sources and potentially reduce non-point source pollution. However, obtaining these savings may also incur substantial risk and capital cost outlays. Disease risk may increase in nurseries that implement re...

  6. Investigation of an outbreak of vomiting in nurseries in South East England, May 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, M; Purcell, B; Willis, C; Amar, C F L; Kanagarajah, S; Chamberlain, D; Wooldridge, D; Morgan, J; McLauchlin, J; Grant, K A; Harvey-Vince, L; Padfield, M; Mearkle, R; Chow, J Y

    2016-02-01

    On 30 May 2012, Surrey and Sussex Health Protection Unit was called by five nurseries reporting children and staff with sudden onset vomiting approximately an hour after finishing their lunch that day. Over the following 24 h 50 further nurseries supplied by the same company reported cases of vomiting (182 children, 18 staff affected). Epidemiological investigations were undertaken in order to identify the cause of the outbreak and prevent further cases. Investigations demonstrated a nursery-level attack rate of 55 out of 87 nurseries (63·2%, 95% confidence interval 52·2-73·3). Microbiological tests confirmed the presence of Bacillus cereus in food and environmental samples from the catering company and one nursery. This was considered microbiologically and epidemiologically consistent with toxin from this bacterium causing the outbreak. Laboratory investigations showed that the conditions used by the caterer for soaking of pearl haricot beans (known as navy bean in the USA) used in one of the foods supplied to the nurseries prior to cooking, was likely to have provided sufficient growth and toxin production of B. cereus to cause illness. This large outbreak demonstrates the need for careful temperature control in food preparation.

  7. school eye health screening in kaduna north metropolis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ogwurike

    The commonest causes of eye disorders were allergic conjunctivitis (14.5%), refractive error (1.7%), and infective conjunctivitis (1.4%). Conclusion: School eye screening visits should be at least once a year and should involve screening of all nursery one and primary one pupils. School teachers can be trained to measure ...

  8. Building Inclusive Processes for School Improvement: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Pilar; Escarbajal, Andrés; Guirao, José Manuel; Martínez, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out in a nursery and primary school in order to ascertain the level of self-assessment undertaken by teachers with respect to their educational processes using the "ACADI" instrument, "School-based self-assessment of diversity awareness from an inclusive approach." The objective was to…

  9. Re-imagining Educational Reform: Public Schools and the Nurture of Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Barbara

    1983-01-01

    A comparative analysis of urban public schools as learning environments during the early 1900s shows that although public schools in the early 1900s were ageist, sexist, and racist, they were, nonetheless, havens of liberating possibility. Schools today, although stripped of racism, sexism, and ethnocentricity, are nurseries of oppression. (RM)

  10. Influence of food availability on the spatial distribution of juvenile fish within soft sediment nursery habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tableau, A.; Brind'Amour, A.; Woillez, M.; Le Bris, H.

    2016-05-01

    Soft sediments in coastal shallow waters constitute nursery habitats for juveniles of several flatfishes. The quality of a nursery is defined by its capacity to optimize the growth and the survival of juvenile fish. The influence of biotic factors, such as food availability, is poorly studied at the scale of a nursery ground. Whether food availability limits juvenile survival is still uncertain. A spatial approach is used to understand the influence of food availability on the distribution of juvenile fish of various benthic and demersal species in the Bay of Vilaine (France), a productive nursery ground. We quantified the spatial overlap between benthic macro-invertebrates and their predators (juvenile fish) to assess if the latter were spatially covering the most productive areas of the Bay. Three scenarios describing the shapes of the predator-prey spatial relationship were tested to quantify the strength of the relationship and consequently the importance of food availability in determining fish distribution. Our results underline that both food availability and fish densities vary greatly over the nursery ground. When considering small organisational levels (e.g., a single fish species), the predator-prey spatial relationship was not clear, likely because of additional environmental effects not identified here; but at larger organisational level (the whole juvenile fish community), a strong overlap between the fish predators and their prey was identified. The evidence that fish concentrate in sectors with high food availability suggests that either food is the limiting factor in that nursery or/and fish display behavioural responses by optimising their energetic expenditures associated with foraging. Further investigations are needed to test the two hypotheses and to assess the impact of benthic and demersal juvenile fish in the food web of coastal nurseries.

  11. Variations in phytosanitary and other management practices in Australian grapevine nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen WAITE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic and costly failure of newly planted vines is an ongoing problem in the Australian wine industry. Failed vines are frequently infected with wood pathogens, including the fungi associated with Young Vine Decline. Hot water treatment (HWT and other nursery practices have also been implicated in vine failure. We undertook a survey of Australian grapevine nurseries to develop an understanding of current propagation practices and to facilitate the development of reliable propagation procedures that consistently produce high quality vines. A survey covering all aspects of grapevine propagation including sources of cuttings, HWT, sanitation and cold storage was mailed to all 60 trading Australian vine nurseries. In all, 25 nurseries responded, a response rate of 41.7%. Practices were found to vary widely both within and between nurseries. The vast majority of respondents (20 reported that they currently used, or had used, HWT, but the reliability of HWT was questioned by most nursery operators. A majority (18 felt that some Vitis vinifera varieties were more sensitive to HWT than others. Hydration also emerged as an important factor that had the potential to affect vine quality. All respondents used hydration and although the majority used treated water, cuttings were not generally seen as a source of cross contamination. Our study identified a clear need for further research into the effects of HWT on cutting physiology and the role of hydration in the epidemiology of grapevine pathogens, and the importance of incorporating the results of such research into practical and comprehensive propagation guidelines for vine nurseries.

  12. Nursery Product-Related Injuries Treated in United States Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, Christopher E; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Smith, Gary A

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the epidemiology of injuries associated with nursery products among young children treated in US emergency departments. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were retrospectively analyzed for patients aged injuries among children aged injuries per 10 000 children. The annual injury rate decreased significantly by 33.9% from 1991 to 2003, followed by a significant increase of 23.7% from 2003 to 2011. The decrease was driven by a significant decline in baby walker/jumper/exerciser-related injuries; the increase was driven by a significant increase in concussions and closed head injuries. Nursery product-related injuries were most commonly associated with baby carriers (19.5%), cribs/mattresses (18.6%), strollers/carriages (16.5%), or baby walkers/jumpers/exercisers (16.2%). The most common mechanism of injury was a self-precipitated fall (80.0%), and the most frequently injured body region was the head or neck (47.1%). Although successful injury prevention efforts with baby walkers led to a decline in nursery product-related injuries from 1991 to 2003, the number and rate of these injuries have been increasing since 2003. Greater efforts are warranted to prevent injuries associated with other nursery products, especially baby carriers, cribs, and strollers. Prevention of falls and concussions/closed head injuries associated with nursery products also deserves special attention. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Phytophthora nicotianae is the predominant Phytophthora species in citrus nurseries in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra AHMED

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora root rot is considered to be the most destructive disease to citrus production in Egypt. Phytophthora species are generally present in citrus nurseries, where soil pots containing the survival propagules are considered responsible for their spread into new orchards. The goal of this study was to investigate the distribution and seasonal variation of Phytophthora species in soil and feeder roots in two Egyptian citrus nurseries, characterized by different management, and to identify Phytophthora species associated with root rot. Soil and root samples were collected at monthly intervals from Sour orange and Volkameriana lemon rootstocks during March-July period. The inoculum density of Phytophthora species, and the percentage of infected feeder roots, were estimated using the plate dilution method in conjunction with selective media. Phytophthora isolates were identified according to their morphological characteristics and on the basis of the ITS regions of the rDNA. Phytophthora nicotianae was the predominant isolated species, followed by P. citrophthora and P. palmivora. Phytophthora nicotianae was detected in both nurseries, while P. citrophthora and P. palmivora were recovered only in one nursery. Inoculum density of Phytophthora species fluctuated during spring and summer according to the environmental conditions, rootstock, and nursery management practices.

  14. Understanding the workplace culture of a special care nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Valerie J; McCormack, Brendan G; Ives, Glenice

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents findings from the first phase of a research study focusing on implementation and evaluation of emancipatory practice development strategies. Understanding the culture of practice is essential to undertaking effective developments in practice. Culture is a dominant feature of discussions about modernizing health care, yet few studies have been undertaken that systematically evaluate the development of effective practice cultures. The study intervention is that of emancipatory practice development with an integrated evaluation approach based on Realistic Evaluation. The aim of Realistic Evaluation is to evaluate relationships between Context (setting), Mechanism (process characteristics) and Outcome (arising from the context-mechanism configuration). This first phase of the study focuses on uncovering the context (in particular the culture) of the Special Care Nursery in order to evaluate the emancipatory practice development processes and outcomes. Data collection methods included survey, participant observation and interview. Cognitive mapping, constant comparative method and coding were used to analyse the data. Findings. Four key categories were identified: Teamwork, Learning in Practice, Inevitability of Change and Family-Centred Care and collectively these formed a central category of Core Values and Beliefs. A number of themes were identified in each category, and reflected tensions that existed between differing values and beliefs within the culture of the unit. Understanding values and beliefs is an important part of understanding a workplace culture. Whilst survey methods are capable of outlining espoused workplace characteristics, observation of staff interactions and perceptions gives an understanding of culture as a living entity manifested through interpersonal relationships. Attempts at changing workplace cultures should start from the clarification of values held among staff in that culture.

  15. "Let's Spend More Time Together Like This!": Fussy Baby Network® Infusion in a Baltimore Homeless Nursery Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kim; Norris-Shortle, Carole

    2015-01-01

    The development of babies whose families are homeless can easily be affected by their uncertain living arrangements. The PACT Therapeutic Nursery's attachment-based, trauma-informed, mindfully focused family interventions help these children and families move beyond the trauma of shelter living. In the past year, Nursery clinicians have infused…

  16. National Literacy Trust Survey in Partnership with Nursery World: Investigating Communication, Language and Literacy Development in the Early Years Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halden, Amanda; Clark, Christina; Lewis, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    In May 2011 "Nursery World" and the National Literacy Trust launched its language development survey to celebrate Hello; the national year of communication. The National Literacy Trust teamed up with "Nursery World" to carry out research into the sector's support for children's language and literacy development. Two hundred…

  17. Evidence of estuarine nursery origin of five coastal fish species along the Portuguese coast through otolith elemental fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Rita P.; Reis-Santos, Patrick; Tanner, Susanne; Maia, Anabela; Latkoczy, Christopher; Günther, Detlef; Costa, Maria José; Cabral, Henrique

    2008-08-01

    Connectivity is a critical property of marine populations, particularly for species with segregated juvenile and adult habitats. Knowledge of this link is fundamental in understanding population structure and dynamics. Young adults of commercially important fish species Solea solea, Solea senegalensis, Platichthys flesus, Diplodus vulgaris and Dicentrarchus labrax were sampled off the Portuguese coast in order to establish preliminary evidence of estuarine nursery origins through otolith elemental fingerprints. Concentrations of Li, Na, Mg, K, Mn, Cu, Zn, Sr, Ba and Pb in the otolith section corresponding to juvenile's nursery life period were determined through laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Element: Ca ratios in coastal fish differed significantly amongst collection areas, except for Platichthys flesus, and were compared with the elemental fingerprints previously defined for age 0 juveniles in the main estuarine nurseries of the Portuguese coast. Identification of nursery estuaries was achieved for four of the species. Assigned nursery origins varied amongst species and differences in the spatial scale of fish dispersal were also found. Diplodus vulgaris was not reliably assigned to any of the defined nurseries. Overall, results give evidence of the applicability of estuarine habitat tags in future assessments of estuarine nursery role. Research developments on the links between juvenile and adult habitats should contribute for the integrated management and conservation of nurseries and coastal stocks.

  18. Effect of fungicides and biocontrol agents on inoculum production and persistence of Phytophthora ramorum on nursery hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Tjosvold; David Chambers; Gary Chastagner; Marianne. Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Once Phytophthora ramorum is introduced into a nursery on a host, its local spread and establishment is primarily dependent on sporangia and zoospore production. Nursery operators commonly use fungicides to prevent the establishment of Phytophthora –caused diseases, although current research only supports the use of fungicides...

  19. Report on hard red spring wheat varieties grown in cooperative plot and nursery experiments in thespring wheat region in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hard Red Spring Wheat Uniform Regional Nursery (HRSWURN) was planted for the 85th year in 2015. The nursery contained 28 entries submitted by 6 different scientific or industry breeding programs, and 5 checks (Table 1). Trials were conducted as randomized complete blocks with three replicates ...

  20. Successes and failures in controlling weeds in hardwood seedbeds at the Arkansas Forestry Commission Baucum Forest Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan Murray

    2009-01-01

    Fumigation with methyl bromide is essential in the production of hardwood seedlings in nurseries in the southern United States. However, the proposed rules under the 2008 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Mitigation will further restrict the use of methyl bromide for nursery use.

  1. Effect of tetracycline dose and treatment mode on selection of resistant coliform bacteria in nursery pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig...... by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracyclineresistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated...... with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaximeresistant strains...

  2. Freshwater Aquaculture Nurseries and Infection of Fish with Zoonotic Trematodes, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Nguyen, Khue Viet; Nguyen, Ha Thi; Murrell, Darwin; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Residents of the Red River Delta region of northern Vietnam have a long tradition of eating raw fish. Fish-borne zoonotic trematodes (FZTs) are estimated to infect ≈1 million persons in Vietnam. It remains uncertain at what stages in the aquaculture production cycle fish become infected with FZTs. Newly hatched fish (fry) from 8 hatcheries and juveniles from 27 nurseries were therefore examined for FZT infection. No FZTs were found in fry from hatcheries. In nurseries, FZT prevalence in juveniles was 14.1%, 48.6%, and 57.8% after 1 week, 4 weeks, and when overwintered in ponds, respectively. FZT prevalence was higher in grass carp (paquaculture management practices, particularly in nurseries, to minimize the risk of distributing infected juveniles to grow-out ponds and, subsequently, to markets for human consumption. PMID:21122220

  3. Nursery performance of the pink shrimp Farfantepenaeus paulensis (Crustacea: Decapoda: Penaeidae postlarvae in different salinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael F. Costa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Nursery performance, development, and RNA:DNA ratio were investigated in Farfantepenaeus paulensis (Pérez-Farfante, 1967 postlarvae acclimated from a salinity of 30‰ to higher (35‰ or lower (16, 22 and 29‰ salinities and reared for 20 days. Overall, higher final weight, yield and growth rate were observed at a salinity of 29‰. RNA:DNA ratio indicated reduced growth potential at a salinity of 35‰. Low salinities resulted in more developed individuals. Thus, early postlarval F. paulensis should not be stocked in salinities higher than that of the original hatchery, otherwise in lower salinities postlarvae should be older and/or have an extended nursery phase. Results may assist in the development of nursery rearing protocols for F. paulensis, an alternative species for aquaculture in subtropical areas.

  4. Determination of heavy metals in dust from selected nursery and kindergarten classrooms within the Kumasi metropolis of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Asantewah Nkansah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The exposure potential of children in nursery and kindergarten schools to metals in dust in the Kumasi Metropolis was studied. Dust samples from 20 selected schools were analyzed for heavy metal levels using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The results showed that concentrations were in the range of below detection −9.710 μg/g for cobalt, below detection to 33.291 μg/g for chromium, below detection to 41.909 μg/g for lead, below detection to 1.383 μg/g for mercury, while cadmium levels were below detection for all samples. The mean levels of metals therefore decreased in the order: Cr > Pb > Co > Hg and Cd. Geographical variation correlated with heavy metal load. Health risk assessment using hazard quotient (HQ and hazard index (HI calculations indicated that ingestion contributed more to exposure than dermal contact. However, the values obtained by HQ and HI do not pose any immediate health risk but the cumulative effect is a matter of concern.

  5. Ancient nursery area for the extinct giant shark megalodon from the Miocene of Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimiento, Catalina; Ehret, Dana J; Macfadden, Bruce J; Hubbell, Gordon

    2010-05-10

    As we know from modern species, nursery areas are essential shark habitats for vulnerable young. Nurseries are typically highly productive, shallow-water habitats that are characterized by the presence of juveniles and neonates. It has been suggested that in these areas, sharks can find ample food resources and protection from predators. Based on the fossil record, we know that the extinct Carcharocles megalodon was the biggest shark that ever lived. Previous proposed paleo-nursery areas for this species were based on the anecdotal presence of juvenile fossil teeth accompanied by fossil marine mammals. We now present the first definitive evidence of ancient nurseries for C. megalodon from the late Miocene of Panama, about 10 million years ago. We collected and measured fossil shark teeth of C. megalodon, within the highly productive, shallow marine Gatun Formation from the Miocene of Panama. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other fossil accumulations, the majority of the teeth from Gatun are very small. Here we compare the tooth sizes from the Gatun with specimens from different, but analogous localities. In addition we calculate the total length of the individuals found in Gatun. These comparisons and estimates suggest that the small size of Gatun's C. megalodon is neither related to a small population of this species nor the tooth position within the jaw. Thus, the individuals from Gatun were mostly juveniles and neonates, with estimated body lengths between 2 and 10.5 meters. We propose that the Miocene Gatun Formation represents the first documented paleo-nursery area for C. megalodon from the Neotropics, and one of the few recorded in the fossil record for an extinct selachian. We therefore show that sharks have used nursery areas at least for 10 millions of years as an adaptive strategy during their life histories.

  6. Defining fish nursery habitats: an application of otolith elemental fingerprinting in Tampa Bay, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Janet A.; McIvor, Carole C.; Peebles, Ernst B; Rolls, Holly; Cooper, Suzanne T.

    2009-01-01

    Fishing in Tampa Bay enhances the quality of life of the area's residents and visitors. However, people's desire to settle along the Bay's shorelines and tributaries has been detrimental to the very habitat believed to be crucial to prime target fishery species. Common snook (Centropomus undecimalis) and red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) are part of the suite of estuarine fishes that 1) are economically or ecologically prominent, and 2) have complex life cycles involving movement between open coastal waters and estuarine nursery habitats, including nursery habitats that are located within upstream, low-salinity portions of the Bay?s tidal tributaries. We are using an emerging microchemical technique -- elemental fingerprinting of fish otoliths -- to determine the degree to which specific estuarine locations contribute to adult fished populations in Tampa Bay. In ongoing monitoring surveys, over 1,000 young-of-the-year common snook and red drum have already been collected from selected Tampa Bay tributaries. Using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), we are currently processing a subsample of these archived otoliths to identify location-specific fingerprints based on elemental microchemistry. We will then analyze older fish from the local fishery in order to match them to their probable nursery areas, as defined by young-of-the-year otoliths. We expect to find that some particularly favorable nursery locations contribute disproportionately to the fished population. In contrast, other nursery areas may be degraded, or act as 'sinks', thereby decreasing their contribution to the fish population. Habitat managers can direct strategic efforts to protect any nursery locations that are found to be of prime importance in contributing to adult stocks.

