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Sample records for schools dental

  1. ARUSHA SCHOOL DENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARUSHA SCHOOL DENTAL HEALTH. PROGRAMME. Dr. MOSHA H. T. Senior Dental Surgeon,. Ministry of Health, Dar es Salaam. DESCRIPTION OF THE DISTRICT. Arusha District is one of the 6 districts of. Aruska region. It consists of an urban part and a suburban part. Arusha Town has a population of. 88155 people ...

  2. Noise Exposure Assessment in a Dental School

    OpenAIRE

    Thitiworn Choosong; Wandee Kaimook; Ratchada Tantisarasart; Puwanai Sooksamear; Satith Chayaphum; Chanon Kongkamol; Wisarut Srisintorn; Pitchaya Phakthongsuk

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. Methods: A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the...

  3. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education.

  4. Undergraduate dental English education in Japanese dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodis, Omar M M; Matsumura, Seishi; Kariya, Naoyuki; Nishimura, Michiko; Yoshida, Toshiko

    2013-05-01

    Dental schools in Japan are among many worldwide whose medium of instruction is not in English. With advances in science, technology, and communication, the demand for the globalization of professions increases. At present, dental schools in Asia, the Middle East, and Europe have started revising their dental curricula to either include English courses for dentistry or offer a full English dental curriculum. In Japan, dental English courses started to be introduced into curricula in the early 1990s. However, a survey conducted in 1999 found that English courses were not offered in Japan's twenty-nine dental schools and there was no consensus as to what such courses should include or when and how they should be taught. Ten years after that survey, the survey results reported in this article found that the problems reported in the 1999 survey still exist. Additionally, there are still differences among schools offering English courses in terms of the timing and contents of the courses. Since teachers and school officials will have an important role in curriculum development, this article recommends that a fact-finding meeting with educators, school, and education officials be initiated to discuss, develop, and implement a core curriculum for these dental English courses.

  5. Entrepreneurship in continuing dental education: a dental school perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Vincent N

    2005-01-01

    The definition of continuing dental education is presented, along with its benefits to the profession. The preeminence of dental schools in providing lifelong learning opportunities and freedom from commercial involvement that existed even twenty years ago has changed. Less than a quarter of CE takes place in school, and the focus there is increasingly on material with deep scientific background and hands-on learning. The newest innovations and those with the greatest commercial potential are taught elsewhere. Proposed changes in the ADA CERP standards would take on a "purist" approach that could place dental schools at a severe disadvantage while allowing "for profit" institutes to flourish and thus further undermine the role dental schools can play in providing quality professional development experiences.

  6. Personality types of Chinese dental school applicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengjun; Miao, Danmin; Zhu, Xia; Luo, Zhengxue; Liu, Xufeng

    2007-12-01

    This his article reports the findings of a study conducted to investigate the personality types of Chinese dental school applicants. The Chinese version of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) (Form G) was used to assess the personality styles of 332 dental school applicants from the mainland of China. The results of the MBTI for Chinese dental school applicants were compared with a previous study of applicants from the U.K. A higher percentage of this group of Chinese applicants scored higher for Introversion (I) than Extroversion (E); both Chinese and English applicants preferred Judging (J) to Perceiving (P). The dominant personality types in Chinese applicants were ISTJ, ESTJ, and ISFP. The findings suggest that the personality types of Chinese dental students may be somewhat different from the personality profiles exhibited by dental students from other nations. The findings may be of value to individuals who desire to investigate personality type differences among dental students with different cultural backgrounds.

  7. [Electives at the dental school in Groningen].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar-Krieger, H M J; Huysmans, M C D N J M; Molenaar, W M; Tams, J

    2005-01-01

    To offer a more comprehensive curriculum in various dental topics, the dental school of the University of Groningen developed electives. This article gives an overview of the learning objectives of the different electives, the program and the way in which students are examined. Attention is also

  8. Noise exposure assessment in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choosong, Thitiworn; Kaimook, Wandee; Tantisarasart, Ratchada; Sooksamear, Puwanai; Chayaphum, Satith; Kongkamol, Chanon; Srisintorn, Wisarut; Phakthongsuk, Pitchaya

    2011-12-01

    This cross-sectional study was performed in the Dental School of Prince of Songkla University to ascertain noise exposure of dentists, dental assistants, and laboratory technicians. A noise spectral analysis was taken to illustrate the spectra of dental devices. A noise evaluation was performed to measure the noise level at dental clinics and one dental laboratory from May to December 2010. Noise spectral data of dental devices were taken during dental practices at the dental services clinic and at the dental laboratory. A noise dosimeter was set following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria and then attached to the subjects' collar to record personal noise dose exposure during working periods. The peaks of the noise spectrum of dental instruments were at 1,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz which depended on the type of instrument. The differences in working areas and job positions had an influence on the level of noise exposure (p personal hearing zone found that the laboratory technicians were exposed to the highest impulsive noise levels (137.1 dBC). The dentists and dental assistants who worked at a pedodontic clinic had the highest percent noise dose (4.60 ± 3.59%). In the working areas, the 8-hour time-weighted average of noise levels ranged between 49.7-58.1 dBA while the noisiest working area was the dental laboratory. Dental personnel are exposed to noise intensities lower than occupational exposure limits. Therefore, these dental personnel may not experience a noise-induced hearing loss.

  9. Developing a flexible core Dental Public Health curriculum for predoctoral dental and dental hygiene schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Bhoopathi, Vinodh

    2015-01-01

    The curriculum for graduating dental and dental hygiene students must prepare them to contribute to the improvement or maintenance of health for individual patient's and the public's health. The objective is to describe the background for and the process used to develop a core Dental Public Health Curriculum for such students. The process used was to solicit and review existing dental public health curriculum in dental and dental hygiene schools; review curriculum for other health professionals; identify the themes needed to frame the curriculum; select usable materials and identify gaps in existing curricular materials; and develop appropriate curriculum materials that would embody the competencies developed for undergraduate dental and dental hygiene education. Twenty-three topics were identified as embodying the eight competencies. Based on these topics, six courses, Principles of Dental Public Health, Evidence-Based Dentistry, Ethics and Dental Public Health, Dental Public Health Policy and Advocacy, Oral Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Oral Health Literacy and Dental Public Health, were prepared. Each course includes syllabus, PowerPoint presentations, student assignments and activities, instructor guide, and classroom discussion points. Depending on the hours available in the existing curriculum at the dental or hygiene school, lecture presentations and take home assignments/discussions may be used independently or in combination with presentations from other courses. In addition, individual discussions and activities may be used to integrate dental public health materials into other courses. A flexible curriculum is available at the AAPHD website to enable the incorporation of DPH topics into the curriculum. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  10. Pattern of dental caries in Mulago Dental School clinic, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutesa, Annet; Mwanika, Andrew; Wandera, Margaret

    2005-03-01

    Information on dental caries among patients attending Mulago Hospital is scarce. Yet knowledge of the pattern of caries can be used to plan preventive and treatment interventions. This study describes the pattern of dental caries (in terms of age group, tooth and tooth surface and gender) among patients attending the Public Health Dental Officers School Clinic, Mulago Hospital. A review of patients' treatment records for the period 1995 to 1999 was done. A total of 1800 cards were reviewed for the diagnosis of dental caries, age, gender and the data was analyzed using EPI INFO 6 program. The patients were from both urban and peri-urban settings and were aged between 10-90 years. The results showed that the most frequently affected tooth surface was the occlusal (68.8%) followed by the interproximal (24%) and the least affected was the lingual/palatal (1.5%). The second molars were found to be the most affected of all teeth, with tooth 37(12%), 47(11%), 17(9.5%) and 27 (9.1%). The distribution of caries was higher in the lower than the upper jaw. There was a slight difference in sex predilection with females having 54.5% and males 45.5% of the lesions and the age group most affected was 20-29 years. The results showed a high occurrence of occlusal surface caries in molars especially the second molars in the 20-29 age group in the patients attending the Public Health Dental Officers School Clinic, Mulago Hospital.

  11. The Challenges Facing Dental Schools and Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Allen W.

    1995-01-01

    If dental schools are to be competitive in the current economic environment, they will need to collaborate with and become active participants in their academic health centers. The dental school can strengthen the center's competitive edge in the managed care market, strengthening the dental school's position in the center and generating new…

  12. The amalgam-free dental school.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, F.J.M.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Loomans, B.A.C.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To review the change in teaching of Restorative Dentistry at Nijmegen dental school over the period 1986 to the present. KEY POINTS: In 1986, class I and II resin composite restorations were included in the pre-clinical program. However, these courses still started with class I and II

  13. Is there an association between the presence of dental fluorosis and dental trauma amongst school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lorenna Fonseca Braga de; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Mendes, Rafael Inácio Pompeu; Oliveira, Rodrigo Caldeira Nunes; Oliveira, Carolina de Castro; Lima, Carolina Veloso; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima

    2016-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate whether there is an association with the different levels of dental fluorosis and the presence of dental trauma amongst school children. A transversal study was conducted amongst school children from the age of 12. Dental examinations were conducted by 24 well trained and fully qualified dental surgeons. Data was collected from 36 randomly selected public schools amongst 89 schools in a municipality. The criteria used to diagnose dental fluorosis was based on the Dean's fluorosis Index and for diagnosing dental trauma we looked for clinical signs of crown fractures and dental avulsions. Multiple descriptive analysis, which was bivariate, was carried out. Amongst the 2,755 school children that took part in the study 1,089 (39.6%) were diagnosed with dental fluorosis and 106 (3.8%) had one tooth or more with dental trauma. We noted a high prevalence of dental fluorosis, independent of the level of severity, amongst individuals with one tooth or more who had dental trauma. This association was even more evident where there were severely high levels of fluorosis. We also noted that the presence of fluorosis was greater amongst those that actively paid more attention to discoloration on their teeth and who received treatment from a dental professional at their schools. Nevertheless dental fluorosis was associated with the presence of dental trauma, independent of its severity.

  14. The Maine Sealant Manual for School-Based and School-Linked Dental Sealant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Kneka, Ed.

    This manual is designed for use by school personnel and dental personnel to aid in the development and maintenance of school-based or school-linked dental sealant programs. The sections include (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Guidelines" (school selection, school contacts, dental providers, target grades, and tooth selection…

  15. Current Status of Operation and Management of Dental School Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, John W

    2017-08-01

    This article summarizes the current status of the operation and management of dental school clinics as schools strive to provide excellent patient-centered care in an environment that is educationally sound, efficient, and financially strong. Clinical education is a large component of dental education and an area in which many dental schools have an opportunity to enhance revenue. Clinical efficiencies and alternative models of clinical education are evolving in U.S. dental schools, and this article describes some of those evolutionary changes. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  16. Personality preference distribution of dental students admitted to one dental school using different selection methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    von Bergmann, Hsingchi; Dalrymple, Kirsten R; Shuler, Charles F

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) would detect differences in personality preferences in first-year dental students admitted to the same dental school through different admission methods...

  17. Future priorities for a successful dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, R R

    1999-01-01

    Priorities for success for a dental school of the future are considered. University relations, demographic changes, digital information technology and functional genetic technology are emphasised as important environmental pressures that will influence the priorities. The goal advocated for university relations is creating a culture in which the dental school is viewed as integral and necessary to the University's mission. Financial stability, quality research and scholarship and provision of health care for employees may be important ingredients. Keeping an eye on demographic changes and taking the school's business where the customers are is another key to success in the future. Ethnic diversity, changing approaches with changing disease patterns, flexibility in schedule and collaborations in areas of need are strategies to be considered. The emerging field of functional genetics typifies a new biology with which currency will be needed in a health-sciences field. Necessity for faculty development, adoption of molecular diagnostic technologies, emphasis on risk assessment and preventive counselling, and a shift to a wellness model are likely consequences. Digital information technology will result in increased distance-learning opportunity. Dental schools will also need to make accommodating changes in curriculum structure available. Conversion to electronic imaging and totally electronic patient records are likely to become standard.

  18. School dental screening programmes for oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ankita; Khattri, Shivi; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Kumbargere Nagraj, Sumanth; Prashanti, Eachempati

    2017-12-21

    School dental screening refers to visual inspection of children's oral cavity in a school setting followed by making parents aware of their child's current oral health status and treatment needs. Screening at school intends to identify children at an earlier stage than symptomatic disease presentation, hence prompting preventive and therapeutic oral health care for the children. This review evaluates the effectiveness of school dental screening in improving oral health status. To assess the effectiveness of school dental screening programmes on overall oral health status and use of dental services. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 15 March 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, the Cochrane Register of Studies, to 15 March 2017), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 15 March 2017), and Embase Ovid (15 September 2016 to 15 March 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on language or publication status when searching the electronic databases; however, the search of Embase was restricted to the last six months due to the Cochrane Centralised Search Project to identify all clinical trials and add them to CENTRAL. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) (cluster or parallel) that evaluated school dental screening compared with no intervention or with one type of screening compared with another. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included six trials (four were cluster-RCTs) with 19,498 children who were 4 to 15 years of age. Four trials were conducted in the UK and two were based in India. We assessed two trials to be at low risk of bias, one trial to be at high risk of bias and three trials to be at unclear risk of bias.None of the six trials

  19. Curriculum survey on tobacco education in European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, C A; Aurich, P; Bottini, C; Warnakulasuriya, S; Davis, J M

    2012-10-01

    Dental professionals need adequate education in tobacco use prevention and cessation skills. The aim of this study was to identify the level of integration of tobacco education in undergraduate curricula of European dental schools. In 2009, a total of 197 European dental schools were identified through web-based searches. An e-mail survey, containing 20 questions, was sent to each head of school/director of education with up to five follow-up e-mails to non-responders. Dental schools from 21 European countries responded to the survey. The overall return rate was 68 out of 197 schools (35%). In 14 (21%) dental schools, the students were requested to be tobacco free, 14 (21%) asked their students to quit tobacco use and 21 (31%) offered students cessation assistance. All responding schools reported that patients were asked about their tobacco use; 59% by taking an oral history, 75% using a general medical history form and 10% using a specific tobacco use history form. A total of 34% of the schools referred smokers to an external counselling clinic, 13% referred to a telephone counselling, and dental students provided brief counselling in 11 schools (16%). Forty-five (67%) dental schools reported to have tobacco education implemented in their curriculum, of these 30 (67%) stated their tobacco curriculum was mandatory. Theoretical education on tobacco culture and its impact on oral health were implemented in 45 (66%) dental schools. However, only 18 (40%) schools have introduced practical skills training to their students. Dental schools assessed their students' theoretical knowledge (27%) and practical training (4%), respectively. Even though theoretical tobacco education appears to be acknowledged by many European dental schools, further practical training of undergraduate dental students in tobacco prevention and cessation skills should be encouraged.

  20. Problems in Admissions in U.S. Dental Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Robert W.; Tabb, W. Gary

    1977-01-01

    Dental school admission policy must direct significant attention to the number of selectees who might enter each of the dental career fields and to those who might eventually serve population segments that currently receive little dental care. Specific suggestions for improving the admissions situation are offered. (LBH)

  1. Patient satisfaction with dental services rendered at School of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine patient satisfaction among dental patients treated at the School of Dentistry, MUHAS. Study design: Cross-sectional clinic based study. Study participants and methods: Two hundred twelve dental patients aged 18 years and above who attended the oral surgery and restorative dental clinics were given a ...

  2. Effect of Perceived Stress on Student Performance in Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anne E.; Lushington, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Examined the relationship between perceived stress and academic performance in 202 dental students at an Australian dental school. Found little support for an association between increased factor stress scores on the Dental Environmental Stress (DES) questionnaire and reduced academic performance. (EV)

  3. Marketing the Dental School: Response to Inquiries from Prospective Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A letter sent to 58 dental schools asking for entrance applications and information typically sent to applicants elicited information about marketing practices. Findings suggest that dental schools are not doing a good job of marketing their programs to prime prospects, not responding personally, and not reading information requests carefully.…

  4. Pattern of dental caries in Mulago Dental School clinic, Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on dental caries among patients attending Mulago Hospital is scarce. Yet knowledge of the pattern of caries can be used to plan preventive and treatment interventions. This study describes the pattern of dental caries (in terms of age group, tooth and tooth surface and gender) among patients attending the ...

  5. The prevalence of dental anxiety and fear in patients referred to Isfahan Dental School, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, Masoud; Abtahi, Mansoureh; Mohammadi, Golshan; Mirdamadi, Motahare; Binandeh, Elham Sadaat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental anxiety and fear are major complications for both patient and dental care provider. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear in patients who referred to Isfahan Dental School and their relation to their age, gender, educational level, past traumatic experiences and frequency of dental visits. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 473 patients were provided with a questionnaire including three sections. First section contained questions concerning their age, gender, educational level, frequency of dental visits, reasons for irregular attendance and existence of past traumatic experiences. Second section comprised a Farsi version of Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS); and third included a Farsi version of dental fear survey (DFS). Data were analyzed by t-test, ANOVA, Pearson and Spearman correlation tests. Results: The prevalence of dental anxiety among the study population was 58.8%. No correlation was found between age and MDAS (r = −0.08, P = 0.07) and DFS (r = −0.03, P = 0.53). Women demonstrated higher anxiety (P dental anxiety (r = −0.046, P = 0.32) and dental fear (r = −0.017, P = 0.79). Previous traumatic experiences were found to result in elevated anxiety and fear (P dental attendance and anxiety (r = −0.128, P = 0.008). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, anxiety associated with dental treatment was widespread in the study population. Dental fear and anxiety were not affected by age or education level. Dental fear and anxiety were higher in women. In addition, people who visited the dentist more regularly and individuals without previous traumatic dental experiences were less anxious. PMID:26005465

  6. Arusha school dental health programme | Mosha | Tanzania Dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tanzania Dental Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (1986) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Appraisal of the dental school learning environment: the students' view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzi, David; Davis, Elaine; Jasinevicius, Roma; Hendricson, William; Cintron, Laura; Isaacs, Marcia

    2005-10-01

    The majority of studies examining dental school curriculum have addressed organization, structure, and content issues from the perspectives of administrators, faculty, practitioners/alumni, and professional organizations. However, few studies have focused on students' opinions of dental school. The purpose of this study was to determine students' perceptions of the learning environment, intellectual climate, and teacher-student relationships in dental school. This report describes how the "dental version" of the Medical Student Learning Environment Survey (MSLES) was used to identify students' perceptions of their dental education. Freshman and junior dental students' perceptions were measured with the Dental Student Learning Environment Survey (DSLES), which evaluates learning environment, intellectual climate, and relationships among students and teachers in seven areas: flexibility, student-to-student interaction, emotional climate, supportiveness, meaningful experience, organization, and breadth of interest. The DSLES was mailed to twenty-three dental schools in North America with eighteen of the schools distributing the inventory. A total of 619 dental students responded. Results were differentiated between freshman and junior dental students. Both freshman and junior students provided the highest (most positive) ratings for the DSLES subscales of "breadth of interest" (interest in dentistry and outside interests are encouraged) and "meaningful learning experience" (significance of courses to dentistry). Freshman students provided the lowest (least positive) ratings for "emotional climate" (students' responses to the way their courses were conducted and stress levels), and junior students provided the least positive ratings for "faculty supportiveness" (extent of faculty support and encouragement provided to students). The DSLES identified students' perceptions of their educational experience and localized areas for improvement. By addressing these areas of

  8. Western Australian schools access to dentally optimal fluoridated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, P; Kruger, E; Trolio, R; Tennant, M

    2015-03-01

    This study examined water fluoride levels at schools across Western Australia. The aim was to identify schools where levels of water fluoride appeared to be below dental health thresholds (0.5-1.0 mg/L) as recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). The objective is to provide health organizations with the knowledge for a more targeted approach to schools with greater risk of decay. Population data, school location, enrolment data and water quality data were integrated into geographic databases for analysis using Quantum GIS, Lisboa 1.8. The results indicated that 46% of school attendees in the northern half of Western Australia were at schools where there was the potential that the water was not dentally optimally fluoridated while in the southern half of Western Australia this was about 10%. Of these attendees (north and south), 45% were at primary school. Similarly, there was an association between socio-economic decile and proportion of school attendees in non-dentally optimally fluoridated schools. Lower deciles (i.e. poorer attendees) had a greater risk of being in schools outside dentally optimally fluoridated areas. This study clearly highlights areas where more prevention (and probably) treatment needs are present and provides a framework for targeted service planning. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Use of Selected Dental School Courses for Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Roger G.

    1981-01-01

    In an effort to market current predoctoral dental courses offered at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center School of Dentistry to the practicing dentist, a 10-hour forensic odontology course was offered to both predoctoral dental students and practicing dentists and their staffs. Positive reactions and cost effectiveness of this pilot…

  10. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  11. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines reviewed and approved by the American Association of Dental Schools and sent to the Council on Dental Education in June 1979 are outlined. Educational goals and objectives and sequence of instruction (including growth and development, preclinical orthodontics, and clinical experience) are discussed. (MLW)

  12. A survey of local anaesthesia education in European dental schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Kuin, D.; Baart, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A survey of European dental schools was conducted in 2006 to determine the curricular structure, techniques and materials used in local anaesthesia teaching to dental students. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was designed to collect information about local anaesthesia education.

  13. Perception on dental appearance among secondary school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In the period of adolescence, dental appearance takes on significant importance in the construction of personal identity and this may influence psychological adjustment and relationship status. Objective: To determine perception on dental appearance among adolescents in Kigali secondary schools. Material ...

  14. Descriptive study of dental injury incurred by junior high school and high school students during participation in school sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonoyama, Toshiya; Shimazaki, Yoshihiro; Nakagaki, Haruo; Tsuge, Shinpei

    2016-12-01

    Students often injure their teeth during participation in school-based sports clubs. This study examined the frequencies and types of dental injuries sustained at school sports clubs and compared the risk of dental injury among different sports. Based on injury statistics from the Japan Sport Council of the junior high schools and high schools in seven prefectures during fiscal year 2006, the risk of dental injury was estimated using a rate ratio (RR) by calculating the ratio of occurrence of dental injury under various circumstances. The RRs of exercise-related dental injury for boys and girls in junior high school were 0.7 (P injuries. In high school, Japanese-style wrestling (RR = 18.5) and rugby (RR = 7.3) for boys and handball (RR = 6.5) for girls had high risks for dental injury. Crown fracture was the predominant dental injury among boys and girls attending both junior high school and high school. The proportion of alveolar fracture was higher in school sports clubs than outside school sports clubs among high school boys. Contact or limited-contact sports had significantly higher risks for dental injuries than did noncontact sports. The results of this study suggest that teachers and administrators at schools should pay attention to the risk of dental injury among students participating in high-risk sports. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  15. Effects of a proposed rural dental school on regional dental workforce and access to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchek, Tanya N; Rephann, Terance J

    2013-01-01

    Southwest Virginia is a rural, low-income region with a relatively small dentist workforce and poor oral health outcomes. The opening of a dental school in the region has been proposed by policy-makers as one approach to improving the size of the dentist workforce and oral health outcomes. A policy simulation was conducted to assess how a hypothetical dental school in rural Southwest Virginia would affect the availability of dentists and utilization levels of dental services. The simulation focuses on two channels through which the dental school would most likely affect the region. First, the number of graduates who are expected to remain in the region was varied, based on the extensiveness of the education pipeline used to attract local students. Second, the number of patients treated in the dental school clinic under different dental school clinical models, including the traditional model, a patient-centered clinic model and a community-based clinic model, was varied in the simulation to obtain a range of additional dentists and utilization rates under differing dental school models. Under a set of plausible assumptions, the low yield scenario (ie private school with a traditional clinic) would result in three additional dentists residing in the region and a total of 8090 additional underserved patients receiving care. Under the high yield scenario (ie dental pipeline program with community based clinics) nine new dentists would reside in the region and as many as 18 054 underserved patients would receive care. Even with the high yield scenario and the strong assumption that these patients would not otherwise access care, the utilization rate increases to 68.9% from its current 60.1%. While the new dental school in Southwest Virginia would increase the dentist workforce and utilization rates, the high cost combined with the continued low rate of dental utilization suggests that there may be more effective alternatives to improving oral health in rural areas

  16. Factors influencing students' performance in a Brazilian dental school

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erica Tatiane da Silva; Maria de Fátima Nunes; Maria Goretti Queiroz; Cláudio R. Leles

    2010-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to investigate variables that influence student's performance in a retrospective sample including all undergraduate students who entered in a Brazilian dental school, in...

  17. Dental Occlusion among School Going Children of Maharashtra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Mukesh; Banerjee, Prasenjit; Gondhalekar, Rajesh; Gondhalekar, Rajeshri; Lall, Rajeev; Parwani, Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    A dental survey was conducted among the school going children of age group 6-13 yrs, focused to find out incidence of malocclusion so as to predict the probable time at which preventive measures can be taken...

  18. Gender differences in first-year dental students' motivation to attend dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbecz, Mark; Ross, Judith A

    2002-08-01

    Women's role in the field of dentistry has historically been limited to the dental auxiliary fields, rather than that of D.D.S. or D.M.D. Today, women are nearly 38 percent of U.S. dental school students and 14 percent of active practitioners. The slow(er) influx of women into dentistry has been little studied by dental educators. During the 2000-01 academic year, we conducted a survey of first-year dental students at a sample of publicly funded U.S. dental schools. The purpose of the survey was to assess gender differences in motives for pursuing a dental career. The data show that male dental students rate self-employment and business-related motives as more important, while female dental students rate people-oriented motives more highly. Factor analysis revealed four distinct clusters of motives for pursuing a dental career: a financial motive, a business-oriented motive, a people-oriented or caring motive, and a flexibility motive. Women scored significantly higher than men on the caring factor, whereas the reverse was true on the business factor. Male and female students rated financial and flexibility motives equally. The implications of the results for attracting students to the profession of dentistry are discussed.

  19. Using Registered Dental Hygienists to Promote a School-Based Approach to Dental Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmer-Beck, Melanie; Wellever, Anthony; Kelly, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    We examine a strategy for improving oral health in the United States by focusing on low-income children in school-based settings. Vulnerable children often experience cultural, social, economic, structural, and geographic barriers when trying to access dental services in traditional dental office settings. These disparities have been discussed for more than a decade in multiple US Department of Health and Human Services publications. One solution is to revise dental practice acts to allow registered dental hygienists increased scope of services, expanded public health delivery opportunities, and decreased dentist supervision. We provide examples of how federally qualified health centers have implemented successful school-based dental models within the parameters of two state policies that allow registered dental hygienists varying levels of dentist supervision. Changes to dental practice acts at the state level allowing registered dental hygienists to practice with limited supervision in community settings, such as schools, may provide vulnerable populations greater access to screening and preventive services. We derive our recommendations from expert opinion.

  20. Ethics and the electronic health record in dental school clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Robert A; Valenza, John A

    2012-05-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are a major development in the practice of dentistry, and dental schools and dental curricula have benefitted from this technology. Patient data entry, storage, retrieval, transmission, and archiving have been streamlined, and the potential for teledentistry and improvement in epidemiological research is beginning to be realized. However, maintaining patient health information in an electronic form has also changed the environment in dental education, setting up potential ethical dilemmas for students and faculty members. The purpose of this article is to explore some of the ethical issues related to EHRs, the advantages and concerns related to the use of computers in the dental operatory, the impact of the EHR on the doctor-patient relationship, the introduction of web-based EHRs, the link between technology and ethics, and potential solutions for the management of ethical concerns related to EHRs in dental schools.

  1. Dental Students' Knowledge of Resources for LGBT Persons: Findings from Three Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoying; Mugayar, Leda; Perez, Edna; Nagasawa, Pamela R; Brown, David G; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2017-01-01

    Recently, there has been increased attention to including cultural diversity in the education of health professionals, including concern for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) inclusion and visibility. Studies regarding cultural exposure and acceptance of LGBT populations have been concentrated in medicine, with findings showing that medical providers often graduate having missed the preparation required to care for LGBT persons. A visible, comprehensive, culturally competent environment in dental schools would help ensure that all oral health professionals and students are aware of services available to address the particular needs of LGBT students. The aims of this survey-based study conducted in 2015-16 were to determine dental students' perceptions regarding LGBT students' needs and to assess dental students' knowledge of resources for LGBT persons at three U.S. dental schools, one each in the Midwest, West, and South. Of the 849 students invited to participate, 364 completed the survey (338 dental, 26 dental hygiene), for an overall response rate of 43%. The response rate at individual schools ranged from 30% to 55%. The results showed perceptions of insufficient LGBT information, resources, and support at these institutions, especially at the Western school. There were significant differences among the three schools, with students at the Western school more than the other two schools perceiving that their institution was less aware of whether it met the academic, social support, and spiritual needs of LGBT students. There were no significant differences between LGBT and non-LGBT students' perceptions. The authors urge dental school administrators to explore the degree to which their programs teach respectful and caring behavior towards LGBT students and, by extension, LGBT patient populations.

  2. Internal dental school environmental factors promoting faculty survival and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masella, Richard S

    2005-04-01

    A career in dental academics offers ample rewards and challenges. To promote successful careers in dental education, prospective and new dental faculty should possess a realistic view of the dental school work environment, akin to the informed consent so valuable to patients and doctors. Self-assessment of personal strengths and weaknesses provides helpful information in matching faculty applicants with appropriate dental schools. Essential prehiring information also includes a written job description detailing duties and responsibilities, professional development opportunities, and job performance evaluation protocol. Prehiring awareness of what constitutes excellence in job performance will aid new faculty in allotting time to productive venues. New faculty should not rely solely on professional expertise to advance careers. Research and regular peer-reviewed publications are necessary elements in academic career success, along with the ability to secure governmental, private foundation, and corporate grant support. Tactful self-promotion and self-definition to the dental school community are faculty responsibilities, along with substantial peer collaboration. The recruitment period is a singular opportunity to secure job benefits and privileges. It is also the time to gain knowledge of institutional culture and assess administrative and faculty willingness to collaborate on teaching, research, professional development, and attainment of change. Powerful people within dental schools and parent institutions may influence faculty careers and should be identified and carefully treated. The time may come to leave one's position for employment at a different dental school or to step down from full-time academics. Nonetheless, the world of dental and health professional education in 2005 is rapidly expanding and offers unlimited opportunities to dedicated, talented, and informed educators.

  3. Sabbatical policies and their implementation at United States dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidle, E A

    1978-11-01

    An ad hoc Committee on Sabbaticals created by the Council of Faculties of the AADS surveyed sabbatical policies and their implementation at dental schools in the United States. Data from a questionnaire completed by 56 of 60 members of the Council of Faculties reveal that a majority of U.S. dental schools have sabbatical policies but that dental educators are less likely to apply for or to be awarded sabbaticals than educators from other parts of the university, except perhaps the medical school. Information was also obtained on the regulations governing sabbaticals--interval between leaves, rates of remuneration, and rules defining how the leave may be spent. Finally, suggestions are made as to how this important benefit of academic life might be made more available to dental educators.

  4. An approach to using noncognitive variables in dental school admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Margaret B; Sedlacek, William E; Lowery, B Lamont

    2014-04-01

    Dental school admissions committees continue to grapple with challenges associated with recruiting, admitting, and enrolling students who best meet the mission of the particular institution. For many students, particularly underrepresented minority students and those from non-traditional backgrounds, standardized tests such as the Dental Admission Test (DAT) are poor predictors of their potential for success. Noncognitive assessment methods can be used in conjunction with traditional cognitive measures in making admissions decisions. These methods have been employed by hundreds of higher education institutions, foundations, and scholarship programs, but are relatively new in dental education. This article describes a prevalent assessment model and discusses one dental school's implementation of the model, with the outcome of enrolling students from diverse backgrounds whose career goals parallel the mission of the school.

  5. Are Dental Schools Part of the Safety Net?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Howard L

    2017-08-01

    This article examines the current safety net activities of dental schools and reviews strategies by which schools could care for more poor and low-income patients. The primary data come from the annual Survey of Dental Education, a joint American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and American Dental Association (ADA) activity. The analyses use descriptive statistics and are intended to give ballpark estimates of patients treated under varying clinical scenarios. Some 107.4 million people are underserved in comparison to utilization rates for middle-income Americans. In 2013-14, pre- and postdoctoral students treated about 1,176,000 disadvantaged patients. This is an estimate; the actual value may be 25% above or below this number. The impact of potential strategies for schools to provide more care to poor and low-income patients are discussed; these are larger class size, more community-based education, a required one-year residency program, and schools' becoming part of publicly funded safety net clinics. While dental schools cannot solve the access problem, they could have a major impact if the payment and delivery strategies discussed were implemented. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  6. Evaluation of radiation protection principles observance in Iranian dental schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GhazikhanlouSani K.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: In recent decades many guidelines has been conducted by radiation protection organizations about radiation protection in dentistry. This study was designed to evaluate the observance of these guidelines in educational clinics of all dental schools in Iran."nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study a questionnaire based on National Radiation Protection guidelines was conducted. The questionnaire consisted of questions about radiation protection principles in dental radiography that is needed for patients and personnel protection and quality control of radiological instruments. The questionnaires were completed by the responsible person of each radiology department of dental schools (18 schools. After gathering the data, the results were compared with radiation protection standards."nResults: There was proper condition in the case of the existence of radiation protection facilities, such as lead apron, thyroid shield and lead impacted walls. However, personnel rarely use these facilities. Usage of high speed films and existence of automatic processor in dental schools was an appreciable point. The main problem was related to the lack of regular quality control programs."nConclusion: The observance of radiation protection regulations in radiology departments of dental schools was proper. But majority of departments had no regular quality control programs; and the use of digital systems in dental radiography was not common.

  7. Risk factors and prevalence of dental fluorosis and dental caries in school children of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaka, Kavita; Ravindra, Khaiwal; Mor, Suman; Gauba, Krishan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis, dental caries, and associated risk factors in the school children of district Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab, India, using a cross-sectional study design. Oral health status of children aged between 8 and 15 years was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO) 2013 criteria. Dental fluorosis was assessed using Dean's index, and dental caries were recorded using decayed, missing, filled/decayed, extracted, filled (DMF/def) indices. Four hundred school children were examined, of which 207 were in the 8-11-year-old group and 193 were in the 12-15-year-old group. The overall prevalence of dental fluorosis was 4.1%, which might be linked to a high concentration of fluoride in drinking water at certain locations of rural Punjab. The prevalence of dental caries was 36.5% with a mean DMF score of 0.3 and def score of 0.6. Risk factors for dental caries include oral hygiene behavior and sugar consumption patterns. The study highlights the need to increase awareness about the oral health and hygiene among the school children in India.

  8. A brief comparison of curricula at dental schools in China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hantang; Yang, Jingyi; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Wu; Wang, Ping

    2012-06-01

    This study compared the dental curricula at dental schools in China and Japan. A survey was conducted in representative dental schools in China and Japan. It was found that, in China and Japan where dental schools recruit students directly from high schools, more attention is paid to introduction of early professional education. Most dental schools in Japan arrange dental subjects for their students from the first through the fourth years, while in China, only a few dental schools take this path although many of them are currently making changes. It was also discovered that, in both countries, an increasing number of dental schools assign a specific dental subject to the same period with its relevant bioscience or biomedical counterparts, which makes it possible for them to enhance each other reciprocally in a positive way for students and consequently help dental students master the related topics.

  9. Who succeeds at dental school? Factors predicting students' academic performance in a dental school in republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Jung-Joon; Lee, Gene; Kim, Kack-Kyun; Jang, Ki-Taeg; Jin, Bo-Hyoung

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what cognitive and non-cognitive factors were responsible for predicting the academic performance of dental students in a dental school in the Republic of Korea. This school is one of those in Korea that now require applicants to have a bachelor's degree. In terms of cognitive factors, students' undergraduate grade point average (GPA) and Dental Education Eligibility Test (DEET) scores were used, while surveys were conducted to evaluate four non-cognitive measures: locus of control, self-esteem, self-directed learning, and interpersonal skills. A total of 353 students matriculating at Seoul National University School of Dentistry in 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 consented to the collection of records and completed the surveys. The main finding was that applicants who scored higher on internal locus of control and self-efficacy were more likely to be academically successful dental students. Self-directed learning was significantly associated with students ranked in the top 50 percent in cumulative GPA. However, students' interpersonal skills were negatively related to their academic performance. In particular, students' lack of achievement could be predicted by monitoring their first-year GPA. Therefore, the identification of those factors to predict dental school performance has implications for the dental curriculum and effective pedagogy in dental education.

  10. What I wish I'd learned at dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, G R; Lynch, C D; Chadwick, B L; Santini, A; Wilson, N H F

    2016-08-26

    Background Much concern appears to exist as to the scope and content of contemporary dental school programmes, with the oft-cited criticism being made that dental graduates are 'no longer as good as they used to be'.Aim The aim of this project was to survey the views of dentists - both new graduates and more established practitioners - on aspects of their own dental school training they felt had been deficient as well as commenting on what aspects of dental school education they would like to see improved/enhanced in current times.Methods An invitation to complete an Internet-based questionnaire was emailed to the Fellows and Members of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK). Topics in the questionnaire included the respondent's own dental education history, how well they felt their dental school training had covered certain clinical and non-clinical topics; and their opinions on areas they felt should be included in contemporary dental school programmes.Results Six hundred and forty-nine responses were received from 3,348 emailed invitations (response rate = 19.4%). Sixty-one percent (395) of respondents were qualified for 10 years or more. Among clinical skills and techniques, a majority of respondents reported they felt they had not had sufficient teaching/training in dental school in surgical endodontics (76%), conscious sedation (72%), root surface debridement (71%), fixed orthodontic appliances (68%), porcelain veneers (63%), implants (56%) and posterior composites (53%). If designing a new dental school programme, the most common topics respondents would seek to include/increase were business and practice management (21%), communication skills (including patient management and leadership skills) (10%), and increased clinical time and experience (8%).Conclusions The findings of this project are of interest and relevance to those working with student dentists and young dental practitioners. A greater emphasis is needed on the teaching of certain non

  11. Smoking Policies of U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, H. Gordon

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of a study on the preventive health activity concerning smoking at dental schools were to determine the smoking policies and what actions were taken to reduce health hazards of smoke to personnel in institutions. The majority of schools surveyed (N=46) restricted smoking to certain areas in their facility. (MLW)

  12. Models for Delivering School-Based Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David A.; McManus, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) often are located in high-need schools and communities. Dental service is frequently an addition to existing comprehensive services, functioning in a variety of models, configurations, and locations. SBHCs are indicated when parents have limited financial resources or inadequate health insurance, limiting…

  13. Dental School of Graduation in Relation to Dentist Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald W.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A statistical study is presented of the 1976 location, by region and state, of the active civilian dentists of the United States in relation to the dental schools from which they graduated. A master matrix table shows state-by-state distribution of the graduates of each school and, conversely, where each state obtained its dentists. (Author/JMD)

  14. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues in dental school environments: dental student leaders' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joan I; Patterson, April N; Temple, Henry J; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study reported in this article were to assess dental student leaders' perceptions of educational efforts concerning lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) topics and the cultural climate concerning LGBT issues in dental schools in the United States and Canada. In addition, the perceptions of student leaders who self-identified as belonging to the LGBT community and of students with a heterosexual orientation were compared. Data were collected from 113 dental student leaders from twenty-seven dental schools in the United States and three in Canada. Fifty student leaders were females, and sixty-two were males. Only 13.3 percent of the respondents agreed that their dental education prepared them well to treat patients from LGBT backgrounds. The more the student leaders believed that their university has an honest interest in diversity, the better they felt prepared by their dental school program to treat patients from LGBT backgrounds (r=.327; pstudents with LGBT orientations, the more they agreed that persons can feel comfortable regardless of their sexual orientation (r=.585; pLGBT backgrounds and that staff, faculty, students, and patients from these backgrounds are not discriminated against.

  15. Curriculum content in geriatric dentistry in USA dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Goettsche, Zachary S; Qian, Fang

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to re-examine the teaching of geriatric dentistry in the USA dental schools, to identify curriculum content and compare the findings to previous reports. All dental schools in the United States were contacted via email with a questionnaire to assess the teaching of geriatric dentistry. Non-responding schools were sent a minimum of three reminder emails to complete the survey. A statistical analysis was performed. Descriptive statistics were conducted to profile the variables of interest. Bivariate analysis was performed to explore if any of the variables were related using Fisher's exact test, non-parametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Kruskal-Wallis test. Fifty-six of the 67 dental schools completed the questionnaire. Geriatric dentistry was taught in all dental schools; for 92.8%, the course was compulsory. We found that 62.5% were teaching it as an independent course, 25% as an organised series of lectures and 8.9% as occasional lectures in parts of other courses. Clinically, 84.2% have some form of compulsory education in geriatric dentistry. Public schools were marginally associated with an increased interest in expanding the geriatric dentistry curriculum (P = .078). No differences were found between these variables and school location. Geriatric dentistry is now required in 92.8% of dental schools. The teaching of traditional topics has not changed much; however, the number of gerontological topics has increased. Clinical teaching needs to be expanded, as in only 57.1% of schools was it a requirement. The ageing imperative will require research to determine the impact of teaching on services to the geriatric community. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. PREVALENCE OF DENTAL CARIES AMONG SCHOOL CHILDREN IN SULUR - COIMBATORE

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    Abhirami Kannan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dental caries is a universal health problem with involving the people globally of all regions and society. The agonising fact is that despite several efforts towards total eradication, dental caries is still prevalent. As the prevalence of dental caries is very high among school children and there is a paucity of such data in Coimbatore and the literature review does not reveal many such studies from this area, the study was conducted in the school going children in Sulur. MATERIALS AND METHODS All the students were screened visually using torch with the help of mouth mirror and probe and the observation recorded. A health screening camp was conducted for the students in private school, Sulur, February 20-25, 2017, by a team of doctors from PSG UHTC. A total of 1945 students were screened. The students health details have been entered in their health card and those requiring further evaluation have been counseled and the nursing staff at school has been requested to facilitate and guide for followup. All the students were screened visually using torch with the help of mouth mirror and probe and the observation recorded. All the students who were present in school during 20th to 25th were screened and considered as the inclusion criteria. The exclusion criteria were the absentees during this period. The students were made to sit in an ordinary chair in broad daylight facing away from the sunlight and examined in their school. Data were compiled in an excel worksheet and the percentage calculated. RESULTS A total of 1945 students were screened, of which, 541 students were found to have dental problems that is about 28% of the total screening done. The percentage of dental caries were found to be higher compared to other dental diseases like deep caries, malalignment, malocclusion and calculus. The percentage of dental caries was found to be higher in the females about 78% than the male for whom it was about 72%. The percentage of deep

  17. Sexual harassment in Dentistry: prevalence in dental school

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    Cléa Adas Saliba Garbin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sexual harassment is unlawful in all work and educational environments in most nations of the world. The goals of this study were to describe the sexual harassment prevalence and to evaluate the experiences and attitudes of undergraduate students in one dental school in Brazil. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An 18-item questionnaire was administered to 254 dental students with a completion rate of 82% (208. Students were requested to respond to questions about their background and academic level in dental school, their personal experiences with sexual harassment and their observation of someone else being sexually harassed. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of the students reported being sexually harassed by a patient, by a relative of a patient or by a professor. Male students had 3 times higher probability of being sexually harassed than female student [OR=2.910 (1.113-7.611]. Additionally, 25.4% of the students reported witnessing sexual harassment at the school environment. The majority of students did not feel professionally prepared to respond to unwanted sexual behaviors. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that sexual harassment can occur in a dental school setting. There is a need for ongoing sexual harassment education programs for students and university staff. Increased knowledge of sexual harassment during graduation can better prepare dental professionals to respond to sexual harassment during their practice.

  18. Sexual harassment in Dentistry: prevalence in dental school

    Science.gov (United States)

    GARBIN, Cléa Adas Saliba; ZINA, Lívia Guimarães; GARBIN, Artênio José Insper; MOIMAZ, Suzely Adas Saliba

    2010-01-01

    Objective Sexual harassment is unlawful in all work and educational environments in most nations of the world. The goals of this study were to describe the sexual harassment prevalence and to evaluate the experiences and attitudes of undergraduate students in one dental school in Brazil. Material and Methods An 18-item questionnaire was administered to 254 dental students with a completion rate of 82% (208). Students were requested to respond to questions about their background and academic level in dental school, their personal experiences with sexual harassment and their observation of someone else being sexually harassed. Bivariate statistical analyses were performed. Results Fifteen percent of the students reported being sexually harassed by a patient, by a relative of a patient or by a professor. Male students had 3 times higher probability of being sexually harassed than female student [OR=2.910 (1.113-7.611)]. Additionally, 25.4% of the students reported witnessing sexual harassment at the school environment. The majority of students did not feel professionally prepared to respond to unwanted sexual behaviors. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that sexual harassment can occur in a dental school setting. There is a need for ongoing sexual harassment education programs for students and university staff. Increased knowledge of sexual harassment during graduation can better prepare dental professionals to respond to sexual harassment during their practice. PMID:21085799

  19. The impact of new dental schools on the dental workforce through 2022.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, David; Valachovic, Richard W; Brown, L Jackson

    2009-12-01

    Following a wave of dental school closures from 1986 to 2001 and a perceived shortage of dentists, three new dental schools were established between 1997 and 2003, and eight more are in various stages of planning and development to open over the next decade. Conditions are moving rapidly, and several institutions have stated intentions to open new dental schools since this analysis. This article presents a supply-side analysis of the impact of the new schools on the effective dentist to population ratio, taking into account changes in graduation rates, retirement rate, population growth, productivity, and gender ratio of the profession. Demand-side factors including utilization, per patient expenditures, and case mix are addressed, as well as the implications of these changes on access to care and the future of the profession. Given approximately ten new schools, by 2022, an additional 8,233 graduates will have joined the workforce, or approximately three dentists per 100,000 people. Effective dentist to population ratios vary greatly depending on all of the factors addressed. Changes in productivity influence the effective ratio most significantly. Most probable scenarios for the dental workforce suggest a stable dentist to population ratio at minimum, with an increase likely given recent productivity changes. The increase in dentists will not noticeably improve access to care for low-income and rural populations absent additional public funding to support demand for these populations and concurrent measures to effect even distribution of dentists throughout the country.

  20. PENN PASS: a program for graduates of foreign dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, P; Lopez, N

    1994-01-01

    An increasing number of graduates of foreign dental schools who enroll in advanced standing programs to qualify for licensure calls for dental schools to be prepared to handle not only the curricular demands but also the growing cultural diversity among its student population. The "reeducation" of this student group not only meets the need of foreign dentists for an American degree but may also provide health professionals to service various ethnic populations whose language and culture they are able to understand and identify with. A survey of students and graduates of a two-year Program for Advanced Standing Students (PASS) for graduates of foreign dental schools representing 34 countries aimed to arrive at an understanding of this student group through characterization of the foreign dentists and identification of their attitudes and feelings toward various aspects of the program, the school and faculty and their experience of stress. This report includes description of the distinctive features of the program which cater to specific needs and concerns of this non-traditional group of dental students. PASS students are accepted on the basis of their grades in dental school in home country, scores in the National Dental Board Examination Part I, Test of English as Foreign Language (TOEFL), and ratings in personal interviews. They complete an intensive summer program consisting of didactic and laboratory courses which prepares them for integration with four-year students for the last two years of didactic and clinical curriculum. Cultural diversity seminars, a special English class, PASS class meetings and seminars are unique additions to their program and aim to assist them adjust to the educational, social and cultural systems in an American school. Results of the survey show a majority of the PASS students feel that they are part of the school and that there is someone in the school whom they can approach for problems. An understanding of their ethnic and

  1. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust.

  2. Reflections on academic careers by current dental school faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogér, James M; Wehmeyer, Meggan M H; Milliner, Matthew S

    2008-04-01

    During the inaugural year (2006-07) of the Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP), 110 faculty members at ten different dental schools were interviewed by dental students who were participating as ADCFP fellows in this year-long program designed to introduce them to faculty roles and activities and help them gain an appreciation for the rewards and issues associated with academic life. The goals, format, and components of the ADCFP are described in a companion article in this issue of the Journal of Dental Education. One of the fellows' assignments during the ADCFP was to interview faculty at various academic ranks who had differing degrees of work emphasis in teaching, research, service/patient care, and administration. Sixty-nine (63 percent of the total) of these interviews were reviewed and analyzed by the authors, who were student fellows in the ADCFP during 2006-07. The purpose of these interviews was to provide the fellows with insight into the positive aspects and challenges in becoming and remaining a dental school faculty member. This aggregate perspective of the interviews conducted at ten dental schools highlights the motivations and challenges that confront a dentist during the process of choosing a career in academic dentistry and determining if dental education is a good fit for each individual who elects to pursue this pathway. Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed several factors consistently identified by faculty across the schools as being positive influences on the quality of the academic work environment and career satisfaction: mentorship and student interaction, opportunities for scholarship (research and discovery), job diversity, intellectual challenge, satisfaction with the nature of academic work, lifestyle/family compatibility, flexibility, lifelong learning, professional duty, and lab responsibility. A series of negative themes were also consistently identified: bureaucracy/administrative burdens and barriers, time

  3. Student adjustment problems in two dental schools in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjakul, P; Cheunarrom, C

    2000-05-01

    Adjustment problems and academic achievement among dental students at two universities, one located in Thailand's capital city (Mahidol University) and the other in southern Thailand (Prince of Songkla University), were studied. All first- to sixth-year students at each university completed the Mooney Problem Checklist Thai version, by Supapan, which covers eleven areas of adjustment problems. The most severe adjustment problems at both schools were related to adjustment to college work. Problems relating to health and physical development, social and recreational activities, and moral and religious adjustment of MU dental students were significantly higher than those of PSU dental students. The checklist showed that, in both universities, the most important adjustment problem was the need for advice from staff concerning clinical experience. Stepwise regression indicated that four variables--adjustment to college work, sex, secondary education system and university (MU or PSU)--were associated with the academic achievement of dental students.

  4. Dental Student Academic Integrity in U.S. Dental Schools: Current Status and Recommendations for Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bruce S; Knight, G William; Graham, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Cheating incidents in 2006-07 led U.S. dental schools to heighten their efforts to enhance the environment of academic integrity in their institutions. The aims of this study were to document the measures being used by U.S. dental schools to discourage student cheating, determine the current incidence of reported cheating, and make recommendations for enhancing a culture of integrity in dental education. In late 2014-early 2015, an online survey was distributed to academic deans of all 61 accredited U.S. dental schools that had four classes of dental students enrolled; 50 (82%) responded. Among measures used, 98% of respondents reported having policy statements regarding student academic integrity, 92% had an Honor Code, 96% provided student orientation to integrity policies, and most used proctoring of final exams (91%) and tests (93%). Regarding disciplinary processes, 27% reported their faculty members only rarely reported suspected cheating (though required in 76% of the schools), and 40% disseminated anonymous results of disciplinary hearings. A smaller number of schools (n=36) responded to the question about student cheating than to other questions; those results suggested that reported cheating had increased almost threefold since 1998. The authors recommend that schools add cheating case scenarios to professional ethics curricula; disseminate outcomes of cheating enforcement actions; have students sign a statement attesting to compliance with academic integrity policies at every testing activity; add curricular content on correct writing techniques to avoid plagiarism; require faculty to distribute retired test items; acquire examination-authoring software programs to enable faculty to generate new multiple-choice items and different versions of the same multiple-choice tests; avoid take-home exams when assessing independent student knowledge; and utilize student assessment methods directly relevant to clinical practice.

