WorldWideScience

Sample records for schools influence student

  1. Factors Influencing High School Students' Career Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mei; Pan, Wei; Newmeyer, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the factors influencing high school students' career aspirations with a study analyzing 141 high school students. The Social Cognitive Career Development Model was utilized to examine the interactive relationships among learning experiences, career self-efficacy, outcome expectations, career interests, and career choices. The…

  2. Alcohol consumption, peer influence and secondary school students' attitudes towards school in Katsit, Kaduna State, Nigeria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anyio, Bahago T

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influences of Alcohol Consumption peer influence and secondary school students attitudes towards school in some selected secondary schools in Katsit, Kafanchan, Kaduna State...

  3. Queries, Influencers and Vocational Interests of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woal, S. Theodore

    1974-01-01

    The study, based on questionnaire results from 207 ninth grade students, investigates: student familiarity with occupations; influencers of their tentative occupational choices; post high school plans; and student queries and concerns pertinent to preparation for entry into a job. (MW)

  4. Factors influencing students' performance in a Brazilian dental school

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erica Tatiane da Silva; Maria de Fátima Nunes; Maria Goretti Queiroz; Cláudio R. Leles

    2010-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to investigate variables that influence student's performance in a retrospective sample including all undergraduate students who entered in a Brazilian dental school, in...

  5. Does Peer Group Identity Influence Absenteeism in High School Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this piece is on exploring questions regarding school organizational structures and cultures and their unintentional encouragement of teenage absenteeism. The organizational structure and culture of a school setting contributes to how students experience the system. School characteristics and culture can influence student absenteeism…

  6. Influence of environment on secondary school students' reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that students' primary school experiences and peer group exert negative influence on their reading effectiveness. There was ... among other things that attention be given to public primary schools in the state and nation to provide students with rich and enabling environment for their future academic growth.

  7. Peer influence on school learning among students of varying socio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined peer Influence on School Learning among students of varying socio-economic backgrounds. One hundred and twenty students (60 males and 60 females) with a mean age 15.1 years were randomly selected from four co-educational Secondary Schools in Ikenne Local Government area of Ogun State.

  8. The Influence of Social Networks on High School Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shanab, Emad; Al-Tarawneh, Heyam

    2015-01-01

    Social networks are becoming an integral part of people's lives. Students are spending much time on social media and are considered the largest category that uses such application. This study tries to explore the influence of social media use, and especially Facebook, on high school students' performance. The study used the GPA of students in four…

  9. [The influencing factors on alienation in high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Sook

    2004-02-01

    This study was performed to identify the influencing factors on alienation among high school students. Data was collected by questionnaires from 550 students of academic and vocational high schools in G city. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, pearson correlation coefficients, and stepwise multiple regression. The scores of alienation among students in financially lower middle class and lower class were higher than those of the upper middle class students, resulting in significant differences(F=6.87, p=.00). A sense of alienation showed a significantly negative correlation with the scores of responding parenting style(r=-.32), family cohesion(r=-.33), school attachment(r=-.51), academic performance(r=-.34), peer relationships(r=-.38), self-control (r=-.43), and social skills(r=-.33). The most powerful predictor of alienation among high school students was school attachment and the variance explained was 26%. A combination of school attachment, self control, peer relationships, family cohesion, demanding parenting style, and academic performance account for 40% of the variance in alienation among high school students. This study suggests that school attachment, self control, peer relationships, family cohesion, demanding parenting style, and academic performance are significant influencing factors on alienation in high school students. Therefore, nursing strategy is needed to manage these revealed factors.

  10. The Influence of Gender on Junior Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is on the influence of gender on junior secondary school student's attitude towards mathematics in Ovia North East local government area of Edo state. The descriptive survey design was employed for the study. The population of the study comprised of all the JSS3 students, a total of Three Thousand Six Hundred ...

  11. The Influence of Gender on Junior Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DrNneka

    Abstract. This paper is on the influence of gender on junior secondary school student's attitude towards mathematics in Ovia North East local government area of Edo state. The descriptive survey design was employed for the study. The population of the study comprised of all the JSS3 students, a total of Three Thousand Six.

  12. Factors Influencing Migrant High School Students to Drop Out or Graduate from High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelken, Ira; Gallo, Kathleen

    Factors influencing migrant students in decisions to drop out or graduate from high school were determined in interviews with 24 dropouts and potential dropouts and 22 students who had graduated. Profiles were compiled on each group. Data were collected from twelfth grade migrant students in northern California. The main appeal of school to the…

  13. Identifying Influencers in High School Student ICT Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Ron; Grant, Kenneth A.; Sawal, Lea

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the role of influencers in Canadian high school student decisions to pursue Information and Communications Technology (ICT) careers and education. With growing rates of retirements of ICT workers expected over the next 10-15 years, industry representatives are concerned that the shortfall in replacement workers will have a…

  14. Teacher Reports of Student Health and Its Influence on Students' School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tara C.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Hollo, Alexandra; Robertson, Rachel E.; Maggin, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Physical health may be an important variable that influences students' behavioral and academic performance in school settings. Poor health status is hypothesized to negatively influence student performance even in the presence of evidence-based practices. In this study, teachers reported their perceptions of students' health status as well as…

  15. Factors influencing career choice among high school students in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugonzibwa, E A; Kikwilu, E N; Rugarabamu, P N; Ntabaye, M K

    2000-06-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that influenced career choice among high school students in Tanzania. The information obtained would be used to formulate effective recruitment strategies and counseling students on their career expectations in dentistry. All 352 high school students who were studying in five randomly selected high schools completed a pre-tested questionnaire containing twenty-four items addressing five factors. Image of a profession (good experiences from the work of professionals, professionals who are attractive to respondents, and professionals who command high respect in the community) was perceived as an important factor in career choice by the majority of respondents (over 88 percent). Work/profession characteristics (knowledge about work to be done, treating patients, giving medicines to patients, helping relatives, etc.) was ranked as the second most important factor, and course characteristics (availability of postgraduate studies, size of annual intake, pass rate, geographic location, etc.) was ranked third. Direct gains and advice from important persons were perceived as least important in career choice.

  16. PARENTAL AND SCHOOL INFLUENCES ON PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN HYDERABAD, PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jamil; Mehraj, Vikram; Jeswani, Gotam Kumar; ur Rehman, Shafiq; Shah, Sayed Masoom; Hamadeh, Randah

    2016-01-01

    Childhood physical activity (PA) is an important determinant of health in adults which is influenced by the environment in and outside of home. We aimed to determine the contribution of parental and school factors on student's PA in this study. This cross sectional study was conducted on students attending public and private schools in Hyderabad, Pakistan. A random sample of 246 girls and 255 boys in grade six to ten were selected from ten schools. The PA was assessed through face to face interviews by using the adapted School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System (SHAPES) questionnaire. 40% of the students either walked to or rode on a cycle to travel to their school and 62% students performed individual exercises after school. They spent 6.2 and 5.3 hours on moderate and hard PA per week. About 57% of the mothers and 47% fathers of the students did some mild to moderate exercise 4 times in the week prior to the interview. Students were physically active if they lived in a nuclear family, had believed they had better athletic ability, participated in sports in and out of school and performed moderate exercises (p students' being physically active both within and outside schools.

  17. Influence of Mothers' Parenting Styles on Self-Regulated Academic Learning among Saudi Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnafea, Tahany; Curtis, David D.

    2017-01-01

    Much of the research on self-regulation has investigated the influence of school settings. However, fewer studies have concentrated on the home environment and its influence on student's academic behaviour in school. The present research investigates the influence of mothers' parenting styles on students' self-regulated learning behaviours in…

  18. INFLUENCE OF STUDENT ENGLISH UTILITY AND TEACHER EFFICACY ON ENGLISH PROFICIENCY OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. ORTEGA-DELA CRUZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning second language considers a number of factors that influence the manner in which the language is taught. Understanding of the learners’ goals and motivation for learning is one. Using descriptive-correlational research design, this study determined the influence of student English utility and teacher efficacy on the students’ English proficiency. A total of 101 students from first year to fourth year level served as the respondents of the study. The study quantified the students’ perception towards English utility and their evaluation of English teacher efficacy which employed a researcher-made survey questionnaire. Results revealed high positive perceptions of students towards English utility. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences in the perceptions of high school students on the efficacy of their English teachers. Correlation coefficients indicated a positive linear relationship among the given variables. The p-value revealed significant relationship of teacher efficacy (r = .691, p-value = .000 and English utility (r = .467, p-value = .000 to students’ English proficiency. Results of regression statistics revealed that English utility has no significant influence on the student English proficiency. Therefore, the main factor that must still be considered then should be the teacher. Finally, there is an explicit indication that high level of teachers’ efficacy performing in teaching has much powerful influence on the English proficiency of high school students. Thus improving the methods of teaching English provides a better way of motivating students to achieve higher levels of proficiency in the future.

  19. Testing a Conception of How School Leadership Influences Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Patten, Sarah; Jantzi, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and reports the results of testing a new conception of how leadership influences student learning ("The Four Paths"). Framework: Leadership influence is conceptualized as flowing along four paths (Rational, Emotions, Organizational, and Family) toward student learning. Each path is populated by multiple…

  20. Smoking experimentation among elementary school students in China: influences from peers, families, and the school environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Huang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate experimentation with smoking among primary school students in China. Data were acquired from a recent survey of 4,073 students in grades 4 to 6 (ages 9-12 in 11 primary schools of Ningbo City. The questions were adapted from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS. Results suggest that although the Chinese Ministry of Education (MOE encourages smoke-free schools, experimentation with cigarettes remains a serious problem among primary school students in China. Peers, family members, and the school environment play important roles in influencing smoking experimentation among students. Having a friend who smoked, seeing a family member smoke, and observing a teacher smoking on campus predicted a higher risk of experimentation with smoking; the exposure to anti-tobacco materials at school predicted a lower risk of experimentation with smoking. The evidence suggests that public health practitioners and policymakers should seek to ensure the implementation of smoke-free policies and that intervention should target young people, families, and communities to curb the commencement of smoking among children and adolescents in China.

  1. Parent Involvement and Student Performance: The Influence of School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Ralph B., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers focusing on parent involvement continue to concentrate their efforts on the relationship between involvement and student performance in isolation of the school context in which involvement occurs. This research outlines an ecology of involvement and how this social context affects parent involvement and student performance. Relying on…

  2. The model for evaluating the influence of student participation on school quality

    OpenAIRE

    Kovač, Tatjana; Resman, Metod; Rajkovič, Vladislav

    2010-01-01

    In this article, special attention is given to student participation as a factor that differentiates schools from one another as regards school quality. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of research on the impact of student participation on the quality of schoolwork. The aim of the research was to develop and verify a model for evaluating the influence of student participation on school quality. In order to achieve the research objectives, it was necessary to determine which...

  3. The Influence of Selected Elements of Schools Culture on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted on the elements of school culture which are teachers' collaboration, self-efficacy and goal achievement orientation and students' academic performance. The expost facto using descriptive survey design was adopted. Multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the sample for this study.

  4. Aboriginal Students' Perspectives on the Factors Influencing High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIver, Marion

    2012-01-01

    The Canadian education system is failing its Aboriginal students as evidenced by the significant proportion not completing high school. The Aboriginal population has experienced a significantly greater proportion of people living in poverty and higher rates of unemployment than has the non-Aboriginal population. These factors can be linked to the…

  5. Influence of Gender and Knowledge on Secondary School Students' Scientific Creativity Skills in Nakuru District, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okere, Mark I. O.; Ndeke, Grace C. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of gender and knowledge on scientific creativity among form three biology students (third year in secondary school cycle) in Nakuru district in Kenya. The cross- sectional survey research was employed. A sample of eight schools with a total of 363 students was selected from the population…

  6. Parental Influence on Academic Achievement among the Primary School Students in Trinidad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emmanuel Janagan; Descartes, Christine H.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the level of parental influence on academic achievement in primary school students who prepare for the National-level test at standard five (grade 6), Secondary Entrance Examinations in Trinidad. A sample of 128 students studying standard five from primary schools was randomly selected. The data were analysed using SPSS.…

  7. Public and Private School Distinction, Regional Development Differences, and Other Factors Influencing the Success of Primary School Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulku, Seher Nur; Abdioglu, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the factors influencing the success of students in primary schools in Turkey. TIMSS 2011 data for Turkey, measuring the success of eighth-grade students in the field of mathematics, were used in an econometric analysis, performed using classical linear regression models. Two hundred thirty-nine schools participated in the…

  8. A study of the factors influencing school-going students considering medical careers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-08-01

    Obtaining a place in an Irish medical school is extremely competitive, a situation mirrored in many other countries. We aimed to determine the factors influencing school students in deciding to study medicine in university. We further determined what level of interest exists in pursuing a surgical career after completion of medical school.

  9. The Teacher as One of the Factors Influencing Students' Perception of Biology as a School Subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiatko, Milan; Torkar, Gregor; Rovnanova, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of our research was to determine whether the teacher is one of the factors influencing students' perception of biology as a school subject. The study also aimed to identify the influence of certain other factors in this regard, specifically: students' gender and place of residence, the number of biology teachers who have taught the…

  10. The Influence of the Home Learning Environment on Middle School Students' Use of ICT at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of information and communication technology (ICT) in schools has been largely explored in relation to how students' use ICT at school. In addition students' lives and experiences with technology beyond school have also begun to be explored. However, the nexus between the two is still an underdeveloped research area. Anecdotally…

  11. Influence of Classroom and School Climate on Teacher Perceptions of Student Problem Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Furlong, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    Reducing student problem behavior remains a leading concern for school staff, as disruptive and aggressive behavior interferes with student achievement and the school climate. However, the multi-systemic nature of schools makes it difficult for researchers and practitioners to identify factors influencing to students' behavior. The current study examined student problem behavior through an ecological lens by taking into account individual (e.g., gender, ethnicity, prosocial behavior), classroom (e.g., class size, average classroom behavior), and school-level factors (e.g., location, school climate). Using data from 37 elementary schools, 467 classrooms, and 8,750 students, a series of hierarchical linear models was tested. Multilevel analyses revealed that while individual student characteristics had the largest influence on problem behavior, average prosocial behavior and concentration problems of students within the classroom, as well as teacher perceptions of the school climate significantly related to how students behaved. These findings support the use of classroom-based intervention programs to reduce student problem behavior.

  12. Pathways to Formal and Informal Student Leadership: The Influence of Peer and Teacher-Student Relationships and Level of School Identification on Students' Motivations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, Alf; Dempster, Neil; Neumann, Regan

    2011-01-01

    Leadership capacity-building is a key factor in sustainable school improvement, and the leadership contribution of students is an integral part of an authentic distributed conception of school leadership. Thus it is important to understand the factors which influence high school students' motivations to engage in formal and informal leadership in…

  13. The Influence of the Principal's Leadership Style on School Climate and Student Achievement. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulach, Clete; And Others

    This paper presents findings of a study that examined the influence of the principal's leadership style on school climate and student achievement. Three survey instruments--the Leadership Behavioral Matrix, the Tennessee School Climate Inventory, and the Group Openness and Trust Scale--were administered to 20 principals and 506 teachers in 20…

  14. Correlates of Student Bachelor of Business Administration Satisfaction and School Reputation Influencing Perceived Market Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Halbert, Terry; Atwater, Craig; Kershner, Ronald; Zuckerman, M. Michael

    2016-01-01

    This study compares correlates of two outcomes: satisfaction with a bachelor of business administration degree, and business school reputation influencing students' perceived market value to potential employers. A sample of 261 graduating business school seniors completed a fall 2014 survey measuring these outcomes and a number of correlates.…

  15. Parents Influencing Secondary Students' University Aspirations: A Multilevel Approach Using School-SES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stuart; Vernon, Lynette; Seddon, Sarah; Andrews, Yolanda; Wang, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Students' university aspirational capacity and expectancies are key factors in predicting future university participation. Aspirations and expectations to attend university are strongly influenced by parent educational socialisation and school culture. This study investigates associations between students' university discussions with parents and…

  16. Factors that Influence Career Choice among Native American and African American High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett-Smith, Keisha K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need for research in the area of career choice of minority students in the United States. This descriptive study examined the factors that may influence Native American and African American high school students' career choices. These factors include such variables as parental educational level, family composition, and potential grade…

  17. A Decade's Difference: Research Revisited on Family Influence of Rural High School Students' Postsecondary Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legutko, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    This study is a quantitative descriptive research design which compared 1995 and 2005 data regarding family influence on rural Pennsylvania high school seniors' postsecondary decisions. A chi-square analysis at p less than 0.05 determined that there was (a) an increase in students planning college attendance, (b) a decrease in students not…

  18. Direct and indirect influences of school learning on Hispanic-American eighth grade students' academic achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Gantes, Victor M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of the direct and indirect influence of previous grades, quality of instruction, motivation, quantity of instruction, and homework on Hispanic-American eighth grade students' academic achievement, while controlling for important background variables (family background, student's English proficiency, and gender). Few researchers have examined both direct and indirect effects of school learning variables and background influences simultaneou...

  19. The Influence of Toy Design Activities on Middle School Students' Understanding of the Engineering Design Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ninger; Pereira, Nielsen L.; George, Tarun Thomas; Alperovich, Jeffrey; Booth, Joran; Chandrasegaran, Senthil; Tew, Jeffrey David; Kulkarni, Devadatta M.; Ramani, Karthik

    2017-10-01

    The societal demand for inspiring and engaging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students and preparing our workforce for the emerging creative economy has necessitated developing students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes from as early as elementary school levels. Hands-on engineering design activities have shown the potential to promote middle school students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes. However, traditional classrooms often lack hands-on engineering design experiences, leaving students unprepared to solve real-world design problems. In this study, we introduce the framework of a toy design workshop and investigate the influence of the workshop activities on students' understanding of and self-efficacy beliefs in engineering design. Using a mixed method approach, we conducted quantitative analyses to show changes in students' engineering design self-efficacy and qualitative analyses to identify students' understanding of the engineering design processes. Findings show that among the 24 participants, there is a significant increase in students' self-efficacy beliefs after attending the workshop. We also identified major themes such as design goals and prototyping in students' understanding of engineering design processes. This research provides insights into the key elements of middle school students' engineering design learning and the benefits of engaging middle school students in hands-on toy design workshops.

  20. Modeling the influence of school leaders on student achievement: How can school leaders make a difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Bruggencate, G.C.; Luyten, Johannes W.; Scheerens, Jaap; Sleegers, P.J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the means by which principals achieve an impact on student achievement. Research Design: Through the application of structural equation modeling, a mediated-effects model for school leadership was tested, using data from 97 secondary schools in the

  1. Influence of Science, Technology, and Engineering Curriculum on Rural Midwestern High School Student Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, John

    Low degree completion in technical and engineering degrees is a growing concern for policymakers and educators in the United States. This study was an examination of the behaviors of adolescents specific to career decisions related to technology and engineering. The central research question for this study was: do rural, Midwestern high school technical and engineering curricula serve to engage students sufficiently to encourage them to persist through high school while sustaining their interests in technology and engineering careers? Engaging students in technology and engineering fields is the challenge for educators throughout the country and the Midwest. Rural schools have the additional challenge of meeting those issues because of resource limitations. Students in three Midwestern schools were surveyed to determine the level of interest in technology and engineering. The generalized likelihood ratio test was used to overcome concerns for small sample sizes. Accounting for dependent variables, multiple independent variables are examined using descriptive statistics to determine which have greater influence on career decisions, specifically those related to technology and engineering. A typical science curriculum is defined for rural Midwestern high schools. This study concludes that such curriculum achieves the goal of maintaining or increasing student interest and engagement in STEM careers. Furthermore, those schools that incorporate contextual and experiential learning activities into the curriculum demonstrate increased results in influencing student career choices toward technology and engineering careers. Implications for parents, educators, and industry professionals are discussed.

  2. Association of school social networks' influence and mass media factors with cigarette smoking among asthmatic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-03-01

    Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks' influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. This study included 9755 asthmatic and 38,487 non-asthmatic middle and high school students. Secondary data analysis incorporated the complex sample design; and univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression statistics. Asthmatic students had greater odds of smoking than non-asthmatic students. Asthmatic female students were more likely than asthmatic male students to have been exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms or cars and to smoking actors, but less likely to associate smoking with intent to wear tobacco-marketing products, or with looking cool/fitting in. Asthmatic male and female students, who have smoking friends, were exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms (only girls) or cars, intended to smoke if best friends offered cigarettes, or received/bought tobacco marketing products had greater odds of smoking than other asthmatic students. The observed associations suggest the need for general interventions to reduce middle and high school students' cigarette smoking as well as targeted interventions for asthmatic adolescent students. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  3. The Influence of Selected Elements of Schools Culture on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... This study was conducted on the elements of school culture which are teachers' collaboration, self-efficacy and ... high hopes are held for education as an instrument of social and economic policy for the betterment of ... administration, and curriculum design and to a functional school system (Englet, Tarrant.

  4. The influence of Mayan education on middle school students in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falbo, Toni; de Baessa, Yetilú

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Mayan education on the academic achievement of Indian and Ladino middle school students (N = 353) in Guatemala. This study also examined changes in ethnic identity achievement and the effects of changes in ethnic identity achievement on gains in self-esteem and other-group attitudes. Superior gains in academic skills for both Ladino and Indian students attending Mayan schools were found. The results also suggested that those students who increased their ethnic identity scores during their first year of middle school also increased their other-group attitudes. These results are discussed in terms of the benefits of Mayan education and ethnic identity achievement for both Indian and Ladino students. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Influence of different domains of social capital on psychological distress among Croatian high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Dario; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Social capital has been shown to have positive effects on multiple health outcomes among young people (i.e., obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and infectious diseases). Studies are suggesting that social capital is an important asset for the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents, including for their mental health. We sought to examine the influences of different domains of social capital - in the family, in the neighbourhood, and at school - on levels of psychological distress among high school students in Croatia. Cross-sectional survey of 3427 high school students (1688 males and 1739 females), aged 17-18 years, was carried out in the 2013/14 school year (response rate: 93.8%). Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of family, neighbourhood and school social capital on the risk of high psychological distress, measured by the Kessler-6 scale. Adjusting for age, school, gender, body mass index, self-perceived socioeconomic status, self-rated health and physical activity, high family support in school (OR 0.37; 95% CI: 0.27-0.51), high neighbourhood trust (OR 0.62; 95% CI: 0.53-0.73), high teacher-student interpersonal trust (OR 0.74; 95% CI: 0.62-0.89) and high student interpersonal trust (OR 0.79; 95% CI: 0.65-0.97) was each associated with lower odds of psychological distress. When all of the social capital variables were entered simultaneously, higher social capital in each domain was inversely associated with psychological distress. Family support in school, neighbourhood trust, teacher-student interpersonal trust and student interpersonal trust were significantly inversely associated with psychological distress among adolescents. Intervention and policies that leverage community social capital might serve as means of mental health promotion among youth.

  6. The Influence of Conflict Resolution Programs on Student Conduct Violations in Middle Schools with a School Uniform Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenbach, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    School safety is a very important issue for school staff, parents, and students. When school safety is lacking, students suffer in emotional, academic, and social areas. One recent intervention middle schools are examining is the student uniform policy. In some cases, school uniforms have been shown to have a profound effect on school safety,…

  7. The Importance of Rule Fairness: The Influence of School Bonds on At-Risk Students in an Alternative School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, Janese L.

    2014-01-01

    Using Hirschi's social bonds theory as a foundation, this study examines the effects of at-risk students' school bonds on their classroom behaviour. In this article, school bonds are defined as the students' attachment to teachers/staff, students' affiliation to the school, students' belief in the fairness of the school rules and students'…

  8. The Influence of Mathematics Anxiety in Middle and High School Students Math Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutawah, Masooma Ali

    2015-01-01

    Math anxiety has been the focus of much psychological and educational research in the past few years, there are many international studies showing that mathematics anxiety is an influence on student's achievements in school, but little research has been done about this issue in Bahrain. Bahrain is a country in the Arabian Gulf region, its economic…

  9. Influence of Teachers and Schools on Students' Civic Outcomes in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Ernesto; Béjares, Consuelo; Villalobos, Cristóbal; Naranjo, Eloísa

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigated to what extent teachers' practices and school characteristics can influence students' civic knowledge, civic attitudes, and future participation in Chile, Colombia, and Mexico and how this can be related to their specific curricular structures and educational content. It uses data from the International Civic and…

  10. A study of the factors influencing school-going students considering medical careers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obtaining a place in an Irish medical school is extremely competitive, a situation mirrored in many other countries. We aimed to determine the factors influencing school students in deciding to study medicine in university. We further determined what level of interest exists in pursuing a surgical career after completion of medical school. METHODS: The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland hosts an annual "Introduction to Medicine" programme for senior school children. Attendees were surveyed using a Likert scale to examine the factors influencing the group in choosing to study medicine, and pursue surgery as their ultimate career choice. RESULTS: A total of 128 completed the survey, giving a response rate of 100%. The opportunity to help others was most the most influential factors cited by students (97%). Males were significantly more likely to have an interest in a career in surgery rather than medicine (p = 0.003), and ranked "financial reward" (p = 0.036) as a more significant factors in influencing career choice than did females. CONCLUSIONS: A clear understanding of these factors influencing our students in their career choices and a strategy of recruitment based on these is imperative in order to optimize recruitment of students most suited to working as doctors.

  11. Influence of Parenting Styles on the Adolescent Students' Academic Achievement in Kenyan Day Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odongo, Alice Atieno; Aloka, Peter J. O.; Raburu, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to establish the influence of parenting styles on adolescent academic achievement in day secondary schools in North Rachuonyo Sub-County, Kenya. Baumrind's theory of parenting style informed the study. The Concurrent Triangulation Design was used. The target population comprised 2409 day secondary students registered for…

  12. Factors Influencing the Teaching of Amish Students in the Public School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Elizabeth A.

    To examine available research, largely done after 1965, and identify factors influencing academic performance of Amish students in public schools, particularly in Indiana, material was divided into four annotated bibliographic sections: Amish definition of education (three items); Amish attitudes toward education, as reflected in their society…

  13. An Examination of Variables Which Influence High School Students to Enroll in an Undergraduate Engineering or Physical Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the variables which influence a high school student to enroll in an engineering discipline versus a physical science discipline. Data was collected utilizing the High School Activities, Characteristics, and Influences Survey, which was administered to students who were freshmen in an engineering or physical…

  14. [Does elitism of school influence the smoking-related health behaviour among grammar school students?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józwicki, Wojciech; Gołda, Ryszard; Domaniewska, Jolanta; Skok, Zdzisław; Jarzemski, Piotr; Przybylski, Grzegorz; Domaniewski, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was connected with smoking health behaviour estimation among public (SZP) and nonpublic (SZN) grammar school students. The analysis of 156 anonymous questionnaires was made. Questionnaires contained questions of parents' education, material situation of family, physical education, social relations with family and peers and positive or negative perception of smoking. In total trial we observed a strong positive correlation between style of smoking or number of smoked cigarettes and positive perception of smoking (r = 0.62 or r = 0.36 respectively). The latter correlated significantly with family presence of smoking (r = 0.18). Percentages of smoking students of SZP and SZN differed and amounted 22% and 18% respectively. Within I/II SZP classes the smoking depended on material position of family (r = 0.28) and positive perception of smoking (r = 0.68). Among students of III SZP classes the dependence on material situation was stronger (r = 0.49), while students of III SZN classes became to perceive smoking more positive (r = 0.82). Social relations of students of I/II SZN classes were inversely proportional to prevalence of smoking in their families. Smoking students of III SZN classes worked out much more variously in comparison with pupils of SZP. The main motivation of smoking within school students was the positive perception of smoking. The differences of smoking prevalence within both types of school probably formed in the families and observed in I/II classes pupils, vanished during the time of III class of studying. Elitism of school do not protect the student from smoking: during the time of III SZN class the smoking receives clearly positive appearance and became established. Probably existing antinicotinic school programs should much more decidedly deliver the negative appearance of health effects of smoking.

  15. What factors influence Hong Kong school students in their choice of a career in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, W; Arthur, D

    2003-01-01

    Chronic and recurrent shortages of nurses, coupled with the increasing demand for high quality and motivated nurses and competition for secondary school leavers from other professions, are issues which prompted this investigation of senior school students' career choice. Using a descriptive survey design, and a questionnaire developed for the study, 1246 Form 6 students in Hong Kong were surveyed, of these 28% respondents reported that they were interested in studying nursing. The findings indicated that students' decision to choose or not choose nursing was significantly influenced by the demographic factors: gender (chi(2) = 42.72, p career score (t = 14.21, df = 1237, p Students' intention to study nursing was also significantly affected by social influence: parents (chi(2) = 11.53, p = 0.001), school career masters (chi(2) = 5.52, p = 0.019) and friends (chi(2) = 4.83, p = 0.028); past experience with career activities (chi(2) = 84.479, p career activities (p students' intention to study nursing. Results of this study can be used by nurse leaders and recruiters to develop strategies and help school leavers perceive nursing in a more positive way. Expanding the informational sources about nursing can facilitate the recruitment process. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. Influence of Cognitive Styles on Technical Drawing Students' Achievements in Senior Secondary School in Federal Capital Territory, Abuja

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owodunni, A. Samuel; Sanni, AbdulRahman; Nwokolo-Ojo, Joy; Igwe, C. Obeta

    2017-01-01

    There are different cognitive strategies for processing information which in turn influence students' academic achievement. This paper reports an investigation of cognitive styles and achievement scores of secondary school students. In the study, the standardised Group Embedded Figures Test was used to determine the influence of student's…

  17. Analysis of Factors Influencing Creative Personality of Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongman; Kim, Minkee; Jang, Shinho

    2017-01-01

    This quantitative research examined factors that affect elementary students' creativity and how those factors correlate. Aiming to identify significant factors that affect creativity and to clarify the relationship between these factors by path analysis, this research was designed to be a stepping stone for creativity enhancement studies. Data…

  18. Association of School Social Networks’ Influence and Mass Media Factors With Cigarette Smoking Among Asthmatic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H.; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks’ influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. METHODS This study included 9755 asthmatic and 38,487 non-asthmatic middle and high school students. Secondary data analysis incorporated the complex sample design; and univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression statistics. RESULTS Asthmatic students had greater odds of smoking than non-asthmatic students. Asthmatic female students were more likely than asthmatic male students to have been exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms or cars and to smoking actors, but less likely to associate smoking with intent to wear tobacco-marketing products, or with looking cool/fitting in. Asthmatic male and female students, who have smoking friends, were exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms (only girls) or cars, intended to smoke if best friends offered cigarettes, or received/bought tobacco marketing products had greater odds of smoking than other asthmatic students. CONCLUSIONS The observed associations suggest the need for general interventions to reduce middle and high school students’ cigarette smoking as well as targeted interventions for asthmatic adolescent students. PMID:25611937

  19. Influencing College and Higher Education Choices in Disadvantaged Hispanic High School Students Through a School-Based Health Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsimran; Matza, Maria; Latham, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Statistics representing professional health care providers do not adequately reflect the shift in the nation's diverse population. Latinos are significantly underrepresented at all levels of appropriate academic programs critical for entry to health profession careers. This project describes the implementation of a student-run, faculty-facilitated Future Nurse and Health Club at a school (with majority Latino students) to emphasize the importance of higher education in health care. Demographic and psychosocial profiles of club members were also developed to understand community needs. The Future Nurse and Health Club was established in partnership with faculty and researchers representing a university-based nursing program, school officials, and community leaders. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from club members and their parents using a variety of techniques including questionnaires and focus groups. The findings of the study highlighted a variety of student- and parent-related factors including poor lifestyle habits and perceptions of support that could potentially influence Latino high school students' interest and progress in health care-related higher education. A school-based health career club involving active participation of parents and students with support from health care professionals such as academic nursing faculty has the potential to simultaneously raise student interest in health-related careers and health needs of their community.

  20. Influence of science and technology magnet middle schools on students' motivation and achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David

    Some informal discussions among educators regarding motivation of students and academic performance have included the topic of magnet schools. The premise is that a focused theme, such as an aspect of science, positively affects student motivation and academic achievement. However, there is limited research involving magnet schools and their influence on student motivation and academic performance. This study provides empirical data for the discussion about magnet schools influence on motivation and academic ability. This study utilized path analysis in a structural equation modeling framework to simultaneously investigate the relationships between demographic exogenous independent variables, the independent variable of attending a science or technology magnet middle school, and the dependent variables of motivation to learn science and academic achievement in science. Due to the categorical nature of the variables, Bayesian statistical analysis was used to calculate the path coefficients and the standardized effects for each relationship in the model. The coefficients of determination were calculated to determine the amount of variance each path explained. Only five of 21 paths had statistical significance. Only one of the five statistically significant paths (Attended Magnet School to Motivation to Learn Science) explained a noteworthy amount (45.8%) of the variance.

  1. Influence of Student Beliefs about Nature of School Mathematics on Their Achievement at Secondary Level in Kerala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Sarabi, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    This study probes students' beliefs about nature of mathematics, difficulty in learning mathematics sourcing from these and their influence on achievement in mathematics. Questionnaire survey on 458, 9th standard students randomly selected from schools of Malappuram district elicited data on nature of school mathematics and difficulty arising out…

  2. High School Students Debate the Use of Embryonic Stem Cells: The Influence of Context on Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinatti, Gregoire; Girault, Yves; Hammond, Constance

    2010-01-01

    The present study analyzes decision-making and argumentation by high school students in a debate situation on a socioscientific issue, the use of embryonic stem cells in research and therapy. We tested the influence on the debates of two different contexts. Adolescent students at the high school level in the same grade (mean age 16.4 years) from…

  3. Student School-Level Math Knowledge Influence on Applied Mathematics Study Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Kriauzienė

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—to find out the influence of student school-level math knowledge on courses of applied mathematics studies: what is the importance of having a math maturity exam for students, an estimate of social science students’ motivation to learn math, and attendance of seminars. Students who did take the state exam attended more seminars than the students who did not take math exam, and vice versa. Design/methodology/approach—this work describes research which involved persistent MRU Public Administration degree program second-year students. Doing statistical analysis of the data will be a link between school-level mathematics knowledge and attendance activity in seminars and motivation to learn mathematics. Findings—the research is expected to establish a connection between school-level mathematics knowledge and student motivation to learn mathematics. It was found that there is no correlation between student opinions about school mathematics courses and result of their first test. Determine relationship between attendance of exercises and public examinations. Between the stored type of exam and test results are dependent. Determine relationship between exercise attendance and test results, as shown by the calculated correlation coefficient Based on the results, it’s recommended to increase the number of exercises. A more refined analysis of the data is subject to further investigation. Research limitations/implications—this method is just one of the possible ways of application. Practical implications—that kind of research and its methodology can be applied not only to the subject of applied mathematics studies, but also to other natural or social sciences. Originality/Value—empirical experiment data can be used in other studies of Educology nature analysis.

  4. Gauging events that influence students' perceptions of the medical school learning environment: findings from one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shochet, Robert B; Colbert-Getz, Jorie M; Levine, Rachel B; Wright, Scott M

    2013-02-01

    The medical school learning environment (LE), encompassing the physical, social, and psychological context for learning, holds significant influence on students' professional development. Among these myriad experiences, the authors sought to gauge what students judge as influencing their perceptions of the LE. Fourth-year medical students at Johns Hopkins University participated in this cohort survey study before their 2010 graduation. A list of 55 events was iteratively revised and pilot-tested before being administered online. Responses assessed whether students experienced each event and, if so, the degree of impact on perceptions of the LE. A calculated mean impact score (MIS) provided a means to compare the relative impact of events. Of 119 students, 84 (71%) completed the survey. Students rated the overall LE as exceptional (29/84; 35%), good (36/84; 43%), fair (17/84; 20%), or poor (2/84; 2%). Eighty percent of students experienced at least 41 of the 55 events. MIS values ranged from 2.00 to 3.76 (highest possible: 4.00). Students rated positive events as having the highest impact. Few significant differences were found across gender, age, or surgical/nonsurgical specialty choice. MIS distributions differed between those perceiving the LE as exceptional or fair to poor for 22 (40%) of 55 events. This study attempted to identify the discrete events that medical students perceive as most affecting their sense of the LE. Knowing the phenomena that most strongly influence student perceptions can inform how settings, relationships, and interactions can be shaped for meaningful learning and professional formation.