  7. Evaluation of serology to measure exposure of piglets to Ascaris suum during the nursery phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandekerckhove, Elise; Vlaminck, Johnny; Geldhof, Peter

    2017-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether serology can be used to measure exposure of piglets to Ascaris suum during the nursery phase. Experimental infection studies were performed in which 7 groups of 10 piglets of 4 weeks of age were orally infected with either 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 and 500 A. suum eggs/day during 7 consecutive weeks, mimicking a nursery phase in an A. suum contaminated environment. Serum was collected on a weekly basis to monitor seroconversion on 2 ELISA tests based on the antibody recognition of either a haemoglobin protein purified from the pseudocoelomic fluid of adult A. suum or a water-soluble complete homogenate of the 3rd stage larvae isolated from the lungs (L3-lung). A dose-dependent seroconversion was measurable with the L3-lung ELISA starting from 4 weeks post-infection onwards, whereas this was not measurable with the haemoglobin-based test. After 7 weeks, equivalent to the end of the nursery phase, the L3-lung ELISA showed a 99% specificity and a 90% sensitivity to detect exposure of piglets to A. suum, with a minimum infection level of 20 A. suum eggs per day. To further evaluate the test under field conditions, a seroprevalence study was performed by sampling 10 piglets on 68 different nursery farms in Belgium. The results showed that for 38% of the farms analysed all piglets tested seronegative, whereas for the remaining 62% of the farms the percentage seropositive piglets ranged from 10 to 100%. This indicates contamination of the nursery facilities with A. suum eggs. In conclusion, the outcome of this study shows that serology can be used to measure exposure of nursery piglets to A. suum, thereby providing an additional tool in the control of this widespread parasite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ancient nursery area for the extinct giant shark megalodon from the Miocene of Panama.

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    Catalina Pimiento

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As we know from modern species, nursery areas are essential shark habitats for vulnerable young. Nurseries are typically highly productive, shallow-water habitats that are characterized by the presence of juveniles and neonates. It has been suggested that in these areas, sharks can find ample food resources and protection from predators. Based on the fossil record, we know that the extinct Carcharocles megalodon was the biggest shark that ever lived. Previous proposed paleo-nursery areas for this species were based on the anecdotal presence of juvenile fossil teeth accompanied by fossil marine mammals. We now present the first definitive evidence of ancient nurseries for C. megalodon from the late Miocene of Panama, about 10 million years ago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We collected and measured fossil shark teeth of C. megalodon, within the highly productive, shallow marine Gatun Formation from the Miocene of Panama. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other fossil accumulations, the majority of the teeth from Gatun are very small. Here we compare the tooth sizes from the Gatun with specimens from different, but analogous localities. In addition we calculate the total length of the individuals found in Gatun. These comparisons and estimates suggest that the small size of Gatun's C. megalodon is neither related to a small population of this species nor the tooth position within the jaw. Thus, the individuals from Gatun were mostly juveniles and neonates, with estimated body lengths between 2 and 10.5 meters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that the Miocene Gatun Formation represents the first documented paleo-nursery area for C. megalodon from the Neotropics, and one of the few recorded in the fossil record for an extinct selachian. We therefore show that sharks have used nursery areas at least for 10 millions of years as an adaptive strategy during their life histories.

  9. Ancient Nursery Area for the Extinct Giant Shark Megalodon from the Miocene of Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimiento, Catalina; Ehret, Dana J.; MacFadden, Bruce J.; Hubbell, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    Background As we know from modern species, nursery areas are essential shark habitats for vulnerable young. Nurseries are typically highly productive, shallow-water habitats that are characterized by the presence of juveniles and neonates. It has been suggested that in these areas, sharks can find ample food resources and protection from predators. Based on the fossil record, we know that the extinct Carcharocles megalodon was the biggest shark that ever lived. Previous proposed paleo-nursery areas for this species were based on the anecdotal presence of juvenile fossil teeth accompanied by fossil marine mammals. We now present the first definitive evidence of ancient nurseries for C. megalodon from the late Miocene of Panama, about 10 million years ago. Methodology/Principal Findings We collected and measured fossil shark teeth of C. megalodon, within the highly productive, shallow marine Gatun Formation from the Miocene of Panama. Surprisingly, and in contrast to other fossil accumulations, the majority of the teeth from Gatun are very small. Here we compare the tooth sizes from the Gatun with specimens from different, but analogous localities. In addition we calculate the total length of the individuals found in Gatun. These comparisons and estimates suggest that the small size of Gatun's C. megalodon is neither related to a small population of this species nor the tooth position within the jaw. Thus, the individuals from Gatun were mostly juveniles and neonates, with estimated body lengths between 2 and 10.5 meters. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the Miocene Gatun Formation represents the first documented paleo-nursery area for C. megalodon from the Neotropics, and one of the few recorded in the fossil record for an extinct selachian. We therefore show that sharks have used nursery areas at least for 10 millions of years as an adaptive strategy during their life histories. PMID:20479893

  10. Climate mediates hypoxic stress on fish diversity and nursery function at the land–sea interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Brent B.; Levey, Matthew D.; Fountain, Monique C.; Carlisle, Aaron B.; Chavez, Francisco P.; Gleason, Mary G.

    2015-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems provide numerous important ecological services, including maintenance of biodiversity and nursery grounds for many fish species of ecological and economic importance. However, human population growth has led to increased pollution, ocean warming, hypoxia, and habitat alteration that threaten ecosystem services. In this study, we used long-term datasets of fish abundance, water quality, and climatic factors to assess the threat of hypoxia and the regulating effects of climate on fish diversity and nursery conditions in Elkhorn Slough, a highly eutrophic estuary in central California (United States), which also serves as a biodiversity hot spot and critical nursery grounds for offshore fisheries in a broader region. We found that hypoxic conditions had strong negative effects on extent of suitable fish habitat, fish species richness, and abundance of the two most common flatfish species, English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and speckled sanddab (Citharichthys stigmaeus). The estuary serves as an important nursery ground for English sole, making this species vulnerable to anthropogenic threats. We determined that estuarine hypoxia was associated with significant declines in English sole nursery habitat, with cascading effects on recruitment to the offshore adult population and fishery, indicating that human land use activities can indirectly affect offshore fisheries. Estuarine hypoxic conditions varied spatially and temporally and were alleviated by strengthening of El Niño conditions through indirect pathways, a consistent result in most estuaries across the northeast Pacific. These results demonstrate that changes to coastal land use and climate can fundamentally alter the diversity and functioning of coastal nurseries and their adjacent ocean ecosystems. PMID:26056293

  11. Climate mediates hypoxic stress on fish diversity and nursery function at the land-sea interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Brent B; Levey, Matthew D; Fountain, Monique C; Carlisle, Aaron B; Chavez, Francisco P; Gleason, Mary G

    2015-06-30

    Coastal ecosystems provide numerous important ecological services, including maintenance of biodiversity and nursery grounds for many fish species of ecological and economic importance. However, human population growth has led to increased pollution, ocean warming, hypoxia, and habitat alteration that threaten ecosystem services. In this study, we used long-term datasets of fish abundance, water quality, and climatic factors to assess the threat of hypoxia and the regulating effects of climate on fish diversity and nursery conditions in Elkhorn Slough, a highly eutrophic estuary in central California (United States), which also serves as a biodiversity hot spot and critical nursery grounds for offshore fisheries in a broader region. We found that hypoxic conditions had strong negative effects on extent of suitable fish habitat, fish species richness, and abundance of the two most common flatfish species, English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and speckled sanddab (Citharichthys stigmaeus). The estuary serves as an important nursery ground for English sole, making this species vulnerable to anthropogenic threats. We determined that estuarine hypoxia was associated with significant declines in English sole nursery habitat, with cascading effects on recruitment to the offshore adult population and fishery, indicating that human land use activities can indirectly affect offshore fisheries. Estuarine hypoxic conditions varied spatially and temporally and were alleviated by strengthening of El Niño conditions through indirect pathways, a consistent result in most estuaries across the northeast Pacific. These results demonstrate that changes to coastal land use and climate can fundamentally alter the diversity and functioning of coastal nurseries and their adjacent ocean ecosystems.

  12. [Technical and sanitary conditions of food service facilities in nurseries in Poland 1975-1985].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojdon-Machała, H

    1990-01-01

    In the years 1975-1985 three times at intervals of 5 years the technical and hygienic condition was checked of the catering facilities of nurseries+ in a 40% randomly selected sample. The aim of the study was establishing whether in the years of increasing economic crisis, despite protective measures introduced by the authorities, detectable changes have taken place ot the advantage or disadvantage in the catering facilities, since a proper standard of this part of the nurseries is indispensable for a normal growth and health of children raised in institutions. In the first analysed 5-year period (1975-1980) some improvement was noted, especially in the technical equipment of these facilities. This was connected with greater investments provided for building of nurseries , resulting in a rise in the proportion of nurseries built according to the accepted building standard to 56%. In this way the number of nurseries with normal functional parameters increased. In the following 5-year period this condition was maintained owing to building of new nurseries although in lower number, while at the same time the worst crêches were liquidated in areas where the requirements for places in crêches have dropped. It was noted that in every third crêche the catering facilities were below the accepted hygienic standard for such institutions, and this situation continued since several years. The quality and timing of meals were incompatible with the principles of rational nutrition already at the stage of menu planning. Activities should be taken for ensuring proper hygienic conditions in the catering facilities in crêches and for improving the nutrition by correct composition of menu.

  13. Perceptions of nursery staff and parent views of healthy eating promotion in preschool settings: an exploratory qualitative study

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    Lorraine A. McSweeney

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK just over a fifth of all children start school overweight or obese and overweight 2–5 year olds are at least 4 times more likely to become overweight adults. This can lead to serious future health problems. The WHO have recently highlighted the preschool years as a critical time for obesity prevention, and have recommended preschools as an ideal setting for intervention. However, existing evidence suggests that the preschool environment, including the knowledge, beliefs and practices of preschool staff and parents of young children attending nurseries can be a barrier to the successful implementation of healthy eating interventions in this setting. Methods This study examined the perceptions of preschool centre staff and parents’ of preschool children of healthy eating promotion within preschool settings. The participants were preschool staff working in private and local authority preschool centres in the North East of England, and parents of preschool children aged 3–4 years. Preschool staff participated in semi-structured interviews (n = 16 female, 1 male. Parents completed a mapping activity interview (n = 14 mothers, 1 father. Thematic analysis was applied to interpret the findings. Results Complex communication issues surrounding preschool centre dietary ‘rules’ were apparent. The staff were keen to promote healthy eating to families and felt that parents needed ‘education’ and ‘help’. The staff emphasised that school policies prohibited providing children with sugary or fatty snacks such as crisps, cakes, sweets and ‘fizzy’ drinks, however, some preschool centres appeared to have difficulty enforcing such guidelines. Parents were open to the idea of healthy eating promotion in preschool settings but were wary of being ‘told what to do’ and being thought of as ‘bad parents’. Conclusions There is a need to further explore nursery staff members’ personal perceptions of

  14. Perceptions of nursery staff and parent views of healthy eating promotion in preschool settings: an exploratory qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, Lorraine A; Rapley, Tim; Summerbell, Carolyn D; Haighton, Catherine A; Adamson, Ashley J

    2016-08-19

    In the UK just over a fifth of all children start school overweight or obese and overweight 2-5 year olds are at least 4 times more likely to become overweight adults. This can lead to serious future health problems. The WHO have recently highlighted the preschool years as a critical time for obesity prevention, and have recommended preschools as an ideal setting for intervention. However, existing evidence suggests that the preschool environment, including the knowledge, beliefs and practices of preschool staff and parents of young children attending nurseries can be a barrier to the successful implementation of healthy eating interventions in this setting. This study examined the perceptions of preschool centre staff and parents' of preschool children of healthy eating promotion within preschool settings. The participants were preschool staff working in private and local authority preschool centres in the North East of England, and parents of preschool children aged 3-4 years. Preschool staff participated in semi-structured interviews (n = 16 female, 1 male). Parents completed a mapping activity interview (n = 14 mothers, 1 father). Thematic analysis was applied to interpret the findings. Complex communication issues surrounding preschool centre dietary 'rules' were apparent. The staff were keen to promote healthy eating to families and felt that parents needed 'education' and 'help'. The staff emphasised that school policies prohibited providing children with sugary or fatty snacks such as crisps, cakes, sweets and 'fizzy' drinks, however, some preschool centres appeared to have difficulty enforcing such guidelines. Parents were open to the idea of healthy eating promotion in preschool settings but were wary of being 'told what to do' and being thought of as 'bad parents'. There is a need to further explore nursery staff members' personal perceptions of health and how food policies which promote healthier food in preschool settings can be embedded and

  15. Making Markets for Low-Cost Schooling: The Devices and Investments behind Bridge International Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riep, Curtis B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the market-making devices behind Bridge International Academies: a for-profit education company aiming to school millions of nursery and primary aged-students living on less than $2 per day. A wide variety of devices are utilised by Bridge International Academies to construct mass markets for low-cost schooling, including GPS…

  16. Prevención, promoción del desarrollo y atención temprana en la Escuela Infantil Prevenção, promoção do desenvolvimento e atenção precoce na Escola Infantil Prevention, promotion of development and early intervention in the Nursery School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Pérez-López

    2012-03-01

    to promote child development and family and school adjustment. It describes the experiment carried out since 2005 by the Research Group on Early Childhood Intervention (GIAT, University of Murcia (Spain, and analyzed the results of the 2010-2011 academic years in the Infant School Lorquí (Murcia, Spain with a group of 64 children and their families. The results indicate an improvement of mental and psychomotor development of children, between the beginning and the end of the school, which highlights the relevance of such services. The study finds a higher level of initial development in children and families who have followed the program of prevention and promotion of child development compared to those who have not received it.

  17. Oxyfluorfen strongly affects Larix occidentalis but minimally affects Sagina procumbens in a bareroot nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Jasmine L. Williams; Jeremy R. Pinto; Peng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate oxyfluorfen for control of birdseye pearlwort (Sagina procumbens L.) in a bareroot nursery crop of western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) seedlings. Oxyfluorfen applied at rates up to 0.56 kg a.i./ha in a split-plot experiment with combinations and frequencies of pre- and postemergence sprays gave minimal control of birdseye pearlwort....

  18. Spatial Distribution of Crown Gall in a Commercial Nursery of Weeping Fig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrobacterium larrymoorei causes tumors on the trunk and branches of weeping fig (Ficus benjamina L.). The extent to which this pathogen is spread through the mother tree planting and transmitted to daughter branches during the process of propagation was studied in a commercial nursery in 2007 and 2...

  19. Comparison of Juglans regia L. bare-root nursery stocks for plantations: morphological characterization

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    Tani A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Good results in plantations are strictly related to the fitness of the nursery stock. Plant fitness, or quality, depends on inherent genetic characters and on physiological and physical (dimensional, morphological and nutritional characteristics. In arboriculture for wood production the role of stock quality is essential for a prompt expression of plant growth potential. So the necessity to define stock quality standards is widely recognized, though is still discussed how to assess stock cultural value by characteristics easy to measure. First step in such activities is to individuate in the above-ground part of the plantlets some traits related to the root system development. The study was carried out in two public forest nurseries (property of Regione Piemonte on 163 Juglans regia seedlings and transplants produced for wood plantations. In order to evaluate Walnut nursery stock production, different kinds of bare-root seedlings and transplants have been compared. For each kind, shoot and root system dimensional and morphological traits have been investigated after assignment of plants in 3 dimensional (height categories. Relations between shoots and roots traits have been studied to allow a visual evaluation of nursery plants based on data easy to collect. This study is to be considered a preliminary survey in the evaluation of stock quality based on field performance.

  20. The Knowledge of Staff in Day Nurseries about Some Basic Measures Which Promote Child Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, Suzy S.; Nunes de Melo, Maria Clotildes; Carneiro, Nadya Bustani; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to determine the knowledge that staff in day nurseries in Brazil had of basic measures to promote child health which are connected with high child mortality. These measures included breastfeeding, oral rehydration therapy, child growth follow-up, immunization and the identification of signs that indicate that the child…

  1. Effects of Greenhouse Conditions on the Quality and Vase Life of Freesia 'Yvonne'. A Nursery Comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, G.

    2005-01-01

    Postharvest trials showed marked differences in the length of vase life and in bud opening of Freesia stems of the same cultivar, obtained at a similar time from various nurseries. The factors that cause these differences in vase life and bud opening are yet unknown. We therefore made a detailed

  2. Pelleted biochar: chemical and physical properties show potential use as a substrate in container nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Juha Heiskanen; Karl Englund; Arja Tervahauta

    2011-01-01

    We found that peat moss, amended with various ratios of pellets comprised of equal proportions of biochar and wood flour, generally had chemical and physical properties suitable for service as a substrate during nursery production of plants. High ratios of pellets to peat (>50%) may be less desirable because of high C:N, high bulk density, swelling associated with...

  3. Pathways of spread of Phytophthora ramorum in a simulated nursery setting: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt Heungens; Bjorn Gehesqui& egrave; re; Kris Van Poucke; Annelies Vercauteren; Martine. Maes

    2013-01-01

    European phytosanitary measures as applied to nurseries require that potential host plants within a radius of 2 m of a Phytophthora ramorum-infected plant must be destroyed and that remaining host plants within a radius of 10 m cannot be traded until they are inspected and found to be pest free at further specific inspections. Despite the wide...

  4. Within-field spread of Phytophthora ramorum on rhododendron in nursery settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt Heungens; Isabelle De Dobbelaere; Bjorn Gehesquière; Annelies Vercauteren; Martine Maes

    2010-01-01

    In Europe, Phytophthora ramorum has mostly been detected on rhododendron plants in nurseries. European Union (EU) phytosanitary measures state that potential host plants within a radius of 2 m of an infected plant must be destroyed, and remaining host plants within a radius of 10 m must be quarantined. Despite the lack of research on the spread...

  5. Crinivirus and begomovirus detection in tomato plantlets and weeds associated to nurseries in Cartago province

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this work was to detect plant infections caused by Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) and begomoviruses in tomato plantlets, as well as in weeds growing around nursery greenhouses. During one year, starting in April 2008, 168 leaf tissue samples were collected, 90 tomato plantlets and 78 weed...

  6. Advance innovations of an intelligent sprayer for nursery and fruit tree crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional spray application technology requires excessive amounts of pesticide use to achieve effective pest control in floral, nursery, and other specialty crop productions. This onerous challenge is now overcome by our newly developed automated variable-rate, air-assisted precision sprayer. Thi...

  7. "Row, Row, Row Your Boat": Singing, Identity and Belonging in a Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niland, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The concept of belonging is widely recognised as a fundamental part of human development and a key element of early childhood curricula. The research presented here explores the role of singing in the development of children's sense of belonging in a day nursery for children aged from six months to two years. The research design incorporated…

  8. Analysis of factors to predict piglet body weight at the end of the nursery phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paredes Escobar, S.P.; Jansman, A.J.M.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Awati, A.; Buist, W.G.; Hartog, den L.A.; Hees, van H.M.J.; Quiniou, N.; Hendriks, W.H.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    In pig production, within-batch variation in body weight (BW) gain of piglets during the nursery period (up to 10 weeks of age) can be high and is of high economic importance. Homogeneity of BW within batches of animals is important as it influences the efficiency of use of the grower and finisher

  9. 7 CFR 301.75-17 - Funds for the replacement of certified citrus nursery stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Funds for the replacement of certified citrus nursery...) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Citrus Canker Notice of Quarantine and Regulations § 301.75-17 Funds for the replacement of certified citrus...

  10. Determining the risk of Phytophthora ramorum spread from nurseries via waterways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marianne Elliott; Gary Chastagner; Katie Coats; Gil Dermott

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, the fungus-like pathogen which causes sudden oak death, is a threat to the Pacific Northwest nursery industry. Because this is a quarantine organism, the destruction of plants and mitigation treatments resulting from a positive P. ramorum detection has caused millions of dollars in losses to the commercial...

  11. Hardwood weed control: Iowa Department of Natural Resources Forestry, Iowa State Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The Iowa Department of Natural Resources Forestry, Iowa State Nursery in Ames grows approximately 4 to 8 million seedlings, consisting of about 50 species. Most of our production is hardwoods. We have not been fumigating very much, if at all, for about 20 years and, with the proposed rules under the 2008 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Risk Mitigation, many...