  5. Periodontology in the undergraduate curriculum in UK dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasman, P A; Witter, J; Preshaw, P M

    2015-07-10

    In 1980 the British Society of Periodontology published a series of educational goals which have guided periodontal curricula at UK dental schools. Further, a survey of UK dental schools evaluated aspects of teaching and learning in periodontology. The aims of this project were to identify teaching practices and assessments in periodontology and best practice which may be developed in the future. A questionnaire was sent to dental schools who had participated in the previous survey. The questionnaire sought information on aspects of teaching and learning in periodontology: teaching manpower, curriculum structure, assessment, research opportunities for students and whether implantology is delivered in the undergraduate curriculum. There is consistency between the education providers with respect to teaching and learning in periodontology. Most are developing integrated learning between dental undergraduates and members of the dental team although there are opportunities for further development. Students are expected to have knowledge of complex treatments but are not expected to be competent at undertaking periodontal surgery nor placing and restoring implants. The findings confirm that there is considerable consistency between the education providers with respect to aspects of teaching and learning in periodontology.

  6. Improving the Fiscal Sustainability of Teaching Clinics at Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, John W

    2015-12-01

    Educational patient care clinics are becoming an increasingly important source of revenue for dental schools. Revenue from clinics can help offset the rising cost of dental education. In addition, those clinics represent a source of income over which the schools have reasonably direct control. Recently, a group of nine U.S. dental schools conducted a detailed financial survey of their clinics and shared the confidential results with each other. The purpose of their analysis was to develop benchmarks for key factors related to clinical financial productivity and expenses and to define best practices to guide improvements at each school. The survey found significant variations among the nine schools in revenue produced by predoctoral students and by postdoctoral residents. There were similar variations for levels of clinical staffing. By sharing the results of the survey with each other, the individual schools gained a strong understanding of the business strengths or weakness of their own clinical programs. That information gave each school's leaders the opportunity to investigate how they might improve their clinical fiscal sustainability.

  7. The role of school-based dental programme on dental caries experience in Yogyakarta Province, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amalia, Rosa; Schaub, Rob M. H.; Widyanti, Niken; Stewart, Roy; Groothoff, Johan W.

    Objectives. To assess the effectiveness of a school-based dental programme (SBDP) in controlling caries by measuring the relationship between the SBDP performance and caries experience in children aged 12 in Yogyakarta Province, Indonesia, by taking into account influencing factors. Methods. A

  8. The quality of dental faculty work-life: report on the 2007 dental school faculty work environment survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haden, N Karl; Hendricson, William; Ranney, Richard R; Vargas, Adriana; Cardenas, Lina; Rose, William; Ross, Ridley; Funk, Edward

    2008-05-01

    This report is the third in a series of articles on the dental school work environment commissioned by the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. The report is based on the most extensive research to date on faculty satisfaction in the dental school environment. The purpose of the study was to assess faculty perceptions and recommendations related to work environment, sources of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction, and professional development needs. More broadly, the study intends to provide insight into the "change readiness" of dental schools to move forward with curricular improvements and innovations. Findings are based on 1,748 responses from forty-nine U.S. dental schools obtained during the time frame of February to April 2007. The total number of respondents constituted 17 percent of all U.S. dental school faculty. The average response rate per school was thirty-six (21 percent). To elucidate the data in terms of issues related to the quality of faculty work-life based on demographics, the authors compared perceptions of various aspects of the work culture in academic dentistry among faculty with different academic ranks and academic degrees and by other variables such as age and gender, tenure versus non-tenure appointments, and full- versus part-time status. Quantitative and qualitative analyses show that the majority of faculty members described themselves as very satisfied to satisfied with their dental school overall and with their department as a place to work. Tenured associate professors expressed the greatest level of dissatisfaction. Opportunities for and support of professional development emerged as an area requiring substantially more attention from dental schools. The authors of the study suggest that dental school leaders use these findings to assess their individual dental school's work environment and to plan changes as needed.

  9. EXPERIENCE IN A DENTAL SCHOOL SETTING

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anxiety. However this is in contrast to the report of Stabholz and Peretz1 who observed no significant difference in the dental anxiety scale of patients with previous endodontic experience and those without. A study on anticipated and experienced pain associated with endodontic therapy found that pain experienced during.

  10. National Educational Stratification of Dental Schools in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aeen Mohammadi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Pupose:After two decades of expansion of universities of medical sciences and increasing the number of medical sciences students as one of the most attainable solutions for the problem of substandard status of Iranian community health, recently, quality-based policies inmedical education have taken priority over most of the national health plans. We conducted this study to determine differences in the field of education between Iranian dental schools by stratifying their educational services.Method: To measure the educational performance that could be utilized to rate the schools nationwide, a benchmarking tool, consisting of about 60 indicators, was devised. Each school was asked to introduce a representative who would complete a questionnaire, which was designed to collect schools’ information. In the next step, all the divisions were visited by one of the project’s members and the school’s representative to revise and approve the data. Then, data retrieval was performed and verified at the project’s office. Finally, a special computer software was exploited to perform the final analysis.Results: There were 18 public and private dental schools nationwide, which were stratified based on their individual scores. Furthermore, all schools were also ranked in each indicator.Conclusion: This study as one of the phases of Strategy Compilation for Educational Missions of the National System of Medical Education, defines the educational strengths and weaknesses of Iranian dental schools that could be used as a measure for authorities to determine the developmental limits and current stance of these schools; and optimize their budget and facilities.Keywords:EDUCATION, DENTAL, MEDICAL, IRAN, RANKINGS, EDUCATIONAL PERFORMANCE, STRATIFICATION, SCHOOL, BENCHMARKING, RANKING.

  11. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

  12. Changes in the prevalence of dental caries in primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the changes in the prevalence of dental caries in Lagos State over a 3 years period and the role of age, sex, and playing in the changes observed. Materials and Methods: Three primary schools in Lagos State, Nigeria were randomly selected for the study. Six hundred and thirty‑three children age ...

  13. Dietary patterns and dental caries in nursery school children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary patterns and dental caries in nursery school children in Nairobi, Kenya. E. M. Ngatia, J. K. Imungi, J. W. G Muita, P. M. Ng'ang'a. Abstract. (East African Medical Journal, 2001: 78 (12): 673-677). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  14. Changes in the prevalence of dental caries in primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-06

    Mar 6, 2013 ... Objectives: To evaluate the changes in the prevalence of dental caries in Lagos State over a 3 years period and the role of age, sex, and playing in the changes observed. Materials and Methods: Three primary schools in Lagos State, Nigeria were randomly selected for the study. Six hundred.

  15. Effectiveness of school dental screening on stimulating dental attendance rates in Vikarabad town: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadde Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The school dental screening program has been in existence from the beginning of 20 th century. Its value in encouraging attendance among school children is not fully established. Aim: The aim was to determine the effectiveness of school dental screening on stimulating dental attendance rates among school children in Vikarabad town. Objectives: (a To compare the dental attendance rates between 6-9 and 10-13 years old age groups, among male and female school children in Vikarabad town. (b To identify the type of dental treatment received by the school children. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted among school children aged 6-13 years old from 16 schools that were randomly selected and divided into two groups. Eight schools had a dental screening program (study group = 300 children and had blanket referral cards and 8 schools that did not have the intervention (control group = 300. The dental attendance rates were determined after 3 months of follow-up period by evaluating the blanket referral cards for the study group and by an oral questionnaire for the control group. Results: The dental attendance rate was 27% for the study group and 18% for the control group which is statistically significant. The attendance rate was higher among 10-13 years of children both in test group and control groups. Among the children who visited the dentist, 53% in the control group and 69% from the test group got simple amalgam and glass ionomer cement restorations. Conclusion: The dental attendance rates were improved following school dental screening.

  16. Personality preference distribution of dental students admitted to one dental school using different selection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, Hsingchi; Dalrymple, Kirsten R; Shuler, Charles F

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) would detect differences in personality preferences in first-year dental students admitted to the same dental school through different admission methods. First-year dental students admitted in 2000 and 2001 were given the MBTI instrument during orientation prior to the start of classes. In fall 2000, the Class of 2004 had 140 students, with 116 in the traditional track and twenty-four in the parallel problem-based learning (PBL) track. In fall 2001, the Class of 2005 had 144 students, all enrolled in the PBL curriculum. All students admitted to the PBL track had experienced a process that included evaluation of their participation in a small group. Students in the traditional track had individual interviews with faculty members. Both student groups were required to meet the same baseline grade point average and Dental Admission Test standards. In 2000, the PBL students showed personality preferences that were distinctly different from the personality preferences of traditional track students in the categories of Extroversion (89 percent PBL, 44 percent traditional) and Thinking (72 percent PBL, 39 percent traditional). In 2001, the all-PBL class retained the trend towards Extroversion (69 percent). This study suggests that admission method may effectively change the personality preference distribution exhibited by the students who are admitted to dental school.

  17. Career transition and dental school faculty development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery L; Hendricson, William D; Partida, Mary N; Rugh, John D; Littlefield, John H; Jacks, Mary E

    2013-11-01

    Academic dentistry, as a career track, is not attracting sufficient numbers of new recruits to maintain a corps of skilled dental educators. The Faculty Development Program (FDP) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School received federal funds to institute a 7-component program to enhance faculty recruitment and retention and provide training in skills associated with success in academics including:(1) a Teaching Excellence and Academic Skills (TExAS)Fellowship, (2) training in research methodology,evidence-based practice research, and information management, (3) an annual dental hygiene faculty development workshop for dental hygiene faculty, (4) a Teaching Honors Program and Academic Dental Careers Fellowship to cultivate students' interest in educational careers, (5) an Interprofessional Primary Care Rotation,(6) advanced education support toward a master's degree in public health, and (7) a key focus of the entire FDP, an annual Career Transition Workshop to facilitate movement from the practice arena to the educational arm of the profession.The Career Transition Workshop is a cap stone for the FDP; its goal is to build a bridge from practice to academic environment. It will provide guidance for private practice, public health, and military dentists and hygienists considering a career transition into academic dentistry. Topics will be addressed including: academic culture, preparation for the academic environment,academic responsibilities, terms of employment,compensation and benefits, career planning, and job search / interviewing. Instructors for the workshop will include dental school faculty who have transitioned from the practice, military, and public health sectors into dental education.Objectives of the Overall Faculty Development Program:• Provide training in teaching and research skills,career planning, and leadership in order to address faculty shortages in dental schools and under representation of minority

  18. Extent and modes of physics instruction in European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letić, Milorad; Popović, Gorjana

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dental education towards integration of sciences and convergence of curricula have affected instruction in physics. Earlier studies of undergraduate curricula make possible comparisons in physics instruction. For this study, the websites of 245 European dental schools were explored, and information about the curriculum was found on 213 sites. Physics instruction in the form of a separate course was found in 63 percent of these schools, with eighty-two hours and 5.9 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits on average. Physics integrated with other subjects or into modules was found in 19 percent of these schools. Half of these schools had on average sixty-one hours and 6.9 ECTS credits devoted to physics. Eighteen percent of the schools had no noticeable obligatory physics instruction, but in half of them physics was found to be required or accepted on admission, included in other subjects, or appeared as an elective course. In 122 dental schools, the extent of physics instruction was found to be between forty and 120 contact hours. Physics instruction has been reduced by up to 14 percent in the last fourteen years in the group of eleven countries that were members of the European Union (EU) in 1997, but by approximately 30 percent in last five years in the group of ten Accession Countries to the EU.

  19. LGBT Coverage in U.S. Dental Schools and Dental Hygiene Programs: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenburg, Kenneth L; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol A; Kinney, Janet S; Temple, Henry; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study were to assess curricular coverage of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) content in U.S. and Canadian dental schools and U.S. dental hygiene programs, including hours of LGBT content, pedagogy used, and assessment methods, and to determine whether respondents perceived their institution's coverage as adequate. Data were collected from academic deans at 32 U.S. and two Canadian dental schools and from program directors at 71 U.S. dental hygiene programs (response rates 49%, 20%, 23%, respectively). The results showed that 29% of responding dental schools and 48% of responding dental hygiene programs did not cover LGBT content. Among the respondents, dental schools dedicated on average 3.68 hours and dental hygiene programs 1.25 hours in required settings to LGBT content. Lectures (dental schools 68%, dental hygiene programs 45%) and small group instruction (43%, 25%) were reported as the most common methodology used in teaching this content. Most of the responding dental schools and dental hygiene programs covered HIV (85%, 53%), oral disease risk (63%, 54%), and barriers to accessing health care for LGBT people (58%, 38%). Up to a third reported no need for coverage of topics such as sexual orientation (21%, 32%), coming out (29%, 37%), transitioning (29%, 38%), and sex reassignment surgery (32%, 35%). Assessment was through written examinations (41%, 30%) and faculty-observed patient interactions (21%, 23%); some respondents (20%, 33%) reported no assessment of learning outcomes. The most frequently endorsed strategies for increasing LGBT content were receiving curricular material focusing on LGBT-related health issues and health disparities and having trained faculty to teach LGBT content.

  20. Applying Corporate Climate Principles to Dental School Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Michelle A; Reddy, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Decades of research have shown that organizational climate has the potential to form the basis of workplace operations and impact an organization's performance. Culture is related to climate but is not the same. "Culture" is the broader term, defining how things are done in an organization, while "climate" is a component of culture that describes how people perceive their environment. Climate can be changed but requires substantial effort over time by management and the workforce. Interest has recently grown in culture and climate in dental education due to the humanistic culture accreditation standard. The aim of this study was to use corporate climate principles to examine how organizational culture and, subsequently, workplace operations can be improved through specific strategic efforts in a U.S. dental school. The school's parent institution initiated a climate survey that the dental school used with qualitative culture data to drive strategic planning and change in the school. Administration of the same survey to faculty and staff members three times over a six-year period showed significant changes to the school's climate occurred as a new strategic plan was implemented that focused on reforming areas of weakness. Concentrated efforts in key areas in the strategic plan resulted in measurable improvements in climate perception. The study discovered that culture was an area previously overlooked but explicitly linked to the success of the organization.

  1. Issues of academic integrity in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beemsterboer, P L; Odom, J G; Pate, T D; Haden, N K

    2000-12-01

    Evidence of violations of academic integrity can be identified at all levels of education. A survey on academic integrity was mailed in 1998 to the academic deans of all fifty-five U.S. dental schools, with a response rate of 84 percent. This survey showed that reported incidents of academic dishonesty occur in most dental schools, with the average school dealing with one or two cases a year. The most common incidents of dishonest behavior involved copying or aiding another student during a written examinations; the second most common involved writing an untrue patient record entry or signing a faculty member's name in a patient chart. Respondents indicated the major reason for failure to report academic dishonesty was fear of involvement because of time and procedural hassles and fear of repercussions from students and peers.

  2. National Educational Stratification of Dental Schools In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mohammadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: After two decades of expansion  of universities of medical  sciences  and increasing  the number  of medical  sciences  students  as one of the most attainable  solutions  for the problem of substandard status of Iranian community health, recently, quality-based policies in medical education have taken priority over most of the national health plans. The pupose of this study was to determine differences of Iranian dental schools in the field of education by stratifying their educational services.Methods: To measure the educational performance that could be utilized to rate the schools nationwide, a benchmarking tool, consisting of about 60 indicators, was devised. Each school was asked to introduce a representative who would complete a questionnaire, which was designed to collect schools' information. In the next step, all the divisions were visited by one of the project :S  members and the school's representative  to revise and approve the data. Then, data retrieval was performed and verified at the project's office. Finally, special computer software was exploited to perform the final analysis.Results: There were 18 public and private dental schools nationwide, which were stratified based on their individual scores. Furthermore, all schools were also ranked in each indicator.Conclusion: This study as one of the phases of Strategy Compilation for Educational Missions of the National System of Medical Education, defines the educational strengths and weaknesses  of Iranian dental schools that could be used as a measure for authorities to determine the developmental limits and current  stance of these schools; and optimize their budget and facilities.

  3. International Volunteer Programs for Dental Students: Results of 2009 and 2016 Surveys of U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodmansey, Karl F; Rowland, Briana; Horne, Steve; Serio, Francis G

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and nature of international volunteer programs for predoctoral students at U.S. dental schools and to document the change over five years. Web-based surveys were conducted in 2009 and 2016. An invitation to participate in the study, along with a hyperlink to the survey, was emailed to the deans of all U.S. dental schools in the two years. In 2009, 47 of 58 dental school deans responded to the survey, for a response rate of 81%. In 2016, 48 of 64 dental school deans responded, for a response rate of 75%. From 2009 to 2016, the number of schools reporting dental student international experiences increased from 25 to 31. In 2016, 65% of responding schools offered dental student international experiences, an 11.5% increase over the results of the 2009 survey. Concomitantly, the number of deans reporting their students' participation in international opportunities not officially sanctioned by the school decreased from 41 to 34. These findings showed an increase in the number of dental schools providing international experiences for their students and established baseline data to assess trends in the future.

  4. Electronic textbooks as a professional resource after dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Michael L; Strother, Elizabeth A; Brunet, Darlene P; Gallo, John R

    2012-05-01

    In two previous studies of dental students' attitudes about the VitalSource Bookshelf, a digital library of dental textbooks, students expressed negative opinions about owning and reading electronic textbooks. With the assumption that dentists would find the digital textbooks useful for patient care, the authors surveyed recent graduates to determine if their attitude toward the VitalSource Bookshelf had changed. A brief survey was sent to 119 alumni from the classes of 2009 and 2010 of one U.S. dental school. Forty-seven (39.5 percent) completed the questionnaire. Eighteen respondents (48.3 percent) reported using the e-textbooks often or sometimes. The twenty-nine dentists who said they have not used the collection since graduation reported preferring print books or other online sources or having technical problems when downloading the books to a new computer. Only five respondents selected the VitalSource Bookshelf as a preferred source of professional information. Most of the respondents reported preferring to consult colleagues (37.8 percent), the Internet (20 percent), or hardcopy books (17.8 percent) for information. When asked in an open-ended question to state their opinion of the Bookshelf, nineteen (42.2 percent) responded positively, but almost one-third of these only liked the search feature. Six respondents reported that they never use the program. Twenty-two said they have had technical problems with the Bookshelf, including fifteen who have not been able to install it on a new computer. Many of them said they have not followed up with either the dental school or VitalSource support services to overcome this problem. Our study suggests that dentists, similar to dental students, dislike reading electronic textbooks, even with the advantage of searching a topic across more than sixty dental titles.

  5. Effect of perceived stress on student performance in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Anne E; Lushington, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    A commonly held view is that chronic stress has an adverse affect on academic performance. Because dental students typically report high levels of stress, they may be at particular risk. This research examined the relationship between perceived stress and academic performance in 202 dental students enrolled in an Australian dental school. In this study, four key stress factors labelled "self-efficacy beliefs," "faculty and administration," "workload," and "performance pressure" previously identified by our group from principal components analysis of the Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaire, together with gender, ethnicity, and stage of course, were entered as independent variables into multiple regression analyses. Three measures of academic performance (basic and applied science knowledge, clinical competency, and contextual understanding) were entered as dependent variables. Regression analysis revealed little support for the assumption that chronic stress predicted academic performance. The only finding of note was that students reporting higher levels of stress on the DES factor "faculty and administration" tended to show lower grades for clinical competency and contextual understanding. In summary, although the DES factor solution used in the present study remains to be validated, we found little support for an association between increased DES factor stress scores and reduced academic performance in dental students.

  6. Psychological distress and its correlates among dental students: a survey of 17 Colombian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Mafla, Ana Cristina; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sánchez-Molina, Marisol; Gallego-Gómez, Clara Liliana; Vélez-Jaramillo, Luis Fernando; Tamayo-Cardona, Julián Andrés; Pérez-Cepeda, David; Vergara-Mercado, Martha Ligia; Simancas-Pallares, Miguel Ángel; Polychronopoulou, Argy

    2013-06-26

    Links between the demanding nature of studies in the health sciences, students' personality traits and psychological distress have been well-established. While considerable amount of work has been done in medicine, evidence from the dental education arena is sparse and data from Latin America are lacking. The authors conducted a large-scale investigation of psychological distress among dental students in Colombia and sought to determine its curriculum and student-level correlates. The Spanish version of the Derogatis' Symptoms Checklist Revised (SCL-90-R) was administered to all students officially registered and attending classes or clinics in 17 dental schools in 4 geographic districts of Colombia between January and April 2012. Additional information was collected on participants' socio-demographic information and first career choice, as well as school's characteristics such as class size. The Global Severity Index (GSI) score, a measure of overall psychological distress, served as the primary analytical endpoint. Analyses relied on multilevel mixed-effects linear and log-binomial regression, accounting for study design and sample characteristics. A total of 5700 dental students completed the survey, a response rate of 67%. Pronounced gradients were noted in the association between socio-economic status and psychological distress, with students in higher strata reporting fewer problems. After adjustment for all important covariates, there was an evident pattern of increasing psychological distress corresponding to the transition from the didactic, to the preclinical and clinical phases of training, with few differences between male and female students. Independent of other factors, reliance on own funds for education and having dentistry as the first career choice were associated with lower psychological distress. Levels of psychological distress correlated with students' socio-economic and study-level characteristics. Above and beyond the influence of person

  7. A Naval Postgraduate Dental School Analysis Of Initial Endodontic Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    DENTAL SCHOOL ANALYSIS OF INITIAL ENDODONTIC TREATMENT ALLEN DANIEL RASMUSSEN D.M.D., ENDODONTICS, 2015 Thesis directed by: CAPT Teny Webb, D.D.S...re-treatment, surgical treatment, or canal obturation using Resilon, carrier-based, silver points or a paste fill technique . Additionally, if any...location by quadrant Follow-up variables Pain location by tooth Permanent restoration History of orthodontic treatment Intracanal post History of external

  8. Technical Quality of Root Fillings Performed by Dental Students in Babol Dental School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ehsani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is substantial evidence that the technical quality of root canalfilling has a significant effect on the outcome of root canal treatment. Theaim of this study was to evaluate the technical quality of root canal fillingsperformed by dental students. Methods: The records of 325 teethradiographs, treated by dental students in 2008-2009 in Babol Dental School,were selected and evaluated. For each tooth, three periapical radiographs(before treatment, during operation and at the end of treatment were examined.Filling length, density and taper, and presence or absence of void wasevaluated. Obturations that have proper length, density and taper, without anyvoid are classified as acceptable root canal fillings. The SPSS statisticalsoftware and Chi-Square test were used for analysis. Results: Of the 325radiographs, 72% had good length and 75% had acceptable taper. There were 14.2%low densities, whereas, only 3.32% of teeth have no void. At least 17.8% ofteeth had underfilling and 10.2% overfilling. Finally, only 17.5% of teethshowed acceptable filling length, taper and density without any void. There wasno significant difference between the 4th and 5th yearstudents and oral hygienist (who studied oral hygiene and now continuing it todentistry in root canal filling quality (P> 0.05. Conclusion:Technical quality of root fillings performed by dental students was found to beless than 20%. .It should be revised in the endodontic curriculum requirementto improve their performance

  9. Correlation Between Students' Dental Admission Test Scores and Performance on a Dental School's Competency Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Alexander M; Schuster, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a statistically significant positive correlation between dental students' Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores, particularly on the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), and their performance on a dental school's competency exam. Scores from the written and clinical competency exam administered in the fall quarter of the fourth year of the curriculum at Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona were compared to DAT scores of all 216 members of the graduating classes of 2012 and 2013. It was hypothesized that students who performed highly on one or more sections of the DAT would perform highly on the competency exam. Backward stepwise regression analyses were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the PAT scores were most strongly correlated with the competency exam scores and were a positive predictor for all three clinical sections of the exam (operative dentistry, periodontics, and endodontics). Positive predictors for the written portion of the exam were total DAT score for patient assessment and treatment planning and the DAT reading comprehension score for prosthodontics; there were no predictors for periodontics. The total variance explained by the results ranged from 4% to 15%. While statistically significant relationships were found between the students' PAT scores and clinical performance, DAT scores explained relatively little variance in the competency exam scores. According to these findings, neither the PAT nor any of the DAT components contributed to predicting these students' clinical performance.

  10. School bullying and traumatic dental injuries in East London adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agel, M; Marcenes, W; Stansfeld, S A; Bernabé, E

    2014-12-01

    To explore the association between school bullying and traumatic dental injuries (TDI) among 15-16-year-old school children from East London. Data from phase III of the Research with East London Adolescents Community Health Survey (RELACHS), a school-based prospective study of a representative sample of adolescents, were analysed. Adolescents provided information on demographic characteristics, socioeconomic measures and frequency of bullying in school through self-administered questionnaires and were clinically examined for overjet, lip coverage and TDI. The association between school bullying and TDI was assessed using binary logistic regression models. The prevalence of TDI was 17%, while lifetime and current prevalence of bullying was 32% and 11%, respectively. The prevalence of TDI increased with a growing frequency of bullying; from 16% among adolescents who had never been bullied at school, to 21% among those who were bullied in the past but not this school term, to 22% for those who were bullied this school term. However, this association was not statistically significant either in crude or adjusted regression models. There was no evidence of an association between frequency of school bullying and TDI in this sample of 15-16-year-old adolescents in East London.

  11. Dental pain as a determinant of expressed need for dental care among 12-year-old school children in India

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran Kumar Dandi; Epari Venkat Rao; Shanti Margabandhu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We have undertaken a cross-sectional study to assess factors associated with dental pain that determine the expressed needs for dental care among 12-year-old school children in India. Materials and Methods: A total of 2 250 school children were surveyed after being drawn through stratified cluster random sampling. The simultaneous effects of sociodemographic characteristics, pain characteristics, and the impact of pain on the quality of life were studied in association with the...

  12. 50(th) Anniversary of the Central Dental Library of School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borić, Vesna

    2014-12-01

    Libraries have an exceptional place in the history, culture, education and scientific life of a nation. They collect all aspects of our linguistics and literacy, all out theoretical assumptions as well as all the results of experience and practice. The importance of a library is not mirrored only in the national and historical role and heritage, but in a more permanent, informational role, since a modern library must, above all, be an effective information system. Since a library of a university operates as a part of its matrix, it is easily shadowed by other forms of educational and scientific infrastructure. 50(th) anniversary of the Central Dental Library of the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb is an excellent opportunity to make a call to the institution and public to its unique and irreplaceable role.

  13. Caries dental en escolares del Distrito Federal Dental caries in school children in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA ESTHER IRIGOYEN-CAMACHO

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Presentar las estimaciones de la prevalencia y la severidad de caries dental, así como las necesidades de tratamiento de la población escolar del Distrito Federal examinada en la encuesta de caries dental que se llevó a cabo en 1988 con la finalidad de obtener datos basales sobre caries en los escolares al inicio del Programa Nacional de Fluoruración de la Sal en México. Material y métodos. La población de estudio fue seleccionada empleando un marco muestral basado en el listado de las escuelas primarias y los jardines de niños registrados por la Secretaría de Educación Pública en 1988. En el examen de la cavidad bucal de los escolares se utilizaron los criterios diagnósticos señalados por la Organización Mundial de la Salud. Resultados. Un total de 4 475 escolares de 5 a 12 años de edad participaron en el estudio. La prevalencia de caries dental en la población alcanzó 90.5%. El índice de necesidades de tratamiento fue elevado (79.6%. El promedio de los índices de caries en los escolares de 12 años de edad fue CPOD= 4.42 (desviación estándar –DE– 3.2 y CPOS= 6.53 (DE 4.8. Conclusiones. Los resultados de la encuesta subrayan la pertinencia de un programa preventivo de amplia cobertura, como el de fluoruración de la sal. Además, muestran que se requiere elaborar estrategias para mejorar el acceso de la población escolar a los servicios odontológicos del sistema de salud en México.Objective. To estimate the prevalence and severity of dental caries and the dental treatment necessities of school children in Mexico City. The studied population was surveyed for dental caries in 1988 to obtain data necessary for the National Program of Salt Fluoridation in Mexico. Material and methods. The population was selected with a sample frame based on a list of Kindergardens and primary schools registered at the Ministry of Public Education in 1988. The oral cavity examination was based on diagnostic criteria marked by the

  14. Occupational accidents in dental school: a 10-year retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Maia Araújo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate occupational accidents that occurred during the first 10 years of Fortaleza University (UNIFOR Dental School. Methods: A documental study based on secondary data from the Notification Center of Occupational Accidents of UNIFOR Dental School, reported in the last 10 years. The variables included characteristics of the accidents and of the injured, besides the type of instrument and the resulting injury. Results: Were recorded 160 occupational accidents divided by location, function of the injured and type of accident. It was observed that 63.1% of cases occurred in the Multidisciplinary Clinic, 23.1% in the Integrated Clinic, 8.8% in the laboratories, 1.9% at home, 1.25% in the Surgical Center, 1.25% in the Material Sterilization Central and 0.6% during the training outside university. Concerning the injured, 90.6% of the victims were undergraduates, 5.0% staff, 3.8% teachers and 0.6% patients. Regarding the injury, 40.6% were penetrating bloody injuries, 11.9% cutting bloody injuries, 2.5% cutting non-bloody injuries, 5% burns, 5% penetrating bloody injuries/cutting bloody injuries, 2.5% were injuries with maceration, 1.9% injuries causing ocular trauma and 0.6% of an incident of dog bite. Conclusion: It was concluded that penetrating injuries were prevalent and these occurred mostly in the multidisciplinary clinic, where students of earlier periods of dental course work, indicating that the experience in dental practice generates more care with safety.

  15. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghipour, Maryam; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Afshin; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman

    2017-01-01

    By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals? dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This corre...

  16. Dental pain, oral impacts and perceived need for dental treatment in Tanzanian school students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashoto, Kijakazi O; Astrøm, Anne N; David, Jamil; Masalu, Joyce R

    2009-07-30

    Dental caries, dental pain and reported oral problems influence people's oral quality of life and thus their perceived need for dental care. So far there is scant information as to the psychosocial impacts of dental diseases and the perceived treatment need in child populations of sub-Saharan Africa. Focusing on primary school students in Kilwa, Tanzania, a district deprived of dental services and with low fluoride concentration in drinking water, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of dental pain and oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP), and to describe the distribution of OIDP by socio-demographics, dental caries, dental pain and reported oral problems. The relationship of perceived need estimates with OIDP was also investigated. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008. A total of 1745 students (mean age 13.8 yr, sd = 1.67) completed an extensive personal interview and under-went clinical examination. The impacts on daily performances were assessed using a Kiswahili version of the Child-OIDP instrument and caries experience was recorded using WHO (1997) criteria. A total of 36.2% (41.3% urban and 31.4% rural, p dental caries was 17.4%, dental pain 36.4%, oral problems 54.1% and perceived need for dental treatment 46.8% in urban students. Corresponding estimates in rural students were 20.8%, 24.4%, 43.3% and 43.8%. Adjusted OR for reporting oral impacts if having dental pain ranged from 2.5 (95% CI 1.8-3.6) (problem smiling) to 4.7 (95% CI 3.4-6.5) (problem sleeping),--if having oral problems, from 1.9 (95% CI 1.3-2.6) (problem sleeping) to 3.8 (95% CI 2.7-5.2) (problem eating) and if having dental caries from 1.5 (95% CI 1.1-2.0) (problem eating) to 2.2 (95% CI 1.5-2.9) (problem sleeping). Students who perceived need for dental care were less likely to be females (OR = 0.8, 95% CI 0.6-0.9) and more likely to have impacts on eating (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.4-2.7) and tooth cleaning (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.6-2.5). Substantial proportions of students

  17. Trends in Behavioral Sciences Education in Dental Schools, 1926 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centore, Linda

    2017-08-01

    This article outlines the journey of behavioral sciences education from a multidisciplinary array of topics to a discipline with a name, core identity, and mission in dental schools' curricula. While not exhaustive, it covers pivotal events from the time of the Gies report in 1926 to the present. Strengths and weaknesses of current behavioral sciences instruction in dental schools are discussed, along with identification of future opportunities and potential threats. Suggestions for future directions for behavioral sciences and new roles for behavioral sciences faculty in dental schools are proposed. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  18. Comparison of clinical practice education in dental hygiene schools in eight countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inukai, Junko; Sakurai, Miwa; Nakagaki, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The profession of dental hygienist is one of the few in which the primary function of the practitioner is to prevent oral disease and to promote the well-being of patients. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical training conditions in schools of dental hygiene in eight...... countries (the USA, Canada, the UK, Sweden, Denmark, Thailand, South Korea and Japan). METHODS: In 2006, we sent out a questionnaire in which we asked dental hygiene schools about how they educate dental hygiene students. RESULTS: The techniques taught to students in schools in Western industrialised...

  19. A survey of dual-degree training opportunities at US dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogér, James M

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe access to information for the dual-degree dental scientist training programs (D.D.S.-D.M.D./Ph.D.) currently available for predoctoral students at U.S. dental schools. Given the ongoing shortage of dental faculty and the progressive emphasis on evidence-based dentistry, these programs will be instrumental in training future dental faculty. A comprehensive review of the institutional websites for all fifty-six U.S. dental schools was undertaken in January 2006. After identification of advertised dual-degree programs, a follow-up survey was sent to twenty-two dental schools that described the existence of a dual-degree dental scientist training program. The results of the survey and website review indicate that there are a number of programs in operation, but it is difficult to determine even basic features of these programs including curriculum structure, financial aid, and infrastructure support for students. Several current dental scientist trainee students were also contacted to discuss their programs in more detail. The insights derived from this investigation may assist dental school applicants, current predoctoral dental students, and administrators seeking to design or promote their existing dental scientist training programs.

  20. Survey and Analysis of Dental Caries in Students at a Deaf-Mute High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling; Cong, Xiao-Na; Tang, Wan-Qin; Wei, Ping-Min

    2012-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted to assess and compare the prevalence of dental caries of 229 deaf adolescents in a special senior high school and to identify factors related to dental caries, with a match group of 196 healthy adolescents in a normal senior high school, in Jiangsu province of East China. In this study the prevalence…

  1. Dental Occlusion among School Going Children of Maharashtra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Banerjee, Prasenjit; Gondhalekar, Rajesh; Gondhalekar, Rajeshri; Lall, Rajeev; Parwani, Rajkumar

    2014-07-01

    A dental survey was conducted among the school going children of age group 6-13 yrs, focused to find out incidence of malocclusion so as to predict the probable time at which preventive measures can be taken. A survey was carried on 985 unrelated healthy subject, including of 575 boys and 410 girls and the population was divided into three economic group of upper, middle and lower class. 1)In the study 57% of sample is found with normal occlusion.2)The proportion of malocclusion was higher in males.3)Lower income group sample showed highest proportion of malocclusion. In this study on school going children, it was found out that 57% of population showed normal occlusion and that malocclusion was higher in males and in lower income group population.

  2. The dental status of asthmatic British school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDerra, E J; Pollard, M A; Curzon, M E

    1998-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of dental disease in British school children with asthma. A convenience sample of 100 asthmatic children (aged 4-16 years) was examined for dental caries, periodontal condition, and tooth surface loss. School children, equated for age, sex, race, and socioeconomic status were chosen for comparison. Children were divided into two age ranges; 4-10 and 11-16 years. A significant difference was found in DMFT (0.96 vs. 0.31) and DMFS (1.37 vs. 0.37) between the 4-10-year-old asthmatic children compared with healthy control children. In the 11-16-year age range, the asthmatic children had a DMFT and DMFS of 2.48 and 3.39 compared with the control children who had a DMFT and DMFS of 1.11 and 1.97 respectively. Asthmatic children had significantly more plaque, gingivitis, and calculus compared with the control group. There was a significant difference in the severity and number of teeth affected by tooth surface loss affecting labial surfaces of the anterior teeth and occlusal surfaces of the posterior teeth of asthmatic children. It was concluded that asthmatic children have more decay affecting their permanent teeth, poorer periodontal status, and more tooth surface loss than healthy controls.

  3. Pediatric obesity-related curricular content and training in dental schools and dental hygiene programs: systematic review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Bhaskar, Vaishnavi; McGraw, Kathleen A

    2017-06-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review to determine: a) What dental schools and dental hygiene programs are doing to promote knowledge and skills related to addressing childhood obesity and to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and b) What else these schools and programs could do to better equip future oral health professionals to address childhood obesity and reduce consumption of SSBs. The authors searched PubMed, Scopus, Education Full Text (EBSCOHost), and ERIC (EBSCOHost) to identify peer-reviewed publications reporting on obesity or dietetic-related curricula in dental and dental hygiene education within the last 20 years. Three studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Outcomes of the identified studies were abstracted and summarized independently by two investigators. The first study describes a 2009 survey of pediatric dentistry residents. Approximately, half had received formal training yet they lacked essential knowledge or skills for managing children who were obese. The second study describes nutrition-related coursework offered in the second year of a predoctoral dental school curriculum in Saudi Arabia, and the third study reports on the development of an "oral health rotation" dietetic internship in a pediatric dentistry clinic, in the context of interprofessional education (IPE). Evidence of dental schools' and dental hygiene programs' efforts to address obesity and SSB consumption in children in their curricula is scant, while Commission on Dental Accreditation standards make sporadic mentions of diet and nutrition. Opportunities exist to leverage existing resources and innovative, experiential approaches, including IPE, to formally, and effectively address this important issue in predoctoral oral health education. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Restructuring an undergraduate dental curriculum to global standards--a case study in an Indian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadagad, P; Tekian, A; Pinto, P X; Jirge, V L

    2012-05-01

    Globalisation has affected all aspects of life and dentistry is no exception. In the context of today's dentist being a global citizen, undergraduate training in dentistry is set to ensure converging standards so that international recognition of dental qualifications can move forward. The decision of the Dental Council of India to expand the undergraduate dental program to five years provides an opportunity to be part of the endeavor of the Global Dental Congress to achieve converging standards which was initially for the European Union, and now spreading out globally. Economic emergence in Indian subcontinent has resulted in growing oral health care needs both in quality and quantity. To address this issue, the graduating dentist needs to be trained following a competency based curricular model. Access to Internet facilitated the goal of achieving converging standards of dental schools to be feasible because of the instant communication and capacity to share information about training strategies via technology across the globe. Upgrading the undergraduate training to global standards by dental schools in India could be a wise and strategic move both for attracting students to study in India, as well as retaining the graduates after their training. The following is a case study of an Indian dental school set to restructure the undergraduate curriculum to global standards using the 8 steps of Kotter's transformational change. Change in curriculum and the subsequent accreditation of the school in global platform not only attracts prospective students but also results in producing competent dentists. Dental education provided by the institution can result in quality assurance, benchmarking the assessment system to achieve international recognition. This paper highlights the need and importance of facilitation of international convergence with long term aspirations for mutual recognition of international degrees. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Geriatric dentistry content in the curriculum of the dental schools in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Soraya; Araya-Bustos, Francisca; Ettinger, Ronald L; Giacaman, Rodrigo A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the status of pre-doctoral geriatric dentistry education among all Chilean dental schools. Chile is one of the most rapidly ageing countries in Latin America. Consequently, specific knowledge and training on the needs of elderly populations need to be emphasised in dental schools. The current extent and methods of teaching geriatric dentistry among the dental schools in Chile are unknown. A web-based questionnaire was developed and sent to all 19 Chilean dental schools to identify which schools had a formal programme on geriatric dentistry and ask about their format, content and type of training of the faculty who taught in the programmes. Data were analysed, and a comparison was made among the schools. Sixteen (84%) of the participant schools reported teaching at least some aspects of geriatric dentistry, using various methodologies, but only 7 (37%) had specific courses. Of those schools reporting a didactic content on geriatric dentistry, 71% included clinical training, either in the school's dental clinics or in an extramural service. Contents mostly included demographics of ageing, theories of ageing and medical conditions. More than half of the faculty (57%) stated that they had formal training in geriatric dentistry, 43% were trained in prosthodontics, public health or other areas. Although most dental schools taught geriatric dentistry, only some had a specific course. Most schools with formal courses followed the international curriculum guidelines for geriatric dentistry. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Dental pain as a determinant of expressed need for dental care among 12-year-old school children in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Kumar Dandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We have undertaken a cross-sectional study to assess factors associated with dental pain that determine the expressed needs for dental care among 12-year-old school children in India. Materials and Methods: A total of 2 250 school children were surveyed after being drawn through stratified cluster random sampling. The simultaneous effects of sociodemographic characteristics, pain characteristics, and the impact of pain on the quality of life were studied in association with the expressed needs for dental treatment. Results: Among the studied school children, 71.4% suffered from dental pain, only 27.7% expressed need for dental healthcare. Socioeconomic status (SES was a statistically significant determinant. Pain characteristics like the severity of pain and pain on eating hot and cold foods were significantly associated with expressed needs. Impact characteristics associated with expressed needs were embarrassment in showing teeth, brushing teeth, and difficulty in eating and drinking. Logistic regression analysis yielded a Nagelkerke R 2 value of 0.106. Conclusion: Important determinants of expressed needs for dental care among the studied population were SES, pain intensity, pain on thermal stimuli, impact characteristics like eating/drinking and embarrassment in showing teeth.

  7. Dental pain as a determinant of expressed need for dental care among 12-year-old school children in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandi, Kiran Kumar; Rao, Epari Venkat; Margabandhu, Shanti

    2011-01-01

    We have undertaken a cross-sectional study to assess factors associated with dental pain that determine the expressed needs for dental care among 12-year-old school children in India. A total of 2,250 school children were surveyed after being drawn through stratified cluster random sampling. The simultaneous effects of sociodemographic characteristics, pain characteristics, and the impact of pain on the quality of life were studied in association with the expressed needs for dental treatment. Among the studied school children, 71.4% suffered from dental pain, only 27.7% expressed need for dental healthcare. Socioeconomic status (SES) was a statistically significant determinant. Pain characteristics like the severity of pain and pain on eating hot and cold foods were significantly associated with expressed needs. Impact characteristics associated with expressed needs were embarrassment in showing teeth, brushing teeth, and difficulty in eating and drinking. Logistic regression analysis yielded a Nagelkerke R2 value of 0.106. Important determinants of expressed needs for dental care among the studied population were SES, pain intensity, pain on thermal stimuli, impact characteristics like eating/drinking and embarrassment in showing teeth.

  8. An Assessment of Global Oral Health Education in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Janet; Gluch, Joan I

    2017-02-01

    Dental schools need to produce graduates who are adequately prepared to respond to the complex needs and challenges of the increasingly diverse and interconnected world in which they will practice dentistry. To enhance discussions about the coverage of global oral health competencies in dental education, the aims of this study were to assess how global health education is currently incorporated into predoctoral dental training in the U.S. and which global oral health competencies are being covered. Surveys were emailed to all 64 accredited U.S. dental schools during the 2015-16 academic year. Respondents from 52 schools completed the survey (response rate 81%). The results showed that social determinants of oral diseases and conditions, how to identify barriers to use of oral health services, and how to work with patients who have limited dental health literacy were covered in the greatest number of responding schools' curricula. Key areas of global health curricula that were covered rarely included global dental infrastructure, data collection design, and horizontal and vertical programming approaches to health improvement. Despite current dialogue on the addition of global oral health competencies to dental curricula, only 41% of the responding schools were currently planning to expand their global oral health education. Based on these results, the authors conclude that it may be most feasible for dental schools to add recommended global oral health competencies to their curricula by incorporating didactic content into already established courses.

  9. A model for forensic dental education in the predoctoral dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Kenneth P; Johnson, J Dane

    2012-05-01

    Forensic odontologists play an important role locally and nationally in assisting in the identification of the victims of mass fatality incidents, whether natural or human-made. With the recent passage of legislation by Congress identifying dentists as a first-responder resource, knowledge of their expanding role in disaster response is particularly important. The purpose of this article is to describe the forensic dental course being taught at Creighton University School of Dentistry in Omaha, Nebraska, as a model for providing a fundamental education in forensic dentistry and disaster preparedness at the predoctoral dental level. This model is designed to 1) provide students with a broad view of forensic odontology; 2) give them a functional knowledge of the tools and techniques of the modern forensic dentist; 3) provide basic knowledge of their potential role in disaster preparedness and response; and 4) encourage students to pursue further forensic education, become active in national forensic organizations, and get involved in disaster preparedness/response in their home communities following graduation. This article includes lecture topics, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises being used at Creighton to teach students the fundamentals of forensic odontology and disaster preparedness.

  10. Undergraduate education in special needs dentistry in Malaysian and Australian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mas S; Razak, Ishak A; Borromeo, Gelsomina L

    2014-08-01

    Meeting the oral health care needs of the growing population of people with special health care needs (SHCN) starts with dental students' acquisition of sound knowledge and development of clinical competence at the predoctoral level. The aim of this study was to review the level of undergraduate education in Special Needs Dentistry (SND) in Malaysian and Australian dental schools. The deans of all six Malaysian public dental schools and eight of nine Australian dental schools participated in a postal survey on current undergraduate didactic and clinical training in SND at their institutions. The results showed the number of dental schools in Malaysia with teaching in SND as a specific discipline was relatively low compared to that of Australia. However, a high percentage of Malaysian and Australian dental schools reported incorporating teaching of SND into pediatric dentistry (83.3 percent vs. 75 percent), oral medicine/oral pathology (66.7 percent vs. 75 percent), and oral surgery (66.7 percent vs. 25 percent). Most respondents said their school delivered SND clinical training in dental school clinics, hospital-based settings, and residential aged care facilities. Respondents in both countries viewed lack of faculty expertise as the greatest barrier to providing SND education. The study provides valuable information that can direct SND curriculum development in the two countries.

  11. A survey of social media policies in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Webb, Chadleo

    2014-06-01

    Since social media sites began to appear in the 1990s, their popularity has increased dramatically, especially among younger individuals. With this widespread use of social media, institutions of higher education are finding the need to implement social media policies. The purpose of this study was to gather information from accredited U.S. dental schools on their social media policies. A survey sent to academic deans asked questions related to social media policies and violations of policies. The survey yielded a 35.9 percent (n=23) response rate. Social media policies at the university level were reported by 47.8 percent (n=11) of respondents, and 34.8 percent (n=8) had social media policies specifically in the dental school. Schools that had an institutional social media policy were more likely to have a social media policy in the dental school (p=0.01), and dental schools were more likely to have a policy if the academic dean had been in the position less than five years (p=0.01). All twenty-three responding dental schools have official social media pages. Dental educators and administrators may want to look for opportunities to raise awareness of social media professionalism in their dental schools.

  12. Dental School Administrators' Attitudes Towards Providing Support Services for LGBT-Identified Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Morris, Dustin R

    2015-08-01

    A lack of curriculum time devoted to teaching dental students about the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) health care patient needs and biases against LGBT students and faculty have been reported. Understanding dental school administrators' attitudes about LGBT students' needs might provide further insight into these long-standing issues. The aims of this study were to develop a survey to assess dental administrators' attitudes regarding the support services they believe LGBT-identified students need, to identify dental schools' current diversity inclusion policies, and to determine what types of support dental schools currently provide to LGBT students. A survey developed with the aid of a focus group, cognitive interviewing, and pilot testing was sent to 136 assistant and associate deans and deans of the 65 U.S. and Canadian dental schools. A total of 54 responses from 43 (66%) schools were received from 13 deans, 29 associate deans, and 11 assistant deans (one participant did not report a position), for a 40% response rate. The findings suggest there is a considerable lack of knowledge or acknowledgment of LGBT dental students' needs. Future studies are needed to show the importance of creating awareness about meeting the needs of all dental student groups, perhaps through awareness campaigns initiated by LGBT students.

  13. Dental Caries Prevalence among 6-12 Years Old School Children in Ardabil City, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh Asdagh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Dental caries is one of the most chronic diseases in children. Various factors were effective in incidence andprevalence of dental caries. The aim of this study was to determine the dental caries prevalence among 6-12 yearsold school children in Ardabil city.   Methods : In this descriptive–cross sectional study a total of 847 school children (444 girls and 403 boys were randomly selected from public and private schools in all over of Ardabil city.Clinical examination of children have been done for dental caries according to world health organization (WHO criteria including determination of DMFT, dmft, DMFS and dental caries prevalence. Data were analysedin SPSS.16 by statistical methods.   Results: Total prevalence of dental caries was 79.7% in children with 71.1 % in permanent and 88.3 % in primary dentition. The mean of dmft, DMFT, DMFS indexes were 2.74± 0.09, 1.6±0.1, and 3.5± 0.1, repectively.Results showed that there was a significant relation between DMFT, dmft and DMFS and age group.   Conclusion : Results showed that the dental caries prevalence among 6-12 years-old school children in Ardabil city was higher than the world standard. Therefore, improving the existing dental services, programing and performing education, prevention and treatment programs for oral health between school children seems tobe necessary in the future.

  14. Prevalence Of Dental Problems In School Children - A Study In A Rural Community In Haryana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajaj M

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out by 13 undergraduate students during their rural posting in Community Medicine at Ballabgarh (Haryana. The Study was performed in a High School to find out the prevalence of dental problems and their probable etiology in 490 school children between 4-17 years of age. The prevalence of caries was found to be 65% and that of dental fluorosis was 40.4%. Consumption of refined sugar in the form of sweets between meals greatly enhanced the problem of dental caries. Plaque, Inadequate cleaning practices leading to poor dental hygiene, flurosis and the lack of earl medical intervention were other contributing factors. There was a lack of awareness about dental hygiene. Community therapy in the form of distribution of pamphlets, posters, giving health talks and a health talks and a health march was imparted with the aim of aiding the primary prevention of dental diseases.

  15. Evaluation of dental erosion prevalence and contributing factors in patients referring to yazd dental school in 2012-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Farahat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dental erosion refers to the loss of tooth structure by being scratched chemically without bacterial involvement which needs to care about due to its prevalence and treatment problems. This study was designed with the aim of evaluation of the frequency of dental erosion and its causing factors in patients referring to yazd dental school in 2012-2013. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 400 patients referring to yazd dental school were randomly selected. All of their teeth were evaluated in three surfaces (buccal, lingual and occlusal. The BEWE score was used for classification the extent of damages. Also, patients were given a questionnaire that included patient demographic information and questions to investigate the causes of dental erosion. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17 and Mann-Whiney, Fisher exact, and Chi-square tests. Results: In this study, 138 men and 261 women were participated with the mean age of 33.26±10.83. 84 persons (21.1% had erosion. There was a direct and significant relationship between the dental erosion and patient's age (P >0.001. Also, there was a direct relationship between the dental erosion and reflux and consumption of lemon and pickle, beverages, soft beer and juice (P>0.001. Conclusion: Consumption of lemon and pickle, beverages, soft beer and juice increases the risk of erosion. Considering the prevalence of dental erosion in about 21% of patients, it is necessary to pay more attention to the knowledge of the causes of erosion and reduction strategies of it.

  16. Pilot survey on dental health in 5-12-year-old school children in Laos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besseling, S.; Ngonephady, S.; van Wijk, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim The burden of dental caries in young Lao children is high. As a result, these children suffer from toothache, and school absenteeism is high. There is a need for the Lao Government to develop a strategy to prevent dental disease, such as caries. The aim of this study was to collect data on the

  17. Qualitative Analysis of Organizational Change in One U.S. Dental School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Geralyn Dell

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is need for change in the way that dental schools in the United States educate their students to keep pace with the rapidly changing nature of the profession and to better address societal needs. Despite a well-documented change agenda put forth by individual authors and agencies both within and outside of dental education,…

  18. Responsibility for Teaching Pain Control in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter B.; Campbell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    A national survey of 53 dental schools found most were not interested in developing a separate division or department of dental anesthesiology. Of those with a dentist anesthesiologist responsible for teaching pain control, all have or favor such a division. Less than one-third employ professionals limiting their practice to anesthesiology. (MSE)

  19. Humanism in Dental Education: A Comparison of Theory, Intention, and Stakeholder Perceptions at a North American Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lucinda; Itaya, Lisa E; Hoover, Terry; Booth, Mark T; Nadershahi, Nader

    2017-08-01

    In today's dental education environment, a humanistic culture is an expectation for all U.S. dental schools, codified in 2013 by its inclusion in the Commission on Dental Accreditation's standards for accreditation. The University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry has made an active commitment to humanism since the mid-1970s. The aim of this study was to determine how well the school's students and faculty and staff members perceived the school was living up to its formal aspirational values and who was benefitting from the humanistic culture. Using an electronic survey, data were collected from a total of 195 students, faculty members, and staff members in 2014. Respondents were 15% of the 492 full- and part-time faculty members; 9% of the total student population of 540; and 29% of 255 staff members. In the responses, humanism was described as manifest by attributes such as caring, understanding, respect, and compassion. Although the findings confirmed the value of a humanistic culture, some portions of the school's formal definition and goals, such as good work ethic, professional responsibility, high ethical standards, increasing independence, and attainment of competence, appeared less frequently in responses. Authentic assessment of institutional culture proved challenging. Focus groups offered additional ways to assess how effectively the school lives its core value of humanism. There was recognition that more varied, robust methods were needed to assess institutional alignment with stated goals for a humanistic learning environment.