  5. The Influence of Extracurricular Activities on Student Performance Perceived by Texas Rural High School Principals with Successful Extracurricular Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Christopher John

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of student participation in extracurricular activities, as perceived by rural high school principals, with successful extracurricular programs. Participating principals were asked about their perceptions on the influence of student participation in extracurricular activities on student…

  6. Factors influencing fast food consumption behaviors of middle-school students in Seoul: an application of theory of planned behaviors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hyun-sun Seo; Soo-Kyung Lee; Soyoung Nam

    2011-01-01

    .... This study examined current fast food consumption status among middle school students and explored factors influencing fast food consumption by applying Theory of Planned Behavior. A total of 354 (52.5% boys...

  7. Influence of Special Educators and Rehabilitators’ Work in Regular School on Peer Relationship Among Students with Delayed Cognitive Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikolić, Milena; Vantić-Tanjić, Medina; Dizdarević, Alma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to see whether work of special educators and rehabilitators in the regular school has a positive influence on peer relationship among students with delayed cognitive...

  8. INFLUENCE OF SPECIAL EDUCATORS AND REHABILITATORS' WORK IN REGULAR SCHOOL ON PEER RELATIONSHIP AMONG STUDENTS WITH DELAYED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Milena Nikolic; Medina Vantic-Tanjic; Alma Dizdarevic

    2013-01-01

      The purpose of the research was to see whether work of special educators and rehabilitators in the regular school has a positive influence on peer relationship among students with delayed cognitive development...

  9. Using Extrinsic Motivation to Influence Student Attitude and Behavior toward State Assessments at an Urban High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to discover the influence of a student achievement program implemented at one large urban high school that employed extrinsic motivation to promote student achievement on state assessments. Using organismic integration theory as the theoretical framework, 19 randomly selected students participated…

  10. Understanding the antecedents of Korean high school students' drinking refusal self-efficacy: parental influence, peer influence, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Ahn; Cho, Namauk; Yoo, Jina

    2011-12-29

    The current study examined the factors that influence Korean adolescents' drinking refusal self-efficacy, which is known to be associated with alcohol use and drinking intentions. Specifically, this study considered parental monitoring, parent-child communication satisfaction, peer influence, and prior alcohol use as possible antecedents of Korean high school students' drinking refusal self-efficacy. High school students (n = 538) in South Korea responded to the current study. The data revealed that parent-child communication satisfaction facilitated parental monitoring, and these factors indirectly predicted adolescents' drinking behavior through peer influence. We also found that prior drinking, parental monitoring, and peer influence were directly associated with drinking refusal self-efficacy, and the self-efficacy, in turn, was associated with drinking intentions. These results not only suggest that drinking refusal self-efficacy are related to drinking behavior and intentions, but they also provide a theoretical explanation for how parental and peer influences are associated with adolescents' drinking refusal self-efficacy.

  11. Do indoor environments in schools influence student performance? A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendell, Mark J.; Heath, Garvin A.

    2004-11-24

    Limited research is available on potential adverse effects of school environments on academic performance, despite strong public concern. We examine the scientific evidence relevant to this relationship by reviewing available research relating schools and other indoor environments to human performance or attendance. As a primary focus, we critically review evidence for direct relationships between indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in buildings and performance or attendance. As a secondary focus, we summarize, without critique, evidence on potential connections indirectly linking IEQ to performance or attendance: relationships between IEQ and health, between health and performance or attendance, and between attendance and performance. The most persuasive direct evidence showed increases in indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and outdoor concentrations of several specific pollutants to be related to reduced school attendance. The most persuasive indirect evidence showed indoor dampness and microbiologic pollutants to be related to asthma and respiratory infections, which have in turn been related to reduced performance and attendance. Furthermore, a substantial scientific literature links poor IEQ (e.g., low ventilation rate, excess moisture or formaldehyde) with respiratory and other health effects in children and adults. Overall, evidence suggests that poor IEQ in schools can influence the performance and attendance of students, primarily through health effects from indoor pollutants. Also, inadequate IEQ in schools seems sufficiently common to merit strong public concern. Evidence is available to justify (1) immediate actions to protect IEQ in schools and (2) focused research on exposures, prevention, and causation, to better guide policies and actions on IEQ in schools.

  12. Influence of Learning Electricity on Liking for Science in Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tokunori; Higashiyama, Yoshio

    Science literacy has needed to be developed by Education for Sustainable Development. However, Japanese society has faced to decrease in motivation for school study such as flight from science. To confirm this tendency and to investigate the relation between liking for science and that for learning electricity in a junior high school, we surveyed students' general awareness toward the subjects and liking for science areas in eight junior high schools in Yonezawa City, Yamagata Prefecture. The rate of students' liking for the school subjects has been decreasing with school grade. The 2nd and 3rd students who hate science became dislike science at the 2nd grade in a junior high school. More than 50% of science-disliking students described that the area of electricity was responsible for disliking science. Especially, female students tend to hate learning electricity more than male students. Learning the areas of electricity would be responsible for flight from science in junior high school students.

  13. Influence of parenting style on the academic performance of middle school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Domínguez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Students who don't succeed in school are a persistent problem in our educational system. This fact shows that all the efforts to reduce this problem are not succeeding. One third of our students are left behind by the educational system; their results are discouraging. The measures to fight the academic failure are not working and that we have to put into practice new ways of analysis and treatment of this problem. This research explores the relationship between the way children perceive the parenting style of their parents and his o her own academic performance. In the intersection of both phenomena we find our hypothesis: the way parents socialise their children influences significantly on their academic performance. This research is orientated to decision taking process: the aim is to define the level of influence of the parenting style on academic outcomes. The main result is that parents acceptation/implication appears to be significantly linked to the school performance (this evidence shows a big area for new researches: the family. Our research confirms and frames the correlation between these two variables and underlies the family as a new scenario of pedagogical concern to explain and treat school failure.

  14. Social influences on cyberbullying behaviors among middle and high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Sameer; Patchin, Justin W

    2013-05-01

    Cyberbullying is a problem affecting a meaningful proportion of youth as they embrace online communication and interaction. Research has identified a number of real-world negative ramifications for both the targets and those who bully. During adolescence, many behavioral choices are influenced and conditioned by the role of major socializing agents, including friends, family, and adults at school. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which peers, parents, and educators influence the cyberbullying behaviors of adolescents. To explore this question, data were analyzed from a random sample of approximately 4,400 sixth through twelfth grade students (49% female; 63% nonwhite) from thirty-three schools in one large school district in the southern United States. Results indicate that cyberbullying offending is associated with perceptions of peers behaving similarly, and the likelihood of sanction by adults. Specifically, youth who believed that many of their friends were involved in bullying and cyberbullying were themselves more likely to report cyberbullying behaviors. At the same time, respondents who believed that the adults in their life would punish them for cyberbullying were less likely to participate. Implications for schools and families are discussed with the goal of mitigating this behavior and its negative outcomes among adolescent populations.

  15. The Influence of Teachers' Knowledge on Student Learning in Middle School Physical Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Philip M.; Sonnert, Gerhard; Coyle, Harold P.; Cook-Smith, Nancy; Miller, Jaimie L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between teacher knowledge and student learning for 9,556 students of 181 middle school physical science teachers. Assessment instruments based on the National Science Education Standards with 20 items in common were administered several times during the school year to both students and their teachers. For items…

  16. Peer Contexts: Do Old for Grade and Retained Peers Influence Student Behavior in Middle School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschkin, Clara G.; Glennie, Elizabeth; Beck, Audrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many school systems have ended social promotion by implementing accountability systems where students who fail academic assessments are retained in grade. Additionally, some parents have delayed their children's entry into school, believing that older students have an advantage. While research has examined outcomes for students who…

  17. Socio-Political Influences on EFL Motivation and Attitudes: Comparative Surveys of Korean High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates Korean high school students' English learning motivation and attitudes. In this regard, the results of a 2002 study were compared with those of a 2006 study. Questionnaire data were obtained from a total of 1,037 high school students in a major city in South Korea, and the data were compared with those on the students'…

  18. Beyond Behavior: Multilevel Analysis of the Influence of Sociodemographics and School Characteristics on Students' Risk of Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda L.; Klingbeil, David A.; Van Norman, Ethan R.

    2013-01-01

    Minority disproportionality in school discipline outcomes continues to trouble practitioners and scholars. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and indicators of school policy enactment (e.g., retention rates, special education identification) on students' risk of suspension. The sample…

  19. The Influence of Acculturation and Enculturation on Mexican American High School Students' Decision to Apply to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Linda G.; Lopez-Arenas, Araceli; Saldivar, Isaac M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the influence of acculturation, enculturation, parental education level, financial concerns, and gender on 106 Mexican American high school students' decisions to apply to college. Results indicated that acculturation and female gender were significant predictors. Implications for interventions with Latino high school students…

  20. An Examination of South Carolina School Boards' Effectiveness and Its Influence on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Marty S.

    2009-01-01

    In the era of school accountability, school boards are under scrutiny for their effectiveness in improving student achievement. It has become more than obvious that school boards play an important role in the effectiveness, ineffectiveness, successes and failures of school districts. However, to what degree of importance was the premise for this…

  1. Teacher Related Factors Influencing Students' Enrollment in Biology Subject in Public Secondary Schools in Meru Central Sub County in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirima, Teresia Mugure; Kinyua, Susan Muthoni

    2016-01-01

    This study examined teacher related factors influencing students' enrollment in Biology subject in public secondary schools in Meru Central Sub County in Kenya. The study utilized the descriptive survey research design on a target population of 9,859 respondents consisting of 9,748 Biology students, 62 trained Biology teachers and 49 Heads of…

  2. An Analysis of Factors Influencing Students' Academic Performance in Public and Private Secondary Schools in Rivers State-Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalagbor, Levi Doe

    2016-01-01

    The study examined factors that positively influence students' academic performance in public and private secondary schools in Rivers State-Nigeria. One research question addressed the objectives and problem of the study. The instrument used for the collection of data was the "Students' Academic Performance Questionnaire" (SAPQ),…

  3. The Influence of Cultural Bias on Motivation to Learn English: The Case of Khoe Primary School Students in Eastern Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magogwe, Joel Mokuedi

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cultural bias in the teaching of English and in the books used to teach English in primary schools attended by Khoe students in eastern Botswana. The study also explored the link between cultural bias and the attitudes and motivation of Khoe students learning English. One hundred and thirty-seven students…

  4. Exploring the Factors That Influence Female Students' Decision to (Not) Enrol in Elective Physical Education: A Private School Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiley, Jill; Robinson, Daniel Bruce

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the results from a qualitative case study that examined the influencers upon a somewhat unique group of female students who opted out of elective physical education (PE). More specifically, this study focused upon female students attending an affluent private school, investigating why--when they transitioned from middle…

  5. Perceived Factors that Influence Career Decision Self-Efficacy and Engineering Related Goal Intentions of African American High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Chandra Yvette

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between specific factors believed to influence career decision self-efficacy and math/science related goal intentions (proxy for engineering related goal intentions) among African American high school students. Minority students generally tend to be underrepresented in such careers, as indicated by the National…

  6. Influence of Gender, Single-Sex and Co-Educational Schooling on Students' Enjoyment and Achievement in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Mark; O'Donoghue, John

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the influence that gender, single-sex and co-educational schooling can have on students' mathematics education in second-level Irish classrooms. Although gender differences in mathematics education have been the subject of research for many years, recent results from PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment)…

  7. PARENTAL INFLUENCE ON CAREER CHOICE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN ENUGU SOUTH LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF ENUGU STATE, NIGERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Anthonia Chinonyelum Egbo

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated parental influence on career choice of secondary school students in Enugu South Local Government Area of Enugu State. The sample comprised of 250 students randomly selected from 3 government and 2 private schools in Enugu South Local Government Area of Enugu State. A questionnaire was constructed for each respondent by the researcher and administered to elicit responses from the respondents. From the analysis of the data collected, the findings of the study show that t...

  8. Factors influencing fast food consumption behaviors of middle-school students in Seoul: an application of theory of planned behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Hyun-sun; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Nam, Soyoung

    2011-01-01

    Fast food is popular among children and adolescents; however, its consumption has often been associated with negative impacts on nutrition and health. This study examined current fast food consumption status among middle school students and explored factors influencing fast food consumption by applying Theory of Planned Behavior. A total of 354 (52.5% boys) students were recruited from a middle school. The subjects completed a pre-tested questionnaire. The average monthly frequency of fast fo...

  9. Longitudinal observation of influence of "taspo" on smoking behavior among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Sayo; Fukuda, Yoshiharu; Yoshimi, Itsuro; Hayashi, Kenji

    2010-08-01

    A system with an adult discrimination IC card "taspo" was introduced in 2008 to prevent minors from purchasing cigarettes in Japan. This study aimed to elucidate the short-term change in smoking behavior among a cohort of high school students through the introduction of the taspo system. We conducted a questionnaire survey in students at one high school in the metropolitan area of Japan in 2008. In this area, the taspo system was introduced on July 1, and the survey was conducted before and after its introduction (June and September). Change in smoking behavior was examined by linking the two questionnaires using a unique identification number for each participant. The questionnaire included basic characteristics, smoking-related behavior, and means of obtaining tobacco. Of 133 students, 123 (response rate 84.7%) completed the before and after questionnaire forms and could be linked. The smoking rate was 22.8% in June and 25.2% in September, with no statistically significant change. Vending machines were the major means of obtaining tobacco in June, while the use of cigarette shops and supermarkets increased after the introduction of taspo. The introduction of taspo hardly influenced underage smoking behavior during the observation period in our study subjects. The only significant change was in the means of obtaining tobacco. To prevent underage smoking, the importance of comprehensive restriction of the procurement route was suggested.

  10. A survey of factors influencing career preference in new-entrant and exiting medical students from four UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer A; Johnston, Peter W; Anthony, Micheal; Khan, Nadir; Scott, Neil W

    2014-07-23

    Workforce planning is a central issue for service provision and has consequences for medical education. Much work has been examined the career intentions, career preferences and career destinations of UK medical graduates but there is little published about medical students career intentions. How soon do medical students formulate careers intentions? How much do these intentions and preferences change during medical school? If they do change, what are the determining factors? Our aim was to compare medical students' career preferences upon entry into and exit from undergraduate medical degree programmes. This was a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Two cohorts [2009-10, 2010-11] of first and final year medical students at the four Scottish graduating medical schools took part in career preference questionnaire surveys. Questions were asked about demographic factors, career preferences and influencing factors. The response rate was 80.9% [2682/3285]. Significant differences were found across the four schools, most obviously in terms of student origin [Scotland, rest of UK or overseas], age group, and specialty preferences in Year 1 and Year 5. Year 1 and Year 5 students' specialty preferences also differed within each school and, while there were some common patterns, each medical school had a different profile of students' career preferences on exit. When the analysis was adjusted for demographic and job-related preferences, specialty preferences differed by gender, and wish for work-life balance and intellectual satisfaction. This is the first multi-centre study exploring students' career preferences and preference influences upon entry into and exit from undergraduate medical degree programmes. We found various factors influenced career preference, confirming prior findings. What this study adds is that, while acknowledging student intake differs by medical school, medical school itself seems to influence career preference. Comparisons across medical school

  11. School Programs and Characteristics and Their Influence on Student BMI: Findings from Healthy Passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Tracy K.; Elliott, Marc N.; Franzini, Luisa; Kawachi, Ichiro; Caughy, Margaret O.; Gilliland, M. Janice; Walls, Courtney E.; Franklin, Frank A.; Lowry, Richard; Banspach, Stephen W.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the contribution of school contextual factors to individual student body mass index (BMI). We set out to determine if school characteristics/resources: (1) are associated with student BMI; (2) explain racial/ethnic disparities in student BMI; and (3) explain school-level differences in student BMI. Methods Using gender-stratified multi-level modeling strategies we examined the association of school characteristics/resources and individual BMI in 4,387 5th graders in the Healthy Passages Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Additionally, we examined the association of race/ethnicity and individual BMI as well as the between-school variance in BMI before and after adding individual and school characteristics to test for attenuation. Results The school-level median household income, but not physical activity or nutrition resources, was inversely associated with female BMI (β = −0.12, CI: −0.21,−0.02). Neither school demographics nor physical activity/nutrition resources were predictive of individual BMI in males. In Black females, school characteristics attenuated the association of race/ethnicity and BMI. Individual student characteristics—not school characteristics/resources-reduced the between-school variation in BMI in males by nearly one-third and eliminated it in females. Conclusions In this cohort of 5th graders, school SES was inversely associated with female BMI while school characteristics and resources largely explained Black/White disparities in female weight status. Between-school differences in average student weight status were largely explained by the composition of the student body not by school characteristics or programming. PMID:24454697

  12. School programs and characteristics and their influence on student BMI: findings from healthy passages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K Richmond

    Full Text Available Little is known about the contribution of school contextual factors to individual student body mass index (BMI. We set out to determine if school characteristics/resources: (1 are associated with student BMI; (2 explain racial/ethnic disparities in student BMI; and (3 explain school-level differences in student BMI.Using gender-stratified multi-level modeling strategies we examined the association of school characteristics/resources and individual BMI in 4,387 5(th graders in the Healthy Passages Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Additionally, we examined the association of race/ethnicity and individual BMI as well as the between-school variance in BMI before and after adding individual and school characteristics to test for attenuation.The school-level median household income, but not physical activity or nutrition resources, was inversely associated with female BMI (β = -0.12, CI: -0.21,-0.02. Neither school demographics nor physical activity/nutrition resources were predictive of individual BMI in males. In Black females, school characteristics attenuated the association of race/ethnicity and BMI. Individual student characteristics-not school characteristics/resources-reduced the between-school variation in BMI in males by nearly one-third and eliminated it in females.In this cohort of 5(th graders, school SES was inversely associated with female BMI while school characteristics and resources largely explained Black/White disparities in female weight status. Between-school differences in average student weight status were largely explained by the composition of the student body not by school characteristics or programming.

  13. Aggressive and Antisocial Behaviours among Secondary School Students in Botswana. The Influence of Family and School Based Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malete, Leapetswe

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between family factors and secondary school students' aggressive and antisocial behaviours. Participants were 1,478 junior and senior secondary school students from four major urban centres in Botswana, aged 12-20. Results showed significant prevalence of self-reported aggressive tendencies and antisocial…

  14. Secondary School Students' Perceptions of, and the Factors Influencing Their Decision-Making in Relation to, VET in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalley-Trim, Leanne; Alloway, Nola; Walker, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of Vocational Education and Training in Schools--an issue that has recently attracted significant political attention particularly in light of current national skills shortage in Australia. Specifically, it investigates secondary school students' perceptions of VET in Schools [VETiS]. It also explores the factors…

  15. The influence of affective teacher-student relationships on students' school engagement and achievement: a meta-analytic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, D.L.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Spilt, J.L.; Oort, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    A meta-analytic approach was used to investigate the associations between affective qualities of teacher-student relationships (TSRs) and students’ school engagement and achievement. Results were based on 99 studies, including students from preschool to high school. Separate analyses were conducted

  16. Disciplinary Differences in Out-of-School High School Science Experiences and Influence on Students' Engineering Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Allison; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Participation from a variety of students is important to the long-term growth of the engineering field. Much of the research on engineering recruitment or career choice has focused on engineering as a whole, even though engineering disciplines are varied in student participation and focus. This work examines how students' out-of-school interests…

  17. The Influence of Attitudes toward Students with Disabilities and Counselor Self-Efficacy on School Counselors' Perceptions of Preparedness to Provide Services to Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrence, Jamie N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative survey study was to determine the influence of attitudes toward students with disabilities and counselor self-efficacy on school counselors' perceptions of preparedness to provide services to students with learning disabilities using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen, 1985). One hundred and sixteen…

  18. Honors Students' Perceptions of Their High School Experiences: The Influence of Teachers on Student Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegle, Del; Rubenstein, Lisa DaVia; Mitchell, Melissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Academic motivation is important for students' task persistence, academic performance, and college selection. The goal of this qualitative study was to understand academic motivation from the students' perspective. Focus group discussions with 28 university honors freshman revealed that students most often attributed their interest and motivation…

  19. Educators' and Parents' Perception of What School Nurses Do: The Influence of School Nurse/Student Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Erin; Adams, Rachael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to determine how ratios influenced relationships between school nurses and the educators and parents with whom they work; and how the relationships influenced the understanding and value of the school nurse. A purposeful sampling of 33 participants from four states (New Hampshire, Vermont, Michigan, and…

  20. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE LEARNING SUCCESS OF MASTER STUDENTS AT IPB BUSINESS SCHOOL (SB-IPB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Wulan Arini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Business School of IPB (SB-IPB has a low level of completing of study for its master program students on-time. Based on the report of SB-IPB 2015, only 0.8% of students graduating in 2014/2015 successfully completed their study in the normal time of thesis writing. This study aims to identify what factors cause the students unable to complete their thesis on time, thus affecting their learning success. The primary data in this study came from interviews to the students of year 2011/2012, while the secondary data were obtained from the academic section of SB-IPB. Determination of the number of samples was done using slovin formula obtaining 80 students as the respondents. The data analysis method used was SEM with PLS method. The results of the research indicate that the indicator that has a dominant role on the student characteristics is employment status while the dominant role indicators on the process of thesis writing are the suitability of area of interest and the administrative process. The value of the characteristics of students significantly affecting the process of their thesis writing is-0.283, and this indicates that students who are full time workers have a number of constraints in their thesis writing process. Likewise, the process of the thesis writing has a significant influence on the success of the study i.e. 0.346, and it means that the easier the process of thesis writing, the greater the success of their study. The academic division is expected to be more active in controlling the students who are in the process of writing their thesis, especially for the class whose students work full time so that it can well support the learning success of the students.Keywords: business school, master program, success of the study, PLS, SEMABSTRAKMahasiswa program magister di sekolah bisnis IPB (SB-IPB memiliki tingkat ketepatan penyelesaian studi yang masih rendah. Berdasarkan laporan SB IPB 2015, hanya 0.8% mahasiswa yang lulus tahun

  1. The Influence of School Climate on Students' Experiences of Peer Sexual Harassment in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    Early studies on the prevalence of peer sexual harassment in schools have left little doubt that it is a serious problem, often with negative consequences. Research indicates that sexual harassment is a subjective and gendered phenomenon, and peer sexual harassment is further complicated by the developmental changes associated with adolescence.…

  2. Factors across home, work, and school domains influence nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, Lisa M; Bishop, Hillary L; Greaney, Mary L; Whiteley, Jessica A

    2012-10-01

    Nontraditional college students (older, part-time, and/or working) have less healthful nutrition and physical activity behaviors compared to traditional students, yet few health promotion efforts focus on nontraditional students. The purpose of this study was to use qualitative methods to explore factors affecting nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional students. Fourteen semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with nontraditional undergraduate students attending a large university. The sample had a median age of 25 (range, 21-64), 57% were men, 43% were racial/ethnic minorities, and 57% were employed (mean 22 hours/week). Data were coded using a systematic team-based approach. Consistent themes (mentioned by 4+ students) were identified and categorized into three domains: home, work, and school. Home (themes: neighborhood characteristics, family, partners), work (theme: work environment), and school (themes: cafeteria, vending machines) factors consistently influenced positive nutrition behaviors. Similarly, home (themes: neighborhood including safety, friends from home, partner,), work (theme: work environment), and school (themes: not having a car, campus structure, campus gym, friends at school) factors consistently influenced positive physical activity. Financial resources and perceptions of autonomy had influence across domains. Results indicate consistent influences on nutrition and physical activity behaviors across home, work, and school domains for nontraditional college students. Study findings suggest possible, and sometimes unconventional, intervention strategies to promote healthful eating and physical activity. For example, when cafeteria meal plans are not offered and financial constraints limit eating at the cafeteria, encouraging healthful choices from vending machines could be preferable to not eating at all. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Peer Pressure on Secondary School Students Drop out in Rongo Sub-County, Migori County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omollo, Atieno Evaline; Yambo, Onyango J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the influence of peer pressure on secondary school students' drop out in Rongo Sub-County, Migori County, Kenya. The statement of the problem showed that the sub-county had a dropout rate of 43 percent as compared to the neighboring sub counties like Uriri, Awendo, Nyatike, Kuria and Migori which had 25,…

  4. The Case for Emotional Literacy: The Influence of Emotional Intelligence on Problem Behaviours in Malaysian Secondary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Albert K.; Liau, Agnes W.; Teoh, George B. S.; Liau, Michael T. L.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies a renaissance in civics and moral education in the Asia-Pacific region. Discusses the need to incorporate emotional literacy in these programs and analyze the influence of emotional literacy on problem behaviors in Malaysian secondary school students. Links results of emotional literacy to internalizing and externalizing problem…

  5. DOES GENDER, CLASS STANDING, AND HIGH SCHOOL ECONOMICS INFLUENCE STUDENTS' ECONOMIC LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Bridges, Deborah E.; Casavant, Kenneth L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates how gender, maturity of the student, and previous economics study in high school contribute to economic learning. Economic learning is measured using the difference between pre- and post-test scores. OLS results suggest that high school economics plays a larger role in economic learning than either gender or maturity.

  6. Students' Democratic Experiences in School: A Multilevel Analysis of Social-Emotional Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Katharina; Noack, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of a democratic school context, little is known about its underling processes. The present research examined in how far a positive social-emotional classroom climate, namely perceptions of community in class and fairness of teachers, furthers students' democratic experiences in school (i.e., open classroom climate for…

  7. Influence of School Playground Size and Equipment on the Physical Activity of Students during Recess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delidou, Eleni; Matsouka, Ourania; Nikolaidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Children's physical activity (PA) is increasingly restricted by the fast pace of modern life. Schools are the opportune setting in which to increase PA during daily recess. The purpose of this study was to record the degree of PA of 6th grade primary school students during recess and determine whether the playground size and available equipment…

  8. A survey of factors influencing career preference in new-entrant and exiting medical students from four UK medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Workforce planning is a central issue for service provision and has consequences for medical education. Much work has been examined the career intentions, career preferences and career destinations of UK medical graduates but there is little published about medical students career intentions. How soon do medical students formulate careers intentions? How much do these intentions and preferences change during medical school? If they do change, what are the determining factors? Our aim was to compare medical students’ career preferences upon entry into and exit from undergraduate medical degree programmes. Methods This was a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Two cohorts [2009–10, 2010–11] of first and final year medical students at the four Scottish graduating medical schools took part in career preference questionnaire surveys. Questions were asked about demographic factors, career preferences and influencing factors. Results The response rate was 80.9% [2682/3285]. Significant differences were found across the four schools, most obviously in terms of student origin [Scotland, rest of UK or overseas], age group, and specialty preferences in Year 1 and Year 5. Year 1 and Year 5 students’ specialty preferences also differed within each school and, while there were some common patterns, each medical school had a different profile of students’ career preferences on exit. When the analysis was adjusted for demographic and job-related preferences, specialty preferences differed by gender, and wish for work-life balance and intellectual satisfaction. Conclusions This is the first multi-centre study exploring students’ career preferences and preference influences upon entry into and exit from undergraduate medical degree programmes. We found various factors influenced career preference, confirming prior findings. What this study adds is that, while acknowledging student intake differs by medical school, medical school itself seems to influence

  9. Influence of gender, single sex and co-educational school on students' enjoyment and achievement in mathematics

    OpenAIRE

    Prendergast, Mark

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED This research investigates the influence that gender, single-sex and co-educational schooling can have on students’ mathematics education in second-level Irish classrooms. Although gender differences in mathematics education have been the subject of research for many years, recent results from PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) show that there are still marked differences between the achievement and attitude of male and female students in Irish mathematics clas...

  10. The Influence of Academic and Social Factors of School Principals on the Success of Middle School Students in Urban Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tonya Yvette

    2012-01-01

    One thing is certain, accountability is here to stay; accountability exposes the good, the bad, and the ugly. The academic achievement gap between non-White and White students continues to exist in the disaggregated data in individual campuses, within school districts, and within comparison studies across the nation. Thus, school leadership is…

  11. The Influence of Extracurricular Activities on Middle School Students' Science Learning in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Danhui; Tang, Xing

    2017-01-01

    Informal science learning has been found to have effects on students' science learning. Through the use of secondary data from a national assessment of 7410 middle school students in China, this study explores the relationship among five types of extracurricular science activities, learning interests, academic self-concept, and science…

  12. The Power of Influence: School Nurse Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazyck, Donna; Cellucci, Margaret; Largent, Piper

    2015-07-01

    School nurses have influence, and this influence is ignited with school nurse stories. School nurses must tell school staff, leaders, families, and students what they do to help students access their education. School boards, city councils, and legislators need to know the knowledge, skills, and judgment school nurses use daily. NASN understands that school nurses benefit from a "how to" kit and has developed tools to empower school nurses in advocating for their important role in supporting the health and learning of students. This article provides an overview this newly developed electronic toolkit while at the same time reinforcing the power of influence when sharing your stories. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Socioeconomic influences on alcohol use patterns among private school students in São Paulo

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo Locatelli; Zila Sanchez; Emerita Opaleye; Claudia Carlini; Ana Noto

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe alcohol use by socioeconomic level and gender among private high school students in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of students in private schools in São Paulo. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was distributed in the classroom. A total of 2,613 students were selected by the stratification and conglomerate methods. Chi-squared tests, t-tests and ANOVA were used to test for associations between alcohol use and gender and socioeco...

  14. Understanding factors influencing foreign-born students' success in nursing school: a case study of East Indian nursing students and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Janelle

    2005-01-01

    The retention and graduation of foreign-born nursing students is essential to meet the needs of our growing racial and ethnic minority population in the United States with their health care needs. Little research has explored factors contributing to the high attrition rate of racial and ethnic minority nursing students. The author describes a case study of East Indian nursing students and examines factors influencing foreign-born students' success in nursing school. Culturally competent teaching strategies for all foreign-born nursing students are presented.

  15. Influence of gender, single-sex and co-educational schooling on students' enjoyment and achievement in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Mark; O'Donoghue, John

    2014-11-01

    This research investigates the influence that gender, single-sex and co-educational schooling can have on students' mathematics education in second-level Irish classrooms. Although gender differences in mathematics education have been the subject of research for many years, recent results from PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) show that there are still marked differences between the achievement and attitude of male and female students in Irish mathematics classrooms. This paper examines the influence of gender in more detail and also investigates the impact of single-sex or co-educational schooling. This is a follow on study which further analyses data collected by the authors when they designed a pedagogical framework and used this to develop, implement and evaluate a teaching intervention in four second-level Irish schools. The aim of this pedagogical framework was to promote student interest in the topic of algebra through effective teaching of the domain. This paper further analyses the quantitative data collected and investigates whether there were differences in students' enjoyment and achievement scores based on their gender and whether they attended single-sex or co-educational schools.

  16. Resilience influence, goals and social context in the academic achievement of high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Concepción Gaxiola Romero

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The academic achievement in high school students of Mexico, according to national and international evaluations has been insufficient. In spite of this situation, is possible to find excellent students, even in the context of sharing negative contextual and physical conditions. There are few investigations that describe the variables associated to resilient students. The alumni that are beyond the risks are called resilient (Rutter, 2007. The aim of this research was to explore and identify the internal variables: goals and resilience, and the external variables: risky neighborhood and risky friends that predicted the scholar achievement of high school students. To measure those variables, was used a compilation of scales validated in the region. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling, and show that resilience predicted indirectly the scholar achievement trough the academic goals. The results could be used in programs to improve the academic achievement of this group of students.

  17. Factors influencing student perceptions of high-school science laboratory environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luketic, Christine D; Dolan, Erin L

    2013-04-01

    Science laboratory learning has been lauded for decades for its role in fostering positive student attitudes about science and developing students' interest in science and ability to use equipment. An expanding body of research has demonstrated the significant influence of laboratory environment on student learning. Further research has demonstrated differences in student perceptions based on giftedness. To explore the relationship between giftedness and students' perceptions of their learning environment, we examined students' perceptions of their laboratory learning environment in biology courses, including courses designated for high-achieving versus regular-achieving students. In addition, to explore the relationship between students' perceptions and the extent of their experience with laboratory learning in a particular discipline, we examined students' perceptions of their laboratory learning environment in first-year biology courses versus elective biology courses that require first-year biology as a prerequisite. We found that students in high-achieving courses had a more favourable perception of all aspects of their learning environment when compared with students in regular courses. In addition, student perceptions of their laboratory appeared to be influenced by the extent of their experience in learning science. Perceptions were consistent amongst regular- and high-achieving students regardless of grade level. In addition, perceptions of students in first year and beyond were consistent regardless of grade level. These findings have critical applications in curriculum development as well as in the classroom. Teachers can use student perceptions of their learning environment to emphasize critical pedagogical approaches and modify other areas that enable enhancement of the science laboratory learning environment.

  18. Do indoor pollutants and thermal conditions in schools influence student performance? A critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, M J; Heath, G A

    2005-02-01

    To assess whether school environments can adversely affect academic performance, we review scientific evidence relating indoor pollutants and thermal conditions, in schools or other indoor environments, to human performance or attendance. We critically review evidence for direct associations between these aspects of indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and performance or attendance. Secondarily, we summarize, without critique, evidence on indirect connections potentially linking IEQ to performance or attendance. Regarding direct associations, little strongly designed research was available. Persuasive evidence links higher indoor concentrations of NO(2) to reduced school attendance, and suggestive evidence links low ventilation rates to reduced performance. Regarding indirect associations, many studies link indoor dampness and microbiologic pollutants (primarily in homes) to asthma exacerbations and respiratory infections, which in turn have been related to reduced performance and attendance. Also, much evidence links poor IEQ (e.g. low ventilation rate, excess moisture, or formaldehyde) with adverse health effects in children and adults and documents dampness problems and inadequate ventilation as common in schools. Overall, evidence suggests that poor IEQ in schools is common and adversely influences the performance and attendance of students, primarily through health effects from indoor pollutants. Evidence is available to justify (i) immediate actions to assess and improve IEQ in schools and (ii) focused research to guide IEQ improvements in schools. There is more justification now for improving IEQ in schools to reduce health risks to students than to reduce performance or attendance risks. However, as IEQ-performance links are likely to operate largely through effects of IEQ on health, IEQ improvements that benefit the health of students are likely to have performance and attendance benefits as well. Immediate actions are warranted in schools to prevent

  19. Geographical Influences on the Language Skill of Elementary School Students in Lae-Lae Island Makassar City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusri Yusri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how geographic factor influences students’ language skill which in this case is the mastery of vocabularies. This study is a quantitative research with sociolinguistic approach. The respondents of this study were elementary school students that live in Lae-Lae Island, Makassar City, and as for the comparison the researcher took other respondents from other elementary schools in urban areas. The researcher selected 30 students from each school. The techniques used in this study were a vocabulary mastery test, observations, and interviews. The data analysis technique is descriptive analysis and independent sample t test. The result indicates that there are significant geographical factors on the students’ vocabulary mastery. Elementary students in urban area have higher skill in mastering vocabularies than those in Lae-Lae Island. In addition, the geographical factors also influence the type of their vocabularies mastered by the students. The students from Lae-Lae Island are better in mastering marine vocabularies than those of urban areas.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF MATERIAL-TECHNICAL CONDITIONS ON SPEED MEASUREMENT OF FEMALE STUDENTS IN LOWER PRIMARY SCHOOL GRADES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živorad Marković

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to determine the influence of material-technical conditions on speed evaluation of female students in lower primery school grades, in the conditions of most frequent floors (grass, asphalt, parquet. The research was realized in primary school “Jovan Jovanovic Zmaj” in Svilajnac, republic of Serbia in the first term of 2009/2010 school year. The sample consisted of 45 female students in fourth grade of primary school. The speed of female students was evaluated by the use of two standardized movement tasks: a 30 meter running from high start and shuttle running 3x10 meters. For the evaluation of the results the following methods were used: descriptive statistics, multivariant analysis of the variance, discriminative analysis and univariant analysis of the variance. The results indicate statistically significant differences of the results of female students for both researched variables in relation to the floor. The results enable more adequate planning and content realization of physical education in lower grades of primary school.