  12. An update on Phytophthora species in California native plant nurseries and restoration areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Rooney-Latham; C.L. Blomquist; M.C. Soriano; Y.Y. Guo; P. Woods; K.L. Kosta; K. Weber; T.J. Swiecki; E.A. Bernhardt; K. Suslow; S.J. Frankel

    2017-01-01

    In 2012, Phytophthora tentaculata was detected for the first time in North America on the roots and crowns of declining sticky monkey flower plants (Diplacus aurantiacus) in a Monterey County, CA native plant nursery. At the time, P. tentaculata was listed among the top five exotic Phytophthora...

  13. External Genital Abnormalities and Inguinal Hernia among Males of Children Nurseries, North West of Iran

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    Hossein Haratipour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Abnormalities of external genitalia in male children nurseries and inguinal hernia are the most common congenital disorders in children. We aimed to determine prevalence rate of inguinal hernia and other genital among children nurseries, in Shahrood-Iran. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, we examined 920 children nurseries boys. Physical examination of children was performed in presence of a parent in a warm room in supine and upright position with and without Valsalva maneuver. A written consent was obtained from parents before examination. Past medical history and history of surgery on inguinal and genital area was taken. Examination was performed 2 interns who were trained about genital system examination.   Results A total of 920 children nurseries boys aged 3 to 6 years were examined which were detected in 88 children and prevalence rate of these abnormalities were 9.6%. The prevalence of abnormalities in the children under study were as follows: Inguinal hernia (5.1%, cryptorchidism (2.1%, Hydrocele (1.5%, hypospadias (0.4%, Varicocele (0.1%, micropenis (0.4%. Conclusion Regarding to relatively high prevalence rate of these abnormalities and low level of people knowledge, seem screening systems for diagnosis and appropriate treatment of these abnormalities to be necessary.

  14. Inoculation of fumigated nursery beds and containers with arbuscular mycorrhizal products for eastern redcedar production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle M. Cram; Stephen W. Fraedrich

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) products were applied at an operational rate to eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) nursery beds and containers to evaluate seedling growth and colonization responses. A field study at the Augusta Forestry Center in Crimora, VA, and a companion container study were initiated in the fall of 2012. MycoApply® Endo...

  15. Effect of fertilization and irrigation on nursery production of hydrangea using alternative containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Container production of nursery plants using biodegradable containers has been studied in recent years as a sustainable alternative to traditional plastic containers. Plant growth and photosynthetic performance of Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Merritt’s Supreme’ were investigated in this study when they we...

  16. Application of Trichoderma to Prevent Phaeomoniella chlamydospora Infections in Organic Nurseries

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    S. Di Marco

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent or reduce infection in grapevine nurseries, greenhouse and nursery trials were carried out to evaluate the effects of Trichoderma harzianum (Rootshield® on the morpho-physiological characteristics of grapevine and on Phaeomoniella chlamydospora artificially inoculated on potted cuttings. The long-distance activity of Trichoderma against Botrytis cinerea was also examined. The study was performed in a commercial nursery where plants were grown organically. Results greatly depended on the vine-growth stage at which Trichoderma was applied. Treatment at rooting was the most effective, whilst callusing-box application or treatments at both rooting and callusing gave inconsistent but generally negative results. Treatment at rooting further improved the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the root system, and increased the percentage of certifiable vines produced. Moreover, Trichoderma application also reduced the necrotic area caused by B. cinerea inoculated on the leaves collected from Trichoderma-treated plants and the extent of necrosis of P. chlamydospora-inoculated cuttings. This reduction in necrosis was significantly higher 15 months after inoculation. On the other hand, Trichoderma increased vine mortality at the end of the growing season compared with untreated plants. On the whole, only when it was applied at rooting did Trichoderma produce positive effects on the morpho-phisiological characteristics of grapevine and increased its tolerance to stress–related diseases, such as forms of esca found in the nursery.

  17. Flush Development Dynamics in First-Year Nursery-Grown Seedlings of Eight Oak Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; Paul P. Kormanik; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to follow flush development dynamics exhibited by various oak species. In experiment I, southern red oak acorns were sown in mid-March 2001 at Whitehall Nursery (Athens, GA). In experiment II, acorns of black oak, cherrybark oak, Nuttall oak, Shumard oak, southern red oak, swamp chestnut oak, white oak, and willow oak were sown in...

  18. What's new with nurseries and reforestation projects at the Missoula Technology and Development Center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob Simonson

    2011-01-01

    The USDA Forest Service Missoula Technology and Development Center (MTDC) offers technical expertise, technology transfer, and new equipment development to federal, state, and private forest nurseries. Current and recently completed projects at MTDC include a front and mid-mount tractor evaluation, ATV-pulled mechanical tree planter, greenhouse snow remover, freeze...

  19. Effectiveness of Special Nursery Provision for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Osborne, Lisa A.; Corness, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of three local authority early teaching interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) was studied. Thirty-three children (2:6 to 4:0 years old) received one of three early teaching interventions: a 1:1 home-based programme, and two different forms of special nursery placement. Measures from the…

  20. Giants in the Nursery: A Biographical History of Developmentally Appropriate Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, David

    2015-01-01

    "Giants in the Nursery" examines the evolution of developmentally appropriate practice in this biographical history of early childhood education. This book, from David Elkind, explores the theory's progression--from its beginnings in writings of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century philosophers, its experimental implementation by…

  1. Technology Use in Nursery and Primary Education in Two Different Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno Alastuey, Mª Camino; García Laborda, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    This article studies which and how Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) are used by nursery and primary education in-service teachers as reported by their pre-service teacher trainees after observations in their practicum in two provinces in Spain, Alcalá de Henares-Guadalajara and Navarre. Results indicate that in-service teachers…

  2. Pilot Study on Kindergarten Teachers' Perception of Linguistic and Musical Challenges in Nursery Rhymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Pascal; Bolduc, Jonathan; Pirkenne, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Nursery rhymes provide a unique learning context for preschoolers in regard to their emergent literacy and musical development. According to Vygotsky's social constructivist theory (1978), in order for learning to occur, children must face challenges, and adults must provide support to guide them toward mastery of new skills. The current pilot…

  3. Emotion in Nursery Work: Work Discussion as a Model of Critical Professional Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The importance of attention to children's emotions has been emphasised widely in early care and education research and policy. Enabling such attention has been seen as achieved primarily through attachment interactions with nursery staff. However, there is increasing awareness that facilitating such interactions in a way that is optimal for…

  4. Analysis of the Spatial Pattern of Strawberry Angular Leaf Spot in California Nursery Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigot, Christophe; Turechek, William; McRoberts, Neil

    2017-10-01

    In California, angular leaf spot (ALS) is a common disease in strawberry nursery production, and a major concern for nurseries wishing to export plants. As the spatial pattern of a disease can offer insight into pathogen source, mode of dissemination, and how current crop management practices affect epidemic development, an understanding of the spatial pattern of ALS would allow nursery growers to make informed decisions regarding disease management. Ninety-seven field assessments of disease incidence were performed at different nursery locations in 2014 and 2015 to quantify ALS spatial pattern under commercial conditions. Both point-pattern and geostatistical statistical procedures were used to analyze the data. The spatial pattern of ALS was characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity, as indicated by high median values of the beta-binomial distribution's theta parameter (0.643), and the index of dispersion, D (4.218). The binary power law provided a robust description of the data with estimated slope and intercept parameters significantly greater than 1 and 0, respectively (P < 0.001). Spatial analysis by distance indices (SADIE) detected significant nonrandom spatial arrangements for 64% of the data sets. Analysis of directional disease spread showed a strong spatial association between sampling units along the same planting row. This suggests that recurrent crop operations during the growing season play a significant role in ALS spread and should be taken into account to improve disease control.

  5. Report of the 2016 Uniform Regional Scab Nursery for spring wheat parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Uniform Regional Scab Nursery for Spring Wheat Parents (URSN) was grown for the 21st year in 2016. Five locations (Brookings, SD, St. Paul and Crookston, MN, Prosper, ND, and Morden, Canada) reported results. A total of 33 entries was included in the 2016 URSN, in addition to the resistant chec...

  6. A systems approach for detecting sources of Phytophthora contamination in nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer L. Parke; Niklaus Grünwald; Carrie Lewis; Val Fieland

    2010-01-01

    Nursery plants are also important long-distance vectors of non-indigenous pathogens such as P. ramorum and P. kernoviae. Pre-shipment inspections have not been adequate to ensure that shipped plants are free from Phytophthora, nor has this method informed growers about sources of contamination in their...

  7. Compost and vermicompost as nursery pot components: effects on tomato plant growth and morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazcano, C.; Arnold, J.; Tato, A.; Zaller, J. G.; Dominguez, J.

    2009-07-01

    Abstract Post transplant success after nursery stage is strongly influenced by plant morphology. Cultural practices strongly shape plant morphology, and substrate choice is one of the most determining factors. Peat is the most often used amendment in commercial potting substrates, involving the exploitation of non-renewable resources and the degradation of highly valuable peatland ecosystems and therefore alternative substrates are required. Here the feasibility of replacing peat by compost or vermicompost for the production of tomato plants in nurseries was investigated through the study of the effect of increasing proportions of these substrates (0%, 10%, 20%, 50%, 75% and 100%) in target plant growth and morphological features, indicators of adequate post-transplant growth and yield. Compost and vermicompost showed to be adequate substrates for tomato plant growth. Total replacement of peat by vermicompost was possible while doses of compost higher than 50% caused plant mortality. Low doses of compost (10 and 20%) and high doses of vermicompost produced significant increases in aerial and root biomass of the tomato plants. In addition these treatments improved significantly plant morphology (higher number of leaves and leaf area, and increased root volume and branching). The use of compost and vermicompost constitute an attractive alternative to the use of peat in plant nurseries due to the environmental benefits involved but also due to the observed improvement in plant quality. Additional key words: peat moss, plant nursery, soil-less substrate, Solanum lycopersicum L. (Author) 37 refs.

  8. Teachers' Attitudes toward Childrens' Behaviour Problems in Nursery Classes in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Theodora; Ramasut, Arlene

    This study investigated teachers' perceptions of their students' behavior problems in nursery classes. A total of 154 female teachers from rural, small town, and urban areas in Greece completed a self-reporting questionnaire and an evaluation of their students' behavior. The overall prevalence rate identified by teachers for all behavior problems…

  9. Using polymer-coated controlled-release fertilizers in the nursery and after outplanting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Landis; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2009-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) are the newest and most technically advanced way of supplying mineral nutrients to nursery crops. Compared to conventional fertilizers, their gradual pattern of nutrient release better meets plant needs, minimizes leaching, and therefore improves fertilizer use efficiency. In our review of the literature, we found many terms used...

  10. Potential application of a bioreactor for removing nitrate from nursery runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bacterial-based bioreactor containing Kaldness media as a substrate for bacteria to grow on was established at a commercial nursery. During the media loading stage, redox potential was poised between +100 and +300 mv, indicating relatively aerobic conditions. Redox potential was highly variabl...

  11. The breeding biology of lemon sharks at a tropical nursery lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldheim, Kevin A; Gruber, Samuel H; Ashley, Mary V

    2002-08-22

    Surprisingly little is known about the reproductive behaviour and breeding biology of most shark species, especially in natural populations. Here, we characterize reproductive patterns and use of a natal nursery at Bimini, Bahamas by lemon sharks, Negaprion brevirostris. We systematically and exhaustively sampled young lemon sharks at Bimini annually from 1995 to 2000 and opportunistically sampled adults over the same period. Out of the 897 young sharks sampled, 119 could be assigned to five sampled mothers using microsatellite genotyping. Reproductive females showed strong philopatry to the nursery, returning to Bimini every two years to give birth. Each of these females may rely entirely on the Bimini nursery for recruitment. The protection of known nursery grounds should therefore figure prominently in conservation efforts for large coastal shark species. The reconstruction of paternal genotypes indicates that litters are sired by multiple males, and females mate with different males nearly every breeding cycle. The ubiquitous polyandry reported here raises the possibility that genetic incompatibility and post-copulatory paternity-biasing mechanisms may operate in viviparous sharks.

  12. Introduction of filtration systems in container nurseries for nonchemical elimination of Phytophthora spp. from irrigation water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsten Ufer; Heinrich Beltz; Thomas Brand; Katrin Kaminski; Ralf Lüttmann; Martin Posner; Stefan Wagner; Sabine Werres; Hans-Peter Wessels

    2006-01-01

    In a 3-year project the elimination of Phytophthora spp. from the recirculation water with different kinds of filtration systems will be tested under commercial conditions in container nurseries. First results indicate that the filtration systems eliminate Phytophthora spp. from the water.

  13. A two-plane internally irrigated root observation system for forest nursery stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul S. Johnson; Charles W. Putnam; William G. Mares

    1981-01-01

    A root observation chamber designed for forest nursery stock is described. The chamber consists of lower root observation section and a detachable upper "planter" section, both constructed of plexiglass and wood; the lower section is internally irrigated by a porous irrigation tube and the upper section by a "leader tube."

  14. Recommended industry best management practices for the prevention of Phytophthora ramorum introduction in nursery operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen Suslow

    2008-01-01

    The following industry recommended best management practices (BMPs), designed for growers and/or interstate shippers of host and associated host plants of Phytophthora ramorum, consists of biosecurity guidelines created by and for nursery growers in order to reduce the risks associated with P. ramorum. The control of P....

  15. Bud Necrosis of Green Ash Nursery Trees is Influenced by Nitrogen Availability and Fertilizer Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted to determine whether nitrogen (N) status of nursery-grown green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica ‘Summit’) trees in the autumn is related to tip die back during the following spring. In 2005, different rates of N from either urea formaldehyde (UF) or a controlled release fertilizer ...

  16. Using Bayleton (Triadimefon) to Control Fusiform Rust in Pine Tree Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.A. Snow; S.J. Rowan; J.P. Jones; W. D. Kelley; J.G. Mexal

    1979-01-01

    Bayletor® was field-tested for fusiform rust control at eight pine tree nurseries during the spring of 1978. Four to six foliar sprays of this systemic fungicide were as effective as ferbam sprayed 16 to 36 times. Seed treatment with Bayleton reduced infection levels but did not significantly improve rust control in plots sprayed with Bayleton. At high rates, Bayleton...

  17. Panel Discussion: Cover Crops Used at Vallonia Nursery, Indiana Division of Forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Hawkins

    2005-01-01

    The use of cover crops is one essential step in management of nursery soils. Cover crops serve many different purposes within the soil. First, cover crops help in reducing erosion by stabilizing soil. Second, cover crops can be used as a visual guide to nutrient deficiencies in fields prior to sowing seedling crops. Most important, cover crops build organic matter,...

  18. fungal diseases of rice in nursery farms in bayelsa state of nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of fungi association with seed, seedling and straw samples of three rice varieties (Faro 12, Faro 15, and Maliong) obtained from 18 nursery farms in Okuokpoti-Ogbia, a major rice producing community in Ogbia Local Government area of Bayelsa State, Nigeria was investigated. Soil samples from the farms were ...

  19. Impact of Copper Sulfate on Plankton in Channel Catfish Nursery Ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many fish culturists are interested in applying copper sulfate pentahydrate (CSP) to channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, nursery ponds as a prophylactic treatment for trematode infection and proliferative gill disease by killing snails and Dero sp., respectively, before stocking fry. However, copp...

  20. Comparison of Tillage for Improving Soil Conditions and Root Health in Barefoot Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Juzwik; Kathryn Kromroy; Raymond Allmaras

    2002-01-01

    Two series of trials were conducted in northern bareroot forest nurseries to determine: 1) the effects of different incorporation implements and two chemical application rates on the efficacy of dazomet fumigation; and 2) soil penetration resistance in the vertical soil profile following sub-soiling by two different implements. When target pests were located > 18 cm...

  1. Comparison of tillage equipment for improving soil conditions and root health in bareroot nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer Juzwik; Kathryn Kromroy; Raymond Allmaras

    2002-01-01

    Two series of trials were conducted in northern bareroot forest nurseries to determine: 1) the effects of different incorporation implements and two chemical application rates on the efficacy of dazomet fumigation; and 2) soil penetration resistance in the vertical soil profile following sub-soiling by two different implements. When target pests were located > 18 cm...

  2. Identification and frequency of Phytophthora species associated with foliar diseases in California ornamental nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. E. Yakabe; C. L. Blomquist; S. L. Thomas; J. D. MacDonald

    2009-01-01

    Numerous ornamental nurseries in 32 California counties were surveyed for leaf spots as part of the California Department of Food and Agriculture mandated surveys targeting Phytophthora ramorum. Tissue collected during the 2005 and 2006 surveys was initially screened by a Phytophthora-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...

  3. Latitudinal trends in habitat quality of shallow-water flatfish nurseries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, V.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.; van der Veer, H.W.

    2012-01-01

    The habitat quality of European shallow-water nurseries was studied for 3 common flatfish species based on juvenile growth conditions. Field growth of 0-group plaice Pleuronectes platessa, flounder Platichthys flesus and sole Solea solea, from both published and unpublished studies, was compared

  4. Root Rot Disease of Five Fruit Tree Seedlings in the Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of root rot disease in the nursery of Chrysophyllum albidun Dacryodes edulis, persea Americana, Irvingia gabonensis and Annona muricala was assessed. Ten fungal pathogen were isolated using serial dilution and pathogenicity tests were carried out on the 5 fruit trees with the 10 isolated fungi. The 5 fruit ...

  5. Digestibility of energy and lipids and oxidative stress in nursery pigs fed commercially available lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of lipid source on GE and ether extract (EE) digestibility, oxidative stress, and gut integrity in nursery pigs fed diets containing 10% of soybean oil (SO), choice white grease (CWG), palm oil (PO), or 2 different distillers corn oils (DCO-1 and DC...

  6. Performance of experimental bioreactors developed for removing nitrate from nursery runoff water

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bacterial-based bioreactor containing Kaldness media as a substrate for bacteria to grow on was established at a commercial nursery. Data from approximately 90 sampling events are reported. Results indicate that the system, when properly managed, offers much potential for removing nitrate from s...

  7. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and seed source on nursery-grown black walnut seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. L. Brookshire; H. E. Garrett; T. L. Robison

    2003-01-01

    A nursery study was established in Missouri to evaluate the effects of endomycorrhizal inoculation and seed source on the growth of black walnut seedlings. Inoculation, in general, resulted in seedlings with significantly larger sturdiness quotients. Glomus intraradicies was found to produce larger seedlings than Glomus etunicatus...

  8. Trophic interactions of Platichthys flesus and Solea solea juveniles in the Lima estuary nursery (NW Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Mendes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trophic interactions play a key role in nursery habitats, and by affecting growth and condition of the juveniles, may control the quality of a given estuarine nursery. This study investigated the trophic ecology of flounder (Platichthys flesus and common sole (Solea solea juveniles in the Lima estuary nursery. Feeding location, main organic matter sources, and prey of the target species were assessed by carbon (δ13C and nitrogen (δ15N stable isotopes, as well as by stomach content analysis. The juveniles, macroinvertebrates, and sediment and water column samples were collected in August 2014 in the lower, middle and upper sections of the Lima estuary. The diet of 0+ flounder relied upon prey from the upper estuary (salinity >5, namely Chironomid larvae and Corophium spp. which showed the role of the upper estuary prey to the 0+ flounder diet and suggest the relative site fidelity of the young juveniles. In contrast, 1+ flounder juveniles had a diverse diet based on bivalves, polychaetes and crustaceans, and a variable stable isotope signature indicating they fed in different areas along the estuary. The 1+ sole juveniles also fed on polychaetes, crustaceans, and bivalves, but the stable isotope values suggested a dependence on the lower estuary (salinity >30 and marine food web sources. Such differential use of food may be understood as a strategic approach to reduce intra- and interspecific competition and thus ensuring the use of Lima estuary as nursery area for these two flatfish species.