  20. Awareness of Dental Trauma Management among School Teachers of Kannur, Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandukutty, Divya; Peedikayil, Faizal C; Premkumar, Chandru T; Narasimhan, Dhanesh; Jose, Deepak

    2017-02-01

    Dental trauma can overtake dental caries and periodontal disease as the most significant threat to dental health among young people. The prognosis of traumatized teeth depends on prompt and appropriate treatment. The role of school teachers in the prevention of traumatic dental injuries is a topic that has received a great deal of attention in recent years. However, studies conducted in different regions of the world have demonstrated that teachers and other lay people's knowledge about traumatic dental injuries is inadequate and their behavior does not contribute to reduce the sequelae. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of school teachers about dental trauma and its management in Kannur district. The survey was conducted under the Department of Paedodontics and Preventive Dentistry; Kannur Dental College among 303 school teachers randomly selected from 16 schools. Four schools were selected from 16 schools using stratified cluster sampling technique. A cross sectional study design was used. A stratified cluster sampling method was done to select the study subjects. The nature and purpose of the study was first explained to the teachers in local language. Following this the printed questionnaire was distributed to school teachers. The questionnaire was prepared based on the needs of the study after referring similar questionnaires used in studies conducted in different parts of the world. A statistically significant association was found between the teacher's knowledge regarding trauma and their teaching experience. Out of the total school teachers who participated in the study, 90.1% responded correctly that the teeth most frequently affected by traumatic accidents are the upper front teeth. Nearly 23.4% responded correctly regarding management of traumatic tooth fracture. Almost 46.5% had correct knowledge regarding the reimplantation of avulsed permanent teeth. Only 14.2% responded correctly to the proper storage medium for avulsed teeth

  1. Occlusal tooth wear in patients of a dental school's prosthodontic department in Xi'an, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, M.; Zhang, Q.; Witter, D.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Ma, C.; Zhang, S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the relationships between occlusal tooth wear and occlusal conditions, chewing side preference, and occlusal guidance scheme. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 257 Chinese adult dental school patients were categorized according to a hierarchical functional classification system.

  2. Improving a Dental School's Clinic Operations Using Lean Process Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Fonda G; Cunningham, Larry L; Turner, Sharon P; Lindroth, John; Ray, Deborah; Khan, Talib; Yates, Audrey

    2016-10-01

    The term "lean production," also known as "Lean," describes a process of operations management pioneered at the Toyota Motor Company that contributed significantly to the success of the company. Although developed by Toyota, the Lean process has been implemented at many other organizations, including those in health care, and should be considered by dental schools in evaluating their clinical operations. Lean combines engineering principles with operations management and improvement tools to optimize business and operating processes. One of the core concepts is relentless elimination of waste (non-value-added components of a process). Another key concept is utilization of individuals closest to the actual work to analyze and improve the process. When the medical center of the University of Kentucky adopted the Lean process for improving clinical operations, members of the College of Dentistry trained in the process applied the techniques to improve inefficient operations at the Walk-In Dental Clinic. The purpose of this project was to reduce patients' average in-the-door-to-out-the-door time from over four hours to three hours within 90 days. Achievement of this goal was realized by streamlining patient flow and strategically relocating key phases of the process. This initiative resulted in patient benefits such as shortening average in-the-door-to-out-the-door time by over an hour, improving satisfaction by 21%, and reducing negative comments by 24%, as well as providing opportunity to implement the electronic health record, improving teamwork, and enhancing educational experiences for students. These benefits were achieved while maintaining high-quality patient care with zero adverse outcomes during and two years following the process improvement project.

  3. Computer literacy and attitudes of dental students and staff at the University of the West Indies Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W; Bedayse, S; Lalwah, S L; Paryag, A

    2009-08-01

    The University of the West Indies (UWI) Dental School is planning to implement computer-based information systems to manage student and patient data. In order to measure the acceptance of the proposed implementation and to determine the degree of training that would be required, a survey was undertaken of the computer literacy and attitude of all staff and students. Data were collected via 230 questionnaires from all staff and students. A 78% response rate was obtained. The computer literacy of the majority of respondents was ranked as 'more than adequate' compared to other European Dental Schools. Respondents computer literacy scores than older age groups (P computer, or were members of online social networking sites had significantly higher computer literacy scores than those who did not (P computer literacy should be a part of every modern undergraduate curriculum; that computer assisted learning applications and web-based learning activity could effectively supplement the traditional undergraduate curriculum and that a suitable information system would improve the efficiency in the school's management of students, teaching and clinics. The implementation of a computer-based information system is likely to have widespread acceptance among students and staff at the UWI Dental School. The computer literacy of the students and staff are on par with those of schools in the US and Europe.

  4. Delivery of comprehensive children's dental services using portable dental clinics in NYC public schools. A six-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, N G; Rosenthal, M; Franklin, D M

    1997-04-01

    In 1990, the Bureau of Dental Health Services of the New York City Department of Health launched a major initiative to modernize a network of school-based dental clinics located throughout the city. Since 1913, the bureau has provided dental care to public school children; however, the clinics were not properly maintained or upgraded, and were in a state of disrepair and obsolescence. Anticipating that the survival of the program was in question, the school program was converted to a fleet of state-of-the-art portable dental clinics permitting targeting of underserved, high-risk poor and immigrant populations. Demographics had changed dramatically over the years; the program could now situate services where they were needed most, and provide a broader array of care where access was a problem. This paper presents a six-year analysis of the program and builds a strong case to show that a portable delivery system can equal or in many ways surpass the effectiveness and capabilities of a fixed-state approach.

  5. A survey of information technology management at U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzosek, Mariusz; Warner, Gary; Donoff, R Bruce; Howell, Thomas H; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to assess how information technology (IT) is being implemented and managed in U.S. dental schools. Recent advances in IT have restructured many of the administrative, curricular, and clinical functions in dental schools. Purchasing hardware and software and hiring personnel to maintain IT present significant financial and administrative commitments for these schools. A nine-question survey was sent to all U.S. dental schools via email with a follow-up postal mailing. Forty-six surveys were returned (83.6 percent response rate). The analysis indicates that dental schools are managing IT in vastly different ways. For example, 71 percent of the schools report a centralized structure, and 61 percent have a line item in the budget to manage IT. On average there are 4.4 full-time equivalents hired to manage IT, with the majority of these people being trained in IT (eight schools reported dually trained IT/dental personnel). The majority of schools report using software to manage their admissions process (70 percent), curriculum analysis (72 percent), and delivery of curriculum content (72 percent), as well as to manage their student clinics (91 percent, business aspect; 87 percent, patients; 65 percent, grading on clinic floor; 76 percent, managing clinical evaluations) and faculty practices (85 percent, business aspect; 65 percent, patients). The use of multimedia (50 percent) and simulation (52 percent) in the preclinical area is mixed. The purchase of laptops (24 percent) and PCs (11 percent) is required in almost a third of all schools participating in this survey. Dental schools in the United States are managing IT in a variety of different ways, using various internally and commercially available tools. The cost to institutions can be large and is usually handled in centralized structures in the school with fixed budgets. The results of this survey can be used to assist schools in the planning and implementation of IT at their

  6. Implementation of new technologies in U.S. dental school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstein, Sheri A; Murad, Aseel; Hunt, Ronald J

    2015-03-01

    With dentistry rapidly evolving as new technologies are developed, this study aimed to identify the penetration of emerging dental technologies into the curricula of U.S. dental schools and to explore whether certain school characteristics affected adoption of these technologies. A 19-question survey was sent to the academic deans of all 62 U.S. dental schools. In addition to questions about characteristics of the school, the survey asked respondents to indicate where in their curricula the technology was incorporated: preclinical didactic, preclinical laboratory, clinical didactic, and/or clinical patient experience. Of 62 eligible schools, 33 useable responses were received, for a 52% response rate. The results showed that the greatest overall penetration of dental technologies was in preclinical didactic courses and the lowest was in the preclinical laboratory. Specific technologies implemented in the largest percentage of responding schools were digital radiography and rotary endodontics. The technologies with the lowest penetration were CAD/CAM denture fabrication and hard tissue lasers. These results suggest that the incorporation of technology into dental schools is following that of private practice as the most widely adopted technologies were those with the greatest acceptance and use in private practice. Among the respondents, factors such as class size and age of the school had greater impact on incorporation of technology than funding source and geographic location.

  7. Prevalence of Dental Caries and Designing the Interventional Strategies for School Children in Rural Konkan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asawari Modak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available School remains an important setting offering an effective and efficient ways to reach over to children and through them, families and community members.(1 Dental caries is very common disease in childhood, interfering with food intake affecting physical development in the form of malnutrition, child’s school attendance and academic performance. Tooth decay or cavities caused by dental caries is an infectious disease and is diet and oral hygiene dependent. If left untreated result in toothache, permanent cavitations and children with active disease become adult with tooth decay. Also poor dentition and malocclusion decreases the masticatory performance effecting oral health and quality of life. Fortunately dental caries is both preventable and treatable with effective home care and regular access to preventive dental services. The present study was carried out in the rural area of Konkan region to assess the awareness regarding oral hygiene, prevalence of dental caries, to assess the masticatory performance.

  8. Graduate and Undergraduate Geriatric Dentistry Education in a Selected Dental School in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Noboru; Sato, Yuji; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Geriatric dentistry and its instruction are critical in a rapidly aging population. Japan is the world’s fastest-aging society, and thus geriatric dentistry education in Japan can serve as a global model for other countries that will soon encounter the issues that Japan has already confronted. This study aimed to evaluate geriatric dental education with respect to the overall dental education system, undergraduate geriatric dentistry curricula, mandatory internships, and graduate geriatric education of a selected dental school in Japan. Bibliographic data and local information were collected. Descriptive and statistical analyses (Fisher and Chi-square test) were conducted. Japanese dental schools teach geriatric dentistry in 10 geriatric dentistry departments as well as in prosthodontic departments. There was no significant differences found between the number of public and private dental schools with geriatric dentistry departments (p = 0.615). At Showa University School of Dentistry, there are more didactic hours than practical training hours; however, there is no significant didactic/practical hour distribution difference between the overall dental curriculum and fourth-year dental students’ geriatric dental education curriculum (p=0.077). Graduate geriatric education is unique because it is a four-year Ph.D. course of study; there is neither a Master’s degree program nor a certificate program in Geriatric Dentistry. Overall, both undergraduate and graduate geriatric dentistry curricula are multidisciplinary. This study contributes to a better understanding of geriatric dental education in Japan; the implications of this study include developing a clinical/didactic curriculum, designing new national/international dental public health policies, and calibrating the competency of dentists in geriatric dentistry. PMID:21985207

  9. Creating an effective PBL case in oral and maxillofacial surgery at a Chinese dental school: a dental education primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jia Wei; Zhang, Shan Yong; Yang, Chi; Zhang, Zhi Yuan; Shen, Guo Fang

    2011-11-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a widely accepted educational method centered on the discussion and learning that emerge from a clinically based problem; however, little has been reported on the details of PBL case-writing in the dental education literature. This article outlines some principles of writing a PBL case as it is practiced at a Chinese dental school and presents, as an example, an actual case based on a clinical problem (ameloblastoma of the jaw) intended to provide a learning focus for predoctoral dental students. A good PBL case should allow for progressive, interdependent actions to be taken in the evaluation and overall management of the patient in context and should trigger inquiry and discussion among students in both the basic sciences (anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, pathophysiology, etc.) and related clinical sciences. The epidemiological, sociological, and ethical considerations related to each problem should also be emphasized as an essential component of effective health care provision.

  10. Perspectives on the dental school learning environment: theory X, theory Y, and situational leadership applied to dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Joseph P; Troendle, Karen

    2007-08-01

    This article applies two well-known management and leadership models-Theory X and Theory Y, and Situational Leadership-to dental education. Theory X and Theory Y explain how assumptions may shape the behaviors of dental educators and lead to the development of "cop" and "coach" teaching styles. The Situational Leadership Model helps the educator to identify the teaching behaviors that are appropriate in a given situation to assist students as they move from beginner to advanced status. Together, these models provide a conceptual reference to assist in the understanding of the behaviors of both students and faculty and remind us to apply discretion in the education of our students. The implications of these models for assessing and enhancing the educational environment in dental school are discussed.

  11. The status of ethics teaching and learning in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Marilyn S; Bebeau, Muriel J; Zarkowski, Pamela

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather and analyze information about the status of ethics teaching and learning in U.S. dental schools and to recommend a curriculum development and research agenda for professional ethics in dental education. A survey to collect this information was developed by the authors and administered by the American Society for Dental Ethics. The results suggest that dental schools have adopted many of the recommendations for curricular content and learning strategies proposed in the 1989 American Association of Dental Schools (now American Dental Education Association) Curriculum Guidelines on Ethics and Professionalism in Dentistry. The survey was sent to the individual who directs the ethics curriculum at the fifty-six U.S. dental schools that had a full complement of enrolled predoctoral classes as of January 2008. All fifty-six schools responded to the survey. The data suggest that, in general, little time is devoted to ethics instruction in the formal curriculum. The mean number of contact hours of ethics instruction is 26.5 hours, which represents about 0.5 percent of the mean clock hours of instruction for dental education programs reported in the most recent American Dental Association survey of dental education. While the amount of time devoted to ethics instruction appears not to have changed much over the past thirty years, what has changed are what qualifies as ethics instruction, the pedagogies used, and the development and availability of norm-referenced learning outcomes assessments, which are currently used by a number of schools. We found that dental schools address a substantial list of topics in their ethics instruction and that there is general agreement as to the appropriateness of the topics and the ethics competencies that need to be developed and assessed. This study also identified the respondents' perceptions of unmet needs in ethics education. Four general themes emerged: the need for ethics to be more fully

  12. Faculty and student perceptions of academic integrity at U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kenneth G; Smith, Linda A; Henzi, David; Demps, Elaine

    2007-08-01

    The issues of cheating and plagiarism in educational settings have received a large amount of attention in recent years. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which academic integrity issues currently exist in the dental schools throughout the United States and Canada. An online survey was developed to gather data pertaining to this topic from two key groups in dental education: faculty and students. Responses were obtained from 1,153 students and 423 faculty members. The results of the survey clearly reveal that cheating is a significant problem in dental schools and that significant differences exist between students' and faculty members' perceptions of academic integrity. The challenge for dental schools is to identify effective strategies to prevent cheating opportunities and to implement and enforce effective means of dealing with specific examples of cheating.

  13. Massachusetts Dental Schools Respond to the Prescription Opioid Crisis: A Statewide Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, David A; Kulich, Ronald J; Bharel, Monica; Boose, Robert E; Brownstein, Jennifer; Da Silva, John D; D'Innocenzo, Richard; Donoff, R Bruce; Factor, Ellen; Hutter, Jeffrey W; Shaefer, Jeffry R; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Jack, Helen; Thomas, Huw F

    2017-12-01

    The prescription opioid crisis has involved all sectors of U.S. society, affecting every community, socioeconomic group, and age group. While federal and state agencies are actively working to deal with the epidemic, medical and dental providers have been tasked to increase their awareness of the issues and consider ways to safely prescribe opioids and, at the same time, effectively treat their patients' pain. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, under the leadership of Governor Charles D. Baker and his administration, challenged the state's four medical schools and three dental schools to improve their curricula to prepare the next generation of clinicians to deal with this crisis in an evidence-based, effective, and sympathetic way. This Perspectives article outlines the national prescription opioid crisis, details its effects in Massachusetts, and describes the interdisciplinary collaboration among the Commonwealth, the three dental schools, the Massachusetts Dental Society, and a concerned student group. The article also describes the efforts each dental school is undertaking as well as an assessment of the challenges and limitations in implementing the initiative. The authors hope that the Massachusetts model will be a useful resource for dental schools in other states.

  14. Penalties for academic dishonesty in a Greek dental school environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletsi-Kounari, Haroula; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Reppa, Christina; Teplitsky, Paul E

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of the faculty and students of the University of Athens Dental School in Greece regarding the appropriate penalty for specific academic offenses. In addition, faculty and student opinions were compared. A questionnaire was distributed to officially registered seniors and full-time faculty members, and 177 individuals responded anonymously and voluntarily. The respondents were asked to select one from a set of nine penalties for each of fifteen hypothetical academic offenses and three cases with extenuating circumstances. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test, depending on the nature of variables, were used to detect significant differences in penalty scores between faculty and students. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The penalty scores for the fifteen offenses ranged from a mean of 2.23±1.55 to 7.25±2.64. Faculty respondents gave more severe penalties than students did for all offenses, and the finding was statistically significant (p<0.05) for eleven of the fifteen offenses. Where extenuating circumstances were added, the penalty selection altered in two of the three cases. A significantly more lenient penalty was selected by both faculty and students in these two cases. The results of this study suggest that faculty members are harsher than students for the same offenses and that extenuating circumstances can sometimes significantly change recommended penalties.

  15. Dental pain as the predictor for caries experience among school children of Udupi district, south India

    OpenAIRE

    Sravan Kumar Y; Shashidhar Acharya; Kalyana Chakravarthy Pentapati

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate child-Dental Pain Questionnaire (Child‐ DPQ) as the predictor for caries experience. Methods: We conducted a cross‐sectional survey among 10‐15 year old school children of Udupi district, Karnataka. Prior consent from parents and verbal consent from school children was obtained. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the school authorities. The study was approved by the ethics committee of Manipal University. All the eligible school children completed se...

  16. Dental pain as the predictor for caries experience among school children of Udupi district, south India

    OpenAIRE

    Sravan Kumar Y

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate child-Dental Pain Questionnaire (Child - DPQ) as the predictor for caries experience. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 10-15 year old school children of Udupi district, Karnataka. Prior consent from parents and verbal consent from school children was obtained. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the school authorities. The study was approved by the ethics committee of Manipal University. All the eligible school children completed sel...

  17. Predicting performance in Canadian dental schools: the new CDA structured interview, a new personality assessment, and the DAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Amanda; Catano, Victor M; Cunningham, D P

    2007-05-01

    Using a sample of dental students (N=373) from four Canadian dental schools, this longitudinal study determined whether the new Canadian Dental Association (CDA) structured interview was a predictor of clinical and academic performance. The new interview predicted clinical performance in the third and fourth years of dental school, but not academic performance. The Canadian Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) continued to predict first- and second-year academic performance, but not clinical performance in the senior years. A personality factor, "Conscientiousness," predicted clinical and academic performance to various degrees across the four years of dental school. A second personality factor, "Openness to Experience," predicted third-year academic performance. The results suggest that a combination of scores from the DAT, a valid measure of personality, and a well-designed structured interview will provide the best prediction of those applicants who will do well in both the academic and clinical aspects of dental school.

  18. Knowledge, attitudes, and behavior concerning dental trauma among parents of children attending primary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, A; De Giglio, O; Trerotoli, P; Vaccaro, S; Napoli, C; Montagna, M T; Caggiano, G

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries occur frequently in children and adolescents. The purpose of the present study is to examine the levels of knowledge and behaviors regarding dental trauma among parents of children attending primary schools in the Apulia region of Italy. The study was carried out using an anonymous questionnaire with closed answers distributed to 2,775 parents who were enrolled based on the entire regional school population. Analyses were conducted using the PROC CORRESP (procedure to perform multiple correspondence analysis) and PROC FASTCLUS (procedure to perform cluster analysis). Statistical significance was set at p-value sports activities. The multivariate analysis showed that wrong knowledge are distributed among all kinds of subject. Parents with previous experience of dental trauma referred right behaviours, instead weak knowledge and wrong behaviours are associated with parents that easily worried for dental events. This study showed that most parents reported no experience of dental trauma in their children, and half of them did not know what to do in case of traumatic dental injury and they would intervene within 30 minutes, suggesting that dental trauma may trigger panic. However, they did not have the information needed to best assist the affected child. Motivating parents to assume a preventive approach towards dental trauma may produce positive changes that would result an increase of long-term health benefits among both parents and children.

  19. Trends in Basic Sciences Education in Dental Schools, 1999-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Marilyn S; Shuler, Charles F

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine data published over the past two decades to identify trends in the basic sciences curriculum in dental education, provide an analysis of those trends, and compare them with trends in the basic sciences curriculum in medical education. Data published from the American Dental Association (ADA) Surveys of Dental Education, American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Surveys of Dental School Seniors, and two additional surveys were examined. In large part, survey data collected focused on the structure, content, and instructional strategies used in dental education: what was taught and how. Great variability was noted in the total clock hours of instruction and the clock hours of basic sciences instruction reported by dental schools. Moreover, the participation of medical schools in the basic sciences education of dental students appears to have decreased dramatically over the past decade. Although modest progress has been made in implementing some of the curriculum changes recommended in the 1995 Institute of Medicine report such as integrated basic and clinical sciences curricula, adoption of active learning methods, and closer engagement with medical and other health professions education programs, educational effectiveness studies needed to generate data to support evidence-based approaches to curriculum reform are lacking. Overall, trends in the basic sciences curriculum in medical education were similar to those for dental education. Potential drivers of curriculum change were identified, as was recent work in other fields that should encourage reconsideration of dentistry's approach to basic sciences education. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  20. Prevalence of dental fluorosis among primary school children in rural areas of Karera Block, Madhya Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwaria, Y S; Saksena, D N

    2013-09-01

    To determine prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in school going children of ten villages of Karera block of Shivpuri District, Madhya Pradesh. Fluoride ion concentration was measured in ten hand pump and two wells waters with a fluoride meter (ORION model 720). For the study total 750 school children were selected from ten government primary schools of ten rural villages. The survey was conducted during the period of November 2007 through December 2009. The dental and oral examination was done by two trained dentists. The occurrence and severity of dental fluorosis was recorded using Dean's index. Drinking water sources considered for study were hand pumps, and wells. Out of 750 children surveyed, 341 were found affected with dental fluorosis. The boys had greater prevalence (46.75%) as compared to girls (42.18%). Dental fluorosis, as assessed by Dean's Index shows that 20.8% children had grade I, 19.47% grade II, 5.2% grade III. Overall, 45.46% of the sample showed some grades of dental fluorosis. In all the 144 water samples from ten villages fluoride level was higher than permissible limits. The boys had greater prevalence of dental fluorosis over the girls.

  1. Profiling alumni of a Brazilian public dental school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes Maria F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Follow-up studies of former students are an efficient way to organize the entire process of professional training and curriculum evaluation. The aim of this study was to identify professional profile subgroups based on job-related variables in a sample of former students of a Brazilian public dental school. Methods A web-based password-protected questionnaire was sent to 633 registered dentists who graduated from the Federal University of Goias between 1988 and 2007. Job-related information was retrieved from 14 closed questions, on subjects such as gender, occupational routine, training, profits, income status, and self-perception of professional career, generating an automatic database for analysis. The two-step cluster method was used for dividing dentists into groups on the basis of minimal within-group and maximal between-group variation, using job-related variables to represent attributes upon which the clustering was based. Results There were 322 respondents (50.9%, predominantly female (64.9% and the mean age was 34 years (SD = 6.0. The automatic selection of an optimal number of clusters included 289 cases (89.8% in 3 natural clusters. Clusters 1, 2 and 3 included 52.2%, 30.8% and 17.0% of the sample respectively. Interpretation of within-group rank of variable importance for cluster segmentation resulted in the following characterization of clusters: Cluster 1 - specialist dentists with higher profits and positive views of the profession; Cluster 2 - general dental practitioners in small cities; Cluster 3 - underpaid and less motivated dentists with negative views of the profession. Male dentists were predominant in cluster 1 and females in cluster 3. One-way Anova showed that age and time since graduation were significantly lower in Cluster 2 (P Conclusions Cluster analysis was a valuable method for identifying natural grouping with relatively homogeneous cases, providing potentially meaningful information for

  2. The teaching of temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain at undergraduate level in Brazilian dental schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner SIMM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Evaluate the way the topics for the study of pain mechanisms in general, and Orofacial Pain (OFP and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs more specifically, are addressed in undergraduate courses curricula, and also to verify the existence of specialist OFP/TMD teachers in Brazilian dental schools. Methods: Between July 2010 and January 2011, course Coordinators/Directors of all dental schools duly registered at the Ministry of Education were invited to answer a questionnaire on topics related to OFP/TMD teaching in their institutions. Results: Fifty-three dental schools representatives answered the questionnaire. The study of pain mechanisms was found to cover an average of less than 10% of the courses' total time. Pharmacology, Endodontics and Physiology were identified as the departments usually responsible for addressing pain mechanisms in dental courses. Psychosocial aspects were found to occupy a very small proportion in the syllabi, while most of the content referred to biological or somatic aspects. OFP/TMD is addressed by a specific department in only 28.4% of the participating dental schools, while in most cases (46.3%, OFP/TMD is under the responsibility of the Prosthodontics department. Only 38.5% of respondents indicated that they had a specialist OFP/TMD teacher in their Schools. Conclusion: Among the Brazilian dental schools participating in the study, the teaching of OFP/TMD was found to be insufficient, segmented or with an extremely restricted focus. This initial assessment indicates that Curricular Guidelines for the study of OFP/TMD at undergraduate dental schools should be developed and implemented to facilitate their appropriate inclusion into the curricula and in specific pedagogical projects.

  3. Deprivation and dental health. The benefits of a child dental health campaign in relation to deprivation as estimated by the uptake of free meals at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C; Wohlgemuth, B

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the overall effect of the 1989 Lothian dental health education campaign on 8-year-old school children's dental health knowledge and behaviour and to examine the relationship between free meals and the children's benefit from the campaign....... Altogether 874 children were randomly selected and included in the study. Sugar-free meals and drinks were provided in all primary schools throughout the campaign week. Dental officers held 30-minute information sessions with each class and encouraged teachers to continue dental health activities. Dental...... knowledge and behaviour were evaluated by interviews immediately before and after the campaign. The results showed a significant increase in knowledge about diet and dental health and a significantly higher proportion of children claimed to choose non-cariogenic foods and drinks as a result of the campaign...

  4. Relationship between hand-skill exercises and other admissions criteria and students' performance in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Cheramie, Toby

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of correlations between dental admissions criteria, including a chalk carving exercise, and students' subsequent academic performance. The retrospective cohort study examined the records of dental students at Louisiana State University Health Science Center School of Dentistry for the years 1998 to 2008. Only those students who could be categorized into the following four groups were included: 1) those who graduated in the top 10% of their class, 2) those who graduated in the bottom 10% of their class, 3) those who repeated a year of dental school, and 4) those who were dismissed or resigned. The study sample consisted of 176 students: 62 in the first group, 62 in the second group, 25 in the third group, and 27 in the fourth group. Data collected were each student's undergraduate grade point average (GPA); chalk carving score; undergraduate biology, chemistry, physics (BCP) GPA; Dental Admission Test (DAT) Academic Average; Perceptual Ability Test (PAT) score of the DAT; total DAT score; grade in preclinical operative dentistry class; grade in morphology and occlusion class; and dental school GPA at graduation. The results showed that only the undergraduate GPA and BCP GPA were significantly higher for students in the top 10% of their class than for other groups. The only positive correlation involving the chalk carving scores was with the preclinical operative dentistry course grade. This study thus found limited correlations between this institution's admissions criteria and its students' success in dental school.

  5. American Association for Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy (General and Oral).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Frank; Mundell, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Anatomical Sciences of the American Association for Dental Schools are presented. These guidelines were drawn up as an effort to provide a general criterion-referenced standard against which a school can measure its course content in histology. (MLW)

  6. Pulp therapy in primary teeth--profile of teaching in Brazilian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergoli, Anieli Dossa; Primosch, Robert Eliot; de Araujo, Fernando Borba; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Casagrande, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the profile of teaching primary tooth pulp therapy practiced by Brazilian dental schools. A multiple-choice questionnaire was sent by e-mail to 191 dental schools in Brazil, addressed to the pediatric dentistry Chairperson. The two-part survey consisting of multiple-choice questions regarding specific materials and techniques on pulp therapies, moreover, hypothetical clinical scenarios were presented so that the respondents could guide the treatment approach. The questionnaires were returned by 46.5% of the dental schools. Ninety-five percent of surveyed schools teach IPT for the treatment of deep carious lesions in dentin and indicate the calcium hydroxide as capping material (59.3%). The direct pulp capping is taught by 68.7% of schools and calcium hydroxide (97%) was the capping material most indicated. Pulpotomy is taught in 98.7% of schools and formocresol (1:5 dilution) was the medicament of choice (50%). All schools taught pulpectomy and Iodoform paste was the filling material preferred (55%). The results showed a lack of consensus in certain modalities and techniques for primary tooth pulp therapy taught by Brazilian dental schools.

  7. Decline in Complete Dentures Patients\\' Turn-Out in Dental Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study is designed to determine the trend in the demand for complete dentures by edentulous patients attending Ibadan dental school's prosthodontic out- patient clinic, compare the possible reasons responsible for the observed trend with those described for the American schools and to offer useful suggestions ...

  8. [Dynamics of tooth decay prevalence in children receiving long-term preventive program in school dental facilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avraamova, O G; Kulazhenko, T V; Gabitova, K F

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the assessment of tooth decay prevalence in clinically homogenous groups of children receiving long-term preventive program (PP) in school dental facilities. Five-years PP were introduced in clinical practice in 2 Moscow schools. Preventive treatment was performed by dental hygienist. The results show that systematic preventive treatment in school dental offices starting from elementary school allows reducing dental caries incidence 46-53% and stabilize the incidence of caries complications. It should be mentioned though that analysis of individualized outcomes proves heterogeneity of study results despite of equal conditions of PP. Potentially significant hence is early diagnostics and treatment of initial caries forms as demineralization foci, especially in children with intensive tooth decay. Optimization of pediatric dentist and dental hygienist activity in school dental facilities is the main factor of caries prevention efficiency.

  9. Quality assurance and benchmarking: an approach for European dental schools.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, M.L.; Hobson, R.S.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Gundersen, S.; Dummer, P.; Roger-Leroi, V.; Sidlauskas, A.; Hamlin, J.

    2007-01-01

    This document was written by Task Force 3 of DentEd III, which is a European Union funded Thematic Network working under the auspices of the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE). It provides a guide to assist in the harmonisation of Dental Education Quality Assurance (QA) systems across

  10. Quality assurance and benchmarking : An approach for European dental schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, M. L.; Hobson, R. S.; Plasschaert, A. J. M.; Gundersen, S.; Dummer, P.; Roger-Leroi, V.; Sidlauskas, A.; Hamlin, J.

    This document was written by Task Force 3 of DentEd III, which is a European Union funded Thematic Network working under the auspices of the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE). It provides a guide to assist in the harmonisation of Dental Education Quality Assurance (QA) systems across

  11. Utilization of dental services among secondary school students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were collected on their demographic characteristics, visit(s) to the dentist in the previous 12 months, reasons for these dental visits, factors preventing subsequent dental visit and barriers to visiting the dentist for those who made no previous visit. The data collected were analyzed with an SPSS version 11.5 using Chi ...

  12. Dental education about patients with special needs: a survey of U.S. and Canadian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Meggan; Vainio, Lauren; Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Inglehart, Marita R

    2010-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore how U.S. and Canadian dental schools educate students about special needs patients and which challenges and intentions for curricular changes they perceive. Data were collected from twenty-two dental schools in the United States and Canada with a web-based survey. While 91 percent of the programs covered this topic in their clinical education, only 64 percent offered a separate course about special needs patients. The clinical education varied widely. Thirty-seven percent of the responding schools had a special clinical area in their school for treating these patients. These areas had between three and twenty-two chairs and were funded and staffed quite differently. Most programs covered the treatment of patients with more prevalent impairments such as Down syndrome (91 percent), autism spectrum disorders (91 percent), and motion impairments (86 percent). Written exams were the most common outcome assessments (91 percent), while objective structured clinical examinations (18 percent) and standardized patient experiences (9 percent) were used less frequently. The most commonly reported challenge was curriculum overload (55 percent). The majority (77 percent) planned educational changes over the next three years, with 36 percent of schools planning to increase clinical and 27 percent extramural experiences. The findings showed that the responding U.S. and Canadian dental schools had a wide range of approaches to educating predoctoral students about treating special needs patients. In order to eliminate oral health disparities and access to care issues for these patients, future research should focus on developing best practices for educational efforts in this context.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine in predoctoral dental curricula: an exploratory survey of U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Michael L; Kummet, Colleen M; Holmes, David C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) education in U.S. dental schools. A survey was administered via e-mail to each U.S. dental school's academic dean, and data were collected from respondents in a fillable PDF form submitted electronically to the study investigators. The survey asked respondents whether CAM was taught at the institution; if the response was yes, information was requested regarding the CAM therapies included, credentials of the instructor, number of hours taught, reason for teaching CAM, and format in which CAM was taught. Of the sixty dental schools contacted, twenty-two responded to the survey (37 percent response rate). Of these respondents, ten (45.5 percent) reported offering instruction in CAM as part of their predoctoral curricula. Herb/drug interactions were found to be taught with more frequency than any other CAM topic (in six out of the ten institutions). Limitations of the study are discussed, and suggestions for future studies are made.

  14. Registered Dental Hygienists as Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Janet; Shugars, Daniel A.

    1985-01-01

    Surveys conducted to (1) investigate why dental hygienists choose to become dentists, (2) evaluate their success in dental school, (3) assess the experience of those who had entered dental school, and (4) gauge the level of interest among dental hygienists in applying to dental school are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  15. Association between BMI and Dental Caries among School Children and Adolescents in Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Hussein Musa, Taha; Gao, Rong; Li, Xiao Shan; Wang, Wei Xiang; Hong, Lei; Wei, Ping Min

    2017-10-01

    Obesity and dental caries are increasing epidemics, especially among children and adolescents. This epidemiological observational cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the possible association between body mass index (BMI) and dental caries among 111,792 school children and adolescents in Jiangsu Province. We found that 13.14% participants of the study sample were overweight, and 7.37% were obese. The prevalence of dental caries was 12.95% in overweight and 7.89% in obese students. There were significant differences in caries prevalence by sex, region, age group, and BMI. Overweight and obesity statuses were associated with dental caries among the study population. BMI and dental caries present a continuous health problem. Thus, we recommend that oral health promotion be used for caries prevention and control. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  16. Education and training in dental schools in Spain, Sevilla University experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Carrera, F.; Gomez, A.; Luis, J.; Rodriguez, M.; Herrador, M.

    2003-07-01

    The ICRP, in its publication 73 entitled Radiological Protection and Safety in Medicine states (paragraph 128) that one important need is to provide adequate resources for the education and training in radiological protection for future professional and technical staff in medical practice. The training programme should include initial training for all incoming staff and regular updating retraining. The European Directive 97/743/EURATOM on Medical Exposure (MED) lays down requirements for education and training. The document RP 116 published by the European commission give guidelines on Education and Training in Radiation Protection and in its paragraph 51 establish that Members States shall encourage the introduction of a course on radiation protection in the basic curriculum of medical and dental schools according to the EC Medical Exposure Directive (MED). In the Spanish legislation RD 815/2001 referred to the medical exposures, it is encourage the need for the introduction of Radiological Protection courses in Medicine and Dental schools with the objective of patient protection. In this study it has been analysed the actual situation of the education and training in Radiation Protection in Dental Schools in Spain. In addition it is described the experience of the University of Sevilla. The results of the study shows that only 4 from 9 dental schools have disciplines of Radiation Protection in its curriculum. In one of them the course is mandatory and has a content of 2 credits (20 hours). In the rest of dental schools the discipline has an optional character with an average of 4 credits. The discipline of Radiation Protection of the curriculum of Dental School at Sevilla university has 4 credits and it is configured as a course with the necessary requirements from the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council to obtain the Radiological Accreditation of Responsible of Dental Radiodiagnostic Installations. This diploma is given once the students have finished the Bachelor

  17. Incidence and Determinants of Dental Implant Failure: A Review of Electronic Health Records in a U.S. Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickin, Matthew Parker; Shariff, Jaffer A; Jennette, Philip J; Finkelstein, Joseph; Papapanou, Panos N

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to use electronic health care records (EHRs) to examine retrospectively the incidence of and attributes associated with dental implant failures necessitating implant removal in a large cohort of patients treated in the student clinics of a U.S. dental school over three and a half years. EHRs were searched for all patients who received dental implants between July 1, 2011, and December 31, 2014. Characteristics of patients and implants that were actively removed due to irrevocable failure of any etiology ("failure cohort") during this period were compared to those of all other patients who received dental implants during the same time frame ("reference cohort"). Differences in the frequency distribution of various characteristics between the failure and reference cohorts were compared. Of a total 6,129 implants placed in 2,127 patients during the study period, 179 implants (2.9%) in 120 patients (5.6%) were removed. In the multivariate analysis, presence of a removable (OR=2.86) or fixed temporary prosthesis (OR=3.71) was statistically significantly associated with increased risk for implant failure. In contrast, antibiotic coverage (pre- and post-surgery OR=0.16; post-surgery only OR=0.38) and implants of certain manufacturers were associated with lower risk of implant failure. In this sizeable cohort of patients receiving care in dental student clinics, the review of EHRs facilitated identification of multiple variables associated with implant failure resulting in removal; however, these findings do not suggest causative relationships. The adopted analytical approach can enhance quality assurance measures and may contribute to the identification of true risk factors for dental implant failure.

  18. State-of-the-art techniques in operative dentistry: contemporary teaching of posterior composites in UK and Irish dental schools.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, C D

    2010-08-14

    Advances of composite systems and their application have revolutionised the management of posterior teeth affected by caries, facilitating a minimally invasive approach. Previous surveys have indicated that the teaching of posterior composites within dental schools was developing, albeit not keeping pace with clinical evidence and the development of increasingly predictable techniques and materials. Concurrently, surveys of dental practice indicate that dental amalgam still predominates as the \\'material of choice\\' for the restoration of posterior teeth within UK general dental practice. In light of such considerations, the aim of this study was to investigate current teaching of posterior composites in Irish and UK dental schools.

  19. Postdoctoral Teaching of Geriatric Dentistry in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Goettsche, Zachary S; Qian, Fang

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the number and size of postdoctoral teaching programs in geriatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools and other health professions educational institutions and those programs with Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funding. In 2015, all 67 U.S. dental schools were contacted via email with a questionnaire to ask if they had a postdoctoral program in geriatric dentistry; if they did, they were asked to report the length and size of the program. Directors of all 16 HRSA-funded geriatric fellowships were also invited to participate in the survey. Fifty-six of the 67 (83.6%) dental schools and 15 of the 16 (93.8%) HRSA-funded programs completed the questionnaire. Postdoctoral geriatric dentistry programs were reported in 12 dental schools and six medical institutions, although only six programs were currently accepting fellows. The length of the programs was 12-36 months. The maximum number of residents in any program was ten. The oldest program was in Minnesota; it began in 1981. The newest program was beginning in 2017 at Boston University as a revised version of its previous HRSA-funded program. The loss of HRSA funding has had a major negative impact on the number of training programs. Future research is needed to determine how the loss of HRSA-funded programs has affected the availability of educators in geriatric dentistry for dental schools and the services provided to the geriatric community.

  20. The association of patients' oral health literacy and dental school communication tools: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Amy; Yue, Olivia; Atchison, Kathryn A; Richards, Jessica K; Holtzman, Jennifer S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to assess adult patients' ability to read and understand two communication tools at the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Dentistry: the dental school clinic website and a patient education brochure pertaining to sedation in children that was written by dental school personnel. A convenience sample of 100 adults seeking treatment at the school's general dental clinic during 2012-13 completed a health literacy screening instrument. They were then asked to read clinic educational and informational materials and complete a survey. Analyses were conducted to determine the association between the subjects' oral health literacy and sociodemographics and their ability to locate and interpret information in written oral health information materials. SMOG and Flesch-Kincade formulas were used to assess the readability level of the electronic and written communication tools. The results demonstrated an association between these adults' oral health literacy and their dental knowledge and ability to navigate health information website resources and understand health education materials. Health literacy was not associated with age or gender, but was associated with education and race/ethnicity. The SMOG Readability Index determined that the website and the sedation form were written at a ninth grade reading level. These results suggest that dental schools and other health care organizations should incorporate a health-literate approach for their digital and written materials to enhance patients' ability to navigate and understand health information, regardless of their health literacy.

  1. Teaching end-of-life issues: survey of U.S. dental schools and dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmons, Karen L; Dickinson, George E; Burkett, Tracy L

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research endeavor was to survey the teaching of end-of-life issues in the curriculum of U.S. dental schools (N=58) and to ascertain changes in education compared to a 1989 study of dental schools. In addition, the aim was to survey practicing dentists in South Carolina (N=400) regarding end-of-life issues. Response rates were 90 percent and 81 percent, respectively. Findings indicated that dental schools today are placing more emphasis on end-of-life issues than twenty years ago. Yet the majority of dentists agreed that more emphasis should be placed on communication skills with patients on end-of-life issues. Moreover, the overwhelming majority of dentists felt that dental school did not prepare them to relate to patients on end-of-life issues. Dentists in general give support to families of deceased patients by sending a card or flowers, attending the funeral, or in some way making personal contact with the family. Perhaps as little as one or two lectures in dental school on dying, death, and bereavement could enhance a dentist's effectiveness in coping with end-of-life issues.

  2. Survey of dental treatments for pediatric patients referred to the pediatric dental clinic of a dental school hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, H; Ishiuchi, C; Yakushiji, M

    2000-08-01

    This survey was conducted to clarify which dental treatments in children are regarded as difficult by general dentistry practitioners. The subjects were 615 children who first visited Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital from January 1995 to August 1999 with reference letters. There were 615 children in the study; 571 (92.8%) came from Chiba City where our hospital is located and the 11 regions surrounding Chiba City. The prime reasons for referral in the order of frequency were treatments of dental caries, malalignment/malocclusion, traumatized teeth, supernumerary teeth, retarded eruption/impacted teeth, abnormal direction of erupted teeth, congenitally missing teeth, prolonged retention of deciduous teeth, and abnormal frenulum. Patients with dental caries or traumatized teeth in the deciduous dentition period and those with malalignment/malocclusion, supernumerary teeth, or retarded eruption/impacted teeth in the mixed dentition period were often referred to medical organizations specializing in pediatric dentistry because of the difficulties in controlling the patients' behavior and in providing adequate treatment. The information about pediatric dental treatments considered difficult by general dentists revealed by this survey appears to be useful and needs to be incorporated in the programs for clinical training of undergraduate students and education of postgraduate students.

  3. Association Between Dental Caries and Body Mass Index Among Hamedan Elementary School Children in 2009

    OpenAIRE

    Mojarad, F.; Maybodi, M. Haeri

    2011-01-01

    Objective Excessive weight in children is a major public health concern. The intake of refined carbohydrates, especially sugars and the prevalence of dental caries are well documented in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between dental caries and BMI in elementary school children. Materials and Methods The sampling technique used in the present study was a cluster random sampling. A total of 1000 pupils (500 girls, 500 boys) aged 6–11 years from 20 ...

  4. Factors Influencing California Dental Hygienists' Involvement in School-Based Oral Health Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Katherine V; Essex, Gwen; Rowe, Dorothy J

    2016-08-01

    To assess the influence of community oral health experiences during entry-level dental hygiene education on participation in community oral health events after graduation and the facilitators and barriers experienced by dental hygienists in participating in these programs. A 27-item survey, consisting of items related to community oral health experiences during and after entry-level education, was distributed by the California Dental Hygienists' Association to all dental hygienists whose email addresses were in their database. Frequencies of participants' responses to each survey item were calculated. Chi-square analysis was performed to identify significant relationships among variables. Response rate was 8%, with 513 out of the 6,248 contacted having responded. Additionally, 95% of the respondents had participated, as entry-level students, in community oral health experiences such as school-based oral health educational programs. Respondents agreed that participation in these programs was valuable to their professional development and encouraged them to participate after graduation; both these variables were related (pconflict with work (61%), family time commitment (52%), and no knowledge of existing programs (24%). Dental hygienists' involvement in school-based oral health programs is enhanced by their community experiences as a dental hygiene student. Barriers and facilitators need to be addressed to increase the number of programs and participants so that more children can benefit. Copyright © 2016 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  5. Personality as a predictor of professional behavior in dental school: comparisons with dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, T C; Catano, V M; Cunningham, D P

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of personality measures to predict the success of dental students (N = 87) in clinical and academic courses and to compare their personality profiles to those of dental practitioners (N = 130). A second purpose of the study was to develop a new criterion measure, the Student Professionalism Scale, based on competencies previously identified as necessary for professional success. The Canadian Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) predicted first-year, preclinical academic success; the DAT Reading Comprehension component predicted third-year clinical performance; and Perceptual Ability, the ability to deal with two- and three-dimensional objects, predicted student professionalism. Results from the personality measure indicated that Conscientiousness and Neuroticism, and to a lesser extent Agreeableness, were significant predictors of both first-year academic performance and professional behavior. In comparing the personality profiles of dental students to dental practitioners, students who were more similar to the dentists did better in their first year of coursework. Implications of the findings are discussed in the context of the dental admissions process.

  6. Management of impacted wisdom teeth: teaching of undergraduate students in UK dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, K; McCarthy, A; Robbins, J; Heffernan, E; Coombes, L

    2014-08-01

    Wisdom tooth removal is one of the most common oral surgical procedures performed across the world. The aim of this study was to gauge the teaching and training of impacted wisdom teeth in undergraduate dental programmes across the UK. The objectives were to identify consistencies and variations in theoretical instructions and clinical training as well as approaches to management of impacted wisdom teeth. This was a cross-sectional survey utilising an online questionnaire. A purposefully designed pro forma with open- as well as closed-ended questions was used. The questionnaire was hosted online on the school's blackboard academic suite (Emily). Prior to conducting the study, approval was gained from the Research and Ethics Committee, and all the ethical principles pertaining to data protection were strictly followed. E-mail invitations were sent to oral surgery leads in all dental schools in the UK. The participants were provided with an information sheet, and an informed consent was obtained. The participants were invited by e-mail to complete the questionnaire online voluntarily. A total of 16 dental schools offering an undergraduate course in dentistry in the UK, 13 responded positively. (response rate = 81.25%). In majority of dental schools, this subject is taught in the 4th and 5th years. A pre-clinical competency on phantom heads is a requirement in six schools, whilst only one school requires the students to pass a clinical competency. The clinical exposure of students to wisdom tooth surgery is quite variable. Although the dental schools are fairly consistent in their teaching with regard to the indications for surgical intervention, diagnostic/treatment modalities as well as the post-operative care, interesting variations were also observed. This study, perhaps the first of its kind, provides useful insights into management of impacted wisdom teeth, as taught in the undergraduate dental programmes across the UK. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published

  7. Clinical experiences of undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry at Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stewart, Christopher J

    2010-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the number and range of clinical procedures completed by undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry in Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Ireland, and to compare the number of procedures undertaken with the subsequent examination scores. The work comprised a retrospective audit of clinical logbooks for all of the undergraduate dental students in one cohort through their fourth and fifth clinical years between 2004 and 2006. Thirty-four quantitative logbooks were audited. Students had seen a total of 1,031 patients, and each student had completed a full course of dental treatment for an average of twenty-two children. Students completed means of 30.2 restorative procedures for children, fourteen in deciduous dentition (range six to twenty-eight), and seventeen in permanent dentition (range seven to twenty-eight). Continuity of education and care (measured through children having their treatment fully completed by the same student) was 72 percent. A moderate positive correlation between levels of clinical experience and exam score was identified. All students gained experience in management of child patients with students providing care for an average of thirty children and a minimum of nineteen.

  8. Motivation and Career Perceptions of Dental Students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb, Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobale, Mihaela; Klaić, Marija; Bavrka, Gabriela; Vodanović, Marin

    2016-09-01

    Health care studies are usually considered to be complex, demanding and time consuming. The right motivation toward choosing a career in the health field is of utmost importance for the successful completion of studies. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the factors motivating students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb, Croatia and, also, to examine their career perceptions. Based on specific questions from available literature, a questionnaire was designed and a total of 270 questionnaires were distributed to the first year students during 2013, 2014 and 2015. A total of 206 students responded, for a response rate of 76.3%. 26.9% of students enrolled in dental studies because it was their first career choice; 16.4% of them believed that it is easy to find a regular job in dentistry. 9.9% of students thought that salaries are high in the field of dental medicine. 45.4% of the first year students were interested in a career in private practice after graduation. These results provide interesting clues to motivation and give additional insights into the expectations of students regarding their studies and profession. The obtained data can be used for the further improvements in the quality of dental study curricula and teaching process.

  9. Motivation and Career Perceptions of Dental Students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobale, Mihaela; Klaić, Marija; Bavrka, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Health care studies are usually considered to be complex, demanding and time consuming. The right motivation toward choosing a career in the health field is of utmost importance for the successful completion of studies. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the factors motivating students at the School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb, Croatia and, also, to examine their career perceptions. Material and Methods Based on specific questions from available literature, a questionnaire was designed and a total of 270 questionnaires were distributed to the first year students during 2013, 2014 and 2015. Results A total of 206 students responded, for a response rate of 76.3%. 26.9% of students enrolled in dental studies because it was their first career choice; 16.4% of them believed that it is easy to find a regular job in dentistry. 9.9% of students thought that salaries are high in the field of dental medicine. 45.4% of the first year students were interested in a career in private practice after graduation. These results provide interesting clues to motivation and give additional insights into the expectations of students regarding their studies and profession. Conclussion The obtained data can be used for the further improvements in the quality of dental study curricula and teaching process. PMID:27847393

  10. Oral Health-Promoting School Environments and Dental Caries in Québec Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edasseri, Anu; Barnett, Tracie A; Kâ, Khady; Henderson, Mélanie; Nicolau, Belinda

    2017-11-01

    Dental caries are highly prevalent among children and have negative health consequences. Their occurrence may depend in part on school-based environmental or policy-related factors, but few researchers have explored this subject. This study aimed to identify oral health promoting school environment types and estimate their relation with 2-year dental caries incidence among Québec children aged 8-10 years. This study used data from two visits (completed in 2008 and 2011) of the QUALITY (Québec Adipose Lifestyle Investigation in Youth) cohort, which recruited white children at risk of obesity and their families from Greater Montreal schools. Measures included school and neighborhood characteristics, and Decayed, Missing, Filled-Surfaces index scores. Principal component and cluster analyses, and generalized estimating equations were conducted. Data were available for 330 children attending 200 schools. Based on a series of statistical analyses conducted in 2016, the authors identified three distinct school environment types. Type 1 and 2 schools had strong healthy eating programs, whereas Type 3 had weak programs. Type 1 schools had favorable neighborhood food environments, whereas Type 2 and 3 had unfavorable ones. Adjusting for potential confounders, children attending Type 1 and 2 schools had 21% (incidence rate ratio=0.79, 95% CI=0.68, 0.90) and 6% (incidence rate ratio=0.94, 95% CI=0.83, 1.07) lower 2-year incidence of dental caries, respectively, compared with Type 3 schools. School-based oral health promotion programs combined with a favorable neighborhood can lower dental caries incidence in school children. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exponential growth of dental schools in Chile: effects on academic, economic and workforce issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Andres Cartes-Velasquez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last 30 years, Chile has undergone noteworthy economic development and an exponential growth in the access of its population to higher education. The aim of this paper was to review the changes in academic, economic and workforce issues that occurred as a consequence of the growth in supply of undergraduate dental vacancies between 1997 and 2011. Data collected from the Consejo de Educación Superior - CES, Comisión Nacional de Acreditación - CNA, and Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas de Chile - INE included these variables: number of dental schools, school type (private or traditional, see explanation below, city where the school is located, entry vacancies, total student enrollment, admission scores, percentile rank of dentistry as a university career, tuition fees, accreditation status, and number of inhabitants. There was an exponential increase in dental schools in Chile (5 to 34 that occurred in association with the rise in tuition fees (US$ 3900 to US$ 9800, a deterioration in the academic level of dental students (650 to 550 points in admission scores and a predicted 77.5% oversupply of dentists by 2025, according to WHO criteria. The exponential increase in dental schools in Chile brought about negative consequences, such as increasing career costs, deterioration in the academic level of dental students, and an oversupply of dentists, associated with lower incomes and possibly leading to unemployment. Additional research should be conducted to determine whether an increase in the number of dentists can improve the population's access to dental care and reduce the oral disease burden.