  1. How Family Background Influences Student Achievement: Can Schools Narrow the Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalite, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    On the weekend before the Fourth of July 1966, the U.S. Office of Education quietly released a 737-page report that summarized one of the most comprehensive studies of American education ever conducted. Encompassing some 3,000 schools, nearly 600,000 students, and thousands of teachers, and produced by a team led by Johns Hopkins University…

  2. The Influence of School Factors on Racial Opportunity Cost for High-Achieving Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzant Chambers, Terah T.; Huggins, Kristin Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Previous work on racial opportunity cost--that is, the price that students of color pay in their pursuit of academic success--is extended here using organizational culture literature to more closely explore the interplay of school culture with the racial opportunity cost experienced by the study participants. Eighteen African American and Latina/o…

  3. The influence of school furniture on students' performance and physical responses: results of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Molenbroek, J F M; de Bruin, R; Viviani, C

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, using a systematic review, whether the design and/or dimensions of school furniture affect the students' physical responses and/or their performance. Of the review studies, 64% presented positive results, i.e. proven effects; 24% presented negative effects or no change/effect; and the remaining 12% showed an unclear effect. The compatibility between school furniture dimensions and students' anthropometric characteristics was identified as a key factor for improving some students' physical responses. Design characteristics such as high furniture, sit-stand furniture, and tilt tables and seats also present positive effects. Finally, we concluded that further research should be conducted exploring various aspects of those variables, particularly focusing on more objective measures complemented by controlled and prospective design. Practitioner Summary: A systematic review of the literature presents a clearly positive effect of school furniture dimensions on students' performance and physical responses. Similar results appeared when school furniture design was tested. However, studying the effects of design and dimensions together produced an unclear positive effect.

  4. The Influence of Science Summer Camp on African-American High School Students' Career Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sumita; Mead, Timothy P.; Nathaniel, Rajkumar

    2011-01-01

    This study explored if a weeklong science camp changed Louisiana African-American high school students' perception of science. A semi-structured survey was used before and after the camp to determine the changes in science attitudes and career choices. Among the perceived benefits were parental involvement, increased science academic ability, and…

  5. Tolerance of Frogs among High School Students: Influences of Disgust and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Pavol; Medina-Jerez, William; Coleman, Joy; Fancovicová, Jana; Özel, Murat; Fedor, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians play an important role in the functioning of ecosystems and some of them inhabit human gardens where they can successfully reproduce. The decline of amphibian diversity worldwide suggests that people may play a crucial role in their survival. We conducted a cross-cultural study on high school students' tolerance of frogs in Chile,…

  6. Socioeconomic influences on alcohol use patterns among private school students in São Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Danilo; Sanchez, Zila; Opaleye, Emerita; Carlini, Claudia; Noto, Ana

    2012-06-01

    To describe alcohol use by socioeconomic level and gender among private high school students in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Cross-sectional study of students in private schools in São Paulo. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was distributed in the classroom. A total of 2,613 students were selected by the stratification and conglomerate methods. Chi-squared tests, t-tests and ANOVA were used to test for associations between alcohol use and gender and socioeconomic status; for binge drinking, an ordered logistic regression model was developed. Overall, 88% of students reported lifetime alcohol use, with 31.6% in combination with energy drinks. Half of the students (51.3%) reported alcohol use in the last month, most frequently beer (35.2%), alcopop (32%) and vodka (31.7%); 33.2% reported binge drinking in the last month (5 drinks per occasion). Most evaluated parameters showed higher rates of use among males and higher social classes. The regression model exhibited an increasing rate of binge drinking with increasing socioeconomic status. The results suggest that socioeconomic features help to define alcohol use among São Paulo students. Use behaviors such as binge drinking are more prevalent among students from the upper social classes.

  7. Factors that influence students' plans to take computing and information technology subjects in senior secondary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Toni; Looker, Dianne

    2011-06-01

    This article explores factors that contribute to low participation rates in computing and information technology (CIT) courses in senior secondary school, particularly for females. Partly drawing on the Values-Expectancy Theory the following variables are explored separately and within a single model: gender, ability and values beliefs, access and use at home and at school. As well as presenting results consistent with current literature, an inclusive and eclectic model is developed. The model indicates that, in addition to gender and the student's beliefs about the value of the subjects, plans to take CIT subjects are also affected by the amount of use of IT at school. These school-related factors are inter-connected either directly or indirectly with students' beliefs about their IT abilities at both schooland home, as well as the amount of use at home. For educators who seek to improve participation rates, particularly for females, theidentification of school-related variables is encouraging, as the school - unlike the home - is a relatively accessible site of intervention.

  8. Exploring the middle school science achievement gap: Influences of curriculum, instruction and students' perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winning, Rosalie Anne

    Students' science achievement has been subject to scrutiny and criticism in the United States. The decline in rankings on standardized international assessments has been the focus of concern for educators, policy makers, parents and society at large. This study, designed as an action research, explored the factors contributing to the decrease in the number of students attaining advanced proficiency in science learning as measured by state assessments in grades four and eight in a New Jersey school district. Specifically, this study addressed the degree to which the middle school curriculum reflected the national science framework standards for 21st century leaning and the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards; the pedagogical approaches regularly planned and implemented in the middle school science classrooms; and the students' perceptions of their science learning. Research data were collected by teacher and student surveys, focus group discussions, student interviews, document reviews of written curricula, and classroom observations. An important disparity emerged between the document analysis of the local curriculum and the teachers' views that 21st century learning skills are reflected in the written curriculum and classroom pedagogy. Further, classroom observations revealed the prevalence of a traditional pedagogy, focused on repetition of teacher-disseminated information and featuring limited differentiation, inquiry-based or constructivist learning strategies. The students expressed a value for discovery and collaboration with peers in order to develop, share and refine their understanding of science. The research concluded with recommendations for a revised curriculum process, sustained and collaborative professional development, on-going formative assessments of student learning and the formal integration of an online student science blog as a means of encouraging the co-construction of deep and enduring science knowledge.

  9. Academic and socio-demographic factors influencing students' performance in a new Saudi medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Raneem O; Al-Mously, Najwa; Nabil, Nihal Mohamed; Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen H; Al-Dhawi, Abeer F; Al-Hamdan, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine factors such as the students' demographic data, motivation, educational factors and socio-cultural factors, and identify whether these factors affect the academic performance of undergraduate medical students. A cross-sectional study design utilising grade point averages (GPAs) of two cohorts of students in both levels of the pre-clinical phase. In addition, self-administered questionnaire was used to evaluate the effect of these factors on students with poor and good cumulative GPA. Academic performance was significantly affected with factors such as gender, marital status, interest and motivation, and the transportation used to reach the faculty. Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater significantly differed than those with a GPA of less than 3.0 being higher in female students, in married students, students have interest to study medicine and type of transportation used to reach the college. Factors including age, motivation, learning resources, study time and type of transportation used have shown to create a significant difference in GPA between male and females. Factors such as age, gender, marital status, interest and motivation to enter medical school, learning resources, study time and the transportation used have been shown to significantly affect medical student's cumulative GPA as a whole batch as well as when they are tested for gender.

  10. Influence of a Non-formal Environmental Education Programme on Junior High-School Students' Environmental Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daphne; Ben Zvi Assaraf, Orit; Shaharabani, Dina

    2013-02-01

    One of the solutions implemented by schools for conducting value-based environmental education (EE) is outsourcing: allocating external environmental organizations that develop and conduct EE programmes. This study addressed such a programme-the Green Council Programme (GCP)-developed and implemented in schools by the Israeli Society for Protection of Nature. A pre-test/post-test design was used to investigate the influence of participation in the GCP on components of junior high-school students' environmental literacy. Conceptualizations of 'environment', environmental attitudes and sense of ability to act on environmental issues were studied employing quantitative and qualitative tools. Contribution of the programme to the cognitive domain, in developing a systemic understanding of the environment, was limited. On the other hand, participating in this programme heightened students' sensitivity to human-environment interrelationships and developed a more ecological worldview. After the programme, students demonstrated greater perception of humans as part of the environment, an increased sensitivity to human impact on the environment and their value for non-human nature moved from an anthropocentric to a more ecocentric orientation. While students' internal locus-of-control increased, when environmental protection entailed personal economic trade-offs, their support was limited and remained unchanged. The article concludes with recommendations, based on the findings, regarding supplementing the school (science) curriculum with external EE enrichment programmes.

  11. [Analysis of current situation of physical activity and influencing factors in Chinese primary and middle school students in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Song, Yi; Yang, Tu-bao; Zhang, Bing; Dong, Bin; Ma, Jun

    2012-09-01

    To find out the current situation of physical activity and its influencing factors among Chinese primary and middle school students. A total of 166 812 students aged 9 - 18 finished the questionnaires of physical activities and lifestyle behaviors who were selected from "2010 National Physical Fitness and Health Surveillance". The subjects were sampled by stratified cluster sampling method in 30 provinces (autonomous regions, municipalities) except Tibet. The physical activity for a total of at least 60 minutes per day, attitudes on physical activity, parents' supports toward physical activity of children, development of school physical education, the schoolwork burden and sedentary lifestyle were all analyzed. Logistic regression was used to analyze the association between the physical activity for a total of at least 60 minutes per day and individual, family, school and sedentary behavior. A total of 22.7% (37 867/166 757) of primary and middle school students aged 9 - 18 had been physically active doing any kind of physical activity for a total of 60 minutes or more per day, the prevalence was higher among male (25.4%, 21 086/83 159) than female (20.1%, 16 781/83 598) students (P students (P day among students who liked physical education (23.7%, 11 866/50 073), were willing to participate in the extracurricular sports activities (23.2%, 13 460/57 907), and were willing to participate long running exercise (26.9%, 9 185/34 153) was higher than those who dislike physical education (15.9%, 589/3705), were not willing to participate in the extracurricular sports activities (15.9%, 567/3565), and were not willing to participate long running exercise (12.1%, 2 246/18 493), respectively. The prevalence was higher among students whose parents supported their physical activity (20.4%, 15 148/74 312) than those students without parents' support (17.5%, 1626/9270) (P students whose parents often took part in the physical activity (22.7%, 12 864/56 769) than those students

  12. Influence of Socioeconomic Factors and Family Social Support on Smoking and Alcohol Use among Health School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Bahar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance dependence is a global problem threatening individuals and communities alike by negatively influencing public health and social cohesion.Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of socioeconomic factors and family social support on substance use and/or dependence among health school students.Results: A significant difference was found between student substance users and nonusers in terms of age, grade level, educational level and vocational status of the student’s mother and father, and substance use among family members (p<0.05. On the other hand, it was determined that there was no influence of departments of the students, receiving any training on substance use, perceived family social support, and educational level of the student’s father on the substance use (p0.05.Conclusion: The findings of our study suggest that family social support is an important determinant of students’ substance use and therefore families need to be aware of the consequences of such behaviors. Trainings on overcoming the stress and information about use and/or abuse of substances should be given to the first-grade students in Samsun Health School to prevent the onset of substance use, and the frequency of such training sessions should be increased especially at the fourth grade.

  13. What influences urban Indian secondary school students' food consumption? - A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Neha; Riddell, Lynn; Worsley, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Indian adolescents' over reliance on foods such as nutrient-poor snacks, sugar-sweetened beverages and take-away foods puts them at significant risk of obesity and several diet-related chronic diseases. Therefore, the factors that influence their dietary behaviours need to be better understood in order to develop effective nutrition promotion strategies. The purpose of this qualitative inquiry was to investigate adolescents', parents', teachers', and school principals' perceptions of the main influences on adolescent eating behaviours. Fifteen adolescents aged 14-15 years, 15 parents, 12 teachers and 10 principals from 10 private English-speaking schools in Kolkata, India, participated in semi-structured interviews. The digitally-recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. The 52 interviews revealed a number of factors that may influence adolescents' eating habits including parent and peer influences, home and school food environments, and the mass media. Emerging evidence suggests that future health and nutrition promotion interventions need to target the different influences on Indian teenagers' food consumption. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Influence of parenting style on the academic performance of middle school students

    OpenAIRE

    María José Domínguez; Montserrat Guasch

    2014-01-01

    Students who don't succeed in school are a persistent problem in our educational system. This fact shows that all the efforts to reduce this problem are not succeeding. One third of our students are left behind by the educational system; their results are discouraging. The measures to fight the academic failure are not working and that we have to put into practice new ways of analysis and treatment of this problem. This research explores the relationship between the way children perceive the ...

  15. Influence of Learning Environment on Students' Academic Achievement in Mathematics: A Case Study of Some Selected Secondary Schools in Yobe State-Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaki, Timothy Ado

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the influence of learning environment on students' academic achievement in mathematics at senior secondary school level. Thus the study investigated some components of learning environment and their possible influence on students' academic achievement in mathematics. A sample of 337 randomly selected SS II…

  16. A Study of the Influence of a Writing Intervention and Selected Demographic Factors on the Writing and Reading Achievement of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Square-Miller, Rhoshanda

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a writing intervention on the writing and reading achievement of middle school students. Specifically, this study was concerned with 6th grade students who were exposed to a writing intervention and those 6th grade students who were not exposed to a writing intervention with regards to…

  17. [Investigation of influencing factors associated with neck-shoulder symptoms among middle school students in three cities in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L; Wan, Y H; Liu, W; Zhang, S C; Ma, S S; Xu, S J; Zhai, L L; Zhang, H; Cao, X J; Tao, F B

    2017-09-06

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the distribution of neck-shoulder symptoms among middle school students, and to explore its influence factors. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 24 middle schools in Shenyang, Zhengzhou and Shenzhen by purposive sampling method. In each middle school, 3 to 4 classes were selected from each grade all the students in the selected class would be recruited to the survey to investigate the demographic characteristics, neck-shoulder symptoms, physical exercise time, academic stress, screen behavior, sedentary behavior and other information by questionnaire. A total of 10 566 questionnaires were issued and 10 270 valid questionnaires were withdrawn. The prevalence of neck-shoulder symptoms among students were compared by different characteristics. Logistic regression models were applied to examine influencing factors associated with neck-shoulder symptoms. Results: The prevalence of neck-shoulder symptoms among middle school students was 19.2% (1 968/10 270), while it was 22.6% (1 137/5 039) among girls and 15.9% (831/5 231) among boys; the difference showed statistical significance (Pmobile phone ≥40 min continuously (OR=4.66, 95%CI: 3.95-5.49), watching TV ≥40 min continuously (OR=4.01, 95%CI: 3.39-4.73), using computer ≥40 min continuously (OR=3.61, 95%CI: 3.09-4.23), doing homework ≥60 min continuously (OR=3.25, 95%CI: 2.79-3.79), the average daily sitting time ≥10 h (OR=4.95, 95%CI: 4.25-5.77), and always sitting ≥90 min continuously (OR=5.18, 95%CI: 4.42-6.06) were risk factors of neck-shoulder symptoms. Conclusion: The prevalence of neck-shoulder symptoms was high among middle school students in China, especially girls in senior grades. Long time, high frequency video behaviors and sedentary behaviors were related to the occurrence of neck-shoulder symptoms among middle school students.

  18. [Analysis of influencing factors on physical endurance of Chinese primary and middle school students aged 10 to 17].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-hui; Ma, Jun; Wang, Hai-jun; Dong, Bin; Fu, Lian-guo; Song, Yi; Hu, Pei-jin; Yang, Yi-de; Wu, Li-jing; Meng, Xiang-rui

    2013-08-01

    To explore the influencing factors on physical endurance among Chinese primary and middle school students aged 10-17. Data was used from "2010 National Physical Fitness and Health Surveillance", from which 68 458 primary and middle school students with complete information were selected. Good physical endurance was defined as endurance running time ≤ P 25 of same gender and age, poor physical endurance as ≥ P 75 of same gender and age. Difference of endurance running time in different physical endurance groups was compared; chi-square test, logistic regression and multiple level model were used to analyze influence of region, BMI, diet, exercise and exercise willingness on physical endurance. There were 34 293 (50.0%) students of good physical endurance and 34 219 (50.0%) ones of poor physical endurance in 68 458 subjects. Percentage of good physical endurance was 53.8% (18 285/33 996) in rural students, higher than urban ones (46.3% (15 954/34 462)) (χ(2) = 384.16, P students, lower than normal (55.2% (28 183/51 028)), overweight (29.3% (2012/6874)) and emaciated ones (52.1% (3596/6896)) (χ(2) = 3840.08, P students having breakfast everyday, higher than ones never having breakfast or 1-2 times per week (41.3% (3209/7768))(χ(2) = 438.31, P students having milk everyday, slightly higher than ones never or sometimes having milk (49.2% (22 659/46 079)) (χ(2) = 39.84, P students with adequate physical education class, higher than ones with inadequate class (44.7% (15 278/34 144)) (χ(2) = 756.41, P students with one hour exercise or more per day, higher than ones with less than one hour exercise (47.4% (24 755/52 263)) (χ(2) = 619.82, P students who were "very willing" to take part in endurance running, higher than "generally willing" ones (45.4% (10 569/23 272)) and "not willing" ones (33.5% (4383/13 068)) (χ(2) = 2909.61, P students (OR = 0.80, 95%CI: 0.77-0.82) than urban ones. Risk in emaciated students (OR = 1.11, 95%CI: 1.05-1.17), overweight students

  19. Video surveillance captures student hand hygiene behavior, reactivity to observation, and peer influence in Kenyan primary schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy J Pickering

    Full Text Available In-person structured observation is considered the best approach for measuring hand hygiene behavior, yet is expensive, time consuming, and may alter behavior. Video surveillance could be a useful tool for objectively monitoring hand hygiene behavior if validated against current methods.Student hand cleaning behavior was monitored with video surveillance and in-person structured observation, both simultaneously and separately, at four primary schools in urban Kenya over a study period of 8 weeks.Video surveillance and in-person observation captured similar rates of hand cleaning (absolute difference <5%, p = 0.74. Video surveillance documented higher hand cleaning rates (71% when at least one other person was present at the hand cleaning station, compared to when a student was alone (48%; rate ratio  = 1.14 [95% CI 1.01-1.28]. Students increased hand cleaning rates during simultaneous video and in-person monitoring as compared to single-method monitoring, suggesting reactivity to each method of monitoring. This trend was documented at schools receiving a handwashing with soap intervention, but not at schools receiving a sanitizer intervention.Video surveillance of hand hygiene behavior yields results comparable to in-person observation among schools in a resource-constrained setting. Video surveillance also has certain advantages over in-person observation, including rapid data processing and the capability to capture new behavioral insights. Peer influence can significantly improve student hand cleaning behavior and, when possible, should be exploited in the design and implementation of school hand hygiene programs.

  20. The Influence of Reciprocal interactions in the Family on Academic Performance among Secondary School Students in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rael Achieng Ogwari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the influence of reciprocal interactions in the family on academic performance among secondary school students in Siaya District. Stratified and purposive sampling techniques were used to select the study participants. The sample comprised of a total of 243 students (154 boys and 89 girls drawn from 27 public coeducational schools in the district.  Data was collected using student questionnaires. The researchers’ judgment of the representativeness of the items in the questionnaire to the study topic was used to determine content validity of the instrument while Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to ascertain validity and reliability of the instrument. Linear regression analysis and one way Analysis of Variance were used to analyze data. The results revealed significant relationship between reciprocal interactions in the family and academic performance of students. There was positive correlation between parental expectation, autonomy granting, cross-sex behaviour and students’ academic performance. Siblings’ sex dyads and birth order were also found to correlate with students’ academic performance. The findings may be used by policy makers to sensitize parents and students on the significance of specific interactions in the family on academic performance.

  1. High School Students Debate the Use of Embryonic Stem Cells: The influence of context on decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinatti, Grégoire; Girault, Yves; Hammond, Constance

    2010-11-01

    The present study analyzes decision-making and argumentation by high school students in a debate situation on a socioscientific issue, the use of embryonic stem cells in research and therapy. We tested the influence on the debates of two different contexts. Adolescent students at the high school level in the same grade (mean age 16.4 years) from rural and urban zones of Provence, France, participated in three debate sessions. During the first session, the students listed the background questions they wanted to ask the expert(s). They were also required to identify one or two major issues that would serve as an outline for the future debate. They then discussed these with the expert(s) during the second session and took note of the answers. During this session, the control groups met with a neuroscientist whereas the experimental 'contextualized' group met with the same neuroscientist together with a representative of an association of patients suffering from a neurodegenerative disease. Analysis of the students' arguments and decision-making revealed that contextualization introduced dynamism in the students' exchanges: they paid more attention to their peers' arguments and were more motivated to argue their own opinion. However, this type of contextualization may contribute to reinforcing ideology in scientific progress.

  2. Law School Intentions of Undergraduate Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Thomas; Flanagan, David J.; Palmer, Timothy B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that influence business students' intentions to enroll in law school. Scant research has focused on factors that influence business students' decisions to enroll in law school. This paper attempts to fill that gap. Hypotheses about student intentions are based on Ajzen & Fishbein's (1977) Theory…

  3. Revisiting School Ethos: The Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Archie

    2012-01-01

    A positive school ethos is considered a key factor contributing to successful school improvement. Yet, despite its assumed educational influence, little is known about how ethos in schools is experienced by students. This study takes a fresh look at school ethos through the meanings which final year students attribute to their lived experience of…

  4. Driving under the influence behaviours among high school students who mix alcohol with energy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Maria N; Cumming, Tammy; Burkhalter, Robin; Langille, Donald B; Ogilvie, Rachel; Asbridge, Mark

    2017-11-29

    Alcohol and energy drinks are commonly used substances by youth in Canada, and are often mixed (AmED). While several studies have shown that AmED can have dangerous effects, less well understood is how AmED is associated with driving under the influence of either alcohol or drugs. This study sought to determine whether youth who use AmED were more likely to engage in driving, or being a passenger of a driver, under the influence of alcohol or cannabis compared to youth who use either alcohol or energy drinks alone. This study used data from grade 10-12 students who took part in the 2014/2015 Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (N=17,450). The association of past-year AmED use with past-30day: driving under the influence of alcohol or cannabis, and riding with an alcohol- or cannabis-influenced driver, was assessed using logistic regression. One in four youth had consumed AmED in the previous 12months. AmED users were more likely to engage in all risk behaviours except riding with a drinking driver, relative to youth who only consumed alcohol. No association was observed for youth who consumed alcohol and energy drinks on separate occasions. Youth who use AmED demonstrate a higher risk profile for driving under the influence of alcohol or cannabis, than youth who use alcohol alone. Future research should explore the biopsychosocial pathways that may explain why using energy drinks enhances the already heightened risk posed by alcohol on other health-related behaviours such as driving under the influence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Can teaching research methodology influence students' attitude toward science? Cohort study and nonrandomized trial in a single medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujaklija, Ana; Hren, Darko; Sambunjak, Dario; Vodopivec, Ivana; Ivanis, Ana; Marusić, Ana; Marusić, Matko

    2010-02-01

    Medical teaching aims to develop attitudes and behaviors underlying professional competence of future physicians. We investigated whether a mandatory course on scientific methodology in the second study year could affect students' attitudes toward science in medicine. In a longitudinal study, students (n = 241) enrolling in 2001-2002 academic year at a single medical school were followed up until graduation in 2006-2007. Each year, they filled out a Likert-type questionnaire of 18 statements evaluating attitude toward science. Direct influence of the course on students' attitudes was tested in a nonrandomized controlled trial with the 2006-2007 second year student cohort. Positive students' attitudes toward science increased during study years (mean [SD] score of the maximum score of 90): from 57.6 (6.0) in the first to 69.8 (10.4) in the sixth year. There was a significant trend of increase in attitudes with the years of study (cubic trend by polynomial contrasts analysis, P = 0.011). Attendance of a course on research methodology significantly increased positive attitudes (score, 67.0 [7.0] before and 70.8 [7.5] after course, P = 0.032 vs control group), regardless of grade point average. The intervention had an effect even when the influence of the initial attitude was accounted for (F1,140 = 9.25, P = 0.003; analysis of covariance). The attitude changes after the course was greatest in students with low initial attitude scores (Spearman rinitial score, score difference, -0.44). Medical students have positive attitudes toward science and scientific method in medicine. Attendance of a course on research methodology had positive short-term effect on students' attitudes toward science. This positive effect should be maintained by vertical integration of the course in the medical curriculum.

  6. Factors influencing students' usage of school bus seat belts: an empirical analysis of the Alabama pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yingyan; Mehta, Gaurav; Turner, Daniel S

    2011-09-01

    The Alabama State Department of Education and the Governor's Study Group on School Bus Seat Belts authorized and funded a research project to investigate the effects of lap-shoulder seat belts on Alabama school buses. This article performs an empirical analysis to address an important component of the study - factors that impact students' decisions about wearing seat belts or not on school buses. Discrete choice modeling framework is applied to quantify relative influences of various factors. To obtain the disaggregate level information on individual student's characteristics and trip properties, a new data collection protocol is developed. Eleven variables are investigated and eight of them are found to have significant impacts. They are age, gender, the home county of a student, a student's trip length, time of day, presence and active involvement of bus aide, and two levels of bus driver involvement. The resulting model fits the data well and reveals several trends that have been overlooked or underestimated in the literature. The model can also be used to predict the change of seat belt usage rate caused by the change of impact factors. This is helpful in identifying the most cost-effective ways to improve compliance rate, which is critical to bring the added safety benefit of seat belts into effect. This article is the first to quantify relative impacts of a range of variables using rigorous statistical modeling techniques. This study will contribute to the literature and provide valuable insights to the practice of school transportation management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Influence of Religion and High School Biology Courses on Students' Knowledge of Evolution When They Enter College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Randy; Cotner, Sehoya; Bates, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Students whose high school biology course included evolution but not creationism knew more about evolution when they entered college than did students whose courses included evolution plus creationism or whose courses included neither evolution nor creationism. Similarly, students who believed that their high school biology classes were the…

  8. The provision of healthy food in a school tuck shop: does it influence primary-school students' perceptions, attitudes and behaviours towards healthy eating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Francette; Marais, Maritha; Koen, Nelene

    2017-05-01

    To investigate students' tuck shop buying behaviour, choices of lunchbox items and healthy eating perceptions and attitudes at a school with a nutritionally regulated tuck shop and a school with a conventional tuck shop. Mixed-methods research comprising a cross-sectional survey and focus groups. Bloemfontein, South Africa. Randomly selected grade 2 to 7 students from a school with a nutritionally regulated tuck shop (school A; n 116) and a school with a conventional tuck shop (school B; n 141) completed a self-administered questionnaire about perceptions, attitudes, buying behaviours and lunchbox content. Six students per grade (n 72) in each school took part in focus group discussions to further explore concepts pertaining to healthy eating. In school A, older students had a negative attitude towards their 'healthy' tuck shop, while younger students were more positive. School B students were positive towards their conventional tuck shop. In both schools students wanted their tuck shop to allow them to choose from healthy and unhealthy items. School A students mostly bought slushies, iced lollies and baked samoosas, while school B students mostly bought sweets and crisps. The lunchboxes of school A students contained significantly (Pparents who are responsible for preparing lunchboxes.

  9. Factors That Influence School Board Policy Making: The Political Context of Student Diversity in Urban-Suburban Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Sarah; Frankenberg, Erica; Cleary, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article examines factors that affect school board policy making about student diversity within two southern urban-suburban school districts experiencing changing demographics: Jefferson County Public Schools and the Wake County Public School System. Both districts have a history of voluntary integration efforts, and research shows…

  10. Fun, influence and competence-a mixed methods study of prerequisites for high school students' participation in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildsnes, Eirik; Rohde, Gudrun; Berntsen, Sveinung; Stea, Tonje H

    2017-03-10

    Many adolescents do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity (PA), and students attending vocational studies are less committed to take part in physical education (PE) than other students. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to examine differences in physical activity, diet, smoking habits, sleep and screen time among Norwegian vocational high school students who selected either a PE model focusing on PA skills, technique and improvement of physical performance ("Sports enjoyment") or more on health, play and having fun when participating in PE lessons ("Motion enjoyment"), and 2) to explore the students' experiences with PE programs. In this mixed methods study 181 out of 220 invited students (82%) comprising 141 (78%) girls and 40 (22%) boys attending vocational studies of Restaurant and Food Processing (24%), Design, Arts and Crafts (27%) or Healthcare, Childhood and Youth Development (49%) were recruited for participation in the new PE program. PA level, sedentary time and sleep were objectively recorded using the SenseWear Armband Mini. A self-report questionnaire was used to assess dietary habits, smoking and snuffing habits, use of alcohol, screen use and active transportation. Four focus group interviews with 23 students (12 boys) were conducted to explore how the students experienced the new PE program. Students attending "Motion enjoyment" accrued less steps/day compared to the "Sports enjoyment" group (6661 (5514, 7808) vs.9167 (7945, 10390) steps/day) and reported higher screen use (mean, 3.1; 95% CI, 2.8, 3.5) vs. 2.4 (2.0, 2.9) hours/day). Compared to those attending "Sports enjoyment", a higher number of students attending "Motion enjoyment" reported an irregular meal pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 5.40; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.28, 12.78), and being a current smoker (12.22 (1.62, 107.95)). The students participating in the focus group interviews emphasized the importance of having competent and engaging teachers

  11. Interactive Physics Apparatus: Influence on Interest of Secondary School Students in Pursuing a Career Path in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrica, Joel V.; Abiasen, Jovalson T.; Dolipas, Bretel B.; Ramos, Jennifer Lyn S.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we present results of our endeavours as physics educators to facilitate and support pedagogical change and development in the educational system of a developing country, the Philippines. We have discovered that the interaction of junior high school (years 7-10) students with physics apparatus can influence students' interest in…

  12. Influence of teachers' competence on students academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of teachers' competence on students; academic performance in senior secondary school chemistry. A random sampling technique was used to select 6 secondary schools out of 12 secondary schools in Yala Local Government Area of Cross River State. 200 students, 20 teachers and 6 ...

  13. Factors influencing fast food consumption behaviors of middle-school students in Seoul: an application of theory of planned behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyun-Sun; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Nam, Soyoung

    2011-04-01

    Fast food is popular among children and adolescents; however, its consumption has often been associated with negative impacts on nutrition and health. This study examined current fast food consumption status among middle school students and explored factors influencing fast food consumption by applying Theory of Planned Behavior. A total of 354 (52.5% boys) students were recruited from a middle school. The subjects completed a pre-tested questionnaire. The average monthly frequency of fast food consumption was 4.05 (4.25 for boys, 3.83 for girls). As expected, fast food consumption was considered to be a special event rather than part of an everyday diet, closely associated with meeting friends or celebrating, most likely with friends, special days. The Theory of Planned Behavior effectively explained fast food consumption behaviors with relatively high R(2) around 0.6. Multiple regression analyses showed that fast food consumption behavior was significantly related to behavioral intention (b = 0.61, P fast food consumption was not significantly associated with behavioral intention. Therefore, effective nutrition education programs on fast food consumption should include components to change the subjective norms of fast food consumption, especially among peers, and perceived behavioral control. Further studies should examine effective ways of changing subjective norms and possible alternatives to fast food consumption for students to alter perceived behavioral control.

  14. The Influence of Loneliness and Interpersonal Relations on Latina/o Middle School Students' Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Dagoberto, Jr.; Sanchéz Gonzalez, Mayra L.; Rosner, Christine M.; He, Xiao; Castillo, Linda G.; Ojeda, Lizette

    2017-01-01

    This study examined associations of loneliness and relationships (e.g., teacher/student relationships, peer support, and family support) with wellbeing among Latina/o middle school students. A hierarchical regression analysis demonstrated that age and loneliness predicted wellbeing; older students and students with high levels of loneliness…

  15. Accessing perceptions of high school teachers about the influence of language and culture in the mathematics learning of English Language Learners (ELL) students.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Milton

    2013-01-01

    This study discusses the challenges faced by high school teachers in providing an environment that successfully maximizes the learning experiences of English Language Learners (ELL) students. It also focuses on the perceptions of these teachers concerning the challenges faced by ELL students in relation to standardized high-stakes tests. In this regard, one of the purposes of this study is to determine how these perceptions are influenced by an understanding of the influences of the diverse l...

  16. German high school students' attitudes and interest in cancer and factors influencing proactive behaviour for cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuckmann, Benedikt; Asshoff, Roman

    2014-09-01

    Cancer diseases are pertinent topics to young people, who are confronted with the issue through media or family members that suffer from these diseases. Based on a paper-and-pencil questionnaire, we investigated German high school students' (N = 369, 16-18 years old) interest in and their attitudes towards cancer. Attitude was assessed measuring multiple dimensions that included scales to measure several components: the cognitive (beliefs about the controllability of cancer), the affective (emotional responses towards cancer) and the behavioural (intention for proactive behaviour towards cancer) components. A student assessment of carcinogenic risk factor was executed. Our results suggest that students' willingness to deal with the topic cancer (e.g. to communicate about cancer or to reconsider their lifestyle) is highly dependent on their interest, their emotional responses and their beliefs about the controllability of cancer. Their assessment of carcinogenic risk factors does not have a direct influence on their intentions to behave proactively against cancer but might have an indirect influence on their beliefs about the controllability of cancer. Based on these results, we have drawn teaching implications and discussed which factors should be included in teaching processes in order to stimulate proactive behaviour related to cancer prevention.

  17. The influence of affective teacher‐student relationships on students’ school engagement and achievement: a meta‐analytic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, D.L.; Koomen, H.M.Y.; Spilt, J.L.; Oort, F.J.

    2010-01-01

    A meta-analytic approach was used to investigate the associations between affective qualities of teacher-student relationships (TSRs) and students’ school engagement and achievement. Results were based on 99 studies, including students from preschool to high school. Separate analyses were conducted

  18. Gifted Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigandi, Carla B.; Siegle, Del; Weiner, Jennie M.; Gubbins, E. Jean; Little, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Grounded in the Enrichment Triad and Achievement Orientation Models, this qualitative case study builds understanding of the relationship between participation in Type III Enrichment and the achievement orientation attitude of goal valuation in gifted secondary school students. Participants included 10 gifted secondary school students, their…

  19. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE IN SEDENTARY LIFESTYLE OF STUDENTS OF FOURTH CYCLE OF A PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Álvarez Bogantes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There is sufficient evidence to say that women as they move into the education system to reduce physical activity levels of sedentary lifestyle that put them at higher risk for non-communicable diseases. This led to determine the reasons for the inactivity of a group of fourth cycle. In order to address this problem, a qualitative design using focus groups and depth interviews was used, applied to30 women of high school participated. The results indicate that the participants are unaware of the benefits that can give them an active life, possibly affecting their movement behavior. A key element that have expressed is little impact of physical education classes when promoting lifestyles movement of the participants in this study, especially for ignoring the needs and barriers that students have. Become clear that the sport orientation of physical education classes and lack the skills to participate in activities successfully, sedentary activities of friends, the attitudes of parents; curriculum and lack of facilities also have significant impact in the studied group.