  9. Nursery cultural practices to achieve targets: A case study in western larch irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Davis; Robert F. Keefe

    2011-01-01

    Nursery cultural practices are used to help growers achieve pre-determined size and physiological targets for seedlings. In that regard, irrigation is used to accelerate or slow growth and as a trigger for changing growth phase. In a case study highlighting the effects of irrigation on seedling development, western larch (Larix occidentalis Nutt.) seedlings were grown...

  10. Biology, ecology, and management of Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) and Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are two of the most damaging non-native ambrosia beetle pests in ornamental tree nurseries. Adult females tunnel into the stems and branches of host trees to create galleries with bro...

  11. Integrating kaolin clay for ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) management in ornamental tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Invasive ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are an important pest problem at ornamental tree nurseries. Available chemical measures are not completely effective, and due to the length of the beetle dispersal period and product breakdown, repeated treatments can become costly in ...

  12. Verticillium wilt in nursery trees: damage thresholds, spatial and temporal aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goud, J.C.; Termorshuizen, A.J.; Bruggen, van A.H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Verticillium wilt can cause high losses in tree nurseries. To be able to predict disease and unravel disease dynamics over time and space, the relationship between verticillium wilt and soil inoculum densities of Verticillium dahliae and the nematode Pratylenchus fallax was studied in two 4-year

  13. Substrate water status and evapotranspiration irrigation schedulingin heterogenous container nursery crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Incrocci, L.; Marzialetti, P.; Incrocci, G.; Vita, Di A.; Balendonck, J.; Bibbiani, C.; Spagnol, S.; Pardossi, A.

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of implementing different irrigation scheduling meth-ods on heterogeneous container hardy ornamental nursery stocks. Four ornamental shrub specieswere grown in the same irrigation sector during the summer of four consecutive years (2007–2010):Forsythia

  14. Subirrigation for production of native plants in nurseries - concepts, current knowledge, and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin L. Schmal; Kas Dumroese; Anthony S. Davis; Jeremy Pinto; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Subirrigation, a method whereby water is allowed to move upward into the growing medium by capillary action, has been the focus of recent research in forest and conservation nurseries growing a wide variety of native plants. Subirrigation reduces the amount of water needed for producing high-quality plants, discharged wastewater, and leaching of nutrients compared with...

  15. Phenotypic and genetic differentiation in young-of-the-year common sole (Solea solea) at differentially contaminated nursery grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinand, Bruno; Durieux, Eric D H; Dupuy, Célie; Cerqueira, Frédérique; Bégout, Marie-Laure

    2011-04-01

    Growth-related characters, condition factor, and genetic differentiation were investigated for a single cohort of young-of-the-year (YOY) sole within and among nurseries with differing levels of heavy metals (Cd, Cu and Zn) contamination in the two Charentais Straits, Bay of Biscay, France. Analyses were performed when individuals recruited (May), then after a full summer spent in each nursery (October). Levels of phenotypic and genetic diversity were compared, together with genetic differentiation at a candidate metallothionein (MT) locus and three putatively neutral microsatellite loci. No phenotypic or genetic differentiation was detected among nurseries in May, but significant variation at each phenotypic trait and at the multilocus level in October (P nurseries, whether corrected for null alleles or not (θ=0.0401 and θ(corr.FreeNA)=0.0326, respectively; P nurseries present a molecular correlate acting at identical spatio-temporal scales among nurseries, potentially reflecting differential selective pressure among nurseries in response to contamination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Teaching Physical Education in Elementary Schools. Sixth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannier, Maryhelen; Gallahue, David L.

    This source book of physical education activities for children from nursery school through the sixth grade covers five major areas of concern to the educator. Part one deals with the role of physical education in child development. The second section examines how children of different ages and abilities learn, discussing the preschool child, the…

  17. Knowledge, Attitude And Practice (Kap) Of School Teachers On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Structured questionnaires were administered to 160 teachers from different Nursery and Primary Schools in GRA Onitsha, Nigeria to assess their knowledge, ... A high percentage o the teachers (754 %) attributed malaria to eating too much oily food, hereditary (0.7 %), intense sunlight (2.1 %), drinking of dirty water (0.7 %) ...

  18. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, K. W.; Berumen, M. L.; Mateo, I.; Elsdon, T. S.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas.

  19. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Kelton

    2011-08-26

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  20. NURSERY ENGLISH” IN THE LIGHT OF UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE TENDENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrebneva Tamara Grigoryevna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes "nursery English" in its substandard manifestations. It aims at classifying lexical units of the chosen colloquial area. Grouping the words is based on the comparison of neutral patterns and their specific ('nursery' counterparts. The results of the analysis demonstrate the two main tendencies of the language – redundancy and insufficiency – in their diverse expressions on the level of lexis of the researched field. The investigation discloses the basic models of "nursery English" (the English used by children registered in fiction (A. Milne's prose and poetry have been chosen for the analysis. It points out the mechanisms, both, phonetic and morphological, used to create the specific nature of the language of the chosen area. The word reduction and extension is registered in the initial, medium, and final positions. Both linguistic phenomena may be caused by simplifying a complex sound structure, when a child is trying to overcome the difficulty of pronouncing the word; or they may arise in the event of eliminating or adding semantically insignificant word components, or be the consequence of insufficient knowledge of grammar. In most cases, the new formations of nursery English are quite clear to the speakers due to the context or speech situation. Yet, there appear structures which cause misunderstanding. The investigated stylistic area overlaps the specific scope of substandard English used by grown-up speakers; however, certain samples of the first one may be regarded as strictly "nursery". It is not unlikely that the expansion of the researched resource will reveal other transformations. The findings can benefit the studies of English stylistics and English Language System studies.

  1. Evaluación de la calidad del aire interior y exterior en un jardín de niños de la Ciudad de México Evaluation of indoor and outdoor air quality of a nursery school in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Cortez-Lugo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar las diferencias en los niveles de ozono (O3 y bióxido de nitrógeno (NO2 en el interior y el exterior de una escuela en el suroeste de la Ciudad de México. Material y métodos. Se midieron diariamente estos contaminantes dentro y fuera del salón, de enero a abril de 1990, mediante monitoreo manual. Resultados. El NO2 adentro y afuera no sobrepasó la norma mexicana (0.21 ppm. El coeficiente de correlación entre las concentraciones máximas de NO2 de la estación de monitoreo local de la ciudad y el exterior del salón fue de 0.82 (pObjective. To evaluate the differences between indoor and outdoor ozone (O3 and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 levels at a school located in southwest Mexico City. Material and methods. Indoor and outdoor O3 and NO2 levels were measured daily between January and April 1990 by manual monitoring. Results. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide did not surpass the Mexican standard (0.21 ppm. The correlation coefficient between maximum NO2 concentrations measured by the city’s local monitoring station and those measured outside the classroom was 0.82 (p< 0.001. Regarding ozone, its maximum outdoor concentration was 0.29 ppm and indoor concentrations were on average below 0.06 ppm (maximum = 0.17 ppm. The indoor/outdoor correlation coefficient was 0.72, and for every 1.7 ppm outside, there was 1.0 ppm inside (p< 0.05 Conclusions. Since the highest outdoors O3 concentrations were observed between 11:00 and 14:00 hrs, it is recommendable to have recess before this time.

  2. Use of island and mainland shorelines by woodland caribou during the nursery period in two northern Ontario parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L. Carr

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Predation is considered a primary limiting factor of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou populations across North America. Caribou are especially vulnerable to predation during their first few weeks of life and have evolved space-use strategies to reduce predation risk through habitat selection during the critical calving and nursery period. We assessed landscape-scale physical characteristics and landcover types associated with caribou nursery sites in Wabakimi and Woodland Caribou Provincial Parks in northern Ontario to better understand nursery site selection in relatively undisturbed landscapes. Although free from industrial activity, these protected areas may subject caribou to human recreational disturbance, so our secondary objective was to evaluate female caribou nursery site selection relative to human recreational activities. We determined that parturient caribou selected landscape characteristics at multiple spatial scales that may reduce predation risk during the calving and nursery period. Generally, female caribou in both parks selected larger lakes with larger than average sized islands configured within shorter than average distances to other islands or landforms that might facilitate escape from predators. The majority of caribou nursery areas in both parks occurred on islands rather than the mainland shoreline of lakes that were surveyed. The nearest landform for escape from these nursery sites on islands was typically another island, and most often 2-3 islands, suggesting parturient caribou may choose islands clustered together as part of their escape strategy. In Woodland Caribou Provincial Park, caribou nursery sites occurred more often in coniferous landcover than expected from availability, while in Wabakimi Provincial Park caribou used sparse, mixed and coniferous forests for nursery activity. Caribou cow-calf pairs typically used areas for nursery activity that were 9.1 km (± 1.0 km, range 2.3-20.6 km in

  3. List of Participating Institutions: Associated Schools Project in Education for International Co-operation and Peace = Liste des establissements participants: Systeme des ecoles associees appliquant un programme d'education pour la cooperation internationale et la paix = Lista de Instituciones Participantes: Plan de Escuelas Asociadas en la Educacion para la Cooperacion Internacional y la Paz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    A list of participating institutions at the Associated Schools Project in Education for International Co-Operation and Peace, December 31, 1985 is presented. A total of 1,970 institutions in 94 countries participated, including 47 nursery schools, 556 primary schools, 1,123 secondary schools, and 248 teacher training institutions. Addresses of…

  4. Analysis of factors to predict piglet body weight at the end of the nursery phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, S P; Jansman, A J M; Verstegen, M W A; Awati, A; Buist, W; den Hartog, L A; Van Hees, H M J; Quiniou, N; Hendriks, W H; Gerrits, W J J

    2012-09-01

    In pig (Sus Scrofa) production, within-batch variation in bw gain of piglets during the nursery period (up to 10 wk of age) can be high and is of high economic importance. Homogeneity of BW within batches of animals is important as it influences the efficiency of use of the grower and finisher facilities, and provides an extra value for the fattening farms. In the current study, factors for a light BW at the end of the nursery period of pigs were determined by analyzing datasets from 3 different swine research centers in the Netherlands and France. The entire dataset contained information on 77,868 individual piglets born between 2005 and 2010. Body weight was determined at different time points over the pre- and post-weaning phase, and sex, season of birth, litter information (litter size at day of birth and after cross-fostering, number of piglets born alive per litter, number of total born littermates, sow parity number), cross-fostered animals (yes or no), and pen group size over the post-weaning period were recorded. A risk factor analysis approach was used to analyze the datasets to determine factors that predict piglet bw at the end of the nursery period. Body weight at the end of the nursery period corrected for age was mainly determined by season (P 0.05) contribute to explaining the BW at the end of the nursery period. To discard the possibility of intrauterine growth retarded piglets (IUGR) being the reason for the influence of BiW as an explanatory factor in the regression model, a further analysis was performed on the effect of this category of piglets on the results of the regression analysis. Overall, it was concluded that the bw of piglets at the end of the nursery phase is mainly determined by season, sex, birth, WW, and BW at 6 wk of age. Piglets with a BiW greater than the mean biw minus 2.5 times the sd have the potential to compensate during the subsequent phases of growth.

  5. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics improves performance in nursery pigs during an indirect immune challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, W T; Wells, J E; Maxwell, C V

    2014-11-01

    Lysozyme is a 1,4-β-N-acetylmuramidase that has antimicrobial properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lysozyme and antibiotics on growth performance and immune response during an indirect immune challenge. Two replicates of 600 pigs each were weaned from the sow at 26 d of age, blocked by litter and sex, and then randomly assigned to 1 of 24 pens in either a nursery room that had been fully disinfected or a nursery room left unclean since the previous group of pigs. Within a room, pigs were randomly assigned to either control diets (2 phase nursery regime), control diets + antibiotics (chlortetracycline/tiamulin hydrogen fumarate), or control diets + lysozyme (100 mg/kg diet). Pig weights and feed disappearance were measured and blood was collected on d 0, 14, and 28 of treatment. A group of 20 pigs were killed at 24 d of age for initial body composition analysis and 10 pigs of median weight were killed per diet room combination for body composition analysis after 28 d of treatment. Control + antibiotics and control + lysozyme-fed pigs grew at a faster rate for the 28-d study compared to control pigs (318 ± 14,320 ± 15 vs. 288 ± 15 g/d, respectively; P 0.05). The indirect immune challenge did not alter growth performance from d 0 to 14 of treatment but decreased ADG from d 14 to 28 of the study (415 ± 15 vs. 445 ± 13 g/d ;: P 0.61) or dietary treatments (P > 0.10), but feed efficiency was worsened by the indirect immune challenge (P 0.25), but both control + antibiotics and control + lysozyme pigs had decreased accretion of whole-body lipid (P pigs reared in the clean nursery (P pigs consuming antibiotics or lysozyme had lower TNF-α, haptoglobin, and CRP compared to control pigs, regardless of nursery environment (P < 0.04). Thus, lysozyme is a suitable alternative to antibiotics in swine nursery diets, and lysozyme ameliorates the effects of a chronic indirect immune challenge.

  6. Nursery life of the marine prawn, Metapenaeus dobsoni (Miers) in the Mandovi estuary, along Goa Coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.

    The nursery phase of Metapenaeus dobsoni was sequentially traced in the Mandovi Estuary of Goa (west coast of India). Peak postlarval ingression occurred between November and March. Of the total, 83.5% was distributed at the lower reaches...

  7. ["The aim is familiarity with the infant". Work and research in the Jackson Nursery (Vienna 1937/38)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The "Jackson Nursery", existing from February 1937 until March 1938, was directed by Anna Freud and financed by Edith Jackson and Dorothy Burlingham. It took care of infants from the poorest strata of Vienna and also gave material support to their families. On the other hand, it was a training institution for psychoanalysts, offering the opportunity of observing children during their first two years, e. g. their feeding habits and social sense. In addition, the Jackson Nursery was a place for research where psychoanalytic theories of infantile development were checked against the findings of direct observation. The work started here was then continued by A. Freud and D. Burlingham on a larger scale in their War Nurseries.--This paper examines the many-sided activities in the nursery mainly on the basis of unpu blished archival documents.

  8. Placoderm Assemblage from the Tetrapod-Bearing Locality of Strud (Belgium, Upper Famennian) Provides Evidence for a Fish Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gaël; Daeschler, Edward B.; Dupret, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The placoderm fauna of the upper Famennian tetrapod-bearing locality of Strud, Belgium, includes the antiarch Grossilepis rikiki, the arthrodire groenlandaspidid Turrisaspis strudensis and the phyllolepidid Phyllolepis undulata. Based on morphological and morphometric evidence, the placoderm specimens from Strud are predominantly recognised as immature specimens and this locality as representing a placoderm nursery. The Strud depositional environment corresponds to a channel in an alluvial plain, and the presence of a nursery in such environment could have provided nutrients and protection to the placoderm offspring. This represents one of the earliest pieces of evidence for this sort of habitat partitioning in vertebrate history, with adults living more distantly from the nursery and using the nursery only to spawn or give live birth. PMID:27552196

  9. Salt marshes as nurseries for nekton: testing hypotheses on density, growth and survival through meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas J. Minello; Kenneth W. Able; Michael P. Weinstein; Cynthia G. Hays

    2003-01-01

    We examined the nursery role of salt marshes for transient nekton by searching the literature for data on density, growth, and survival of juvenile fishes and decapod crustaceans in marshes and using...

  10. Fusarium species associated with rhizosphere soil and diseased roots of eastern white pine seedlings and associated nursery soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia M. Ocamb; Jennifer Juzwik

    1995-01-01

    Fusarium species isolated from necrotic roots of eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) seedlings in two nurseries included F. acuminatum, F. equiseti, F. oxysporum, F. oxysporum var. redolens, F. proliferatum, F....

  11. EOP Acoustic tagging and monitorings of cultured and wild juvenile crimson jobfish (Pristipomoides filamentosus) in a nursery habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw data from Vemco receivers that monitored the Kaneohe, Oahu nursery grounds while tagged juvenile snapper were released in 2006 (cultured) and 2007 (wild). Also...

  12. Effect Of Fertilization And Mycorrhization On Growth And Nutritional Status Of Cranberry (Vaccinium Macrocarpon Ait.) In The Nursery

    OpenAIRE

    Michałojć Zenia; Koter Michał

    2015-01-01

    Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a species that is becoming increasingly popular due to the health value and taste qualities of fruits. Studies on cranberry ‘Pilgrim’ were carried out in 2012-2013 in the nursery farm. Plants were grown in containers in open space. The effect of method of fertilization and application of mycorrhizal vaccine on the growth, development and nutritional status of plants during the first two years of cultivation in the nursery was evaluated. Fertilizer cha...

  13. Social and eating habits in nurseries public understandings and views of teachers and parents about obesity and overweight in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Ãlvaro DiÃgenes Leite Fechine

    2011-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem in several countries, including Brazil, affecting children of all ages, social class and ethnicity. For this, the nursery appears as an important element in preventing obesity and childhood overweight. This study aimed to understand the perceptions of professionals in the nursery and parents of children attending, for their views on the factors that may influence obesity and overweight in children and prevention methods used. The study was co...

  14. A Survey of Current Pre-School Education of/for Children from Urban Low-Income Families in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin-Qinghua; Liu-Yan; Zhang-Yan; Li-Qiong

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the pre-school education of children from low-income families in six urban districts of Beijing, using questionnaires and in-depth interviews with respondents from district educational committees, sub-district and resident's committees, nursery schools, and low-income families. The results indicated that (1) the number of…

  15. Population Structure of Pythium irregulare, P. ultimum, and P. sylvaticum in Forest Nursery Soils of Oregon and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Jerry E; Garrido, Patricia; Kamvar, Zhian N; Espíndola, Andrés S; Marek, Stephen M; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Garzón, Carla D

    2015-05-01

    Pythium species are important soilborne pathogens occurring in the forest nursery industry of the Pacific Northwest. However, little is known about their genetic diversity or population structure and it is suspected that isolates are moved among forest nurseries on seedling stock and shared field equipment. In order to address these concerns, a total of 115 isolates of three Pythium species (P. irregulare, P. sylvaticum, and P. ultimum) were examined at three forest nurseries using simple sequence repeat (SSR) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Analyses revealed distinct patterns of intraspecific variation for the three species. P. sylvaticum exhibited the most diversity, followed by P. irregulare, while substantial clonality was found in P. ultimum. For both P. irregulare and P. sylvaticum, but not P. ultimum, there was evidence for significant variation among nurseries. However, all three species also exhibited at least two distinct lineages not associated with the nursery of origin. Finally, evidence was found that certain lineages and clonal genotypes, including fungicide-resistant isolates, are shared among nurseries, indicating that pathogen movement has occurred.

  16. Spatio-temporal dynamics of cod nursery areas in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Dewitz, B. von; Lehmann, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study the drift of eastern Baltic cod larvae and juveniles spawned within the historical eastern Baltic cod spawning grounds was investigated by detailed drift model simulations for the years 1971–2010, to examine the spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental suitability in the nursery...... important eastern Baltic cod nursery grounds. Only low proportions of juveniles hatched in the Arkona Basin and in the Gotland Basin were able to settle in their respective spawning ground. Ocean currents were either unfavorable for the juveniles to reach suitable habitats or transported the juveniles...... in the Bornholm Basin and in the Gdansk Deep showed a similar declining trend as the Fulton's K condition factor of demersal 1-group cod, which may confirm the importance of oxygen-dependent habitat availability and its effect on density dependence as a process relevant for recruitment success....