  12. Exponential growth of dental schools in Chile: effects on academic, economic and workforce issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo Andrés

    2013-01-01

    In the last 30 years, Chile has undergone noteworthy economic development and an exponential growth in the access of its population to higher education. The aim of this paper was to review the changes in academic, economic and workforce issues that occurred as a consequence of the growth in supply of undergraduate dental vacancies between 1997 and 2011. Data collected from the Consejo de Educación Superior - CES, Comisión Nacional de Acreditación - CNA, and Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas de Chile - INE included these variables: number of dental schools, school type (private or traditional, see explanation below), city where the school is located, entry vacancies, total student enrollment, admission scores, percentile rank of dentistry as a university career, tuition fees, accreditation status, and number of inhabitants. There was an exponential increase in dental schools in Chile (5 to 34) that occurred in association with the rise in tuition fees (US$ 3900 to US$ 9800), a deterioration in the academic level of dental students (650 to 550 points in admission scores) and a predicted 77.5% oversupply of dentists by 2025, according to WHO criteria. The exponential increase in dental schools in Chile brought about negative consequences, such as increasing career costs, deterioration in the academic level of dental students, and an oversupply of dentists, associated with lower incomes and possibly leading to unemployment. Additional research should be conducted to determine whether an increase in the number of dentists can improve the population's access to dental care and reduce the oral disease burden.

  13. Self-reported dental pain and dental caries among 8-12-year-old school children: An exploratory survey in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Abiola A; Odusanya, Olumuyiwa O

    2017-01-01

    Dental pain is considered an important public health problem because it affects the daily life of children. This study was designed to assess the prevalence, associated factors, and impact of dental pain among 8-12-year-old school children in Lagos, Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey to determine self-reported dental pain among 8-12-year-old school children using an interviewer-administered questionnaire was conducted. This was followed by a clinical examination to determine the child's oral hygiene status and dental caries status. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for comparing proportions. Binary logistic regression analysis was also conducted. Statistical significance was set at P dental pain 3 months and 4 weeks before the survey, respectively. Caries prevalence was 21.0%, whereas mean decayed, missing, and filled tooth index score was 0.4420 (±1.078). A report of pain up to 3 months before the survey was significantly associated with the child's age [odds ratio (OR) = 1.254; confidence interval (CI) = 1.037-1.516; P = 0.019], whereas the type of school attended (OR = 1.786; CI = 1.124-2.840; P = 0.014) and the presence of dental caries (OR = 1.738; CI = 1.023-2.953; P = 0.041) were significantly associated with reporting pain 4 weeks before the survey. The prevalence of self-reported dental pain was high among the children surveyed. Report of dental pain was associated with the presence of dental caries. The provision of school oral health services could be useful in reducing the level of untreated caries and possibly dental pain among school children.

  14. Predoctoral Teaching of Geriatric Dentistry in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ronald L; Goettsche, Zachary S; Qian, Fang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the current teaching of geriatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools and compare the findings to previous reports. Academic deans at all 67 U.S. dental schools were contacted in November 2015 via email, asking them to complete a questionnaire about the teaching of geriatric dentistry or gerodontology at their institution. Questionnaires were received from 56 of the 67 schools (84% response rate). The results showed that geriatric dentistry was taught in all responding schools; for 92.8% of the respondents, the instruction was compulsory. Among the responding schools, 62.5% were teaching it as an independent course, 25% as an organized series of lectures, and 8.9% as occasional lectures in parts of other courses. In addition, 57.1% had some form of compulsory clinical education in geriatric dentistry. Public schools, as opposed to private schools, were marginally associated with an increased interest in expanding geriatric dentistry teaching (p=0.078). No differences were found between any teaching variables and school location. This study found that the form of education in geriatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools differed in many ways, but the teaching of geriatric dentistry had increased among all respondents and had been increasing for over 30 years. Future research is needed to determine the impact of this teaching on services to the geriatric community.

  15. Peer review of teaching in UK dental schools. Is it happening? How successful is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, I M; Lynch, C D

    2016-06-24

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the utilisation of peer review of teaching (PRT) within UK dental schools.Method A structured questionnaire was emailed to all sixteen UK dental schools seeking information on existing PRT schemes, level of staff engagement, and the success of schemes in relation to extent of operation and perceived benefit.Results A 100% response rate was achieved. Fourteen schools (88%) operate PRT schemes. For most, the expected frequency of staff engagement is annually, although there was a wide range between schools (minimum = once every five years, maximum = three times per year). Nine schools (64%) consider their schemes to be fully operational. Twelve schools (86%) feel their staff are either mostly or fully engaged. Reasons for sub-optimal operation and/or engagement include: newly introduced schemes, problems with compliance for off-campus staff, and loss of momentum. Thirteen schools (93%) consider that PRT benefits their teaching staff. Ten schools (71%) stated that changes are required to their schemes.Conclusion PRT is operating within the majority of U.K dental schools but the format and success of schemes varies. Schemes will benefit from ongoing development but changes should take into account evidence from the literature, particularly recognised models of PRT.

  16. Temporomandibular disorders: what to teach in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, J F; Mosby, E L

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders continue to be a nemesis for health professionals and for patients who are afflicted. The medical/dental student must be taught to recognize this often complex disorder and be able to interact with the various disciplines within the medical/dental profession to provide the care needed. This article discusses problems and a possible approach for establishing continuity of format for classifying TM disorders so students can be taught to recognize them.

  17. Dental luxation and avulsion injuries in Hong Kong primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S Y

    2015-08-01

    To identify the major causes and types of dental luxation and avulsion injuries, and their associated factors in primary school children in Hong Kong. Case series. School dental clinic, New Territories, Hong Kong. The dental records of children with a history of dental luxation and/or avulsion injury between November 2005 and October 2012 were reviewed. Objective clinical and radiographical findings at the time of injury and at follow-up examinations were recorded using a standardised form. Data analysis was carried out using the Chi squared test and multinomial logistic regression. A total of 220 children with 355 teeth of dental luxation or avulsion injury were recorded. Their age ranged from 6 to 14 years and the female-to-male ratio was 1:1.8. The peak occurrence was at the age of 9 years. Subluxation was the most common type of injury, followed by concussion. Maxillary central incisors were the most commonly affected teeth. The predominant cause was fall and most injuries occurred at school. Incisor relationship was registered in 199 cases: most of them were Class I. Comparison of the incisor relationship in study children and the general Chinese population in another study revealed a higher proportion of Class II and fewer Class III occlusions in the trauma group (Pdental luxation and avulsion injuries in Hong Kong primary school children are caused by fall. Boys are more commonly affected than girls, and a Class II incisor relationship is a significant risk factor.

  18. Individual and maternal determinants of self-reported dental health among Turkish school children aged 10-12 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cinar, A B; Kosku, N; Sandalli, N

    2008-01-01

    To assess the influence of maternal and individual characteristics on self-reported dental health of Turkish school children aged 10-12 years with different socio-economic backgrounds.......To assess the influence of maternal and individual characteristics on self-reported dental health of Turkish school children aged 10-12 years with different socio-economic backgrounds....

  19. Access to Interpreter Services at U.S. Dental School Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lisa; Hum, Lauren; Nalliah, Romesh

    2016-01-01

    The number of Americans with limited English proficiency (LEP) is growing, and legal protections mandate that LEP individuals have equal access to health care services. The aim of this study was to determine the availability of interpretation services in U.S. dental school clinics and the kinds of instruction dental students are given regarding treatment of LEP patients. A survey was distributed to the academic deans of all U.S. dental schools; 35 completed the survey for a response rate of 58%. Respondents were asked to report on the number of LEP patients treated in their student clinics, the resources available to students working with LEP patients, and the extent of instruction offered. Descriptive statistics were calculated. The results indicated that the proportion of LEP patients treated at U.S. dental schools was perceived to be higher than that of the general population. The availability of interpreter services and the extent of student education about LEP individuals varied widely. Among the responding schools, the most common language spoken by LEP patients was Spanish, followed by Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese) and Russian. Most of the responding dental schools reported offering fewer than two hours of instruction to their predoctoral students on treating LEP patients. Although almost 90% of the respondents indicated believing LEP patients received care equal in quality to that of non-LEP patients in their clinics, only 61.9% indicated that their students were adequately prepared to manage LEP patients following graduation. These findings suggest that dental schools should consider curricular innovations that will prepare students to work with LEP populations and improve the ability of LEP patients to receive care in the teaching clinic setting.

  20. In the students' own words: what are the strengths and weaknesses of the dental school curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzi, David; Davis, Elaine; Jasinevicius, Roma; Hendricson, William

    2007-05-01

    Dental students have little input into the selection of course topics and subject matter included in their dental curricula. Curriculum requirements are framed by the Commission on Dental Accreditation, which has stipulated competencies and associated biomedical and clinical knowledge that must be addressed during dental school. Although these competency requirements restrict the variance of educational experiences, students are eager to share their views on the curriculum within the realm of their educational experience. The objective of this research project was to elicit the perspectives of dental students from a broad cross-section of U.S. and Canadian dental schools about their education. A total of 605 students (285 sophomores, 220 seniors, 100 residents) from twenty North American dental schools completed a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis to communicate their perceptions of the curriculum. Students were also asked to provide their impressions of the overall quality of the educational program in an open-ended written format. The students' qualitative comments were then reviewed and categorized into key issues or themes. Resulting themes for each category of the Curriculum SWOT (C-SWOT) analysis were the following. Strengths: 1) clinical learning experience, and 2) opportunity to work with knowledgeable faculty. Weaknesses: 1) disorganized and inefficient clinical learning environment, 2) teaching and testing that focus on memorization, 3) poor quality instruction characterized by curricular disorganization, and 4) inconsistency among instructors during student evaluations. Opportunities: 1) develop strategies to provide students with more exposure to patients, especially early in the curriculum, and 2) opportunities to learn new technology/techniques. Threats: 1) cost of dental education, 2) students' concerns about faculty "brain drain," i.e., lack of sufficient numbers of dental faculty capable of providing high

  1. 20 Years Beyond the Crossroads: The Path to Interprofessional Education at U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatta, Anthony; Cook, Bryan J; Anderson, Eugene L; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-08-01

    In 2003, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) called for interprofessional education (IPE) to be adopted by the health professions education community as the pedagogical approach to educating future practitioners for practice in multidisciplinary teams. In dentistry, this call built on points made in the key 1995 IOM report Dental Education at the Crossroads. Currently, IPE and collaborative practice are among the most significant changes to health care education and delivery in the 21st century. This report describes the path that dental education has taken regarding IPE since the first national report on the subject was released in 1995. It also reports the results of a 2014 survey of U.S. dental schools to ascertain their progress in adopting and implementing IPE, as well as perceived obstacles that persist. Of the 63 dental schools, 62 participated, for a response rate of 98%. While over 90% of the respondents reported that their schools offer IPE experiences, only 58.1% had formal university-led and -promoted IPE programs. Formal IPE experiences were more prevalent at public institutions (67.6%, compared with 44% of private institutions). In 2012, a previous study reported that 66% of the IPE experiences offered to dental students were voluntary; today, 69.1% of these activities are required. Interprofessional core competencies occupy four of the top five content areas of IPE programming, providing a framework for schools to implement IPE activities. However, finding the bandwidth within the dental curriculum to accommodate IPE competencies, identifying adequate time in the schedule, providing faculty training, and assessing IPE activities were the most frequently reported challenges. The results of this survey lead to recommendations for academic dental institutions moving through this transitional phase in adopting IPE.

  2. Development of a Core Curriculum Framework in Cariology for U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Margherita; Guzmán-Armstrong, Sandra; Schenkel, Andrew B; Allen, Kennneth L; Featherstone, John; Goolsby, Susie; Kanjirath, Preetha; Kolker, Justine; Martignon, Stefania; Pitts, Nigel; Schulte, Andreas; Slayton, Rebecca L; Young, Douglas; Wolff, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of health and preservation of tooth structure through risk-based prevention and patient-centered, evidence-based disease management, reassessed at regular intervals over time, are the cornerstones of present-day caries management. Yet management of caries based on risk assessment that goes beyond restorative care has not had a strong place in curriculum development and competency assessment in U.S. dental schools. The aim of this study was to develop a competency-based core cariology curriculum framework for use in U.S. dental schools. The Section on Cariology of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) organized a one-day consensus workshop, followed by a meeting program, to adapt the European Core Cariology Curriculum to the needs of U.S. dental education. Participants in the workshop were 73 faculty members from 35 U.S., three Canadian, and four international dental schools. Representatives from all 65 U.S. dental schools were then invited to review and provide feedback on a draft document. A recommended competency statement on caries management was also developed: "Upon graduation, a dentist must be competent in evidence-based detection, diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and nonsurgical and surgical management of dental caries, both at the individual and community levels, and be able to reassess the outcomes of interventions over time." This competency statement supports a curriculum framework built around five domains: 1) knowledge base; 2) risk assessment, diagnosis, and synthesis; 3) treatment decision making: preventive strategies and nonsurgical management; 4) treatment decision making: surgical therapy; and 5) evidence-based cariology in clinical and public health practice. Each domain includes objectives and learning outcomes.

  3. Dental erosion in 12-year-old school children living in Jakarta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septalita, A.; Bahar, A.; Agustanti, A.; Rahardjo, A.; Maharani, D. A.; Rosalien, R.

    2017-08-01

    This study assesses the dental erosion status of 12-year-old Indonesian children and studies the determinants of dental erosion of these children. The survey was performed in 2016 with ethics approval. A multistage cluster proportional to size random sampling method was adopted to select 12-year-old children in 24 primary schools in Jakarta. The parents were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire concerning their children’s diet and oral health habits. The children were examined by a single calibrated examiner. Detection of dental erosion followed basic erosive wear examination (BEWE) criteria. A total of 487 children participated in the survey. Most children (88%) had at least some signs of erosion (BEWE > 0), with dentin being involved in 50% of the cases (BEWE = 2). Dental erosion was significantly related to gender, the frequencies of citric tea consumption, parent’s dental knowledge, father’s education, and dental caries (OR = 3.148). The 12-year-old Indonesian school children who lived in Jakarta had signs of erosion, although severe erosion was not found. Screening programs should be provided to identify risk groups so early preventive measures can be taken.

  4. Training to Care for Limited English Proficient Patients and Provision of Interpreter Services at U.S. Dental School Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lisa; Hum, Lauren; Nalliah, Romesh

    2017-02-01

    Legal protections in the United States mandate that individuals with limited English proficiency (LEP) have equal access to health care. However, LEP populations are at higher risk of poor health. Dental school clinics offer lower cost care by supervised dental students and often provide care for LEP patients. The aims of this study were to survey dental students about their clinical experience with LEP patients, the interpreter resources available at their dental school clinics, and the extent of instruction on these topics. Academic deans at 19 dental schools (30.6% of 62 invited schools) distributed the survey to their students, and the survey was completed by 325 students (4.2% of students at the 19 participating schools). Among the responding students, 44% reported their dental school clinic lacked formal interpreter services, and most of the respondents reported receiving minimal instruction on caring for LEP patients. Only 54% of the responding students reported feeling adequately prepared to manage LEP patients following graduation. These results suggest there is limited access to interpreter services for students while in dental school. A large proportion of these dental students thus reported feeling unprepared to treat LEP patients after graduation.

  5. Skin entrance dose for digital and film radiography in Korean dental schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Sang; Choi, Kun Ho; Kim, Min Gyu; Lim, Hoi Jeong; Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    This study was aimed to compare skin entrance dose of digital radiography with that of film radiography and to show the dose reduction achievement with digital systems at 11 dental schools in Korea. Forty six intraoral radiographic systems in 11 dental schools were included in this study. Digital sensors were used in 33 systems and film was used in 13 systems. Researchers and the volunteer visited 11 dental schools in Korea. Researchers asked the radiologic technician at each school to set the exposure parameters and aiming the x-ray tube for the peri apical view of the mandibular molar of the volunteer. The skin entrance doses were measured at the same exposure parameters and distance by the technician for each system with a dosimeter (Multi-O-Meter; Unifors instruments, Billdal, Sweden). The median dose was 491.2 {mu}Gy for digital radiography and 1,205.0 {mu}Gy for film radiography. The skin entrance dose in digital radiography was significantly lower than that of film radiography (p<0.05). Fifty-nine percent skin entrance dose reduction with digital peri apical radiography was achieved over the film radiography in Korean dental schools.

  6. The status of undergraduate implant education in dental schools outside the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seckinger, R J; Weintraub, A M; Berthold, P; Weintraub, G S

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the incorporation of implant dentistry into academia has been documented in some detail for North American dental schools but has not been pursued on an international level. In June of 1993, we surveyed 51 dental schools outside of the United States affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine's Office of International Relations concerning their teaching involvement with implant dentistry. Results from the 44 (86 percent) responding schools suggest that implant dentistry is being incorporated into predoctoral curriculums. Industrialized countries were more inclined to provide implant education. Insufficient time and the thought that the predoctoral level was not the place for implant dentistry were cited as some of the reasons for not incorporating implant dentistry into the curriculum. Oral surgery, prosthodontics, and periodontics departments developed and administered the implant curriculum. Formats varied among schools with respect to allotted time, curricular placement, laboratory experience, and clinical participation. Didactic material most frequently presented included a historical overview, diagnosis and treatment planning, classification of dental implants, and surgical and prosthetic concepts. Clinical involvement varied from actual implant placement to observation of prosthodontic procedures. Results were categorized based on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) classification of countries in six regions.

  7. Dental caries among disabled individuals attending special schools in Vhembe district, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemutandani, M S; Adedoja, D; Nevhuhlwi, D

    2013-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of dental caries among disabled individuals attending special schools in Vhembe districts. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from January to June 2012 among disabled individuals receiving special care in four specialised schools of Vhembe District. The research protocol had been approved by the Ethics Committee of the University of Limpopo, Polokwane Campus. Informed consent was obtained from the parents of the participants and from the respective school principals. Oral health examinations took place at the school under natural light, with participants seated on an ordinary chair/wheelchair. Dental caries examinations were carried out, using a mirror and wooden spatula in accordance with World Health Organisation (WHO) criteria and methods. Decayed, missing and filled primary and permanent teeth (dmft, DMFT) were recorded. All disabled individuals who were available during a screening period, were included. Those who were not available, as well as those whose health conditions could be compromised by dental examinations, were excluded. The number of decayed teeth ranged from 0-7 in children below 6 years, 0-12 in children below 11 years; and 0-17 among young adults. The mean decay scores and the numbers of missing teeth increased with age. Only 3 (0.04%) individuals had dental fillings. The mean dmft score of children under 6 years was 5.51 (+/- 2.1), ranging from zero to 8. The mean DMFT's of the 11-18 and 19 years and older groups were 7.38 (+/- 3.22) and 10.24 (+/- 2.97) respectively. Disabled individuals exhibited higher caries prevalence and unmet dental needs than the same age general population in Limpopo. Preventive measures and dental treatment should be considered urgent requirements at special needs schools in the Vhembe District.

  8. Undergraduate experience and self-assessed confidence in paediatric dentistry: comparison of three UK dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, H D; Farman, M; Albadri, S; Mackie, I C

    2010-03-13

    Previous studies have suggested that dental students may not receive sufficient clinical experience in core paediatric dentistry skills. This study aimed to compare dental undergraduates' self-reported experience and confidence in paediatric dentistry within three UK dental schools (Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield). In April/May 2009, 147 final year dental students completed an anonymous questionnaire which captured their experience of seven core clinical skills in both hospital and outreach settings. A visual analogue scale was also employed to record perceived levels of confidence for six generic activities including: examination, diagnosis and treatment planning; patient selection for treatment under general anaesthesia; operative dentistry; preventive dentistry; management of dento-alveolar trauma, and provision of routine care for children on qualification. The key finding was that Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield dental students received comparable clinical experiences in paediatric dentistry, which appeared to satisfy the requirements of the General Dental Council's The first five years. One hundred percent had carried out fissure sealants and restorations, and 87-98% had experience of extractions. Outreach placements were crucial in ensuring students had sufficient opportunity to undertake core skills, notably extractions and pulp therapies. All students reported a lack of confidence in dental trauma management which warrants greater emphasis in the undergraduate curriculum.

  9. Dental Erosion and its Associated Factors In 11-16-Year Old School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirthiga, M; Poornima, P; Praveen, R; Sakeena, B; Disha, P

    2015-01-01

    Dental erosion currently stands as a great challenge for the clinician, regarding the diagnosis, identification of the etiological factors, prevention and execution of an adequate treatment. To evaluate the prevalence, severity, and associated factors on dental erosion in 11-16-years old. A cross sectional study was conducted among 2000 school children who were randomly selected. A questionnaire was given to the children that included personal demographic details and habit of consuming acidic foods and drinks. An index specific for dental erosion given by O Sullivan was used to assess every affected tooth. The values were subjected to chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of dental erosion was found to be 1.4%. Females (1.6%) were slightly more affected than males (1.3%). Public school children (2.1%) were found to be affected a little more than private children (0.7%). Chi square test showed significant association between type of school and erosion prevalence (p = 0.015). Most commonly affected teeth were lateral incisor (59.72%). The prevalence of dental erosion was found to be low when compared to various studies done all over the world.

  10. Dental trauma management awareness among primary school teachers in the Emirate of Ajman, United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, R

    2011-06-01

    To assess, by means of self-administered structured questionnaire, the level of knowledge of primary schools teachers in Ajman with regards to the immediate emergency management of dental trauma. The questionnaire was sent to teachers in randomly selected primary schools in Ajman. A total of 161 teachers responded (response rate 84.4%). The questionnaire surveyed teachers' background, knowledge and management of tooth fracture, avulsion, and also investigated teachers' attitudes and self-assessed knowledge. Ninety-one percent of the teachers were females, 51.6% in their thirties and 61.5% had university qualification. Fifty teachers had received formal first aid training, and only thirteen of them recalled that they had received training on the management of dental trauma. Concerning the management of tooth fracture, 138 respondents (85.8%) gave the appropriate management for fractured tooth. One hundred twenty-one (75%) of the respondents indicated that is very urgent to seek professional assistance if a permanent tooth is avulsed, but they had little knowledge on the correct media for transporting the avulsed tooth. Most teaches were unsatisfied with their level of knowledge for dental trauma and the majority were interested in having further education on the topic. The findings revealed that the level of knowledge of management of dental trauma (especially tooth avulsion) among school teachers in Ajman is inadequate, and education campaigns are necessary to improve their emergency management of dental injuries.

  11. The prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis among secondary school children in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, D M; Arigbede, A O; Dosumu, O O; Ufomata, D

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis among secondary school children in Ibadan, Nigeria. A multi-stage sampling technique was employed to select the participants who consisted of children aged 12-14 years taken from eleven randomly selected secondary schools in the five local government areas of Ibadan Metropolis. The children were examined by the Principal Investigator after submitting parental administered questionnaires. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was based on the TF index. The mean age of the 1372 participants (825 males and 547 females) was 13.15 ± 0.80 years. Dental fluorosis was diagnosed in 157 (11.4%) children (98 males and 59 females). There was no statistically significant difference between age or gender and the occurrence of fluorosis. Most of the cases were very mild with greater than 90% of the affected teeth having a TF score of ≤3. The most severely affected were the maxillary molars. Severe disfiguring cases of dental fluorosis were not common among the secondary school children examined. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was found to be low, with majority of the cases being very mild.

  12. Dental students' regard for patients from often-stigmatized populations: findings from an Indian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhan, Balasubramanian; Gayathri, Haritheertham; Garhnayak, Lokanath; Naik, Eslavath Seena

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare a group of Indian dental students' attitudes toward HIV-positive status, substance misuse, intellectual disability, acute mental illness, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) orientation. Two hundred and twelve students at various stages in the dental curriculum anonymously completed the Medical Condition Regard Scale (MCRS) for these conditions. Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used, respectively, to analyze the intrastage and interstage differences in MCRS scores. The results revealed that the regard of dental students was considerably positive for all the conditions except LGBT, for which it was just borderline positive. Intellectual disability received the highest regard among all the conditions and LGBT the least. An intermediary and comparable regard was noted for acute mental illness and HIV-positive status followed by substance misuse. While the regard for LGBT remained consistent throughout the curriculum, those for other conditions showed a marginal decrease at the completion of the clinical training. Active curricular reforms are required to ensure a more inclusive and nondiscriminatory dental care environment for patients from such often-stigmatized populations, especially those with LGBT orientation and substance misuse.

  13. Prevalence and associated factors of musculoskeletal pain among the dental personnel in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajpratham, Piyapat; Ploypetch, Teerada; Kiattavorncharoen, Sirichai; Boonsiriseth, Kiatanant

    2010-06-01

    To study the prevalence and associated factors of musculoskeletal (MS) pain among the dental personnel. In addition, impacts and treatment of MS pain were reported. Random sampling of 390 participants from the name lists of dental personnel working in each department. Self-administered questionnaires were equally distributed to three groups of dental personnel namely clinical instructors, postgraduate students, and dental assistants. The present study was conducted as a survey in the Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok between December 2008 and January 2009. Three hundred and ninety questionnaires were delivered and 164 questionnaires were returned (response rate 42.5%). The participants with MS pain were 32 clinical instructors (20.3%), 52 postgraduate students (32.9%), and 74 dental assistants (46.8%). Their mean age was 33.0 +/- 9.1 years old. The MS pain found respectively was shoulder pain 72.2% (n = 114), neckpain 70.3% (n = 111), and low backpain 50.6% (n = 80). The participants with shoulder and neckpain were combined and defined as cervicobrachial pain. The associated factor of cervicobrachial pain was working status. Being a clinical instructor and postgraduate student were associated with cervicobrachial pain with OR being 4.7 [1.3, 7.1] and 4.6 [1.6, 13.4], respectively. The impacts of MS pain among the dental personnel included usage of pain relieving medication (34.8%), seeking medical evaluation (32.3%), reduction in working hours (27.2%), difficulty sleeping (22.8%), and work absence (10.8%), respectively. The treatments of MS pain utilized to alleviate those impacts were Thai traditional massage (51.9%), medication (28.5%), physical therapy (15.8%), acupuncture (7.6%), and alternative medicine (4.4%), respectively. Cervicobrachial pain was the most prevalent MS pain among the dental personnel and working status was associated with their MS pain problems. The impact of MS pain was predominantly usage of pain relieving medication. Thai

  14. Assessment of teaching effectiveness in U.S. Dental schools and the value of triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Leila; Mucciolo, Thomas W; Choi, Mijin; Spielman, Andrew I

    2008-06-01

    The routine evaluation of teaching effectiveness is important in improving faculty, departmental, and institutional efforts. There are three main categories of assessments: those performed by students, peers, and self. Although each category is independently valid, a collection of data from all three categories leads to a more comprehensive outcome and a creation of a triangulation model. The purpose of this study was to identify commonly used methods of assessing teaching effectiveness and to suggest the use of a triangulation model, which has been advocated in the literature on performance assessment as an optimal approach for evaluating teaching effectiveness. A twelve-question survey was sent to all U.S. dental schools to identify evaluation methods as well as to find evidence of triangulation. Thirty-nine out of fifty-seven schools responded. The majority of the schools used student evaluations (81 percent) and peer reviews (78 percent). A minority of schools reported using self-evaluations (31 percent). Less than one in five dental schools reported using all three strategies to achieve triangulation (19 percent). The three most commonly used evaluation methods ("performed routinely") were all in the student evaluation category. Less than half of the schools routinely evaluated clinical teaching effectiveness by any means (42 percent). In conclusion, dental schools should implement a triangulation process, in which evaluation data are obtained from students, peers, and self to provide a comprehensive and composite assessment of teaching effectiveness.

  15. Current trends in removable partial denture teaching in British dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R K F; Radford, D R; Juszczyk, A S

    2011-12-09

    To investigate current teaching of removable partial denture construction in British dental schools. A questionnaire was sent by email to each of the 15 UK dental schools. Replies were received from the 12 long established schools, although one declined to participate. The more recently established schools did not respond. All schools have a pre-clinical/technical course, which either precedes or runs in parallel with the early part of the students' partial denture experience, but students complete very little, if any technical work for their clinical cases. The majority of teaching takes place in multidisciplinary teaching clinics in years 2-5 although the majority of schools concentrate teaching of the basics early in the programme. Fewer cases appear to be treated than previously reported, especially cases requiring removable partial dentures with cobalt chromium frameworks. Students may only treat one such case, the remainder of dentures being constructed of acrylic resin. Lack of experience treating cases requiring a combination of complete and removable partial dentures was a concern. Participating schools appear to meet the General Dental Council's requirements. The amount of clinical work undertaken by students may have decreased slightly. There has been a greater decrease in the technical component.

  16. A survey of dental school applicants' career intentions and the balance with family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, F M J; Drummond, J R; Carson, L; Hoad Reddick, G

    2005-06-11

    To investigate the career plans of prospective dental students and how they foresee their work life balance. Applicants to Dundee and Manchester dental schools completed anonymous questionnaires when they attended for interview. The useable response rate was 94% (n=436). The majority of the respondents (91.3%) intended working full time when they enter the workforce, with no significant variation detected between males and females. The cohort anticipated their mean salary to be just over 28,000 UK pounds, five years into their career, although the males felt they would be earning 5,000 UK pounds more than the females. Individuals of Pakistani and Indian origin thought they would earn most, and Asians least. Sixty-five per cent would enter general dental practice and, of these, only 2.8% expected to work exclusively within the NHS. Fifteen per cent intended to go into the hospital dental service, with orthodontics the most popular choice of subspecialty (43.7%), followed by oral surgery (31.1%). Significant variation was seen between ethnic groups, with the hospital and community dental services being more popular with those who identified themselves as of non-white ethnic origin, although the majority would still plan on entering general dental practice. Almost half (44.5%) would take time out of their career to concentrate on childcare when children were of pre-school age, with a further 11% taking longer. Ninety per cent of females and 70% of males anticipated taking time out, of a varying duration. Half of the respondents indicated that they felt a child would affect their career to a moderate extent. The dental profession will be severely affected if both males and females take time out of their careers in the future. As well as a work force shortage, the problems of accessibility to NHS dental services will be exacerbated if fewer dentists choose to provide NHS care.

  17. Costs of a school-based dental mobile service in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molete, M P; Chola, L; Hofman, K J

    2016-10-19

    The burden of untreated tooth decay remains high and oral healthcare utilisation is low for the majority of children in South Africa. There is need for alternative methods of improving access to low cost oral healthcare. The mobile dental unit of the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) has been operational for over 25 years, providing alternative oral healthcare to children and adults who otherwise would not have access. The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-analysis of a school based oral healthcare program in the Wits mobile dental unit. The objectives were to estimate the general costs of the school based program, costs of oral healthcare per patient and the economic implications of providing services at scale. In 2012, the Wits mobile dental unit embarked on a 5 month project to provide oral healthcare in four schools located around Johannesburg. Cost and service use data were retrospectively collected from the program records for the cost analysis, which was undertaken from a provider perspective. The costs considered included both financial and economic costs. Capital costs were annualised and discounted at 6 %. One way sensitivity tests were conducted for uncertain parameters. The total economic costs were R813.701 (US$76,048). The cost of screening and treatment per patient were R331 (US$31) and R743 (US$69) respectively. Furthermore, fissure sealants cost the least out of the treatments provided. The sensitivity analysis indicated that the Wits mobile dental unit was cost efficient at 25 % allocation of staff time and that a Dental Therapy led service could save costs by 9.1 %. Expanding the services to a wider population of children and utilising Dental Therapists as key personnel could improve the efficiency of mobile dental healthcare provision.

  18. Undergraduate degree projects in the Swedish dental schools: a documentary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, C; Brown, G

    2013-05-01

    Undergraduate degree projects have currently been introduced into courses in the four Swedish dental schools. The rationale for research projects is that they enable students to develop research expertise skills and to show their ability to apply and develop knowledge relevant to professional practice. This paper reports a qualitative analysis of the curriculum documents and handbooks including the criteria used to assess the students' research reports. The aim was to investigate commonalities and differences in the design of degree projects between the four Swedish dental schools and to explore any inconsistencies within the documents. The documentary analysis was based on the constant comparison method. Four overarching themes emerged from the analysis: (i) developing scientific expertise, (ii) developing professional expertise, (iii) following rules and (iv) fostering creativity. The documents from the four dental schools revealed similar views on the purposes of the projects and provided similar assessment criteria. The students were requested to formulate an odontological problem, apply a relevant scientific method, analyse texts and empirical data, express critical reflections and write a short thesis. The students were free to choose topics. There were differences between the dental schools on the emphasis placed on practical uses of the projects and theoretical background of the projects. Two of the schools insisted on rigid rules of completing and writing the project yet paradoxically emphasised creativity. There were wide variations in the required length of the project report. The report may prove useful to dental schools in other countries who are about to design undergraduate research projects. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Dental knowledge, attitudes and behavior among Kuwaiti mothers and school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, P E; Hadi, R; Al-Zaabi, F S; Hussein, J M; Behbehani, J M; Skougaard, M R; Vigild, M

    1990-01-01

    In one region in the state of Kuwait children in first grade have been offered a systematic dental health care program. The purpose of this study was to assess (1) dental knowledge, attitudes, and health behavior among the mothers of children in first grade, and (2) dental knowledge and attitudes of schoolteachers, and their involvement in health education. Before the children were enrolled in the program 187 mothers (response 76%) were interviewed. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data on schoolteachers (n = 135, response 695). Most of the mothers (74%) answered that dental caries is caused by sweets/candy; the role of bacteria was mentioned by 9%. Half of the mothers were aware of the harmful effect of sugary drinks, and 50% knew about the preventive effect of fluoride. Knowledge about causes and prevention of periodontal disease was diffuse. According to the mothers, 68% of the children were in need for dental treatment; 37% were seen by a dentist once a year for symptomatic reasons, and 49% brushed their teeth at least twice a day. Sixteen-percent of the mothers helped their child in brushing every day. Sugar consumption among mothers and children was high, e.g. 66% of the children had chocolate bars and 44% had soft drinks several times a day. The level of dental knowledge was higher among teachers than mothers; the mothers were mostly informed through television/radio, while teachers had received information from various sources, including the dentists. The teachers responded positively to prevention of dental diseases among children and should be considered key persons in dental health education. For the Kuwaiti children and the mothers the active involvement principle, group presentations, and one-to-one communications are recommended for the school based dental health program.

  20. The Prevalent Bacterial Isolates Of Dental Caries In School Age ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted at the dental clinic of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife. A total of 100 carious samples were collected from children of varying age and sexes. The bacteria isolated were S. mutans: 45.6%, Lactobacillus spp: 41.2% and S. aureus: 13.2%. Out of the 100 samples, 88(5) ...

  1. Assignment of Dental School Patients Using Periodontal Treatment Need Indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Ala

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Periodontal Treatment Need System and the Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need as screening tests for allocation of patients to dental students was assessed and compared. Sixty-one patients reporting to the Department of Periodontology at the University of Oslo were studied. (MLW)

  2. Self-reported oral health, dental self-care and dental service use among New Zealand secondary school students: findings from the Youth 07 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areai, D M; Thomson, W M; Foster Page, L A; Denny, S J; Crengle, S; Clark, T C; Ameratunga, S N; Koopu, P I

    2011-12-01

    The primary aim was to describe New Zealand secondary school students' use of dental services and determine the nature and extent of any inequities by deprivation status and ethnicity. A secondary aim was to to describe their toothbrushing practices and self-reported dental pain experience, past restorative treatment and tooth loss. Secondary analysis of data from the cross-sectional Youth 07: National Survey of the Health and Wellbeing of New Zealand Secondary School Students. A representative sample of 9,098 secondary school students aged 13-17 years from 96 secondary schools across New Zealand took part, with a response rate of 73%. Self-report information about oral health care behaviour, past dental experiences and dental visiting pattern was collected. Data analysis took the complex survey design into account, and multivariate analysis was undertaken to examine the associations of dental service-use. A dental visit in the previous 12 months was reported by 72% of participants. The odds of having done so were higher among females, those who brushed at least twice daily, and those who had been kept awake at night by dental pain. Lower odds were seen among students identifying with Māori, Pacific or Asian people (and those in the 'Other' ethnic category) than among European students, and among those residing in medium- or high-deprivation areas than those in lo-deprivation areas. One in seven participants reported having lost a tooth due to oral disease. Having had a tooth filled was reported by almost three-quarters of the sample, and having been kept awake by dental pain at night was reported by just over one in five. Almost two-thirds reported brushing their teeth twice or more in the previous 24 hours, and a small minority had not brushed at all. Ethnic and socio-economic inequities in the use of dental services are apparent among New Zealand adolescents.

  3. The Cognitive Level Demands of a Dental School's Predoctoral, Didactic Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchuse, Donald J.; Zullo, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Classification according to Bloom's taxonomy of 518 tests items from one dental school's predoctoral written examination revealed almost 84 percent to be at the knowledge level and the remainder at the comprehension level, with none at any higher cognitive level (application, analysis, synthesis, or evaluation). (MSE)

  4. Continuing Progress in Infection Control in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Virginia A.; Molinari, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of a 1988 survey of dental school deans concerning infection control instruction and protocols found increased attention to infection control and application of recommended protocols. Findings are contrasted with those of earlier studies, and remaining obstacles to implementation of infection control programs are discussed. (Author/MSE)

  5. Caries Risk Assessment for Determination of Focus and Intensity of Prevention in a Dental School Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Michael W. J.; Suddick, Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    A study at the University of Texas, San Antonio's dental school resulted in development of a system of caries risk assessment, applied to all undergraduate clinic patients. The rationale, structure, elements, and application of the system are outlined, and course content supporting the system is noted. Need for validation and other improvements is…

  6. Achievement in Dental School as Related to Personality and Aptitude Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Harrison G.; Kirk, Barbara A.

    1970-01-01

    Attempts to predict performance in dental school from individual scales of the California Psychological Inventory (CPI) have yielded equivocal results. A five scale regression equation to predict grades and faculty ratings suggested implications of dependability, conscientiousness, and perserverance at one pole and impulsiveness, carelessness, and…

  7. The endangered clinical teacher-scholar: a promising update from one dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Marnie; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-04-01

    Clinical dental faculty members' lack of scholarly activity not only impacts their ability to be promoted and retained in their institutions but limits the contributions they could make to clinical discovery. Contributing factors to this situation include the lack of purposeful mentoring and the widespread faculty shortages, which increase faculty workloads. One way to address this challenge is to develop and implement formal mentoring programs, endorsed by the dental school's administration, that use reward structures in which novice clinical faculty members are teamed with faculty members experienced in scholarly activity. The Clinical Research Scholars Program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine has been in existence since 2008. Preliminary data from this program suggest that this has been a successful plan for increasing the scholarly activity of the clinical teacher-scholar. Although not without limitations, this program may serve as a model for other schools to consider as they encourage their own clinical faculty members to undertake research initiatives. Similar programs at dental schools across the country can enhance discovery, research, and treatment by expanding the number of researchers who are addressing the public's oral and systemic health needs.

  8. Improving Documentation, Compliance, and Approvals in an Electronic Dental Record at a U.S. Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierer, Todd E; Delander, Kelsey A

    2017-04-01

    The aims of this study were to improve progress note documentation by dental students, achieve accurate and timely charge capture and treatment code and note approval, and determine the effectiveness of multiple interventions in improving overall documentation of patient encounters in the clinic of one U.S. dental school. The study, conducted in 2014-15, used a logic model to create a process to address documentation issues in the clinic's electronic dental record (EDR) and to assess the effectiveness of interventions. An initial documentation review using the EDR was performed to obtain a baseline measurement. A significant correlation was noted at baseline between poor documentation and unapproved treatment codes and notes. Unapproved treatment codes and corresponding documentation were then reviewed each month. Students who had the highest number of unapproved treatment codes were identified as potentially having documentation issues. These students were contacted and met individually with the associate quality and compliance officer to review documentation and charge practices. Large group education was also provided to key learners: dental students and supervising faculty members. Education consisted of an in-service event for faculty members and a Moodle site course on documentation for students. After one year, the results showed that documentation rates improved from an overall rate of 61% to 81% of required documentation elements being present in the progress note. Although this educational intervention was successful in significantly improving documentation of treatment in the EDR, 19% of the notes at the conclusion of the study were still missing key elements. Further research is necessary to determine whether the interventions will continue to improve documentation or if additional measures need to be taken.

  9. State-of-the-art techniques in operative dentistry: contemporary teaching of posterior composites in UK and Irish dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Frazier, K B; McConnell, R J; Blum, I R; Wilson, N H F

    2010-08-14

    Advances of composite systems and their application have revolutionised the management of posterior teeth affected by caries, facilitating a minimally invasive approach. Previous surveys have indicated that the teaching of posterior composites within dental schools was developing, albeit not keeping pace with clinical evidence and the development of increasingly predictable techniques and materials. Concurrently, surveys of dental practice indicate that dental amalgam still predominates as the 'material of choice' for the restoration of posterior teeth within UK general dental practice. In light of such considerations, the aim of this study was to investigate current teaching of posterior composites in Irish and UK dental schools. An online questionnaire which sought information in relation to the current teaching of posterior composites was developed and distributed to the 17 established Irish and UK dental schools with undergraduate teaching programmes in late 2009. Completed responses were received from all 17 schools (response rate = 100%). All 17 schools taught the placement of occlusal and two-surface occlusoproximal composites in premolar and permanent molar teeth. Two schools did not teach placement of three-surface occlusoproximal composites in either premolars or molars. In their preclinical courses, ten schools taught posterior composites before teaching dental amalgams. Fifty-five percent of posterior restorations placed by dental students were of composite (range = 10-90%) and 44% amalgam (range = 10-90%), indicating an increase of 180% in the numbers of posterior composites placed over the past five years. Diversity was noted in the teaching of clinical techniques and students at different schools are trained with different composites and bonding systems. Some cause for concern was noted in the teaching of certain techniques that were not in keeping with existing best evidence, such as the teaching of transparent matrix bands and light

  10. Dental caries and associated factors among primary school children in Bahir Dar city: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Demilie, Tazebew; Yimer, Mulat; Meshesha, Kassaw; Abera, Bayeh

    2014-12-23

    Dental caries is the most common chronic infectious disease of childhood caused by the interaction of bacteria, mainly Streptococcus mutans and sugary foods on tooth enamel. This study aimed at determining the prevalence and associated factors of dental caries among primary school children at Bahir Dar city. A school based cross-sectional study was conducted at Bahir Dar city from October 2013 to January 2014. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select the children. Structured questionnaire was used to interview children and/or parents to collect socio demographic variables. Clinical dental information obtained by experienced dentist using dental caries criteria set by World Health Organization. Binary and multiple logistic regression analysis were computed to investigate factors associated with dental caries. Of the 147 children, 82 (55.4%) were girls. Majority of the children (67.6%) cleaned their teeth using traditional method (small stick of wood made of a special type of plant). The proportion of children having dental caries was 32 (21.8%). Primary tooth decay accounted for 24 (75%) of dental caries. The proportion of missed teeth was 7 (4.8%). The overall proportion of toothache and dental plaque among school children were 40 (27.2%) and 99 (67.3%), respectively. Grade level of 1-4 (AOR = 3.9, CI = 1.49 -10.4), poor habit of tooth cleaning (AOR = 2.6, CI = 1.08 - 6.2), dental plaque (AOR = 5.3, CI = 1.6 - 17.7) and toothache (AOR = 6.3, CI = 2.4 - 15.4) were significantly associated with dental caries. Dental caries is a common public health problem in school children associated with poor oral hygiene, dietary and dental visit habits. Therefore, prevention measures such as health education on oral hygiene, dietary habits and importance of dental visit are obligatory for children.

  11. Does a selection interview predict year 1 performance in dental school?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, R; Ellis, J; Valentine, R A

    2017-05-01

    It is important for dental schools to select students who will complete their degree and progress on to become the dentists of the future. The process should be transparent, fair and ethical and utilise selection tools that select appropriate students. The interview is an integral part of UK dental schools student selection procedures. This study was undertaken in order to determine whether different interview methods (Cardiff with a multiple mini interview and Newcastle with a more traditional interview process) along with other components used in selection predicted academic performance in students. The admissions selection data for two dental schools (Cardiff and Newcastle) were collected and analysed alongside student performance in academic examinations in Year 1 of the respective schools. Correlation statistics were used to determine whether selection tools had any relevance to academic performance once students were admitted to their respective Universities. Data was available for a total of 177 students (77 Cardiff and 100 Newcastle). Examination performance did not correlate with admission interview scores at either school; however UKCAT score was linked to poor academic performance. Although interview methodology does not appear to correlate with academic performance it remains an integral and very necessary part of the admissions process. Ultimately schools need to be comfortable with their admissions procedures in attracting and selecting the calibre of students they desire. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The status of mineral trioxide aggregate in endodontics education in dental schools in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanalp, Jale; Karapinar-Kazandag, Meriç; Ersev, Handan; Bayirli, Gündüz

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the current status of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an educational material in dental schools in Turkey. A survey was sent to senior members of the endodontic departments of seventeen dental schools; fourteen responded. All respondents reported that they used MTA in their clinical practice, with apexification, perforations, retrograde fillings, and root resorptions being the most frequently occurring treatment procedures. All reported that information was given to students regarding MTA mainly as part of the curriculum. The third and fourth years were the periods when MTA was introduced to students in most of the schools. Twelve schools reported that students had the opportunity to observe procedures in which MTA was used, but students had the chance to use the material in a very minor proportion of the schools, mainly under the supervision of clinical instructors. Ten schools agreed that MTA should be included in the regular endodontic curriculum. Financial constraints seemed to be the predominant reason for those who answered this question negatively, followed by difficult handling properties and low radiopacity of the material. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that ways should be sought to prevent financial difficulties from depriving dental students of the opportunity to receive information about contemporary methodologies such as MTA utilization.

  13. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in school children of Bangarpet taluk, Kolar district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Narayanamurthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Fluorosis is an endemic disease resulting due to excess ingestion of fluoride. Ground water has been a significant water source for domestic, irrigating, and industrial purposes in India. India is placed in a geographical fluoride belt. Kolar, a drought prone area with semiarid climate, is one among 16 fluorosis endemic districts of Karnataka. Aims: To study the prevalence of dental fluorosis among school children and to estimate the fluoride levels in drinking water sources. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted among school-going children. Materials and Methods: School-going children from two randomly selected schools of two randomly selected Panchayat areas of Kyasamballi and Gollahalli were studied in August 2011. All the children in these schools were evaluated for dental fluorosis based on Dean′s index. Fluoride levels of drinking water sources in these communities were estimated by ion-electrode method. Statistical analysis: The data were analyzed with Epi-info 7 statistical software and expressed in proportions. Chi-square test was employed to test the significance. Results: A total of 380 children in the age group of 6-15 years were studied. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 31.05%, predominant in females. The community fluorosis index was 0.718 indicating slight public health importances. The fluoride levels in drinking water sources exceeded 1.5 mg/L. Conclusion: Dental fluorosis is a public health problem in Kolar. High fluoride content in the sources of drinking water is the main reason for dental fluorosis, suggesting an urgent need for defluoridation of water sources with sustainable long-term measures in Kolar.

  14. Mobile phone hygiene: potential risks posed by use in the clinics of an Indian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sweta; Acharya, Shashidhar; Bhat, Meghashyam; Rao, SreeVidya Krishna; Pentapati, Kalyana Chakravarthy

    2010-10-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to determine the level and type of bacterial contamination of the mobile phones of dental personnel involved in direct patient care and to determine the usefulness of cleaning with 70 percent isopropyl alcohol for decontamination. Dental faculty and trainees in an Indian dental school were asked to participate in a study in which a questionnaire concerning patterns of mobile phone use and disinfection was administered. Swabs from mobile phones of the participants were taken using moist sterile swabs and plated on blood agar plates. The bacteria isolated were identified by biochemical tests. Eighteen percent of the participants (n=9) reported using their phones while attending patients. Nearly 64 percent (n=32) used their mobiles for checking time, and 64 percent (n=42) reported never cleaning their phones. In total, fifty mobile phones were cultured for microorganisms: 98 percent (n=49) were culture-positive, and 34 percent (n=17) grew potentially pathogenic bacteria. There was significant reduction in the mean number of colony-forming units after decontamination with alcohol (pphones may act as an important source of nosocomial pathogens in the dental setting. Therefore, it is important for dental school administrators to encourage higher compliance with hand-washing practices and routine surface disinfection through framing of strict protocols to reduce the chances of occurrence of nosocomial infections.

  15. Curricula for the teaching of complete dentures in Spanish and Portuguese dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Javier; Castillo-de Oyagüe, Raquel; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Given the need to ensure that dentists are sufficiently skilled to offer the best possible care to their patients, this study aims to evaluate the teaching methods and clinical experience achieved by undergraduate dental students in Spain and Portugal as regards complete dentures. In February 2011, a questionnaire seeking information about the preclinical and clinical teaching of complete dentures was e-mailed to all Spanish and Portuguese dental schools with fully developed undergraduate degree dental programs. A response rate of 82.6% was obtained. The distribution of lectures and hours spent at the laboratory and in clinical activities revealed that teaching complete dentures is eminently a practical issue, this being mostly performed by full-time prosthodontists. All surveyed schools teach the design of the record base, and most of them instruct students in the mounting of teeth in wax. Most schools (94.7%) used a semiadjustable articulator, alginate for primary impressions (73.7%) and elastomeric materials in border-molded custom trays for final impressions (68.4%). In most schools, within the clinical setting students work in pairs, the mean student/ professional staff member ratio being 2.3 ± 0.7. Most schools perform a competence-based assessment (83.3%), although innovative techniques such as problem-based learning are still rarely applied. On average, the students emplaced 1.8 ± 1.2 complete dentures during their clinical training, ranging from 0 to 4, although no clear trend was seen as regards the minimum number of dentures to be made for graduating. Variations in teaching programs and clinical experience concerning complete denture curricula among Spanish and Portuguese dental schools are evident, but all the schools base their teaching mainly on preclinical and clinical practice. However, the low number of dentures made by student per year seems insufficient to ensure clinical skills and cope with social needs.