  20. Eating attitudes in English secondary school students: influences of ethnicity, gender, mood, and social class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Catherine L; James, Anthony C; Bachmann, Max O

    2002-01-01

    To examine the effects of ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic position, self-esteem, and emotion on eating attitudes in adolescents. Questionnaire survey of 722 students in two English schools, using Eating Attitude Test-26 (EAT), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and Angold vMood and Feeling instruments. EAT scores were significantly higher for Asians and Muslims and for mixed-race subjects than for White or African Caribbean subjects (p =.003). Adjusted odds ratios for having a very high EAT score (>20) were 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-6.0) in Asians and Muslims and 2.9 (95% CI 1.3-18.6) in mixed-race subjects, compared with White subjects. Having only one parent employed was also independently associated with a very high EAT score, compared with having both parents employed. Similar associations were found for a moderately high EAT score (>10) and for a combination of low self-esteem and high EAT score. Low self-esteem and depressed mood were independently associated with a high EAT score. Ethnicity, socioeconomic position, self-esteem, and depression, but not gender, were independently associated with eating attitudes. Effects of cultural and socioeconomic stresses on eating disorders may be mediated through depressed mood and low self-esteem. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  1. School Influences on Child and Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osher, David; Kendziora, Kimberly; Spier, Elizabeth; Garibaldi, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Schools play a key role in child and youth development as both social microcosms of the broader society and reciprocally influencing people and communities. As such, schools can function as a protective factor that promotes safety, motivation, relationships, and support for positive student outcomes. However, schools may also function as a risk…

  2. The Influence of Surface and Deep Cues on Primary and Secondary School Students' Assessment of Relevance in Web Menus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, Jean-Francois; Ros, Christine; Goumi, Antonine; Macedo-Rouet, Monica; Dinet, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments investigated primary and secondary school students' Web menu selection strategies using simulated Web search tasks. It was hypothesized that students' selections of websites depend on their perception and integration of multiple relevance cues. More specifically, students should be able to disentangle superficial cues (e.g.,…

  3. Factors Influencing the Acquisition of Employability Skills by Students of Selected Technical Secondary School in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dania, Jovinia; Bakar, Ab Rahim; Mohamed, Shamsiah

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to assess the acquisition of employability skills by vocational students in Malaysia. A total of 214 students participated in the study. We used the SCANS instrument to assess vocational students' employability skills. The overall mean of vocational secondary students' employability skills was 3.81 (SD = 0.34).…

  4. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in elementary school students in Shantou, China: prevalence, subtypes, and influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Yanhong Huang,1 Shaoxiong Zheng,1 Chongtao Xu,1 Kun Lin,2 Kusheng Wu,2 Maochun Zheng,1 Jie Zhang,1 Haiyun Xu1 1Mental Health Center, 2Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, China Abstract: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a frequent childhood-onset psychiatric condition and categorized into three subtypes of predominantly inattentive (ADHD-I, hyperactive impulsive (ADHD-H, and combined (ADHD-C. The prevalence and subtypes of ADHD vary considerably. The primary aim of this study was to provide a prevalence estimate of ADHD in elementary school students living in Shantou, a district of China, and in addition to examine the influence of informants, age, and gender on the prevalence. A total of 3,497 students aged 7–12 years were enrolled by random and stratified sampling. In stage I, teachers and parents of all participating students in randomly selected schools were asked to complete Chinese versions of the Conners’ 10-item scale. In stage II, students with high scores (.15 were interviewed by a psychiatrist for a diagnosis with or without ADHD. Parents rated many more students with high scores than teachers did in stage I. The prevalence of ADHD determined by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5 was 5.91% (5.27%–6.55%, which is comparable to the rates reported in previous studies with Chinese children. This hits the low border of the ADHD prevalence range from 5.9 to 7.1% worldwide, and is lower than that of Chinese children living in Hong Kong, suggesting an important influence of Chinese culture on the diagnosis of ADHD. The constituent ratios of ADHD-I, ADHD-C, and ADHD-H subtypes were 67.43, 24.57, and 8.00%, respectively. The rate of ADHD-H decreased with age, whereas that of ADHD-I remained at the highest levels in all age groups, suggesting that symptoms in the inattention domain are the most persistent and refractory. Keywords

  5. How Do School Peers Influence Student Educational Outcomes? Theory and Evidence from Economics and Other Social Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Interest among social scientists in peer influences has grown with recent resegregation of the nation's schools and court decisions that limit the ability of school districts to consider race in school assignment decisions. If having more advantaged peers is beneficial, then these trends may reduce educational equity. Previous studies…

  6. Influencing factors for the degree of myopia in the primary and middle school students in Pudong New District of Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Feng Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the influencing factors for the degree of myopia in the primary and middle school students in Pudong district of Shanghai.METHODS:A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 3 295 students in Pudong district from September to October in 2014. These students had been given vision examination and finished a questionnaire survey. Data of the survey was analyzed with rank-sum test and ordinal logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Single factor analysis showed that there was statistical relation on degree of myopia with the grade, myopia in parents. Although there was no statistical difference between the genders, degree of myopia was different between boys and girls in different grades. There was no statistical relation on degree of myopia with time used on playing computer and mobile phone, outdoor activity time, establishment of refractive development file or monophagia. Ordinal regression analysis showed that there were statistical differences on grade, myopia in parents, establishment of refractive development file, time used on playing computer and mobile phone, frequence of wearing glasses and how to realize myopia. CONCLUSION: Grade and myopia in parents were the risk factors for degree of myopia. Ophthalmologists should strengthen the health education on myopia, advise to establish refractive development file as early as possible, monitor regularly for focus groups and control myopia progression actively.

  7. Frequent fliers, school phobias, and the sick student: school health personnel's perceptions of students who refuse school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens Armstrong, Anna M; McCormack Brown, Kelli R; Brindley, Roger; Coreil, Jeannine; McDermott, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    This study explored school personnel's perceptions of school refusal, as it has been described as a "common educational and public health problem" that is less tolerated due to increasing awareness of the potential socioeconomic consequences of this phenomenon. In-depth interviews were conducted with school personnel at the middle school (N = 42), high school (N = 40), and district levels (N = 10). The findings focus on emergent themes from interviews with school health personnel (N = 12), particularly those themes related to their perceptions of and role in working with school-refusing students. Personnel, especially school health services staff, constructed a typification of the school-refusing student as "the sick student," which conceptualized student refusal due to reasons related to illness. Personnel further delineated sick students by whether they considered the illness legitimate. School health personnel referenced the infamous "frequent fliers" and "school phobics" within this categorization of students. Overarching dynamics of this typification included parental control, parental awareness, student locus of control, blame, and victim status. These typifications influenced how personnel reacted to students they encountered, particularly in deciding which students need "help" versus "discipline," thus presenting implications for students and screening of students. Overall, findings suggest school health personnel play a pivotal role in screening students who are refusing school as well as keeping students in school, underscoring policy that supports an increased presence of school health personnel. Recommendations for school health, prevention, and early intervention include the development of screening protocols and staff training. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  8. The influence of outdoor school yard experiences on elementary students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and comfort levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sarah Carrier

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of outdoor school yard activities on elementary students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and comfort levels in the outdoors. In addition, the interaction of students' gender with each of these variables was examined. Data were collected on 105 students in 4th- and 5th-grade public school classes in Gainesville, Florida. Two intact classes were used, one treatment and one control group at each grade level. The treatment group students participated in 14 weeks of weekly outdoor school yard activities exploring environmental science knowledge and attitude topics in a systems context. Pearson correlation coefficients and Cronbach coefficient alpha were used for analysis of the researcher-designed instruments, and ANCOVA was used to analyze the data. The results of the analyses (p < 05) revealed that 5th-grade students' who participated in the outdoor school yard activities showed significant differences in environmental knowledge when compared with the 5th-grade control group students who had no outdoor school yard experiences. Although the results of the study indicated that outdoor school yard experiences do not impact students' environmental attitudes, behaviors, or comfort levels in the outdoors, significant gender differences were found in 5th-grade females' environmental attitudes and behaviors when compared with 5th-grade males. The results of this study indicate the potential for effective use of the school yard for helping students learn firsthand about environmental knowledge and issues. Because the school yard offers teachers and students a readily available and convenient outdoor learning setting, its use in environmental education merits further research.

  9. What affects teacher ratings of student behaviors? The potential influence of teachers' perceptions of the school environment and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2014-12-01

    Teachers serve as the natural raters of students within the school and classroom contexts. Yet teachers' ratings of their students may vary based on these contextual factors. The current study explored the extent to which teacher perceptions of the school environment predict their longitudinal ratings of student behaviors. Data for this study come from 702 teachers in 42 elementary schools. Teachers self-reported their perceptions of the school context at a single time point, and provided ratings of their students' behavior via the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaption-Checklist (TOCA-C) across three school years. Latent profile analysis identified three latent classes of teachers based on their ratings of school organizational health, burnout, and efficacy. A regression framework demonstrated an association between the baseline profiles in relation to TOCA-C ratings of student behavior across 3 years. Teachers with more favorable perceptions of the environment had lower initial ratings of concentration problems, disruptive behavior, and internalizing symptoms, and higher ratings of prosocial behaviors and family involvement. They also showed slower growth in their ratings of emotion dysregulation and greater increases of their ratings of family involvement over time. This work is particularly important for determining the extent to which teacher ratings may be biased by teacher and contextual factors, and may have implications for the identification of teachers who may rate students poorly over time.

  10. The Influence of Placement in an Inclusive Classroom on the Academic Performance of Non-Disabled Eleventh Grade Students in a Suburban New Jersey School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jocelyn Easley; Babo, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence, if any; assignment to an inclusive secondary language arts classroom setting has on the academic performance of grade 11 nondisabled general education students in two suburban New Jersey High Schools. Using a sampling process known as Propensity Score Matching (PSM), a statistical technique…

  11. Contextual Influences on Sources of Academic Self-Efficacy: A Validation with Secondary School Students of Kerala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafoor, K. Abdul; Ashraf, P. Muhammed

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the theorized sources of Academic Self-Efficacy among the higher secondary school students of Kerala, India. Mastery Experience in the form of Academic Achievement, vicarious experience in the form of School Image and Social Persuasion in the form of Parental Encouragement are included as the predictor variables of Academic…

  12. The influence of school size, leadership, evaluation, and time on student outcomes: four reviews and meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    School effectiveness research addresses the question why and how some schools are more effective than others when the differences in achievement cannot be attributed to student intake and educational background characteristics. A main aim is to identify and investigate those malleable conditions at

  13. Modeling the Influences of Upper-Elementary School Students' Digital Reading Literacy, Socioeconomic Factors, and Self-Regulated Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shin-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Reading is an interactive and constructive process of making meaning by engaging a variety of materials and sources and by participating in reading communities at school or in daily life. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting digital reading literacy among upper-elementary school students. Method: A…

  14. Analysis of Factors Influencing Interest in STEM Career: Comparison between American and Turkish High School Students with High Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Abdulkadir; Adiguzel, Tufan

    2016-01-01

    The low number of students studying or applying for STEM subjects and workforce demand has been prioritized in almost all countries policies. This study intended to examine factors that influenced American and Turkish students to pursue a degree or career in STEM-related fields. Participants of the study were 86 high-ability students selected from…

  15. The Influence of Toy Design Activities on Middle School Students' Understanding of the Engineering Design Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ninger; Pereira, Nielsen L.; Tarun, Thomas George; Alperovich, Jeffrey; Booth, Joran; Chandrasegaran, Senthil; Tew, Jeffrey David; Kulkarni, Devadatta M.; Ramani, Karthik

    2017-01-01

    The societal demand for inspiring and engaging science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students and preparing our workforce for the emerging creative economy has necessitated developing students' self-efficacy and understanding of engineering design processes from as early as elementary school levels. Hands-on engineering design…

  16. Compelling Evidence: An Influence on Middle School Students' Accounts That May Impact Decision-Making about Socioscientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, Katherine; Harlow, Danielle; Whitmer, Ali; Gaines, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how middle school students make hypothetical purchasing, consuming, and voting decisions about environmental and science-related issues--a key component of environmental literacy. Fifty-three female students were given a packet containing multiple excerpts of information from conflicting positions from stakeholders and…

  17. Dynamics of teacher-student relationships: stability and change across elementary school and the influence on children's academic success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilt, J.L.; Hughes, J.N.; Wu, J.Y.; Kwok, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study modeled teacher-student relationship trajectories throughout elementary school to predict gains in achievement in an ethnic-diverse sample of 657 academically at-risk students (mean age = 6.57 years, SD = .39). Teacher reports of warmth and conflict were collected in Grades 1-5.

  18. Parents' and peers' normative influence on adolescents' smoking: results from a Swiss-Italian sample of middle schools students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici, Francesca; Schulz, Peter J

    2017-01-21

    Adolescents observe and imitate people to whom they are associated in their social context, and the normative factors sent out by reference groups are crucial determinants of their decision to smoke. The aim of the study is to investigate how adolescents' smoking changes when they are exposed to factors of pro-smoking normative influence by parents and peers, and how age moderate this relation. A cross sectional survey collected data from 5657 students, aged between 11 and 14, from public and private middle schools in the Italian region of Switzerland (Ticino) on their smoking habits, perceived parents' and peers' approval and smoking. Multinomial logistic regression show that, as adolescents get older, more of the pro-smoking factors come from peers and parents, the higher the risk gets of being a "heavy smoker" has compared against having no experience with smoking. Living in a context with no factor of normative influence toward smoking play a protective role against smoking, and this effect becomes more important than more harmful the smoking behavior in question is. Furthermore, peers' descriptive norms are more influential for adolescents to become "light" and "heavy smokers", while smoking being approved by peers is important for adolescents to become accustomed to smoking. Findings support the different influence of parents' and peers' norms on adolescents' smoking, and highlight the importance of peers' model behavior as the most important factor influencing smoking during adolescence. Such results have implications for programs that aim to prevent or reduce smoking in early adolescence when friendship choice starts to become crucial.

  19. Cascadia Initiative Broader Impacts to Influence Student Career Choices and Engage K-12 Schools in Seismic Hazard Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livelybrooks, D.; Richter, M.; Head, E.; Toomey, D. R.; Trehu, A. M.; Tolstoy, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Cascadia Initiative is an amphibious seismic and geodetic experiment addressing questions about volcanic arc structure to formation, hydration and deformation of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates to megathrust earthquake genesis, interface characterization and forearc prism phenomenon. Broader impacts for the Cascadia Initiative include a program placing community college students onboard cruises and following up with presentations and other outreach on community college campuses and elsewhere ('CC@sea'). The first two CC@sea-ers participated in the first cruise to deploy ocean-bottom seismometers off the Washington and Oregon coast in July, 2011 and returned to their home campuses in Portland and rural Oregon fall term. A goal of CC@sea is to increase participation by community college students, typically from diverse backgrounds, in geoscience career paths, either through direct participation in CC@sea or through indirect exposure to CC@sea-ers. Another outreach program (seismometers@school) will place seismometers in Pacific NW schools for long-term monitoring of ground motion at different buildings within a school district. High school teachers and students will help analyze their data to characterize local shaking at individual schools within their districts. This will supplement other assessments of seismic risk and culminate in presentations to school boards where students and teachers can advocate for improved K-12 preparedness for potentially devastating Cascadia megathrust events. A teacher workshop to kick-start seismometers@school takes place November, 2011.

  20. Overweight or Obesity, Gender, and Age Influence on High School Students of the City of Toluca’s Physical Fitness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flor de Maria Cruz Estrada; Patricia Tlatempa Sotelo; Roxana Valdes-Ramos; José Aldo Hernández Murúa; Rafael Manjarrez-Montes-de-Oca

    2017-01-01

    ... high schools from the city of Toluca, Mexico, aged 15–17, were assessed. Objective . To determine if weight, age, and gender have an influence on physical fitness evaluated with the EUROFIT and ALPHA-FITNESS batteries. Results...

  1. The influence of family context on life, educational and occupational ideal among middle school students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Benxian; Zhang, Ling; Zhen, Rui; Zhou, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between family context of middle school students on their educational and occupational ideals. Middle school students (N = 2000) responded to questions assessing family location, family structure, parental educational level and family economic status, as well as to the Middle School Students' Ideals Questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that life, educational and occupational ideals of female students and students in lower grades were higher than that of male students and students in higher grades. Regression analysis indicated that paternal education level have a positive association with educational and occupational ideals, but not life ideals, and family economic status have a positive relation to life ideals, but not educational and occupational ideals. Moreover, the interaction between family economic status and family location has a negative association with students' life, educational and occupational ideals. These results suggest that different factors predicted different ideals of adolescents, and that family economic status had a negative moderating effect on the relationship between family location and ideals of students. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  2. Do School Resources Influence the Relationship between Adolescent Financial Background and Their School Perceptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summersett-Ringgold, Faith C.; Li, Kaigang; Haynie, Denise L.; Iannotti, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Socioeconomic status (SES) influences students' school perceptions and affects their performance, engagement, and personal beliefs. This study examined the effects of school population SES and school resources on the association between student SES and student perceptions. Methods: School liking, classmate social relationships, family…

  3. [Functional dyspepsia in students of eigth peruvians medical schools. Influence of the habits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mariela; Talledo-Ulfe, Lincolth; Samaniego, Reimer O; Heredia, Paula; Rodríguez, Christian A S; Mogollón, César A; Enriquez, Walter F; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-06-01

    Functional dyspepsia impacts on quality of life. Due to its multifactorial etiology its characterization proves difficult, especially in populations at risk such as medical students. To determine if behavioral and harmful habits of medical students from eight universities of Peru were associated to functional dyspepsia. Multicentric, cross-sectional study. A self-administered questionnaire was taken among students enrolled in eight medical faculties in Peru. Functional dyspepsia was measured using a validated test; diet characteristics, alcohol, tobacco, coffee or energy drinks consumption were considered behavioral habits. Furthermore, others from the social and educational sphere were measured. Bivariate and multivariate statistical analyses were made. From a total of 1.923 students, the median of the ages was 20, 55% were women and 24% suffered from functional dyspepsia. Factors which diminished the frequency of functional dyspepsia were masculine gender (aPR:0,75; 95%CI:0.64-0.87; p eating following a fixed schedule (aPR:0,80; 95%CI:0,67- 0,95; p = 0,013); however, having failed a course increases the frequency of functional dyspepsia (aPR:1.24; 95%CI:1.13-1.37; p students suffered from functional dyspepsia, this being related to several behavioral variables; therefore further studies as well as educational institutions’ intervention is required, due to the short and long term problems that may arise from this situation.

  4. Examining classroom influences on student perceptions of school climate: the role of classroom management and exclusionary discipline strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mary M; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2013-10-01

    There is growing emphasis on the use of positive behavior supports rather than exclusionary discipline strategies to promote a positive classroom environment. Yet, there has been limited research examining the association between these two different approaches to classroom management and students' perceptions of school climate. Data from 1902 students within 93 classrooms that were nested within 37 elementary schools were examined using multilevel structural equation modeling procedures to investigate the association between two different classroom management strategies (i.e., exclusionary discipline strategies and the use of positive behavior supports) and student ratings of school climate (i.e., fairness, order and discipline, student-teacher relationship, and academic motivation). The analyses indicated that greater use of exclusionary discipline strategies was associated with lower order and discipline scores, whereas greater use of classroom-based positive behavior supports was associated with higher scores on order and discipline, fairness, and student-teacher relationship. These findings suggest that pre-service training and professional development activities should promote teachers' use of positive behavior support strategies and encourage reduced reliance on exclusionary discipline strategies in order to enhance the school climate and conditions for learning. Copyright © 2013 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Influence of Reading Skills on the Missing-Letter Effect among Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Aubin, Jean; Klein, Raymond M.

    2008-01-01

    When skilled readers search for a target letter while reading for comprehension, they miss the target letter more often when it is embedded in high-frequency function words than in less frequent content words. The magnitude of this "missing-letter-effect" (MLE) was investigated among 180 first- to fifth-grade students as a function of…

  6. Influence of Songs in Primary School Students' Motivation for Learning English in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Diego; Bustinza, Daisy; Garvich, Mijail

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that using music and songs while learning a new language can be of great benefit to students in aspects such as grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary. However, the use of songs in class as motivation to learn English is a subject that has not been explored thoroughly. The purpose of this study is to explore how the use of…

  7. Willingness to Intervene in Bullying Episodes among Middle School Students: Individual and Peer-Group Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espelage, Dorothy; Green, Harold; Polanin, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the associations among gender, empathy, attitudes toward bullying, willingness to intervene, and bullying within peer groups in a sample of sixth and seventh-grade students (N = 346; M Age = 12.22 years). Peer groups were identified via social network analysis using NEGOPY (Richards, 1995) and peer-group predictors were…

  8. Influences of Constructivist-Oriented Nutrition Education on Urban Middle School Students' Nutrition Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughtry, Nate; Fahlman, Mariane; Martin, Jeffrey J.; Shen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health professionals are looking to nutrition-based youth health interventions in K-12 schools to combat the growing obesity crisis; however, none have explored the influences of interventions guided by constructivist learning theory. Purpose: This study examined the influences of a constructivist-oriented nutrition education program…

  9. Knowledge about and sources of smoking-related knowledge, and influencing factors among male urban secondary school students in Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianglong; Chen, Cheng; Abdullah, Abu S; Sharma, Manoj; Liu, Hengyi; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This study examined smoking-related knowledge, sources of smoking-related knowledge and its influencing factor among male urban secondary school students. We conducted a cross-sectional survey, using a self-administered questionnaire, among 1297 male secondary school students in municipal areas of Chongqing, China. Non-smokers had a better knowledge of smoking hazards than smokers. Less than 20% of students knew that smoking can cause heart disease, peptic ulcer, and cerebral stroke. Sources of smoking-related knowledge differed between smokers and non-smokers, respectively: TV (76.5 vs. 76.7%), teacher (70.1 vs. 62.4%), social network (66.6 vs. 73.1%), parents (57.0 vs. 59.2%), newspaper (55.4 vs. 61.6%), and friends (37.7 vs. 33.9%). Non-smokers' hobbies of reading were significantly higher than smokers' (χ 2  = 11.5845, p = 0.0007). Smokers' hobbies of online games (χ 2  = 14.9106, p = 0.0001), and sports (χ 2  = 4.8609, p = 0.0275) were significantly higher than non-smokers'. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) found that students whose both father and mother smoke were unable to receive tobacco-related knowledge. GEE also found that students in high school, with affluent family economic condition and with an opposing attitude towards father smoking possessed a better smoking-related knowledge. However, male students with disagreement or neutral attitude towards friends smoking were negatively associated with the knowledge of smoking hazards. The findings of the present study suggest that a significant proportion of male secondary school students in urban Chongqing lack specific knowledge about smoking-related diseases. Targeted educational programs for secondary school students in China are needed to promote tobacco control and tobacco use reduction and cessation among students.

  10. Out-of-School Experience Categories Influencing Interest in Biology of Secondary School Students by Gender: Exploration on an Abu Dhabi Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Masood; Yang, Guang; Al Mazroui, Karima; Mohaidat, Jihad; Al Rashedi, Asma; Al Housani, Najwa

    2017-01-01

    This study employed the international Relevance of Science Education questionnaire to survey the interest in biology and the out-of-school experiences of Abu Dhabi secondary school students (median age 17, mean age 17.53 and mode age of 16) in the third semester of 2014. It included 3100 participants. An exploratory factor analysis was used to…

  11. Influence of Culture on Secondary School Students' Understanding of Statistics: A Fijian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sashi

    2014-01-01

    Although we use statistical notions daily in making decisions, research in statistics education has focused mostly on formal statistics. Further, everyday culture may influence informal ideas of statistics. Yet, there appears to be minimal literature that deals with the educational implications of the role of culture. This paper will discuss the…

  12. Influences on Body Image and Disordered Eating among Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, William; Rhea, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    This study examined whether behavioral differences (exercise, dieting, changing eating habits, taking pills, or vomiting/taking laxatives to lose weight) exist when identifying the major influencing factors (media, family, friends, teacher/coach, and doctor/nurse) among Black and White men's and women's self-perceptions of body weight. Respondents…

  13. Social Influences on Cyberbullying Behaviors among Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Sameer; Patchin, Justin W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a problem affecting a meaningful proportion of youth as they embrace online communication and interaction. Research has identified a number of real-world negative ramifications for both the targets and those who bully. During adolescence, many behavioral choices are influenced and conditioned by the role of major socializing…

  14. Including Student Voices in School Reform: Students Speak out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Deanna Iceman; Guzman, Lydia; Stephens, Laura; Boggs, Alison

    2007-01-01

    If school renewal is to ultimately impact student outcomes, then understanding and responding to the factors students describe as influencing their constructive and unconstructive effort is vital. Results from focus groups with 4th, 7th, 9th, and 11th graders indicated that when students set and work toward goals, they expend more effort in…

  15. Influence of Culture and Gender on Secondary School Students' Scientific Creativity in Biology Education in Turkana County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruan, Susan A.; Okere, Mark I. O.; Wachanga, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the extent to which biology scientific creativity skills are influenced by the students' culture and gender in Turkana County. A mixed method research design was used. This involved cross sectional survey and ethnographic study. The target population comprised all form three students in sub county schools…

  16. Association of School Social Networks' Influence and Mass Media Factors with Cigarette Smoking among Asthmatic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H.; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks' influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. Methods: This study…

  17. Factors Influencing the Educational and Career Choices of Senior High School Students: A Case Study in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Thuy T.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study examined factors that could influence the educational and career decision-making of the senior students in the Northern part of Vietnam. The researcher was interested in the students and their parents' perceptions of the contextual factors, gender, individual factors, and the challenges that contribute to the…

  18. American Sign Language and Academic English: Factors Influencing the Reading of Bilingual Secondary School Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Hoffmeister, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    For many years, researchers have sought to understand the reading development of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students. Guided by prior research on DHH and hearing students, in this study we investigate the hypothesis that for secondary school DHH students enrolled in American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual schools for the deaf, academic English proficiency would be a significant predictor of reading comprehension alongside ASL proficiency. Using linear regression, we found statistically significant interaction effects between academic English knowledge and word reading fluency in predicting the reading comprehension scores of the participants. However, ASL remained the strongest and most consistent predictor of reading comprehension within the sample. Findings support a model in which socio-demographic factors, ASL proficiency, and word reading fluency are primary predictors of reading comprehension for secondary DHH students. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@.com.

  19. Rural Virginia Middle School Teachers\\' and Students\\' Perceptions on the Influence of One-to-one Computers in the Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Schott, Thomas Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Children of the 21st century are digital learners and have various technologies at their fingertips. As a result, classrooms have evolved and school systems are equipping students and teachers with the technological tools that are believed to meet the needs of 21st century learners. However, researchers say there is still a need to examine students\\' and teachers\\' perceptions of, and attitudes about, technology and its use in the classroom (Maninger & Holden, 2009). There has also been a gro...

  20. Poljane High School students - school library users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Bon

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The information technology revolution has influenced education greatly. All participants in the educational process should be informed about the latest teaching and information technology on a regular basis, and should prepare and teach the younger generation to use it. An important role in spreading information literacy is played by libraries and librarians in frame of the subject of Library Information Skills tought in schools. The research, as presented in continuation, was performed by means of a questionnaire answered by students of Gimnazija Poljane (Poljane High School. The purpose of the research was to find out how well the students are prepared to use information technology (IT, which types of materials (traditional : up-to-date electronical they tend to use more, how they gather information. The results have shown that boys can handle the information technology better than girls. Boys use electronic sources more frequently, they visit the school library more frequently, more of them searching for information which is not directly related to their lessons. Girls use traditional materials and search for information related to their lessons. However, the majority of students search for library material on their own or with the help of a librarian rather than use information technology.

  1. Alcohol Consumption, Peer Influence and Secondary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influences of Acohol Consumption peer influence and secodnary school stuents attitudes towards schol in some selected secodnary shools in Katsit, Kafanchan, Kaduna State. The study adopted a correlational research design and the population of this study was 200 senior students from four (4) ...

  2. Interactive physics apparatus: influence on interest of secondary school students in pursuing a career path in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubrica, Joel V.; Abiasen, Jovalson T.; Dolipas, Bretel B.; Ramos, Jennifer Lyn S.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we present results of our endeavours as physics educators to facilitate and support pedagogical change and development in the educational system of a developing country, the Philippines. We have discovered that the interaction of junior high school (years 7-10) students with physics apparatus can influence students’ interest in pursuing a career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). This assertion stems from self-reports of students who gave their views immediately after their exposure to interactive apparatus in their own school, outside of their usual lessons. Participants claimed that their interest in following a STEM career path was ‘greatly increased’ due to their exposure to these apparatus. This was true even for students who were intending to take a non-STEM career path. Thus, we recommend that, in settings that have constraints involving access to practical equipment, ways to introduce school level interactive physics apparatus to secondary school students be conducted in order to attract more students towards STEM courses. Possibly, policies encouraging this type of exposure should also be formulated.

  3. The Influence of Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Metacognitive Prompting on Genetics Problem Solving Ability among High School Students in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurah, Catherine Muhonja

    Within the framework of social cognitive theory, the influence of self-efficacy beliefs and metacognitive prompting on genetics problem solving ability among high school students in Kenya was examined through a mixed methods research design. A quasi-experimental study, supplemented by focus group interviews, was conducted to investigate both the outcomes and the processes of students' genetics problem-solving ability. Focus group interviews substantiated and supported findings from the quantitative instruments. The study was conducted in 17 high schools in Western Province, Kenya. A total of 2,138 high school students were purposively sampled. A sub-sample of 48 students participated in focus group interviews to understand their perspectives and experiences during the study so as to corroborate the quantitative data. Quantitative data were analyzed through descriptive statistics, zero-order correlations, 2 x 2 factorial ANOVA,, and sequential hierarchical multiple regressions. Qualitative data were transcribed, coded, and reported thematically. Results revealed metacognitive prompts had significant positive effects on student problem-solving ability independent of gender. Self-efficacy and metacognitive prompting significantly predicted genetics problem-solving ability. Gender differences were revealed, with girls outperforming boys on the genetics problem-solving test. Furthermore, self-efficacy moderated the relationship between metacognitive prompting and genetics problem-solving ability. This study established a foundation for instructional methods for biology teachers and recommendations are made for implementing metacognitive prompting in a problem-based learning environment in high schools and science teacher education programs in Kenya.

  4. Impact of Acculturation, Ethnic Identity and Peer Influence on Substance Use, Depression, and Self-Esteem in Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Given the changing racial/ethnic composition of the United States, the impact of culture on adolescent health risk behaviors is an emerging and important issue. The purpose of the present study was to examine acculturation and ethnic identity and its impact on substance use, depression, and self-esteem in a sample of middle school students.…

  5. The Influence of Perceived Convenience and Curiosity on Continuance Intention in Mobile English Learning for High School Students Using PDAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Tseng, Kuo-Hung; Liang, Chaoyun; Yan, Chi-Fang

    2013-01-01

    Mobile learning aims to utilise communication devices such as mobile devices and wireless connection in combination with e-learning systems, allowing learners to experience convenient, instant and suitable learning at unrestricted time and place. Participants were 125 Taiwanese senior high school students, whose continuance intention was examined…

  6. Do school resources influence the relationship between adolescent financial background and their school perceptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaigang; Haynie, Denise L.; Iannotti, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Socioeconomic status (SES) influences students’ school perceptions and affects their performance, engagement, and personal beliefs. This study examined the effects of school population SES and school resources on the association between student SES and student perceptions. METHODS School liking, classmate social relationships, family affluence, and experience of hunger were assessed in a nationally representative sample of 12,642 students (grades 5–10) in the 2009–10 Health Behavior in School-Aged Children study. School characteristics included school meal program, Title I dollars/student, school resources, and urban/rural status. Multilevel analysis was used. RESULTS At the individual level, both school liking and social relationships were negatively associated with student grade level. Boys liked school less and had more positive perceptions of social relationships than girls. Students in rural schools and who experienced hunger liked schools less and had poorer perceptions of social relationships than their respective counterparts. School-level percentage of students eligible for free/reduced meals accounted for 33% of the between-school variance in social relationships. CONCLUSIONS Family and school economic characteristics and grade level influenced students’ school perceptions. The associations between student SES, school population SES, and school perceptions suggests that school health professionals should recognize and address student economic issues at school. PMID:26032271

  7. Confidence as motivational expressions of interest, utility, and other influences: Exploring under-confidence and over-confidence in science students at secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Sheldrake, Richard

    2016-01-01

    An enhanced understanding of how students’ self-confidence is influenced benefits educational practice and motivational theories. For 1523 students in 12 secondary schools in England, science self-confidence was predicted by various factors: current self-confidence (self-concept) was most strongly predicted by received praise, current grades, and interest in science; self-confidence for future attainment (self-efficacy) was most strongly predicted by current grades and perceived utility of sc...

  8. Students "Hacking" School Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Del

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with students hacking school computer systems. School districts are getting tough with students "hacking" into school computers to change grades, poke through files, or just pit their high-tech skills against district security. Dozens of students have been prosecuted recently under state laws on identity theft and unauthorized…

  9. Dynamics of teacher-student relationships: stability and change across elementary school and the influence on children's academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilt, Jantine L; Hughes, Jan N; Wu, Jiun-Yu; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2012-01-01

    This study modeled teacher-student relationship trajectories throughout elementary school to predict gains in achievement in an ethnic-diverse sample of 657 academically at-risk students (mean age = 6.57 years, SD = .39). Teacher reports of warmth and conflict were collected in Grades 1-5. Achievement was tested in Grades 1 and 6. For conflict, low-stable (normative), low-increasing, high-declining, and high-stable trajectories were found. For warmth, high-declining (normative) and low-increasing patterns were found. Children with early behavioral, academic, or social risks were underrepresented in the normative trajectory groups. Chronic conflict was most strongly associated with underachievement. Rising conflict but not declining Conflict coincided with underachievement. The probability of school failure increased as a function of the timing and length of time children were exposed to relational adversity. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  10. The Effect of School Design on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Mohsen Ghasemi; Mirdad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at exploring the influence of school design on student performance. The participants consisted of 150 students who studied at two Iranian public school and private school in Mashhad City. School Design and Planning Laboratory (SDPL) model of Georgia University (and Tanner (2009)) was used as an appraisal indicator of school…

  11. Influence of Perceived Parenting Styles: Goal Orientations and Career Aspirations of High School Science Students in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Ravinder; Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita; Poondej, Chanut

    2016-01-01

    There has been considerable research interest into the relationship between the parenting styles of Asians, and student motivation and achievement. The investigation presented in this paper contributes to the literature in this area by examining the influence of perceived parenting style on goal orientations and career aspirations of a sample of…

  12. The Influence of Ability Beliefs and Motivational Orientation on the Self-Efficacy of High School Science Students in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdpornkulrat, Thanita; Koul, Ravinder; Sujivorakul, Chuchai

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of entity beliefs, gender stereotypes and motivational goals on participants' self-efficacy in biology and physics and their career aspirations. Participants (n = 2638, males 46% and females 54%) were students enrolled in Years 10-12 of the academic science-maths stream in Thailand. Entity beliefs were…

  13. Mathematics Anxiety in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lay Keow

    2012-01-01

    The detrimental consequences of mathematics anxiety have repeatedly been evidenced empirically, yet little is known of its influence on secondary school students in Asia. This study thus examined its origins and impact on 294 secondary students in Singapore through interviews and surveys. Results revealed an average anxiety level of 44% and a…

  14. Factors that Influence Participation of Students in Secondary Science and Mathematics Subjects in IB Schools Outside of the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straffon, Elizabeth

    The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that affect the extent of international secondary students' participation in International Baccalaureate science and mathematics courses. The factors examined were gender, home region, size, percent host culture and age of the program, and coeducational and legal status of the school. Participation in math and science subjects was determined by analyzing the level and number of courses taken by students taking International Baccalaureate exams in 2010. Chi-Square and Cramer's V analysis were used to measure the effect of categorical variables on student participation and One-Way ANOVA and Bonferroni comparison of means were used to analyze the quantitative variables. All categorical variables were statistically significant (pNew Zealand, Northern Europe, East Africa and South-Central and Western Asia. State schools showed higher math and science participation. Science and math participation was also greater in all-male schools though associations were weak. Boys participated more than girls, especially in math. All quantitative variables were statistically significant. The program size had the largest effect size for both math and science with larger programs showing more participation at the higher level. A decreasing trend for age of the program and percent host culture was found for math participation. Three years of participation data were collected from an international school in Western Europe (n = 194). Variables included the influence of parent occupation, math preparedness (PSAT-Math), student achievement (GPA), and the importance of significant others in career and academic decisions. Findings indicate that performance on the PSAT- Math was the most important predictor of both science and mathematics participation. Twenty students were also interviewed. Results showed the importance of several key factors. These include the role of parents in student academic and career decisions, the importance of

  15. Code Compliant School Buildings Boost Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Lumpkin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus in the literature in raising student achievement has included parental involvement, principal leadership, quality of instruction, students’ socioeconomic status, curriculum, and use of technology. Limited empirical research relates the condition of the school building as a variable that affects student achievement. Furthermore, there is no research that has examined the impact of building codes on achievement outcomes in the state of Florida. This research determined whether academic achievement of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students as measured by the mathematics and reading subtests of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT increased in new school buildings compliant to the 2000 Florida State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A causal-comparative design determined whether the independent variables, old and new school building influenced student achievement as measured by students’ FCAT mathematics and reading subtest scores. The control group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in old buildings. The experimental group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in new buildings. Transition from an old school into a new school was the treatment. Two hypotheses were formulated for testing and the research question for the inquiry was whether the percentage of students passing the FCAT mathematics and reading subtests increases after transitioning from an old school building into a new 2000 UBC (Uniform Building Code compliant facility.