  17. [Nutritional status of Cuban elders in three different geriatric scenarios: community, geriatrics service, nursery home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, Alina; Cuyá Lantigua, Magdalena; González Escudero, Hilda; Sánchez Gutiérrez, Ramón; Cortina Martínez, Rafael; Barreto Penié, Jesús; Santana Porbén, Sergio; Rojas Pérez, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    The undernutrition rates observed in Cuban elders surveyed in three different geriatric scenarios: Community: coastal town of Cojímar (City of Havana); Geriatrics Service ("Hermanos Ameijeiras" Hospital, City of Havana); and Nursery Home (city of Cárdenas, province of Matanzas) by means of the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) of the Elderly are presented. Undernutrition rates were 2.7% among elders surveyed in the coastal community of Cojímar, but increased to become 91.6% among those admitted to the hospital Geriatrics Service, and 95.3% for those institutionalized in the Nursery Home, respectively. The occurrence of undernutrition can be low among elders living freely in the community, but it might affect a vast number of those seeking medical assistance at the public health institutions. Extent of undernutrition among elders in geriatric assistance scenarios should lead to the adoption of the required measures for early identification, and timely treatment, of this health problem.

  18. Use of the heat dissipation method for sap flow measurement in citrus nursery trees1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Augusto Girardi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sap flow could be used as physiological parameter to assist irrigation of screen house citrus nursery trees by continuous water consumption estimation. Herein we report a first set of results indicating the potential use of the heat dissipation method for sap flow measurement in containerized citrus nursery trees. 'Valencia' sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck] budded on 'Rangpur' lime (Citrus limonia Osbeck was evaluated for 30 days during summer. Heat dissipation probes and thermocouple sensors were constructed with low-cost and easily available materials in order to improve accessibility of the method. Sap flow showed high correlation to air temperature inside the screen house. However, errors due to natural thermal gradient and plant tissue injuries affected measurement precision. Transpiration estimated by sap flow measurement was four times higher than gravimetric measurement. Improved micro-probes, adequate method calibration, and non-toxic insulating materials should be further investigated.

  19. Fungicidal control of Lophodermium seditiosum on Pinus sylvestris seedlings in Swedish forest nurseries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, Elna [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology; Arvidsson, Bernt [Svenska Skogsplantor AB, Joenkoeping (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    During the 1990s, there were serious outbreaks of the pathogen Lophodermium seditiosum on pine seedlings in Swedish forest nurseries, even though the seedlings had been treated with the fungicide propiconazole. The present experiment was carried out to evaluate two other fungicides, fluazinam and azoxystrobin, as possible alternatives to propiconazole. In the tests, which were all carried out in the same forest nursery, seedlings were treated with either propiconazole, fluazinam. or azoxystrobin, and the proportion of needles with ascocarps of L. seditiosum and the number of ascocarps per needle were recorded over the following 2 yrs. Seedlings treated with azoxystrobin already appeared healthier than control seedlings in September of the first year, and by November all azoxystrobin-treated seedlings had fewer ascocarps per needle compared with control seedlings. In autumn of the second year, there were no ascocarps on seedlings treated with fluazinam or azoxystrobin, whereas seedlings treated with propiconazole had similar numbers of ascocarps to non-treated control seedlings.

  20. Challenges and opportunities in South Africa’s indigenous plants industry: De Fynne Nursery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Mabaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available De Fynne Nursery, a black-owned agribusiness, has cemented a unique position in South Africa’s indigenous plants industry against all odds. With an undying passion for the horticulture industry, Jacky Goliath and Elton Jefthas, De Fynne’s cofounders, continue to live the dream that began in their backyard. Today, they sit in their new 22-hectare farm and muse over strategic decisions as they navigate the challenges of doing business in an emerging economy. This case study focuses on opportunities and challenges for De Fynne as it pushes into its next growth phase by looking at the changing competitive landscape, the balance between marketing existing products and innovating new products, and ways to become operationally efficient and profitable in both its nursery and the farm.

  1. The digital in the nursery and kindergarten: create immersive narratives through collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pennazioa Valentina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research experience (case study on the use of digital technologies for the development of the ability to invent stories for images in a collaborative way, in some nurseries (0-3 years and in some kindergartens in La Spezia. We have involved in the experience: the sections of the older children of the nursery (3 years; the heterogeneous sections of kindergarten, with the aim of presenting different educational activities and technologies (PC, tablet, projector ... - prepared by educators-teachers and researchers - in an immersive environment to enable children to enter into the image and interact with it. The collaborative activities have also predicted the use of i- Theatre, an interactive integrated system for the narrative creation of multimedia stories. During the activities, educators and researchers conducted free observations that aim to bring out possible elements of transferability of the experience and set the second stage of work (model of research-training.

  2. The role of the neonatal nurse practitioner in the community hospital level I nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have played a significant role in providing medical coverage to many of the country's Level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Extensive education and experience are required for a nurse practitioner (NP) to become competent in caring for these critically ill newborns. The NNP can take this competence and experience and expand her role out into the community Level I nurseries. Clinical care of the infants and close communication with parents, pediatricians, and the area tertiary center provide a community service with the goal of keeping parents and babies together in the community hospital without compromising the health of the baby. The NNP service, with 24-hour nursery and delivery coverage, supports an ongoing obstetric service to the community hospital. The NNP's experience enables her to provide a neonatal service that encompasses a multitude of advanced practice nursing roles.

  3. Increased Biomass of Nursery-Grown Douglas-Fir Seedlings upon Inoculation with Diazotrophic Endophytic Consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zareen Khan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii seedlings are periodically challenged by biotic and abiotic stresses. The ability of endophytes to colonize the interior of plants could confer benefits to host plants that may play an important role in plant adaptation to environmental changes. In this greenhouse study, nursery-grown Douglas-fir seedlings were inoculated with diazotrophic endophytes previously isolated from poplar and willow trees and grown for fifteen months in nutrient-poor conditions. Inoculated seedlings had significant increases in biomass (48%, root length (13% and shoot height (16% compared to the control seedlings. Characterization of these endophytes for symbiotic traits in addition to nitrogen fixation revealed that they can also solubilize phosphate and produce siderophores. Colonization was observed through fluorescent microscopy in seedlings inoculated with gfp- and mkate-tagged strains. Inoculation with beneficial endophytes could prove to be valuable for increasing the production of planting stocks in forest nurseries.

  4. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal from plant nursery runoff in vegetated and unvegetated subsurface flow wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huett, D O; Morris, S G; Smith, G; Hunt, N

    2005-09-01

    Subsurface horizontal flow reed beds are being evaluated for Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) removal from plant nursery runoff water in New South Wales Australia. The need to include plants (Phragmites australis), the effect of reaction time (3.5 v 7.0 d) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on N and P removal in batch fed gravel wetland tubs (55 L) was studied over 19 months. Simulated nursery runoff water containing N (10.1 mg L(-1), 74% as NO3) and P (0.58 mg L(-1), 88% as PO4) and DOC (2-5 mg L(-1)) was used. The planted wetland tubs removed >96% TN and TP over most of the 19-month study period while unplanted tubs were inefficient (wetland to achieve efficient nutrient removal with effluent TN and TP concentrations of <1 mg L(-1) and 0.05 mg L(-1), respectively with a 3.5 day reaction time.

  5. Effect of Soil Nursery Mixtures on the Growth of Pepper Seedlings in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design used was completely randomized design (CRD) with five replications. A total of six different soil mixtures (treatment) were used in the study. Treatments comprised soil nursery mixtures in the ratio of 0:3:3, 1:2:3, 1:3:2, 2:3:1, 3:2:1 and 2:1:1 for poultry manure: top soil: river sand. Data was collected on percentage ...

  6. Pemberian Pupuk Kascing dan Urin Sapi pada Bibit Kelapa Sawit (Elaeis Guineensis Jacq.) di Main Nursery

    OpenAIRE

    Gusriyono, Fajar '; Sampurno,; yulia, Arnis En

    2016-01-01

    The research aimed to determine the effect of interaction giving of vermicompost fertilizer and cow urine to the growth of oil palm seeds (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and get a suitable combination for the growth of oil palm seedlings in main nursery. The research was conducted from April to July 2015. The research used to completely randomized design (CRD) factorial consisting of two factors . The first factor is vermicompost fertilizer consists of 4 levels: vermicompost fertilizer dose of 0 g/...

  7. Experimental data comparing two coral grow-out methods in nursery-raised Acropora cervicornis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Bartels, Erich; Stathakopoulos, Anastasios; Enochs, Ian C.; Kolodziej, Graham; Toth, Lauren; Manzello, Derek P.

    2017-01-01

    Staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis, is a threatened species and the primary focus of western Atlantic reef-restoration efforts to date. As part of the USGS Coral Reef Ecosystems Studies project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/crest/), we investigated skeletal characteristics of nursery-grown staghorn coral reared using two commonly used grow-out methods at Mote Tropical Research Laboratory’s offshore nursery. We compared linear extension, calcification rate, and skeletal density of nursery-raised A. cervicornis branches reared for six months either on blocks attached to substratum or hanging from monofilament line (on PVC “trees”) in the water column. We demonstrate that branches grown on the substratum had significantly higher skeletal density, measured using computerized tomography (CT), and lower linear extension rates compared to water-column fragments. Calcification rates determined with buoyant weighing were not statistically different between the two grow-out methods, but did vary among coral genotypes. Whereas skeletal density and extension rates were plastic traits that depended on environment, calcification rate was conserved. Our results show that the two rearing methods generate the same amount of calcium-carbonate skeleton but produce colonies with different skeletal characteristics, and suggest that genetically based variability in coral-calcification performance exists. The data resulting from this experiment are provided in this data release and are interpreted in Kuffner et al. (2017).Kuffner, I.B., E. Bartels, A. Stathakopoulos, I.C. Enochs, G. Kolodziej, L.T. Toth, and D.P. Manzello, 2017, Plasticity in skeletal characteristics of nursery-raised staghorn coral, Acropora cervicornis: Coral Reefs, in press.

  8. Use of a mobile nursery to obtain a virulence pattern of common bean.

    OpenAIRE

    Steadman, James; Godoy-Lutz, Gabriela; Rosas, Juan Carlos; Beaver, James

    2006-01-01

    As new sources of resistance genes areidentified to rust caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, weneed to know if these genes or others incorporated in the beangermplasm will become susceptible to the pathogen when theresistant varieties are widely grown. We have used a mobilenursery of bean lines/varieties with different rust resistancegenes to answer this question. This nursery, composed of sixday-old bean plants, is placed in a rusted bean field for two tothree hours, misted for 15 hours in a ...

  9. In situ observations of a possible skate nursery off the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, M O; Smith, K E; McClintock, J B; Singh, H; Thatje, S; Vos, S C; Brothers, C J; Brown, A; Ellis, D; Anderson, J; Aronson, R B

    2015-06-01

    A dense aggregation of skate egg cases was imaged during a photographic survey of the sea floor along the western Antarctic Peninsula in November 2013. Egg cases were noted in a narrow band between 394 and 443 m depth. Although some skate species in other oceans are known to utilize restricted areas to deposit eggs in great numbers, such nurseries have not been described in the Southern Ocean. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Hepatitis B vaccination practices in hospital newborn nurseries before and after changes in vaccination recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S J; Cabana, M D; Malik, T; Yusuf, H; Freed, G L

    2001-08-01

    Routine use of hepatitis B vaccine for low-risk newborns was suspended on July 7, 1999, because of concern about the potential risk of thimerosal, a mercury-containing vaccine preservative. Reinstatement of the birth dose was recommended when a thimerosal-free vaccine became available. To explore changes in hepatitis B vaccination practices for newborns related to the revised recommendations for low-risk infants (in this study, the terms newborn and infant are used interchangeably). A telephone survey of a random sample of 1000 US hospitals. Nurse managers, nursery directors, and staff nurses of the newborn nurseries. Nursery vaccination practices before and after July 7, 1999, and the availability and use of thimerosal-free vaccine. Interviews were conducted with 773 (87%) of 886 eligible hospitals. Before July 7, 1999, 78% of the hospitals reported vaccination practices that were consistent with recommendations at that time, although only 47% vaccinated all low-risk infants at birth. After July 7, 1999, almost all hospitals discontinued vaccination of low-risk infants, in accordance with the recommendation change; however, there was a 6-fold increase in the number of hospitals that were not vaccinating all high-risk infants. After the introduction of thimerosal-free vaccine, only 39% of the hospitals reported vaccinating all low-risk infants. Most hospital nurseries altered their newborn hepatitis B vaccination practices consistent with changes in national recommendations. However, unintended consequences included the failure of some hospitals to continue vaccinating all high-risk infants and the delay in reintroducing vaccination for low-risk newborns after the introduction of a thimerosal-free vaccine. Assessments of the appropriateness of this country's response to the threat of thimerosal in vaccines should consider these findings.

  11. Nursery areas and recruitment variation of Northeast Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis; Kristensen, Kasper; Van der Kooij, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no dedicated recruitment survey data available in support of the assessment of the abundance and distribution of Northeast Atlantic (NEA) mackerel (Scomber scombrus), one of the most widespread and commercially important fish stocks in the North Atlantic. This is despite the f......, showing that the most important nursery areas are around Ireland, north and west of Scotland, in the northern North Sea north of 598Nand, to some extent, also in the Bay of Biscay....

  12. Attitudes of ornamental trees and shrubs producers towards nursery production of ornamental beech cultivars in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonić Marina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. is, along with its significance as a forest species, renowned as an ornamental species, due to its numerous cultivars. Ornamental beech cultivars are planted in various green spaces, but a small number of such trees have ascertained in Serbia. For the time being, production of beech cultivars is represented in a very small number of nurseries, with a negligible share of those seedlings in their total assortment. The aim of this research is to study the attitudes of ornamental trees and shrubs producers towards the nursery production of ornamental beech cultivars, and possibilities of its improvements in Serbia. “Door to door” survey and in-depth interviews were used as research techniques. Surveys with the representatives of 65 nurseries in Serbia (in the selected statistical region Šumadija and Western Serbia were conducted in the first stage of data collection. In the second stage of data collection were interviewed the representatives of the 10 nurseries who, during the survey, pointed out that they produce ornamental beech cultivars. Nurserymen’s attitudes suggest that there is a possibility to improve the production of ornamental beech cultivars in Serbia, with the appropriate support measures and increased interest of customers on the market, i.e. with the provision of subsidies for the production of seedlings and greater use of cultivars by utility companies in the cities of Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ТP 31041: Establishment of forest plantations to increase the afforested areas in Serbia

  13. Climate mediates hypoxic stress on fish diversity and nursery function at the land–sea interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Brent B.; Levey, Matthew D.; Fountain, Monique C.; Carlisle, Aaron B.; Chavez, Francisco P.; Gleason, Mary G.

    2015-01-01

    Human populations are rapidly expanding along Earth's coastlines, increasing stress to coastal ecosystems and the services they provide. One of these stressors comes from an increase in nutrient inputs from coastal land development that can enter estuaries and coastal seas leading to algal blooms that deplete oxygen from the water, a condition known as hypoxia. In this study, we investigated how coastal hypoxia influences fish diversity, the nursery habitat for juvenile fish, and fisheries pr...

  14. Evaluation of Two Moringa oleifera Lam Varieties Using Different Substrates in Nursery Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Damisela Pacheco Veiga; Idania Yero Pino; Nelson Heriberto Martin Cuesta; Delmy Triana González; Oscar Loyola Hernández

    2016-01-01

    A nursery study was made on brown soil with typical carbonate to evaluate agroproductive behavior of Plain and Supergenious Moringa oleifera Lam varieties, using different substrates. Three substrates were studied (worm castings, decomposed cattle manure and compost), using a randomized block experimental design, with 8 treatments and three replicas. The evaluation included the amount of leaves 30 days after germination, plant height until transplantation every ten days and at 30 days, stem d...

  15. A secondary nursery area for the copper shark Carcharhinus brachyurus from the late Miocene of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, Walter; Collareta, Alberto; Pesci, Fabio; Di Celma, Claudio; Urbina, Mario; Bianucci, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    The life history strategies of sharks often include the use of protected nursery areas by young-of-the-year and juveniles. Nursery areas can be primary (i.e., grounds where the sharks are born and spend the very first part of their lives) or secondary (i.e., grounds inhabited by slightly older but not yet mature individuals). Criteria utilized to recognize these strategic habitats include: high concentration of young sharks, high food availability, and low predation risk. Since the fossil record of sharks consists mainly of isolated teeth, identification of paleonurseries involves a series of problems due to difficult application of actualistic criteria. A rich shark tooth-bearing level (ST-low1) has recently been discovered in the upper Miocene deposits of the Pisco Formation exposed at Cerro Colorado (southern coast of Peru). Most of the teeth collected from this level belong to the extant copper shark Carcharhinus brachyurus. These teeth are small and compatible with those of extant juveniles. This observation, coupled with other paleoenvironmental considerations, indicates that the ST-low1 horizon could have represented a nursery ground for juvenile individuals of C. brachyurus. The absence of very small-sized teeth (i.e., referable to young-of-the-year) suggests a secondary nursery ground inhabited by immature copper sharks. Observations on the tooth size of other Lamniformes, Carcharhiniformes, and Myliobatiformes occurring along with C. brachyurus point to a significantly juvenile structure of this elasmobranch assemblage, thus supporting the hypothesis of a communal use of the Cerro Colorado paleonursery.

  16. Effect of iron fortification of nursery complementary food on iron status of infants in the DPRKorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, HuiYong; Kim, SuHuan; Sim, ByongChel; Gang, HaeYong; Kim, HoYong; Kim, YongRan; Kim, RakChel; Yang, MunHui; Kim, SangPil

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the iron status of infants who consumed porridge cooked in water with added ferrous sulphate. A total of 234 infants, aged 6-12 months, were recruited from 36 nurseries in the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (DPRK North Korea) and randomly divided into iron (Fe) and placebo groups. At baseline, almost half the children had Hbnurseries.

  17. Latitudinal trends in habitat quality of shallow-water flatfish nurseries

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, V.; Kooijman, S A L M; van der Veer, H.W.

    2012-01-01

    The habitat quality of European shallow-water nurseries was studied for 3 common flatfish species based on juvenile growth conditions. Field growth of 0-group plaice Pleuronectes platessa, flounder Platichthys flesus and sole Solea solea, from both published and unpublished studies, was compared with maximum growth predicted by a bioenergetics model based on the dynamic energy budget theory. In plaice and flounder, realized growth ratio decreased consistently during the growing season in most...

  18. The removal of nutrients from plant nursery irrigation runoff in subsurface horizontal-flow wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, T R; Huett, D O; Davison, L

    2001-01-01

    In New South Wales (NSW) Australia, the recent introduction of legislation to control runoff and charge for water used in agricultural production has encouraged commercial plant nurseries to collect and recycle their irrigation drainage. Runoff from a nursery typically contains around 6 mg/L TN (> 70% as NO3), 0.5 mg/L TP (> 50% as P04), and virtually no organic matter (BOD wetlands in the removal of nutrients from nursery runoff on the sub-tropical northern coast of NSW, Australia. Four experimental subsurface flow wetlands (1 m x 4 m x 0.5 m water depth) were planted with Phragmites australis in April 1999. TN and TP load removals were > 84% and > 65% respectively at HRTs of between 5 and 2 days, with the majority of out-flowing TN and TP being organic in form. Internal generation of organic N and P resulted in persistent background levels of 0.45 mg/L TN and 0.15 mg/L TP in the reed bed effluent. TN, NH4 and TP removal was affected by HRT (P NO2, NO3 and Ortho-P was achieved at all HRTs, with outlet concentrations generally < 0.01 mg/L for all. For TN, a strong relationship existed between removal rate (g/m2/day) and loading rate (r2 = 0.995), while a weaker relationship existed for TP (r2 = 0.47). It is estimated that a 1 ha nursery would require a reed bed area of 200 m2 for a 2 day HRT.