  16. Dental caries status of students from migrant primary schools in Shanghai Pudong New Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Jun; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Xue-Shan

    2016-03-05

    In China, there is a large migrant population. A significant proportion of children of the migrant population in China are not able to attend public schools due to the lack of local household registration (HuKou). They turn to privately-operated migrant schools, which are usually under-funded, have bad environmental facilities and are inadequately staffed compared to public schools. This study aims to describe the dental caries status of students from migrant primary schools in Shanghai Pudong New Area and factors that influence their caries status. Children (7-12 years old) from migrant primary schools in Shanghai Pudong New Area were randomly selected through a multi-stage cluster sampling method. Following the recommendation of the World Health Organization, caries experiences were recorded using the dmft index. A questionnaire to survey the children's socio-demographic characteristics and oral health-related behaviours was completed by the children's parents or guardians. A total of 1385 children in migrant primary schools were invited, of which 1323 joined the survey (95.5 %). Among all the surveyed subjects, the prevalence rate of dental caries was 74.7 % (65.7 % for primary teeth and 28.1 % for permanent teeth). The mean (SD) dmft scores were 3.17 (3.12), 2.74 (3.02) for the primary teeth and 0.44 (0.84) for the permanent teeth, and 99.5 % of the carious teeth received no treatment. Students from migrant primary schools in Shanghai Pudong New Area had bad conditions of dental caries and most of the carious teeth were left untreated. The caries experience was associated with tooth brushing habits, snacking habits, dental visit and gender.

  17. A four-tier problem-solving scaffold to teach pain management in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Hottel, Timothy L

    2013-06-01

    Pain constitutes a major reason patients pursue dental treatment. This article presents a novel curriculum to provide dental students comprehensive training in the management of pain. The curriculum's four-tier scaffold combines traditional and problem-based learning to improve students' diagnostic, pharmacotherapeutic, and assessment skills to optimize decision making when treating pain. Tier 1 provides underpinning knowledge of pain mechanisms with traditional and contextualized instruction by integrating clinical correlations and studying worked cases that stimulate clinical thinking. Tier 2 develops critical decision making skills through self-directed learning and actively solving problem-based cases. Tier 3 exposes students to management approaches taken in allied health fields and cultivates interdisciplinary communication skills. Tier 4 provides a "knowledge and experience synthesis" by rotating students through community pain clinics to practice their assessment skills. This combined teaching approach aims to increase critical thinking and problem-solving skills to assist dental graduates in better management of pain throughout their careers. Dental curricula that have moved to comprehensive care/private practice models are well-suited for this educational approach. The goal of this article is to encourage dental schools to integrate pain management into their curricula, to develop pain management curriculum resources for dental students, and to provide leadership for change in pain management education.

  18. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, Maryam; Khoshnevisan, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Afshin; Shariatpanahi, Seyed Peyman

    2017-01-01

    By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals' dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This correlation was further spread over the network within the 5 months period. Moreover, it was identified that the average brushing level was improved within the 5 months period. Given that there was a significant correlation between social network's nodes' in-degree value, and brushing level, it was suggested that the observed improvement was partially due to more popularity of individuals with better tooth brushing habit. Agent Based Modeling (ABM) was used to demonstrate the dynamics of dental brushing frequency within a sample of friendship network. Two models with static and dynamic assumptions for the network structure were proposed. The model with dynamic network structure successfully described the dynamics of dental health behavior. Based on this model, on average, every 43 weeks a student changes her brushing habit due to learning from her friends. Finally, three training scenarios were tested by these models in order to evaluate their effectiveness. When training more popular students, considerable improvement in total students' brushing frequency was demonstrated by simulation results.

  19. Friendship Network and Dental Brushing Behavior among Middle School Students: An Agent Based Modeling Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sadeghipour

    Full Text Available By using a standard questionnaire, the level of dental brushing frequency was assessed among 201 adolescent female middle school students in Tehran. The initial assessment was repeated after 5 months, in order to observe the dynamics in dental health behavior level. Logistic Regression model was used to evaluate the correlation among individuals' dental health behavior in their social network. A significant correlation on dental brushing habits was detected among groups of friends. This correlation was further spread over the network within the 5 months period. Moreover, it was identified that the average brushing level was improved within the 5 months period. Given that there was a significant correlation between social network's nodes' in-degree value, and brushing level, it was suggested that the observed improvement was partially due to more popularity of individuals with better tooth brushing habit. Agent Based Modeling (ABM was used to demonstrate the dynamics of dental brushing frequency within a sample of friendship network. Two models with static and dynamic assumptions for the network structure were proposed. The model with dynamic network structure successfully described the dynamics of dental health behavior. Based on this model, on average, every 43 weeks a student changes her brushing habit due to learning from her friends. Finally, three training scenarios were tested by these models in order to evaluate their effectiveness. When training more popular students, considerable improvement in total students' brushing frequency was demonstrated by simulation results.

  20. 'Schools without walls?' Developments and challenges in dental outreach teaching - report of a recent symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, K A; de Vries, J; Widström, E; Gait, T C; Bedi, R; Meyers, I; Feldman, C A; Hobson, R

    2006-11-01

    During the 2004 annual meeting of the International Association for Dental Research, the Education Research Group held a symposium on dental outreach teaching. After a brief introduction, which reviews relevant aspects of the relatively sparse literature, this paper summarises the proceedings, the themes and conclusions that emerged and the research issues that were identified. It aims to describe aspects of current practice around the world and to promote future discussion. Presenters gave details of outreach programmes for dental undergraduates in Australia, Finland, Malaysia (and Southeast Asia), the United Kingdom and the United States. From these presentations four themes emerged. They were: reasons for the introduction of outreach teaching, its perceived beneficial effects, organisational issues, educational issues. The reasons included a recognition of the need to educate dental undergraduates as members of 'care teams' in the environments and communities where they were ultimately like to work and the current shortage of both suitable patients and teachers (faculty) in many dental schools. A wide range of potential benefits and some disadvantages were identified. The organisational issues were, in the main, seen to relate to finance and administration. The educational issues included the need to train and monitor the performance of teachers at outreach clinics and to assess the performance of the undergraduates whilst at the outreach locations. It was concluded that new technology made it easier to teach at a distance and it was possible to create a dental 'school without walls'. It was recognised that few evaluations of dental outreach teaching have been carried out and that there were many research questions to be answered, including: whether it should be a voluntary or compulsory part of the undergraduate curriculum, how long it should last and what type of outcomes should be assessed.

  1. Interprofessional ethics learning between schools of pharmacy and dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Miranda; Poirier, Therese; Otsuka, Allen; Wagner, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    A case-based interprofessional education (IPE) ethics activity between pharmacy and dental students was developed and evaluated. Eighty-two third-year pharmacy and 51 first-year dental students were divided into teams for two sessions. The IPE activity involved the student teams analyzing two cases at each session utilizing an ethical decision-making process followed by debriefing of each case. Assessments included pre-/post-Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS), pre-/post-individual ethics knowledge quiz, pre-team ethics knowledge quiz and post-student perception survey. The results indicated no significant differences in RIPLS scores although scores indicated a high readiness for interprofessional learning including teamwork and collaboration among pharmacy and dental students. When comparing pre-/post-ethics knowledge quiz scores a significant difference was found between individual and team scores as well as between professions. Perception survey results were highly favorable toward the value of interprofessional learning activities. The sessions resulted in enhanced knowledge about ethical decision-making.

  2. Dental school deans' and dentists' perceptions of infection control and HIV/AIDS patient care: a challenge for dental education in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Mayoral, E E; Sánchez-Pérez, L; Olguín-Barreto, Y; Acosta-Gío, A E

    2009-07-01

    HIV/AIDS patients face unique oral diagnostic and treatment challenges. The aim of this investigation among dental school deans (DSD) and graduate school applicants (GSA) who had qualified from 30 different dental schools was to assess their perceptions on dental education relevant to infection control (IC) and HIV/AIDS patient care. The questionnaire included Likert-type scale evaluations of agreement with statements. Of 158 questionnaires, 23 DSD (68% response rate), and 123 GSA (100% response rate) returned valid questionnaires. Fifteen (65%) DSD and 89 (72%) GSA ranked as "very strong" their perception that infection control prevents the transmission of blood borne viruses. However, the perception prevailed, among DSD and GSA, that HIV infection was a "very strong" to "strong" occupational hazard. Special reprocessing of instruments used on HIV patients was frequently reported. Many considered "very strong" to "strong" that HIV/AIDS patients must be treated in specialized clinics, and nearly half (48%) of the DSD and one third (35%) of the GSA stated that their school does refer HIV/AIDS patients to dental treatment in specialized clinics. These results indicate that many dental schools in Mexico must provide better education on IC and HIV/AIDS patient care to enhance attitudes toward HIV/AIDS patients.

  3. The demographic and academic profile of Irish dental school faculty members.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Eleanor M

    2010-04-23

    AIM: This paper reviews the demographic, academic and professional profile of Irish dental school faculty members. Faculty duties are explored. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Custom-designed questionnaires were distributed to faculty members for self-completion, adopting a \\'mixed-method\\' approach with quantitative and qualitative components. Response rate was 64.60%. RESULTS: Demographic profile reveals a male-dominated regime (64%). Males also occupy a disproportionate number of senior academic positions. The age profile mirrors international trends with 75% of staff over 40 and c.33% over 50, including 78% of professorial staff (p < 0.001). Dental school faculties are comprised of highly educated professionals with the following qualifications: 89% BDS, 43% FDS, 39% Masters, 16% Doctorates. Most (77%) have 10+ years of clinical experience, while 47% have over 20 years\\' experience. Clinical experience varied by age, rank (p < 0.001) and gender (p < 0.05). A review of contractual agreements and duties confirms the major role of part-time clinical staff in dental education, comprising the largest single group (48%) delivering the bulk of the clinical teaching. However, 54% of part-time clinical staff have less than five years teaching experience. This study also explores staff views of various faculty roles. CONCLUSIONS: This report provides a benchmark profile of Irish dental school faculty members. It reflects on the heavily skewed age groups of our current dental educators and the impending retirement of many senior academics. Educational organisations need to explore ways to make a career in dental education financially and sociologically attractive and provide adequate support for existing faculty to ensure their development during these challenging times.

  4. Job requirements compared to dental school education: impact of a case-based learning curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeve, Philip L.; Gerhards, Ute; Arnold, Wolfgang A.; Zimmer, Stefan; Zöllner, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Case-based learning (CBL) is suggested as a key educational method of knowledge acquisition to improve dental education. The purpose of this study was to assess graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL)-based curriculum as regards to key competencies required at their professional activity. Methods: 407 graduates from a patient-oriented, case-based learning (CBL) dental curriculum who graduated between 1990 and 2006 were eligible for this study. 404 graduates were contacted between 2007 and 2008 to self-assess nine competencies as required at their day-to-day work and as taught in dental school on a 6-point Likert scale. Baseline demographics and clinical characteristics were presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD) for continuous variables. To determine whether dental education sufficiently covers the job requirements of physicians, we calculated the mean difference ∆ between the ratings of competencies as required in day-to-day work and as taught in medical school by subtracting those from each other (negative mean difference ∆ indicates deficit; positive mean difference ∆ indicates surplus). Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was calculated to reveal statistical significance (statistical significance pcompetencies required at work and taught in medical school, CBL was associated with benefits in “Research competence” (∆+0.6) “Interdisciplinary thinking” (∆+0.47), “Dental medical knowledge” (∆+0.43), “Practical dental skills” (∆+0.21), “Team work” (∆+0.16) and “Independent learning/working” (∆+0.08), whereas “Problem-solving skills” (∆-0.07), “Psycho-social competence” (∆-0.66) and “Business competence” (∆-2.86) needed improvement in the CBL-based curriculum. Discussion: CBL demonstrated benefits with regard to competencies which were highly required in the job of dentists. Psycho-social and business competence deserve closer attention in future curricular

  5. Physiology education in North American dental schools: the basic science survey series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Medha; Shaw, David H; Pate, Ted D; Lambert, H Wayne

    2014-06-01

    As part of the Basic Science Survey Series for Dentistry, members of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Physiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics Section surveyed directors of physiology courses in North American dental schools. The survey was designed to assess, among other things, faculty affiliation and experience of course directors, teaching methods, general course content and emphasis, extent of interdisciplinary (shared) instruction, and impact of recent curricular changes. Responses were received from forty-four of sixty-seven (65.7 percent) U.S. and Canadian dental schools. The findings suggest the following: substantial variation exists in instructional hours, faculty affiliation, class size, and interdisciplinary nature of physiology courses; physiology course content emphasis is similar between schools; student contact hours in physiology, which have remained relatively stable in the past fifteen years, are starting to be reduced; recent curricular changes have often been directed towards enhancing the integrative and clinically relevant aspects of physiology instruction; and a trend toward innovative content delivery, such as use of computer-assisted instruction, is evident. Data from this study may be useful to physiology course directors, curriculum committees, and other dental educators with an interest in integrative and interprofessional education.

  6. Pharmacology education in North American dental schools: the basic science survey series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Medha; Shaw, David H; Pate, Ted D; Lambert, H Wayne

    2013-08-01

    As part of the Basic Science Survey Series (BSSS) for Dentistry, members of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Physiology, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics Section surveyed course directors of basic pharmacology courses in North American dental schools. The survey was designed to assess, among other things, faculty affiliation and experience of course directors, teaching methods, general course content and emphasis, extent of interdisciplinary (shared) instruction, and impact of recent curricular changes. Responses were received from forty-nine of sixty-seven (73.1 percent) U.S. and Canadian dental schools. The findings suggest the following: 1) substantial variation exists in instructional hours, faculty affiliation, placement within curriculum, class size, and interdisciplinary nature of pharmacology courses; 2) pharmacology course content emphasis is similar among schools; 3) the number of contact hours in pharmacology has remained stable over the past three decades; 4) recent curricular changes were often directed towards enhancing the integrative and clinically relevant aspects of pharmacology instruction; and 5) a trend toward innovative content delivery, such as use of computer-assisted instruction applications, is evident. Data, derived from this study, may be useful to pharmacology course directors, curriculum committees, and other dental educators with an interest in integrative and interprofessional education.

  7. Do maternal factors influence the dental health status of Nigerian pre-school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiola Adeniyi, A; Eyitope Ogunbodede, O; Sonny Jeboda, O; Morenike Folayan, O

    2009-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between maternal related factors and the dental health status of pre-school children in Lagos State, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study of 404 pairs of mothers and their pre-school children was conducted at two selected primary health centres in Lagos State Nigeria. An interviewer administered questionnaire recorded the mother's socio-demographic characteristics and assessed her perception of her child's dental needs, attitude to oral disease prevention, level of dental health knowledge and attitude to oral health. The child's dental status was assessed using the dft index (caries status) and the simplified oral hygiene index. Data analysis tools included Spearman's correlation coefficient and multivariate logistic regression. Maternal age, maternal education, location of residence, maternal knowledge, and attitudes were all positively correlated with the child's caries and oral hygiene status. There were statistically significant correlations between maternal attitude and the oral hygiene index (P = 0.01) and dft score (P = 0.001). Maternal age also had a significant relationship with the child's caries status (P = 0.003). This study concluded that maternal age and attitude were important determinants of caries experience whereas the mother's attitude was an important determinant of oral cleanliness in pre-school children in Lagos State Nigeria.

  8. Electronic health records: a valuable tool for dental school strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filker, Phyllis J; Cook, Nicole; Kodish-Stav, Jodi

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if electronic patient records have utility in dental school strategic planning. Electronic health records (EHRs) have been used by all predoctoral students and faculty members at Nova Southeastern University's College of Dental Medicine (NSU-CDM) since 2006. The study analyzed patient demographic and caries risk assessment data from October 2006 to May 2011 extracted from the axiUm EHR database. The purpose was to determine if there was a relationship between high oral health care needs and patient demographics, including gender, age, and median income of the zip code where they reside in order to support dental school strategic planning including the locations of future satellite clinics. The results showed that about 51 percent of patients serviced by the Broward County-based NSU-CDM oral health care facilities have high oral health care needs and that about 60 percent of this population resides in zip codes where the average income is below the median income for the county ($41,691). The results suggest that EHR data can be used adjunctively by dental schools when proposing potential sites for satellite clinics and planning for future oral health care programming.

  9. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in school going children of Dammam, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Soban Qadir Khan; Imran Alam Moheet; Imran Farooq; Faraz Ahmed Farooqi; Aws Saleh ArRejaie; Mohammad Hassan Abdullah Al Abbad; Abdul Khabeer

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of dental fluorosis and its pattern in primary and permanent teeth among 6-12-year-old Pakistani school going children living in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed between June and September 2014. A total number of screened children were 496 among them 259 were males and 237 were females. World Health Organization′s scale was used to examine children for dental fluorosis. Results...

  10. [The development of the costs of school dental care in the Canton of Zurich from 1967 to 1986].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändle, C R; Marthaler, T M; Menghini, G D

    1990-01-01

    The costs of the school dental services in the Canton of Zurich between 1967 and 1986 were assessed. The data were compiled from the annually submitted requests for financial support which are made by each community to the Cantonal Health Department. The total costs decreased slowly because of the diminishing number of schoolchildren since 1975 and the continually decreasing caries prevalence. Nevertheless, the individual costs per child increased slightly even after correction of the inflation. No clearcut reason explains the unexpectedly slow cost-reduction of the school dental service in the canton. The costs per child were higher in the City of Zurich than in the other communities with a school dental clinic. The costs of dental treatment was lowest in communities with dentists under contract for the school dental service. The reasons for this fact and the advantages of the school dental clinics are discussed. A more transparent structuring of the school dental services in the different communities is necessary and would allow a better analysis.

  11. How the insightful leadership of James English transformed a traditional dental school into a leading educational institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Norman D; Scannapieco, Frank A; Fischman, Stuart L

    2013-01-01

    During the 1960s, the dental school at the University of Buffalo underwent a profound change, as a result of its merger with the State University of New York (SUNY), and, very importantly, because of the outstanding leadership provided by Dean James A. English. This article contrasts what the school was like in 1960 before Dean English's arrival, and what it had become in 1970 when his deanship ended. It also recounts the leadership qualities of Dean English and the measures he took to transform the dental school into a leading educational institution. During his tenure, the school experienced profound change, including integration of medicine with dentistry in the curriculum; "internationalization" of dental education and research; organization of the first Oral Biology Department and PhD graduate program in a dental school in the United States; insistence on "knowledge-driven" dental practice--a concept we now term "evidenced-based dentistry"; the establishment of novel approaches to dental education including the "diagonal" curriculum; incorporation of prevention in practice; elective courses for dental students; and comprehensive clinical care. All of these accomplishments were novel for the day and greatly influenced incorporation of similar innovations in many schools around the world.

  12. Prevalence of dental fluorosis among 12–15 years school children of Bharatpur city: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Vardhan Dubey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Healthy teeth are important for any section of society. Dental caries, the product of man's progress toward civilization, has a very high morbidity potential. Fluoride has been recognized as one of the most influential factor responsible for the observed decline of caries among children as well as adults of these countries. While fluoride is accepted as an effective method to prevent caries, the excessive consumption of fluoride can put teeth at risk of developing dental fluorosis. Aims and Objectives: To assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis among 12–15 years old government and private school children of Bharatpur city, Rajasthan. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was carried out on total 1400 school children, out of which 700 school children were from government schools and 700 were from private schools. Simple random sampling methodology was used to select the sample. The subjects were examined for dental fluorosis according to WHO 1997 assessment form. Results: The prevalence of dental fluorosis was found higher among government school children, that is, 54.5% when compared to private school children, that is, 45.5% respectively, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05. Conclusion: The study showed the increased prevalence of dental fluorosis among government school children as compared to private school children. Dental fluorosis was found to be the major public health problem among both government and private school children of Bharatpur city which needed immediate attention. Regular dental check-ups and routine oral hygiene practice will enable them to lead a healthier life.

  13. Psychometric assessment of anxiety with the Modified Dental Anxiety scale among central Indian adults seeking oral health care to a dental school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C Deogade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety toward dental treatment can cause people to delay or avoid seeking oral health care despite being in need of treatment. Therefore, recognizing such anxious patients and their appropriate management plays important aspects in clinical practice. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the level of dental anxiety (DA, factors affecting it, and anxiety toward dental extraction among adults seeking dental care to a dental school in Central India. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 1360 consecutive patients aged 18–70 years. Participants completed a questionnaire while in the waiting room, which included the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS to assess the level of DA. An additional item was included which asked participants to rate the anxiety felt on having a tooth extracted. Results: Among the study group, 65.1% were men and 34.9% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 41.8% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 53.2% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 5% were suffering from dental phobia. Female participants and younger patients were more anxious (P = 0.0008. Patients who were anxious had postponed their dental visit (P = 0.0008. Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious (P = 0.03. Nearly, 83% reported anxiety toward extraction procedure. A significant association was observed between anxiety toward dental extraction and the patients' gender (P = 0.03, age (P = 0.0007, education level (P = 0.03, employment status (P = 0.0006, income (P = 0.0007, self-perceived oral health status (P = 0.03, and their history of visit to dentist (P = 0.02. Conclusion: Majority of patients in this population revealed high levels of DA. Factors such as age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influence DA to various levels. Extraction followed by injection of local anesthetics and drilling of tooth provoked more anxiety.

  14. Psychometric assessment of anxiety with the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale among central Indian adults seeking oral health care to a dental school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogade, Suryakant C.; Suresan, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anxiety toward dental treatment can cause people to delay or avoid seeking oral health care despite being in need of treatment. Therefore, recognizing such anxious patients and their appropriate management plays important aspects in clinical practice. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the level of dental anxiety (DA), factors affecting it, and anxiety toward dental extraction among adults seeking dental care to a dental school in Central India. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 1360 consecutive patients aged 18–70 years. Participants completed a questionnaire while in the waiting room, which included the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) to assess the level of DA. An additional item was included which asked participants to rate the anxiety felt on having a tooth extracted. Results: Among the study group, 65.1% were men and 34.9% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 41.8% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 53.2% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 5% were suffering from dental phobia. Female participants and younger patients were more anxious (P = 0.0008). Patients who were anxious had postponed their dental visit (P = 0.0008). Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious (P = 0.03). Nearly, 83% reported anxiety toward extraction procedure. A significant association was observed between anxiety toward dental extraction and the patients' gender (P = 0.03), age (P = 0.0007), education level (P = 0.03), employment status (P = 0.0006), income (P = 0.0007), self-perceived oral health status (P = 0.03), and their history of visit to dentist (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Majority of patients in this population revealed high levels of DA. Factors such as age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influence DA to various levels. Extraction followed by injection of local anesthetics and drilling of tooth provoked more anxiety. PMID

  15. The opinions and attitudes of dental school academic staff towards oral healthcare education for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haresaku, S; Mariño, R; Naito, T; Morgan, M V

    2016-08-01

    The term 'oral health care for older adults' has various interpretations, and its meaning is not clear among dental school academic staff. Additionally, there are no theoretical or practical stand-alone courses on oral health care for older adults in Japanese dental schools. To improve oral health care education, we investigated the opinions and attitudes toward oral health care education for older adults among academic staff in dental schools. Data were collected in seven dental schools from May to September 2013 via an online questionnaire survey. Five-hundred-fifty-eight academics (428 male, 130 female) participated (response rate 57%). The average number of years since they had completed a university degree was 20.2 (SD 10.2) years. The majority (Over 90%) of participants perceived that oral health care should be provided in nursing facilities, hospitals, and at home. Its treatments and instructions should include, not only methods of keeping good oral hygiene, but also improvement of oral function such as swallowing training and salivary glands massage. The majority (84.2%) suggested oral health care education should be combined as a one-credit, stand-alone course. Findings indicate that dental academics have an understanding the need for a course in oral health care for older adults. Participants supported the need for further development of education in oral health care for older adults' in Japan, as a separate course on its own right. However there were some different views about content by teaching field. The need for a national core program for teaching oral health care education was suggested. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A school-based epidemiological study of dental neglect among adolescents in a deprived area of the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, G; Evans, P; Stansfeld, S; Marcenes, W

    2012-11-01

    To assess the prevalence of two types of dental neglect (DN) for adolescents attending secondary schools in a deprived inner city area: neglect of the prevention of oral disease (DPN) and neglect of dental treatment (DTN). This study used cross-sectional data from Phase III of the research with East London adolescents community health survey (RELACHS); a longitudinal school-based epidemiological study that followed up a representative random sample of pupils in 29 secondary schools across three boroughs of inner North East London. Participants were clinically examined and answered a supervised questionnaire. DN was assessed in relation to DPN (measured by reference to experience of dental conditions and/or dental pain) and DTN (measured by reference to experience of at least one untreated dental condition and/or dental pain). Dental conditions included dental caries and traumatic dental injuries. Four in ten adolescents in the study experienced DPN and five in ten experienced DTN. Adolescents with special educational needs without a statement, refugee and those 'looked after' by a local authority experienced a higher proportion of both types of DN. In an inner city deprived area, the proportion of adolescents with DN (either DPN or DTN) was of significance. Refugee adolescents and looked after children may be more at risk of DN.

  17. The Relationship of Bi/Polar Personality Patterns with Self-esteem, Stress, and Satisfaction in Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer, James E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The Bi/Polar Inventory of Core Strength was administered to two senior dental classes. This inventory identifies preferences on three fundamental underlying dimensions of personality and yields eight personality patterns, which were subsequently correlated with the students' self-assessment of various aspects of the dental school experience.…

  18. Students' perceptions of materials and techniques used at European dental schools in the education of fixed prosthodontics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Kamell, H.; Kharbanda, A.; Dozic, A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the materials and procedures used by students in dental schools across Europe for teaching fixed prosthodontics. An online questionnaire, containing twenty-eight dichotomous, multiple-choice, and Likert scale rating questions, was sent to students in forty dental

  19. Deprivation and dental health. The benefits of a child dental health campaign in relation to deprivation as estimated by the uptake of free meals at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C; Wohlgemuth, B

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the overall effect of the 1989 Lothian dental health education campaign on 8-year-old school children's dental health knowledge and behaviour and to examine the relationship between free meals and the children's benefit from the campaign...... knowledge and behaviour were evaluated by interviews immediately before and after the campaign. The results showed a significant increase in knowledge about diet and dental health and a significantly higher proportion of children claimed to choose non-cariogenic foods and drinks as a result of the campaign....... Toothbrushing frequency also increased significantly. Ninety-eight per cent of the children enjoyed the campaign and 66 per cent discussed it with their family. Each school was classified according to the proportion of children receiving free school meals, and this showed a statistically significant negative...

  20. Epidemiology of dental caries in Chandigarh school children and trends over the last 25 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyal A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of dental caries in 6, 9, 12 and 15-year-old school children of Chandigarh, selected on a randomized basis was evaluated using Moller′s criteria (1966 and correlated with the various risk factors. The mean deft was found to be 4.0 ± 3.6 in 6 year old and 4.61 ± 3.14 in 9 year old, whereas the mean DMFT in 12 and 15 year old was found to be 3.03 ± 2.52 and 3.82 ± 2.85 respectively. The high prevalence of dental caries in these children was attributed to the lack of use of fluoride toothpaste (80% children, lack of knowledge about etiology of dental caries (98% and frequency of sugar exposures up to more than five times per day (30%.

  1. Cost savings from a teledentistry model for school dental screening: an Australian health system perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estai, Mohamed; Bunt, Stuart; Kanagasingam, Yogesan; Tennant, Marc

    2017-06-05

    Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the costs of teledentistry and traditional dental screening approaches in Australian school children.Methods A cost-minimisation analysis was performed from the perspective of the oral health system, comparing the cost of dental screening in school children using a traditional visual examination approach with the cost of mid-level dental practitioners (MLDPs), such as dental therapists, screening the same cohort of children remotely using teledentistry. A model was developed to simulate the costs (over a 12-month period) of the two models of dental screening for all school children (2.7million children) aged 5-14 years across all Australian states and territories. The fixed costs and the variable costs, including staff salary, travel and accommodation costs, and cost of supply were calculated. All costs are given in Australian dollars.Results The total estimated cost of the teledentistry model was $50million. The fixed cost of teledentistry was $1million and that of staff salaries (tele-assistants, charters and their supervisors, as well as information technology support was estimated to be $49million. The estimated staff salary saved with the teledentistry model was $56million, and the estimated travel allowance and supply expenses avoided were $16million and $14million respectively; an annual reduction of $85million in total.Conclusions The present study shows that the teledentistry model of dental screening can minimise costs. The estimated savings were due primarily to the low salaries of dental therapists and the avoidance of travel and accommodation costs. Such savings could be redistributed to improve infrastructure and oral health services in rural or other underserved areas.What is known about the topic? Caries is a preventable disease, which, if it remains untreated, can cause significant morbidity requiring costly treatment. Regular dental screening and oral health education have the great potential

  2. Noncognitive Indicators as Critical Predictors of Students' Performance in Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, D Graham; Kurunathan, Tania M

    2015-12-01

    Dental educators have traditionally prioritized cognitive indicators (especially undergraduate grade point average and Dental Admission Test scores) in choosing students for admission to dental school. These indicators' role in predicting academic outcomes, including coursework and examination success, is well documented. However, noncognitive predictors including conscientiousness, self-discipline, achievement-striving, task orientation, deliberation, resilience, and situational judgment have also been identified. This study's aims were to assess the significance of noncognitive indicators measured by the version of the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory (NEO PI) known as the NEO-PI-3, determine the place in the curriculum when these indicators' impact was most influential, and compare their influence with that of the cognitive indicators. Analysis was performed on stored data for three classes of dental students from admission through clinical exams at one U.S. dental school. Significant associations were found between NEO-PI-3 domains and facets (especially Conscientiousness) and the outcomes of coursework grades, standardized exam scores, and clinical behavior scores. Multiple regression analyses identified that the noncognitive indicators enhanced the prediction of students' academic and clinical performance early in the curriculum and then equaled or surpassed the predictive impact of cognitive indicators as they progressed through the curriculum sequence. The implications of noncognitive predictors for dental education are discussed including the challenge to identify and then weight the indicators, whether to include them as admissions criteria, how to assess their impact as compared with cognitive measures, the necessity of standardization of assessment, and if and when to evaluate their relevance to professional practice.

  3. Education Status of Oral Genetics at the Fourth Military Medical University and other Chinese Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan Li; Wang, Chang Ning; Fan, Zhi Peng; Jiao, Yang; Duan, Xiao Hong

    To investigate the current state of genetics education at the Fourth Military Medical University (FMMU) and compare it with other dental schools of China. Detailed information about the history and current education status of Oral Genetics in the FMMU were collected and questionnaires were completed to acquire the feedback of twenty-seven students on the course. In the other thirty-five dental schools including the capitals of twenty-five provinces and four municipalities in China, information about the oral genetic course were collected by a telephone survey. The contents of survey included whether or not the Oral Genetic course is offered and some basic information about the curriculum (such as the content, hours, teachers' background and teaching methods). Among a total of thirty-six dental schools investigated, six of them (16.7%) offered the Oral Genetic course or related lectures/seminars. The length and contents of the curriculum vary among these schools. The FMMU offered the oral genetic curriculum both to undergraduates and graduated students. Their teachers had a broad range of backgrounds, such as dentistry, biology, genetics, and biochemistry. The students considered the Oral Genetics course to be helpful for their future professional careers. Genetic education in dentistry in China is still at a preliminary stage. More effort must be paid to spread the knowledge of Oral Genetics in China. In addition, domestic and international communications and networks for Oral Genetics should be set up in the near future.

  4. Dental pain among 10-15 year old children attending oral health promoting schools: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saheer, Abdul; Kousalya, Pallavi Swami; Raju, Rekha; Gubbihal, Radha

    2015-12-01

    Dental pain is a major public health problem and one of the consequences of oral diseases which requires significant adjustments in life management leading to decreased quality of life. To assess prevalence of dental pain and its impact on daily life and to explore its relationship with oral health behavior and clinical oral status among 10-15 year old school children attending oral health promoting schools. This cross sectional study was conducted in 6 schools serving low -middle socio economic strata in Bangalore, India. A total of 1237 children were surveyed for history of dental pain during past 3 month. Participants who reported dental pain completed self-reported oral health behaviour and Child dental pain questionnaire. Clinical oral examination included assessment of dental caries, periodontal status. Data was analyzed using t - test, Chi-square test, ANOVA and Regression Analysis. Prevalence of dental pain was 15.6% (n = 194). Among children with pain, 17%, 43% and 40% reported mild, moderate and severe pain. Impact on daily activities was reported by 66%. Mean DMFT and DMFS was 1.80 and 2.11 Mean deft and defs was 2.47 and 3.41. Multiple logistic regression revealed that severity and impact of dental pain was associated with gender, frequency of tooth brushing, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience. Prevalence of Dental pain is associated with brushing behavior, consumption of sweets and deciduous dental caries experience, showing need for further attention to these conditions and a need to strengthen preventive and therapeutic dental services.

  5. Perception of tobacco use prevention and cessation among faculty members in Latin American and Caribbean dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamí-Maury, Irene; Aigner, Carrie J; Hong, Judy; Strom, Sara; Chambers, Mark S; Gritz, Ellen R

    2014-12-01

    Rates of tobacco use are increasing in the regions of Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). Unfortunately, tobacco cessation education is not a standard component of the dental curriculum in LAC dental schools. The objective of this study was to identify the perceptions of LAC dental faculty members regarding the tobacco use prevention and cessation (TUPAC) competencies that should be addressed in the dental curricula. Dental deans and faculty completed a web-based questionnaire in Spanish, Portuguese, French, or English. The questionnaire contained 32 competencies grouped into the five A's (Ask, Advise, Assess, Assist, and Arrange) of tobacco cessation and six supplementary questions for identifying barriers to providing TUPAC education to dental students. Respondents indicated the degree to which they believed each competency should be incorporated into the dental curricula using a five-point Likert scale ("1" = strongly disagree to "5" = strongly agree). Responses were obtained from 390 faculty members (66 % South America, 18 % Mexico/Central America, 16 % the Caribbean). Of the respondents, 2, 12, and 83 % reported that smoking was allowed in clinical environments, other indoor environments, and outdoor environments of their dental schools, respectively. Mean importance ratings for each of the competencies were as follows: Ask (4.71), Advise (4.54), Assess (4.41), Assist (4.07), and Arrange (4.01). Overall, LAC dental educators agree that TUPAC training should be incorporated into the dental curricula. Assist and Arrange competencies were rated lower, relative to other competencies. Tobacco use among dental educators and high rates of on-campus smoking could potentially pose barriers to promoting cessation interventions in the LAC dental schools.

  6. Prevalence of dental caries and treatment needs among school going children of Chandigarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakar, Jayashri; John, Joseph; Srisakthi, D

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is the most common chronic disease of childhood that interferes with normal nutrition intake, speech, and daily routine activities. Dental caries is a lifetime disease, and the highest priority risk group is school children. To assess the prevalence of dental caries and treatment needs among school going children of Chandigarh. A cross-sectional study was done among school going children of Chandigarh in the age group of 3-17 years. The subjects were selected from four randomly selected schools. All the children from the selected schools were examined. A total of 4493 subjects formed the sample size. Dentition status was assessed using dft index by Gruebbel for primary dentition and DMFT index by Klein, Palmer, Knutson for permanent dentition, respectively. Chi-square test was used to find an association between the study variables. Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used to compare the mean difference. Among the 4493 study subjects, caries prevalence was found to be 47.3%. Mean dft and DMFT score of the population was 1.06 ± 1.995 and 0.41 ± 1.022, respectively. When analyzing the treatment needs among various age groups 42.6% of the study subjects required oral prophylaxis and 45% required restorative procedures. Based on the findings, it can be concluded that high prevalence of caries was found in primary dentition than permanent dentition and most of the decayed teeth were untreated. This study emphasize the need for treating dental caries at its earliest possible stage and parents should be made aware of caries preventive measures for their children.

  7. Dental pain and associated factors in Brazilian adolescents: the National School-Based Health Survey (PeNSE), Brazil, 2009

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Sardinha, Luciana Monteiro Vasconcelos; Paludetto Junior, Moacir; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Peres, Marco A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental pain and associated socio-demographic and behavioral factors in Brazilian adolescents, using data from the National School-Based Health Survey (PeNSE), Brazil, 2009...

  8. Psychological stress and health in undergraduate dental students: fifth year outcomes compared with first year baseline results from five European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, R; Freeman, R; Hammen, S; Murtomaa, H; Blinkhorn, A; Humphris, G

    2008-05-01

    Psychological stress in undergraduate dental students: fifth year outcomes compared with first year baseline results from five European dental schools. To compare the levels of a series of health-related indicators from a cohort of fifth year dental students from five European schools with their first year scores, and to investigate the relationship between these follow-up measures. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), consisting of three scales: Emotional Exhaustion (EE, alpha = 0.90), Depersonalisation (alpha = 0.80) and Personal Accomplishment (alpha = 0.72). Physical health was measured by the Physical Symptoms Questionnaire (alpha = 0.82), psychological distress was measured using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ, alpha = 0.89) and student stress was captured using seven subscales of the Dental Environment Stress questionnaire (DES, alpha = 0.92). A total of 132 fifth year students responded from five dental schools (Manchester, Belfast, Cork, Helsinki and Amsterdam), a 51% response. Fifth year students showed relatively high mean MBI scores when compared with first year results, especially on EE; 39% could be labelled 'high scorers'; 44% of the students met the criteria for 'cases' on the GHQ. Highest mean scores on the DES were obtained on the subscales: Study Obligations, Patient-Related Aspects and Study Pressure respectively. Between schools interesting differences were detected on all variables. As hypothesised, a clear direct effect of stress on both burnout and physical symptoms was shown. An indirect effect of stress on mental health via burnout was shown. Dental students showed a negative development through the years from first to fifth year with regard to EE and psychological distress. Both burnout constructs related to physical and mental health. It is recommended that dental faculty focus on the importance of prevention and intervention of stress amongst undergraduates.

  9. Eruption pattern of permanent molars: implications for school-based dental sealant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthy, R A; Ashton, J J

    1989-01-01

    Dental caries remains a prevalent, chronic disease of childhood. The preponderance of dental caries is located on the pit and fissure surfaces of teeth, an area where dental sealants are most effective in preventing this malady. In the school year 1987-88, 4,879 Ohio schoolchildren participated in an assessment of dental health. Grades chosen for this assessment included 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 11. This study focuses on eruption of first and second permanent molars in development of a timing strategy for placement of occlusal sealants in a school-based program. An eruption score was developed for the determination of the first or second molar eruption status for each child. The data were analyzed for grade, sex, race, locale, fluoridation status, and percent of children on free or reduced-cost lunch programs. Analyses were performed on 2,215 children in grades 1-3 and 1,840 children in grades 6-8. Fifty-seven percent of first graders had all first permanent molars sufficiently erupted for sealant placement on the occlusal surface. Likewise, 23.6 percent of sixth graders had sufficient occlusal exposure on the second molar. Females showed an earlier eruption pattern than males for both first (P less than .05) and second (P less than .001) molars. Black children preceded white children only in the eruption of the second molar (P less than .001). This study provides dental public health decision makers with state-specific information on the earliest time to initiate a school-based occlusal sealant program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries among visually impaired children attending special schools of Chhattisgarh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munot, Harsha; Avinash, Alok; Kashyap, Nilotpol; Baranwal, Rashmi; Kumar, Brij; Sagar, Maylavarapu Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Studies on dental trauma of the normal population have been carried out in the past; however, limited data are available on dental trauma of the handicapped population, especially visually impaired children in Chhattisgarh, India. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) in visually impaired children in relation to age, cause, and place of injury. Epidemiological study was carried out among 400 children from various special schools of visually impaired children of Chhattisgarh followed by school dental checkup camps. All the children completed a questionnaire related history of trauma, cause, and place. The prevalence of TDIs in each special child was recorded based on the Epidemiological classification of TDIs by the WHO and was modified by Andreasen et al. (2007). Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 17. The level of significance was fixed at P ≤ 0.05. Association between categorical variables was done using Chi-square test. The results showed that out of 400 children, 39% suffered from TDIs. Permanent maxillary central incisors were most commonly injured teeth with injuries involving enamel (53%) being most frequently observed. Increased overjet and inadequate lip coverage were significantly associated with the occurrence of trauma. As blind children are at the risk of multiple TDI, it is necessary to create awareness, health education, and periodic screening for appropriate management.

  11. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries among visually impaired children attending special schools of Chhattisgarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Munot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies on dental trauma of the normal population have been carried out in the past; however, limited data are available on dental trauma of the handicapped population, especially visually impaired children in Chhattisgarh, India. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs in visually impaired children in relation to age, cause, and place of injury. Materials and Methods: Epidemiological study was carried out among 400 children from various special schools of visually impaired children of Chhattisgarh followed by school dental checkup camps. All the children completed a questionnaire related history of trauma, cause, and place. The prevalence of TDIs in each special child was recorded based on the Epidemiological classification of TDIs by the WHO and was modified by Andreasen et al. (2007. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 17. The level of significance was fixed at P ≤ 0.05. Association between categorical variables was done using Chi-square test. Results: The results showed that out of 400 children, 39% suffered from TDIs. Permanent maxillary central incisors were most commonly injured teeth with injuries involving enamel (53% being most frequently observed. Increased overjet and inadequate lip coverage were significantly associated with the occurrence of trauma. Conclusion: As blind children are at the risk of multiple TDI, it is necessary to create awareness, health education, and periodic screening for appropriate management.

  12. Does the Structure of Dental Hygiene Instruction Impact Plaque Control in Primary School Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaizzi, Lynda R; Tomar, Scott L; Urdegar, Steven M; Kass, Susan H

    2015-06-01

    A 6-month pilot study was conducted to test the assumption that an interactive, contextualized tooth brushing education program would impact the oral hygiene of low income students. The intervention consisted of an educational program focused on tooth brushing that included interactive sessions with dental professionals and teachers. School 1 students received instruction, toothbrushes, and encouragement to brush their teeth daily after lunch. School 2 students received instruction only. School 3 students only received toothbrushes to remove plaque. Children in all 3 schools were examined by trained dental hygiene students who used plaque disclosing liquid to score the amount of plaque. A predictive correlational design was used to determine the extent that different intervention types and/or demographic/hygiene practices predicted differences in post intervention plaque level, once baseline plaque level was taken into account. A total of 254 first and second grade students in 3 public elementary schools in Miami participated in the study. Overall, mean plaque scores were significantly lower at the 6 month follow-up. Between-group comparisons of the mean follow-up scores, adjusted for the effect of the baseline scores, revealed greater but non-significant plaque reduction at School 1 compared to the other schools, and the presence of significant age and ethnic effects. The most intensive intervention instruction accompanied by repeated practice may lead to improved oral hygiene when compared to instruction alone, when oral hygiene practices and demographic characteristics are taken into account. Design changes intended to increase statistical power may help to explicate these effects. Copyright © 2015 The American Dental Hygienists’ Association.

  13. Dental pain as the predictor for caries experience among school children of Udupi district, south India

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    Sravan Kumar Y

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate child-Dental Pain Questionnaire (Child - DPQ as the predictor for caries experience. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 10-15 year old school children of Udupi district, Karnataka. Prior consent from parents and verbal consent from school children was obtained. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the school authorities. The study was approved by the ethics committee of Manipal University. All the eligible school children completed self- administered Child-DPQ followed by clinical examination for dental caries as per the WHO guidelines under natural day light within the school premises. Results: A total of 306 children participated in the study, of them 56.5% were ≤ 12 years old, 58.8% were males, 50.7% were in government school and 54.9 % were from urban areas. Around 45.1% of the children were caries experienced and the mean child-DPQ was significantly higher among caries experienced children than caries free children (p=0.017. The Area Under the Curve (AUC was 0.567 (p=0.043 and was above the reference line which was suggestive that the curve predicted individuals with disease (caries experience. The optimal cut-off point was considered as 3 points on child –DPQ score with sensitivity of 41.3% and specificity of 70.2% with a positive likelihood ratio of 1.39. Conclusion: The Child – Dental Pain Questionnaire showed to be an acceptable instrument to predict the caries experience among school children.

  14. The teaching of fixed partial dentures in undergraduate dental schools in Ireland and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Singhrao, H; Addy, L D; Gilmour, A S M

    2010-12-01

    All areas of the practice of dentistry are evolving at a considerable pace. One area in particular which has seen a rapid revolution is the oral rehabilitation of partially dentate adults. The aim of this study was to describe the contemporary teaching of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) in dental schools in Ireland and the United Kingdom. An online questionnaire which sought information in relation to the current teaching of FPDs was developed and distributed to 15 Irish and UK dental schools with undergraduate teaching programmes in Spring 2009. Responses were received from 12 schools (response rate=80%). All schools offer teaching programmes in relation to FPDs. The number of hours devoted to pre-clinical/phantom head teaching of FPDs ranged from 3 to 42h (mean: 16h). The staff/student ratio for pre-clinical teaching courses in FPDs ranged from 1:6 to 1:18 (mode: 1:12). Cantilever resin-retained FPDs were the most popular type of FPD provided clinically (average=0·83 per school; range=1-2). Five schools (42%) report that they have requirements (e.g. targets, quotas, competencies) which students must complete prior to graduation in relation to FPDs. Fixed partial dentures form an important part of the undergraduate teaching programme in UK and Irish dental schools. While this teaching is subjected to contemporary pressures such as lack of curriculum time and a lack of available clinical facilities and teachers, there is evidence that teaching programmes in this area are evolving and are sensitive to current clinical practice trends and evidence-based practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Knowledge and performance of dental students with regard to infection control guidelines in Dental School of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ebrahimpour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dentists are at risk of infectious diseases and dental offices can serve as a source of infection transmission if the infection control guidelines are not properly implemented. Adherence to infection control principles can help prevent disease transmission. This study sought to assess the level of knowledge and performance of dental students with regard to infection control principles in dental clinics of School of Dentistry, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. This study was conducted on 87 dental students. Data were collected using a 9-question questionnaire and a 16-item checklist. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 21 and descriptive statistics by calculation of mean and standard deviation (SD, t-test, Chi square test, Kruskal Wallis test and the Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Level of significance was set at P=0.05.Of subjects, 100% were wearing sterile gloves and changed them for each patient, collected and disposed wastes after examination or treatment of each patient, capped the needle after anesthetic injection and changed the dental suction tip; 94% were wearing a mask and changed it for each patient; 89% were wearing clean white coats. The level of knowledge of students was found to be moderate. Also, the performance of students with regard to infection control principles was found to be very good probably due to the rules and regulations set by the dental school departments.

  16. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Primary Preventive Dental Health Education Programme Implemented Through School Teachers for Primary School Children in Mysore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Jaya; Nandlal, B

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of a Primary Preventive Dental Health Education Programme conducted for 6-12-year-old primary school children in Mysore City. A total of 12 schools, one each in the category of Government, Aided, and Unaided, were randomly selected per zone viz., North, South, East, and West. These 12 schools constituted the study group where the Primary Preventive School Dental Health Education Programme (PPSDHEP) was implemented. Two additional schools were selected at random from the four zones to serve as the control. A total of 926 children participated in the study. The PPSDHEP involved the second-level transfer of preventive package wherein the oral health education was imparted to the school children by schoolteachers trained by the investigator. Among the parameters for evaluating the outcome of the programme were the pre and post-programme assessment (at the baseline and at follow-up, i.e., after 6 months) of knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP), dental caries status, oral hygiene, and gingival health status. The results suggest that the PPSDHEP resulted in bringing about an enhancement in the KAP towards oral health and also an improvement in dental caries, oral hygiene, and gingival health status of the school children in the study group. The present study supports the implementation of similar programmes in schools and the contention that schoolteachers are suitable personnel for imparting dental health education to school children on a regular basis.

  17. Are general dentists' practice patterns and attitudes about treating Medicaid-enrolled preschool age children related to dental school training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, K T; Seale, N S; Kanellis, M J; Damiano, P C; Bidaut-Russell, M; McWhorter, A G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study were to investigate the willingness of general practitioners to provide dental care for preschool-aged children, and to explore the relationship between dental school experiences and practitioners' attitudes about treating Medicaid-enrolled children 3 years of age and younger. A survey was mailed to 3,559 randomly selected general dentists in Texas. Respondents were asked to answer questions about their willingness to provide specified dental procedures for children of different ages, their dental school experiences with pediatric dentistry and whether these experiences were hands-on, lecture or no training, and their attitudes concerning treating Medicaid-enrolled children 3 years of age or younger. Associations between attitudes about treating Medicaid-enrolled children and dental school experiences were determined. The response rate was 26%. Almost all respondents were willing to provide routine procedures such as an examination (95%) and prophylaxis (94%) for children 5 years or younger. However, as children became younger and procedures more difficult, the number of general dentists willing to provide treatment decreased. The level of dental school training was significantly associated with the attitudes of general dentists about providing dental care for Medicaid-enrolled preschool-aged children (P dentists' willingness to see young children may improve access by increasing the number who will provide care for preschool-aged children.

  18. Factors associated with receipt of preventive dental treatment procedures among adult patients at a dental training school in Wisconsin, 2001-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Bajorunaite, Ruta; Mehta, Jessica; Hodgson, Brian; Iacopino, Anthony M

    2009-04-01

    Gender differences in oral health-related quality of life and the fear of dental pain in seeking and receiving preventive dental care have been recognized and documented. Preventive dental treatment procedures (PDTPs) are commonly accepted as the primary approach to prevent dental disease. We examined whether the likelihood of receiving PDTPs differed by gender in adult patients receiving dental care at a dental training institution in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Data from the Marquette University School of Dentistry electronic patient management database for 2001 through 2002 were analyzed. Descriptive, bivariate, and multivariable analyses were performed. The preventive procedures used in the study were those coded in accordance with the American Dental Association's classification system: D1110 (adult prophylaxis: professional cleaning and polishing of the teeth), D1204 (adult topical application of fluoride), D1205 (adult topical application of fluoride plus prophylaxis), and D1330 (oral hygiene instruction). Of the 1563 consecutive patient records (888 women, 675 men) reviewed for the years 2001-2002, 794 individuals (51%), aged 18 to 60 years, were identified as having received PDTPs. At the bivariate level, a significant gender difference in the receipt of PDTPs was identified (423 women [48%] vs 371 men [55%]; P = 0.004). In the multivariable analyses, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, poverty level, and health insurance type (public, private, none) were significantly associated with the receipt of PDTPs (all, P dental school patient population. Receipt of PDTPs was associated with other demographic factors such as age, race/ethnicity, marital status, income level, and health insurance.

  19. Barriers to standard precautions adherence in a dental school in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Hamidreza; Marjadi, Brahmaputra; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2014-07-01

    Setting up good infection control practices in educational institutions is crucial in shaping future health professionals. The implementation of standard precautions (SPs) in Iranian dental schools has not been explored qualitatively to identify barriers to good practice. Twelve focus group discussions and 8 semistructured interviews were conducted with students, residents, and staff members (n = 83) of the Shiraz University of Medical Sciences Dental School. The interview guide addressed performance, subjective norms, and behavioral control domains of SP-related behaviors. Thematic analysis was performed manually to identify barriers to SP practices. Proximal factors of poor SP adherence were a lack of knowledge and technical difficulties. These factors were compounded by intermediate factors in the work environment: lack of facilities, heavy workload, patient expectations, interprofessional conflicts, and lack of good role models. Two underlying distal factors were financial issues and unsupportive organizational culture. The social constructionism theory was useful in analyzing the situation and suggesting an educational approach as part of the solution. Complex and intertwined barriers of SP adherence were found in this dental school. A social construction approach may assist in addressing these problems by shifting the culture through education to construct a contextual new knowledge. Further research in medical sociology of SP practices would be useful. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dental fluorosis: concentration of fluoride in drinking water and consumption of bottled beverages in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, N; Torres-Mendoza, N; Borges-Yáñez, A; Irigoyen-Camacho, M E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify dental fluorosis prevalence and to analyze its association with tap water fluoride concentration and beverage consumption in school children from the city of Oaxaca, who were receiving fluoridated salt. A cross-sectional study was performed on elementary public school children. Dean's Index was applied to assess dental fluorosis. The parents of the children who were studied completed a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics and type of beverages consumed by their children. A total of 917 school children participated in this study. Dental fluorosis prevalence was 80.8%. The most frequent fluorosis category was very mild (41.0%), and 16.4% of the children were in the mild category. The mean water fluoride concentration was 0.43 ppm (±0.12). No association was detected between tap water fluoride concentration and fluorosis severity. The multinomial regression model showed an association among the mild fluorosis category and age (OR = 1.25, [95% CI 1.04, 1.50]) and better socio-economic status (OR = 1.78, [95% CI 1.21, 2.60]), controlling for fluoride concentration in water. Moderate and severe fluorosis were associated with soft drink consumption (OR = 2.26, [95% IC 1.01, 5.09]), controlling for age, socio-economic status, and water fluoride concentration. The prevalence of fluorosis was high. Mild fluorosis was associated with higher socio-economic status, while higher fluorosis severity was associated with soft drink consumption.