  16. Factors Influencing Examination Malpractice in Secondary Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate factors influencing examination malpractice in some selected secondary schools in Cross River State, Nigeria. A sample of one thousand two hundred (1200) students were selected across the three educational zones of Ogoja, Ikom and Calabar using stratified, random ...

  17. Bringing Student Responsibility to Life: Avenues to Personalizing High Schools for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre Gibney, Daniela; Preston, Courtney; Drake, Timothy A.; Goldring, Ellen; Cannata, Marisa

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how school structures and policies shape school culture to ultimately influence student success in one urban high school. We develop a model that explains how caring and personalized connections between students and teachers, coupled with a focus on academic press and support, interact with teacher efficacy to influence student…

  18. Variables affecting high school students' perceptions of school foodservice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M K; Conklin, M T

    1998-12-01

    To determine if student satisfaction with high school foodservice is directly related to participation in the foodservice. A valid and reliable survey was conducted in a variety of classes such as English, history, and health science in grades 9 through 12, representing students aged 13 through 19 years. Students were asked 38 questions concerning variety of food, food quality, foodservice staff, aesthetics of the serving and dining area, and demographics. The study was conducted with 1,823 students from 9 schools representing 4 geographic regions. Stepwise multiple regression was used to determine the independent variables (attributes desired by the students) that most highly correlated with the dependent variable (satisfaction with the school foodservice overall). Variables most highly correlated with overall satisfaction were variety of food offered, flavor of food, attractiveness of food on the serving line, staff smiling and greeting students, quality of food choices, choices that allow students to meet cultural and ethnic preferences, courteousness of the staff, and quality of ingredients. Variety of food offered was the best predictor of satisfaction. A statistically significant difference was found (Pnutrition programs are critically important for providing nutrition to millions of our future leaders. Today it is not enough to prepare healthful, good-tasting food. High school students are sophisticated and are exposed at an early age to a variety of dining experiences including fast foods, ethnic cuisine, and fine dining. These factors have influenced the attributes students use to evaluate school foodservice. To maintain participation levels and financial stability, school foodservice professionals should evaluate student satisfaction with food quality, variety, and other variables that affect overall satisfaction and participation. These data may then be incorporated into continuous quality improvement and strategic planning. Marketing must be

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF TWO MODELS OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION PLANNING ON SPORT-TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL FEMALE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živorad Marković

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to determine eventual difference between continuo- us and concentrated model of planning and realization of program contents of Physical Education in relation to sport-technical knowledge of female students. This research was educational experiment with longitudinal character on the specimen of 92 fema- le examinees divided into two sub specimens - according to the criterion of realization of program contents of Physical Education lesson: experimental group with 50 female examinees and control group with 42 secondary school female examinees of year one. Sport-technical knowledge was evaluated with ten variables. Multivariant analysis of the variance, Roy’s test, discriminative analysis and descriptive analysis were applied in processing of data which were acquired by empirical research. Statistically significant differences , in favor of experimental group in all ten researched variables, indicate that the contents of experimental treatment resulted in positive effects in sport-technical knowledge of female students in experimental group.

  20. Specialty preferences of 1(st) year medical students in a Saudi Medical School - Factors affecting these choices and the influence of gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliyadan, Feroze; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Qureshi, Habib; Al Wadani, Fahad

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing appreciation of the issues of career preference in medicine as it affects student learning and academic performance. Various factors influence the specialty choices of medical students. Some specialties tend to attract students more than others. One possible consequence of this would be a mismatch between health needs and specialist numbers in the region. This study investigated the career preferences of 1(st) year medical students in a Saudi medical school and to assess factors affecting these choices. The study was a cross-sectional survey carried out on the 1(st) year undergraduate students in the college of medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A total of 109 students (57 female and 52 males) responded to the questionnaire which was initially administered to all the students of the 1(st) year - A total of 120 students (response rate was 90.8%). A mixed method approach was used and qualitative data from open-ended questions were analyzed based on thematic analysis. The top choices were general surgery, internal medicine, and pediatrics. Among female students; the top specialty choices were: General surgery (23%), pediatrics (18%), and dermatology (15%). Among the male students; the top choices were: General surgery (54%) and internal medicine (23%). Of the total, 57% of the students agreed or strongly agreed that primary aptitude was the main factor affecting the choice. Only 31% felt that there was a significant influence of role model, 48% felt that the advice of others - peers and family, would be a factor influencing their choices, and 53% agreed that specialty choice would influence their future learning patterns. Males were more likely to choose a specialty based on actual aptitude for the specialty, financial rewards, and scope for research; and this gender difference was statistically significant. Surgery was the top-choice in both genders. Other popular choices included internal medicine, pediatrics

  1. Peer Group Counselling and School Influence on Adolescents' Self-Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbochuku, E. O.; Aihie, N. O.

    2009-01-01

    The study focused on the influence of peer group counselling and school influence on the self-concept of adolescents' in Nigerian secondary schools. Sixty-eight Senior Secondary School II students from three schools--a boys' school, a girls' school and a co-educational school in Benin City participated in the study. A pre-test, post-test control…

  2. The Influence of Social Capital Domains on Self-Rated Health Among Serbian High-School Students? A School-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Novak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Social capital has been shown as a positive asset for improving overall health in children and youth. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine the associations between family, neighborhood and school social capital with self-rated health among Serbian high-school students. This cross-sectional study on 1220 high-school students (539 males and 681 females was carried out in the school year 2015/2016. Main outcome was defined as self-rated health, measured by one question: "How would you rate your health?" with five possible answers: (1 very poor; (2 poor, (3 fair, (4 good and (5 excellent. We binarised the outcome, where answers "very poor", "poor" and "fair" represented "poor health" and "good" and "excellent" "good health". Multiple logistic regression was used to determine the associations between social capital domains and self-rated health. Adjusted by gender, body-mass index, self-perceived socioeconomic status, psychological distress and physical activity, good self-rated health was positively associated only with high family social capital (OR 2.29; 95% CI 1.62 to 3.24. When all the social capital variables were entered simultaneously, self-rated health remained associated with family social capital (OR 2.28; 95% CI 1.61 to 3.24. Family social capital was the only domain strongly associated with self-rated health. Since neighborhood and school social capital represent key support and empathy for children and youth, neighborhood and school-based strategies and policies should be implemented within the system to increase overall physical and mental health.

  3. School ethnic diversity and students' interethnic relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijs, Jochem; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2014-03-01

    School ethnic desegregation has been a topic of strong societal and educational concern. Research has examined the effects of ethnic school composition on students' interethnic relations with diverging outcomes and sometimes inconsistent results. In this review paper, we provide an assessment of this literature to explain why and when school desegregation might improve or worsen ethnic relations and to identify important future research directions. We discuss different theoretical perspectives predicting positive versus negative aspects of school ethnic diversity: intergroup contact theory and the perspectives of group threat and power differences. Subsequently, we consider a number of school and educational characteristics that can moderate the impact of ethnic diversity on students' interethnic relations and that could be considered in future research. Furthermore, we discuss the need for studying underlying psychological and social processes as well as the importance of investigating interethnic relations in combination with academic adjustment. School ethnic diversity is not enough to promote interethnic tolerance. It is important to examine diversity in relation to other aspects of the school environment that may influence how students respond to the ethnic diversity within school. Important factors to consider are the presence of multicultural education and inclusive school identities, student-teacher relationships, and peer norms and networks, but also the role of parents and of peer relations outside the school context. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Overweight or Obesity, Gender, and Age Influence on High School Students of the City of Toluca's Physical Fitness

    OpenAIRE

    Flor de Maria Cruz Estrada; Patricia Tlatempa Sotelo; Roxana Valdes-Ramos; José Aldo Hernández Murúa; Rafael Manjarrez-Montes-de-Oca

    2017-01-01

    Material and Method. This is a prospective, cross-sectional, and correlational study with a probabilistic sampling in which 150 teenagers from three different high schools from the city of Toluca, Mexico, aged 15–17, were assessed. Objective. To determine if weight, age, and gender have an influence on physical fitness evaluated with the EUROFIT and ALPHA-FITNESS batteries. Results. Women have a higher overweight and obesity rate than men (3 : 1). Adolescents who have normal weight have regul...

  5. The emerging dental workforce: short-term expectations of, and influences on dental students graduating from a London dental school in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Clarke, Wendy; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this research was to identify short-term career aspirations and goals of final-year dental students at a London dental school and the perceived factors that influenced these aspirations. Two methods were used to collect data on final-year students' short-term career plans and influences. Qualitative data were collected through focus groups and analysed using 'framework methodology'. These findings informed a questionnaire survey of all students at the end of their final undergraduate year. Data were entered into and analysed using a statistical software package. Thirty-five students participated in focus groups, with recruitment continuing until data were saturated. Ninety per cent (n=126) of the total population (140) responded to the questionnaire survey; the majority were Asian (70%), female (58%), and aged 23 years (59%). Short-term professional expectations focused around 'achieving professional status within a social context', 'gaining professional experience', 'developing independence' and 'achieving financial stability'. 'Achieving financial stability' was ranked as the most important influence in decision-making about their career in the short term (77%), followed by 'balance of work and other aspects of life' (75%) and 'good lifestyle' (75%). Four out of ten intended to work towards membership of a Royal College and/or becoming a specialist. Proximity to family (81%) and friends (79%) was an important or very important influence on location in the short term. Asian students were significantly more likely to rate 'proximity to family' (p=0.042), working in an 'urban area' (p=0.001) and 'opportunities for private care' (p=0.043) of greater importance than their White counterparts. Short-term aspirations involve 'achieving professional status within a social context', and personal, social, professional and financial goals. Location of future practice was significantly associated with ethnicity.

  6. Sending Public School Students to Private Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Public schools often contract with private schools to meet the needs of special-education students. When disagreement exists about placement, parents can forego the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) placement process in exchange for private education which is only partially subsidized by the government. Vouchers would provide…

  7. INFLUENCE OF MOTOR MANIFESTATIONS FROM THE EUROFIT PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN ON MOTOR SKILLS AND HABITS AT HIGH SCHOOL FEMALE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Mitrevski

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The survey was conducted among 183 regular female students in the secondary education. The objective of the research was to see what was the correlation, i.e. the influence of a system of motor tests EUROFIT program for children on motor test - polygon to assess motor skills and habits of pupils who regularly attended the course sport and sport activities. The sample of indicators included one criteria variable for the assessment of motor skills and habits and eight motor variables for the assessment of motor skills. With regression analysis was determined the impact of the system of motor variables on the criterion.

  8. School Safety Concerns All Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Megan

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that school safety is an issue that concerns all students. Discusses how the staff of the Rockwood South (Missouri) "RAMpage" covered the shootings at Columbine High School in a 14-page issue and in follow-up issues. Suggests that the student newspaper covered the controversial topic in an appropriate, tasteful manner. (RS)

  9. Student Experience of School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Shaista

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a two-phase mixed methods research study that explores the link between experiences of school science of post-16 students and their decisions to take up science for their higher studies. In the first phase, students aged 16-17 (n = 569) reflected on the past five years of their school science experience in a…

  10. Learning Styles of Students of Secondary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Chocholoušová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is focused on learning styles of students of secondary schools, particularly of secondary vocational schools. It is divided in two parts - theoretical and practical. The theoretical part deals with the definitions of basic terms as learning, learner and meaningful learning. It also analysis the term learning style and other related terms, such as cognitive style. Final section of the theoretical part is dedicated to mesurement and influencing od leraning styles as a preparation fo...

  11. Examining the Relationship between Self-Esteem, Mattering, School Connectedness, and Wellness among Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.

    2018-01-01

    With data collected from 254 middle grade (5-8) students enrolled in a rural, southern school district, this study sought to determine the influence of self-esteem, mattering, and school connectedness on students' overall wellness. Using a two-step hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the author found that school connectedness significantly…

  12. Students' constructs of elementary school physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissanos, B W; Allison, P C

    1993-12-01

    The constructivist educational orientation acknowledges that students construct their own learning as they experience and make meaning from their schooling. An elementary school physical education master teacher and 10 of her former students participated in a naturalistic study designed to answer two research questions: (a) How did 10 students at the time of their high school graduation construct the meaning of elementary school physical education? and (b) What factors associated with their elementary school physical education experiences influenced the ways they constructed meaning? Participants were asked to reminisce in a semistructured, open-ended interview format specifically designed to enhance the recall of their physical education experiences during the 7-year, K-6 time frame. Data were inductively analyzed using the constant comparative analytic strategy. The meanings constructed by the students from their elementary school physical education experiences were defined by the teacher's value orientation and her invitational teaching style. Gender was the only factor evidenced in influencing the construction of meaning, with females recalling more variety and greater detail in the sport curricular area.

  13. Influences on students' assistive technology use at school: the views of classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students with cerebral palsy and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Petra; Johnston, Christine; Barker, Katrina

    2017-09-07

    This study explored how classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students with cerebral palsy, and their parents view high-tech assistive technology service delivery in the classroom. Semi-structured interviews with six classroom teachers and six parents and their children were conducted. Additionally, two focus groups comprising 10 occupational therapists and six speech pathologists were carried out. Ethical and confidentiality considerations meant that the groups were not matched. Results revealed that it is often untrained staff member who determine students' educational needs. The participants' experiences suggested that, particularly in mainstream settings, there is a need for support and guidance from a professional with knowledge of assistive technology who can also take a lead and guide classroom teachers in how to meet students' needs. Students' motivation to use the technology was also found to be critical for its successful uptake. The study points to the need for classroom teachers to be given sufficient time and skill development opportunities to enable them to work effectively with assistive technology in the classroom. The participants' experiences suggest that such opportunities are not generally forthcoming. Only in this way can it be ensured that students with disabilities receive the education that is their right. Implications for Rehabilitation Classroom teachers, allied health professionals, students, parents need ongoing support and opportunities to practise operational, strategic and linguistic skills with the assistive technology equipment. System barriers to the uptake of assistive technology need to be addressed. To address the lack of time available for training, programing and other support activities around assistive technology, dedicated administrative support is crucial. Professional development around the use of the quality low cost ICF-CY checklist is recommended for both school and allied health staff.

  14. Researching the Relationship between the Influence of Games on Elementary School Students, Their Gender and Lesson Success Variables and Their Game Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Kadir

    2011-01-01

    This research is a descriptive research with scanning method. It aims to define the relationship between the gender and academic success of secondary school students and their play preferences. The population of the research is composed of the secondary schools of Burdur city centrum and the sample group is composed of the students who are…

  15. Perceptions, Attitudes and Institutional Factors That Influence Academic Performance of Visual Arts Students in Ghana's Senior High School Core Curriculum Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia; Tachie-Menson, Akosua; Essel, Harry Barton

    2015-01-01

    Senior High School (SHS) students in Ghana are required to pass all core and elective curricula subjects in the West Africa Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) to qualify for higher education. Unfortunately, many Visual Arts students perform poorly or fail in English, Mathematics, Integrated Science and Social Studies, which constitute…

  16. Teaching the Anxiety of Learning a Foreign Language That Influences High School Students in Learning French as a Second Foreign Language "The Case of Denizli"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusçu, Ertan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons of anxiety levels of high school students who learn French as a second foreign language. The sample of the study consisted of four hundred fifty-six students from two high schools in Denizli province in 2015-2016 academic year. In this study, the effects of variables such as learners' gender,…

  17. Examining the Effects of Parental Influence on Adolescent Smoking Behaviors: A Multilevel Analysis of the Global School-Based Student Health Survey (2003-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Harris Hyun-Soo; Chun, JongSerl

    2016-05-01

    Based on a large cross-national dataset, we investigated the role of parental smoking (a risk factor) and parental supervision (a protective factor) on the frequency of smoking by youths in resource-poor countries. In addition, we tested for cross-level interactions between these two predictors and national wealth on the outcome variable. Pooled cross-sectional data from the Global School-based Student Health Survey (2003-2011) were analyzed, which consists of 58956 students in 31 countries. Hierarchical linear models were estimated to examine the associations between the two parental influence variables and adolescent smoking. Among the control variables, age, gender (male), the experience of being bullied, frequency of getting into physical fights, truancy, and anxiety were significantly related to higher frequency of smoking. With respect to the main predictors, both at the individual level, parental supervision was negatively associated with adolescent smoking, while parental smoking was positively related to it. Two cross-level interaction terms were also observed. National wealth (GDP per capita) significantly moderated, that is, increased, these effects of parental influence on how often the adolescents smoked. We provided new evidence on the factors related to adolescent smoking in low-income countries, a topic that has received very little attention. We showed that the associations between parental influences and adolescent smoking behaviors are not constant but vary according to the level of economic development. Future research should incorporate this comparative dimension in elaborating and specifying the conditions under which parental influences and other predictors differentially affect adolescent smoking. Prior research on adolescent smoking focused on developed countries. Based on the secondary analysis of the Global School-based Student Health Survey (2003-2011), this study examines the associations between parental influence (parental smoking and

  18. Do examinations influence student evaluations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, I.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper measures the impact of timing on student evaluations of teaching effectiveness, using a dataset of close to 3000 observations from Erasmus School of Economics. A special feature of the data is that students were able to complete on-line questionnaires during a time window ranging from one

  19. Bullying among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursel TÜRKMEN, Delia; Halis DOKGÖZ, Mihai; Semra AKGÖZ, Suzana; Bülent EREN, Bogdan Nicolae; Pınar VURAL, Horatiu; Oğuz POLAT, Horatiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Results: Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. Conclusion: a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators. PMID:24371478

  20. Bullying among High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Delia Nursel; Dokgöz, Mihai Halis; Akgöz, Suzana Semra; Eren, Bogdan Nicolae Bülent; Vural, Horatiu Pınar; Polat, Horatiu Oğuz

    2013-06-01

    The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators.

  1. Overweight or Obesity, Gender, and Age Influence on High School Students of the City of Toluca’s Physical Fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor de Maria Cruz Estrada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Material and Method. This is a prospective, cross-sectional, and correlational study with a probabilistic sampling in which 150 teenagers from three different high schools from the city of Toluca, Mexico, aged 15–17, were assessed. Objective. To determine if weight, age, and gender have an influence on physical fitness evaluated with the EUROFIT and ALPHA-FITNESS batteries. Results. Women have a higher overweight and obesity rate than men (3 : 1. Adolescents who have normal weight have regular physical fitness (74.9%. When comparing genders we found that men have a higher mean than women in the tests, except for skinfold thickness and waist circumference. Age was only correlated with the plate tapping test (p=0.001. There are significant differences in the standing broad jump test and the Course-Navette of the EUROFIT and ALPHA-FITNESS batteries (p=0.000. Conclusions. It is likely that regular physical activity, and not normal weight, helps generate healthy physical fitness. Male subjects had a higher mean than women, reporting a better physical fitness and more frequent physical activity.

  2. Overweight or Obesity, Gender, and Age Influence on High School Students of the City of Toluca's Physical Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Estrada, Flor de Maria; Tlatempa Sotelo, Patricia; Valdes-Ramos, Roxana; Hernández Murúa, José Aldo; Manjarrez-Montes-de-Oca, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This is a prospective, cross-sectional, and correlational study with a probabilistic sampling in which 150 teenagers from three different high schools from the city of Toluca, Mexico, aged 15-17, were assessed. To determine if weight, age, and gender have an influence on physical fitness evaluated with the EUROFIT and ALPHA-FITNESS batteries. Women have a higher overweight and obesity rate than men (3 : 1). Adolescents who have normal weight have regular physical fitness (74.9%). When comparing genders we found that men have a higher mean than women in the tests, except for skinfold thickness and waist circumference. Age was only correlated with the plate tapping test (p = 0.001). There are significant differences in the standing broad jump test and the Course-Navette of the EUROFIT and ALPHA-FITNESS batteries (p = 0.000). It is likely that regular physical activity, and not normal weight, helps generate healthy physical fitness. Male subjects had a higher mean than women, reporting a better physical fitness and more frequent physical activity.

  3. Factors across home, work, and school domains influence nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional college students

    OpenAIRE

    Quintiliani, Lisa M.; Bishop, Hillary L; Greaney, Mary L.; Whiteley, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    Nontraditional college students (older, part-time, and/or working) have less healthful nutrition and physical activity behaviors compared to traditional students, yet few health promotion efforts focus on nontraditional students. The purpose of this study was to use qualitative methods to explore factors affecting nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional students. Fourteen semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with nontraditional undergraduate students attend...

  4. The Influence of Psychological and Societal Factors on Student ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the influence of psychological and societal factors on students' performance in mathematics at Senior Secondary School Level in. Ilorin metropolis of Kwara state. A simple random sampling technique was used to sample three hundred secondary school students who supplied information on the ...

  5. Market Forces and Strategic Adaptation: The Influence of Private Scholarships on Planning in Urban School Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Edward P.; Ridenour, Carolyn S.

    2001-01-01

    Examined the influence of a privately funded scholarship program on strategic adaptations within urban public and private schools. School administrators rapidly adapted their strategies to contend with the program. Suburban public schools prevented scholarship students from enrolling, urban public schools increased public school students' choices,…

  6. Fluorescence for high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheiss, N.G.; Kool, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In a not obligatory series of lessons for high school students in the Netherlands we discuss the fluorescence aspects of anthracene. These lessons were developed because HiSPARC (High school Project on Astrophysics Research with Cosmics) detection of cosmic rays are available for different secondary

  7. Giving Students Their School Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchorn, Vince; Willingham, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Opportunities, not obligations. That is how Providence Country Day School (Rhode Island) characterizes its daily one-hour "Community Time." The block, from 9:25 to 10:25 a.m., is used chiefly for students to partake in activities of their own making--as a daily lesson in the value of students taking charge of their own education. On any…

  8. School Libraries and Student Learning: A Guide for School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Innovative, well-designed school library programs can be critical resources for helping students meet high standards of college and career readiness. In "School Libraries and Student Learning", Rebecca J. Morris shows how school leaders can make the most of their school libraries to support ambitious student learning. She offers…

  9. Influence of a Non-Formal Environmental Education Programme on Junior High-School Students; Environmental Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Daphne; Assaraf, Orit Ben Zvi; Shaharabani, Dina

    2013-01-01

    One of the solutions implemented by schools for conducting value-based environmental education (EE) is outsourcing: allocating external environmental organizations that develop and conduct EE programmes. This study addressed such a programme--the Green Council Programme (GCP)--developed and implemented in schools by the Israeli Society for…

  10. the influence of parents' educational status on students' tendency to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. BARTH EKWEME

    The influence of parents' educational status on students' tendency to cheat in examination was investigated in Secondary Schools in Calabar South Local Government. The objective was to determine whether parents' educational qualification and current enrolment in higher institutions influence students' tendency to cheat ...

  11. Complex ecologies in educational transitions: factors influencing the educational attitudes of vocational students in transit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elffers, L.

    2010-01-01

    School-related attitudes affect students' persistence (Bers&Smith, 1991, Finn, 1993, Tinto, 1993). Various factors have a role in shaping students' educational attitudes, including personal background characteristics and prior school experiences. We assessed factors influencing the educational

  12. Students' Perception of Homework Assignments and What Influences Their Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letterman, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Authors have researched the effects of homework, but few studies have delved into the idea of students' attitude towards homework. Consequently, students' perception of homework, the principal participants, remains largely unknown. Students' experience in homework that started as early as elementary school has influenced their ideas of homework.…

  13. Travel Abroad: A Study of the Perceived Influence of High School Students' Experiences of Short-Term Travel or Study Abroad Prior to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angwenyi, David Matara

    2014-01-01

    Students who participate in a short-term travel experience program of 4 weeks or less develop a sense of global citizenship. High school students who spend time traveling abroad might seek to address global issues, not only from a local perspective, but also from a global perspective. The Troika Study guided this study. Using qualitative…

  14. High School Graphics Experience Influencing the Self-Efficacy of First-Year Engineering Students in an Introductory Engineering Graphics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metraglia, Riccardo; Villa, Valerio; Baronio, Gabriele; Adamini, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Today's students enter engineering colleges with different technical backgrounds and prior graphics experience. This may due to their high school of provenience, which can be technical or non-technical. The prior experience affects students' ability in learning and hence their motivation and self-efficacy beliefs. This study intended to evaluate…

  15. Twitter Uses and Gratifications of High School Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Menawer Alrajehi

    2016-01-01

    ... understand the factors influencing continuance intention to use Twitter. [...]the purpose of this study is to explore the reasons that drive high school students to use Twitter and the benefits they achieve from using this social network site...

  16. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  17. School Types, Facilities and Academic Performance of Students in Senior Secondary Schools in Ondo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimi, Olatunji Sabitu; Ehinola, Gabriel Babatunde; Alabi, Festus Oluwole

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the influence of school types and facilities on students' academic performance in Ondo State. It was designed to find out whether facilities and students' academic performance are related in private and public secondary schools respectively. Descriptive survey design was used. Proportionate random sampling technique was used…

  18. Test anxiety, attitude to schooling, parental influence, and peer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated test anxiety, attitude to schooling, parental influence, and peer pressure as predictors of cheating tendencies in examination among secondary school students in Edo State, Nigeria. Ex-post facto research design was adopted for the study. Using stratified random sampling technique, 1200 senior ...

  19. School Head Leadership Style and its Perceived Influence on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The major findings revealed that the school heads in Bikita district of Masvingo province were generally perceived to display a high degree of democratic style of leadership based on the frequency of responses. It also emerged that leadership style of school heads influence performance of teachers. Calibre of students ...

  20. Peer influence on the study habit of secondary school adolescents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the influence of peer group on the study habit of secondary school adolescents. A sample of two hundred and ninety two (292) students was randomly selected from nine schools in two Local Government Areas of Ogun State. Two instruments were used to collect data. They are: Adolescents' Peer ...

  1. Influence of Peer Victimization on School Attendance among Senior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the influence of peer victimization on school attendance among senior secondary school students in Uromi metropolis. One research question and hypothesis was raised and formulated respectively to guide the study. Descriptive based on survey method was used as the research design of the study.

  2. Influence of food education in eating habits in students from 2nd and 3rd cycles in viseu schools

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Sofia; Cardoso, Ana Paula; Abrantes, José Luís; Ferreira, Manuela; Guiné, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Food Education as a means of promoting a healthy diet is very important nowadays, given the problems identified in the eating habits of the young’s, resulting in public health problems. The intervention strategies haven’t proved to be very effective and therefore children and young students still reveal inadequate diets and sedentary lifestyles. Objectives: Verify the level of knowledge about food and habits of the students; Analyze how the information provided by educators ...

  3. Local School Boards under Review: Their Role and Effectiveness in Relation to Students' Academic Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Provides a review of the literature published in the past two decades on the role and effectiveness of local school boards, specifically with respect to school boards' influence on students' academic achievement. Identifies characteristics of effective school boards. (SLD)

  4. Race, Poverty and SAT Scores: Modeling the Influences of Family Income on Black and White High School Students' SAT Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Roman, Ezekiel J.; Everson, Howard T.; McArdle, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Educational policy makers and test critics often assert that standardized test scores are strongly influenced by factors beyond individual differences in academic achievement such as family income and wealth. Unfortunately, few empirical studies consider the simultaneous and related influences of family income, parental education, and…

  5. Secondary School Students' Interest in Homework: What about Race and School Location?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined models of homework interest at the secondary school level to assess whether homework interest varies across race and school location and whether the influence of race on homework interest depends on characteristics of the context (e.g., school location and teacher feedback). Student- and class-level predictors of homework…

  6. Interrelations of Behavioral, Emotional, and Cognitive School Engagement in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yibing; Lerner, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    School engagement, or the extent to which students are involved in, attached and committed to the academic and social activities in school, plays a prominent role in preventing academic failure, promoting competence, and influencing a wide range of adolescent outcomes. Although the multidimensional nature of school engagement is well-recognized,…

  7. Middle school students' perceptions of a peer who stutters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Healey, E Charles; Kawai, Norimune; Rowland, Susan

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about how middle school students perceive a similar-aged peer who stutters. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the influence of stuttering frequency, Likert statement type (affective, behavioral, cognitive), and the gender of the listener on middle school students' perceptions of a peer who stutters. Sixty-four middle school students (10-14 years) individually viewed a video sample of a teen telling a joke at one of four stuttering frequencies (peer who stuttered. The results revealed an interaction between stuttering frequency and Likert statement type. Ratings of behavioral statements (speech production characteristics) were significantly more positive for the sample containing positive for the sample containing peer did not significantly influence how students rated affective statements (feelings and emotions). It was also found that male and female middle school students did not significantly differ in their perceptions of a male peer who stutters. Clinical implications are discussed relative to peer teasing, friendship, listener comfort, and social acceptance within a middle school setting for a student who stutters. Future research directions are also discussed. The reader will be able to: (1) summarize how middle school students perceive stuttering; (2) explain how the frequency of stuttering influences middle school students' perceptions of a peer who stutters; and (3) provide clinical implications of the data from this study.

  8. Harmfulness of smoking among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Rotter

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess the level of awareness of smoking and non smoking students on harmful impact of nicotine and cigarette smoke on human body. Material and methods: The study was carried out in March 2011 in high schools in Szczecin. Own elaborated questionnaire was used. 288 students from high school, technical college and vocational school were tested. Results: The majority of responders (95,1% claimed that cigarette smoke is harmful both for passive and active smokers. They most often pinpoint the direct cause connected with smoking to pulmonary diseases (264 persons and cancers (240 persons. Almost 90% of students found negative impact of tobacco products on development of fetus of pregnant women. Overwhelming majority of respondents (83,2% feels anxious if it comes to stay in a room filled with smoke. Conclusions: The awareness of high school students on negative influence of smoking on human body is quite satisfactory, but there is still a need for more education in the range of diseases and symptoms connected with smoking.

  9. Supporting High School Graduation Aspirations among Latino Middle School Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lys, Diana B

    2009-01-01

    ... their selfperceived likelihood of graduating from high school. Middle schools are poised to help Latino students prepare themselves for a smoother adjustment to high school academic life and reinforce the enthusiasm with which they anticipate the transition...

  10. Influence of having breakfast on cognitive performance and mood in 13- to 20-year-old high school students: results of a crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widenhorn-Müller, Katharina; Hille, Katrin; Klenk, Jochen; Weiland, Ulrike

    2008-08-01

    The goal was to determine whether breakfast had effects on the cognitive performance and mood of high school students. A crossover trial was performed in boarding schools, involving 104 students between 13 and 20 years of age. The participants were randomly assigned to 2 equal-size groups on the morning of the first testing day. One half of the total sample received a standardized breakfast, whereas the other half received no breakfast. Seven days later, the treatment order was reversed. Measurements of cognitive function included standardized tests of attention and concentration, as well as tests of verbal and spatial memory. In addition, mood was rated with a self-administered questionnaire covering the dimensions of positive and negative affect, information uptake, arousal, and alertness. Statistical analysis consisted of repeated-measures analysis of variance. Breakfast had no effect on sustained attention among high school students. Visuospatial memory was improved in male students. Self-reported alertness improved significantly in the entire study population. Male students reported feeling more positive after consuming breakfast, compared with the fasting condition. This crossover trial demonstrated positive short-term effects of breakfast on cognitive functioning and self-reported alertness in high school students.

  11. Variables that influence junior secondary school students‟ attitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The positive relationship between the rate of learning, attitude to and achievement in science has been documented in literature. It is therefore pertinent to assess the variables that tend to influence students' attitude to Agricultural Science. The study assessed the influence of gender, location of school and sex composition ...

  12. The Schools Transgender Students Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    In May 2016, the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Education issued guidance to schools intended to provide transgender students with safe and inclusive learning environments. On the heels of this guidance, Ellen Kahn, the Human Rights Campaign's director of Children, Youth, and Families Program, offers advice for educators…

  13. Student engagement in two Singaporean secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yuen Teng

    2016-01-01

    Student engagement is important to prevent school dropout and enhance school experiences. Engagement of secondary 2 and 3 students in Singapore was studied with Student Engagement Instrument (SEI) and its relation to burnout. The SEI measured students’ cognitive and affective engagement while burnout was examined using School Burnout Inventory (SBI). An electronic survey was administered to 335 students from two secondary schools. The engagement and burnout across grades, streams, gender, aca...

  14. High School Students' Perception of University Students as STEM Representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Eva Lykkegaard

    The Danish government has an ambition to recruit more high school students into STEM edu-cations (science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics). The students’ choice of further education is based on the people and jobs they have knowledge of. Therefore, to recruit more students into STEM......’ potential identities. It shows that the students preferred STEM representatives resembled themselves in some aspects (primarily social and health aspects) and fit their perceptions of a typical person working in STEM in other aspects (knowledge seeking, hard-working etc.). At least two different......’s potential identity, others will do so only after prolonged contact, while others again will be able to influence the students potential identity and thus educational choices after just a brief meeting....

  15. The Influence of the Family, the School, and the Group on the Environmental Attitudes of European Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rosa; Escario, José-Julián; Sanagustín, María-Victoria

    2017-01-01

    The attitudes of young people arise from an intense interaction with their social groups of reference, and in this work we examine the extent to which this background conditions the individual environmental attitudes of the young. Using data provided by the PISA 2006 survey for the European Union, we test for the influence of the family, the…

  16. Influence of leadership skills acquired through student council and club activities in junior high school and high school using PROG test data

    OpenAIRE

    洲, 雅明

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the nature of leadership skills acquired through leadership experiences in junior high school and high school by measuring generic skills using the Progress Report on Generic Skills test. The subjects were 218 freshmen in the 2015 and 2016 batches of the Department of Information and Communication, Oita Prefectural College of Arts and Culture. The two elements of generic skills, literacy and competency, were compared according to each category of leadership experience incl...

  17. The Influence of Teaching Methods and Learning Environment to the Student's Learning Achievement of Craft and Entrepreneurship Subjects at Vocational High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munawaroh

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to explain the influence of teacher's teaching methods and learning environment to the learning achievement in class XI with the competency of accounting expertise to the subjects of craft and entrepreneurship, according to the students, the subject was very heavy and dull. The population in this research are students in class…

  18. Student Background Factors Influencing Student Achievement in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes student-level findings of the first large-scale comprehensive school effectiveness study of the primary education in Serbia. Twenty-five student-level variables were examined in a three-level HLM model using a study sample of almost 5000 students, over 250 classrooms and over 100 schools. Differences between the students were…

  19. School Uniform Policies: Students' Views of Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Teresa M.; Moreno, Josephine

    2001-01-01

    Focus-group interviews of New York City middle-school students about their perceptions of the effectiveness of the school-uniform policy. Finds that students' perceptions of the effects of school-uniform policy on school culture varied considerably with those intended by the principal. (Contains 40 references.) (PKP)

  20. School Related Alienation: Perceptions of Secondary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Richard C.; And Others

    Responses to questionnaires administered to 10,000 senior high school students to ascertain their feelings of alienation as related to their schools are presented. The questionnaire items concerned: School as an Institution, The School as Teacher, Authority--Autonomy, and Parental Interest in School. The findings that resulted from the…

  1. Is Critical Thinking a Mediator Variable of Student Performance in School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Christel; Walter, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The study explores the influences of critical thinking and interests on students' performance at school. The tested students attended German grammar schools ("Gymnasien"). Separate regression analyses showed the expected moderate positive influences of critical thinking and interests on school performance. But analyzed simultaneously,…

  2. [Causal relationships between school adjustment of middle school students and related variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jeongyee

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the causal relationship of familial factors (parental acceptance, autonomy, and family satisfaction), social support (teacher's support and friend's support), school achievement, self-concept, and school adjustment. Based on preceding research, this study established a path model of school adjustment and its related variables. Two thousand six hundred and twenty nine middle school students participated in this study. Data were collected by a visit-survey with an organized questionnaire and was analyzed by the SPSS and AMOS programs. Self-concept showed a significantly direct influence to school adjustment while both family satisfaction and school achievement directly and indirectly influenced school adjustment. Parental acceptance, autonomy, and social support indirectly influenced school adjustment. These results imply that first, family satisfaction and self-concept are essential to solve the problems of school adjustment. Especially friend's support, teacher's support and school achievement should help improve the self-concept and school adjustment. Second, a variety of programs are available for schools to employ in an effort to provide interventions for students who demonstrate school maladjustment. Finally, it is necessary for family, school and society members to comprehensively cooperate to improve school adjustment.