  19. Effects of nursery preconditioning through mycorrhizal inoculation and drought in Arbutus unedo L. plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro García, Alejandra; Del Pilar Bañón Árias, Sebastián; Morte, Asunción; Sánchez-Blanco, María Jesús

    2011-01-01

    The influence of a water deficit treatment and mycorrhizal inoculation with Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch on the water relations, gas exchange, and plant growth in Arbutus unedo L. plants was studied in order to evaluate the hardening process during the nursery period. The ability to withstand the adverse conditions after transplantation was also studied. Mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal seedlings of A. unedo were pot-grown for 4 months in a greenhouse (nursery period), during which time two irrigation treatments, well watered (100% water holding capacity, leaching 20% of the applied water) and deficit irrigation (50% of the well watered), were applied. Subsequently, the plants were transplanted to the field and well irrigated (transplanting period), after which and until the end of the experiment they received no water (establishment period). At the end of the nursery period, both water deficit and mycorrhizae were seen to have altered the plant morphology. Mycorrhizal plants had lower leaf area and improved leaf color parameters, while the water deficit increased root dry weight and the root/shoot ratio. Mycorrhizal plants had higher leaf water potential values than non-inoculated plants. Mycorrhizae increased stomatal conductance and photosynthesis values, especially in stressed plants. Drought led to an osmotic adjustment and a decrease in the leaf water potential values at turgor loss point in the mycorrhizal plants. Cell wall rigidity, measured as increased bulk modulus of elasticity, was decreased by the mycorrhizae effect. After transplanting, no differences were found in the water relations or gas exchange values between treatments. During the establishment period, the plants that had been exposed to both drought and mycorrhizae showed a better water status (higher leaf water and turgor potential values) and higher gas exchange values. In conclusion, water deficit and mycorrhizal inoculation of A. unedo plants in nursery produced changes in

  20. Negotiating Care in the Special Care Nursery: Parents' and Nurses' Perceptions of Nurse-Parent Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Liz; Taylor, Tara; Watson, Bernadette; Fenwick, Jennifer; Dordic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Nursing staff are an important source of support for parents of a hospitalized preterm infant. This study aimed to describe parents' and nurses' perceptions of communicating with each other in the context of the special care nursery. A qualitative descriptive design was employed. Thirty two parents with a newborn admitted to one of two special care nurseries in Queensland, Australia participated, and 12 nurses participated in semi-structured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the interviews. Nurses and parents focused on similar topics, but their perceptions differed. Provision of information and enabling parenting were central to effective communication, supported by an appropriate interpersonal style by nurses. Parents described difficulties accessing or engaging nurses. Managing enforcement of policies was a specific area of difficulty for both parents and nurses. The findings indicated a tension between providing family-centered care that is individualized and based on family needs and roles, and adhering to systemic nursery policies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of nursery microhabitats on the future abundance of a coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Shaun K; Depczynski, Martial; Fulton, Christopher J; Holmes, Thomas H; Radford, Ben T; Tinkler, Paul

    2016-08-17

    Species habitat associations are often complex, making it difficult to assess their influence on populations. Among coral reef fishes, habitat requirements vary among species and with ontogeny, but the relative importance of nursery and adult-preferred habitats on future abundances remain unclear. Moreover, adult populations may be influenced by recruitment of juveniles and assessments of habitat importance should consider relative effects of juvenile abundance. We conducted surveys across 16 sites and 200 km of reef to identify the microhabitat preferences of juveniles, sub-adults and adults of the damselfish Pomacentrus moluccensis Microhabitat preferences at different life-history stages were then combined with 6 years of juvenile abundance and microhabitat availability data to show that the availability of preferred juvenile microhabitat (corymbose corals) at the time of settlement was a strong predictor of future sub-adult and adult abundance. However, the influence of nursery microhabitats on future population size differed spatially and at some locations abundance of juveniles and adult microhabitat (branching corals) were better predictors of local populations. Our results demonstrate that while juvenile microhabitats are important nurseries, the abundance of coral-dependent fishes is not solely dependent on these microhabitats, especially when microhabitats are readily available or following large influxes of juveniles. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Angels in the nursery: The intergenerational transmission of benevolent parental influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Alicia F; Padrón, Elena; Van Horn, Patricia; Harris, William W

    2005-11-01

    Fraiberg and her colleagues (1975) introduced the metaphor "ghosts in the nursery" to describe the ways in which parents, by reenacting with their small children scenes from the parents' own unremembered early relational experiences of helplessness and fear, transmit child maltreatment from one generation to the next. In this article we propose that angels in the nursery-care-receiving experiences characterized by intense shared affect between parent and child in which the child feels nearly perfectly understood, accepted, and loved-provide the child with a core sense of security and self-worth that can be drawn upon when the child becomes a parent to interrupt the cycle of maltreatment. We argue that uncovering angels as growth-promoting forces in the lives of traumatized parents is as vital to the work of psychotherapy as is the interpretation and exorcizing of ghosts. Using clinical case material, we demonstrate the ways in which early benevolent experiences with caregivers can protect against even overwhelming trauma, and examine the reemergence of these benevolent figures in consciousness as an instrument of therapeutic change. Finally, we examine implications of the concept of "angels in the nursery" for research and clinical intervention. Copyright © 2005 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  3. Probiotics association in the suckling and nursery in piglets challenged with Salmonella typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Ramalho Afonso

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to study the probiotics association in 144 piglets from birth to 62 days old. In lactation, the design was completely randomized with two treatments, CTL, 1 mL of distilled water and ProbA, 5g in 15 ml of distilled water, both orally, and in the nursery in randomized block design, with 2x3 factorial arrangement of treatments, ProbA ProbB: 30g/ton of ProbB in the ration; CTL ProbB: 30g/ton of ProbB in the ration; ProbA ProbA, CTL CTL; ProbA CHA (challenged; CTL CHA. At 35 days of age the animal of the nursery were inoculated with Salmonella typhimurium orally. There was no effect of the parameters evaluated during the maternity. In nursery, the feed conversion was favorable to the ProbA. In the evaluation of fecal score, the challenged group had more diarrhea and increased elimination of S. typhimurium. Results showed the positive action of probiotics when applied at birth by the direct influence on the formation of the intestinal microbiota.

  4. Nursery function of an estuarine tidal marsh for the brown shrimp Crangon crangon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattrijsse, André; Dankwa, Hederick R.; Mees, Jan

    1997-12-01

    The brown shrimp Crangon crangon migrates into the brackish part of the Westerschelde estuary (southwest Netherlands) shortly after metamorphosis and uses the tidal marsh habitat as a nursery until reaching a total length of about 15 mm. The importance of the marsh as a nursery was evaluated by estimating foraging activity, predation mortality and residence time. In early postlarval stages, C. crangon utilised the intertidal creeks of an estuarine tidal marsh from early spring (March-April) until late autumn (October-November). Postlarval shrimp leaving the marsh with the ebb tide always had significantly more food in their stomachs than shrimp entering the marsh with the incoming flood water. Predation upon the shrimp population was relatively low during most months, but in increased between August and October when common gobies, Pomatoschistus microps, were present in high densities. There was also predation by the small seabass Dicentrarchus labrax. The marsh creeks function both as foraging areas and as predation refuge. Depending on temperature, postlarval shrimp stayed in the marsh for a period of two to three weeks. Quantitatively, the value of the marsh as a nursery area had changed drastically during a second year of sampling, illustrating high natural year-to-year variability. However, the seasonal pattern remained. Recruitment to the subtidal adult population represents an export of animals from the marsh to the estuary. This export is negligible in terms of biomass (as compared to the total biomass of the estuarine population) but it may be important in terms of numbers of individuals.

  5. Active Optical Sensors for Tree Stem Detection and Classification in Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garrido

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops.

  6. Effects of emotional dissonance and job burnout on the psychological heath of the nursery teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kwang Il; Lee, Won Jae [Gachon University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study collected data from 467 nursery teachers and it aimed to investigate the association between mental health and emotional dissonance and job burnout of the day care nursery teachers. Measurement tool was developed, most of the questions having 5-point scale. The data were analyzed structural equation model with the statistical package IBM SPSS 23 and AMOS 21 with 5% percent of significance level. Main results are as follows. First, it was found that emotional dissonance of nursery teachers working in day care centers showed significant effect on the mental health such factors as job-stress (relationships with children and parents and work overload). Second, emotional dissonance were found to have a significant effect on job burnout, too. Third, job burnout had a significant effect on the mental health, job stress and psychological wellbeing. Fourth, job burnout was found to mediate partially on mental health and emotional dissonance. These findings suggest the importance of mental health promotion programs for child care teachers working in the day care centers.

  7. The growth of seedlings of rhizophoraceae in the nursery utilizing fresh water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarno Sarno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of the mangrove areas that have been degraded needs mangrove seedlings in large quantity. A mangrove nursery is generally located on the land close to the planting site and brackish water. The mangrove nursery by means of fresh water is an innovation in the provision of seeds. The objective of this experiment was to determine the growth of seedlings of Rhizophoraceae in fresh water based on the parameters of the number of leaves and the height of the shoots. The method of breeding utilizes fresh water and to keep the water remains available the water circulation is regulated. The results of the observations show that the number of leaves of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza has the number of pairs of leaves compared with Rhizophora apiculata dn R. mucronata. The average height of the shoots up to the age of 5 months after planting, the highest seedlings are R. mucronata seedlings. In general, mangrove nursery with fresh water can be utilized as a means for providing seedlings for rehabilitation of mangrove. Key words: fresh water, mangrove, propagules, Rhizophoraceae, seedlings.

  8. Improvement of salinity in sewage sludge compost prior to its utilization as nursery substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Tao; Gao, Ding; Chen, Tong-Bin; Cai, Hong; Zheng, Guo-Di

    2014-05-01

    Soluble salts are enriched in sewage sludge compost because of their inherent derivation. Accordingly, the content of soluble salt in sludge compost is usually much higher than most seedlings can tolerate. To determine whether sludge compost is suitable for use as a nursery substrate, some experiments were conducted. Reduction of the electrical conductivity (EC) value could improve seed germination in saturated extract from sludge compost. In addition, water elution and mixing dilution with raw soil were all shown to be able to alleviate saline inhibition on seed germination and seedling growth, including stem diameter, seedling height, and above-ground weight. Overall, salinity is a crucial problem when sewage sludge compost is reused as a nursery substrate, and some effective and convenient approaches to reduce salt should be served prior to its reuse. Sewage sludge after being composted is usually reused as organic fertilizer or plant substrate. However, salt is the main problem during its reclamation. What is the highest salt level the seedling can tolerate? Which types of salts are effective in salinity of sludge-amended substrate? Meanwhile, can the salinity be reduced through water elution or soil mixing dilution? This paper is the first to investigate the salinity and its reduction of sewage sludge compost prior to its use in the development of nursery substrate.

  9. [Giardiasis in nurseries supported by the São Paulo Municipal Prefecture, 1982/1983].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, D M; Chieffi, P P; Costa, W A; Kudzielics, E

    1991-01-01

    Parasitological analysis was carried out during 1982 and 1983 in 3,076 children aged under 7 years, who were enrolled in 52 day nurseries supported by Municipal Prefecture of São Paulo and 50 food handlers (cooking employees) working at 18 day nurseries. The prevalence of Giardia lamblia infection was studied according to sex, age group and seasonal variations, and attained 32.80% among children and 4.0% among adult population. The occurrence of giardiasis was most frequent in age group corresponding to 1-4 years old. The study of seasonal variations showed that, in 1982, the prevalence of G. lamblia was high in the autumn and in the spring and, in 1983, giardiasis was more prevalent in the autumn and in the summer. Statistical analysis indicated non association between sex and prevalence for Giardia infection, and there was also no significative difference on the distribution of G. lamblia prevalence in the four regions analysed in the present study (p > 0.05). The most probable mode of acquisition of Giardia infection, in the nurseries analysed in the present study was person-to-person, as factors, like environmental contamination and others, associated with the spreading of giardiasis through water, reported in other countries, are unlike from those verified in our Municipality. On the other hand, there is evidence of no significant role of food handlers in Giardia transmission, because of the rate of infection in this group was very low.

  10. Financial costs for parents with a baby in a neonatal nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, Brenda M; Dawson, Jennifer A; Wong, Connie; Morley, Colin J; Davis, Peter G

    2009-09-01

    To determine the additional financial cost to families of babies admitted to the nurseries of The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Prospective case series of consecutive babies admitted to the Special and Intensive Care Nurseries at The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Data were collected from diaries completed by parents who recorded expenses related to having their baby in hospital. Fifty nine families of babies born nurseries was 7 weeks. The major costs were related to food and transport. Expenses related to the expression/storage of breast milk and accommodation were also considerable consuming 11% and 14%, respectively of the weekly amount spent. Of the 23 families who reported lost or reduced income, the median amount lost per week per family was A$324. The financial burden on families with babies admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit is substantial. The median cost per week was approximately one quarter of the average gross weekly income and included lost income as well as additional expenses. It is important that institutions and health-care systems recognise the magnitude of this additional burden on vulnerable families.

  11. Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua benefits from the availability of seagrass (Zostera marina nursery habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Lilley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua is a species of significant economic and historic importance but infamous for its decline. Apart from overfishing, the causes of this decline and its subsequent lack of recovery remain largely unresolved. Indeed, the degree to which specific habitats are important for this species remains unquantified at the scale of North Atlantic. Here, the literature on the role of eelgrass meadows (Zostera marina as valuable nursery habitat for the Atlantic cod is reviewed and synthesized. Evidence is presented on relative densities of Atlantic cod in shallow water environments and in eelgrass meadows in comparison to alternative habitats. In addition, evidence pertaining to the ’viability gains’ attributed to the use of eelgrass meadows as nursery habitat (growth and survival by juvenile Atlantic cod is analyzed. Although juvenile Atlantic cod use of Z. marina is found to be facultative, when possible, available literatures indicates that they may select Z. marina as a nursery habitat where they are found in high density (average of at least 246 ha−1. From their use of Z. marina habitat the juvenile Atlantic cod receives viability benefits from it, improving their chances of reaching maturation. This paper provides strong evidence that eelgrass meadows are of significant importance to contributing to Atlantic cod stocks.

  12. Active optical sensors for tree stem detection and classification in nurseries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Miguel; Perez-Ruiz, Manuel; Valero, Constantino; Gliever, Chris J; Hanson, Bradley D; Slaughter, David C

    2014-06-19

    Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission) devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops.

  13. A Reflective Encounter with the Fine Sand Area in a Nursery School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on a model of reflection that involves creating meanings through repeated encounters with evocative objects. Responses to one such evocative object, a 20-second video clip of children playing in the fine sand area, illustrates the "turning toward" and then "turning away" from the object to engage with broader…

  14. Lotte lasteaed : Ida 8, Tartu = Lotte Nursery School : Ida 8, Tartu / Margit Mutso

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mutso, Margit, 1966-

    2009-01-01

    Lasteaiast, mille arhitektid on Indrek Peil ja Siiri Vallner (pälvisid riigi kultuuripreemia, Kavakava), sisearhitektid Tea Tammelaan, Malle Jürgenson, Krista Lepland (pälvisid EK arhitektuuri sihtkapitali aastapreemia 2008) ja Sirli Ehari (Laika, Belka & Strelka), maastikuarhitekt Anna-Liisa Unt. Žürii hinnang lasteaiale

  15. Characteristics of substrates used for nursery production of Austrian pine and Scots pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vratuša Vesna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses research results concerning properties of substrates used for nursery production of Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arn and Scots pine (Pinus silvestris L in the experimental field of the Faculty of Forestry in Belgrade There is no doubt that peat is the most favorable substrate for successful massive nursery production of various woody species. Favorable physical, chemical and biochemical properties guarantee nursery production success, on condition that all technical and technological procedures, characteristic for this production, are recognized. Certain shortcomings that may occur with different kinds of peat (inadequate air capacity, nutrient deficiency, excessive acidity, etc may relatively easily be overcome with appropriate materials and procedures. Nevertheless, the main shortcoming of this most widely used nursery substrate, especially when the countries with economies in transition are concerned, is its high price. In order to overcome this problem, it is necessary to use domestic resources for creating a substrate of approximately the same characteristics, but much lower price Research results regarding the substrate – mixture "Goč 1" show that this substrate, comprising 30% silica sand, 20% earthworm manure, and 50% bark humus, is characterised by all necessary starting prerequisites for fulfilling the cited functions. This material represents loamy sand of almost neutral reaction (pHH2O=6.9, pHCaCl2=6.40, and even though its CEC is relatively modest (33.08 cmol(+ x kg–1, it is extremely well supplied with bases (V=94.32%. Also, "Goč 1" is rich in humus (8.94%, with relatively high content of total N (0.47%, and favorable C:N ratio (11.0. It is extremely well supplied with available phosphorus and potassium (>50 cmol(+ x kg–1. Further research regarding stability of this artificial substrate and alterations of its physical, chemical, and biochemical properties in the course of exploitation, together with

  16. Children’s Day-Care Centre (EVE) and School kicked off the school year 2016-2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    It has been 54 years already, ever since the Nursery school was founded in March 1961, that the Staff Association together with the teachers, the managerial and the administrative staff, welcomes your children at the start of the school year. On Tuesday, 30 August 2016, the Children’s Day-Care Centre (EVE) and School opened its doors again for children between four months and six years old. The start of the school year was carried out gradually and in small groups to allow quality interaction between children, professionals and parents. This year, our structure will accommodate about 130 children divided between the nursery, the kindergarten and the school. Throughout the school year, the children will work on the theme of colours, which will be the common thread linking all our activities. Our team is comprised of 38 people: the headmistress, the deputy headmistress, 2 secretaries, 13 educators, 4 teachers, 11 teaching assistants, 2 nursery assistants and 4 canteen workers. The team is delighted...