  1. Description of dental caries on mixed dentition stage of elementary school students in Cibeber Community Health Center

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    Andi Supriatna

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental and oral health are able to affect the quality of life as it relates to the general health condition. Dental and oral health problem that mostly found is dental caries. Dental caries mostly occurs in children, especially in the mixed dentition stage. The mixed dentition stage occurs in elementary school-aged children, marked with premature tooth loss, malocclusions, and tooth decays, that allows food retention as the main cause of dental caries. The purpose of this study was to see the description of dental caries on mixed dentition stage of elementary school students in Cibeber Community Health Center working area. Methods: This research was a descriptive research with cross-sectional approach. The population in this study was elementary school students in Cibeber Community Health Center working area. The sampling method used was purposive sampling method. The caries profile was measured by def-t index for deciduous teeth and DMF-T index for permanent teeth and presented in tabular and diagrams. Results: The results of the study towards 272 elementary school students showed that the average value of def-t index was 3.99 and DMF-T index value was 1.26. The location of the population was in the Cibeber Community Health Center working area that was located in urban areas, with easy access to dental and oral health services and good tendencies towards the awareness of dental and oral health care. Conclusion: The description of dental caries of elementary school students in Cibeber Community Health Center working area based on WHO guidelines by def-t index was classified as moderate category and by DMF-t index was classified as low category.

  2. [Epidemiological study of oral dental health of 4-year-old children in french nursery schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droz, D; Guéguen, R; Bruncher, P; Gerhard, J-L; Roland, E

    2006-09-01

    The departmental service of maternal and infantile protection (PMI) of Moselle (Lorraine region), together with the Paediatric Dentistry Department from Nancy University, organized a study of the dental health of 4-year-old children. To assess the children dental health; to evaluate parental knowledge of dental health; to identify the factors associated with caries amongst children. The study was a cross sectional observation. A random sample of 4-year-old children was selected among 11 586 children in nursery schools. The study was based on a clinical examination performed by a dentist and a structured questionnaire completed by parents. The overall proportion of children affected by caries was 37.5%. The mean dmft score was 1.51 (sd = 2.82) and 11.6% of the children had caries which affected their upper incisors, a sign of early childhood caries. Only 6.2% had received dental treatment on at least 1 occasion. There was a clear disparity in dental health: 1 child out of 3 suffered from caries but 1 out of 2 children in priority education districts was affected, compared with only 1 out of 4 children coming from a rural area. The questionnaires completed by parents showed a lack of knowledge of dental health and inadequate use of current prevention facilities. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the variables that were significantly associated with caries in 4 year-old children were the mother's education, the low social background, the level of consumption of drinks containing sugar by both children and parents, the consumption of fluoride, and the level of knowledge about fluoride. Preventive measures must be developed in close relationship between pediatricians and dentists. Initial training of health care professionals has to be reinforced. Health care professionals in paediatrics are far more likely to meet mothers and young children than are dentists.

  3. Diversity, cultural sensitivity, unequal treatment, and sexual harassment in a school of dental hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Donna P; Henson, Harold A; Turner, Stewart D; O'Neill, Paula N

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cultural environment in the School of Dental Hygiene at the University of Texas Dental Branch (UTDB) at Houston. A 36-item questionnaire was developed and administered to first- (DH1; n=34) and second-year (DH2, n=33) dental hygiene students. Questions explored satisfaction with diversity and interactions with faculty, staff, patients, and other students relative to gender, ethnicity/race, age, and sexual orientation. Data were analyzed using 2x3 and 2x5 contingency tables to calculate the chi square test statistic. Ninety-one percent of the 67 DH students responded. While the majority of students reported satisfaction with the cultural diversity and their interactions at UTDB at Houston, 76% of the DH2 students and 62% of the DH1 students reported that the curriculum did not prepare them to work with patients whose primary language is not English. Eighty-two percent of DH1 students and 59% of DH2 students reported that the curriculum did not prepare them to work with patients with different sexual orientations and religious backgrounds. The DH2 students reported unequal treatment by faculty of another gender (24%) and ethnicity (21%), and sexual harassment by other students (6%). DH1 reported 6%, 12%, and 0%, respectively. Data indicate that dental hygiene students in the UTDB at Houston dental hygiene program experienced unequal treatment and sexual harassment by either faculty, staff, patients, or other students. To create a more culturally sensitive environment, the students, faculty, and staff could benefit from training on diversity, cross-cultural competence and awareness, and sexual harassment prevention and management. The dental hygiene curriculum should be reviewed for the inclusion of topics related to diversity, cultural competence, and sexual harassment.

  4. Prevalence of dental caries among school-going children in Namakkal district: A cross-sectional study

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    Ramachandran Karunakaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of dental caries in primary teeth among 4-6 years old school going children in the Namakkal District. Materials and Methods: The study covered a total of 850 school going children in a total of 26 schools in the Namakkal district of Tamil Nadu. The age group selected for this study ranged from 4 to 6 years of age. Each child was examined in their respective schools by one of the four calibrated examiners and decay, missing and filled teeth (dmft index was recorded along with demographic details. This study was done in September-October 2013 in a span of 1 month duration. Results: Of 850 children examined, 560 (65.88% children had dental caries. Mean dmft score was 2.86. Prevalence of dental caries was higher in boys (69.6% than in girls (61.5%. The untreated decay teeth accounted for 92.4%. Conclusion: The prevalence of dental caries among 4-6 years old children is high in the Namakkal district. The need for the creation of dental awareness among children and their primary caregivers is crucial and the need for developing immediate oral health promotion strategies including an increase in school dental health programs is recommended.

  5. Assessing the Effectiveness of a School-Based Dental Clinic on the Oral Health of Children Who Lack Access to Dental Care: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Rachel; Walker, Mary P.; Liu, Ying; Simmer-Beck, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    This program evaluation examines the effectiveness of a school-based dental clinic. A repeated-measures design was used to longitudinally examine secondary data from participants (N = 293). Encounter intensity was developed to normalize data. Multivariate analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to investigate the effect of encounter…

  6. Psychological stress and health in undergraduate dental students: fifth year outcomes compared with first year baseline results from five European dental schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, R.C.; Freeman, R.; Hammen, S.; Murtomaa, H.; Blinkhorn, A.; Humphris, G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the levels of a series of health-related indicators from a cohort of fifth year dental students from five European schools with their first year scores, and to investigate the relationship between these follow-up measures. Methods: Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout

  7. Paediatric dentistry education of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in Brazilian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, L B; Fell, C; Bonini, G C; Marquezan, M; Imparato, J C P; Mendes, F M; Raggio, D P

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the degree of knowledge, use and teaching of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) of paediatric dentistry lecturers in dental schools throughout Brazil. A structured questionnaire was applied, containing questions regarding the use of ART, socio-demographic characteristics and academic degree background. Descriptive analysis and Poisson's regression were conducted in order to verify the association between exploratory variables and ART teaching (α=5%). Of the 721 questionnaires sent to dental schools, approximately 40% were returned (n=285). Some 98.2% of the participants teach ART. Concerning dental lecturers who teach ART, in multiple regression model, considering ART indication (emergency versus restorative treatment) the lecturers residents of the Mid-West (PR=1.66; CI:1.13-2.45) and Northeast region (PR=1.33; CI:1.02-1.72) and lecturers who use ART regularly (PR=3.73; CI:2.11-5.59) teach ART as restorative treatment. When the question was about reason for using ART (conservative technique versus other techniques failures/fast treatment), lecturers with a longer period of TG (time elapsed since graduation) (PR=1.30; CI:1.08- 1.56) and also lecturers who use ART regularly (PR=2.87; CI:1.95-4.22), teach it as being a conservative technique. Regarding the patients' age covered by ART (versus without limitation), women (PR=1.26; CI:1.06-1.50) and lecturers who use ART regularly (PR=1.28; CI:1.06-1.54), teach that there is no age restriction. ART has been widely taught in Brazilian dental schools, is regularly used in lecturer's clinical practices and has positively influenced the appropriate teaching of this technique.

  8. [Dental caries in an urban school population in Azul, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguillansky, E

    1990-01-01

    The Odontopediatric Service of the Azul Children's Hospital has accomplished this survey in order to know the caries prevalence in students of Azul city (Pcia. Buenos Aires) and to compare its results with a similar research done in April 1968. A group of 518 pupils attending one of the city schools were investigated in order to establish the amount of damage produced by caries in children between 6 and 14 years old.

  9. Assessment of willingness to provide diabetes education and counseling in a dental school clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Dena J; Koerber, Anne

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health concern for the U.S. population because of its high prevalence and long-term health implications. The purpose of this study was to apply the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to assess dental faculty member and student willingness to provide diabetes education and counseling to patients in a dental school. A survey was administered to dental students (n=101 respondents) and faculty members (n=39 respondents), and summary scores for seven diabetic educational activities and TPB constructs were calculated and analyzed. Participants were most willing to refer a patient to a physician for treatment and provide basic information about diabetes and oral health, and they were least willing to provide basic information about diabetic medications. Importance, self-efficacy, and barriers constructs predicted willingness to perform diabetic educational or counseling activities. Our findings suggest that, when developing innovative approaches to expand diabetic education and counseling in our dental education environment, programs should demonstrate how diabetic counseling can improve patients' health and should include diabetic management skills-building in the curriculum.

  10. Transfer students' personality types and their academic performance in a graduate-entry dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Jung Joon; Park, Bo Young; Lee, Gene; Jin, Bo Hyoung

    2012-09-01

    The study was designed to identify how different types of transfer student personality would be constituted in Seoul National University School of Dentistry (SNU SD) and delve into what personal types were often observed more competent in academic performance. Among 40 students who transferred to SNU SD in 2004, 15 students voluntarily participated in completing the Myers-Briggs type indicator (MBTI; GS form); then, it was tested whether or not their MBTI types would be dependent upon their final grades. In addition, another 32 out of the 50 students who were enrolled through a traditional pre-den system served as a control group. It was mainly found that ISTJ type was the most typical one for those transfer dental students as well as for other native dental students who excelled in their academic performance. The noticeable majority of transfer students were Introverted (67%), Sensing (80%), Thinking (86%), and Judging (80%), with S-J pattern being statistically significant. SNU SD has been in a rebuilding process in terms of student/outcome centered dental education to have it up to the global standards. For this reason, it is ultimately a crucial part of that process to understand what personality types of the dental students with different backgrounds in major are observed and thus recognize how to support their learning according to different patterns of individual personality.

  11. Prevalence and self perception of Dental Fluorosis among 15 year old school children in Prakasham district of south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Guntipalli M; Rahamthullah, S A K Uroof; Kopuri, Raj Kumar Chowdary; Kumar, Y Anil; Suman, S V; Balaga, Ramesh Naidu

    2013-12-01

    To assess the Prevalence and self perception of dental fluorosis among 15 - year old school children. A cross sectional study was conducted on 840, 15 - year old school children from 12 schools of Prakasam district. After taking informed consent from their parents or legal representatives, an interview was conducted using a pretested questionnaire to collect the data regarding self perception of dental fluorosis, dental behaviour, and source of water and diet and socio demographic characters. Oral examination was done under natural light to score Deans fluorosis index. Statistical test used was chisquare test. Study revealed that 82.04% of the study population were having dental fluorosis. Out of which only 42.3% were aware of the existing situations. 47.90% of boys are aware of dental fluorosis where as 40.50% of girls are aware of dental fluorosis. Fluorosis score in relation to gender is not statistically significant (chisquare (8.796);p=0.117). Dental fluorosis is a public health problem in Kanigiri town. As there was no study conducted in Kanigiri town even though it is one of the severely affected area in our country. Active steps must be taken to De fluoridate the water before distribution to reduce the morbidity associated with dental fluorosis in this area. How to cite this article: Naidu GM, Rahamthullah SA, Kopuri RK, Kumar YA, Suman SV, Balaga RN. Prevalence and self perception of Dental Fluorosis among 15 year old school children in Prakasham district of south India. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):67-71.

  12. Effect of school environment on dental students' perceptions of cultural competency curricula and preparedness to care for diverse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewlett, Edmond R; Davidson, Pamela L; Nakazono, Terry T; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Carreon, Daisy C; Freed, James R

    2007-06-01

    Reports of oral health disparities among racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic sectors of the U.S. population have hastened development of strategies to address this issue. Among these strategies is revising dental school curricula in order to develop more culturally competent graduates. The present study uses data from the 2003 American Dental Education Association (ADEA) survey of dental school seniors to assess students' perceptions of the adequacy of their cultural competency training. We hypothesize that these perceptions are influenced by multiple student characteristics and contextual factors, including a school's status with respect to the Pipeline, Professions, and Practice initiative of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The California Endowment. Response data from ADEA survey items reflecting student perceptions of adequacy of curriculum time devoted to cultural competency and their preparedness to treat an ethnically and culturally diverse population were analyzed to assess the influence of selected student and contextual factors. Student gender, marital status, and level of educational debt were found to influence the curriculum time variable, and students at California schools reported higher perceived preparedness levels than students at dental schools nationwide. Dental school environments promoting acceptance and respect of diverse ethnicities/cultures and student race/ethnicity were significantly associated with students' perception of the adequacy of curriculum time for cultural competency and students' perception of their preparedness to provide oral health care for racially and culturally diverse groups. The findings provide insight for development of cultural competency curricula and direction for future study in this area.

  13. Strategies for student services for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students in dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Frederick G; Whitehead, Albert W; Gonthier, Mark

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore issues that pertain to the needs of gay men, lesbians, and bisexual and transgender (GLBT) students as a subgroup in U.S. dental schools. The increasing visibility of GLBT persons in all aspects of life is one aspect of the changing face of the U.S. population. Increasingly, there is dialogue about issues related to GLBT persons, their nontraditional families, and their full engagement in society. Recent court decisions, changing policies in states and municipalities, and increasing acceptance in society promote inclusion. Likewise, this dialogue has extended into academic life. In medicine and nursing, GLBT issues include the needs of GLBT patients, the mentoring of faculty and administration, and acculturation of students in a dynamic college environment. Increasing the acceptance of GLBT persons and enhancing the value of diversity throughout the community and within the profession are challenges that must be met. In addition, fostering positive behaviors in a multicultural environment is a priority that is recognized in business and academe. In an effort to assess the present situation in U.S. dental schools, a survey was developed to gather data about support services provided for GLBT students. Based on the results of the survey, a series of recommendations are made to meet the needs of GLBT students, faculty, staff, and administrators in dental education institutions.

  14. Frequency of Color Vision Defect in Students of Mashhad Dental School and Evaluation of Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Daryaeian

    Full Text Available Introduction: In esthetic dentistry, color matching ability is one of the influencing factors in treatment. To achieve this goal, matching the color of restoration with natural teeth is essential. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of color vision defect in students of Mashhad Dental School and evaluation of related factors.Materials & Methods: In this descriptive analytical study, 356 students of Mashhad Dental School were evaluated. Demographic data including age, gender, color vision defect in relatives, use of glasses and contact lenses, refractive errors (myopia, hypermetropia and astigmatism were documented in the designed questionnaire. To determine the impaired color vision, Ishihara diagnostic test was used. Statistical analysis of SPSS version 19 was performed using Chi-Square and Logistic Regression tests at the significance level of 0.05%.Results: Color vision defect was found in 6% (12 persons of male students while none of the females were affected. All affected persons were red-green color blind and strong deutan. There was a significant relationship between color vision deficiency and history of color vision defect in relatives (P= 0.03, so that 25% (3 persons of affected persons had a positive family history of color vision defect. Conclusion: Considering the frequency of color vision defect in the present study as well as the importance of color matching in dental treatments and because most affected persons are unaware of this defect, color vision tests seem necessary.

  15. Association between dental caries and body mass index among hamedan elementary school children in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojarad, F; Maybodi, M Haeri

    2011-01-01

    Excessive weight in children is a major public health concern. The intake of refined carbohydrates, especially sugars and the prevalence of dental caries are well documented in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between dental caries and BMI in elementary school children. The sampling technique used in the present study was a cluster random sampling. A total of 1000 pupils (500 girls, 500 boys) aged 6-11 years from 20 private and state elementary schools (10 boys, 10 girls). The weight status was measured in children by assessment of body mass index (BMI) (=body weight/body height(2) kg/m(2)) corresponding to gender and age-ranked percentages. To assess the caries frequency the decayed filled teeth (DFT) index for permanent dentition and the dft index for primary dentition were used since they give good perception about the situation of tooth caries in young patients. The highest mean total dft/DFT was seen in normal weight and lowest average in at risk of overweight children. There was not a statistically significant relationship found between high weight and caries frequency in the first (p=0.08) and permanent dentitions (p=0.06). The results of this preliminary study do not support an association between dental caries and obesity.

  16. Association Between Dental Caries and Body Mass Index Among Hamedan Elementary School Children in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haeri Maybodi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Excessive weight in children is a major public health concern. The intake of refined carbohydrates, especially sugars and the prevalence of dental caries are well documented in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between dental caries and BMI in elementary school children.Materials and Methods: The sampling technique used in the present study was a cluster random sampling. A total of 1000 pupils (500 girls, 500 boys aged 6-11 years from 20 private and state elementary schools (10 boys, 10 girls. The weight status was measured in children by assessment of body mass index (BMI (=bodyweight/body height2 kg/m2 corresponding to gender and age-ranked percentages.To assess the caries frequency the decayed filled teeth (DFT index for permanent dentition and the dft index for primary dentition were used since they give good perception about the situation of tooth caries in young patients.Results: The highest mean total dft/DFT was seen in normal weight and lowest average in at risk of overweight children. There was not a statistically significant relationship found between high weight and caries frequency in the first (p=0.08 and permanent dentitions (p=0.06.Conclusion: The results of this preliminary study do not support an association between dental caries and obesity.

  17. Embryology and histology education in North American dental schools: the Basic Science Survey Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Dorothy T; Lee, Lisa M J; Lambert, H Wayne

    2013-06-01

    As part of the Basic Science Survey Series (BSSS) for Dentistry, members of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Anatomical Sciences Section surveyed faculty members teaching embryology and histology courses at North American dental schools. The survey was designed to assess, among other things, curriculum content, utilization of laboratories, use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI), and recent curricular changes. Responses were received from fifty-nine (88.1 percent) of the sixty-seven U.S. and Canadian dental schools. Findings suggest the following: 1) a trend toward combining courses is evident, though the integration was predominantly discipline-based; 2) embryology is rarely taught as a stand-alone course, as content is often covered in gross anatomy, oral histology, and/or in an integrated curriculum; 3) the number of contact hours in histology is decreasing; 4) a trend toward reduction in formal laboratory sessions, particularly in embryology, is ongoing; and 5) use of CAI tools, including virtual microscopy, in both embryology and histology has increased. Additionally, embryology and histology content topic emphasis is identified within this study. Data, derived from this study, may be useful to new instructors, curriculum and test construction committees, and colleagues in the anatomical sciences, especially when determining a foundational knowledge base.

  18. [Epidemiological profile of dental occlusion in children attending school in Envigado, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego-Burbano, Paola A; Jiménez-Arroyave, Lina P; Londoño-Bolívar, Miguel Á; Zapata-Tamayo, Mario; Botero-Mariaca, Paola

    2011-12-01

    Ideal occlusion is a hypothetical standard based on teeth's morphological relationships and is characterised by perfection in anatomy and dental position, mesiodistal contacts, arch alignment and dental interdigitation. This investigation was aimed at determining the epidemiological profile of dental occlusion of children attending urban and rural public schools in Envigado during the first semester, 2010. A cross-sectional, prospective, descriptive epidemiological study was carried out on patients ranging from 5 to 12 years of age. A sample size of 436 students from 6 rural schools 6 urban institutions was calculated. The oral cavity was clinically examined and different occlusal variables on the three planes of space were evaluated: sagittal, transversal, and vertical. 436 subjects were evaluated; average age was 8 years (±1.9). The most prevalent malocclusion for permanent dentition was Angle's Class I (49.7%, 176/354), followed by Angle's Class II (43.5%, 154/354) and Angle's Class III (6.8%, 24/354). Angle's Class I malocclusion was the most prevalent condition with alterations in both vertical and transversal planes and space problems in the anterior segment.

  19. Survey of student attitudes towards digital simulation technologies at a dental school in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Q; Wang, Y; Zheng, Q; Ye, L; Zhou, X D; Zhang, L L

    2017-08-01

    Digital simulation technologies have become widespread in healthcare education, especially in dentistry; these technologies include digital X-ray images, digital microscopes, virtual pathology slides and other types of simulation. This study aimed to assess students' attitudes towards digital simulation technologies at a large, top-ranked dental school in China, as well as find out how students compare the digital technologies with traditional training methods. In April 2015, a custom-designed questionnaire was distributed to a total of 389 students who had received digital technology and simulation-based training in West China Dental School during 2012-2014. Results of a cross-sectional survey show that most students accept digital simulation technology; they report that the technology is stimulating and facilitates self-directed and self-paced learning. These findings, together with the objective advantages of digital technology, suggest that digital simulation training offers significant potential for dental education, highlighting the need for further research and more widespread implementation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The emerging dental workforce: short-term expectations of, and influences on dental students graduating from a London dental school in 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Clarke, Wendy; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this research was to identify short-term career aspirations and goals of final-year dental students at a London dental school and the perceived factors that influenced these aspirations. Two methods were used to collect data on final-year students' short-term career plans and influences. Qualitative data were collected through focus groups and analysed using 'framework methodology'. These findings informed a questionnaire survey of all students at the end of their final undergraduate year. Data were entered into and analysed using a statistical software package. Thirty-five students participated in focus groups, with recruitment continuing until data were saturated. Ninety per cent (n=126) of the total population (140) responded to the questionnaire survey; the majority were Asian (70%), female (58%), and aged 23 years (59%). Short-term professional expectations focused around 'achieving professional status within a social context', 'gaining professional experience', 'developing independence' and 'achieving financial stability'. 'Achieving financial stability' was ranked as the most important influence in decision-making about their career in the short term (77%), followed by 'balance of work and other aspects of life' (75%) and 'good lifestyle' (75%). Four out of ten intended to work towards membership of a Royal College and/or becoming a specialist. Proximity to family (81%) and friends (79%) was an important or very important influence on location in the short term. Asian students were significantly more likely to rate 'proximity to family' (p=0.042), working in an 'urban area' (p=0.001) and 'opportunities for private care' (p=0.043) of greater importance than their White counterparts. Short-term aspirations involve 'achieving professional status within a social context', and personal, social, professional and financial goals. Location of future practice was significantly associated with ethnicity.

  1. Adequacy of patient pools to support predoctoral students' achievement of competence in pediatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamassimo, Paul S; Seale, N Sue

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the current status of predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pools in U.S. dental schools and compare their status to that in 2001. A 2014 survey of school clinic-based and community-based dental patient pools was developed, piloted, and sent to pediatric predoctoral program directors in 57 U.S. dental schools via SurveyMonkey. Two follow-up contacts were made to increase the response rate. A total of 49 surveys were returned for a response rate of 86%. The responding program directors reported that their programs' patient pools had declined in number and had changed in character with more diversity and fewer procedures. They attributed the changes to competition, cost, and location of the dental school. The respondents reported that community-based dental education clinical sites continued to provide additional service experiences for dental students, with contributions varying by the nature of the site. A large number of the respondents felt that their graduates lacked some basic pediatric dentistry clinical skills and were not ready for independent practice with children. The results of this study suggest that the predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pool has changed and general dentists may be graduating with inadequate experiences to practice dentistry for children.

  2. The effect of a single educational input given to school teachers on patient's correct handling after dental trauma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahabuka, F.K.; Willemsen, W.L.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Burgersdijk, R.C.W.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of mailed guidelines and seminars to school teachers on self-care actions taken by children after trauma. Data was collected 6 months before and 5 months after provision of the guidelines. Particulars of school children who sought dental

  3. The Impact of Dietary and Tooth-Brushing Habits to Dental Caries of Special School Children with Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Chun-Chih; Hu, Wen-Chia; Tang, Ru-Ching; Chen, Cheng-Chin; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Te

    2010-01-01

    The daily oral activities may severely influence oral health of children with disabilities. In this survey, we analyzed the impact of dietary and tooth-brushing habits to dental caries in special school children with disabilities. This cross-sectional survey investigated 535 special school children with disabilities aged 6-12 years, 60.93% males,…

  4. Dental education in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  5. Dental education in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Jorge A; Pulido, Jairo H Ternera; Castro Núñez, Jaime A; Bird, William F; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2010-03-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty.

  6. The Role of School Social Environment on Dental Caries Experience in 8- to 12-Year-Old Brazilian Children: A Multilevel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María Raquel; Goettems, Marília L; Ardenghi, Thiago M; Demarco, Flávio F; Correa, Marcos Britto

    2015-01-01

    Although children spend most of their time involved in activities related to school, few studies have focused on the association between school social environment and oral health. This cross-sectional study assessed individual and school-related social environment correlates of dental caries in Brazilian schoolchildren aged 8-12 years. A sample of children from 20 private and public schools (n=1,211) was selected. Socio-economic data were collected from parents, and data regarding children characteristics were collected from children using a questionnaire. Dental examinations were performed to assess the presence of dental plaque: dental caries experience (DMFT≥1) and dental caries severity (mean dmf-t/DMF-T). The social school environment was assessed by a questionnaire administered to school coordinators. Multilevel Poisson regression was used to investigate the association between school social environment and dental caries prevalence and experience. The dental caries prevalence was 32.4% (95% confidence interval: 29.7-35.2) and the mean dmf-t/DMF-T was 1.84 (standard deviation: 2.2). Multilevel models showed that the mean dmf-t/DMF-T and DMFT≥1 were associated with lower maternal schooling and higher levels of dental plaque. For contextual variables, schools offering after-hours sports activities were associated with a lower prevalence of dental caries and a lower mean of dmf-t/DMF-T, while the occurrence of violence and theft episodes was positively associated with dental caries. The school social environment has an influence on dental caries in children. The results suggest that strategies focused on the promotion of healthier environments should be stimulated to reduce inequalities in dental caries. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Anxiety in children during occlusal ART restorations in primary molars placed in school environment and hospital dental setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, N M; Sakeenabi, B

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the anxiety in children during occlusal atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) in the primary molars of children; and compare the anxiety for ART procedure performed in school environment and in hospital dental setup. A randomized controlled trial where one dentist placed 120 ART restorations in 60 five- to seven year-olds who had bilateral matched pairs of occlusal carious primary molars. A split-mouth design was used to place restorations in school and in hospital dental setup, which were assigned randomly to contralateral sides. Anxiety was evaluated by Modified Venhem score and the heart rate of the children at five fixed moments during dental treatment. At the entrance of the children into the treatment room, statistically significant difference between treatment in school environment and treatment in hospital dental setup for venham score and heart rate could be found (P = 0.023 and P = 0.037 respectively). At the start of the treatment procedure higher venham score and heart rate was observed in children treated in hospital dental setup in comparison with the children treated in school environment, finding was statistically significant (P = 0.011 and P = 0.029 respectively). During all other three points of treatment, the Venham scores of the children treated in school were lower than those of the children treated in hospital dental setup but statistically not significant (P > 0.05). Positive co-relation between Venham scores and Heart rate was established. No statistically significant relation could be established between boys and girls. Overall anxiety in children for ART treatment was found to be less and the procedure was well accepted irrespective of environment where treatment was performed Hospital dental setup by itself made children anxious during entrance and starting of the treatment when compared to children treated in school environment.

  8. Dental fluorosis and its association with the use of fluoridated toothpaste among middle school students of Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Poornima; Kaur, Suminder; Sodhi, Alka

    2010-01-01

    Fluorosis can manifest as dental fluorosis (seen mostly in secondary dentition), skeletal fluorosis, and systemic fluorosis. Groundwater with high fluoride concentrations, diet rich in fish and tea, indoor air-pollution, and use of fluoride toothpastes may contribute considerably to total exposure. To assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis and associated factors particularly fluoridated toothpastes, among middle school children of a resettlement colony in Delhi. This survey was conducted among the middle school students (VI th -VIII th ) studying in three government schools of Sangam Vihar, South Delhi. Students were examined for dental fluorosis by experts. A pre-structured questionnaire was used to obtain data regarding age, source of drinking water, toothpaste used, etc. Height, weight, and hemoglobin were recorded. Two repeat visits were made. Out of 432 students enrolled in these schools, 413 students were examined. Descriptive and chi-square statistics were used. Dental fluorosis was prevalent in 121 (29.3%) study subjects. It was significantly more in children of age 13 years or above, in those who used fluoridated toothpaste for dental cleaning (P=0.033) and in anemic children (Pdental fluorosis is very common (in about one-fourth) among the middle school children, in this resettlement colony of Delhi, various control measures e.g. discouraging the fluoridated toothpastes, educating parents about fluorosis, de-fluoridation of water in the high risk areas, etc may help to tackle this situation.

  9. Effective admissions practices to achieve greater student diversity in dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Shelia S; Grant-Mills, Donna

    2010-10-01

    In this chapter we describe the institutional and policy-level strategies that dental schools in the Pipeline, Profession, and Practice: Community-Based Dental Education program used to modify their admissions practices to increase the diversity of their student bodies. Schools developed and used clear statements recognizing the value of diversity. They incorporated recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings regarding educational diversity into their revised admissions practices; these rulings cited diversity as both a "compelling interest" and its use in only "narrowly tailored" circumstances. We make a case for admissions decisions based on a comprehensive evaluation that balances the quantitative and qualitative qualities of a candidate. It refutes the practice of overreliance on standardized tests by detailing the whole-file review process to measure merit and professional promise. Also described is a range of noncognitive variables (e.g., leadership, ability to sustain academic achievement with competing priorities, volunteerism, communication, social background, and disadvantaged status) that schools can take into consideration in admissions decisions. Admissions committees can tie this comprehensive review of candidates into the case for promoting cross-cultural understanding and enhanced competence to provide care to patients from diverse backgrounds. In addition, the chapter reviews the challenges schools face in developing admissions policies and procedures that reflect the university's mission for diversity. It addresses the importance of a diverse composition of the admissions committee. It also describes how tailored workshops and technical assistance for admissions committees can help schools improve their student diversity and how admissions committees can engage in a process of periodic review of their diversity objectives in relationship to the school's mission.

  10. CAREER PLANS OF GRADUATES OF A CANADIAN DENTAL SCHOOL: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A 5-YEAR SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Usama; Fairbanks, Connor; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Kilistoff, Alan; Easton, Rick

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive data on the characteristics and opinions of graduating dental students in Canada are lacking. Specifically, only minimal information is available on graduates' immediate career plans and factors that may influence their decisions regarding these plans. Our aim was to gather such data to allow better understanding of this issue and improve the design of future studies on this topic. The Career Development Committee at the school of dentistry, University of Alberta, designed a short survey to be administered to graduating students over 5 years to gain insight into their immediate career plans and opinions on career services at the school. Preliminary results from 2012-2014 are reported here. With a response rate of close to 90% (n = 99/111), the data reveal considerable differences in immediate career plans between the surveyed students and those in other schools in Canada and the United States. Of the students, 89% were planning to work in a general dental practice and only 9% were planning to enroll in advanced education, including general practice residency training. More research is needed to better understand the factors affecting career path decisions of students.

  11. Dental Caries Status, Socio-Economic, Behavioral and Biological Variables among 12-Year-Old Palestinian School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgan-Cohen, H D; Bajali, M; Eskander, L; Steinberg, D; Zini, A

    2015-01-01

    There are currently inadequate data regarding the prevalence of dental caries and its associated variables, among Palestinian children. To determine the current prevalence of dental caries and related variables, among Palestinian children in East Jerusalem. A stratified sample of 286 East Jerusalem Palestinian children was selected, employing randomly chosen sixth grade clusters from three pre-selected socio-economic school groups. Dental caries was recorded according to WHO recommendations. Salivary flow, pH, buffer capacity and microbial parameters, were recorded according to previously employed methodologies. The mean level of caries experience, by DMFT, was 1.98 ± 2.05. This level was higher than those found among Israeli children, but lower than several other Middle Eastern countries. In uni-variate analysis, significant associations were revealed between caries and school categories, which indicated lower, middle and higher socio-economic position(SEP), mothers' employment, home densities, dental visits, tooth brushing, Streptococci mutans (SM), Lactobacilli (LB), and saliva pH. According to a linear logistic regression model, children learning in lower SEP schools, with higher SM levels and more acidic saliva, had a higher chance of experiencing dental caries. These findings should be considered in the planning of services and dental health care programs for Palestinian children.

  12. Evaluation of a comprehensive clinical dentistry course at dental schools in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidar Al-Alawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to evaluate a Comprehensive Clinical Dentistry Course conducted at two dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional cohort study was conducted in two dental schools: King Saud University (KSU and University of Dammam (UOD. The study subjects were students (42 UOD and 30 KSU, patients (32 UOD and 46 KSU, and faculty members (8 UOD and 7 KSU. Evaluations were collected using self-administered surveys. Results: The response rates were 72%, 78%, and 32% for students, patients, and faculty members, respectively. The students′ evaluations demonstrated that case acceptance by supervisors was one of the difficulties facing 57.14% of UOD students compared to 30% of KSU students. The majority of faculty members (39% were restorative specialists (25% UOD, 42.86% KSU. The overall evaluation of UOD faculty members was fair (50% or good to very good (50%. For KSU faculty members, the overall evaluation was good (50% or very good (50%. The mean age of the patients was 33.26 years. The level of education of the study subjects was either secondary school (43.6% or university level (35.9%. Most of the study subjects knew about the program from their friends (57.7%. Approximately 96.1% of the study subjects were satisfied with the overall treatment of students. Discussion: The fundamental aim of the students was to have their cases accepted as early as possible to complete requirements on time. Conclusion: Dental students displayed relatively high psychological stress in relation to case acceptance by their supervisors. Demonstrating good attitude and quality treatment can increase the flow of patients.

  13. Caries with Dental Fluorosis and Oral Health Behaviour Among 12-Year School Children in Moderate-Fluoride Drinking Water Community in Quetta, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Erum; Vichayanrat, Tippanart; Satitvipawee, Pratana

    2016-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of dental caries and its relationship with dental fluorosis, oral health behaviour and dietary behaviour among 12-year school children in moderate-fluoride drinking water community in Quetta, Pakistan. Cross-sectional study. Government and private schools of Quetta, from November 2012 to February 2013. Atotal of 349 children aged 12-year from 14 randomly selected schools were included. The data collection was done on questionnaire designed for children. Dental caries status was examined by using WHO criteria. Dental caries was found in 81 children (23.2%) with mean DMFT0.61. Boys had 1.6 times more chance to have dental caries than girls. Dental fluorosis was found in 63.6% of children with majority of moderate degree (50.5%). Dental fluorosis status was found significantly associated with dental caries status in children. The children who had mild, moderate and severe fluorosis, had 4 times more chances to develop caries than those who did not have fluorosis. There was no significant association between children's caries status and use of paste, brushing habit, miswak, and visit to the dentist. The use of pastries and juices had a direct relation with the children's dental caries status. Dental caries in children of Quetta is not so much frequent as compared to the fluoride deficient countries. However, the high prevalence of moderate dental fluorosis and consumption of pastries and juices resulted in dental caries.

  14. Validity of Peer Evaluation for Team-Based Learning in a Dental School in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigawa, Keisuke; Hayama, Rika; Omoto, Katsuhiro; Okura, Kazuo; Tajima, Toyoko; Suzuki, Yoshitaka; Hosoki, Maki; Ueda, Mayu; Inoue, Miho; Rodis, Omar Marianito Maningo; Matsuka, Yoshizo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity of peer evaluation for team-based learning (TBL) classes in dental education in comparison with the term-end examination records and TBL class scores. Examination and TBL class records of 256 third- and fourth-year dental students in six fixed prosthodontics courses from 2013 to 2015 in one dental school in Japan were investigated. Results of the term-end examination during those courses, individual readiness assurance test (IRAT), group readiness assurance test (GRAT), group assignment projects (GAP), and peer evaluation of group members in TBL classes were collected. Significant positive correlations were found between all combinations of peer evaluation, IRAT, and term-end examination. Individual scores also showed a positive correlation with group score (total of GRAT and GAP). From the investigation of the correlations in the six courses, significant positive correlations between peer evaluation and individual score were found in four of the six courses. In this study, peer evaluation seemed to be a valid index for learning performance in TBL classes. To verify the effectiveness of peer evaluation, all students have to realize the significance of scoring the team member's performance. Clear criteria and detailed instruction for appropriate evaluation are also required.

  15. Mouthguard use and dental injury in sport: a questionnaire study of national school children in the west of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Margaret; Evans, David S; Hewson, Antonia; Owens, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    The risk of children getting dental injuries during sport can be minimised by using a mouthguard. Within Ireland, information on mouthguard use and policy is limited. The extent of dental trauma experienced by children during sport is also unclear. To determine the extent of mouthguard use, dental trauma and barriers to use among children. The survey also investigated school and sports club policy on mouthguard use in sport. A questionnaire was sent to parents of 1,111 children aged nine to 13 years attending 25 randomly selected schools in the Health Service Executive West region of Ireland. It sought information about children's sporting activities, mouthguard policy and use, barriers to use, and dental accidents. A total of 505 questionnaires were returned (46%). More than nine out of ten children were involved in sport. Mouthguards were worn by 22% of children during sport. Less than one-third of schools and sports clubs that children attended had a mouthguard policy. Significantly more children used mouthguards where there was a mouthguard policy. Reasons for not wearing mouthguards included cost, lack of knowledge and information, and lack of a mouthguard policy. One in ten children had suffered a sports accident in the previous year, of which 51% injured teeth. Of these, 72% visited a dentist within two hours. The dental profession and individual practitioners should promote mouthguard use for children during sport and be advocates for the development of policies in schools and sporting organisations.

  16. Reasons for late seeking of dental care among dental patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine reasons for seeking dental care at late stages of oral diseases among dental patients attending the dental clinics at the School of Dentistry MUHAS. Materials and Methods: A total of 365 dental patients aged 15+ years who attended outpatient dental clinics of School of Dentistry MUHAS as first visit during ...

  17. The Prevalence of Bruxism and Correlated Factors in Children Referred to Dental Schools of Tehran, Based on Parent's Report

    OpenAIRE

    Farid Zayeri; Jaleh Nikfarjam; Rahil Ahmadi; Sara Ghadimi; Mehdi Shahrabi; Fatemeh Pour-Taghi; Bahman Seraj; Hadi Zare

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Bruxism is defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bruxism and correlated factors in children referred to dental schools of Tehran, based on parents' report.Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 600 4-12 year-old children with a mean age of 7.4±2.4 years, who were referred to four dental schools in Tehran. After collecting information with questionnair...

  18. Students' perceptions of effective learning experiences in dental school: a qualitative study using a critical incident technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoroff, Kristin Zakariasen; Hogan, Sarah

    2006-02-01

    Students' views of their educational experience can be an important source of information for curriculum assessment. Although quantitative methods, particularly surveys, are frequently used to gather such data, fewer studies have employed qualitative methods to examine students' dental education experiences. The purpose of this study is to explore characteristics of effective learning experiences in dental school using a qualitative method. All third-year (seventy) and fourth-year (seventy) dental students enrolled in one midwestern dental school were invited to participate. Fifty-three dental students (thirty-five male and eighteen female; thirty-two third-year and twenty-one fourth-year) were interviewed using a critical incident interview technique. Each student was asked to describe a specific, particularly effective learning incident that he or she had experienced in dental school and a specific, particularly ineffective learning incident, for comparison. Each interview was audiotaped. Students were assured that only the interviewer and one additional researcher would have access to the tapes. Data analysis resulted in identification of key themes in the data describing characteristics of effective learning experiences. The following characteristics of effective learning experiences were identified: 1) instructor characteristics (personal qualities, "checking-in" with students, and an interactive style); 2) characteristics of the learning process (focus on the "big picture," modeling and demonstrations, opportunities to apply new knowledge, high-quality feedback, focus, specificity and relevance, and peer interactions); and 3) learning environment (culture of the learning environment, technology). Common themes emerged across a wide variety of learning incidents. Although additional research is needed, the characteristics of effective learning experiences identified in this study may have implications for individual course design and for the dental school

  19. Post-operative complications following dental extractions at the School of Dentistry, University of Otago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Darryl C; Al-Hassiny, Haidar H; Ain, Adrian B; Broadbent, Jonathan M

    2014-06-01

    To determine the frequency and correlates associations of post-extraction complications at a dental school. Retrospective review of patient records. Exodontia clinic at the School of Dentistry, University of Otago, Dunedin. Provider characteristics, patient demographic characteristics, patient medical history, teeth extracted and occurrence of postoperative complications. Of the 598 extractions (540 routine and 58 surgical) which were undertaken in the audit period, 74 (12.4%) resulted in post-operative complications. Dry socket and post-operative pain were the major complications. A higher complication rate was found among patients treated by fourth-year undergraduate students than among those treated by more senior students or staff. Post-operative complications were not significantly associated with patients' ethnicity or medical history. The rate of postoperative complications at the Univeristy of Otago's Faculty of Dentistry is consistent with reports in existing literature and inversely associated with operators' experience.

  20. Dental Aesthetic Index of school students in Telangana region - An epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anita, G; Kumar, G Anil; Reddy, Vamsi; Reddy, T Praveen Kumar; Rao, M S Rama; Wankhade, Swapnil B

    2013-12-01

    Malocclusion should be identified at its earliest before it produces any detrimental effects. The objective of this study is to evaluate the orthodontic status and treatment need of school children in Telangana region, Andhra Pradesh, using Dental Aesthetic Index. One thousand children in the age group of 12 - 14 years who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were considered. The demographic details of the students along with the information on the orthodontic status were collected using a predesigned questionnaire by a single orthodontist. The information on orthodontic status was obtained using Dentofacial Anomalies with the criteria of Dental Aesthetic Index (W H O Oral Health Assessment form 1997). RESULTS were subjected to ANOVA, Tukeys test and chi square test using SPSS, version 16. 86.1% of the subjects had DAI score of less than 25, suggesting 'no treatment'; 10% had DAI score of 26-30, suggesting 'elective treatment'; 3% had DAI score of 31-35, suggesting 'highly desirable treatment'; 0.9% had DAI score of >36, indicating 'mandatory treatment'; Higher prevalence of malocclusion among females than males. It is necessary to identify this abnormality at its earliest before it produces detrimental effects. It is also essential to know the prevalence of malocclusion in any society, as it reveals the true extent of the problem and guides in overcoming it. The general public can, then, be educated on widespread occurrence of malocclusion and its deleterious effects, so that appropriate preventive and corrective measures can be instituted. How to cite this article: Anita G, Kumar GA, Reddy V, Reddy TP, Rao MS, Wankhade SB. Dental Aesthetic Index of school students in Telangana region - An epidemiological study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):55-60 .

  1. Analysis of health behaviour change interventions for preventing dental caries delivered in primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, P M; Burnside, G; Pine, C M

    2013-01-01

    To improve oral health in children, the key behaviours (tooth brushing and sugar control) responsible for development of dental caries need to be better understood, as well as how to promote these behaviours effectively so they become habitual; and, the specific, optimal techniques to use in interventions. The aim of this paper is to describe and analyse the behaviour change techniques that have been used in primary school-based interventions to prevent dental caries (utilizing a Cochrane systematic review that we have undertaken) and to identify opportunities for improving future interventions by incorporating a comprehensive range of behaviour change techniques. Papers of five interventions were reviewed and data were independently extracted. Results indicate that behaviour change techniques were limited to information-behaviour links, information on consequences, instruction and demonstration of behaviours. None of the interventions were based on behaviour change theory. We conclude that behaviour change techniques used in school interventions to reduce dental caries were limited and focused around providing information about how behaviour impacts on health and the consequences of not developing the correct health behaviours as well as providing oral hygiene instruction. Establishing which techniques are effective is difficult due to poor reporting of interventions in studies. Future design of oral health promotion interventions using behaviour change theory for development and evaluation (and reporting results in academic journals) could strengthen the potential for efficacy and provide a framework to use a much wider range of behaviour change techniques. Future studies should include development and publication of intervention manuals which is becoming standard practice in other health promoting programmes. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Where is leadership training being taught in U.S. dental schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S; Parkinson, Joseph W

    2012-06-01

    Since leadership is vital in all professions and organizations, the purpose of this study was to determine where in dental schools leadership for predoctoral students is taught and to what degree it is emphasized in order to establish a baseline from which to generate recommendations for best practices. Academic deans of U.S. dental schools were surveyed to determine where in the curriculum leadership is taught and emphasized. The response rate was 39 percent returned completed surveys. These responses were representative of all geographic regions of the country, with equitable distribution between private and public institutions. The results showed that leadership training is delivered in many different parts of the curriculum and at various levels. Generally, the respondents indicated that leadership education is delivered in the setting of practice management, community out-reach, or public health. In some cases, specific training programs are dedicated to leadership development. Thus, several models for leadership development were identified, showing design flexibility in addressing regional and national needs. In the future, it would be of value to assess the effectiveness of the various models and whether single or multiple pathways for leadership training are most beneficial.

  3. A faculty group practice-driven credentialing and privileging infrastructure in a school of dental medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Friedland, Bernard; White, Robert R; Zavras, Athanasios; Da Silva, John D; Timothé, Peggy; Gallucci, German; Donoff, Bruce R

    2010-04-01

    Credentialing and assigning clinical privileges are well-established practices in institutions that need to verify a clinician's ability to provide direct patient care services. The credentialing process verifies a provider's credentials to practice his or her profession, while privileging authorizes the individual to perform enumerated procedures within a specific scope of practice. All clinical faculty members at Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) practice in the Faculty Group Practice (FGP). Because of the number of practitioners in the FGP, the organization instituted a more formal process of credentialing that verifies that practitioners are not only licensed to practice, but also are competent to provide direct patient care. In contrast to other dental schools that have established similar protocols, HSDM approached the process not from the academic side, but rather from the clinical practice side, explicitly taking into account whether the FGP could accommodate another practitioner when an academic department wished to appoint a new faculty member. In doing so, we had to be careful to reconcile our educational and research needs with those of the FGP. In this article, we describe how, within this framework, we established a credentialing and privileging program in which all full- and part-time faculty members, as well as advanced graduate students, were included.

  4. Where is Leadership Training Being Taught in U.S. Dental Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, Russell S.; Parkinson, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership is vital in all professions and organizations. Our purpose was to determine where in dental schools leadership is taught, and to what degree it is emphasized so that we could establish a base line from which to generate recommendations for best practices. Therefore we surveyed all US Deans of Academic Affairs in Dental Schools to determine where in the curriculum leadership is taught and emphasized. Our results showed that leadership training is delivered in many different parts of the curriculum, and at various levels. Generally, respondents indicated that leadership education is delivered either in the setting of practice management, community outreach or in public health settings. In some cases, specific training programs are dedicated specifically to leadership development. Thus several models for leadership development were identified showing design and flexibility to address regional and national needs. In the future it would be of value to assess the effectiveness of the different models and whether single or multiple pathways for leadership training are most beneficial. PMID:22659699

  5. Determination of Prevalence of Dental Erosion in 12 - 14 Years School Children and Its Relationship with Dietary Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbaz, Uzma; Quadir, Fauzia; Hosein, Tasleem

    2016-07-01

    To determine the frequency of dental erosion in 12-14 years school children and its association with dietary habits. Observational cross-sectional analytical study. Fatima Jinnah Dental College, Karachi, from January to June 2010. School children aged between 12 - 14 years were included in this study. Dental erosion was detected by visual examination. Aself-developed questionnaire was used to assess the dietary habits of children. Acidic diet was considered a diet that has an acidic pH. The amount of consumption of acidic drinks and food per week was categorized into low consumption (1 - 7 times / week) and medium consumption (8 - 21 times / week). Chi-square test was applied to see any statistical difference between diet and tooth erosion at 95% CI. The results showed a high frequency of (46%) dental erosion in children, which was significantly higher (p children with more acidic diet. This study highlights the impact of dietary habits on the prevalence of dental erosion in children. Acidic diets need to be controlled in frequency to prevent dental erosion.

  6. Geriatrics education in U.S. dental schools: where do we stand, and what improvements should be made?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Naomi; Goldblatt, Ruth S; Reisine, Susan

    2013-10-01

    The number of adults above sixty-five years of age in the United States will expand considerably over the next thirty years. However, many dentists believe that their dental education did not adequately prepare them to treat an older adult population. Consequently, it is important to review dental curricula to determine where these gaps in education may occur and what can be done to address them in order to improve access to care. In this study, information was gathered from the websites of sixty-two U.S. dental schools in order to understand the types of geriatric courses offered. This review revealed that while most schools (89 percent) provide their predoctoral students with some education in geriatrics, only fourteen (22.6 percent) offer clinical training specifically for older adult care. In addition, forty-three schools (69 percent) include a geriatric component in either their General Practice Residency or Advanced Education in General Dentistry programs or have a certificate program in geriatric dentistry. Only about 23 percent of the schools offer a continuing education course in geriatrics at any one time. Previous studies have shown that clinical training is the most effective method of increasing students' confidence in treating older patients. Consequently, dental schools should work to incorporate clinical experience into geriatric education to prevent widening an existing gap in older adult oral health care.

  7. Dental education in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, David; Komabayashi, Takashi; Reyes-Vela, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about dental education in Mexico, including its history, the dental school system, curriculum and dental licensure. In 1977, there were only 59 Mexican dental schools; however, there were 83 schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Forty-one dental schools are public, and the other 42 are private. Every year the number of private dental schools increases. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma. All classes are conducted in Spanish. To obtain licensure in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5-year program plus a year of community service. No formal nationwide standard clinical/didactic curriculum exists in Mexico. There are approximately 153,000 dentists in Mexico, a number that increases each year. The dentist-patient ratio is approximately 1:700. However, the high percentage of inactive licensed dentists in Mexico points to a serious problem.

  8. Prevalence of Dental Implants and Evaluation of Peri-implant Bone Levels in Patients Presenting to a Dental School: A Radiographic Cross-Sectional 2-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Eylem Ayhan; Mau, Lian Ping; Schoolfield, John; Guest, Gary F; Cochran, David L

    To evaluate the number of patients with dental implants who present to a dental school clinic for screening and to report the prevalence of peri-implant bone level change detected on digital panoramic radiographs of those subjects. Patient screening files for 9,422 patients over a 2-year period were examined to see how many patients presented with dental implants. Those patients with at least one implant were further evaluated by measuring the bone level on the mesial and distal sides of the implant using the screening radiograph. A total of 187 patients (2%) had at least one implant. In regard to implants, 423 were examined and 146 (33%) had no detectable bone loss defined as bone level below the top of the implant. When thresholds of bone loss were evaluated, 109 implants (25%) had ≥ 2 mm of bone loss on either the mesial or distal sides or both. The median bone loss was 1.74 mm for the 277 implants with detectable bone loss and 2.97 mm for the 109 implants that had ≥ 2 mm bone loss. Interestingly, patients who were ≥ 70 years of age had significantly (P = .03) more bone loss in the mandible compared with the maxilla, while patients who were 60 to 69 years of age had significantly greater loss in the maxilla. These data reveal that for patients presenting to the dental school for a screening over a 2-year period, 1.98% had one or more dental implants. Furthermore, those patients with implants had a minimum amount of bone loss as measured from the top of the implant.