  3. The Influence of Parent-Adolescent Relationship Quality, Parental Monitoring, and Peer Substance Use on Substance Use in South Korean High School Students: Using Latent Growth Curve Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Substance use, such as alcohol and tobacco, is becoming a critical problem in the area of health promotion and preventive programme. Furthermore, the onset of alcohol use has been becoming increasingly earlier. This study examined developmental trajectories of substance use among high school students in South Korea and effects of peer…

  4. Fact or Fiction: The Influence of Leadership Styles on Student Achievement in Private Primary Schools in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell-Jack, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    The intent of this quantitative descriptive research was to determine if or to what extent a relationship existed between the leadership styles of principals of private primary schools in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and the achievement levels of their first, third, and fifth standard students who took national tests in language arts and…

  5. The Effect of Three Orchestra/School Partnerships on Students' Interest in Instrumental Music Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeles, Hal

    2004-01-01

    This study is an examination of the influence of three orchestra/school partnerships on students' interest in instrumental music. A vocational choice school was used to assess students' interest in instrumental music. Surveys were administered to second- through fourth-grade students at partnership and nonpartnership schools. Results indicated…

  6. Parental Influence on Chinese Students' Achievement: A Social Capital Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how social capital formed by effective parental practices within Chinese families influences student achievement. Survey responses from 266 students from Grades 4 to 6 in a suburban elementary school in China were analysed to identify their perceptions of parental practices (support, pressure, help, monitoring and…

  7. Influence of Cognitive Styles on Students' Achievements in Biology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the influence of Cognitive styles on students' achievements in biology in senior secondary schools in Anambra State. One research question and one null hypothesis tested at 0.05 level of significance guided the study. A causal comparative design and a population of 10,206 (SSII) biology students in ...

  8. Factors Influencing Student Nurses' Performance in the Final ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to identify leads to factors influencing student nurses' performance in the final year practical examination at Gweru School of Nursing. A descriptive survey was used to collect data from a census of 16 assessors and cluster sample of 35 student nurses. A questionnaire designed for the research ...

  9. Factors Influencing Students' Decisions about Post-Year 10 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Kim; Hay, Ian; Watson, Jane; Allen, Jeanne; Cranston, Neil

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports pilot data from an instrument devised as part of a large ARC funded project that aims, among other things, to investigate factors that influence the decisions of students in rural and/or disadvantaged areas to continue their schooling beyond Year 10. One section of the pilot student questionnaire comprised 42 items designed to…

  10. Does tutor subject-matter expertise influence student achievement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To establish whether or not tutor subject-matter expertise influences student achievement in content-based examinations in the problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum at the University of Transkei (UNITRA) Medical School. Design. A retrospective study of MB ChB III student achievement in end-of-block ...

  11. Factors Influencing Research Activity among Medical Students at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at describing the factors that influence research among medical students in a Kenyan University. Subjects and Methods This descriptive cross sectional study involved medical students at the School of Medicine, University of Nairobi. An open questionnaire regarding research activity was administered to ...

  12. Gender, Professional Orientation, and Student Achievement: Elements of School Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Teresa; Martin, Barbara N.; Johnson, Judy A.

    2003-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between professional orientation (defined as how the principal sees his or her role in the organization) and school culture, the influence of gender on professional orientation, and the relationship between school culture and the academic achievement of students. One hundred principals were surveyed. Two…

  13. Patterns of examination anxiety among secondary school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anxiety is a negative emotion which affects human beings irrespective of social status. However, individuals exhibit anxiety in different forms. This study therefore investigated the patterns of examination anxiety among secondary school students in Ilorin metropolis, Nigeria. The influence of variables of gender and school ...

  14. Burnout, Stress and Direct Student Services among School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Patrick R.; Gutierrez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The burnout and stress experienced by school counselors is likely to have a negative influence on the services they provide to students, but there is little research exploring the relationship among these variables. Therefore, we report findings from our study that examined the relationship between practicing school counselors' (N = 926) reported…

  15. Having influence: faculty of color having influence in schools of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouneh, Dena; Lutz, Kristin F

    2013-01-01

    Faculty of color (FOC) play an important role in mentoring students and other FOC in schools of nursing. However, the unique nature of mentoring that FOC provide, which includes transmission of expert knowledge of the operations of racism in nursing academe, is not well understood. Furthermore, the influence FOC have on school cultures has not been well documented. To address this gap in knowledge we conducted a critical grounded theory study with 23 FOC in predominately Euro-American schools of nursing. Findings indicate that FOC Having Influence is a key process that explicates the influence FOC wield, exposing their work, which is often taken for granted, hidden, and, unacknowledged. FOC Having Influence occurred in two areas: 1) the survival and success of students and FOC and 2) shaping practices in schools of nursing and impacting health in communities. Implications for educational practice and future research are presented, based on study findings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Locus of Control, Interest in Schooling and Science Achievement of Some Deaf and Typical Secondary School Students in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatoye, R. Ademola; Aanu, E. Mosunmola

    2010-01-01

    This study compared locus of control, interest in school and science achievement of typical and deaf secondary school students. The study also investigated influence of students' locus of control and interest in school on general science achievement. Seventy two (72) deaf and 235 typical children were purposively selected from eight secondary…

  17. Sexting by High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassberg, Donald S; Cann, Deanna; Velarde, Valerie

    2017-08-01

    In the last 8 years, several studies have documented that many adolescents acknowledge having exchanged sexually explicit cell phone pictures of themselves, a behavior termed sexting. Differences across studies in how sexting was defined, recruitment strategies, and cohort have resulted in sometimes significant differences in as basic a metric as what percentage of adolescents have sent, received, or forwarded such sexts. The psychosocial and even legal risks associated with sexting by minors are significantly serious that accurate estimates of its prevalence, including over time, are important to ascertain. In the present study, students (N = 656) from a single private high school were surveyed regarding their participation in sexting. Students at this same school were similarly surveyed four years earlier. In this second survey, reported rates of sending (males 15.8%; females 13.6%) and receiving (males 40.5%; females 30.6%) sexually explicit cell phone pictures (revealing genitals or buttocks of either sex or female breasts) were generally similar to those reported at the same school 4 years earlier. Rates of forwarding sexts (males 12.2%; females 7.6%) were much lower than those previously acknowledged at this school. Correlates of sexting in this study were similar to those reported previously. Overall, our findings suggest that sexting by adolescents (with the exception of forwarding) remains a fairly common behavior, despite its risks.

  18. The Social Experiences of High School Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Glenda; Bundy, Anita C.; Broom, Alex; Hancock, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores the social experiences in high school of students with visual impairments. Methods: Experience sampling methodology was used to examine (a) how socially included students with visual impairments feel, (b) the internal qualities of their activities, and (c) the factors that influence a sense of inclusion. Twelve…

  19. Entrepreneurial Attitude and Entrepreneurial Efficacy of Technical Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidatol Akmaliah, Lope Pihie; Bagheri, Afsaneh

    2010-01-01

    Entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial efficacy are considered to be two important factors influencing students' intention and success in becoming entrepreneurs. This study was conducted to determine the entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial efficacy of 3000 students following technical subjects in the secondary schools of Malaysia.…

  20. What Greek Secondary School Students Believe about Climate Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liarakou, Georgia; Athanasiadis, Ilias; Gavrilakis, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what Greek secondary school students (grades 8 and 11) believe about the greenhouse effect and climate change. A total of 626 students completed a closed-form questionnaire consisting of statements regarding the causes, impacts and solutions for this global environmental issue. The possible influence of…

  1. Study of Educational Aspirations of Preparatory School Students in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edington, Everett D.

    To identify causes for low enrollment in secondary agricultural schools in Yemen, the United States Agency for International Development and the Yemen Ministry of Education surveyed 990 preparatory (junior high) students, examining their educational aspirations, differences between rural and urban youth, major influences on student aspirations,…

  2. Self-Concept and Secondary School Students' Academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of self concept on physics students' academic achievement in secondary schools. The study was conducted in Uyo LGA of Akwa Ibom State in Nigeria. A sample size of five hundred (500) senior secondary two physics students took part in the investigation.

  3. Perceived Factors Influencing High School Student Participation in an Integrated Statewide Dual Credit Program: An Examination of Program Success and Student Higher Education Selection Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchstone, Allison J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Dual credit programs have become increasingly popular with 71% U.S. public high schools offering dual credit courses in 2002-2003. As this popularity has grown, so have concerns regarding academic rigor, course quality, parity with college courses, and effects on higher education. Determining actual dual credit course equivalent in higher…

  4. Progress in student achievement as an indicator of school effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branković Nataša

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Achievement is usually seen as a major indicator of school performance and school effectiveness. Educational effectiveness associated with the quality of education. The study of teaching, teachers' influence and effectiveness of teaching methods and procedures aimed at innovating teaching. Monitoring of progress in student achievement are monitored transformational processes in schools, and is one of the tasks of school permanent commitment to introduce innovative ways of work and monitor progress in student achievement at all levels of education. This paper was presented analysis of student achievement progress in primary education, the introduction of innovative models of teaching. The choice in this paper was going to analyze the effects of activity that had an experimental program of work on individual classes of students and impact indicators of student achievement in the interpretation of research results.

  5. Experiences that influence a student's choice on majoring in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Donya Rae

    Currently the production of college graduates with science and engineering degrees is insufficient to fill the increasing number of jobs requiring these skills. This study focuses on physics majors with an in-depth examination of student transitions from high school to college. Many different areas of influence could affect a student's decision to major in physics. The first phase of this study addresses all of the potential areas of influence identified from the literature. The goal was to identify common influences that might be used to increase students' interest in majoring in physics. Subjects (N=35) from the first phase were recruited from physics majors at diverse Michigan colleges and universities. The second phase of this study explored, in more depth, important areas of influence identified in the first phase of the study. Subjects (N=94) from the second phase were recruited from diverse colleges and universities in Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio. The interviews were also conducted via email. Approximately half of the students in the study decided to major in physics while still in high school. Their reasons relate to many of the areas of influence. For example, high school physics teachers were cited as a strong influence in many students' decisions to major in physics. Influential physics teachers were described as being helpful, encouraging and interesting. The teachers also need to be their students' number one cheerleader and not their number one critic. Some areas of influence were found to be different for males vs. females. A high percentage of all physics majors had influential adults with careers in physical or biological science fields. This percentage was even larger for female physics majors. Female students also showed a greater initial interest in astronomy than the male students. Thus, high school and college physics teachers should seek to expose students to science-related careers and adults with these careers. Astronomy is also an

  6. Developing Junior Secondary School Students' Reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the impact of Story Telling and Story Retelling on Secondary School Students' Reading Comprehension and Written Composition performance. Two hundred and forty (240) Junior Secondary School Students from three selected schools in Pankshin Local Government Area of Plateau State were ...

  7. Student Achievement in Title I Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Abby T.

    2017-01-01

    This researcher seeks to answer the following question: How did two elementary Title I schools, identified as "high performing" on the first Smarter Balanced assessment, address elements of Maslow's hierarchy of needs when developing school-wide initiatives to enhance student achievement? Many students in Title I schools face barriers to…

  8. Do Charter Schools Improve Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melissa A.; Gleason, Philip M.; Tuttle, Christina Clark; Silverberg, Marsha K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a lottery-based study of the impacts of a broad set of 33 charter middle schools across 13 states on student achievement. To estimate charter school impacts, we compare test score outcomes of students admitted to these schools through the randomized admissions lotteries with outcomes of applicants who were not…

  9. Dynamics of Teacher-Student Relationships: Stability and Change across Elementary School and the Influence on Children’s Academic Success

    OpenAIRE

    Spilt, Jantine L.; Hughes, Jan N.; Wu, Jiun-yu; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2012-01-01

    This study modeled teacher–student relationship trajectories throughout elementary school to predict gains in achievement in an ethnic-diverse sample of 657 academically at-risk students (mean age = 6.57 years, SD = .39). Teacher reports of warmth and conflict were collected in Grades 1–5. Achievement was tested in Grades 1 and 6. For conflict, low-stable (normative), low-increasing, high-declining, and high-stable trajectories were found. For warmth, high-declining (normative) an...

  10. Korean Students' Minority Schooling Experience in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative study conducted in western Japan examined the perceptions of Korean students in Japanese junior high school to identify factors contributing to a consistently low high school advancement rate compared to mainstream Japanese students. Fourteen people were interviewed about their Korean students' experiences in Japan. The findings of…

  11. Creating Career Awareness Among Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discussed the need for creating career awareness among Secondary School Students through career fair Career selection is a critical issue for secondary school students who may not be aware of the existing occupations in the labour market. It is important that career information be made available to students ...

  12. Relationship between Senior School Physics Students' Perceptions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the correlation between senior physics student's perception of their physics teachers' effectiveness and the students' performance in physics. One hundred and seventy-seven (177) Senior Secondary School year 3 physics students of six (6) randomly selected secondary schools in Ilorin metropolis ...

  13. Dynamics of Teacher-Student Relationships: Stability and Change across Elementary School and the Influence on Children’s Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilt, Jantine L.; Hughes, Jan N.; Wu, Jiun-Yu; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2012-01-01

    This study modeled teacher-student relationship trajectories throughout elementary school to predict gains in achievement in an ethnic-diverse sample of 657 academically at-risk students. Teacher reports of Warmth and Conflict were collected in grades 1 to 5. Achievement was tested in grade 1 and 6. For Conflict, low-stable (normative), low-increasing, high-declining, and high-stable trajectories were found. For Warmth, high-declining (normative) and low-increasing patterns were found. Children with early behavioral, academic, or social risks were under-represented in the normative trajectory groups. Chronic conflict was most strongly associated with under achievement. Rising Conflict but not declining Conflict coincided with underachievement. The probability of school failure increased as a function of the timing and length of time children were exposed to relational adversity. PMID:22497209

  14. Personal attributes influencing school burnout among graduating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study predicted that personal attributes and demographics will significantly influence school burnout. The hypothesis was confirmed as predicted as result showed significant joint influence of academic self-efficacy, perception of teacher support, sex and age on school burnout. Academic self-efficacy had significant ...

  15. Effective Urban Schools--Building Student Pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachum, Lock P.

    1985-01-01

    Principals in urban high schools can play an important role in improving school effectiveness by adopting an educational philosophy that focuses on development of the students' sense of self-worth. (PGD)

  16. MATHEMATICS ANXIETY AND ACHIEVEMENT AMONG SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Effandi Zakaria; Normalizam Mohd Zain; Nur Amalina Ahmad; Ayu Erlina

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown that mathematics achievement in students is influenced by psychological factors such as mathematics anxiety. Weaknesses among students in learning mathematics in particular will affect the efforts of various sectors in making Malaysia a fully developed nation by 2020. The purpose of this study was to determine mathematics anxiety and mathematics achievement among secondary school students in Selangor, Malaysia. The research examined the differences in mathematics anxiety ac...

  17. Student engagement in Finnish lower secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Virtanen, Tuomo

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examined the engagement of students at lower secondary schools in Finland. Two independent cross-sectional data sets collected in 2010 (N = 821) and 2013 (N = 2485) were analyzed using both variable-centered and personcentered methods. The thesis analyzed the associations between teacher– student relationships, family support for students’ learning, peer support at school, control and relevance of school work, students’ future aspirations and goals, school burnou...

  18. Graph Theory and the High School Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Gary; Wall, Curtiss E.

    1980-01-01

    Graph theory is presented as a tool to instruct high school mathematics students. A variety of real world problems can be modeled which help students recognize the importance and difficulty of applying mathematics. (MP)

  19. Student Behavior Management: School Leader's Role in the Eyes of the Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooruddin, Shirin; Baig, Shariffullah

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the perspectives and viewpoints of the teachers and students in relation to the influence of the head teacher and senior leadership team on students' behavior management in the form of policies, procedures and support mechanisms in a secondary school in Karachi Pakistan. Two surveys were developed and employed, one for the…

  20. Elementary Magnet School Students' Interracial Interaction Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Gerald B.; Holifield, Mitchell L.; Holifield, Glenda; Creer, Donna Grady

    2000-01-01

    Investigated elementary students' interracial interaction preferences in four desegregated, urban magnet schools. Data from a sociogram of students' working, playing, and sitting choices indicated that black students were less willing than white students to interact. Racial considerations were more pronounced among girls. There was no trend toward…

  1. Scientists of tomorrow - Geophysics School Lab for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschämmer, Ellen; Bohlen, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Starting in 2012, the Geophysical Institute (GPI) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed several geophysical experiments for secondary school students which are now part of the Geophysics School Lab at the GPI. Usually, the students visit the School Lab as a class together with their teacher (Physics, Geography, Science), but the School Lab can also be used for extracurricular learning of individual students. The experiments carried out deal with the topics Seismology, Geoelectrics, and Fluid Dynamics: A horizontal seismometer is decoupled from its registration unit for the time of the visit of the students. With this setup, the students can measure the natural period of the pendulum, and adjust the seismometer accordingly. At different experimental stations, students can analyse seismic data registered with this unit, locate earthquakes, or get to know and understand an accelerometer. The accelerometer is attached to a registration unit and data can be visualized in real time. In another experimental setup, the students can measure the viscosity of a fluid as a function of temperature in order to get a better understanding of different magma types and their viscosity. Furthermore, a geoelectric experiment is carried out in a sandbox: The students experience with non-destructive testing, and try to reveal the subsurface structure. For our experiments, secondary school teachers can receive free supportive materials for the preparation of the visit. The aim of the Geophysics School Lab is to encourage and acquaint secondary school students to the concepts of Geophysics, and to enthuse them with the applied issues of Geosciences.

  2. Feeling of Course Understanding and Stress Responses of Junior High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    玉瀬, 耕治; 松田, 由美

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of students' cognition about schoolwork upon school stress in junior high school. On the basis of the results of our previous study (Matsuda & Tamase, 2002) it was predicted that there would be some meaningful relationship between the students' subjective feeling of course understanding and their stress responses. Fifty male and sixty-five female students were used as raters and they rated school stressors, stress responses in school, and...

  3. Peer Effects on Academic Cheating among High School Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Li

    2012-01-01

    Although academic cheating has been found to be a common phenomenon in high schools, few studies investigate how peers influence individual cheating behavior among high school students. In this paper, we estimate the cross-gender and intra-gender interaction effects on academic cheating among high school students in Taiwan. We detect the evidence…

  4. High School Students' Jobs: Related and Unrelated to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Stephen F.; Sumner, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Work experience can be beneficial to high school students, especially when the work is regular and less than 20 hours/week. Previous studies have found that school-related work experience provides more learning opportunities with fewer negative consequences than jobs unrelated to school. This study analyzed responses of 22,183 seniors from 868…

  5. School bullying and suicidal risk in Korean middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Leventhal, Bennett

    2005-02-01

    Being a victim or a perpetrator of school bullying, the most common type of school violence, has been frequently associated with a broad spectrum of behavioral, emotional, and social problems. In a Korean middle school community sample, this study specifically investigated the prevalence of suicidal ideations and behaviors in victims, perpetrators, and victim-perpetrators of school bullying and compared them with a group of students who were in the same schools and were not involved with bullying. In a cross-sectional study, 1718 seventh- and eighth-grade students in 2 middle schools participated in the study in October 2000. Students completed demographic information, Korean Peer Nomination Inventory, and Korean Youth Self-Report. Compared with the students who were not involved with school bullying, victim-perpetrators reported more suicidal/self-injurious behaviors and suicidal ideation in the previous 6 months (odds ratio [OR]: 1.9 and 1.9, respectively). In female students, all 3 school bullying groups had increased suicidal ideation for the previous 2 weeks (OR: 2.8, 2.0, and 2.8, respectively) but not in male students (OR: 0.9, 1.1, and 1.3, respectively). Students who were involved in school bullying, especially victim-perpetrators and female students, had significantly higher risks for suicide ideation and suicidal behavior when compared with individuals who were not involved in school bullying. In addition to attempting to decrease bullying in a community, students who are involved in school bullying should be the targets for suicide monitoring and prevention programs.

  6. The Effects of Transformational Leadership on Organizational Conditions and Student Engagement with School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithwood, Kenneth; Jantzi, Doris

    2000-01-01

    Uses survey data from an achieved sample of 1,762 teachers and 9,941 students in a large Canadian school district to explore influences of transformational leadership practices on selected organizational conditions and student engagement with school. Transformational leadership strongly influenced organizational conditions and moderately but…

  7. Gender differences in the pathways of family factors influencing children's oral health behaviours: a cross-sectional study of primary school students in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yanling; Ji, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Research on what family factors influence children's oral health behaviours (COHB) in developing countries is limited, and there have been no path analyses accounting for gender differences in these factors. Thus, our study evaluated gender differences in COHB including the influencing pathways of family factors in China. Through multistage cluster sampling, 915 pairs of mothers and children from six public elementary schools in Beijing completed self-administered questionnaires regarding COHB, parents' modelling behaviours (PMB), parents' controlling behaviours (PCB), parents' oral health knowledge and attitudes (PKA), and children's oral health knowledge and attitudes (CKA). The influencing factors were analysed using path analysis. Compared with boys, girls showed significantly better performance in drinking less carbonated drinks regularly (8.6% vs. 16.9%). For both genders, PMB shad a significant direct influence on COHB, while PKA had an indirect influence through PMB. In the boys' model, PKA indirectly influenced COHB through CKA. In the girls' model, socioeconomic status had a positive direct effect on COHB. The gender differences were not as large as expected. Given that slightly different influential factors for COHB exist between boys and girls, interventions should take note of the similarities and differences in pathways.

  8. Leadership to Support Student Voice: The Role of School Leaders in Supporting Meaningful Student Government and Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautsch, Catherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Student voice is defined as meaningful opportunities that allow students to take an active role in the decision-making that influences their lives. While there is a growing body of literature linking student voice to increased student engagement, achievement, civic engagement and successful school reform, the role of the principal in supporting…

  9. Prevalence of school bullying in Korean middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Shin; Koh, Yun-Joo; Leventhal, Bennett L

    2004-08-01

    School bullying is the most common type of school violence. Victimization by or perpetration of school bullying has frequently been associated with a broad spectrum of behavioral, emotional, and social problems. To investigate the prevalence and demographic characteristics of victims, perpetrators, and victim-perpetrators in a Korean middle school sample. We evaluated 1756 middle school students in this cross-sectional study. Students provided demographic information and completed the Korean-Peer Nomination Inventory. Descriptive statistics and the Pearson chi(2) test were used. We found that 40% of all children participated in school bullying. By category, the prevalence of victims, perpetrators, and victim-perpetrators was 14%, 17%, and 9%, respectively. The most common subtypes of victimization were exclusion (23%), verbal abuse (22%), physical abuse (16%), and coercion (20%). Boys were more commonly involved in both school bullying and all 4 types of victimization. The prevalence of bullying was greater in students with either high or low socioeconomic status and in nonintact families. School bullying is highly prevalent in Korean middle school students. Demographic characteristics can help identify students at greater risk for participation in school bullying.

  10. Self-esteem, Motivation, and Emotional Intelligence: Three Factors that influence the Successful Design of a Life Project of Middle-school Young Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Magdalena Lomelí-Parga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research study is to depict the factors that allow young people to effectively carry out their life projects by planning short, mid, and long term goals. The population sample participating in this study was comprised of middle and high school students. This research was executed using mixed methods in order to identify the determining factors for young people who plan to have success in facing the daily life challenges, as well as today’s society demands, through a solid construction of their private vision of the future. The results of this project determine that the features which allow the conclusion of students’ life projects are closely related with a high self-esteem and motivation, as well as some emotional intelligence that allow students to visualize a successful personal and professional future.

  11. Factors influencing health professions students' use of computers for data analysis at three Ugandan public medical schools: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munabi, Ian G; Buwembo, William; Bajunirwe, Francis; Kitara, David Lagoro; Joseph, Ruberwa; Peter, Kawungezi; Obua, Celestino; Quinn, John; Mwaka, Erisa S

    2015-02-25

    Effective utilization of computers and their applications in medical education and research is of paramount importance to students. The objective of this study was to determine the association between owning a computer and use of computers for research data analysis and the other factors influencing health professions students' computer use for data analysis. We conducted a cross sectional study among undergraduate health professions students at three public universities in Uganda using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire was composed of questions on participant demographics, students' participation in research, computer ownership, and use of computers for data analysis. Descriptive and inferential statistics (uni-variable and multi- level logistic regression analysis) were used to analyse data. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Six hundred (600) of 668 questionnaires were completed and returned (response rate 89.8%). A majority of respondents were male (68.8%) and 75.3% reported owning computers. Overall, 63.7% of respondents reported that they had ever done computer based data analysis. The following factors were significant predictors of having ever done computer based data analysis: ownership of a computer (adj. OR 1.80, p = 0.02), recently completed course in statistics (Adj. OR 1.48, p =0.04), and participation in research (Adj. OR 2.64, p computer, participation in research and undertaking courses in research methods influence undergraduate students' use of computers for research data analysis. Students are increasingly participating in research, and thus need to have competencies for the successful conduct of research. Medical training institutions should encourage both curricular and extra-curricular efforts to enhance research capacity in line with the modern theories of adult learning.

  12. A Logistic Regression Analysis of Score Sending and College Matching among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Krystle S.

    2015-01-01

    College decisions are often the result of a variety of influences related to student background characteristics, academic characteristics, college preferences and college aspirations. College counselors recommend that students choose a variety of schools, especially schools where the general student body matches the academic achievement of…

  13. Relational scaffolding of school motivation: developmental continuities in students' and parents' ratings of the importance of school goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, B J; Zhou, R M

    2001-03-01

    The authors investigated whether parents and students are consistent, over grade levels, in the importance they assign to school goals. Elementary and high school students (n = 178) and their parents (n = 130) completed a questionnaire addressing the personal importance of students' school goals, defined in terms of school success. Parent-child consistencies in the rating patterns of school goals over grade levels were more common than were inconsistencies. These developmental consistencies support the position that students' school goals are embedded within the parent-child relationship (J. Youniss, 1980; J. Youniss & J. Smollar, 1985) and are scaffolded within it (J. S. Bruner, 1975; L. S. Vygotsky, 1978). Potential sources of relational and phenotypic influences on school goals are discussed, as is the need for effective friendship management and school performance in high school.

  14. Family and behavioral predictors of school problems in junior and high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Frías Armenta

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A model of family influences on the development of antisocial behavior and scholar problems in adolescents is presented. Two-hundred four students of junior and high school were assessed. Data were analyzed through a structural equation model. Results showed that child abuse, a no cooperative family and mothers' alcohol consumption had a direct effect on antisocial behavior,which in turn promoted delinquen behavior and negatively affected school grades of students. Delinquency and mothers' alcohol consumption had an influence on students' school problems,which could be partially overturned by their social abilities. Results suggest the necessity of counselling for families in arder to prevent school problems and bad grades in adolescents.

  15. School Helping Students Deal with Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In the aftermath of a natural disaster, schools may need to plan to address the suffering and loss of many. These Guidance Notes discuss five areas in which schools can help students cope with loss: (1) Fostering Resiliency; (2) Facilitating and Fostering Social Ties and Resources; (3) Stages of Grieving; (4) Helping Students Deal with Loss; and…

  16. Secondary School Students' Attitudes towards Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, Daniel P.

    1986-01-01

    Reports on Nigerian students' attitudes towards science. Findings suggest that students in general have a favorable attitude towards science and that exogenous factors such as family background and religion do not affect attitudes, whereas school and type of school attended (single-sex) affected attitude. Males were more positive than females…

  17. Binge Drinking and the Independent School Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggish, Rosemary; Wells, Peter

    2013-01-01

    When questioned about illegal, mood-altering substance use, 15,743 high school students surveyed in the last three years with the "Independent School Health Check" said alcohol is most commonly used. For the 30 days prior to filling out the survey, 33.9 percent of the students reported drinking, and 24.2 percent reported binge drinking…

  18. Impact of School Technology on Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Larry Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the impact of school technology on elementary students in grades three through five attending public schools in Indiana. The investigation focused on the impact of various technologies on student achievement as measured on Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus (ISTEP+). Various comparisons were…

  19. Charter Schools and Student Compositions of Traditional Public Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevbahar Ertas

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most contentious urban education policy issues in the United States today is the expansion of charter schools and its repercussions. Does the expansion of charter schools affect the racial and socioeconomic composition of traditional public schools in the United States? This study provides empirical evidence on this question by relying on a panel design that uses school-level data from two states that have experimented with charter schools for more than 15 years: Ohio and Texas. Using county-level, spatial, and enrollment-based measures of charter exposure, the changes from pre- to post-charter-legislation stages in the student compositions of public schools that do and do not face competition from charters are examined. The results suggest that charter school presence contributes to aggregate-level changes in the share of non-Hispanic White and free-lunch-eligible students in traditional public schools in both states in different ways.

  20. More Private Schools for Nonnative Students? Migrant Performance in Private Schools of Differing National Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jungbauer-Gans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Migrant children from most countries are disadvantaged in school. We investigate which characteristics of both school and societal contexts influence the achievements of migrant students. We argue that living conditions and inequality in a society as a whole may affect the chances of minority members and the function that private schools perform in the process of social reproduction of inequality. We investigate in particular the question of whether migrant students attending private schools show a better performance than those attending public schools. The analyses of the paper are based on the data collected in the PISA 2006 survey. Our main results are that the lower mathematics and reading competencies of migrant students can partly be explained by the socioeconomic status and cultural capital of the family and—to a marginal degree—by school characteristics. Initially, students in private independent schools have some advantages that disappear after controlling for country attributes. In both fields of knowledge, migrants obtain better results in private government-dependent schools (interaction effect; this, however, can be traced back to their families' socioeconomic origin and cultural capital. We detect that students in private independent schools reach lower competency levels in wealthier societies (GNP.

  1. High School Physics Students' Personal Epistemologies and School Science Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan; Loving, Cathleen

    2017-10-01

    This case study explores students' physics-related personal epistemologies in school science practices. The school science practices of nine eleventh grade students in a physics class were audio-taped over 6 weeks. The students were also interviewed to find out their ideas on the nature of scientific knowledge after each activity. Analysis of transcripts yielded several epistemological resources that students activated in their school science practice. The findings show that there is inconsistency between students' definitions of scientific theories and their epistemological judgments. Analysis revealed that students used several epistemological resources to decide on the accuracy of their data including accuracy via following the right procedure and accuracy via what the others find. Traditional, formulation-based, physics instruction might have led students to activate naive epistemological resources that prevent them to participate in the practice of science in ways that are more meaningful. Implications for future studies are presented.

  2. High School Physics Students' Personal Epistemologies and School Science Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpaslan, Muhammet Mustafa; Yalvac, Bugrahan; Loving, Cathleen

    2017-11-01

    This case study explores students' physics-related personal epistemologies in school science practices. The school science practices of nine eleventh grade students in a physics class were audio-taped over 6 weeks. The students were also interviewed to find out their ideas on the nature of scientific knowledge after each activity. Analysis of transcripts yielded several epistemological resources that students activated in their school science practice. The findings show that there is inconsistency between students' definitions of scientific theories and their epistemological judgments. Analysis revealed that students used several epistemological resources to decide on the accuracy of their data including accuracy via following the right procedure and accuracy via what the others find. Traditional, formulation-based, physics instruction might have led students to activate naive epistemological resources that prevent them to participate in the practice of science in ways that are more meaningful. Implications for future studies are presented.

  3. Teaching Ethics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan; Willingham, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Working with two teachers and thirty-four high school seniors, the authors developed procedures and assessments to teach ethics in an American high school civics class. This approach requires high school students to discover an agreement or convergence between Kantian ethics and virtue ethics. The authors also created an instrument to measure…

  4. Chinese Graduate Students' Perspectives on Home Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    Although an established alternative form of American education, the concept of home schooling is just beginning to surface in China. Few Chinese have knowledge of home schooling yet alone consider this form of education. However, graduate students studying in the field of education are aware of this unusual alternative to traditional schooling,…

  5. White School Counselors Becoming Racial Justice Allies to Students of Color: A Call to the Field of School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Lauren J.; Singh, Anneliese A.

    2015-01-01

    White school counselors must consider how racial identity, and whiteness as a construct, influences their work with students of color. This article addresses opportunities for White school counselors regarding how they may become allies to students of color and suggests way in which counselor educators can support the ally identity development in…

  6. Influence of Gender and Cognitive Styles on Students' Achievement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the influence of gender and cognitive styles on students' achievement in biology in senior secondary schools in Anambra State. One research question and one null hypothesis tested at 0.05 level of significance guided the study. A causal comparative research design and a population of 12,000 (SSII) ...

  7. Disciplinary Exclusion: The Influence of School Ethos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Lucy Ann

    2013-01-01

    Disciplinary exclusion is a strategy used by some schools in response to challenging behaviour. While some studies have explored interventions that can be implemented to reduce the exclusion of "at risk" pupils, others have considered how the underlying school ethos influences how challenging behaviour is understood and managed. The…

  8. Factors Affecting Aggression in South Korean Middle School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MiJeong Park, PhD, RN

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Findings indicate that depression, academic stress, and grade (second grade influence aggression. To decrease aggressive behavior, it is necessary to provide systematic and political programs in schools and local communities that can ameliorate negative emotional factors like depression and academic stress. Additionally, development of positive factors such as self esteem, decision-making skills, and happiness in middle school students is important to reduce aggression.

  9. Student Trust in Teachers and Student Perceptions of Safety: Positive Predictors of Student Identification with School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Kensler, Lisa; Tschannen-Moran, Megan

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the effects of student trust in teacher and student perceptions of safety on identification with school. Data were collected from one large urban district in an eastern state. Participants included 5441 students in 3rd through 12th grades from 49 schools. Students responded to surveys that assessed student trust in teachers,…

  10. The relationship between high school students' academic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive comparative study to determine agriculture students= performance in science as compared to agriculture found superior performance in science than in agriculture. Students= performance in science was highly correlated with performance in agriculture. Students from urban, mission and single schools ...

  11. IMPACT OF SCHOOL TUTORING IN THE PROJECTION OF HIGH SCHOOL ADULT STUDENTS, SEMIPRESENTIAL MODALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor José Peinado-Guevara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The semipresential modality at high school level for adults, as the offered in the nightlife high school of the Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, that creates high expectations for Sinaloa´s society, to give the student an opportunity to continue its educational development in high school level and, lead him to continue with their vocational training. With this investigation, and given to their conditions, the objective it´s to know the competitive level at the beginning and during the development in the institution, also to identify the influence of the school tutoring in the development of adult students in high school. It was identified the income profile of students to the institution; was necessary to rescue the results of CENEVAL and EDAOM tests, practiced at the entry of students to the institution. Together this tools, was necessary to practice two questionnaires to evaluate the students perception about their teachers; and another one to identify the main problems they faced and the function of their school tutor in the institution. With the data obtained, were identified some deficiencies of semipresential system, especially in educational planning. Even though the students recognizes that the tutoring its fundamental to the incorporation of students to academic activities and that exists a high level of acceptance to the programs set by the institution.

  12. tanzanian high school students' attitude towards five university

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-03-01

    Mar 1, 2000 ... Objective: To determine the attitude of high school students majoring in Physics, Chemistry and Biology (PCB) towards ... class, education and employment status of father and mother as background variables, and questions on the .... explored factors influencing career choice among potential applicants for ...

  13. Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid; Jabari, Kamran; Rajeswari, K.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the influence of self-esteem on academic achievement among high school students in Miandoab City of Iran. The methodology of the research is descriptive and correlation that descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Statistical Society includes male and female high…

  14. Latino/a Student Misbehavior and School Punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.; Shekarkhar, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Although Latino/as are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. student population, Latino/a youth face a number of educational hurdles, such as disproportionate school punishment. This topic is particularly relevant today in the midst of the current social, political, and economic debate over the influence of Latino/a immigration in the US school…

  15. A Research on Foreign Language Anxiety among Vocational School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓莉

    2014-01-01

    Foreign language anxiety is a negative emotion of fear or apprehension occurring in the specific situation of foreign language learning influencing language learning. The author made a research among vocational school students to investigate the level and sources of foreign language anxiety.

  16. Factors Influencing Difficulty Learn Economic Subject Of Student Class Of XII IPS Sman 2 Sijunjung

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmah, Aulia -

    2014-01-01

    This research aim to to know Factors influencing difficulty learn economic subject of Class student of XII IPS SMAN 2 Sijunjung. Population is class student of XII IPS SMAN 2 Sijunjung School year 2014 / 2015 a number of 139 student. Sampel the taken a number of 103 student. Intake of sampel use technique of purposive sample. In this research of researcher study factors influencing difficulty learn economic subject of Class student of XII IPS SMAN 2 Sijunjung. Appliance data collecting which ...