  17. Revealing critical mechanisms of BR-mediated apple nursery tree growth using iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liwei; Ma, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lizhi; Gao, Cai; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Caiping; Han, Mingyu

    2017-12-19

    Brassinosteroid is identified as an important hormone. However, information about brassinosteroid has not been fully elucidated, and few studies concerned its role in apple. The aim of this work was to study the role of brassinosteroid for apple tree growth. In our study, the effect of brassinosteroid on apple nursery tree was analyzed. The biomass, cell size and xylem content of apple nursery tree were obviously evaluated by brassinosteroid treatment; mineral elements contents, photosynthesis indexes, carbohydrate level and hormone contents were significantly high in brassinosteroid treated trees. To explore the molecular mechanisms of these phenotypic differences, iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics were used to identify the expression profiles of proteins in apple nursery tree shoot tips in response to brassinosteroid at a key period (14days after brassinosteroid treatment). A total of 175 differentially expressed proteins were identified. They were mainly involved in chlorophyII biosynthesis, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, glycolysis, citric acid cycle, respiratory action, hormone signal, cell growth and ligin metabolism. The findings in this study indicate that brassinosteroid mediating apple nursery tree growth may be mainly through energy metabolism. Important biological processes identified here can be useful theoretical basis and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of brassinosteroid. Brassinosteroid is very important for plant growth and development. However, the molecular mechanism of brassinosteroid mediating growth process is not perfectly clear in plant, especially in apple nursery tree. We used a combination of physiological and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the effects of brassinosteroid on apple nursery tree growth and development. The data reported here demonstrated that brassinosteroid regulates apple nursery tree growth mainly through energy metabolism. Therefore it can provide a theoretical basis from energy

  18. Localisation of nursery areas based on comparative analyses of the horizontal and vertical distribution patterns of juvenile Baltic cod (Gadus morhua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rasmus Nielsen

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the spatial distribution of juvenile cod is essential for obtaining precise recruitment data to conduct sustainable management of the eastern and western Baltic cod stocks. In this study, the horizontal and vertical distribution and density patterns of settled juvenile 0- and 1-group Baltic cod are determined, and their nursery areas are localised according to the environmental factors affecting them. Comparative statistical analyses of biological, hydrographic and hydroacoustic data are carried out based on standard ICES demersal trawl surveys and special integrated trawl and acoustic research surveys. Horizontal distribution maps for the 2001-2010 cohorts of juvenile cod are further generated by applying a statistical log-Gaussian Cox process model to the standard trawl survey data. The analyses indicate size-dependent horizontal and distinct vertical and diurnal distribution patterns related to the seabed topography, water layer depth, and the presence of hydrographic frontal zones (pycnoclines as well as intraspecific patterns in relation to the presence of adult cod. The extent of the nursery areas also depends on the cod year class strength. Juvenile cod (≥3 cm are present in all areas of the central Baltic Sea (CBS, showing broad dispersal. However, their highest density in the Baltic Basins is found at localities with a 40-70 m bottom depth in waters with oxygen concentrations above 2 ml O₂.l⁻¹ and temperatures above 5°C. The smallest juveniles are also found in deep sea localities down to a 100 m depth and at oxygen concentrations between 2-4 ml O₂.l⁻¹. The vertical, diurnally stratified and repeated trawling and hydroacoustic target strength-depth distributions obtained from the special surveys show juvenile cod concentrations in frontal zone water layers (pycnocline. However, the analyses indicate that in the CBS, juvenile cod of all sizes do not appear to aggregate in dense schooling patterns, which differs

  19. Localisation of nursery areas based on comparative analyses of the horizontal and vertical distribution patterns of juvenile Baltic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J Rasmus; Lundgren, Bo; Kristensen, Kasper; Bastardie, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution of juvenile cod is essential for obtaining precise recruitment data to conduct sustainable management of the eastern and western Baltic cod stocks. In this study, the horizontal and vertical distribution and density patterns of settled juvenile 0- and 1-group Baltic cod are determined, and their nursery areas are localised according to the environmental factors affecting them. Comparative statistical analyses of biological, hydrographic and hydroacoustic data are carried out based on standard ICES demersal trawl surveys and special integrated trawl and acoustic research surveys. Horizontal distribution maps for the 2001-2010 cohorts of juvenile cod are further generated by applying a statistical log-Gaussian Cox process model to the standard trawl survey data. The analyses indicate size-dependent horizontal and distinct vertical and diurnal distribution patterns related to the seabed topography, water layer depth, and the presence of hydrographic frontal zones (pycnoclines) as well as intraspecific patterns in relation to the presence of adult cod. The extent of the nursery areas also depends on the cod year class strength. Juvenile cod (≥3 cm) are present in all areas of the central Baltic Sea (CBS), showing broad dispersal. However, their highest density in the Baltic Basins is found at localities with a 40-70 m bottom depth in waters with oxygen concentrations above 2 ml O₂.l⁻¹ and temperatures above 5°C. The smallest juveniles are also found in deep sea localities down to a 100 m depth and at oxygen concentrations between 2-4 ml O₂.l⁻¹. The vertical, diurnally stratified and repeated trawling and hydroacoustic target strength-depth distributions obtained from the special surveys show juvenile cod concentrations in frontal zone water layers (pycnocline). However, the analyses indicate that in the CBS, juvenile cod of all sizes do not appear to aggregate in dense schooling patterns, which differs from what has

  20. Effect of Family Supported Pre-Reading Training Program Given to Children in Preschool Education Period on Reading Success in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuktaskapu, Sema

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effect of Family Supported Pre-Reading Program developed for 6 year olds attending nursery school on children's reading success in the future was examined. In order to fulfill this aim, reading skills of 25 primary school first-grade pupils who participated Family Supported Pre-Reading Program were compared with another 25…

  1. Shallow rocky nursery habitat for fish: Spatial variability of juvenile fishes among this poorly protected essential habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheminée, Adrien; Rider, Mary; Lenfant, Philippe; Zawadzki, Audrey; Mercière, Alexandre; Crec'hriou, Romain; Mercader, Manon; Saragoni, Gilles; Neveu, Reda; Ternon, Quentin; Pastor, Jérémy

    2017-06-15

    Coastal nursery habitats are essential for the renewal of adult fish populations. We quantified the availability of a coastal nursery habitat (shallow heterogeneous rocky bottoms) and the spatial variability of its juvenile fish populations along 250km of the Catalan coastline (France and Spain). Nurseries were present in 27% of the coastline, but only 2% of them benefited from strict protection status. For nine taxa characteristic of this habitat, total juvenile densities varied significantly between nursery sites along the coastline, with the highest densities being found on the northern sites. Recruitment level (i.e. a proxy of nursery value) was not explained by protection level, but it was moderately and positively correlated with an anthropization index. Patterns of spatial variations were taxa-specific. Exceptional observations of four juveniles of the protected grouper Epinephelus marginatus were recorded. Our data on habitat availability and recruitment levels provides important informations which help to focus MPA management efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Batman and Batwoman Go to School: Popular Culture in the Literacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jackie

    1999-01-01

    This case study investigated the introduction of a theme from popular culture into a sociodramatic role-play area in a northern England Nursery Infant school, focusing on its effects on 6- to 7-year olds' literacy activities. Findings indicated that the incorporation of themes from popular culture into the curriculum motivated children whose…

  3. The daily of an school of early childhood education: sharing experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Souza Broering

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Assuming the difficulty of talking about the experience and want to say without a model, this report presents the experience lived and shared by professionals, children and families of the "Creche Municipal Nossa Senhora Aparecida" known as nursery school "Pantanal".

  4. Spatio-temporal dynamics of cod nursery areas in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichsen, H.-H.; von Dewitz, B.; Lehmann, A.; Bergström, U.; Hüssy, K.

    2017-06-01

    In this study the drift of eastern Baltic cod larvae and juveniles spawned within the historical eastern Baltic cod spawning grounds was investigated by detailed drift model simulations for the years 1971-2010, to examine the spatio-temporal dynamics of environmental suitability in the nursery areas of juvenile cod settlement. The results of the long-term model scenario runs, where juvenile cod were treated as simulated passively drifting particles, enabled us to find strong indications for long-term variations of settlement and potentially the reproduction success of the historically important eastern Baltic cod nursery grounds. Only low proportions of juveniles hatched in the Arkona Basin and in the Gotland Basin were able to settle in their respective spawning ground. Ocean currents were either unfavorable for the juveniles to reach suitable habitats or transported the juveniles to nursery grounds of neighboring subdivisions. Juveniles which hatched in the Bornholm Basin were most widely dispersed and showed the highest settlement probability, while the second highest settlement probability and horizontal dispersal was observed for juveniles originating from the Gdansk Deep. In a long-term perspective, wind-driven transport of larvae/juveniles positively affected the settlement success predominately in the Bornholm Basin and in the Bay of Gdansk. The Bornholm Basin has the potential to contribute on average 54% and the Bay of Gdansk 11% to the production of juveniles in the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, transport of juveniles surviving to the age of settlement with origin in the Bornholm Basin contributed on average 13 and 11% to the total settlement in the Arkona Basin and in the Gdansk Deep, respectively. The time-series of the simulated occupied juvenile cod habitat in the Bornholm Basin and in the Gdansk Deep showed a similar declining trend as the Fulton's K condition factor of demersal 1-group cod, which may confirm the importance of oxygen-dependent habitat

  5. Environmental influences on potential recruitment of pink shrimp, Fatlantopenaeus duorarum, from Florida Bay nursery grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browder, Joan A.; Restrepo, V.R.; Rice, J.K.; Robblee, M.B.; Zein-Eldin, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Two modeling approaches were used to explore the basis for variation in recruitment of pink shrimp, Farfantepenaeus duorarum, to the Tortugas fishing grounds. Emphasis was on development and juvenile densities on the nursery grounds. An exploratory simulation modeling exercise demonstrated large year-to-year variations in recruitment contributions to the Tortugas rink shrimp fishery may occur on some nursery grounds, and production may differ considerably among nursery grounds within the same year, simply on the basis of differences in temperature and salinity. We used a growth and survival model to simulate cumulative harvests from a July-centered cohort of early-settlement-stage postlarvae from two parts of Florida Bay (western Florida Bay and northcentral Florida Bay), using historic temperature and salinity data from these areas. Very large year-to-year differences in simulated cumulative harvests were found for recruits from Whipray Basin. Year-to-year differences in simulated harvests of recruits from Johnson Key Basin were much smaller. In a complementary activity, generalized linear and additive models and intermittent, historic density records were used to develop an uninterrupted multi-year time series of monthly density estimates for juvenile rink shrimp in the Johnson Key Basin. The developed data series was based on relationships of density with environmental variables. The strongest relationship was with sea-surface temperature. Three other environmental variables (rainfall, water level at Everglades National Park Well P35, and mean wind speed) also contributed significantly to explaining variation in juvenile densities. Results of the simulation model and two of the three statistical models yielded similar interannual patterns for Johnson Key Basin. While it is not possible to say that one result validates the other, the concordance of the annual patterns from the two models is supportive of both approaches.

  6. Walnut Twig Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) Colonization of Eastern Black Walnut Nursery Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audley, Jackson; Klingeman, William E; Mayfield, Albert; Myers, Scott; Taylor, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Thousand cankers disease, caused by the invasive bark beetle Pityophthorus juglandis Blackman and an associated fungal pathogen Geosmithia morbida M.Kolařík, E. Freeland, C. Utley, N. Tisserat, currently threatens the health of eastern black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) in North America. Both the beetle and pathogen have expanded beyond their native range via transport of infested walnut wood. Geosmithia morbida can develop in seedlings following inoculation, but the ability of P. juglandis to colonize young, small diameter trees has not been investigated. This study assessed the beetle's colonization behavior on J. nigra nursery trees. Beetles were caged directly onto the stems of walnut seedlings from five nursery sources representing a range of basal stem diameter classes. Seedlings were also exposed to P. juglandis in a limited choice, field-based experiment comparing pheromone-baited and unbaited stems. When beetles were caged directly onto stems, they probed and attempted to colonize seedlings across the range of diameters and across sources tested, including stems as small as 0.5 cm in diameter. In the field experiment, beetles only attempted to colonize seedlings that were baited with a pheromone lure and appeared to prefer (though not statistically significant) the larger diameter trees. Despite several successful penetrations into the phloem, there was no evidence of successful progeny development within the young trees in either experiment. Further investigation is recommended to better elucidate the risk nursery stock poses as a pathway for thousand cankers disease causal organisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  7. Optimisation of mesh enclosures for nursery rearing of juvenile sea cucumbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Steven W; Agudo, Natacha S

    2013-01-01

    Mariculture of tropical sea cucumbers is promising, but the nursery rearing of juveniles is a bottleneck for farming and sea ranching. We conducted four medium-scale experiments lasting 3-6 weeks, using thousands of cultured juvenile sandfish Holothuria scabra, to optimise nursery rearing in mesh enclosures in earthen seawater ponds and to test rearing in enclosures in the sea. In one experiment, survival in fine-mesh enclosures (1 m(3); 660-µm mesh) related nonlinearly to juvenile size, revealing a threshold body length of 5-8 mm for initial transfer from hatchery tanks. Survival in enclosures within ponds in the other experiments ranged from 78-97%, and differences in growth rates among experiments were explained largely by seasonal differences in seawater temperatures in ponds. Stripped shadecloth units within fine-mesh enclosures increased feeding surfaces and improved growth rates by >15%. On the other hand, shading over the enclosures may lower growth rates. Following the rearing in fine-mesh enclosures, small juveniles (0.5 to 1 g) were grown to stocking size (3-10 g) in coarse-mesh enclosures of 1-mm mesh. Sand or mud added to coarse-mesh enclosures did not significantly improve growth compared to controls without sediment. Survival of sandfish juveniles in coarse-mesh enclosures set on the benthos within seagrass beds differed between two sheltered bays and growth was slow compared to groups within the same type of enclosures in an earthen pond. Our findings should lead to significant improvement in the cost-effectiveness of rearing sandfish juveniles to a stocking size compared to established methods and highlight the need for further research into nursery systems in the sea.

  8. Spawning and nursery habitats of neotropical fish species in the tributaries of a regulated river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrakis, Maristela Cavicchioli; da Silva, Patrícia S.; Makrakis, Sergio; de Lima, Ariane F.; de Assumpção, Lucileine; de Paula, Salete; Miranda, Leandro E.; Dias, João Henrique Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides information on ontogenetic patterns of neotropical fish species distribution in tributaries (Verde, Pardo, Anhanduí, and Aguapeí rivers) of the Porto Primavera Reservoir, in the heavily dammed Paraná River, Brazil, identifying key spawning and nursery habitats. Samplings were conducted monthly in the main channel of rivers and in marginal lagoons from October through March during three consecutive spawning seasons in 2007-2010. Most species spawn in December especially in Verde River. Main river channels are spawning habitats and marginal lagoons are nursery areas for most fish, mainly for migratory species. The tributaries have high diversity of larvae species: a total of 56 taxa representing 21 families, dominated by Characidae. Sedentary species without parental care are more abundant (45.7%), and many long-distance migratory fish species are present (17.4%). Migrators included Prochilodus lineatus, Rhaphiodon vulpinus, Hemisorubim platyrhynchos, Pimelodus maculatus, Pseudoplatystoma corruscans, Sorubim lima, two threatened migratory species: Salminus brasiliensis and Zungaro jahu, and one endangered migratory species: Brycon orbignyanus. Most of these migratory species are vital to commercial and recreational fishing, and their stocks have decreased drastically in the last decades, attributed to habitat alteration, especially impoundments. The fish ladder at Porto Primavera Dam appears to be playing an important role in re-establishing longitudinal connectivity among critical habitats, allowing ascent to migratory fish species, and thus access to upstream reaches and tributaries. Establishment of Permanent Conservation Units in tributaries can help preserve habitats identified as essential spawning and nursery areas, and can be key to the maintenance and conservation of the fish species in the Paraná River basin.

  9. EVE and School

    CERN Multimedia

    EVE et École

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANT DATES Enrolments 2017-2018 Enrolments for the school year 2017-2018 to the Nursery, the Kindergarten and the School will take place on 6, 7 and 8 March 2017 from 10 am to 1 pm at EVE and School. Registration forms will be available from Thursday 2nd March. More information on the website: http://nurseryschool.web.cern.ch/. Saturday 4 March 2017 Open day at EVE and School of CERN Staff Association Are you considering enrolling your child to the Children’s Day-Care Centre EVE and School of the CERN Staff Association? If you work at CERN, then this event is for you: come visit the school and meet the Management on Saturday 4 March 2017 from 10 to 12 am We look forward to welcoming you and will be delighted to present our structure, its projects and premises to you, and answer all of your questions. Sign up for one of the two sessions on Doodle via the link below before Wednesday 1st March 2017 : http://doodle.com/poll/gbrz683wuvixk8as

  10. Solarization of reused pots is an inexpensive and efficient method to eliminate Phytophthora cactorum and other serious soilborne Phytophthora spp. found in production nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Suslow; S. Sharma; K. Kosta; Kristina Weber; S. Rooney-Latham

    2017-01-01

    The reuse of plant pots by nursery growers has repeatedly been shown to be a method by which transfer of plant pathogens within a nursery will occur. More critically, this practice is an efficient pathway to infest landscape settings or habitat restoration sites by the out-planting of pre-symptomatic infected plant material. The transfer of water molds (oomycetes),...

  11. The Differential Role of Symptoms of Anxiety and Social Withdrawal in Chinese Children's Dependency on Their Teachers during the Transition to Nursery Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: Based on a short-term longitudinal sample of Chinese children, the present study examined the role of symptoms of anxiety and social withdrawal in dependency on teachers during the transition to nursery care. Children's dependency on their teachers was assessed first at 3 months after nursery entry (Time 1) and then at the end…

  12. Thermal inactivation of infested plants, nursery equipment, and soil is a management option for the treatment of Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang Schweigkofler; Vernon Huffman; Karen Suslow; Kathleen Kosta

    2017-01-01

    Infected nursery plants play an important role in the spread of Phytophthora ramorum , the causal agent of sudden oak death and ramorum blight. In order to minimize the risk for disease transmission to new areas, nurseries are inspected regularly for P. ramorum , and federal regulations require the eradication of...

  13. Report on hard red spring wheat varieties grown in cooperative plot and nursery experiments in the spring wheat region in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hard Red Spring Wheat Uniform Regional Nursery (HRSWURN) was planted for the 80th year in 2008. The nursery contained 37 entries submitted by 13 different scientific or industry breeding programs, and 5 checks. Trials were conducted as randomized complete blocks with three replicates except wher...

  14. Report on hard red spring wheat varieties grown in cooperative plot and nursery experiments in the spring wheat region in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hard Red Spring Wheat Uniform Regional Nursery (HRSWURN) was planted for the 83rd year in 2013. The nursery contained 29 entries submitted by 7 different scientific or industry breeding programs, and 5 checks (Table 1). Trials were conducted as randomized complete blocks with three replicates ex...

  15. Report on Hard Red Spring Wheat Varieties Grown in Cooperative Plot and Nursery Experiments in the Spring Wheat Region in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hard Red Spring Wheat Uniform Regional Nursery (HRSWURN) was planted for the 81st year in 2009. The nursery contained 32 entries submitted by 8 different scientific or industry breeding programs, and 5 checks. Trials were conducted as randomized complete blocks with three replicates except where...

  16. Report on hard red spring wheat varieties grown in cooperative plot and nursery experiments in the spring wheat region in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hard Red Spring Wheat Uniform Regional Nursery (HRSWURN) was planted for the 86th year in 2016. The nursery contained 26 entries submitted by 8 different scientific or industry breeding programs, and 5 checks (Table 1). Trials were conducted as randomized complete blocks with three replicates ...

  17. Report on hard red spring wheat varieties grown in cooperative plot and nursery experiments in the spring wheat region in 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hard Red Spring Wheat Uniform Regional Nursery (HRSWURN) was planted for the 84th year in 2014. The nursery contained 26 entries submitted by 6 different scientific or industry breeding programs, and 5 checks (Table 1). Trials were conducted as randomized complete blocks with three replicates ex...

  18. Report on hard red spring wheat varieties grown in cooperative plot and nursery experiments in the spring wheat region in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hard Red Spring Wheat Uniform Regional Nursery (HRSWURN) was planted for the 82nd year in 2010. The nursery contained 32 entries submitted by 7 different scientific or industry breeding programs, and 5 checks. Trials were conducted as randomized complete blocks with three replicates except where...

  19. Effect of seed position and media on germination of black walnut and northern red oak: implications for nursery production and direct seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Davis; Barrett C. Wilson; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2004-01-01

    Germination of black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) and northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) prior to sowing into containers or bareroot nursery beds can help maintain desired crop density and reduce nursery costs. Recommended techniques for germination of black walnut are labor intensive and require that walnuts be completely covered...

  20. Characteristics and diversity of Rhizoctonia spp. population in soil of selected forest bare-root nurseries in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Bełka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fourty three Rhizoctonia isolates obtained from four forest nurseries situated in the Wielkopolska region (central-western Poland has been proved as multinucleate (anamorph – R. solani. They represented four anastomosis groups (AG: AG1-IC, AG-5, AG4-HG2 and AG2-1. Three AGs were found in Jarocin nursery (AG-5, AG4-HG2 and AG2-1, two in Łopuchówko (AG-5 and AG4-HG2 and one in Konstantynowo (AG1-IC and Pniewy (AG-5. All isolates were highly pathogenic to Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris seedlings and pose a large damping-off threat to the seedlings in the nurseries with single AG and in those where more AGs exists.