  9. Dental caries prevalence, oral health knowledge and practice among indigenous Chepang school children of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai Dixit, Lonim; Shakya, Ajay; Shrestha, Manash; Shrestha, Ayush

    2013-05-14

    Chepang communities are one of the most deprived ethnic communities in Nepal. According to the National Pathfinder Survey, dental caries is a highly prevalent childhood disease in Nepal. There is no data concerning the prevalence of caries along with knowledge, attitude and oral hygiene practices among Chepang schoolchildren. The objectives of this study were to 1) record the prevalence of dental caries 2) report experience of dental pain 3) evaluate knowledge, attitude and preventive practices on oral health of primary Chepang schoolchildren. A cross sectional epidemiological study was conducted in 5 government Primary schools of remote Chandibhanjyang Village Development Committee (VDC) in Chitwan district. Ethical approval was taken from the Institutional Review Board within the Research Department of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Tribhuvan University. Consent was obtained from parents for conducting clinical examination and administrating questionnaire. Permission was taken from the school principal in all schools. Data was collected using a pretested questionnaire on 131 schoolchildren aged 8-16-year- olds attending Grade 3-5. Clinical examination was conducted on 361 school children aged 5-16 -year-olds attending grade 1-5. Criteria set by the World Health Organization (1997) was used for caries diagnosis. The questionnaires, originally constructed in English and translated into Nepali were administered to the schoolchildren by the researchers. SPSS 11software was used for data analysis. Caries prevalence for 5-6 -year-old was above the goals recommended by WHO and Federation of Dentistry international (FDI) of less than 50% caries free children. Caries prevalence in 5-6-year-olds was 52% and 12-13-year-olds was 41%. The mean dmft/DMFT score of 5-6 -year-olds and 12 -13-year -olds was 1.59, 0.31 and 0.52, 0.84 respectively. The DMFT scores increased with age and the d/D component constituted almost the entire dmft/DMFT index. About 31% of 8-16-year

  10. A Cross-sectional Study of Patients' Satisfaction with Dental Care Facilities: A Survey of Adult Treatment at The University of the West Indies, School of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkaran, R L; Osoba, T; Rafeek, R

    2014-09-01

    To determine the level of satisfaction with adult dental care at The University of the West Indies (UWI), School of Dentistry, using the Dental Satisfaction Questionnaire (DSQ) developed by Davies and Ware (1982) and to inferentially explore the factors associated with various patients' demographics. A cross-sectional study was performed among adult dental patients attending UWI adult dental clinics. Data were collected using a self- administered, structured questionnaire which consisted of 19 questions on three subscales of pain management, quality and access (total). Sixty-nine per cent were female, 40% were between 45 and 64 years old, and 31.3% had excellent self-rated dental health status. A Dental Satisfaction Index (DSI overall) of 76.42% satisfaction was found, with the highest satisfaction subscale for quality (81.17%), while access (72%) was the lowest occurring subscale. The mean DSI was 3.57 for the UWI emergency dental clinic and 3.87 for the polyclinic. The difference between the DSI overall in the emergency clinic compared to the polyclinic was statistically significant (p dental care at the UWI dental school. Self-rated oral health status may be important in patients' satisfaction. Policies and strategies promoting preventive dental advice are likely to improve patients' satisfaction with dental care and may lead to increased satisfaction with dental services.

  11. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations.

  12. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to the anterior teeth among three to thirteen-year-old school children of Tamilnadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Govindarajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and associated variables with the specific condition. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of traumatic dental injuries (TDI to anterior teeth among 3 to 13 years old Chidambaram school children. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. Materials and Methods: A total of 3200 school children in the age group of 3-13 years were selected from 10 schools of Chidambaram, Tamilnadu. Information concerning sex, age, cause of trauma, number of injured teeth, type of the teeth, lip competence, terminal plane relationship and the molar relationship were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical software EPIINFO (Version 6.0 was used for statistical analysis. In the present study, P≤0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The trauma prevalence in the present study was 10.13%. Children with class I type 2 and mesial step molar relationship exhibited more number of dental injuries. Enamel fracture was the most common injury recorded. Only 3.37% of the children had undergone treatment. Conclusion: The high level of dental trauma and low percentage of children with trauma seeking treatment stresses the need for increased awareness in Chidambaram population.

  13. Prevalence of traumatic dental injuries to the anterior teeth among three to thirteen-year-old school children of Tamilnadu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Mohan; Reddy, Venugopal N.; Ramalingam, Krishnakumar; Durai, Kaliyamoorthy Sugumaran; Rao, Prasad Arun; Prabhu, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Context: Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health. The primary requisite before actively dealing with such problems is to describe the extent, distribution, and associated variables with the specific condition. Aims: The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and distribution of traumatic dental injuries (TDI) to anterior teeth among 3 to 13 years old Chidambaram school children. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data was collected through a survey form and clinical examination. Materials and Methods: A total of 3200 school children in the age group of 3-13 years were selected from 10 schools of Chidambaram, Tamilnadu. Information concerning sex, age, cause of trauma, number of injured teeth, type of the teeth, lip competence, terminal plane relationship and the molar relationship were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical software EPIINFO (Version 6.0) was used for statistical analysis. In the present study, P≤0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The trauma prevalence in the present study was 10.13%. Children with class I type 2 and mesial step molar relationship exhibited more number of dental injuries. Enamel fracture was the most common injury recorded. Only 3.37% of the children had undergone treatment. Conclusion: The high level of dental trauma and low percentage of children with trauma seeking treatment stresses the need for increased awareness in Chidambaram population. PMID:22919215

  14. Long-term effect of intensive prevention on dental health of primary school children by socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Julia; Jablonski-Momeni, Anahita; Ladda, Annett; Pieper, Klaus

    2017-12-29

    Children in a German region took part in regular toothbrushing with fluoride gel during their time in primary school after having received a preventive program in kindergarten. The study aimed at determining the dental health of the students as a function of prevention in kindergarten and at school while taking into account their socioeconomic status and other confounders. The subjects were in six groups: groups 1 and 2, intensive prevention in kindergarten with and without fluoride gel at school; groups 3 and 4, basic prevention in kindergarten with and without fluoride gel at school; groups 5 and 6, no organized prevention in kindergarten with and without fluoride gel at school. Two dental examinations were performed for assessing caries experience and calculating caries increment from second grade (7-year-olds) to fourth grade (9-year-olds). A standardized questionnaire was used to record independent variables. To compare caries scores and preventive measures of various subgroups, non-parametric tests and a binary logistic regression analysis were performed. A significant difference was found in the mean decayed, missing, and filled tooth/teeth (DMFT) depending on socioeconomic status (no prevention in kindergarten, fluoride gel at school in children with low SES: DMFT = 0.47 vs. DMFT = 0.18 in children with high SES; p = 0.023). Class-specific differences were no longer visible among children who had taken part in an intensive preventive program combining daily supervised toothbrushing in kindergarten and application of fluoride gel in school. Early prevention, focusing on professionally supported training of toothbrushing in kindergarten and at school, has a positive effect on dental health and is able to reduce class-specific differences in caries distribution. Early training of toothbrushing and fissure sealing of first permanent molars are the most important factors for the dental health of primary school children.

  15. Can the development of new dental caries in Danish schoolchildren be predicted from surveillance data in the School Dental Service?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Berit Anna; Foldspang, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Background:  Dental screening programmes for Danish children generally target all children, irrespective of their individual caries risk. The standard screening interval is approximately 12 months. A valid systematic screening tool based on routine information sources is however indispensable......, if more selective screening strategies should be developed to target the children at highest risk. Objective:  To estimate the precision with which Danish schoolchildren at high risk for developing dental caries within 1 year can be identified based on information from routine registers. Methods:  Based...... on data from the Danish National Board of Health's Recording System for the Danish Child Dental Services and from the Central Office of Civil Registration, 3705 schoolchildren aged 7–12 years were followed through 1994–1996. Dental health information as of 1994 and changes 1994–1995 were applied...

  16. Dental Fluorosis and Dental Caries Prevalence among 12 and 15-Year-Old School Children in Nalgonda District, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhabogi, JR; Parthasarathi, P; Anjum, S; Shekar, BRC; Padma, CM; Rani, AS

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fluoride is a double edged sword. The assessment of dental caries and fluorosis in endemic fluoride areas will facilitate in assessing the relation between fluoride concentrations in water with dental caries, dental fluorosis simultaneously. Aim: The objective of the following study is to assess the dental caries and dental fluorosis prevalence among 12 and 15-year-old school children in Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Two stage cluster sampling technique was employed to select 20 schools from Nalgonda district. The oral examination of available 12 and 15-year-old children fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria was carried out to assess dental caries and fluorosis. The examination was conducted by a single trained and calibrated examiner using the mouth mirror and community periodontal index probe under natural daylight. These areas were divided into four categories, low, medium, high and very high fluoride areas based on the fluoride concentration at the time of statistical analysis. The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 (IBM, Chicago, USA). Results: The caries prevalence was less among 12-year-old children (39.9% [369/924]) compared with 15-years-old children (46.7% [444/951]). The prevalence was more among females (50.4% [492/977]) than males (35.8% [321/898]). The prevalence was more in low fluoride area (60.5% [300/496]) followed by very high fluoride area (54.8% [201/367]), high fluoride area (32.4% [293/904]) and medium fluoride area (17.6% [19/108]) in the descending order. The fluorosis prevalence increased with increasing fluoride concentration with no difference in gender and age distribution. Conclusion: Low fluoride areas require fluoridation or alternate sources of fluoride, whereas high fluoride areas require defluoridation. Defluoridation of water is an immediate requirement in areas with fluoride concentration of 4

  17. Dental Fluorosis and Dental Caries Prevalence among 12 and 15-Year-Old School Children in Nalgonda District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhabogi Jr; Parthasarathi, P; Anjum, S; Shekar, Brc; Padma, Cm; Rani, As

    2014-09-01

    Fluoride is a double edged sword. The assessment of dental caries and fluorosis in endemic fluoride areas will facilitate in assessing the relation between fluoride concentrations in water with dental caries, dental fluorosis simultaneously. The objective of the following study is to assess the dental caries and dental fluorosis prevalence among 12 and 15-year-old school children in Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, India. This was a cross-sectional study. Two stage cluster sampling technique was employed to select 20 schools from Nalgonda district. The oral examination of available 12 and 15-year-old children fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria was carried out to assess dental caries and fluorosis. The examination was conducted by a single trained and calibrated examiner using the mouth mirror and community periodontal index probe under natural daylight. These areas were divided into four categories, low, medium, high and very high fluoride areas based on the fluoride concentration at the time of statistical analysis. The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 (IBM, Chicago, USA). The caries prevalence was less among 12-year-old children (39.9% [369/924]) compared with 15-years-old children (46.7% [444/951]). The prevalence was more among females (50.4% [492/977]) than males (35.8% [321/898]). The prevalence was more in low fluoride area (60.5% [300/496]) followed by very high fluoride area (54.8% [201/367]), high fluoride area (32.4% [293/904]) and medium fluoride area (17.6% [19/108]) in the descending order. The fluorosis prevalence increased with increasing fluoride concentration with no difference in gender and age distribution. Low fluoride areas require fluoridation or alternate sources of fluoride, whereas high fluoride areas require defluoridation. Defluoridation of water is an immediate requirement in areas with fluoride concentration of 4 parts per million and above as dental fluorosis is a public

  18. Identifying risk factors for predicting caries in school-aged children using dental health information collected at preschool age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, P; Fraser-Lee, N J; Shimono, T

    2001-01-01

    The study was done to identify toddlers who have an increased risk of developing dental decay at school age. Six variables-Cariostat score, mother's ethnicity, evidence of baby bottle tooth decay, mother;s dental health status, toddler's age at first tooth, and frequency of brushing - showed a significant association with decay status at school age with odds ratios ranging from 1.89 to 2.63. The Cariostat score and the frequency of brushing remained significant in a logistic regression. No interaction terms were significant. The Cariostat caries activity test would be a useful screening tool for identifying toddlers most likely to develop decay or could be used periodically as the deciduous molars erupt and become colonized with oral bacteria. The findings confirm that good oral hygiene practices can have an impact on future dental health, and caregivers should be encouraged to brush young children's teeth regularly.

  19. Teaching of the assessment of head and brain injury in UK dental schools--The Headway Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H R; Nickson, G P; Curran, A L M

    2005-09-01

    Under the auspices of Headway--the brain injury association, the charity supplies information on head/brain injury and runs a telephone advice line: (0115 924 0800). Questionnaires regarding the undergraduate teaching related to head/brain injuries were sent to, and returned by, all 12 UK dental schools. The replies suggest that undergraduate teaching of this subject is patchy and inadequately prepares dentists to recognise and cope with patients who may have had head, and consequently brain, injuries. It is recommended that dental schools review their teaching of this subject and ensure that it is consistent with the current guidelines issued by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) on the recognition of head injury and that the findings are brought to the attention of the General Dental Council in the context of the GDC's "The first five years" report.

  20. Current cariology education in dental schools in Spanish-speaking Latin American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignon, Stefania; Gomez, Juliana; Tellez, Marisol; Ruiz, Jaime A; Marin, Lina M; Rangel, Maria C

    2013-10-01

    This study sought to provide an overview of current cariology education in Spanish-speaking Latin American dental schools. Data collection was via an eighteen-item survey with questions about curriculum, methods of diagnosis and treatment, and instructors' perceptions about cariology teaching. The response rate was 62.1 percent (n=54), and distribution of participating schools by country was as follows: Bolivia (four), Chile (four), Colombia (twenty-four), Costa Rica (one), Cuba (one), Dominican Republic (two), El Salvador (two), Mexico (six), Panama (two), Peru (four), Puerto Rico (one), Uruguay (two), and Venezuela (one). Forty percent of the responding schools considered cariology the key axis of a course, with a cariology department in 16.7 percent. All schools reported teaching cariology, but with varying hours and at varying times in the curriculum, and 77.8 percent reported having preclinical practices. The majority reported teaching most main teaching topics, except for behavioral sciences, microbiology, saliva and systemic diseases, caries-risk factors, root caries, erosion, and early caries management strategies. The most frequently taught caries detection methods were visual-tactile (96.3 percent), radiographic (92.6 percent), and the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) (61.1 percent). Respondents said their schools' clinics make an operative treatment decision when radiolucency is in the inner half of enamel (42.3 percent) for radiographic criteria and when the lesion is visually non-cavitated (5.8 percent). All respondents reported that their schools teach preventive strategies, but only 43.4 percent said they tie it to risk assessment and 40.7 percent said they implement nonsurgical management regularly.

  1. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  2. Changes in the prevalence of dental caries in primary school children in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofola, O O; Folayan, M O; Oginni, A B

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the changes in the prevalence of dental caries in Lagos State over a 3 years period and the role of age, sex, and playing in the changes observed. Three primary schools in Lagos State, Nigeria were randomly selected for the study. Six hundred and thirty-three children age 2-12 years, were examined for caries in 2000 while 513 children were examined in 2003. The prevalence of tooth decay and the prevalence of untreated tooth decay were calculated for the two years, that is, 2000 and 2003. Also the degree of unmet treatment need among the population with caries experience was measured. Differences in the prevalence and severity of dental caries in the primary and permanent dentition were assessed. Approximately 18% of children had untreated tooth decay in their primary dentition in 2003: A 26.1% increase from 2000. About 12.0% of the decay, extracted, and filled teeth (deft) index was seen with decayed teeth in 2000 and 16.6% in 2003. Extracted primary teeth decreased from 2.5% in 2000 to 1.5% in 2003. The change in mean deft between 2000 (0.42) and 2003 (0.47) was 11.9%. Over the study period, the overall reduction in the prevalence of dental caries was 34.8% in the permanent dentition. The decline was larger among children aged 5-9 years (62.1%) and among females (75%). The study showed no overall changes in caries severity but a decrease in caries prevalence in the permanent dentition over the study period. The largest decline in caries prevalence in the permanent dentition was observed in children aged 5-9 years and females. On the contrary, there was an increase in the caries prevalence in the primary dentition.

  3. The efficacy of treatment performed for temporomandibular joint patients at dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahebi Majid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Temporomandibular joint disorders are common problems among patients referring to dental schools and clinics. However appropriate treatment modalities are performed for the TMD patients in dental school, the results and success rate of these treatments are not studied distinctly. The aims of this study was to determine the treatment performed for temporomandibular patients at the TMJ department of Tehran University dental school in 2010-11 .   Materials and Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional trial, 85 TMD patients treated at the TMJ department of Tehran University dental school were examined at least 3 months after the treatments. The patients demographic data ,TMD signs and symptoms and the improvements occurred in TMD disorder were determined (complete, partial and no improvement. The patients satisfaction regarding the treatment results were investigated and data were analyzed regarding the presence of different TMD signs and symptoms before and after the treatment using Mann-Whitney U test .   Results: TMJ pain (35 cases, 42.2%, click (33 cases, 39.8% and muscle tenderness (26 cases, 31.3% were the most prevalent obtained signs and symptoms. The mean age of the patients were 32.3 years old while females were the predominant group (72 cases vs.11 one. 44 individuals (53.0% were treated by splint, 11 ones (13.3% with anterior repositioning splint and 17 individuals (92.5% were managed by physiotherapy plus splint. 65 patients (87.3% were satisfied with the results and 16 ones (19.3% were not. After the treatment, patients with TMJ pain (P0.05 .   Conclusion: The results showed that the treatments presented for the TMD patients at Tehran University dental school were successful and most patients received satisfactory treatment.

  4. Students' perceptions of their education on graduation from a dental school in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Vittaldas B; Shirahatti, Ravi V; Pawar, Prakash

    2012-11-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of assessing students' perceived learning experience at the time of graduation from a dental school in India. The domains appraised were undergraduate curriculum, student motivation and support services, institutional infrastructure, administrative services, components of teaching-learning programs, confidence level in carrying out specific clinical procedures, career choice, and postgraduate specialty preference after graduation. The authors surveyed forty-five dental interns at the end of their undergraduate course, a 100 percent response rate from the class. The results showed that over 95 percent of the graduates were satisfied with the curriculum and 60 to 95 percent reported that the various components of the teaching-learning process were adequate. Only 42 percent of the students were confident about setting up a practice; 65 percent wished to take a course on general dentistry; and 86 percent wanted to pursue postgraduate study. The principal conclusions were that although the program was satisfactory to the majority of participants, some areas of concern were identified that need improvement.

  5. Perceptions and practices of U.S. dental schools regarding curriculum integrated format and traditional format licensure exams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shamik; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Donoff, R Bruce; Howell, T Howard; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2013-08-01

    The dental licensure exam in the United States has evolved over the past ten years, and two formats-the traditional format and curriculum integrated format-are now available for students to satisfy licensure requirements. The objective of this study was to examine the differences and relative merits of the two formats. A twenty-five-question survey was distributed to the fifty-seven U.S. dental schools at the time. The survey included both quantitative and discrete variables and followed a strategic sequential order. The first set of questions sought to determine what type of board preparatory/mock exam each dental school offered, and the next set of questions asked which licensure exam each school formally offered. The final questions were qualitative in nature and aimed to determine the school representatives' opinions about the curriculum integrated format versus traditional format. Of the fifty-seven schools contacted, thirty-seven agreed to participate (response rate=64.9 percent). Fourteen schools reported that they administer the traditional format only and twelve administer the curriculum integrated format only, while eleven offer both. Thirty-two schools offered mock board exams to their graduating students, and twenty-four of those said their mock exams were identical in format to the actual qualifying clinical exams offered at their institution. The respondents reported no significant advantage to preparing for the curriculum integrated format examination as compared to the traditional format examination with regards to number of clock hours taken from regular curriculum time. In reporting on this study, this article provides an overview of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two examination formats used for the dental licensure process in the United States.

  6. Factors associated with dental fluorosis in school children in southern Brazil: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sousa Azevedo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study assessed risk factors for dental fluorosis (DF among 8- to 12-year-old children in southern Brazil. Children attending 20 schools were randomly selected (n = 1,196. They were interviewed and their parents answered a questionnaire that was sent home. Prevalence of DF was 8.53% (modified Dean’s criteria, and the prevalence of severe DF was 0.17%. The results of multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that DF was associated with a higher frequency of tooth brushing and with initial use of fluoride toothpaste at the emergence of the first tooth. DF does not constitute a public health problem in southern Brazil.

  7. Ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in dental treatment at a school of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, J M; Theodore, R F; Te Morenga, L; Thomson, W M; Brunton, P A

    2016-06-01

    Health services should be targeted toward those most in need of health care. Poor oral health disproportionately affects Māori, Pacific Island, and socioeconomically deprived New Zealanders of all ages, and oral health care services should be prioritised to such groups. In New Zealand, free oral health care is available for all children up to the age of 17. On the other hand, adult dental services are provided on a user-pays basis, except for a limited range of basic services for some adults, access to which varies regionally. This study investigated the extent of dental treatment inequalities among patients at New Zealand's only School of Dentistry. Data were audited for all treatments provided at the University of Otago Faculty of Dentistry from 2006 to 2011 for patients born prior to 1990. Ethnic and socioeconomic inequalities in the provision of dental extractions, endodontic treatment, crowns, and preventive care were investigated. Differences were expressed as the odds of having received one or more treatments of that type during the six-year period 2006 to 2011. Data were analysed for 23,799 individuals, of whom 11,945 (50.2%) were female, 1,285 (5.4%) were Māori and 479 (2.0%) were Pacific, 4,040 (17.0%) were of low socioeconomic status (SES), and 2,681 (11.3%) were beneficiaries or unemployed. After controlling for SES, age, and sex, Māori had 1.8 times greater odds of having had a tooth extracted than NZ European patients, while Pacific Islanders had 2.1 times the odds. Furthermore, after controlling for ethnicity, age, and sex, low-SES patients had 2.4 times greater odds of having had a tooth extracted than high-SES patients, and beneficiaries had 2.9 times the odds. Conversely, these groups were less likely to have had a tooth treated with a crown or endodontics or receive preventive care. Existing policies call for the reduction of inequalities. There is a need for a strategy to monitor changes in treatment inequality over time which includes

  8. Occurrence of aggressive periodontitis in patients at a dental school in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Chirley Roberta; Baumhardt, Simone Glesse; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a rare, severe and rapidly progressing periodontal disease. Early diagnosis is of utmost importance for establishing treatment in order to stop periodontal destruction and prevent tooth loss. The aim of this study is to describe the occurrence of aggressive periodontitis in patients at a Dental School in Brazil by means of a cross-sectional study. First, records from patients aged 15-36 years were consecutively scrutinized. Patients should not have systemic diseases. The search went up to 383 valid records. By means of periapical radiographs, the distance between the cement-enamel junction and the bone crest was measured. Records in which there was severe bone loss or periodontal destruction incompatible with the age of the patient were selected. Patients with bone loss > or = 3mm were called to answer a questionnaire and undergo periodontal examination, in order to confirm or dismiss the diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis. From a total 383 records, 55.1% (211) were female and 44.9% (172) were male. In 3.9% (15) of the records, presumed diagnosis was aggressive periodontitis, and 12 out of those 15 eligible patients (80%) came in for clinical examination and confirmation or dismissal of the diagnosis. Aggressive periodontitis was diagnosed in 7 patients, corresponding to 1.8% of the total. Of these, 4 (1% of the total) presented generalized aggressive periodontitis and 3 (0.8% of the total) presented localized aggressive periodontitis. In 5 patients (1.3%) chronic periodontitis was diagnosed. It may be concluded, within the limits of the study, that aggressive periodontitis at this Dental School is compatible with world prevalence values, suggesting the need for periodontal diagnosis as from adolescence, considering the possible damage caused by this disease.

  9. Will a Short Training Session Improve Multiple-Choice Item-Writing Quality by Dental School Faculty? A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinges, Mark A; Curtis, Donald A

    2017-08-01

    Faculty members are expected to write high-quality multiple-choice questions (MCQs) in order to accurately assess dental students' achievement. However, most dental school faculty members are not trained to write MCQs. Extensive faculty development programs have been used to help educators write better test items. The aim of this pilot study was to determine if a short workshop would result in improved MCQ item-writing by dental school faculty at one U.S. dental school. A total of 24 dental school faculty members who had previously written MCQs were randomized into a no-intervention group and an intervention group in 2015. Six previously written MCQs were randomly selected from each of the faculty members and given an item quality score. The intervention group participated in a training session of one-hour duration that focused on reviewing standard item-writing guidelines to improve in-house MCQs. The no-intervention group did not receive any training but did receive encouragement and an explanation of why good MCQ writing was important. The faculty members were then asked to revise their previously written questions, and these were given an item quality score. The item quality scores for each faculty member were averaged, and the difference from pre-training to post-training scores was evaluated. The results showed a significant difference between pre-training and post-training MCQ difference scores for the intervention group (p=0.04). This pilot study provides evidence that the training session of short duration was effective in improving the quality of in-house MCQs.

  10. A survey of the computer literacy of undergraduate dental students at a University Dental School in Ireland during the academic year 1997-98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, N J; Hannigan, A

    1999-05-01

    As dental practice management becomes more computer-based, the efficient functioning of the dentist will become dependent on adequate computer literacy. A survey has been carried out into the computer literacy of a cohort of 140 undergraduate dental students at a University Dental School in Ireland (years 1-5), in the academic year 1997-98. Aspects investigated by anonymous questionnaire were: (1) keyboard skills; (2) computer skills; (3) access to computer facilities; (4) software competencies and (5) use of medical library computer facilities. The students are relatively unfamiliar with basic computer hardware and software: 51.1% considered their expertise with computers as "poor"; 34.3% had taken a formal typewriting or computer keyboarding course; 7.9% had taken a formal computer course at university level and 67.2% were without access to computer facilities at their term-time residences. A majority of students had never used either word-processing, spreadsheet, or graphics programs. Programs relating to "informatics" were more popular, such as literature searching, accessing the Internet and the use of e-mail which represent the major use of the computers in the medical library. The lack of experience with computers may be addressed by including suitable computing courses at the secondary level (age 13-18 years) and/or tertiary level (FE/HE) education programmes. Such training may promote greater use of generic softwares, particularly in the library, with a more electronic-based approach to data handling.

  11. Estimation of dental age by Nolla’s method using orthopantomographs among rural free residential school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandlal B, Karthikeya Patil, Ravi S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Teeth and dental restorations are resistant to destruction by fire and the elements are therefore useful in identification. This permits accurate identification of a missing child or remains. The Rural Residential free school at Suttur houses a large number of inmates and hence dental records are kept for their identification. Objective: Estimation of Age of children. Methods: Orthopantomographs were used to study for estimation of age of children, using a Nolla’s method of dental age estimation. Results: In this study Nolla’s method underestimated the chronological age of the individuals and underestimation of age increased as the chronological age of the individuals increased. Conclusion: Studies involving larger sample size and population specific data needs to be developed.

  12. A school-wide assessment of social media usage by students in a US dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, M R; Christensen, H L; Nelson, B A

    2014-11-01

    Social media sites have become an established means of communication due to the exponential growth in number of users across the world and the encouragement of interaction between users through site features. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which Loma Linda University School of Dentistry students use social media accounts, the types of accounts they prefer, their interest in incorporating social media into courses and their perceptions of the usefulness of social media in private practice. In addition, we wanted to determine the degree of student interest in the integration of these social tools into their instruction. One thousand one hundred and sixty-two students from Loma Linda University School of Dentistry were invited by e-mail to complete a confidential 18 item multiple choice survey through Surveymonkey.com. The overall response rate was 30% (n = 351) from the pooled response periods; the first in 2011 and the second in 2013. Similar to other studies, Facebook was used by 91% of the School of Dentistry students, and less than half used Google+, Twitter and LinkedIn. Of the respondents, 68% of students reported communicating on social media daily and 80% saw value for practising dentists to operate accounts. Time and privacy concerns were the largest barriers to usage at 16% and 12% respectively. One third of respondents were in favour of the incorporation of social media in their courses.

  13. Caries y pérdida dental en estudiantes preuniversitarios mexicanos Dental decay and tooth loss at the high school level in Mexican students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier de la Fuente-Hernández

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Conocer la prevalencia de caries y pérdida dental para calcular las necesidades terapéuticas en estudiantes de educación media superior que ingresan a la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio transversal descriptivo en el que se obtuvo una muestra de 77 191 estudiantes correspondientes a las generaciones de ingreso al bachillerato 2003, 2004 y 2005. Los datos de salud bucal se obtuvieron a partir del índice CPOD incluido en el Examen Médico Automatizado (EMA, instrumento de autorrespuesta estandarizado que aplica la Dirección General de Servicios Médicos (DGSM. El análisis del EMA fue univariado con la finalidad de identificar la distribución y la frecuencia de las variables. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de caries y pérdida dental fue de 48.0 y 34.2%, respectivamente, con una cuantificación del índice CPOD de 5. Las necesidades de tratamiento para caries y pérdida dental se obtuvieron en al menos un diente por estudiante. CONCLUSIONES: Cerca de la mitad de los alumnos que ingresan al bachillerato de la UNAM requiere al menos la atención de una caries o prótesis dental. Lo anterior evidencia que las políticas en salud bucal instrumentadas no han alcanzado los índices en salud esperados en relación con los objetivos internacionales, así como la necesidad de impulsar nuevas líneas de investigación orientadas a identificar la gravedad de la enfermedad y factores vinculados con el deterioro de la salud bucal.OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of dental decay and tooth loss, and to consider the treatment needs for students at the Mexican National Autonomous University (UNAM. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross sectional study was designed including 77 191 students corresponding to the years of entrance to high school 2003, 2004 and 2005. Oral health data were obtained from the DMF-T index included in the Automatized Medical Exam (AME, a student self-answer instrument

  14. An Innovative, Comprehensive Faculty Recruitment and Development Program at One U.S. Dental School: Early Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabato, Emily; DeCastro, Jeanette E; Fenesy, Kim

    2017-06-01

    Dental faculty recruitment and development are critical to replenish and cultivate sufficient and adequately prepared educators to educate future generations of dentists. At Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, the From Practice to Preceptor (FP2P) program, now in the last of its five years of funding from the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), has an overall aim of recruiting, training, and retaining a diverse and well-prepared dental faculty workforce. The FP2P program introduced novel methods for recruiting and preparing new faculty members since its goal is to help participants transition from being practicing dentists to becoming part- or full-time faculty members. The recruitment and selection process has emphasized reaching community practitioners in general or pediatric dentistry, individuals from underrepresented groups, and those with a passion for teaching. The two-year program with weekly meetings was designed to develop participants' skills to meet the teaching, clinical, and administrative roles of dental faculty. The aims of this study were to determine if the program recruitment methods used would result in participants who were more ethnically and racially diverse than the school's current faculty and to determine if, after training, participants perceived they had increased knowledge, skills, and abilities in specified areas as compared to before training. Participants completed pre- and post-program surveys assessing their perceived level of preparedness in critical competencies for dental faculty. Surveys were completed by 94% of participants in cohorts one through four; 75% (n=15) of cohorts two and three completed both the pre- and post-program surveys, which were used for this analysis. Over 30% of the 35 participants to date were from an underrepresented group. Survey results suggest the participants increased their perceived preparedness in administrative, clinical, and educational competencies. Follow-up is needed to

  15. Dental health knowledge and attitudes of regularly attending mothers of high-risk, pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkhorn, A S; Wainwright-Stringer, Y M; Holloway, P J

    2001-12-01

    The aims of this study were to discover the knowledge of and attitudes towards dental health of a group of regularly attending mothers of young children at high-risk of caries, and to evaluate their toothbrushing techniques. As part of the baseline examination of a randomised controlled trial to test the influence of dental health counselling on the caries increment of at-risk pre-school children, 268 mothers of 334 children completed a questionnaire enquiring about their dental health knowledge and attitudes, and were also observed brushing their children's teeth. Although most mothers (71%) knew that they should brush their children's teeth twice a day using a small toothbrush (94%) only 52% knew that they should use only a small pea-sized amount of paste, and only 3% knew the recommended level of fluoride in toothpaste for these at-risk children. 40% of the children insisted on brushing their own teeth and 40% of the mothers brushed their children's teeth inadequately. Although three-quarters of the mothers knew that sugary foods and drinks should be consumed only at mealtimes, only 7% knew the four foods and drinks supplying most sugar to a child's diet. Although three-quarters of mothers thought that dental decay in milk teeth was very important, only half wanted their children's carious teeth restored. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviour about dental health among these regularly attending mothers of at-risk, pre-school children were superficial. Their attitudes to dental health of primary teeth were equivocal and their demonstrated brushing behaviour on the part of their children was inadequate.

  16. Impact of targeted, school-based dental sealant programs in reducing racial and economic disparities in sealant prevalence among schoolchildren--Ohio, 1998-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-31

    Despite the availability of highly effective measures for primary prevention, dental caries (tooth decay) remains one of the most common childhood chronic diseases. When properly placed, dental sealants are almost 100% effective in preventing caries on the chewing surfaces of first and second permanent molarteeth. However, sealants remain underused, particularly among children from low-income families and from racial/ethnic minority groups. Schools traditionally have been a setting for both dental disease prevention programs and for oral health status assessment. To determine the prevalence of dental sealant use among third grade students from schools with and without sealant programs, during the 1998-99 school year, the Ohio Department of Health conducted an oral health survey among schoolchildren. This report summarizes the results of this survey, which indicate that targeted, school-based dental sealant programs can substantially increase prevalence of dental sealants. Providing sealant programs in all eligible, high-risk schools could reduce or eliminate racial and economic disparities in the prevalence of dental sealants.

  17. Prevalence of dental fluorosis among primary school children in rural areas of Chidambaram taluk, Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fluorosis is one of the common but major emerging areas of research in the tropics. It is considered endemic in 17 states of India. However, the Cuddalore district of Tamil Nadu is categorised as a fluorosis non-endemic area. But clinical cases of dental fluorosis were reported in the field practice area of Department of Community Medicine, Rajah Muthiah Medical College, Annamalai University, Chidambaram. Since dental fluorosis has been described as a biomarker of exposure to fluoride, we assessed the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis among primary school children in the service area. Materials and Methods: Children studying in six primary schools of six villages in the field practice area of Rural Health Centre of Faculty of Medicine, Annamalai University, Chidambaram, were surveyed. Every child was clinically examined at the school by calibrated examiners with Dean′s fluorosis index recommended by WHO (1997. Chi-square test, Chi-square trend test and Spearman′s rank correlation coefficient test were used for statistical analysis. Results: Five hundred and twenty-five 5- to 12-year-old school children (255 boys and 270 girls were surveyed. The overall dental fluorosis prevalence was found to be 31.4% in our study sample. Dental fluorosis increased with age P < 0.001, whereas gender difference was not statistically significant. Aesthetically objectionable dental fluorosis was found in 2.1% of the sample. Villages Senjicherry, Keezhaperambai and Kanagarapattu revealed a community fluorosis index (CFI score of 0.43, 0.54 and 0.54 with 5.6%, 4.8% and 1.4% of objectionable dental fluorosis, respectively. Correlation between water fluoride content and CFI values in four villages was noted to be positively significant. Conclusion: Three out of six villages studied were in ′borderline′ public health significance (CFI score 0.4-0.6. A well-designed epidemiological investigation can be undertaken to evaluate the risk factors

  18. Dental aesthetic self-perception and desire for orthodontic treatment among school children in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Emmanuel O

    2011-01-01

    The availability of information on the individual perception of own's dental appearance and desire to uptake orthodontic treatment is of importance in the planning of orthodontic care within a population. The subjective assessment of personal dental appearance and desire for orthodontic treatment was appraised among Nigerian children. The study was conducted among 91 school children (33 boys, 58 girls) aged 12 years old in Benin City, south-southern region of Nigeria. The satisfaction of the subjects with the arrangement of their anterior teeth and desire to straighten their teeth was determined using a questionnaire. The subjects were further asked to rank their dental attractiveness in relation to the photographs in the Aesthetic component (AC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). The need for orthodontic treatment among the subjects was also assessed by the examiner with the Aesthetic component of IOTN. Chi-square tests were used for data analysis. The result revealed that more than three-quarters (76.9%) of the subjects were satisfied with their dental aesthetics while 23.1% desired to have orthodontic treatment. The boys expressed significantly higher level of dissatisfaction with their dental aesthetics and a greater desire to have orthodontic treatment (P dental attractiveness in the "little to no need" orthodontic treatment grade on the AC scale. The normative borderline treatment need was higher than subjective borderline need but there was consistency in distribution of 4.4% in definite need treatment grade by the subjects and examiner. The majority of the children rated their teeth as aesthetically satisfactory but there were gender differences in perception of dental aesthetics and desire for orthodontic treatment among this sample of Nigerian children.

  19. Prevalence of dental caries in high school students in Asmara, Eritrea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    possibly longer for dental plaque to organize to the point when destructive activity can take place 4. Many studies have shown that dental caries increases with age. A study done by Yayeh Yirad et. al reported that the dental caries prevalence rate in the age group of 15-19 years was 49%, compared to. 65% in people aged ...

  20. Prevalence of dental caries in high school students in Asmara, Eritrea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dental Caries is a common but unnoticed health problem affecting all age groups Dental Surgeon to population ration is 1:900000 rendering effective service with this scarce man power impossible. Objective: To determine the prevalence of dental caries in Eritrea. Method: A cross-sectional comparative study ...

  1. Oral health impact, dental caries experience, and associated factors in 12-15-year-old school children in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Amit; Badiyani, Bhumika; Kumar, Arunoday; Basak, Debashish; Ismail, Mohammed B

    2017-04-01

    Dental caries affects quality of life and has a negative impact on daily performance. The study was conducted to assess the impact of oral health and its associated factors in schoolchildren in the age group 12-15 years in Indore, Madhya Pradesh. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in schoolchildren in the age group 12-15 years. Sociodemographic and oral health related behaviors of schoolchildren were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Child oral impact on daily performance (OIDP) questionnaire was used to assess the oral impacts. Oral examination was performed to check the presence of caries using decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index. A total of 690 schoolchildren participated in the survey. The mean age of the children was 13.58 years. The overall prevalence of dental caries was found to be 47.2%. The prevalence of one or more impact in the study population was 36.5%. The most prevalent impact was difficulty in eating and cleaning of teeth and the least prevalent impact were emotion and studying. Results of logistic regression analysis showed that the type of school that a child goes to, socioeconomic status, material used, dental visit, and dental caries were significantly associated with the Child-OIDP affected score. Oral health had a significant effect on the quality of life of schoolchildren. The prevalence of dental caries was found to be high. Effective policies need to be drafted for oral health promotion in this age group.

  2. Dental injuries sustained by high school athletes in the United States, from 2008/2009 through 2013/2014 academic years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christy L; McKenzie, Lara B; Ferketich, Amy K; Andridge, Rebecca; Xiang, Huiyun; Comstock, R Dawn

    2016-04-01

    Risk of dental injuries is present in a variety of sports. Mouthguards are effective yet underutilized. This study aimed to estimate the rate of dental injuries among high school athletes and investigate the utilization of mouthguards across multiple high school sports. Athlete exposure and dental injury data were collected during the 2008/2009 through 2013/2014 academic years from a large sample of high schools in the United States as part of the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study. There were 222 dental injuries sustained during 24,787,258 athlete exposures for a rate of 0.90 per 100,000 athlete exposures. The rate of dental injuries in competition (1.8) was three times higher than the rate in practice (0.6) (RR: 3.1, 95% CI: 2.3-4.0). Rates of dental injuries varied by sport with the highest rates in girls' field hockey (3.9) and boys' basketball (2.6). Dental injuries most commonly occurred as a result of contact with another player (61.3%) and contact with a playing apparatus (31.5%). For the majority of dental injuries, the athlete was not wearing a mouthguard (72.5%). Among injuries where athletes were wearing mouthguards, the majority were self-fitted (95.9%). Although dental injuries were relatively uncommon, the majority occurred while the athlete was not wearing a mouthguard. As previous studies have shown that mouthguards are effective in preventing injuries, all high school athletes participating in a sport that places them at risk of sustaining a dental injury should wear a mouthguard consistently in both competition and practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Computer literacy and attitudes among students in 16 European dental schools: current aspects, regional differences and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Nattestad, A; Schittek, M; Attström, R

    2002-02-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out to investigate the competence and attitude of dental students towards computers. The current study presents the findings deriving from 590 questionnaires collected from 16 European dental schools from 9 countries between October 1998 and October 1999. The results suggest that 60% of students use computers for their education, while 72% have access to the Internet. The overall figures, however, disguise major differences between the various universities. Students in Northern and Western Europe seem to rely mostly on university facilities to access the Internet. The same however, is not true for students in Greece and Spain, who appear to depend on home computers. Less than half the students have been exposed to some form of computer literacy education in their universities, with the great majority acquiring their competence in other ways. The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills of the average dental student, within this limited sample of dental schools, do not facilitate full use of new media available. In addition, if the observed regional differences are valid, there may be an educational and political problem that could intensify inequalities among professionals in the future. To minimize this potential problem, closer cooperation between academic institutions, with sharing of resources and expertise, is recommended.

  4. PREVALENCE AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS OF DENTAL CARIES, GINGIVITIS, AND CALCULUS DEPOSITS IN SCHOOL CHILDREN OF SARGODHA DISTRICT, PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umer, Muhammad Farooq; Farooq, Umer; Shabbir, Arham; Zofeen, Shumaila; Mujtaba, Hasan; Tahir, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    According to a pathfinder survey conducted by World Health Organization, dental caries is the single most common chronic childhood disease in Pakistan. The update information regarding dental health of school children of Sargodha district is required to plan community caries prevention programs and for better understanding of existing situation, and may improve longevity, treatment, and care. This cross sectional study was conducted in four randomly selected schools of Sargodha district, stratified by gender selected. Two well-trained dentists examined the oral cavities of children for dental caries, gingivitis, and calculus deposits. The sample consisted of children aged between 3-12 years. The overall prevalence rate of gingivitis, calculus, and dental caries was found as 14.5%, 14.3%, and 45.9% respectively. A significant association was found between DMFT score (p caries than children residing in rural areas. Incidence of gingivitis (p caries in primary (p caries in primary teeth was found higher (p < 0.01) in children who brushed occasionally. Study also showed that none of the children ever visited dentist for treatment. The results emphasize the need for initiation of awareness programs to achieve 0 DMFT/df scores.

  5. Design and validation of an educational questionnaire for evaluation of teachers by students in Shahid Beheshti dental school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Ghasemi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Dental students’ evaluation of teachers’ educational activity is crucial for the improvement of dental school’s performance. The process of the evaluation needs a valid and reliable tool. This study aimed to produce and validate a questionnaire for the evaluation of dental school teachers by students. Materials and Methods: A group of 15 teachers in the Shahid Beheshti dental school gave their opinions regarding the characteristics of an ideal teacher using nominal group technique. These characteristics together with characteristics gathered from similar studies made the base of a questionnaire which later underwent a validity and reliability assessment by means of the calculation of Content Validity Index (CVI, Content Validity Ratio (CVR, and Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. Results: The preliminary questionnaire included 94 items in four categories naming: ethics, educational capability, practical capability, and managemet. After calculating CVR and CVI for each item, 23 items with CVR<0.33 and 20 items with CVI<0.79 have been excluded from the questionnaire leaving a questionnaire with 54 items. The overall reliability of this questionnaire using Chronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.96. Conclusion: Consulting an expert group that are familiar with different aspects of educational performance of faculty teachers, it was concluded that applying various methods for validity and reliability, and considering local culture values are useful for the preparation of the questionnaire for similar studies in Iran.

  6. Implementation of Problem-Based Learning by Faculty Members at 12 U.S. Medical and Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkarim, Ahmad; Schween, Dorothy; Ford, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the perspectives of medical and dental faculty members regarding implementation of problem-based learning (PBL). A survey instrument was designed with demographic questions and two open-ended questions to investigate faculty members' perceptions of the most suitable subjects or courses in which to use PBL and examples of how they incorporated PBL into their instruction. The survey was sent to 12 U.S. medical and dental schools known to use PBL, and 73 medical faculty members and 88 dental faculty members completed the survey (n=161), for an overall response rate of 28% of those who were sent the survey at each school (not each's total faculty). In the results, 41% of the medical faculty respondents and 22% of the dental faculty respondents stated that PBL is applicable for all subjects. Members of both groups perceived that PBL is primarily applicable in clinical education, including clinical courses or the clinical applications of courses. The respondents' perceptions about PBL implementation varied significantly, and both groups reported a wide range of approaches in which they implement PBL in their instruction, some of which were not consistent with the purpose of PBL.

  7. Transition from glass to digital slide microscopy in the teaching of oral pathology in a Brazilian dental school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger; Lopes, Márcio-Ajudarte; de Almeida, Oslei-Paes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Several medical and dental schools have described their experience in the transition from conventional to digital microscopy in the teaching of general pathology and histology disciplines; however, this transitional process has scarcely been reported in the teaching of oral pathology. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to report the transition from conventional glass slide to virtual microscopy in oral pathology teaching, a unique experience in Latin America. Study Design: An Aperio ScanScope® scanner was used to digitalize histological slides used in practical lectures of oral pathology. The challenges and benefits observed by the group of Professors from the Piracicaba Dental School (Brazil) are described and a questionnaire to evaluate the students’ compliance to this new methodology was applied. Results: An improvement in the classes was described by the Professors who mainly dealt with questions related to pathological changes instead of technical problems; also, a higher interaction with the students was described. The simplicity of the software used and the high quality of the virtual slides, requiring a smaller time to identify microscopic structures, were considered important for a better teaching process. Conclusions: Virtual microscopy used to teach oral pathology represents a useful educational methodology, with an excellent compliance of the dental students. Key words:Digital microscopy, virtual microscopy, dental education, virtual slides, oral pathology. PMID:25129250

  8. Prevalence of dental fluorosis among primary school children in association with different water fluoride levels in Mysore district, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Shibu Thomas; Soman, Rino Roopak; Sunitha, S

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride intake at optimal level decreases the incidence of dental caries. However, excessive intake, especially during developmental stages can cause adverse effects such as dental and skeletal fluorosis. To assess the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in primary school children born and raised in three villages of Mysore District. The three selected villages have different water fluoride concentrations. Three villages namely, Nerale (water fluoride 2.0 ppm), Belavadi (1.2 ppm) and Naganahally (0.4 ppm) were selected for the study. Then, a total of 405 children, 10-12-year-old (204 [50.4%] males and 201 [49.60%] females) were selected from three schools of the villages. Dean's fluorosis index recommended by World Health Organization was used to evaluate fluorosis among the study population. The overall prevalence of dental fluorosis was found to be 41.73%. An increase in the community fluorosis index (CFI) was higher among those living in high water fluoride area. A significantly positive correlation was found between CFI and water fluoride concentration in drinking water.

  9. [Survey of hepatitis B and C in students of faculty of dentistry and dental hygienist school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yumiko; Chibo, Itsuo; Sata, Michio

    2004-07-01

    At present, in Japan, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection by blood transfusion rarely happens. However, according to the national survey, outbreak of sporadic acute hepatitis B and C is reported every year and viral hepatitis induced by iatrogenic infection is also reported. We think that education and enlightenmen for measures of infection control for hepatitis virus in dentisal medical care are important. Therefore, we carried out a questionnaire survey about measures of an infection control including hepatitis B and C for 352 students of a certain faculty of dentistry and a dental hygienist school. 35.5% of the total students thought the defense of oneself against infection was more important than defense of cross infection. Furthermore, the prevalence of the student who thought to permit recycle of a disposer glove and a disposer cartridge of a local anesthesia was 13.1% (46/352), 14.8% (52/352), respectively. The prevalence of students who recognized that HCV and HBV were detected from not only blood but also body fluid such as saliva remained in 65.3%. Consequently, the reality that knowledge of hepatitis virus and understanding about sterilization and disinfection of instruments were low became clear. In conclusion, immediate making of the guideline that aimed at standardization of prevention of hospital infection in domestic dental treatment and education to introduce the curriculum with a high regard for risk management of infection for students of dentistry will be required. In addition, it is an important problem to spread thoughts of standard precautions for dentistry.

  10. Periodontal and systemic diseases among Swedish dental school patients - a retrospective register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Marija; Buhlin, Kåre

    2013-01-01

    To investigate if patients with periodontitis attending the Dental School in Huddinge, Sweden presented with more signs of systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and respiratory diseases, compared to healthy and gingivitis patients. In this retrospective study, dental charts were examined where the periodontal diagnoses of patients were known. A total of 325 patients with severe periodontitis and 149 patients without periodontitis, born 1928 to 1968, were identified. Diagnosis regarding the systemic diseases was self-reported. Odds ratios for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and respiratory diseases were calculated with a logistic regression model that was adjusted for age, gender and smoking. It was observed that more cases of periodontitis were found in older individuals than the controls (61.7 vs 56.2 years; P diabetes mellitus. Among the controls, 30.9% had cardiovascular disease, 23.5% suffered from respiratory diseases and 6.7% had diabetes mellitus. Across both groups, hypertension was the most frequent diagnosis. There was a significant association between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79, confidence interval [CI] 1.12-2.86), but not between respiratory diseases and periodontitis (OR= 0.88, CI 0.53-1.47). The risk of diabetes mellitus was greater among those patients with periodontitis (OR= 2.95, CI 1.45- 6.01). This study found that patients with periodontitis presented with more systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus than control patients. However, no association was found between periodontitis and respiratory diseases. At the present time, the reasons for the associations or lack of association are unknown.

  11. Students' perceptions of vertical and horizontal integration in a discipline-based dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, T C; White, J G

    2017-05-01

    Integration is a key concern in discipline-based undergraduate dental curricula. Therefore, this study compared feedback on integration from students who participated in different instructional designs in a Comprehensive Patient Care course. The study was conducted at the University of Pretoria (2009-2011). Third-year cohorts (Cohorts A, B and C) participated in pre-clinical case-based learning, whilst fourth-year cohorts (Cohorts D and E) received didactic teaching in Comprehensive Patient Care. Cohorts A, D and E practised clinical Comprehensive Patient Care in a discipline-based clinic. Cohort B conducted their Comprehensive Patient Care patient examinations in a dedicated facility supervised by dedicated faculty responsible to teach integration. Students had to indicate on visual analogue scales whether the way they were taught at the school helped them to integrate knowledge from the same (horizontal integration) and preceding (vertical integration) year of study. The end-points of the scales were defined as 'definitely' and 'not at all'. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to measure the differences between cohorts according to the year of study. Third-year case-based learning cohorts rated the horizontal integration close to 80/100 and vertical integration ranging from 64 to 71/100. In year four, Cohort B rated vertical and horizontal integration 9-15% higher (ANOVA, P vertical and horizontal integration 11-18% higher (ANOVA, P integration in the discipline-based undergraduate dental curriculum. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. DENTAL FLUOROSIS AND ITS RELATION TO SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS, PARENTS' KNOWLEDGE AND AWARENESS AMONG 12-YEAR-OLD SCHOOL CHILDREN IN QUETTA, PAKISTAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Erum; Vichayanrat, Tippanart; Satitvipawee, Pratana

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of dental fluorosis and its relationship to socioeconomic status, knowledge, and awareness among 12-year-old school children in Quetta, Pakistan. A cross sectional study was conducted among 349 school children aged 12 years in Quetta, Pakistan. By interviewing children and questionnaire for parents, socioeconomic status, knowledge, and awareness of fluorosis were collected. Dental fluorosis was examined using Dean's Index and Community Fluorosis Index. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was high (63.6%) among children with a majority of moderate and mild degree at 32.1% and 27.5%, respectively. The community fluorosis index was 1.6. While most children and parents had low-to-moderate levels of fluorosis knowledge, the majority of them worried about dental fluorosis. Most parents (84.8%) were uncertain about the condition of fluorosis in their children, and 87.4% did not know about fluorosis before. Dental fluorosis was found significantly associated with gender, family income, and parents' awareness (p ≤ 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated that gender, and parent's awareness significantly predicted children's dental fluorosis. Knowledge and basic information regarding dental fluorosis is lacking in the community. Efforts in dissemination and communication about dental fluorosis should be increased in order to raise awareness and prevent the dental fluorosis in Pakistan.