  17. Correlates of parental influence, school environment, learners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents\\' influence, self–efficacy, and school environment were also found to be statistically significant. Results are discussed in terms of counseling implications. Keywords: parental influence, academic performance, police children, Nigeria African Journal of Psychological Study of Social Issues Vol. 8(1) 2005: 42-57 ...

  18. Learning Leadership Matters: The Influence of Innovative School Leadership Preparation on Teachers' Experiences and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphanos, Stelios; Orr, Margaret Terry

    2014-01-01

    School leadership has been shown to exert a positive but mostly indirect influence on school and student outcomes. Currently, there is great interest in how quality leadership preparation is related to leadership practice and improved teacher outcomes. The purpose of the study was to understand the moderating influence of leadership preparation on…

  19. Sociological Factors to Drug Abuse and the Effects on Secondary School Students' Academic Performance in Ekiti and Ondo States, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu-Raheem, B. O.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of drug abuse on secondary school students in relation to their family background, family cohesion, peer group influence, and students' academic performance. Descriptive research design of the survey type and an inventory were used for the study. The population comprised all secondary school students in Ekiti and…

  20. Good Teachers/Bad Teachers: How Rural Adolescent Students' Views of Teachers Impact on Their School Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwerda-Brown, Joan; Oliver, Rhonda; Hodgson, David; Palmer, Marylin; Watts, Lynelle

    2008-01-01

    Student views of their teachers and schooling can influence motivation and interest in schooling as well as their approach to learning. This paper describes the results of an investigation of rural adolescents' views of their schooling. A total of 240 students from government and non-government schools in the South West of Western Australia were…

  1. The School Absenteeism among High School Students: Contributing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkis, Murat; Arslan, Gökmen; Duru, Erdinç

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the direct and indirect relationship between student school absenteeism, personal factors (academic self- perception, attitudes towards teacher and school, goal valuation and motivation/ self-regulation), family factors (parents' educational level and income), and academic achievement in structural equation…

  2. Medical student and medical school teaching faculty perceptions of conflict of interest

    OpenAIRE

    Andresen, Nicholas S.; Olson, Tyler S.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Attitudes towards conflict of interest (COI) and COI policy are shaped during medical school and influence both the education of medical students and their future medical practice. Understanding the current attitudes of medical students and medical school teaching faculty may provide insight into what is taught about COI and COI policy within the ?hidden? medical curriculum. Differences between medical student and medical school teaching faculty perceptions of COI and COI policy ha...

  3. The Influence of School Health Education Programmes on the Knowledge and Behaviour of School Children towards Nutrition and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keirle, Kathleen; Thomas, Malcolm

    2000-02-01

    A comparative investigation was conducted involving two school situations; one identified as being health promoting and having a comprehensive policy and a defined programme of health education, and the other not health promoting, having no policy and an unstructured programme of health education. A total of 367 students from two secondary and four primary schools participated in the study. The factors used to categorise schools are highlighted. A self-completion questionnaire was employed to assess students' knowledge and behaviour with regard to nutrition and health. Students' dietary intake was monitored by employing a frequency of consumption tick sheet. The results revealed that students from the more health promoting secondary school (School 1(H)) were more knowledgeable of what constitutes a healthy diet and the benefits and risks to health. The implications of these results are considered within the context of the many factors that could influence students' knowledge and behaviour.

  4. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: Associations with school food environment and policies

    OpenAIRE

    Story Mary; Hannan Peter J; French Simone A; Neumark-Sztainer Dianne; Fulkerson Jayne A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. Methods A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained resear...

  5. Student Nomads: Mobility in Ohio's Schools. Ohio Student Mobility Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Student mobility is the phenomenon of students in grades K-12 changing schools for reasons other than customary promotion from elementary school to middle school or from middle school to high school. This non-promotional school change can occur during the school year or in the summer between school years. It may involve residential change, school…

  6. Descriptive study abroad students schooled Galicia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cristina Goenechea Permisán

    2016-01-01

    ... (Department of Education in the Autonomous Region of Galicia), the main aim of this article is to describe both the distribution and the main characteristics of foreign students who attend Galician schools...

  7. High School Students' Attitudes Toward Homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H.

    1982-01-01

    A review of research concerning attitudes toward homosexuality and a study of 278 high school students' attitudes toward homosexuality show that males have significantly greater negative attitudes toward homosexuality. Tables display results of the study. (CJ)

  8. Handwashing Practices among Various School Age Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pete, Joanette M.

    1987-01-01

    Given the importance of handwashing to help control infectious organisms, this study investigated the frequency of handwashing after bathroom use of 200 elementary, middle, high school, and university students. Results and their implications are discussed. (MT)

  9. Sensitization of Secondary School Students towards Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gold

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... Sensitization of Secondary School Students towards. Sustainable Electoral Process in Nigeria: Nigeria. Independent Electoral Commission as a Focus. (Pp. 239-251). Uhunmwuangho, Sunday Okungbowa - Lecturer, Institute of Public. Administration & Extension Services, University of Benin, Benin City,.

  10. Can Eco-Schools Improve Elementary School Students' Environmental Literacy Levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy, Sibel; Ertepinar, Hamide; Saglam, Necdet

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of eco-schools on elementary school students' environmental literacy levels. Data of the study were gathered from 316 students enrolled to two elementary schools. One of the schools was determined as experimental group (n = 156) and students attending this school received eco-school application.…

  11. American high school students visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Fifteen final-year students from Columbus High School, Mississippi, USA visited CERN recently with their physics teacher Ken Wester (left at rear). Mr Wester organized the trip after his participation in the 2002 edition of CERN's High School Teachers programme. The students visited the CMS construction site and the AD antimatter factory during their two-day visit. They are pictured here with Michel Della Negra, CMS spokesman (kneeling), in front of the model of the CMS detector in building 40.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS AMONG SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanya C H; Mrs. Pankajam. R

    2017-01-01

    Environmental awareness is to understand the fragility of our environment and the importance of its protection. Promoting environmental awareness is an easy way to become an environmental steward and participate in creating a brighter future for our children. The study aimed to examine the environmental awareness among secondary school students. The investigator adopted survey method to study the environmental awareness among secondary school students. For this study a sample of 300 secondary...

  13. School Facility Conditions and Student Academic Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Earthman, Glen I.

    2002-01-01

    This paper shows that the condition of school facilities has an important impact on student performance and teacher effectiveness. In particular, research demonstrates that comfortable classroom temperature and noise level are very important to efficient student performance. The age of school buildings is a useful proxy in this regard, since older facilities often have problems with thermal environment and noise level. A number of studies have measured overall building condition and its conne...

  14. Student and teacher perceptions of school climate: a multilevel exploration of patterns of discrepancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mary M; Bradshaw, Catherine P; Leaf, Philip J

    2010-06-01

    School climate has been linked with improved academic achievement and reduced discipline problems, and thus is often a target of school improvement initiatives. However, few studies have examined the extent to which student and teacher perceptions vary as a function of individual, classroom, and school characteristics, or the level of congruence between teachers' and their students' perceptions of school climate. Using data from 1881 fifth-grade students and their 90 homeroom teachers, we examined parallel models of students' and teachers' perceptions of overall school climate and academic emphasis. Two additional models were fit that assessed the congruence between teacher and student perceptions of school climate and academic emphasis. Multilevel analyses indicated that classroom-level factors were more closely associated with teachers' perceptions of climate, whereas school-level factors were more closely associated with the students' perceptions. Further analyses indicated an inverse association between student and teacher ratings of academic emphasis, and no association between student and teacher ratings of overall climate. Teacher ratings were more sensitive to classroom-level factors, such as poor classroom management and proportion of students with disruptive behaviors, whereas student ratings were more influenced by school-level factors such as student mobility, student-teacher relationship, and principal turnover. The discrepancy in ratings of academic emphasis suggests that while all of the respondents may have shared objectively similar experiences, their perceptions of those experiences varied significantly. These results emphasize the importance of assessing both student and teacher perceptions in future research on school climate.

  15. Cognitive Skills, Student Achievement Tests, and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Amy S.; Kraft, Matthew A.; West, Martin R.; Leonard, Julia A.; Bish, Crystal E.; Martin, Rebecca E.; Sheridan, Margaret A.; Gabrieli, Christopher F. O.; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive skills predict academic performance, so schools that improve academic performance might also improve cognitive skills. To investigate the impact schools have on both academic performance and cognitive skills, we related standardized achievement test scores to measures of cognitive skills in a large sample (N=1,367) of 8th-grade students attending traditional, exam, and charter public schools. Test scores and gains in test scores over time correlated with measures of cognitive skills. Despite wide variation in test scores across schools, differences in cognitive skills across schools were negligible after controlling for 4th-grade test scores. Random offers of enrollment to over-subscribed charter schools resulted in positive impacts of such school attendance on math achievement, but had no impact on cognitive skills. These findings suggest that schools that improve standardized achievement tests do so primarily through channels other than cognitive skills. PMID:24434238

  16. Influence of School Certificate English Achievement and Faculty on Course of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguma, Vincent U.; Timothy, Alexander E.

    2015-01-01

    The study was to find out the influence of both students' achievement in the West African Examination Council's Senior School Certificate English Language examination and the faculty of study by the students in the university on their performances in Use of English and in specific courses of study. 964 undergraduate students of Cross River…

  17. Affective Factors Influencing Plurilingual Students' Acquisition of Catalan in a Catalan-Spanish Bilingual Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaus, Merce; Moore, Emilee; Azevedo, Adriana Cordeiro

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the affective factors influencing students' learning of Catalan across different year levels in a multilingual school community in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain). Questionnaires were distributed to 176 students, from 12 to 17 years of age, registered in a public secondary school, the majority of whom were not born in Catalonia.…

  18. The Effect of School Principals' Leadership Styles on Elementary School Students' Reading Achievement Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Principal leadership studies have indicated that leadership can play an important role in augmenting students' achievement scores. One significant influence that can affect achievement scores is the leadership style of the principal. This study focuses on fourth-grade achievement scores within urban elementary schools and explores the relationship…

  19. Examining the Effects of School Composition on North Carolina Student Achievement over Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Southworth

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the effects of school-level characteristics on North Carolina students’ reading and math achievement from fourth through eighth grade, focusing on the relationships between achievement and the racial and poverty composition of schools. After creating race-by-poverty cohorts of schools, I use multilevel models to examine math and reading achievement for the same students in fourth, sixth, and eighth grades. The racial and poverty composition of schools affect student achievement after factoring in student, family, and other school influences. In addition, increasing teacher quality and school resources reduces but does not eliminate the effects of school racial and poverty composition on student achievement. Policies leading to reductions in racial and poverty isolation in schools and increases in teacher quality should be pursued to guarantee equality of educational opportunities to all children in North Carolina schools.

  20. Hidalgo School District Supports All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodine, Thad R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the Hildago (Texas) Independent School District, in partnership with the University of Texas-Pan American, the University of Texas System, the Communities Foundation of Texas/Texas High School Project, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, promised that all of its students would earn college credits before graduating from high…

  1. Students and Their Schooling: Does Happiness Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Scott

    2010-01-01

    With the increased emphasis on measuring school success primarily through academic outcomes, some might argue that school professionals cannot afford to pay much attention to students' well-being, especially to such a frivolous component as happiness. Indeed, even some positive psychologists who encourage greater attention to research and…

  2. School ethnic diversity and students' interethnic relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Jochem; Verkuijten, Maykel

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: School ethnic desegregation has been a topic of strong societal and educational concern. Research has examined the effects of ethnic school composition on students' interethnic relations with diverging outcomes and sometimes inconsistent results. In this review paper, we provide

  3. Causes of Student Absenteeism and School Dropouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Seyma; Arseven, Zeynep; Kiliç, Abdurrahman

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the causes of student absenteeism and school dropouts at primary, secondary and high school level in Düzce Province and to develop suggestions for solving these problems. A "case study" design, which is one of the qualitative research approaches, was used in this study. The study group consisted of…

  4. High School Dropout: The Students' Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francesca Salvà-Mut; Miquel F Oliver-Trobat; Rubén Comas-Forgas

    2014-01-01

      This study addresses the problem of high school dropout in Spain. It aims to gain a more profound understanding of the reasons and processes that lead to students leaving school, based on the point of view of the teenagers themselves...

  5. High School Journalism Experiences Influence Career Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Julie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes a study of how University of Florida communications students developed their expectations of a career in communications. Identifies scholastic journalism experience, high school career decisions, personal reading, and a desire to write as common reasons for pursuing communications careers. Suggests areas for further research. (SG)

  6. How Family Background Influences Student Achievement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna J Egalite

    2016-01-01

    .... Because parental education influences children's learning both directly and through the choice of a school, we do not know how much of the correlation can be attributed to direct impact and how much...

  7. Influence of Learning Strategies STAD Using Portfolio Assessment and Academic Ability to Concept Training Junior High School Students in Biology Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspani Puspani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh Strategi Pembelajaran STAD Menggunakan Penilaian Portofolio dan Kemampuan Akademik terhadap Pemahaman Konsep Siswa SMP pada Pembelajaran Biologi Abstract: This study is a quasi-experimental research (quasi experimental which aims to: (1 examine the effect of STAD learning strategies using a portfolio assessment to the understanding of concepts and critical thinking skills, (2 test the effect of academic ability to understanding of concepts and critical thinking skills students, (3 test the interaction effect of STAD strategy using portfolio assessment and academic ability to the understanding of concepts and critical thinking skills of students. Research using the draft "non-pretest-posttest control group design equivalent" version 2x2 factorial. Data analysis to test for normality and homogeneity, followed by analysis of covariance (Anacova and a further test LSD. The study population is class VIII SMPN 12 Balikpapan. Samples are 6 classes determined by random cluster sampling technique. The results showed: (1 there was an effect of STAD strategy using a portfolio assessment to the understanding of concepts and critical thinking skills of students, (2 no influence on the understanding of the concept of academic ability and critical thinking skills of students, (3 there is no interaction effect between strategy STAD using portfolio assessment and academic ability to the understanding of concepts and critical thinking skills of students. Key Words: STAD, portfolios, academic ability, understanding of the concept Abstrak: Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimen semu (quasi experiment yang bertujuan untuk: (1 menguji pengaruh strategi pembelajaran STAD dengan menggunakan penilaian portofolio terhadap pemahaman konsep dan kemampuan berpikir kritis, (2 menguji pengaruh kemampuan akade-mik terhadap pemahaman konsep dan kemampuan berpikir kritis siswa, (3 menguji pengaruh interaksi strategi pembelajaran STAD dengan menggunakan penilaian

  8. School Mobility and Students' Academic and Behavioral Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    The study examined estimated effects of school mobility on students' academic and behaviouiral outcomes. Based on data for 2,560 public schools from the School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS) 2007-2008, the findings indicate that high schools, urban schools, and schools serving a total student population of more than 50 percent minority…

  9. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Abdullah Faruk; Güzeller, Cem Oktay

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The…

  10. Working While in Middle School: Student Perceptions of School Climate & Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sabrena

    2016-01-01

    Does working during the school year result in lowered perceptions of school climate and connectedness for middle school students? According to outcomes from a Rocky Mountain Region School District's (RMRSD) school climate survey, 20% of their middle school student population works during the school year. Existing literature on youth employment…

  11. The Relationship between Student Achievement, School District Economies of Scale, School District Size, and Student Socioeconomic Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Randy

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between student achievement, school district economies of scale, school district size and student socioeconomic status were measured for 131 school districts in the state of Oregon. Data for school districts ranging in size from districts with around 300 students to districts with more than 40,000 students were collected for…

  12. Student Engagement in After-School Programs, Academic Skills, and Social Competence among Elementary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E. Grogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the relationship between after-school program participation and student outcomes has been mixed, and beneficial effects have been small. More recent studies suggest that participation is best characterized as a multidimensional concept that includes enrollment, attendance, and engagement, which help explain differences in student outcomes. The present study uses data from a longitudinal study of after-school programs in elementary schools to examine staff ratings of student engagement in after-school activities and the association between engagement and school outcomes. The factor structure of the staff-rated measure of student engagement was examined by exploratory factor analysis. Multiple regression analyses found that student engagement in academic, youth development, and arts after-school program activities was significantly related to changes in teacher ratings of academic skills and social competence over the course of the school year and that students with the greatest increase in academic skills both were highly engaged in activities and attended the after-school program regularly. The results of this study provide additional evidence regarding the benefits of after-school programs and the importance of student engagement when assessing student outcomes.

  13. Middle school student perceptions of school lunch following revised federal school meal guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed student perceptions of school meals under the new federal meal patterns for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Student feedback is instrumental in developing strategies to increase and maintain NSLP participation, satisfaction, and ultimately provide students with a health...

  14. Effective Students and Families : The Importance of Individual Characteristics for Achievement in High School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, René; Kuyper, Hans

    2004-01-01

    The school careers in secondary education are influenced by individual and environmental characteristics. Using longitudinal data on 7,000 students from 450 classes in 150 schools in The Netherlands, we present results on the importance of student and family characteristics for achievement (text

  15. Improving Junior High School Students' Mathematical Analogical Ability Using Discovery Learning Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarif, Samsul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the influence of discovery learning method towards the mathematical analogical ability of junior high school's students. This is a research using factorial design 2x2 with ANOVA-Two ways. The population of this research included the entire students of SMPN 13 Jakarta (State Junior High School 13 of Jakarta)…

  16. Analysis of Errors Committed by Physics Students in Secondary Schools in Ilorin Metropolis, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omosewo, Esther Ore; Akanbi, Abdulrasaq Oladimeji

    2013-01-01

    The study attempt to find out the types of error committed and influence of gender on the type of error committed by senior secondary school physics students in metropolis. Six (6) schools were purposively chosen for the study. One hundred and fifty five students' scripts were randomly sampled for the study. Joint Mock physics essay questions…

  17. An Investigation of the Effects of School Context and Sex Differences on Students' Motivational Goal Orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowson, Martin; McInerney, Dennis M.; Nelson, Genevieve F.

    2006-01-01

    It is widely postulated that school context characteristics and sex may influence students' motivational orientations. However, relatively little empirical evidence exists to support this postulate. Hence the present study sought to examine both the individual and interactive effects of school and sex differences on students' motivational goals.…

  18. Students' Perceived Parental School Behavior Expectations and Their Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Gary L.; Hopson, Laura M.; Rose, Roderick A.; Glennie, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    Self-report data from 2,088 sixth-grade students in 11 middle schools in North Carolina were combined with administrative data on their eighth-grade end-of-the-year achievement scores in math and reading to examine the influence of students' perceived parental school behavior expectations on their academic performance. Through use of multilevel…

  19. Promoting Elementary School Students' Autonomous Reading Motivation: Effects of a Teacher Professional Development Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Naeghel, Jessie; Van Keer, Hilde; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Haerens, Leen; Aelterman, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Responding to the declining trend in reading motivation in and beyond the elementary school years, the authors aimed to enhance late-elementary school students' autonomous reading motivation. Toward this end, the authors evaluated the influence of a teacher professional development grounded in self-determination theory on fifth-grade students' (n…

  20. High School Students' Attitudes toward Fitness Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Kevin; Silverman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of high school students toward fitness testing. An instrument containing 18 items and four factors measuring student's attitudes toward fitness testing: cognitive, affect-enjoyment, affect-feelings, and affect-teacher was completed by 524 boys and 675 girls (N = 1199). MANOVA indicated…

  1. Secondary School Student's Attitude towards Consumer Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The urban groups were made up of 64 students in two schools in Warri South Local Government Area. A questionnaire was the main instrument used to collect data for this study. Means were then used to analyze the data collected. Findings indicated that students in both urban and rural areas have positive attitude towards ...

  2. Introducing Undergraduate Students to School Leadership Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eacott, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the role of an under-graduate educational leadership in introducing students to the complexity of school leadership practice. Design/methodology/approach: Theoretically informed by Bourdieuian social theory and drawing on a questionnaire with a cohort of students, the paper evaluates a course in relation to…

  3. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis among primary school students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    microscope was used to examine all study subjects. Results: A total of 792 students, 348 (43.9%) males and 444 (56.1%) females, were screened. ... As VKC is a chronic, recurrent condition, school health education about its supportive and symptomatic management need to be given to teachers and students. [Ethiop.

  4. Predictors of scientific understanding of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Joshua Matthew

    The purpose of this study was to determine if middle school student scientific understanding could be predicted by the variables: standardized 5th grade score in science, standardized 5th grade score in mathematics, standardized 5th grade score in reading, student attitude towards science, socioeconomic status, gender, and ethnicity. The areas of the comprehensive literature review were trends in science learning and teaching, research in the K-12 science education arena, what factors have influenced K-12 science education, scientific understanding, what research has been done on K-12 scientific understanding, and what factors have influenced science understanding in the K-12 arenas. Based on the results of the literature review, the researcher of this study examined a sample of middle school 8th grade students. An Attitude Towards Science Survey (SATS) Simpson & Oliver (1990) and a Survey of Scientific Understandings (Klapper, DeLucia, & Trent, 1993) were administered to these 116 middle school 8th grade students drawn from a total population of 1109 who attend this middle school in a typical county in Florida during the 2010- 2011 school year. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test each sub-hypothesis and to provide a model that attempted to predict student scientific understanding. Seven null sub-hypotheses were formed to determine if there were significant relationships between student scientific understanding and the abovementioned variables. The results of the tests of the seven null sub-hypotheses showed that the sub-hypothesis that involved socioeconomic status was rejected, which indicated that the socioeconomic status of a family does influence the level of scientific understanding of a student. Low SES students performed lower on the scientific understanding survey, on average, than high SES students. This study can be a source of information for teachers in low-income schools by recognizing potential areas of concern for low

  5. Students' Perceptions of Family Influences on their Academic Motivation: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdan, Tim; Solek, Monica; Schoenfelder, Erin

    2007-01-01

    Research examining family influences on student motivation and achievement in school has generally focused on parental influences and has often been limited to one or two variables (e.g., parental expectations or aspirations, parental involvement in schoolwork). In the present study we interviewed high school seniors to examine whether and how…

  6. Demographic Factors Affecting Internet Using Purposes of High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Faruk Kılıç; Cem Oktay Güzeller

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the impact of demographic factors on the Internet usage purposes of high school students. The population of the study consisted of students between 9th and 12th grades from the Anatolian high schools, science high schools, social sciences high schools, sports high schools and fine arts high schools in Turkey. The sample was chosen through the stratified and cluster sampling procedure. The students were chosen randomly depending on the regions of their school at...

  7. Citizenship Engagement: Responses from High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, the main mission of social studies education is to prepare students for citizenship. With this in mind, the following study examined 191 high school students’ views on how they demonstrated citizenship. Traditionally with this age group, personally responsible citizenship has been a common form of self-reported citizenship engagement. However, in this study, the students seemed to conceptualize citizenship differently. With the Akwesasne Mohawk students, the European Ame...

  8. Functions of parental involvement and effects of school climate on bullying behaviors among South Korean middle school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Song, Juyoung

    2012-08-01

    This study uses an ecological systems theory to understand bullying behavior. Emphasis is given to overcome limitations found in the literature, such as very little empirical research on functions of parental involvement and the impacts of school climate on bullying as an outcome variable. Two functions of parental involvement investigated are (a) bridging the negative experiences within the family with bullying behaviors at schools, and (b) influencing school climate. Bullying behaviors were measured by a modified Korean version of Olweus' bully/victim questionnaire (reliability range: .78-.84) from 1,238 randomly selected Korean middle school students in 2007. Findings from structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses showed that (a) individual traits are one of the most important influence on bullying, (b) negative experiences in the family do not have direct influence on bullying behaviors at school, (c) parental involvement influences school climate, and (d) positive school climate was negatively related to bullying behaviors.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF DANCE HALL ON THE POSTURE OF THE STUDENTS FROM A SCHOOL DANCE IN BENTO GONÇALVES-RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace dos Santos Feijó

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The practice of Ballroom Dance (BD meets the desires of human beings to practice regular physical activity, increase self-esteem, improve cosmetic appearance and develop skills such as coordination, laterality and rhythm. However, no previous studies assessing postural changes generated by it were found. OBJECTIVE: To study the postural effects that the BD promotes in students of a dance school in the city of Bento Gonçalves-RS, over the first three months of practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated the static posture in the sagital plane of 18 individuals who had never come into contact with this type of dance, divided into 2 groups (control and experimental and evaluated by photographic, both pre and post-experiment. The experiment consisted of one weekly class of BD, lasting 75 minutes each, over 3 months. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The results of the postural assessment showed that the practice of BD affected only in the posture of the cervical spine, causing the individual practitioners to provide additional rectified after the first three months of lessons. Regarding other aspects evaluated postural significant changes were not found after comparing the results before and after the experiment, suggesting that three months practice of BD were not sufficient to promote changes in the static posture of individuals.

  10. The emerging dental workforce: long-term career expectations and influences. A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their long-term career from one London Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Patel, Resmi; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2009-12-23

    career break' (p = 0.01), 'assistance with student debt' (p = 0.01) and 'incentives to work in deprived areas'. Long-term career plans of new graduates from this London Dental School commonly embrace opportunities for professional development as well as personal issues such as work/life balance and financial income. Significant differences were identified between male and females long-term plans and influences. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. The emerging dental workforce: long-term career expectations and influences. A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their long-term career from one London Dental School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nairn HF

    2009-12-01

    ' (p = 0.02, 'retraining facilities after career break' (p = 0.01, 'assistance with student debt' (p = 0.01 and 'incentives to work in deprived areas'. Conclusion Long-term career plans of new graduates from this London Dental School commonly embrace opportunities for professional development as well as personal issues such as work/life balance and financial income. Significant differences were identified between male and females long-term plans and influences. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Shifting Attendance Trajectories from Middle to High School: Influences of School Transitions and Changing School Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Aprile D.; Wang, Yijie

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we examine patterns of school attendance across middle and high school with a diverse sample of 8,908 students (48% female; 54% Latino, 31% White, 13% African American, 2% Asian American). Attendance declined from middle through high school, but this overall pattern masked important variations. In total, 44% of students…

  13. School Substance Use Norms and Racial Composition Moderate Parental and Peer Influences on Adolescent Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jinni; Supple, Andrew J

    2016-06-01

    Parental and peer influences on adolescent substance use have been well demonstrated. However, limited research has examined how parental and peer influences vary across school contexts. This study used a multilevel approach to examine the effects of school substance use norms and school racial composition in predicting adolescent substance use (a composite measure of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use) and in moderating parental and peer influences on adolescent substance use. A total of 14,346 adolescents from 34 schools in a mid-western county completed surveys electronically at school. Analyses were conducted using hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicated that school-level disapproval against substance use and percentage of minority students at school were negatively associated with adolescent substance use. School-level disapproval moderated the association between peer substance use and adolescent substance use, with the association being stronger when school-level disapproval was lower. School racial composition moderated the influence of parental disapproval and peer substance use on adolescent substance use. Specifically, both the association between parental disapproval and adolescent substance use and the association between peer substance use and adolescent substance use were weaker for adolescents who attended schools with higher percentages of minority students. Findings highlighted the importance of considering the role of school contexts, in conjunction with parental and peer influences, in understanding adolescent substance use. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  14. Pilot study on depression among secondary school students in Selangor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlina, S; Suthahar, A; Ramli, M; Edariah, A B; Soe, Soe Aye; Mohd Ariff, F; Narimah, A H H; Nuraliza, A S; Karuthan, C

    2007-08-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study of 2048 subjects was conducted to determine the prevalence of depression and factors influencing depression among students in secondary school from urban and rural areas in the state of Selangor, Malaysia. The children's depression inventory (CDI) developed by Maria Kovacs was used in this study. Students who participated in this study come from two urban schools and three rural schools. It was found that in the yield for scores for five factors were 9.2% have negative mood, 5% have interpersonal problems, 8.3% have ineffectiveness, 9.8% have anhedonia and 10.6% have negative self esteem. Following the interpretive guidelines for the T-scores, it was found that 10.3% of the students were much above average in the depression scale. This study also found that: 1% of students were smoking, 1.6% of students were gum sniffling, 0.9% took drugs, 4.1% took alcohol and 9.9% took things from other people. Females were more depressed than males. The Chinese students were more depressed compared to Indian students. Students whose parents had no formal education or had only primary education were more depressed than students whose parents had secondary, college or university education. Depression increased with increasing number of siblings. Depression contributed to the habit of drug abuse, gum sniffing and stealing but not to smoking and alcohol abuse. Suicidal tendencies were more likely among the depressed students. It is imperative that not only caregivers but also teachers have to be equipped with the knowledge, attitude and skills to assist secondary school children cope with their emotions, handle conflicts and manage stress early so that a more productive society will develop in the future.

  15. Do school context, student composition and school leadership affect school practice and outcomes in secondary education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdenakker, M.C.; van Damme, J

    This study examined effects of school context, student composition and school leadership on school practice and outcomes in secondary education in Flanders. The study reveals that relations between school characteristics do exist and that it is possible to explain an important part of the

  16. Factors influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Vitti; Chan, Fong; Chan, Jacob Yui-Chung; Lee, June Ka Yan; Sung, Connie; H Wilson, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Transition from high school to college can be particularly difficult and stressful for Chinese college students because of parent expectations. The purpose of this study was to examine therapist variables influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals using conjoint analysis. Two hundred fifty-eight community college students in Hong Kong were asked to rate the profile of 55 mental health professionals representing a combination of therapist characteristics (i.e., gender, age, race/ethnicity, professional background, and training institutions) from the most to least preferred therapist from whom to seek psychological counselling. Results indicated that students' preference formation was based largely on professional background and training institution of the mental health professionals. Clinical psychologists and clinical social workers were preferred over educational psychologists (school psychologists), counsellors, and psychiatrists. Mental health professionals who received training from more prestigious schools were preferred over those trained at less prestigious schools. Understanding clients' preference formation for choosing mental health professionals could be the first step to gain insights for developing effective educational and outreach strategies to promote help seeking behavior and mental health service utilization among Chinese college students.

  17. Developing cloud chambers with high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    2013-01-01

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry ice free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical detail of the chamber is presented. We also argue how the project affects student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project had been done in very similar way to those of professional researchers, i.e., planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we learn that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  18. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  19. The Wicehtowak Partnership: Improving Student Learning by Formalizing the Family-Community-School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunison, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which formalization of the family-community-school partnership through the Wicehtowak Partnership influenced educational outcomes for Aboriginal students in one urban school district. It finds that the community engagement process employed by the school district for creating the partnership…

  20. The Influence of Cyberbullying on the College Objectives of Female Undergraduates Who Were Victims in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Militza

    2012-01-01

    Cyberbullying has a negative influence on academic grades, school attendance, and graduation rates, and occurs more frequently among female high school students. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of cyberbullying on the college objectives of female undergraduates who were victims in high school. Goleman's theory of…

  1. Sleep and student performance at school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Howard; Potts-Datema, William

    2005-09-01

    To review the state of research on the association between sleep among school-aged children and academic outcomes, the authors reviewed published studies investigating sleep, school performance, and cognitive and achievement tests. Tables with brief descriptions of each study's research methods and outcomes are included. Research reveals a high prevalence among school-aged children of suboptimal amounts of sleep and poor sleep quality. Research demonstrates that suboptimal sleep affects how well students are able to learn and how it may adversely affect school performance. Recommendations for further research are discussed.

  2. Investigating how high school deaf students spend their leisure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Arabmomeni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on deaf students' interests in spending their leisure times. We design a questionnaire and distribute among all deaf students who are enrolled in high schools in two provinces of Iran. The questionnaire consists of three parts, in the first part, we ask female and male deaf students about their interests in various entertainment activities in Likert scale. In terms of gender, we find out that walking inside or outside house is number one favorite exercise for female students while male students mostly prefer to walk on the streets. Although male students prefer to go biking or running activities, female students prefer to go for picnic or similar activities. This could be due to limitations on female for running or biking inside cities. While going to picnic with members of family or friends is the third popular activity for male students, stretching exercises is third most popular activity among female students. Breathing exercise is the fourth most popular activity among both male and female students. The second part of the survey is associated with the barriers for having no exercise among deaf students. According to our survey, while lack of good attention from public and ordinary people on exercising deaf students is believed to be number one barrier among male students, female students blame lack of transportation facilities as the most important barrier. However, both female and male students believe these two items are the most important factors preventing them to exercise. Lack of awareness for exercising deaf students and lack of good recreational facilities are the third most important barriers among male and female students. The last part of the survey attempted to detect important entertainment activities. Watching TV, entertaining with mobile devices, chatting with friends and watching DVD or movies were the most important items influencing deaf students' free times.DOI: 10.5267/j.msl.2012

  3. Predictive Influence of Factors Predisposing Secondary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Predictive Influence of Factors Predisposing Secondary School Adolescents Dropouts to Sexual Risk Behaviour in Ogun State. ... Parent/peer approval of condom use (r = .114; p> .05), , attitude about personal use of condoms (r = .638; p>.05), gender (r = .555; p>.05). However, there is negative correlation between ...

  4. What Matters Most: Factors Influencing the University Application Choice Decisions of Korean International Students and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Breanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine factors influencing Korean parents' and students' university application choice decisions in three international schools in the Republic of Korea (South). Institutional and individual factors that influenced Korean students' university application choice decisions and their parents' university application…

  5. School Plus Home = Student Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Nancy; Santos, Ricardo Sotelo

    This handbook was developed to serve as a point of reference in identifying potential dropout problems. Included are several crucial recommendations for establishing an effective partnership between home and school that will help children succeed in school. Recommendations focus on preventive action in the classroom and at home. Artwork and…

  6. Students' perceptions of school climate and trait test anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang Yang

    2012-12-01

    In a sample of 916 Chinese high school students, the relations among the students' perceptions of school climate and their trait test anxiety were examined. The results indicated that students' perceptions of teacher-student relationships and student-student relationships negatively predicted their trait test anxiety. Furthermore, girls had higher scores on trait test anxiety than boys.

  7. Factors influencing US medical students' decision to pursue surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lauren E; Cooper, Clairice A; Guo, Weidun Alan

    2016-06-01

    Interest and applications to surgery have steadily decreased over recent years in the United States. The goal of this review is to collect the current literature regarding US medical students' experience in surgery and factors influencing their intention to pursue surgery as a career. We hypothesize that multiple factors influence US medical students' career choice in surgery. Six electronic databases (PubMed, SCOPUS, Web of Science, Education Resources Information Center, Embase, and PsycINFO) were searched. The inclusion criteria were studies published after the new century related to factors influencing surgical career choice among US medical students. Factors influencing US medical student surgical career decision-making were recorded. A quality index score was given to each article selected to minimize risk of bias. We identified 38 relevant articles of more than 1000 nonduplicated titles. The factors influencing medical student decision for a surgical career were categorized into five domains: mentorship and role model (n = 12), experience (clerkship n = 9, stereotype n = 4), timing of exposure (n = 9), personal (lifestyle n = 8, gender n = 6, finance n = 3), and others (n = 2). This comprehensive systemic review identifies mentorship, experience in surgery, stereotypes, timing of exposure, and personal factors to be major determinants in medical students' decisions to pursue surgery. These represent areas that can be improved to attract applicants to general surgery residencies. Surgical faculty and residents can have a positive influence on medical students' decisions to pursue surgery as a career. Early introduction to the field of surgery, as well as recruitment strategies during the preclinical and clinical years of medical school can increase students' interest in a surgical career. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Public School Uniforms: Effect on Perceptions of Gang Presence, School Climate, and Student Self-Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Kathleen Kiley; Stafford, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relationship between public school uniforms and student self-worth and student and staff perceptions of gang presence and school climate. Surveys of middle school students and teachers indicated that although students' perceptions did not vary across uniform policy, teachers from schools with uniform policies perceived lower levels of…

  9. Factors potentially influencing academic performance among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shawwa, Lana; Abulaban, Ahmad A; Abulaban, Abdulrhman A; Merdad, Anas; Baghlaf, Sara; Algethami, Ahmed; Abu-Shanab, Joullanar; Balkhoyor, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Studies are needed to examine predictors of success in medical school. The aim of this work is to explore factors that potentially influence excellence of medical students. The study was conducted in the Medical Faculty of King Abdulaziz University during October 2012. A self-administered questionnaire was used. Medical students with a grade point average (GPA) ≥4.5 (out of 5) were included and compared to randomly selected medical students with a GPA hours on social networking per day as compared to 42.6% of the lower GPA students (Pstudying time (P=0.013), and 47% revise their material at least once before an exam (P=0.02). Excellent medical students have many different characteristics. For example, they do not use social networking for prolonged periods of time, and they have strong motivation and study enjoyment. Further studies are needed to examine whether these differences have a real impact on GPA or not.