  1. Ergonomic adequacy of the baby nursery of child development center located in UFSC - Florianópolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Lizandra Garcia Lupi; Ribet, Lucie Elisa

    2012-01-01

    A study in the educators' work station at baby nursery of NDI/UFSC, located in Florianópolis, was conducted using the Work Ergonomic Analysis methodological tool. The demand considered was the educators' physical exhaustion caused by the weight carried when taking care of the babies, the postures assumed during the labor activity and the spatial arrangement of the baby nursery. Thinking ergonomically, the spatial arrangement is directly associated to three factors: the formal aspect of the environment, the esthetic aspect including colors and finish quality and the ease of understanding involved in the baby nursery labor. By the ergonomic adequacy it is possible to assert that if were established better conditions of posture and comfort for the educators, as well as satisfactory technical and operational information to carry out the activities, greater safety and welfare would be provided to the babies, the main focus of the work.

  2. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: improvements in performance, thermal comfort, and electricity use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Sartor, Karina

    2016-08-01

    The use of smarter temperature control technologies in heating systems can optimize the use of electric power and performance of piglets. Two control technologies of a resistive heating system were assessed in a pig nursery: a PID (proportional, integral, and derivative) controller and a thermostat. The systems were evaluated regarding thermal environment, piglet performance, and use of electric power for 99 days. The heating system with PID controller improved the thermal environment conditions and was significantly (P PID-controlled heating system is more efficient in electricity use and provides better conditions for thermal comfort and animal performance than heating with thermostat.

  3. Evaluation of Two Moringa oleifera Lam Varieties Using Different Substrates in Nursery Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damisela Pacheco Veiga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A nursery study was made on brown soil with typical carbonate to evaluate agroproductive behavior of Plain and Supergenious Moringa oleifera Lam varieties, using different substrates. Three substrates were studied (worm castings, decomposed cattle manure and compost, using a randomized block experimental design, with 8 treatments and three replicas. The evaluation included the amount of leaves 30 days after germination, plant height until transplantation every ten days and at 30 days, stem diameter, and root length and diameter. The best results were achieved with soil + wormcast in the two varieties.

  4. Growth and nutrition of ‘Imperial’ pineapple nursery plants associated with the fungus Piriformospora indica and herbicide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lana Ivone Barreto Cruz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The low supply of healthy and quality nursery plants has been an obstacle to the growth of pineapple crop in Brazil. The research was carried out with the aim of evaluating mycorrhizal association, growth and nutrient uptake of ‘Imperial’ micropropagated pineapple plants inoculated with the fungus Piriformospora indica in cultivation with herbicide application. The 2 x 4 factorial scheme was used, being the factors the two inoculations: inoculated nursery plants with the fungus P. indica and without inoculation and four doses of herbicides: 0, 1.5, 3.0 and 6.0 L ha-1 for ametryn, 0, 1.6, 3.2, 6.4 L ha-1 for diuron and 0, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 L ha-1 for sulfametrazone distributed in a completely randomized design with three replications. The doses of herbicides were applied to substrate before planting. The inoculation with the fungus P. indica was made at the time of planting, placing in the substrate 5 mm mycelial discs containing fungal structures. At 150 days after inoculation evaluations were made by analysis of colonization, determination of N, P and K levels and of nursery plants growth. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and regression. The association of fungus P. indica with ‘Imperial’ pineapple nursery plants was observed with the application of all herbicides. ‘Imperial’ pineapple nursery plants associated with P. indica fungus showed higher levels of nutrients and growth. The use of herbicides in high doses interfered in growth and nutrient uptake by mycorrhizal pineapple nursery plants.

  5. Effect of cleaning and disinfection of toys on infectious diseases and micro-organisms in daycare nurseries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibfelt, T.; Engelund, E. H.; Schultz, Anna Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rising number of children in daycare nurseries increases opportunities for the transmission of infectious diseases. Pathogens may be transmitted directly from child to child via sneezing, coughing and touching, or indirectly via the environment. Toys are among the fomites with the......Background: The rising number of children in daycare nurseries increases opportunities for the transmission of infectious diseases. Pathogens may be transmitted directly from child to child via sneezing, coughing and touching, or indirectly via the environment. Toys are among the fomites...

  6. PID temperature controller in pig nursery: spatial characterization of thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Granja Barros, Juliana; Rossi, Luiz Antonio; Menezes de Souza, Zigomar

    2017-11-28

    The use of enhanced technologies of temperature control can improve the thermal conditions in environments of livestock facilities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of the thermal environment variables in a pig nursery with a heating system with two temperature control technologies based on the geostatistical analysis. The following systems were evaluated: overhead electrical resistance with Proportional, Integral, and Derivative (PID) controller and overhead electrical resistance with a thermostat. We evaluated the climatic variables: dry bulb temperature (Tbs), air relative humidity (RH), temperature and humidity index (THI), and enthalpy in the winter, at 7:00, 12:00, and 18:00 h. The spatial distribution of these variables was mapped by kriging. The results showed that the resistance heating system with PID controllers improved the thermal comfort conditions in the pig nursery in the coldest hours, maintaining the spatial distribution of the air temperature more homogeneous in the pen. During the hottest weather, neither system provided comfort.

  7. Nursery Growing Media: Agronomic and Environmental Quality Assessment of Sewage Sludge-Based Compost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a stringent need to reduce the environmental impact of peat in the plant nursery production chain. In this experiment, the use of different rates of sewage sludge compost in the preparation of growing media for potted Bougainvillea was evaluated to assess its efficiency for the replacement of peat and to quantify the environmental impact of such alternative substrates by the life cycle assessment (LCA method. Five substrates containing increasing proportion of composted sewage sludge to peat (0%, 25%, 40%, 55%, and 70% v/v were used, and their physicochemical properties were measured. Bougainvillea plant growth, biomass production, and macro- and micronutrient absorption were also determined. The main results were that compost addition improved the plant nutrient and increased the substrate pH, electrical conductivity (EC, and dry bulk density values. Globally, the results showed that compost could be used at up to 55% by volume with no negative effects on plant growth. The LCA showed that use of compost reduced the environmental loads of the growth media, except the Global Warming Potential value (GWP100. Environmental implications of the use of compost in the plant nursery chain are discussed.

  8. Best Management Practices for Minimizing Nitrate Leaching from Container-Grown Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Chen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Containerized plant production represents an extremely intensive agricultural practice; 40,000 to 300,000 containers may occupy one acre of surface area to which a large amount of chemical fertilizer is applied. Currently, recommended fertilizer application rates for the production of containerized nursery ornamental plants are in excess of plant requirements, and up to 50% of the applied fertilizers may run off or be leached from containers. Among the nutrients leached or allowed to runoff, nitrogen (N is the most abundant and is of major concern as the source of ground and surface water pollution. In this report, current N fertilizer application rates for different container-grown nursery ornamental plants, the amount of nitrate leaching or runoff from containers, and the potential for nitrate contamination of ground and surface water are discussed. In contrast, our best N management practices include: (1 applying fertilizers based on plant species need; (2 improving potting medium�s nutrient holding capacity using obscure mineral additives; (3 using controlled-release fertilizers; and (4 implementing zero runoff irrigation or fertigation delivery systems that significantly reduce nitrate leaching or runoff in containerized plant production and encourage dramatic changes in N management.

  9. Crinivirus and begomovirus detection in tomato plantlets and weeds associated to nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ántony Solórzano Morales

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to detect plant infections caused by Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV and begomovirus in tomato plantlets, and in growing weeds around nursery greenhouses. During one year, starting in April 2008, 168 leaf tissue samples were collected, 90 tomato plantlets and 78 weeds from three different nurseries in Cartago province, Costa Rica. Reverse transcription and real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was used to determine that 18,9% of tomato plantlets and 7,7% of weeds were infected with ToCV virus. Begomoviruses were detected using Dot Blot hybridization and non-radioactive probe. Next, hybridization results were confirmed using Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA followed by PCR, using universal primers. None tomato plantlet resulted positive when tested, but there were six weeds infected; in fact, Phytolacca icosandra and Brassica sp. were both coinfected with ToCV virus. These results suggest that ToCV infected tomato plantlets when commercialized, could serve as way of virus introduction to other country regions. Finally, weeds growing around greenhouses have shown to be potential viral sources of ToCV and begomovirus.

  10. Nursery function of coastal temperate benthic habitats: New insight from the bivalve recruitment perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Pierrick; Meziane, Tarik; Forêt, Martin; Tremblay, Réjean; Robert, René; Olivier, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    Marine habitat function has been typically investigated in terms of biogeochemical regulation but rarely in terms of population renewal, which is mainly controlled by recruitment dynamics. The recruitment phase is crucial for organisms with a bentho-pelagic life cycle, such as bivalves, and it regulates the population renewal success. This study provides new insight on the role of temperate benthic habitats on bivalve recruitment, as a function of nursery areas. Six dominant benthic habitats of the Chausey archipelago (Normandy, France) were studied. In each habitat, bivalve recruit assemblages were described at the end of two reproductive seasons. Furthermore, Ostrea edulis juveniles were immerged on each habitat during two months to compare growth performances and feeding status, estimated by fatty acid composition. Recruit assemblages differ from each habitat according to sediment grain-size composition and bathymetrical levels. Subtidal habitats, and especially Crepidula fornicata banks and Glycymeris glycymeris coarse sands, supported the highest species abundance and richness of recruits. All O. edulis juveniles fed on the same trophic resources but digestive glands of juveniles from C. fornicata banks were more concentrated in total fatty acids than those from subtidal G. glycymeris coarse sands and maerl banks. Our results depict the key role of subtidal and structured habitats, composed of ecosystem engineers, in enhancing bivalve recruitment and extending the bivalve population renewal. This study suggests that the crucial role of these habitats as bivalve nurseries must be integrated in management perspectives.

  11. Intergenerational transmission of attachment for infants raised in a prison nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M W; Goshin, L S; Joestl, S S

    2010-07-01

    Within a larger intervention study, attachment was assessed with the Strange Situation Procedure for 30 infants who co-resided with their mothers in a prison nursery. Sixty percent of infants were classified secure, 75% who co-resided a year or more and 43% who co-resided less than a year, all within the range of normative community samples. The year-long co-residing group had significantly more secure and fewer disorganized infants than predicted by their mothers' attachment status, measured by the Adult Attachment Interview, and a significantly greater proportion of secure infants than meta-analyzed community samples of mothers with low income, depression, or drug/alcohol abuse. Using intergenerational data collected with rigorous methods, this study provides the first evidence that mothers in a prison nursery setting can raise infants who are securely attached to them at rates comparable to healthy community children, even when the mother's own internal attachment representation has been categorized as insecure.

  12. A low-cost drone based application for identifying and mapping of coastal fish nursery grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Daniele; Bruno, Michele; Jona Lasinio, Giovanna; Belluscio, Andrea; Ardizzone, Giandomenico

    2016-03-01

    Acquiring seabed, landform or other topographic data in the field of marine ecology has a pivotal role in defining and mapping key marine habitats. However, accessibility for this kind of data with a high level of detail for very shallow and inaccessible marine habitats has been often challenging, time consuming. Spatial and temporal coverage often has to be compromised to make more cost effective the monitoring routine. Nowadays, emerging technologies, can overcome many of these constraints. Here we describe a recent development in remote sensing based on a small unmanned drone (UAVs) that produce very fine scale maps of fish nursery areas. This technology is simple to use, inexpensive, and timely in producing aerial photographs of marine areas. Both technical details regarding aerial photos acquisition (drone and camera settings) and post processing workflow (3D model generation with Structure From Motion algorithm and photo-stitching) are given. Finally by applying modern algorithm of semi-automatic image analysis and classification (Maximum Likelihood, ECHO and Object-based Image Analysis) we compared the results of three thematic maps of nursery area for juvenile sparid fishes, highlighting the potential of this method in mapping and monitoring coastal marine habitats.

  13. GROWTH OF Jacaranda puberula Cham. SEEDLINGS IN NURSERY UNDER DIFFERENT SHADING LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lausanne Soraya de Almeida

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Jacaranda puberula, known as caroba, is a species that presents potential use for the recovery of degraded areas, since it possesses fast growth and adapts well to sandy and loamy soils. It presents great aggressiveness in secondary forests and it can be used as urban tree because it produces beautiful lilac flowers. With the intention of obtaining information about potential species for use in recovery of riparian forest, were tested in the nursery of the city hall of the municipal district of Colombo, the development of seedlings of Jacaranda puberula submitted at 30, 50 and 70% of shading. There were used 40 seedlings by treatment and there were evaluated the following parameters: height (60, 90 and 120 days and diameter (90 and 120 days of all seedlings, leaf area and root and shoot dry weight of 6 seedlings per treatment. The largest averages of the analyzed variables were obtained for the 30% shading, except for root dry weight.  The seedlings exposed to full sun presented high mortality rate and was not compared to the others. The smallest averages of the analyzed variables, except for height, were observed for the shading of 70%, indicating that this treatment is not advisable for the production of seedlings of this species in nursery. The best condition for planting the seedlings appears to be in open areas with shading of 30 to 50%, since its natural occurrence is not at full exposure.

  14. Population Dynamics and Dispersal of Aphelenchoides fragariae in Nursery-grown Lantana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Lisa M.; Warfield, Colleen Y.; Benson, D. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Population dynamics of Aphelenchoides fragariae were assessed over three growing seasons and during overwintering for naturally-infected, container-grown lantana (Latana camara) plants in a North Carolina nursery. During the growing season, the foliar nematode population in symptomatic leaves peaked in July each year then remained above 100 nematodes/g fresh weight into late summer. Foliar nematodes were also detected in asymptomatic and abscised leaves. Results suggest that leaves infected with foliar nematodes first develop symptoms at populations of about 10 nematodes/g. Foliar nematodes were detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic plant leaves and in abscised leaves during overwintering in a polyhouse, but the number of infected plants was low. A steep disease gradient was found for infection of lantana plants by A. fragariae on a nursery pad with sprinkler irrigation. When the canopies of initially healthy plants were touching the canopies of an infected plants, 100% of the plants became infected within 11 wk, but only 5 to 10% became infected at a canopy distance of 30 cm. Overwintering of A. fragariae in infected plants and a steep disease gradient during the growing season suggests strict sanitation and an increase in plant spacing are needed to mitigate losses from this nematode pest. PMID:22736867

  15. Biocontrol of Phytophthora infestans, Fungal Pathogen of Seedling Damping Off Disease in Economic Plant Nursery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Loliam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to control Seedling damping off disease in plants by using antagonistic actinomycetes against the causative fungi. Phytophthora infestans was isolated from the infected tomato plant seedling obtained from an economic plant nursery in Amphoe Pak Chong, Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand. The chitinolytic Streptomyces rubrolavendulae S4, isolated from termite mounds at the grove of Amphoe Si-Sawat, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand, was proven to be the most effective growth inhibition of fungal pathogens tested on potato dextrose agar. Tomato and chili seedlings that colonized with antagonistic S. rubrolavendulae S4 were grown in P. infestans artificial inoculated peat moss. Percents of noninfested seedling in fungal contaminated peat moss were compared to the controls with uninoculated peat moss. In P. infestans contaminated peat moss, the percents of survival of tomato and chili seedling were significantly increased (0.05. It was clearly demonstrated that S. rubrolavendulae S4 can prevent the tomato and chili seedling damping off disease in economic plant nurseries.

  16. Effects of pesticide application on arthropod pests of nursery-grown maples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Julia; Quesada, Carlos; Sadof, Clifford

    2014-04-01

    Insecticides used against potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris) (Homoptera: Cicadellidae), have been reported to cause problems with maple spider mite, Oligonychus aceris (Shimer) (Acarina: Tetranychidae), on nursery-grown 'Red Sunset' red maple and 'Autumn Blaze' Freeman maple. To test this, we conducted two experiments on field-grown trees in nurseries. In the first, the effects of early-season pesticide applications were examined during 2009. The second experiment was conducted in 2010 to compare effects of using threshold levels of one, three, or six leafhoppers per branch to time applications. Pesticide applications reduced abundance and damage by leafhoppers in both cultivars, but increased populations of O. aceris on Autumn Blaze during 2009. In contrast, on Red Sunset, populations of O. aceris did not increase after insecticide applications. In 2010, insecticide applications did not increase abundance of O. aceris on Autumn Blaze because use of treatment thresholds to manage leafhoppers greatly reduced numbers of trees requiring treatment for leafhoppers. Two phytoseiid mites, Neoseiulus fallacis (Garman) and Typhlodromus caudiglans (Schuster), and one stigmaeid, Zetzellia mali (Ewing), were identified as the principal predators of O. aceris on maple leaves. Insecticide applications had no significant effects on the total abundance of predatory mites on either Red Sunset or Autumn Blaze maples in 2009 or 2010. However, populations of predator Z. mali were higher during both years on Red Sunset than on Autumn Blaze. These results suggest that both early-season pesticide use and cultivar can affect the likelihood of secondary outbreaks of spider mites on maples.

  17. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana; Folkesson, Anders; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2017-06-15

    This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis -induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in livestock

  18. Effect of Tetracycline Dose and Treatment Mode on Selection of Resistant Coliform Bacteria in Nursery Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Damborg, Peter; Mellerup, Anders; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Larsen, Inge; Holm, Anders; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Angen, Øystein; Ahmed, Shahana

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes the results of a randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of oxytetracycline treatment dose and mode of administration on the selection of antibiotic-resistant coliform bacteria in fecal samples from nursery pigs. Nursery pigs (pigs of 4 to 7 weeks of age) in five pig herds were treated with oxytetracycline for Lawsonia intracellularis-induced diarrhea. Each group was randomly allocated to one of five treatment groups: oral flock treatment with a (i) high (20 mg/kg of body weight), (ii) medium (10 mg/kg), or (iii) low (5 mg/kg) dose, (iv) oral pen-wise (small-group) treatment (10 mg/kg), and (v) individual intramuscular injection treatment (10 mg/kg). All groups were treated once a day for 5 days. In all groups, treatment caused a rise in the numbers and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria right after treatment, followed by a significant drop by the time that the pigs left the nursery unit. The counts and proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms did not vary significantly between treatment groups, except immediately after treatment, when the highest treatment dose resulted in the highest number of resistant coliforms. A control group treated with tiamulin did not show significant changes in the numbers or proportions of tetracycline-resistant coliforms. Selection for tetracycline-resistant coliforms was significantly correlated to selection for ampicillin- and sulfonamide-resistant strains but not to selection for cefotaxime-resistant strains. In conclusion, the difference in the dose of oxytetracycline and the way in which the drug was applied did not cause significantly different levels of selection of tetracycline-resistant coliform bacteria under the conditions tested. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance is a global threat to human health. Treatment of livestock with antimicrobials has a direct impact on this problem, and there is a need to improve the ways that we use antimicrobials in

  19. Learning and Development in the Nursery Setting: The Value of Promoting Emergent Information and Communications Technology Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Denise R.; Dunbar, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of computers within the nursery sector and what are viewed as the potential benefits and concerns of introducing young children to computers. It also examines how the computer is introduced and presented to young children and the form it takes. Data collection comprises a number of methods: questionnaires,…

  20. Nursery Cultural Practices and Morphological Arrtibutes of Longleaf Pine Bare-Root Stock as Indicators of Early Field Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyndon E. Hatchell; H. David Muse

    1990-01-01

    Longleaf pine seedlings performed satisfactorily after planting on deep sands in South Carolina in dry years when: (1) They were vertically root-pruned in the nursery. (2) They had 14 or more first-order lateral roots and nonfibrous root systems. (3) They had six or more first-order lateral roots and highly fibrous root systems.