  10. Factors influencing French medical students towards a career in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andlauer, Olivier; Guicherd, William; Haffen, Emmanuel; Sechter, Daniel; Bonin, Bernard; Seed, Kitty; Lydall, Gregory; Malik, Amit; Bhugra, Dinesh; Howard, Rob

    2012-09-01

    There is a need to increase the recruitment to psychiatry in France. Our aim in this study was to compare factors influencing career choice between French medical students considering and not considering psychiatry as a specialty. Quantitative cross-sectional online survey on 145 French students in their last year of medical school. 22.7% of our sample considered choosing a career in psychiatry. A preference for a career in psychiatry was associated with more frequent history of personal/familial mental illness, higher ratings of psychiatric teaching, more weeks of compulsory psychiatry teaching and placement, during which students had more often met patients in recovery and been asked their opinion on patients. Students considering psychiatry as a career also emphasized more the need for a good work-life balance, and presented better attitudes toward psychiatry. Improving opportunities of interactions between students and psychiatrists or psychiatric patients might help to improve recruitment in psychiatry.

  11. Students' First Amendment Rights and School District Demographics: Gauging School Board Responsiveness to Student Speech Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Mario Sergio; Collier, Virginia; Tolson, Homer; Huang, Tse-Yang

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which Texas school boards of education made efforts to locally modify student speech policy. Using online policy manuals provided by the Texas Association of School Boards, speech policies for 91 school districts were gathered using a purposive stratified sampling procedure and examined for local modifications to…

  12. Educational Justice for Undocumented Students: How School Counselors Encourage Student Persistence in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Emily R.; Valle, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    School counselors are critical intermediaries in K-12 schools who can help students from undocumented immigrant families persist in school. Yet, a dearth of research exists about their advocacy work, or the range of efforts they make to support unauthorized youth. This paper asks, (1) what challenges do counselors face and strive to overcome to…

  13. What Can Student Bystanders Do to Prevent School Violence?: Perceptions of Students and School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Simmons, Renee; Dash, Kimberly; Tehranifar, Parisa; O'Donnell, Lydia; Stueve, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Incidents of school violence have prompted calls for school communities to create environments that encourage student bystanders to act responsibly and proactively when they confront a range of violent incidents, from bullying and fights to weapon carrying and other serious threats to school safety. It is not always clear, however, what bystanders…

  14. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: associations with school food environment and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; French, Simone A; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2005-10-06

    This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained research staff. Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p off during lunch time, students purchased soft drinks from vending machines 1.4 +/- 1.6 days/week as compared to 1.9 +/- 1.8 days/week in schools in which soft drink machines were turned on during lunch (p = .040). School food policies that decrease access to foods high in fats and sugars are associated with less frequent purchase of these items in school among high school students. Schools should examine their food-related policies and decrease access to foods that are low in nutrients and high in fats and sugars.

  15. Mathematical fluency in high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikhomirova, Tatiana N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study of mathematical fluency in high school students. We provide a definition of mathematical fluency and illustrate the relevance of the research by presenting an overview of studies examining mathematical fluency development and its relationship with success in mathematical disciplines. A computerized test “Problem Verification Task” (Tosto et al., 2013 was administered to 692 high school students from one public secondary school (grades 9/10/11: n = 336/210/146 in the Moscow region. The stimuli consisted of 48 elementary arithmetic equations along with answer options. To indicate a correct answer, participants were instructed to press the corresponding key on the keyboard as quickly as possible. Two-way ANOVA was used to estimate grade and sex similarities and differences in mathematical fluency at the high school level. The current study has two primary findings: (1 students differed in math fluency across grades, and (2 there were no sex differences in mathematical fluency at the high school level. ANOVA exhibited significant differences in mathematical fluency among all three groups of students at grades 9, 10 and 11 with a 19% effect size. These results may be associated with the accumulating effects of the educational process: high school students in each subsequent year of schooling demonstrate a higher level of mathematical fluency on average compared to the previous year. At the same time, we observed no sex differences in mathematical fluency at the high school level. The results are discussed in terms of educational effects.

  16. Gender Associations with World Music Instruments by Secondary School Music Students from the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.; VanWeelden, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    This article investigated possible gender associations with world music instruments by secondary school-age music students from the USA. Specific questions included: (1) Do the primary instruments played by the students influence gender associations of world music instruments? (2) Does age influence possible gender associations with world music…

  17. Choosing family medicine. What influences medical students?

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, John; Brown, Judith Belle; Russell, Grant

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore factors that influence senior medical students to pursue careers in family medicine. DESIGN: Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. SETTING: University of Western Ontario (UWO) in London. PARTICIPANTS: Eleven of 29 graduating UWO medical students matched to Canadian family medicine residency programs beginning in July 2001. METHOD: Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted with a maximum variation sample of medical students. Interviews were transcribed ...

  18. Urban high school students' perspectives about sexual health decision-making: the role of school culture and identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Jennie S.; Mensah, Felicia Moore

    2013-06-01

    Studies across fields such as science education, health education, health behavior, and curriculum studies identify a persistent gap between the aims of the school curriculum and its impact on students' thinking and acting about the real-life decisions that affect their lives. The present study presents a different story from this predominant pattern in the literature. Through a year-long ethnographic investigation of a health-focused New York City public high school's HIV/AIDS and sex education program, this study illustrates a case in which 20 12th grade students respond positively to their education on these topics and largely assert that school significantly influences their perspectives and actions related to sexual health decision-making. This paper presents the following interpretation of this positive influence: school culture influences these students' perspectives and decisions around sexual health by contributing to the formation of students' identities. This paper further shows how science learning in particular becomes important for students in relation to decision-making when it is linked to issues of identity. These findings suggest that, in addition to attending to the design of classroom curriculum, HIV/AIDS and sex education researchers and curriculum developers (as well as those in science education focusing on other controversial science topics) might also explore the kinds of relational and school-wide factors that potentially influence students' identities, decisions, and responses to school learning.

  19. Greenhouse Schools: How Schools Can Build Cultures Where Teachers and Students Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNTP, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Successful teachers make successful schools. Yet some schools are better than others at accelerating student learning by developing and keeping great teachers, even compared to schools that serve the same population of students and have access to the same resources. These schools are called "greenhouse schools"--schools with carefully…

  20. Greenhouse Schools: How Schools Can Build Cultures Where Teachers and Students Thrive. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNTP, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Successful teachers make successful schools. Yet some schools are better than others at accelerating student learning by developing and keeping great teachers, even compared to schools that serve the same population of students and have access to the same resources. These schools are called "greenhouse schools"--schools with carefully fostered…

  1. An Inquiry into Student Unrest in Independent Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Alan R.

    This report focuses on the nature and forms of student unrest in a sample of schools that make up the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS). Although not limited to one type of NAIS school, this study emphasizes boarding schools of the New England and Middle Atlantic States since evidence of student unrest is greater in these schools.…

  2. Students' Perception of the Role of School Counselling | Ngale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School counselling is an important aspect in education. This paper evaluates students' perception of school counselling in Cameroon using a purposive probability sample of 150 high school students from Bamenda Sub-division. The paper reveals that school counselling is an integral part of the school programme and is ...

  3. Cultural activities in primary school students' spare time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikanović Brane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Culture is a form of creative expression of a human being through which he reshapes the world, acts on it adding it value and creating new, cultural values. A human being is able to create a product of culture only when he is free and able to express himself. A contemporary man can incorporate various cultural activities into his spare time. They are especially important when they concern children and young people: regardless of whether they are used in institutional settings or in spare time. The authors conducted an empirical research of students' assumptions and beliefs concerning cultural activities in their free time. The sample comprised 233 fifth grade students. The findings show that in their spare time fifth graders: engage in various cultural activities; that students who live in urban areas attend more cultural events; that students have the opportunity to engage in extra-curricular activities in the area of culture - join cultural and artistic groups and associations and engage in various creative pursuits at different levels of participation (as consumers, full participants; and that students' attitudes concerning the influence of parents and teachers on the selection of cultural activities to be pursued do not vary greatly by gender, location or school achievement. Cultural activities do play a significant part in the free time of primary school students. This is why it is important that guidance provided in school and in spare time should be brought in greaer harmony.

  4. Enhancement of Elementary School Students' Science Learning by Web-Quest Supported Science Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Hsiung, Chuang; Jeng-Fung, Hung; Quo-Cheng, Sung

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to probe into the influence of implementing Web-quest supported science writing instruction on students' science learning and science writing. The subjects were 34 students in one class of grade six in an elementary school in Taiwan. The students participated in the instruction, which lasted for eight weeks. Data collection…

  5. Middle School Students' Conceptual Understanding of Equations: Evidence from Writing Story Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibali, Martha W.; Stephens, Ana C.; Brown, Alayna N.; Kao, Yvonne S.; Nathan, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated middle school students' conceptual understanding of algebraic equations. 257 sixth- and seventh-grade students solved algebraic equations and generated story problems to correspond with given equations. Aspects of the equations' structures, including number of operations and position of the unknown, influenced students'…

  6. Students' Perceptions of Factors That Contribute to Risk and Success in Accelerated High School Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaunessy-Dedrick, Elizabeth; Suldo, Shannon M.; Roth, Rachel A.; Fefer, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, we investigated 15 successful and 15 struggling high school students, perceived stressors, coping strategies, and intrapersonal and environmental factors that students perceive to influence their success in college-level courses. We found that students' primary sources of stress involved meeting numerous academic demands…

  7. Relationship between Recreational Resources in the School Neighborhood and Changes in Fitness in New York City Public School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezold, Carla P; Stark, James H; Rundle, Andrew; Konty, Kevin; Day, Sophia E; Quinn, James; Neckerman, Kathryn; Roux, Ana V Diez

    2017-02-01

    Physical fitness in children has many beneficial effects, including the maintenance of a healthy weight. The built environment may influence youths' physical fitness by encouraging physical activity. This paper assessed whether higher density of parks, playgrounds, and sports facilities around a school is related to improvements in fitness in middle school boys and girls. Fitness scores and other student covariates collected as part of NYC FITNESSGRAM between the 2006-2007 and 2010-2011 school years were linked with school neighborhood data on characteristics of the built environment for NYC public school students in grades 6-8. Data were analyzed in 2015. Medium, but not high, density of recreational resources in the area surrounding a school was associated with greater annual improvements in fitness for both boys and girls. This association appeared to be driven mainly by the presence of parks. Findings for sports facilities and playgrounds were inconsistent. Overall, few associations were observed between recreational resources near a school and changes in student fitness. Future studies of school influences on student fitness should consider the influence of school resources and the home neighborhood.

  8. Influence of school-related factors on smoking among Chilean adolescents: a cross-sectional multilevel study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Jorge; Ortúzar, Catalina; Zitko, Pedro; Montgomery, Alan; Araya, Ricardo

    2016-06-09

    Adolescent tobacco smoking is a major health concern in Chile. Schools may be able to influence adolescent behaviour regarding smoking; however, this topic has received limited research attention in Latin-American countries. Moreover, the prevalence of cigarette smoking varies between schools, and some of this variability may be explained by school factors. This article examines the inter-school variability in student smoking in a large sample of Chilean schools and identifies the school- and student-level characteristics associated with cigarette smoking. This cross-sectional study used self-reported student-level data from 45,273 students from 1462 schools and official data from these schools provided by the Chilean Ministry of Education (2007). Student smoking behaviour was used as an outcome, and individual-level and school-level features were used as explanatory variables. Logistic multilevel modelling was used to analyse the data. The mean prevalence of smoking in the 1462 schools was 39.9 %. The null model indicated that 8 % of the variance in smoking behaviour was explained by schools; and in the final model, controlled by individual- and school-level variables, the variance explained by schools dropped to 2.4 %. The main school-level variables explaining the school influence were school bonding, school truancy and school achievement. This is the first study to examine the extent to which student smoking varies between Chilean schools and to identify some of the school factors associated with this inter-school variability. Although most variation in smoking prevalence lies between students within schools, there is sufficient between-school variation to be of interest to educators and policy makers.

  9. Examining potential school contextual influences on gambling among high school youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Grace P; Martins, Silvia S; Pas, Elise T; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2014-01-01

    Gambling is an increasing concern among adolescence, yet there has been limited investigation into school-level factors that may increase the risk for gambling. The current study examined the relationship between substance use and gambling, and explored the influence of school context on adolescent gambling. Data come from 25,456 students in 58 high schools participating in the Maryland Safe and Supportive Schools Initiative. Youth-reports of socio-demographics, lifetime gambling, and past-month substance use (ie, alcohol, cigarette, marijuana, non-medical prescription drug) were collected. School-level characteristics were student suspension rate, student mobility, percentage of students receiving free/reduce-priced meals, percentage of African American students, urbanicity, gambling prevalence, gambling problem prevalence, and substance use prevalence. Weighted multilevel analyses were conducted. One-third (n = 8,318) reported lifetime gambling, and 10% (n = 2,580) of the full sample, or 31% of the gamblers, experienced gambling problems. Being male and alcohol, marijuana, and non-medical prescription drug use were associated with twice the odds of gambling. Among gamblers, being male, African American, and cigarette, marijuana, and non-medical prescription drug use were associated with higher odds of gambling problems. The school-level factors of suspension rate and percentage of African American had minimal, inverse associations with gambling; however, none were related to gambling problems. Multilevel results indicated that adolescents that are male and use substances are more likely to gamble and have gambling problems. The findings indicate a need for prevention programs targeting risky behaviors to also target gambling as such behaviors often co-occur among adolescents. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  10. Communities, Students, Schools, and School Crime: A Confirmatory Study of Crime in U.S. High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Greg

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates how community characteristics, student background, school climate, and zero-tolerance policies interact to affect school crime. The study articulates and fits a school crime model to 712 high schools participating in the 2000 School Survey on Crime and Safety, confirming that school location and student socioeconomic status…

  11. Professional Staffing Levels and Fourth-Grade Student Research in Rural Schools with High-Poverty Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Karla Steege; Donham, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Rural schools in high-poverty areas are often understaffed. This descriptive phenomenological study examined fourth-grade state research projects in high-poverty rural Iowa schools to reveal the influence of school librarians' staffing levels on student learning of research skills. To determine evidence of students' critical literacy, ethical use…

  12. Weight perception of adolescent dancing school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisman, N; Voet, H; Akivis, A; Sive-Ner, I

    1996-02-01

    To study the hypothesis that underweight may be more prevalent among dancing school students than among nondancing school girls, and that their teachers and peers may play a role in developing this tendency. A case-control study on a convenience sample. Two local dancing schools and one neighboring regular school. Forty ballet students, aged 13 to 17 years, from four classes and 29 age-matched girls in four regular classes. None. Each pupil was asked to classify herself and her peers as underweight, normal, or overweight; teachers were asked to classify their pupils by the same categories. Results were compared with an objective score, weight as a percentage of ideal weight for height, in which less than 85% indicates underweight; 85% to 115%, normal; and more than 115%, overweight. A higher prevalence of underweight as well as a significant tendency to overestimate self-evaluation was found among dancing students. Dancing teachers' evaluation tended to be inaccurate, especially regarding their underweight students. The atmosphere in dancing classes may encourage striving for thinness beyond normal limits. Ballet teachers may play a significant role in this process. We suggest that physicians and nutritionists be involved in ballet schools.

  13. How Wearing School Uniforms Affects the Behavior of Male and Female High School Students in Tokyo Metropolitan and Toyama Prefectures

    OpenAIRE

    孫, 珠熙; 元林, 理佳

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed how school uniforms influence the behavior and lives of high school students by conducting a questionnaire survey involving 811 male and female high school students in Tokyo Metropolitan and Toyama Prefectures on the amount of their monthly allowance, present satisfaction levels, and school-uniform-wearing behavior.(1)"The average monthly allowance" is 4,587 yen for males in Toyama, 5,822 yen for males in Tokyo, 4,173 yen for females in Toyama, and 7,369 yen for females in...

  14. School library services and students' satisfaction in the school library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined school library services and satisfaction of students in the Federal Government Girls College Owerri, Imo State. The Survey method was adopted for the study and the population of study was 2756, out of which a sample of 281 was drawn. Two sets of questionnaire (one for management staff and one for ...

  15. The Role of the School Climate in High School Students' Mental Health and Identity Formation: A South Australian Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riekie, Helen; Aldridge, Jill M.; Afari, Ernest

    2017-01-01

    The well-documented increase in student mental health issues in Australia and growing recognition of the need for education to play a part in students' identity formation prompted this study. The research reported in this article sought to identify specific elements of the school climate that were likely to influence the interplay of adolescent…

  16. High school students writing skill

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Amharic, in this case) writing and their L2 (English) proficiency could significantly predict their L2 writing. It also investigated whether or not the students' L2 reading, grammar and vocabulary knowledge could significantly determine their L2 ...

  17. The Influence of the Student Mobility Rate on the Graduation Rate in the State of New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lavetta S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of the student mobility rate on the high school graduation rate of schools in the state of New Jersey. Variables found to have an influence on the graduation rate in the extant literature were evaluated and reported. The analysis included multiple and hierarchical regression models for school variables (i.e.,…

  18. Teachers' Personal and Professional Influences Related to School-Wide Positive Behavior Supports (SWPBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broskey, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    This study focused on understanding teachers' personal and professional experiences that influence the fidelity of implementation of a school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) program within their classrooms. Research has focused on the implementation fidelity of school-wide positive support programs, academic impact on students, teacher…

  19. Social Justice: A Case-Study Examining the Influence of Primary Headteachers in Two Manchester Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Christian; Winterbottom, Shauna S.

    2017-01-01

    Presently, there are a growing number of students in the primary schools in northwest England who are living in broken communities, exacerbated by the most recent global recession. Through social justice theory, this paper examines the influence of head teachers as they look to balance administrative and pedagogical experiences in the schools.…

  20. The School Violence Between Peers in Popular and Rejected Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa I. Jiménez Gutiérrez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial models of adolescent development have pointed to the importance of considering the interrelationship between relevant contexts (family, school and community in understanding psychosocial adjustment. However, few studies have examined the combined influence of these contexts in the development of specific behavioral problems such as violent behavior in schools. The present study aims to explore the links between the perception of the family, school and community climate on school violence considering the role of subjective well-being and adolescent distress. To test these multiple relationships a sample of 1795 adolescents of both sexes aged between 11 and 18 has been used. Data were analyzed using a structural equation model, including a multi-group analysis for popular and rejected students in the classroom. The results support the expected relationships and the resulting model is equivalent for both sociometric status. The discussion considers the implications of these findings for intervention with adolescents from an individual and contextual perspective.

  1. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: associations with school food environment and policies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; French, Simone A; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2005-01-01

    .... Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p < .001...

  2. Student characteristics, professional preferences, and admission to medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesternich, Iris

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians’ choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students’ attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (; whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector.Methods: We conducted two internet surveys in 2012 and 2014. In the first survey, the sample comprised 701 students and in the second, 474 students. In both surveys, we asked students for their regional preferences; in the 2014 survey, we additionally asked students for their first, second, and third preferences among a comprehensive set of specializations, including becoming a general practitioner. In both surveys, we asked students for basic demographic information (age and gender, their parents’ occupation, a measure of subjective income expectations, a measure of risk attitudes, and their high-school grade point average (, and First National Boards Examination grade (. In 2014, we additionally asked for waiting periods ( as well as for prior professional experience in the health-care sector.Results: We find that three factors increase the probability of having a preference for working in a rural area significantly, holding constant all other influences: Moreover, we find that those willing to work in the countryside have significantly more experience in the medical sector before admission to medical school.Discussion: Our results suggest that a change in the selection process for medical school may increase the supply of country doctors. Instead of focusing on the high-school grade point average, universities could even more intensely screen for study motivation

  3. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: Associations with school food environment and policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Story Mary

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. Methods A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained research staff. Results Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p Conclusion School food policies that decrease access to foods high in fats and sugars are associated with less frequent purchase of these items in school among high school students. Schools should examine their food-related policies and decrease access to foods that are low in nutrients and high in fats and sugars.

  4. Taking Students Seriously: Their Rights To Be Safe at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairn, Karen; Smith, Anne B.

    2003-01-01

    Reports data from a nationwide survey of New Zealand high school students and staff that examined their attitudes toward lesbian/gay/bisexual students. Most respondents perceived that lesbian/gay/bisexual students were not safe at school and that these students experienced subtle and extreme forms of intimidation. However, many students and staff…

  5. The Impact of Problem-Based Learning Approach to Senior High School Students' Mathematics Critical Thinking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyatiningtyas, Reviandari; Kusumah, Yaya S.; Sumarmo, Utari; Sabandar, Jozua

    2015-01-01

    The study reported the findings of an only post-test control group research design and aims to analyze the influence of problem-based learning approach, school level, and students' prior mathematical ability to student's mathematics critical thinking ability. The research subjects were 140 grade ten senior high school students coming from…

  6. A Career School-Within-a-School for Ethnically Diverse, At-Risk High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Jeanne E.; Shorr, Abbe

    1997-01-01

    To counter low test scores, a rising dropout rate, and teacher apathy, a small group of teachers at Hollywood (California) High School developed a career academy, an interdisciplinary school-within-a-school stressing small classes and business speakers. The program recruited interested students and promoted a career theme with good employment…

  7. Academic Coping, Friendship Quality, and Student Engagement Associated with Student Quality of School Life: A Partial Least Square Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien, Lei Mee; Razak, Nordin Abd

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine an untested research model that explains the direct- and indirect influences of Academic Coping, Friendship Quality, and Student Engagement on Student Quality of School Life. This study employed the quantitative-based cross-sectional survey method. The sample consisted of 2400 Malaysian secondary Form Four students…

  8. Schooling Background and Academic Academic Achievement of Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jayakumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In our society academic achievement is considered as a key criterion to judge one’s total potentiality and capability. Academic achievement is seen as a students’ grade point averages in many academic settings. Academic achievement has become an index of students’ future in this highly competitive world and Agricultural education is no exception.  Hence it becomes necessary to find out the factors that determine better academic performance. In this context the present study had been carried out to find out the possible relationship between schooling background and academic achievement of agriculture students. The students admitted in Adhiparasakthi Agricultural College, Kalavai, Vellore between 1999 and 2009 formed the subjects of the study. Findings of the study revealed that determinants like gender, type of school and stream of education had a significant role in the academic achievement of the students. Medium of instruction in HSC did influence the academic achievement but not significantly. It was also found that students who performed well in their HSC did perform well in their undergraduate programme also. This confirms that previous educational outcomes are the most important indicators of student’s future achievement and schooling background has a significant role in academic achievement of students.

  9. A Survey of Factors Influencing High School Start Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Amy R.; Carskadon, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    The present study surveyed high school personnel regarding high school start times, factors influencing school start times, and decision making around school schedules. Surveys were analyzed from 345 secondary schools selected at random from the National Center for Educational Statistics database. Factors affecting reported start times included…

  10. Changing Schools: A Look at Student Mobility Trends in Chicago Public Schools Since 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, Marisa; Gwynne, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Student mobility has been a long-standing concern to educators and researchers because of the negative impact that changing schools can have on students, teachers, and schools. High levels of student mobility can create a sense of upheaval and constant change at the school level, and schools typically have few established practices in place to…

  11. Review of "Everyone Wins: How Charter Schools Benefit All New York City Public School Students"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    The report examines whether increasing competition from charter schools has a causal effect on the achievement of public school students in New York City, using a three-year longitudinal database of student test scores. As a measure of competition, it considers the percentage of students who left a public school for a charter school in the prior…

  12. Exploring School- and Home-Related Protective Factors for Economically Disadvantaged Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okilwa, Nathern S. A.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the experiences of middle school students, particularly focusing on the academic achievement of economically disadvantaged students. For low SES middle school students, the known cumulative effects of poverty coupled with school transition and early adolescence development heighten the potential risks for school failure. By…

  13. The Chinese High School Student's Stress in the School and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 466 Chinese high school students, we examined the relationships between Chinese high school students' stress in the school and their academic achievements. Regression mixture modelling identified two different classes of the effects of Chinese high school students' stress on their academic achievements. One class contained 87% of…

  14. The Effects of School Climate Change on Student Success in a Fifth and Sixth Grade School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kim M.

    2011-01-01

    The significance of the study was to examine intentional strategies to improve school climate relative to student school success as measured by academic achievement, attendance, and student behavior. It was important to understand how student school success was affected by factors related to school climate improvement such as leadership and change…

  15. Transitioning from High School to College: Examining the Sources and Influences of Social Capital for a First-Generation Latina Student

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randall F Clemens

    2016-01-01

    .... Based on two years of data collection, the author presents Camilla's experiences at different stages, including her childhood in El Salvador, first and last year in high school, and her first year in college...

  16. Academic dishonesty among health science school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, Nazan Tuna; Can, Hafize Öztürk; Şenol, Selmin; Hadımlı, Aytül Pelik

    2016-12-01

    Academic dishonesty has become a serious problem at institutions of higher learning. What is the frequency of academic dishonesty and what factors affect the tendency of dishonesty among Turkish health science school students? This descriptive and cross-sectional study aims to evaluate academic dishonesty among university nursing, midwifery, and dietetic students. Participants and research context: The study sample consisted of 499 health science students in Turkey. The tendency toward academic dishonesty was investigated using the Academic Dishonesty Tendency Scale. Ethical considerations: Institutional review board approved the study. Written permission was obtained from the researcher to use Turkish version of the Academic Dishonesty Tendency Scale. Of all the students, 80.0% claimed to refer to Internet during homework preparation and 49.1% of students reported to cite the references at the end of article on some instances. Of the students, 56.1% claimed never to have cheated in the exams. It was found that academic dishonesty was partly low (1.80-2.59) in students. For students using a library while doing their homework, mean scores were significantly lower ( p academic dishonesty was lower among students who use Internet and library more frequently. These findings are consistent with previous studies. Measurements to take against academic dishonesty should be directed toward not only students but institutions and instructors as well.

  17. High School Students' perception of University Students as STEM representatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Eva Lykkegaard

    2012-01-01

    The Danish government has an ambition to recruit more high school students into STEM educations (science, technology, engineering and/or mathematics). The students’ choice of further education is based on the people and jobs they have knowledge of. Therefore, to recruit more students into STEM......’ potential identities. It shows that the students preferred STEM representatives resembled themselves in some aspects (primarily social and health aspects) and fit their perceptions of a typical person working in STEM in other aspects (knowledge seeking, hard-working etc.)....

  18. An Examination of the Influence of Self Efficacy, Locus of Control, and Perceptions of Parent Involvement on Academic Achievement of Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myree, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Current research indicates that there is an on-going concern for the graduation rate of African American students in urban settings. This particular study sought to investigate the impact of students' self-efficacy, locus of control, and parental involvement on academic achievement via a targeted sample of urban African American high school…

  19. Influence of Psychological and Social Factors on Bystanders' Roles in School Bullying among Korean-American Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sumi; Cho, Young Il

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the associations of psychological and social variables with the likelihood of exhibiting three different behaviors as a bystander in a bullying situation. The sample comprised 238 Korean-American and Korean students, from the 3rd to 12th grades, studying in the USA. Students receiving classmate support showed a lower…

  20. What Motivates High-School Students to Pursue STEM Careers? The Influence of Public Attitudes towards Science and Technology in Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seong Won

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the degree of association between students' STEM occupational expectations and between-country differences in public attitudes toward science and technology (S&T). This study focuses on public attitudes among two different populations: students and adults. Three-level Hierarchical Generalised Linear Models are employed to…

  1. Addressing Students with Disabilities in School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Karen Kow Yip; Beigi, Amir Biglar

    2011-01-01

    Inclusive education can help facilitate the inclusion of students with disabilities in mainstream schools. Inclusive education has proven to be a key benefit for disabled children as an end in itself and as a means to an end of greater social acceptance of difference and disability. However there needs to be greater awareness-raising measures at…

  2. Teaching Information Ethics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    The new AASL standards clearly spell out ethical responsibilities, which school librarians strive to instill and model as they work with staff and students. In this article, the author presents the AASL standards together with some tips and lesson ideas which she and her library partner have put into practice within their library media program.

  3. Creativity of secondary school students: entrepreneurial skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study adopted a quasi-experimental design using a pre-test, post-test control design in order to investigate the entrepreneurial skills and creative abilities of secondary school students in Physics. The study was carried out in Obio/Akpo Local Government Area of Rivers State of Nigeria, using purposive sampling ...

  4. Vernal keratoconjunctivitis among primary school students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An operational definition was set to classify the types of VKC and hand held slit lamp microscope was used to examine all study subjects. Results: A ... population. As VKC is a chronic, recurrent condition, school health education about its supportive and symptomatic management need to be given to teachers and students.

  5. Secondary School Students' Reasoning about Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Cheryl; Tenenbaum, Harriet R.; Hogh, Henriette

    2017-01-01

    This study examined age differences in young people's understanding of evolution theory in secondary school. A second aim of this study was to propose a new coding scheme that more accurately described students' conceptual understanding about evolutionary theory. We argue that coding schemes adopted in previous research may have overestimated…

  6. Dating Violence among High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Libby

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed students (n=631) from rural, suburban, and inner-city high schools regarding sexual, physical, and verbal dating violence. Proportion of females reporting sexual violence was 15.5%; proportion reporting physical violence was same. Proportion of males reporting violence was lower. Significant correlates of violence included dating…

  7. Iraqi Refugee High School Students' Academic Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Hyeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Many Iraqi refugee students in the United States suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as acculturation stresses. These stresses often create challenges for their integration into U.S. schools. The project explored risk factors such as the length of educational gaps in transit, PTSD, and separation and marginalization…

  8. Vietnamese Students in the Public School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    The purpose of this booklet is to familiarize teachers and administrators with the background of Vietnamese immigrant students in Canadian public schools. A historical and cultural overview is provided which briefly describes Vietnamese customs, attitudes, roles of family members, and religion. The need for supporting and enhancing the self esteem…

  9. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via…

  10. High schools students' views on history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grever, M.C.R.; Pelzer, B.J.; Haydn, T.

    2011-01-01

    The article reports the outcomes of a survey of 678 Dutch, English, and French students in multicultural high schools located in three urban areas, with the aim of developing insight into the sort of history they consider worthwhile. The research was undertaken in the context of widespread concern

  11. High School Students' Views on History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grever, Maria; Pelzer, Ben; Haydn, Terry

    2011-01-01

    The article reports the outcomes of a survey of 678 Dutch, English, and French students in multicultural high schools located in three urban areas, with the aim of developing insight into the sort of history they consider worthwhile. The research was undertaken in the context of widespread concern about the effects of recent migration patterns on…

  12. The influence of violent TV cartoons watched by school children in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Ergün,Sibel

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to demonstrate the gender-specific impact of violence-oriented television cartoons on children, and to identify the behaviors demonstrating this influence. METHODS: The research was conducted on a total of 300 students chosen by a simple, random method applying a stratified weight in each school. A 20-question instrument was used for data collection, using face-to-face interviews with the students which occurred during visits to primary schools. RESULTS: A signific...

  13. Influence of stress on snack consumption in middle school girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun-Young; Kim, Ki-Nam

    2007-01-01

    Stress has been known to change dietary behaviors and food intakes in individuals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of stress level on the frequency and the amount of snack consumption. The high stress group (HS) showed significantly higher frequency of consumption for bread, chips, cookies, ramyeon, and frozen snacks (pstress group (LS) with higher frequency of snack consumption (psnacks (pstress level became higher, the proportions of students with irregular meals, overeating, and night snacking increased (psnacks when they were feeling stressed. Our results indicated that stress has negative influence on snack consumption in middle school girls.

  14. School Choice Considerations and the Role of Social Media as Perceived by Computing Students: Evidence from One University in Manila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansigan, Rolando R.; Moraga, Shirley D.; Batalla, Ma. Ymelda C.; Bringula, Rex P.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study utilized a validated questionnaire that gathered data from freshmen of two different school years. Demographic profile, marketers (i.e., source of information of students about the school), influencers (i.e., significant others that persuaded them to enroll in the school), level of school choice, and level of consideration…

  15. The relationship between school violence and student proficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Severnini, Edson; Firpo, Sergio Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    School violence has recently become a central concern among teachers, students, students' parents and policymakers. Violence can induce behaviors on educational agents that go against the goals of improving the quality of education and increasing school attendance. In fact, there is evidence that school environmental characteristics and student performance and behavior at school are related. Although school violence may have a direct impact on students’ performance, such impact has not yet be...

  16. Factors that influence first year medical students' choice of student selected component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jane

    2009-09-01

    Undergraduate medical training should ensure students have choice and autonomy in the learning process, including the student selected components (SSCs) which should comprise up to about a third of the curriculum. Students' choices of SSC will influence the knowledge, skills and attitudes they acquire. To investigate how motivations and personality in first year medical students influence their choice of SSCs. A questionnaire regarding motivations for SSC choice and the NEO-FFI personality measure was administered to all first year students at a London medical school. Relationships with type of SSC were examined. A total of 82% (268/329) students responded. Six motivational factors arose from a principle components analysis of the questionnaire: future achievements, prior information, internal motivation, personal recommendation, convenience and certainty. Students with different motivational factors chose different SSCs, and had different personality traits. Weak but significant correlations were found between personality traits and motivational factors, but not between personality and SSC choice, or sex and SSC choice. This offers insight into medical student choices of SSC and is the first step towards ensuring appropriate provision of modules that students wish to study to enable them to meet the demands of the medical profession.

  17. Companeros: High school students mentor middle school students to address obesity among Hispanic adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promotoras, Hispanic community health workers, are frequently employed to promote health behavioral change with culturally bound Hispanic lifestyle behaviors. Peer health mentors have been used in schools to promote healthy nutrition and physical activity behaviors among students. This study investi...

  18. School connectedness in the health behavior in school-aged children study: the role of student, school, and school neighborhood characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Douglas R; Iachan, Ronaldo; Overpeck, Mary; Ross, James G; Gross, Lori A

    2006-09-01

    School connectedness includes liking school and positive relations with teachers and peers. School connectedness is associated with a variety of positive health outcomes. The goal of this study was to identify characteristics of students, schools, and school neighborhoods that are related to school connectedness. In the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) Study, school connectedness was reported by 13,207 students (grades 6-10) in 340 schools. HBSC measured a variety of student characteristics. Characteristics of schools were culled from data maintained by Quality Education Data, and school neighborhood characteristics were derived from the 2000 decennial census. Associations between connectedness and student, school, and school neighborhood characteristics were estimated using hierarchical linear models. Characteristics of students, schools, and school neighborhoods were associated with school connectedness. Connectedness was greater among younger students, females, students with better academic performance and greater extracurricular involvement, students with greater self-rated physical attractiveness, students with more friends, students from 2-parent families, and students whose parents were more involved with school. Connectedness was greater in smaller schools, more racially homogeneous schools, and schools with more students from relatively wealthy households. School connectedness was higher in neighborhoods with a greater percentage of non-US citizens. As the percent of renters in the neighborhood increased beyond 20%, school connectedness tended to decrease. The findings point to possible strategies for fostering school connectedness.

  19. A Closer Look at the Charter School Movement: Schools, Students, and Management Organizations, 2015-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Enrollment in charter public schools has grown by 250,000 students in the 2015-16 school year, and more than 400 new charter public schools have opened their doors, according to, "A Closer Look at the Charter School Movement: Schools, Students, and Management Organizations, 2015-16." The report also estimates that the total number of…

  20. Uniforms in the Middle School: Student Opinions, Discipline Data, and School Police Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jafeth E.; Yoxsimer, Andrew; Hill, George C.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated public middle school students' opinions on the benefits of wearing a school uniform. A review of related literature is provided along with results of the opinions obtained from 604 seventh- and eighth-grade middle school students attending a public school in Nevada that had recently initiated a school uniform policy.…