  13. Oral hygiene practices, dental knowledge, dietary habits and their relation to caries among male primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, T T; Al-Abad, B M

    2008-11-01

    To assess the frequency of consumption of cariogenic foods, oral hygiene practices and dental health knowledge among Saudi male primary school children in relation to socio-demographics and to find the possible predictors for dental caries among them. The cross-sectional descriptive study included 1115 Saudi male selected by multistage random sample from 18 public primary schools. Subjects were interviewed by closed ended questionnaire gathering data regarding frequency consumption of some cariogenic foods, oral hygiene practices and dental health knowledge. Students were submitted to dental screening to detect the clinically evident caries lesion. The clinically decayed tooth was diagnosed in 68.9% of the included children, more in urban and younger students. Caries affected the subjects consumed cariogenic foods at greater frequency compared with caries-free children. Only 24.5% of the students brushed their teeth twice or more per day, and 29% of them never received instructions regarding oral hygiene practices. Miswak as an alternative and/or additional method of dental cleaning was used by 44.6%. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that maternal working conditions, large family size and poor oral hygiene practices were the chief predictors for dental caries among the included school children. The poor oral hygiene practices, lack of parental guidance and appropriate dental health knowledge with frequent exposure to cariogenic foods in addition to socio-demographics are the main risk factors for dental decay among the surveyed students.

  14. The response of 1578 school leavers to a campaign combining commercial, Health Boards' and GDPs' sponsorship in an effort to improve dental attendance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craven, R; Blinkhorn, A S; Schou, L

    1993-01-01

    A dental health promotion campaign was developed by Forth Valley Health Board in conjunction with the Scottish Health Education Group and the Department of Marketing at Strathclyde University. The aim was to encourage dental attendance among early school leavers. The emphasis was on the contribut......A dental health promotion campaign was developed by Forth Valley Health Board in conjunction with the Scottish Health Education Group and the Department of Marketing at Strathclyde University. The aim was to encourage dental attendance among early school leavers. The emphasis...... the difficulties in initiating a behaviour change, overcoming apathy and modifying the lack of felt need for dental care among the age group concerned. It does, however, suggest that there is potential for a more prolonged marketing effort....

  15. Prevalence of dental caries and dental fluorosis among 12 and 15 years old school children in relation to fluoride concentration in drinking water in an endemic fluoride belt of Andhra Pradesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekar, Chandra; Cheluvaiah, Manjunath Bhadravathi; Namile, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    The published literature on the prevalence and severity of dental caries and dental fluorosis among school going children in Nalgonda district - An Endemic Fluoride belt was lacking . To assess the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis and dental caries among 12 and 15 years old children in relation to fluoride concentration in drinking water . It was a cross-sectional study, done in Nalgonda district of Andhra Pradesh, India (endemic fluoride belt) . 5 of the 59 mandals in the district of Nalgonda were selected by simple random sampling. Then, 3 schools from each of these selected mandals were chosen at random. All the eligible 6 th and 9 th standard children were considered for final analysis. The demographic and other relevant information was collected by 3 trained and calibrated dentists, using a structured questionnaire. Dental caries were recorded using dentition status and treatment needs and fluorosis were recorded by Dean's fluorosis index. The statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 16. The prevalence of dental caries among children was 56.3% with the highest in below optimal fluoride area (71.3%) and lowest in optimal fluoride area (24.3%). The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 71.5%. The prevalence was 39.7% in below optimal fluoride area and 100% in high and very fluoride areas. The prevalence and severity of fluorosis increased with increasing fluoride concentration. The caries experience was more among boys than girls. There was a negative correlation between dental caries and fluoride concentration for the entire study population. However, in high fluoride areas, there was a positive correlation between fluoride concentration and dental caries. Water defluoridation on an urgent basis is a priority here than water fluoridation, because the prevalence and severity of dental flurorosis is very high.

  16. [Dental pain and associated factors in Brazilian adolescents: the National School-Based Health Survey (PeNSE), Brazil, 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Maria do Carmo Matias; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Sardinha, Luciana Monteiro Vasconcelos; Paludetto Junior, Moacir; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Peres, Marco A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental pain and associated socio-demographic and behavioral factors in Brazilian adolescents, using data from the National School-Based Health Survey (PeNSE), Brazil, 2009. The survey was conducted by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) and Ministry of Health in students 11 to 17 years of age or older in the 27 State capitals, using a self-administered questionnaire. Analyses included Poisson regression following a hierarchical approach. Prevalence of dental pain in the sample (n = 54,985) in the previous six months was 17.8% (95%CI: 17.5-18.1). Higher prevalence was associated with female gender, age 14 years and over, racial self-identification as black, brown, or indigenous, enrollment in public schools, lower maternal schooling, not living with the mother, history of smoking or drinking, less frequent toothbrushing, and heavy consumption of sweets and soft drinks. Dental pain was thus associated with socio-demographic factors and health-related behaviors.

  17. Association between unmet dental needs and school absenteeism because of illness or injury among U.S. school children and adolescents aged 6-17 years, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaku, Israel T; Olutola, Bukola G; Adisa, Akinyele O; Obadan, Enihomo M; Vardavas, Constantine I

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the prevalence of dental disease among U.S. children and adolescents aged 6-17 years, as well as the impact of unmet dental needs on school absenteeism because of illness/injury within the past 12 months. Data were from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children's Health (n=65,680). Unmet dental need was defined as lack of access to appropriate and timely preventive or therapeutic dental healthcare when needed within the past 12 months. The impact of unmet dental needs on school absenteeism was measured using a multivariate generalized linear model with Poisson probability distribution (pdental need (i.e., preventive and/or therapeutic dental need) within the past 12 months. The mean number of days of school absence because of illness/injury was higher among students with an unmet therapeutic dental need in the presence of a dental condition compared to those reporting no unmet dental need (β=0.25; pdental services among underserved U.S. children and adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dental hygienists' contributions to improving the nation's oral health through school-based initiatives from 1970 through 1999: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCombs, Gayle B; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Wilder, Rebecca S; Skaff, Karen O; Lappan Green, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to document the contributions dental hygienists have made over the past 3 decades to improve the nation's oral health. This historical review encompasses selected literature that acknowledged dental Hygienists' direct involvement in U.S. school-based or school-linked oral health programs from 1970-1999. Five researchers independently searched MEDLINE, PubMed, and other electronic databases to identify relevant literature for the years 1970-1999. The search aimed to locate articles authored by or that documented dental Hygienists' involvement as "service provider" in U.S. school-based oral health programs. For the purpose of this review, service provider was defined as educator, administrator, clinician, examiner, or any other unspecified service performed by a dental hygienist. Fifty-seven articles were retrieved, of which 36 (63%) directly linked dental hygienists to U.S. school-based activities. Twenty-seven articles specifically identified dental hygienists as service providers. Dental hygienists were listed as either primary or contributing author on 19 of these articles. The decade of the 1970s revealed very little literature documenting dental Hygienists' involvement in U.S. school-based oral health programs. The 1970s, however, were instrumental in laying the foundation for service in the years that followed. As public health initiatives expanded in the 1980s, dental hygienists were identified in the largest number of papers as key personnel in the areas of education, management, service provider, and author. The decade of the 1990s yielded less literature than the 1980s, yet recognized dental Hygienists' involvement in all aspects of oral health care delivery, program development and management, and authorship. The authors of this review theorize that dental hygienists were engaged in more school-based programs than reported and were involved in the authorship process more frequently than documented. Due to lack of

  19. Undergraduate experience and self-assessed confidence in paediatric dentistry at the University of Jordan Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonbol, H N; Abu-Ghazaleh, S B; Al-Bitar, Z B

    2017-11-01

    The aims of the study were to audit the number and types of clinical procedures completed by the undergraduate dental students in the paediatric dentistry course at the University of Jordan Dental School and to present data on self-reported confidence in a variety of aspects of paediatric dentistry. A retrospective audit of clinical logbooks for the entire class of 120 dental students in their fifth clinical year was performed. Key clinical procedures performed in the paediatric clinics were recorded including treatment performed on both primary and permanent teeth. Students were requested to complete an anonymous questionnaire to assess confidence related to six activities using a visual analogue scale (VAS). All students performed restorations in primary teeth with the majority providing approximal restorations (91%), pit and fissure restorations (89%) followed by stainless steel crowns (81%). In addition, all students performed a pulpotomy for a primary tooth, extraction of a primary tooth and fissure sealants. Only a quarter of the students treated a traumatised incisor. Students considered themselves most confident (VAS ≥ 7) in performing operative dentistry, examination, diagnosis and treatment planning and providing preventive therapy. They were least confident in the management of dento-alveolar trauma (VAS = 3.8). Students at the University of Jordan Dental School were found to have good experience of clinical paediatric operative dentistry with the majority performing pulp therapy, preformed crowns and extractions. Deficiencies have been reported in student exposure to dental trauma, and these are being addressed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Knowledge, attitudes and practices surrounding occupational blood-borne pathogen exposure amongst students in two Chinese dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L; Yin, Y-L; Song, J-L; Chen, Y; Wu, Y-F; Zhao, L

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the knowledge, attitudes and practices surrounding occupational blood-borne pathogen exposure amongst dental students at two Chinese dental schools, as well as important factors that are associated with their career choice and attitudes towards infected patients. The study was conducted using a student self-administered questionnaire from March to June 2013 at two Chinese dental schools. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regression were used to compare the categorical variables and identify the variables related to attitudes. One hundred and seventy-one students answered the questionnaire (response rate 83%). Most participants had incomplete knowledge about occupational exposure and participants' compliance with the infection control programme during routine clinical work was low. Fifty-six participants (34%) experienced at least one occupational exposure, but only one reported the incident. Percutaneous injuries and mucous membrane exposures were the main causes for exposure. Protection of the eyes and post-exposure management were inadequate. According to most participants, they had received insufficient education. Their concerns about the risk of infectious professional exposure would influence their career choice and approach to patients. Only 14% and 26% of the participants were willing to treat human immunodeficiency virus- and hepatitis B virus-infected patients, respectively. More effective education on prevention and management is required for dental students to reduce the harm caused by occupational exposure. It is important to ensure dental students' knowledge and understanding before allowing them to enter clinical training. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Assessment of Elementary School Teachers' Level of Knowledge and Attitude regarding Traumatic Dental Injuries in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHammadi, Eman; Malalla, Mariam; Maklai, Zainab; Tariq, Aisha; Al-Ali, Badria; Al Jameel, Alaa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In this cross-sectional study, the level of knowledge and attitude of elementary school teachers regarding traumatic dental injuries (TDI) were assessed. Materials and Methods A questionnaire was distributed to 330 elementary school teachers in 30 randomly selected schools in the Emirates of Sharjah and Dubai. The questionnaire collected information on participants' demographic characteristics, first aid training, and attitude about emergency management of TDI. Results 292 teachers (88%) completed the questionnaires; of these, 95% were females, and 50% of the participants had first aid training. Knowledge about tooth avulsion was inadequate, and first aid training was not associated with correct responses to management of avulsed teeth (p > 0.05). A significantly higher percentage of younger teachers (p teachers (79%) and administrators (87%) (p Elementary school teachers in the UAE have a low level of knowledge regarding the management of dental trauma. Educational programs that address TDI are needed and could improve the elementary school teachers' level of knowledge in emergency management of TDI. PMID:29062362

  2. Assessment of Elementary School Teachers’ Level of Knowledge and Attitude regarding Traumatic Dental Injuries in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal A. Awad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this cross-sectional study, the level of knowledge and attitude of elementary school teachers regarding traumatic dental injuries (TDI were assessed. Materials and Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to 330 elementary school teachers in 30 randomly selected schools in the Emirates of Sharjah and Dubai. The questionnaire collected information on participants’ demographic characteristics, first aid training, and attitude about emergency management of TDI. Results. 292 teachers (88% completed the questionnaires; of these, 95% were females, and 50% of the participants had first aid training. Knowledge about tooth avulsion was inadequate, and first aid training was not associated with correct responses to management of avulsed teeth (p>0.05. A significantly higher percentage of younger teachers (p<0.05 expressed the need for future education on TDI management. A significantly higher percentage of participants who had an educational position (95% indicated that they did not have enough knowledge regarding TDI compared to physical education teachers (79% and administrators (87% (p<0.05. Conclusions. Elementary school teachers in the UAE have a low level of knowledge regarding the management of dental trauma. Educational programs that address TDI are needed and could improve the elementary school teachers’ level of knowledge in emergency management of TDI.

  3. Oral health comparisons between children attending an Aboriginal health service and a Government school dental service in a regional location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Eleanor J; Jamieson, Lisa M

    2007-01-01

    Indigenous children in Australia have higher dental caries levels than their non-Indigenous counterparts. Indigenous communities in South Australia's mid-north region have identified dental health as one of their top health priorities. In response to this, an oral health program based at the Pika Wiya Health Service in Port Augusta was established, with a dentist providing care for adults, and a dental therapist providing care for children, 2 days per week each. The purpose of this article is to compare the socio-demographic and oral health characteristics of children attending for care at the Pika Wiya Health Service Dental Clinic with those of their counterparts attending the general Port Augusta School Dental Service (SDS). Both Indigenous and non-Indigenous children were included. Data were obtained from the South Australian Dental Service (SADS), which routinely collects socio-demographic and dental information from patients seen through their system. Examinations were conducted by SADS-employed dental professionals. A full enumeration of children attending for care at Pika Wiya and the Port Augusta SDS from March 2001 to March 2006 was included. Surface level tooth data was captured using the EXACT treatment charting and management information system. The Socio-Economic Indices For Areas (SEIFA) were used to determine socio-economic status, and the dmft (sum of decayed, missing and filled teeth in the deciduous dentition) and DMFT (sum of decayed, missing and filled teeth in the permanent dentition) indices were used to assess oral health outcomes. Both measures were used for children aged 6-10 years because in such age groups children have a mixed dentition (both primary and permanent teeth are present). Caries prevalence (dmft/DMFT>0) and severity (mean dmft/DMFT) were calculated, as well as the Significant Caries Index (SiC) and Significant Caries Index 10 (SiC 10). The SiC is the mean dmft/DMFT of the one-third of the sample with the highest caries score

  4. Knowledge and behavior of dentists in a dental school regarding toothbrush disinfection

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    Ilkay PEKER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and behavior of dentists regarding toothbrush disinfection. This study included 147 dentists (88 women and 59 men who were actively employed at a dental school in Ankara, Turkey. Participants were asked to fill out a standard questionnaire, which contained questions regarding their demographics, brushing habits, toothbrush storage and disinfection habits, toothpaste use, knowledge about toothbrush disinfection, and whether they advised their patients about toothbrush storage. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and statistical analyses were performed with t-tests, chi-squared tests, and Fisher exact tests, where appropriate. Among the 147 surveyed dentists, 62.6% and 85.7% reported that they did not have any knowledge about toothbrush disinfection and did not disinfect their toothbrushes, respectively. However, approximately two thirds of surveyed dentists thought that toothbrush disinfection should be performed by everyone, including healthy individuals. Significant associations were found between knowledge about toothbrush disinfection and the professional title of dentists, how they stored their toothbrushes, and whether their toothbrushes were in contact with each other during storage (p < 0.05. A minority of dentists reported that they disinfected their toothbrushes.

  5. Knowledge and behavior of dentists in a dental school regarding toothbrush disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Ilkay; Akarslan, Zuhre; Basman, Adil; Haciosmanoglu, Nur

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and behavior of dentists regarding toothbrush disinfection. This study included 147 dentists (88 women and 59 men) who were actively employed at a dental school in Ankara, Turkey. Participants were asked to fill out a standard questionnaire, which contained questions regarding their demographics, brushing habits, toothbrush storage and disinfection habits, toothpaste use, knowledge about toothbrush disinfection, and whether they advised their patients about toothbrush storage. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and statistical analyses were performed with t-tests, chi-squared tests, and Fisher exact tests, where appropriate. Among the 147 surveyed dentists, 62.6% and 85.7% reported that they did not have any knowledge about toothbrush disinfection and did not disinfect their toothbrushes, respectively. However, approximately two thirds of surveyed dentists thought that toothbrush disinfection should be performed by everyone, including healthy individuals. Significant associations were found between knowledge about toothbrush disinfection and the professional title of dentists, how they stored their toothbrushes, and whether their toothbrushes were in contact with each other during storage (p toothbrushes.

  6. Prevalence of periodontal disease by recorded indices among low income discount dental school patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famili, Pouran; Shaya, Mandana M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of periodontal disease among the patient population at the University of Pittsburgh who receive the Low Income Discount (LID) financial obligation reduction based on family income in relation to federal poverty guidelines. This was a retrospective study examining the Electronic Health Record at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine (axiUm, Exan Group) from August 2008 to April 2013 (N = 7936). Records of the complete periodontal examination, income, age, gender, race, and other variables were collected and analyzed. Logistic regressions were performed, controlling for patients' age, ethnicity, smoking status, BMI, and diabetes. The odds of having periodontal disease for patients receiving the low income discount (LID) was higher (1.055), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.35). Patients receiving the low income discount did not have a higher prevalence of periodontal disease. Factors other than income appear to be more important to predict greater prevalence of periodontal disease, but this insight requires further investigation.

  7. An Overview of the Models in Reporting School Data on Dental Credentialing Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsun; Spielman, Andrew I; Kramer, Gene A

    2017-02-01

    The development and dissemination of meaningful and useful performance reports associated with examinations involved in the licensure process are important to the communities of interest, including state boards, candidates, and professional schools. Discussions of performance reporting have been largely neglected however. The authors recognize and reinforce the need for such discussions by providing prototypes of performance reporting in dentistry with examples and recommendations to guide practice. For illustrative purposes, this article reviews and discusses the different reporting models used over the past ten years with Part I and Part II of the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE). These reporting models are distinguished by such features as the following: 1) scores in each discipline covered on the exam (four for Part I and nine for Part II) and an overall average are reported in a standard-score metric; 2) a single overall score in a standard-score metric is reported; and 3) performance on the exam is reported as pass/fail. Standard scores on the NBDE range from 49 to 99, with 75 being a passing score. Sample data, without identifying information, are used to illustrate the reporting models.

  8. Knowledge and Attitude of Primary School Teachers toward Tooth Avulsion and Dental First Aid in Davangere City: A Cross-sectional Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanna, Sapna; Giriraju, Anjan; Narayan, Nagesh Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the study Traumatic dental injuries including avulsed tooth is a tragic and ignored problem among school children. As children spend much of their time in schools, school teachers form the group who commonly supervise the physical activity of the children, so awareness about avulsed tooth emergency management among school teachers is an important concept for long-term success and to prevent its future consequences. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude rega...

  9. Assessment of stress level among dental school students: An Indian outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Tangade, Pradeep S.; Anmol Mathur; Rahul Gupta; Shikha Chaudhary

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the factors influence student perception, might allow programmatic changes designed to enhance students′ psychosocial well-being and academic performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate perceived sources of stress on dental students and the role of parents in their career choice decisions. Methods : In a cross-sectional design, a modified dental environmental stress questionnaire was administered to all dental students. The responses to the questionna...

  10. Evaluated the incidence of dental fluoroses in school children the public net education in Joinville

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Gastaldi de M. M. Lopes CORRÊA; Sylvio MONTEIRO JÚNIOR; Maria Dalva de Souza SCHROEDER

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the incidence of dental fluorosis in 640 six totwelve year-old schoolchildren of the public education net. The dataallow the delimitation and establishment of community and individualfluorosis rates as preconized by Dean and Arnold (1943) [1], theprevalence of dental caries and the CPO-D rate, considering the ratiobetween dental caries and the fluorosis degree. It must be rememberedthat this net is submitted to the fluorine water application with topical application metho...

  11. Relation between dental fluorosis and intelligence quotient in school children of Bagalkot district

    OpenAIRE

    P K Shivaprakash; Kushagra Ohri; Hina Noorani

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted on 160 children, in the Bagalkot district of Karnataka state between August and October 2010, with the aim of finding out if there is a relation between dental fluorosis status and Intelligence Quotient (IQ). Children were categorized as, those suffering from dental fluorosis and those not suffering from dental fluorosis and for all children in both categories, Intelligence testing was done using the Raven′s Coloured Progressive Matrices. The following observations we...

  12. Dental caries in relation to socio-behavioral factors of 6-year-old school children of Udaipur district, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakamadla, Santhosh Kumar; Tadakamadla, Jyothi; Tibdewal, Harish; Duraiswamy, Prabu; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2012-11-01

    Based on the previous national oral health survey in India, some variation was observed in oral health status and behavior between the urban and rural population. Thus, the present study aimed to assess the dental caries experience in deciduous dentition of 6-year-old urban and rural schoolchildren of Udaipur district and to evaluate the influence of socio behavioral characteristics on dental caries experience. A combination of multi stage and cluster sampling procedure was executed to collect a representative sample of 875, 6-year-old school children. Clinical examination for caries was conducted using dmft (decayed, missing and filled teeth) index. Socio - demographic information was collected prior to clinical examination in addition to information on oral health behavior by personal interviews. Only 7.8% children reported of brushing their teeth twice or more than twice daily. Rural children visited the dentist less often than the urban children (P influence of gender, urbanization, tooth brushing frequency, dental visits, parent's education and occupation on caries occurrence. Rural children and boys experienced greater caries than their urban and girl counterparts. Caries experience was related to the parent's occupation and education. Moreover, caries occurrence was influenced by brushing frequency and dental visiting habits.

  13. Dental and maxillofacial skeletal injuries seen at the University of Otago School of Dentistry, New Zealand 2000-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Robert M; Ponnambalam, Y

    2008-04-01

    An epidemiological study of dental and facial trauma injuries was performed on patient presentations to the University of Otago School of Dentistry during the period 2000-2004. A total of 1287 patients were seen for dental injuries with 3473 tooth injuries. The mean age was 17.48 +/- 13.13 years (range: 2-86), the highest number of injuries occurred in the 16-25 year group with a male to female ratio of 2.01:1. Uncomplicated crown fractures were the most common injury that required treatment and the variables of age, gender, tooth type, type of injury, cause of injury, location where injury occurred were similar to other studies. Falls, accidental contact, assault and motor vehicle accidents attributed to >60% of the causes of trauma and to more serious injuries. Dental injuries sustained during sporting activities reflected the potential for high impact contact and the pattern of injury suggested that preventative measures had a positive outcome in limiting the number and degree of complexity of injuries. The emergence of skateboard injuries was a feature of this study. Non-sport causes attributed to the majority of facial fractures while rugby union was the most common sport associated with bone fractures. This study shows that dental and facial injury rates and patterns in a New Zealand region are similar to other populations.

  14. U.S. Dental students' and faculty members' attitudes about technology, instructional strategies, student diversity, and school duration: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkarim, Ahmad; Benghuzzi, Hamed; Hamadain, Elgenaid; Tucci, Michelle; Ford, Timothy; Sullivan, Donna

    2014-04-01

    In this study, attitudes and perceptions of U.S. dental students and faculty members were evaluated regarding four aspects of dental education: technology integration, instructional strategies, student diversity, and school duration. A survey instrument with eight statements using a five-point Likert scale and a free-text comment section was developed and distributed through Survey Monkey. A total of 426 students and 187 faculty members from ten U.S. dental schools participated, a response rate of 17 percent of those surveyed. Faculty and student responses were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The results of this analytic procedure revealed that the groups differed in their average responses for seven of the eight statements. Analysis of the faculty and student comments revealed similar themes between the two groups. Both dental students and dental faculty members stated that technology integration should be viewed as only a supplement to conventional instruction and showed mixed opinions about electronic textbooks. Further, both groups had positive views of the roles of problem-based learning, community service, and the integration of research practice into dental education. Both groups also valued diversity in the student body and supported the current four-year duration of dental school.

  15. Dental caries and oral health practice among 12 year old school children from low socio-economic status background in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafuvadze, Brighton Tasara; Mahachi, Lovemore; Mafuvadze, Benford

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases affecting children in Sub-Saharan Africa. Previous studies show a higher prevalence of dental caries in children from low socio-economic status backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of dental caries among 12 year old children in urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe and establish preliminary baseline data. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 12 year old children at primary schools in Harare and Bikita district. A Pre-tested questionnaire was administered to elicit information from the participants on tooth cleaning, dietary habits and dental experience. Dental caries status was assessed using the DMFT index following World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Our results showed a high prevalence of dental caries in both urban (59.5%) and rural (40.8%) children. The mean DMFT in urban and rural areas was 1.29 and 0.66, respectively. Furthermore, our data showed a general lack of knowledge on oral health issues by the participants. There is high prevalence of dental caries among 12 years old school children in both urban and rural areas of Zimbabwe. This calls for early preventive strategies and treatment services. We recommend incorporation of oral health education in the elementary school curricula.

  16. [Microbiological study of dental clinic air at the University Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo Dental School].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M C; de Campos, A C; Tommasi, D; dos Santos, M A

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the environmental microbiote and to verify its occurrence in different areas. During 3 months, from April to June 1986, several air samples of working areas of the Dental Clinic of Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo were analised. The study consisted of 10 exposures in strategically selected points during 10 minutes each, blood-agar plates and Sabouraud-agar plates. It was done the identification in genera and in some cases at species, according to the conventional methods. The plates were incubated, and the colonies isolated and identified. It was done the statistical analysis (Z test) and it was observed bigger incidence of bacteria than fungi and more diversity of the fungi than bacteria. From the Odontological health point of view, the isolated microorganisms (ubiquitous in the air) do not reveal patogenicity however the determinants of the local hygiene.

  17. Patients' Perceptions of Dental Students' Empathic, Person-Centered Care in a Dental School Clinic in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babar, Muneer Gohar; Hasan, Syed Shahzad; Yong, Wong Mei; Mitha, Shahid; Al-Waeli, Haider Abdulameer

    2017-04-01

    Empathy has been identified as a crucial foundation in building an effective dentist-patient relationship. The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of dental students' empathic care in the primary oral health care clinic at International Medical University in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia in May-October 2014. The study also assessed the validity and reliability of the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure in this setting; the association between number of encounters and students' CARE Measure scores; and the association between students' empathy (measured by the Toronto Empathy Questionnaire) and CARE Measure scores. Participants were 283 patients (aged ≥18 years) who were asked to self-complete the ten-item CARE Measure immediately after their clinical encounter with students who provided care under supervision of the teaching staff. The results showed that the CARE Measure demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's α=0.95). A single factor solution emerged, accounting for 69% of the variance. The mean CARE Measure score in the consultations was 43.55±6.14, and 26% of the students achieved the maximum possible score of 50. The mean number of encounters with each student was 2.33±2.78. An increase of one episode was associated with an insignificant average CARE score decrease of 0.05 (-0.28, 0.38), whereas students' empathy was associated with a small increase in average CARE Measure score of 0.63 (0.08, 1.18). These results provide evidence of the measure's ability to support feedback to dental students on their empathy when interacting with patients.

  18. Constraints on the performance of school-based dental program in Yogyakarta, Indonesia: A qualitative study

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    Rosa Amalia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A high prevalence of caries at ages ≥ 12 in Yogyakarta province (DMFT = 6.5, raises the question of the effectiveness of the school-based dental program (SBDP which, as a national oral health program in schools, is organized by community health centers (CHCs. Purpose: The aim of this study is to explore the possible constraints on work processes which might affect the performance of SBDPs in controlling caries. Methods: In-depth interviews was conducted in twelve CHCs, covering all five districts both in urban and rural areas. Subjects were 41 dentists and dental nurses working in these CHCs. The interviews were structured according to the following themes: resources and logistics; program planning; target achievement; monitoring and evaluation; and suggestions for possible improvements. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Results: The main constraints identified were limited resources and inflexible regulations for resource allocation in the CHC, and inadequate program planning and program evaluation. Inadequate participation of parents was also identified. Another constraint is thatpolicy at the district level orientates oral health towards curative intervention rather than prevention. Suggestions from interviewees include encouraging a policy for oral health, task delegation, a funding program using school health insurance, and a reorientation towards prevention. Conclusion: The weakness of management processes and the unsupported policy of the SBDP at the local level result in a lack of effectiveness. The constraints identified and suggestions for improvements could constitute a basis for improving program quality.Latar Belakang: Tingginya prevalensi karies pada usia ≥ 12 tahun (DMFT = 6.5 di Provinsi Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta (DIY menimbulkan pertanyaan akan efektifitas Usaha Kesehatan Gigi Sekolah (UKGS. UKGS adalah salah satu program nasional di bidang kesehatan gigi dan mulut yang dilaksanakan oleh Puskesmas

  19. An international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program: an option in the dental school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Mier, Esperanza A; Soto-Rojas, Armando E; Stelzner, Sarah M; Lorant, Diane E; Riner, Mary E; Yoder, Karen M

    2011-04-01

    Many health professions students who treat Spanish-speaking patients in the United States have little concept of their culture and health related traditions. The lack of understanding of these concepts may constitute major barriers to healthcare for these patients. International service-learning experiences allow students to work directly in communities from which patients immigrate and, as a result, students gain a better understanding of these barriers. This article describes the implementation of an international, multidisciplinary, service-learning program in a dental school in the United States. The Indiana University International Service-Learning program in Hidalgo, Mexico began in 1999 as an alternative spring break travel and clinical experience for medical students, focusing on the treatment of acute health problems. Travel-related preparatory sessions were offered, and no learning or service objectives had been developed. The program has evolved to include a multidisciplinary team of dental, medical, nursing, public health and social work students and faculty. The experience is now integrated into a curriculum based on the service-learning model that allows students to use their clinical skills in real-life situations and provides structured time for reflection. The program aims to enhance teaching and foster civic responsibility in explicit partnership with the community. Preparatory sessions have evolved into a multidisciplinary graduate level course with defined learning and service objectives. PROGRAM EVALUATION METHODS: In order to assess the program's operation as perceived by students and faculty and to evaluate student's perceptions of learning outcomes, evaluation tools were developed. These tools included student and faculty evaluation questionnaires, experiential learning journals, and a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis. Evaluation data show that after program participation, students perceived an increase in their

  20. Widening access? Characteristics of applicants to medical and dental schools, compared with UCAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J E; Niven, V; Donaldson, N; Wilson, N H F

    2009-11-14

    The aim of this paper is to compare the demography (age, sex, ethnicity, social status) and academic experience (school type, tariff scores) of focused and successful applicants to preclinical dentistry with preclinical medicine, and with higher education in general in the UK. Retrospective analyses of anonymised University and College Admissions Services (UCAS) data for focused applicants whose preferred subject was preclinical dentistry or medicine, and accepted (successful) applicants to the same programmes in 2006. These data were compared with publicly available data on applicants and accepted applicants through UCAS. Information for each medical, dental and general UCAS applicant included age, sex, ethnicity, socio-economic group, region, school type and tariff score. Logistic regression was used to model the probability of being accepted in relation to all explanatory variables and interactions. In total there were 2,577 focused applicants to dentistry; 1,114 applicants were accepted, 4% (n = 46) of whom did not have it as their preferred subject choice. There were seven times as many focused applicants for medicine (18,943) when compared with dentistry; 8,011 applicants were accepted, 2.7% of whom did not have medicine as their preferred subject choice (n = 218). Just over half of the applicants to dentistry were from minority ethnic backgrounds (50.5%), exceeding medicine (29.5%), and higher education in general (19%). The proportion of female applicants was similar across all three groups at around 55%. Only one fifth (21%) of focused applicants to dentistry were mature compared with one third (33%) to medicine and one quarter (25.5%) of all UCAS applicants. Greater proportions of applicants to medicine (25.8%) and dentistry (23.5%) were from upper socio-economic backgrounds, compared with higher education in general (15.5%). When all other factors are controlled, the odds of being accepted for medicine, and for dentistry, are lower if mature, male, from

  1. Transition from glass to digital slide microscopy in the teaching of oral pathology in a Brazilian dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Felipe-Paiva; Santos-Silva, Alan-Roger; Lopes, Márcio-Ajudarte; Almeida, Oslei-Paes de; Vargas, Pablo-Agustin

    2015-01-01

    Several medical and dental schools have described their experience in the transition from conventional to digital microscopy in the teaching of general pathology and histology disciplines; however, this transitional process has scarcely been reported in the teaching of oral pathology. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to report the transition from conventional glass slide to virtual microscopy in oral pathology teaching, a unique experience in Latin America. An Aperio ScanScope® scanner was used to digitalize histological slides used in practical lectures of oral pathology. The challenges and benefits observed by the group of Professors from the Piracicaba Dental School (Brazil) are described and a questionnaire to evaluate the students' compliance to this new methodology was applied. An improvement in the classes was described by the Professors who mainly dealt with questions related to pathological changes instead of technical problems; also, a higher interaction with the students was described. The simplicity of the software used and the high quality of the virtual slides, requiring a smaller time to identify microscopic structures, were considered important for a better teaching process. Virtual microscopy used to teach oral pathology represents a useful educational methodology, with an excellent compliance of the dental students.

  2. Evaluating Success of Pediatric Dentistry Department at Mashhad Dental School (Iran in Clinical Skills Education from Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Nematollahi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodic evaluation of educational programs provides insight into the course and teaching effectiveness. Effective evaluation provides valuable information, which contributes to both student’s and course success. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of pediatric dentistry department at Mashhad dental school in clinical education from students’ perspectives.Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 116 fifth and sixth grade undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry at Mashhad dental school. A questionnaire including 21 multiple choice questions about 7 parts of clinical skills in pediatric dentistry was given to each student. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney in SPSS software. Results: According to the study results, among 7 different clinical skills in pediatric dentistry including: examination, behavior management, prevention, injection, restoration, pulp treatment and space management, the highest success rate of pediatric dentistry department was in prevention and injection and the lowest success rate in space management and behavior control. Furthermore, from the students’ perspective, male students compared to female students mentioned a higher rate of success in choosing the type of restoration material for pediatric dentistry department (P=0. 041. Conclusion: This study showed that the students’ self-reported clinical skills in different parts of pediatric dentistry has been adequate. Students reported a lack of confidence in “behavior management” and “space management” which warrants greater emphasis in the undergraduate curriculum.

  3. Impact of dental trauma on oral health-related quality of life among 12 years Lucknow school children: A cross-sectional survey

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    Sanjukta Bagchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental trauma has become an important attribute of dental public health inducing feelings of embarrassment to smile, laugh, and show teeth affecting social relationships. Available literature regarding the impact of dental trauma on the quality of life of children in Lucknow is scarce. Aims: To assess the impact of traumatic dental injuries (TDI on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL among 12-year-old school going children of Lucknow. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 12-year-old Lucknow school children. A total of 492 school children were selected through multistage cluster random sampling. The participants completed the child perceptions questionnaire (CPQ 11-14 - impact short form: 16 followed by an assessment of TDI. Unpaired t-test was used to determine the association of TDI with CPQ 11-14 because it involved two separate groups; one with dental trauma and other without dental trauma. Results: The prevalence of TDI was 10.8%. Maxillary central incisors (8.73% were the frequently traumatized teeth. Enamel fracture (7.11% was the most common type of TDI. OHRQoL had statistically significant association with TDI. Conclusions: TDI has a negative impact on OHRQoL of children affecting their personal relationships and school performance.

  4. Relation between dental fluorosis and intelligence quotient in school children of Bagalkot district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprakash, P K; Ohri, Kushagra; Noorani, Hina

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted on 160 children, in the Bagalkot district of Karnataka state between August and October 2010, with the aim of finding out if there is a relation between dental fluorosis status and Intelligence Quotient (IQ). Children were categorized as, those suffering from dental fluorosis and those not suffering from dental fluorosis and for all children in both categories, Intelligence testing was done using the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices. The following observations were made from the data gathered: The mean IQ score of children without dental fluorosis was significantly higher than those children who had dental fluorosis. The mean IQ scores did not vary with the severity of dental fluorosis as classified by Dean's fluorosis index. Also it was noticed that the percentage of children with dental fluorosis was more in Extremely Low and Low IQ categories whereas the percentage of children without dental fluorosis was more in Average and High Average IQ categories. Previous studies had indicated toward decreased Intelligence in children exposed to high levels of fluoride and our study also confirmed such an effect.

  5. Oral hygiene, dental caries and nutritional Status of in-school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dental caries has become a disease of public health significance with dietary and hygiene practices being identified has major contributors. The extent of this burden is poorly explored among the adolescents in Nigeria. This study examines the association between oral hygiene, dental caries and nutritional ...

  6. e-Assessment in a Limited-Resources Dental School Using an Open-Source Learning Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tantawi, Maha M A; Abdelsalam, Maha M; Mourady, Ahmed M; Elrifae, Ismail M B

    2015-05-01

    e-Assessment provides solutions to some problems encountered in dental students' evaluation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experience of a limited-resources dental school with e-assessment provided through an open-source learning management system (LMS). Data about users' access and types of e-assessment activities at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, were obtained from the web-based LMS Moodle. A questionnaire developed to assess students' perceptions of the e-assessment was also sent to students registered in two courses (undergraduate and postgraduate) with the same instructor. The results showed that most e-courses at the school had one form of e-assessment (82%) and, of these, 16.7% had summative assessment activities. There were significant differences among departments in the number of e-courses with e-assessment. One-quarter of e-courses with e-assessment used Moodle quizzes. Of 285 students registered in the two courses that included the questionnaire, 170 responded (response rate=59.6%). The responding students positively perceived the impact of e-assessment on learning and its reliability and security, whereas technical issues and related stresses were negatively perceived. This study suggests that e-assessment can be used at minimal cost in dental schools with limited resources and large class sizes with the least demands on faculty members and teaching staff time. For these schools, an open-source LMS such as Moodle provides formative e-assessment not available otherwise and accommodates various question formats and varying levels of instructors' technical skills. These students seemed to have a positive impression of the e-assessment although technical problems and related stresses are issues that need to be addressed.

  7. Assessment of Dental Caries Spectrum among 11 to 14-Year-Old School Going Children in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Radhey; Manjunath, B C; Kumar, Adarsh; Narang, Ridhi; Goyal, Ankita; Piplani, Ankita

    2017-06-01

    The quantification of dental caries is usually done by DMFT index but efforts are being made to find an alternative. Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment (CAST) is a recent, innovative caries assessment tool which can be used in epidemiological surveys. To assess dental caries using CAST index among 11-14-year-old school children in Rohtak city, Haryana, India. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 11-14-year-old children in schools of Rohtak City using multi stage cluster sampling technique. Rohtak city was divided in to nine clusters. In the 2nd stage, one school was randomly selected from each cluster with lottery method. Finally from each selected school, every odd roll number child between age group 11-14 years, were enrolled to reach a sample of 586. Caries was recorded using the CAST index. Each child was clinically examined by a trained examiner using CAST index. Descriptive and inferential statistics were done and Chi-square test was used to find association between caries prevalence and gender. Mann-Whitney U test was used to find any difference of mean DMFT between different age groups. A total of 586 children were examined. Prevalence of dental caries was 28.6%. Highest caries was observed in lower right first molar and lower left first molar (13.8% and 11.6%) respectively. Pulpal involvement in lower molars was found more than the upper molars. CAST index presents a simple hierarchical structure of caries spectrum and is a promising index for epidemiological studies with complex quantifiability.

  8. Vital Signs: Dental Sealant Use and Untreated Tooth Decay Among U.S. School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Susan O; Wei, Liang; Gooch, Barbara F; Weno, Katherine; Espinoza, Lorena

    2016-10-21

    Tooth decay is one of the greatest unmet treatment needs among children. Pain and suffering associated with untreated dental disease can lead to problems with eating, speaking, and learning. School-based dental sealant programs (SBSP) deliver a highly effective intervention to prevent tooth decay in children who might not receive regular dental care. SBSPs benefits exceed their costs when they target children at high risk for tooth decay. CDC used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2014 to estimate current prevalences of sealant use and untreated tooth decay among low-income (≤185% of federal poverty level) and higher-income children aged 6-11 years and compared these estimates with 1999-2004 NHANES data. The mean number of decayed and filled first molars (DFFM) was estimated for children with and without sealants. Averted tooth decay resulting from increasing sealant use prevalence was also estimated. All reported differences are significant at pchildren, sealant use prevalence increased by 16.2 and 8.8 percentage points to 38.7% and 47.8%, respectively. Among low-income children aged 7-11 years, the mean DFFM was almost three times higher among children without sealants (0.82) than among children with sealants. Approximately 6.5 million low-income children could potentially benefit from the delivery of sealants through SBSP. The prevalence of dental sealant use has increased; however, most children have not received sealants. Increasing sealant use prevalence could substantially reduce untreated decay, associated problems, and dental treatment costs.

  9. Occupational accidents in dental school: a 10-year retrospective - doi:10.5020/18061230.2009.p240

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    Ítalo Sarto Carvalho Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate occupational accidents that occurred during the first 10 years of Fortaleza University (UNIFOR Dental School. Methods: A documental study based on secondary data from the Notification Center of Occupational Accidents of UNIFOR Dental School, reported in the last 10 years. The variables included characteristics of the accidents and of the injured, besides the type of instrument and the resulting injury. Results: Were recorded 160 occupational accidents divided by location, function of the injured and type of accident. It was observed that 63.1% of cases occurred in the Multidisciplinary Clinic, 23.1% in the Integrated Clinic, 8.8% in the laboratories, 1.9% at home, 1.25% in the Surgical Center, 1.25% in the Material Sterilization Central and 0.6% during the training outside university. Concerning the injured, 90.6% of the victims were undergraduates, 5.0% staff, 3.8% teachers and 0.6% patients. Regarding the injury, 40.6% were penetrating bloody injuries, 11.9% cutting bloody injuries, 2.5% cutting non-bloody injuries, 5% burns, 5% penetrating bloody injuries/cutting bloody injuries, 2.5% were injuries with maceration, 1.9% injuries causing ocular trauma and 0.6% of an incident of dog bite. Conclusion: It was concluded that penetrating injuries were prevalent and these occurred mostly in the multidisciplinary clinic, where students of earlier periods of dental course work, indicating that the experience in dental practice generates more care with safety.

  10. Association of caries experience and dental plaque with sociodemographic characteristics in elementary school-aged children: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashirian, Saeed; Shirahmadi, Samaneh; Seyedzadeh-Sabounchi, Shabnam; Soltanian, Ali Reza; Karimi-Shahanjarini, Akram; Vahdatinia, Farshid

    2018-01-10

    Dental caries among Iranian elementary school children aged 6-12 years continue to rise. To estimate treatment needs and guide health initiatives, current epidemiologic data are required. Such data are currently unavailable for dental health. The purpose of this study was to assess caries experience, dental plaque, and associated factors in elementary school-aged children from Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 988 elementary school children aged 7-12 years were selected by multistage cluster sampling. Dental caries was studied using the WHO criteria, dental plaque was examined according to O'Leary index. Data on parental education and occupation, living district, dental pain within the past year, and tooth brushing habits under parental supervision were collected through interviews based on questionnaire. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and logistic and linear regression. The mean (SD) age of the elementary school children was 9.64 (1.73) years. The highest dmft was seen in elementary school children aged 7-8 years 6.53 (4.37) and the highest DMFT and dental plaque was in 12 year olds recorded as 1.17 (1.77) and 51.97 (25.86), respectively. The proportion of decayed teeth in 7 years old elementary school based on dmft index was 80.36%, moreover, the proportion in 12 years old elementary school was 40.17% based on the DMFT index. Age, gender, and dental pain within the past year were significantly associated with DMFT and dmft. The odds of developing dental caries (DMFT) was 1.70 times higher in girls than in boys (p plaque such that Plaque Index increased by 2.44 times per one year increase in age (p plaque formation among elementary school children in Hamadan were high and they were influenced by their sociodemographic factors. The associations found can be used as a helpful guide for planning accurate preventive programs for elementary school children in this region.

  11. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in relation with different fluoride levels in drinking water among school going children in Sarada tehsil of Udaipur district, Rajasthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvaiya, B U; Bhayya, D; Arora, R; Mehta, D N

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of dental fluorosis in relation with different fluoride levels in drinking water among school going children of 6-12 years age group. Dental fluorosis was recorded using Dean's index in school children of selected villages. The drinking water samples of all the selected villages were collected in polyethylene bottles and the fluoride content of these samples was determined by fluoride ion selective method using Orion microprocessor analyser. The overall prevalence of dental fluorosis was found to be 69.84%. An increase in the community fluorosis index (CFI) with corresponding increase in water fluoride content was found. There was an increase in prevalence of dental fluorosis with a corresponding increase in water fluoride content from 0.8 ppm to 4.1 ppm. A significantly strong positive correlation was found between CFI and fluoride concentration in drinking water.

  12. Oral hygiene and dental status as factors related to asthma in high school and college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario H; Macedo-Sánchez, Francisco; Solís-Torres, Cuauhtémoc; Rubio-Monteverde, Horacio; Furuya, María E Y

    2015-05-01

    Considering that oral microbiota might modulate immune responses, we explored if customary oral care procedures might influence immune-driven diseases such as asthma. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of responses to a self-completion medical questionnaire applied to subjects entering into college and high school programs during 2006-2011. Responses from 329 780 students aged 14-24 years (97.6% of the original population) were analyzed. The prevalence of lifetime asthma was 4.01%. Subjects with asthma were slightly older, taller and heavier than subjects without asthma, and these differences were equally present in males and females. Subjects currently having two or more decayed teeth had asthma less frequently than those with one or none decayed tooth, with an odds ratio (OR) = 0.86 and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.83-0.89. In contrast, asthma was reported more frequently among students having two or more missing or filled teeth [OR = 1.1 (95% CI 1.04-1.17) and OR = 1.05 (95% CI 1.01-1.09), respectively]. From 2008 onwards, subjects also responded questions about oral hygiene incorporated into the core questionnaire. In these subjects, the use of toothpaste as well as the frequency and duration of toothbrushing were unrelated to asthma; regular use of mouthwash was associated with asthma in women [OR = 1.16 (95% CI 1.07-1.25)], but not in men [OR = 1.04 (95% CI 0.96-1.13)]. Results of multiple logistic regressions were in line with these findings. Our results suggested that oral hygiene and dental status could be novel factors influencing asthma development, and thus further studies to confirm and clarify this association are warranted.

  13. The emerging dental workforce: long-term career expectations and influences. A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their long-term career from one London Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jennifer E; Patel, Resmi; Wilson, Nairn H F

    2009-12-23

    career break' (p = 0.01), 'assistance with student debt' (p = 0.01) and 'incentives to work in deprived areas'. Long-term career plans of new graduates from this London Dental School commonly embrace opportunities for professional development as well as personal issues such as work/life balance and financial income. Significant differences were identified between male and females long-term plans and influences. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. The emerging dental workforce: long-term career expectations and influences. A quantitative study of final year dental students' views on their long-term career from one London Dental School

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    Wilson Nairn HF

    2009-12-01

    ' (p = 0.02, 'retraining facilities after career break' (p = 0.01, 'assistance with student debt' (p = 0.01 and 'incentives to work in deprived areas'. Conclusion Long-term career plans of new graduates from this London Dental School commonly embrace opportunities for professional development as well as personal issues such as work/life balance and financial income. Significant differences were identified between male and females long-term plans and influences. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. An audit of the quality of referral letters received by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Justin

    2010-11-01

    One hundred consecutive referral letters, sent by dental practitioners to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, were audited in terms of quality. The audit was based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) recommendations of 1998. The audit demonstrated that in general referral letters required modification and did not give the clinician the required information. This paper sets out the results of the audit and suggests a template that should be used for future referrals.

  16. An audit of the quality of referral letters received by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Justin

    2010-10-01

    One hundred consecutive referral letters, sent by dental practitioners to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, were audited in terms of quality. The audit was based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) recommendations of 1998. The audit demonstrated that in general referral letters required modification and did not give the clinician the required information. This paper sets out the results of the audit and suggests a template that should be used for future referrals.

  17. Attitudes Towards Problem-Based Learning of Faculty Members at 12 U.S. Medical and Dental Schools: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkarim, Ahmad; Schween, Dorothy; Ford, Timothy

    2018-02-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching method used in medical and dental education to promote students' problem-solving skills. It may also be a viable tool for interprofessional education in which medical and dental students learn together, collaborate, and learn about, from, and with each other. The aim of this study was to compare medical and dental faculty members' attitudes about and perceptions of PBL at 12 U.S. medical and dental schools known to use PBL. In 2015, 111 medical and 132 dental faculty members (combined n=243) from six medical and six dental schools completed a survey containing ten statements and an open comment section. The response rate was 42% of those who received the survey. In the results, the medical faculty participants showed significantly higher enthusiasm for and agreement with PBL benefits than did the dental faculty participants (p˂0.05). The two groups agreed that PBL should be used to supplement conventional teaching (p>0.05). There were no opposite attitudes or contrasts found between the two groups with regards to PBL. The strongest themes expressed by both groups were that PBL should not be used as the sole method of instruction and that students needed a solid foundation in the subject prior to engaging in PBL.

  18. Prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis and genu valgum among school children in rural field practice area of a medical college

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    Banavaram Anniappan Arvind

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of dental fluorosis and genu valgum among school children in the above mentioned area. Methods: A Cross sectional study was conducted on school children of 1st to 7th standard in the rural field practice area of a medical college. Children were examined for dental fluorosis and genu valgum. Drinking water samples were also tested for fluoride levels. Proportion of children with dental fluorosis and genu valgum were calculated by severity, age and sex. Statistical significance was analyzed by using Chisquare test or Mc Nemar test. Results: Of the 1 544 children examined 42.1% and 8.4% had dental fluorosis and genu valgum respectively. Prevalence of very mild dental fluorosis and moderate grade genu valgum were high compared to other categories. Prevalence rates increased with the age (P<0.05 and was more among girls (45.2% as compared to boys (39.1% (P<0.05. Of the 26 water samples analysed, 18 samples (69.2% revealed the fluoride content above the permissible limit. Conclusions: Findings of the present study reveal a high prevalence of dental fluorosis and genu valgum amongst school children and high fluoride level in the water. Further studies are needed to evaluate the other risk factors and reasons for gender differences.

  19. The impact of dietary and tooth-brushing habits to dental caries of special school children with disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Chun-Chih; Hu, Wen-Chia; Tang, Ru-Ching; Chen, Cheng-Chin; Tsai, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Te

    2010-01-01

    The daily oral activities may severely influence oral health of children with disabilities. In this survey, we analyzed the impact of dietary and tooth-brushing habits to dental caries in special school children with disabilities. This cross-sectional survey investigated 535 special school children with disabilities aged 6-12 years, 60.93% males, 39.07% females from 10 special schools in Taiwan. Oral examinations were carried out by dentists with a Kappa score of their inter-examiner agreement exceeding 0.8. Data on demographics, diet, and tooth-brushing habits of children with disabilities were collected using a standardized questionnaire completed by parents/caregivers. More than three quarters of the participants were combined with severe or profound disability. Children with profound severity in disability had a higher percentage (67.37%) in teeth-brushing by parents/caregivers compared to those children with mild/moderate severity in disability which had a higher percentage (81.60%) in teeth-brushing by themselves. Children whose teeth were brushed by parents/caregivers had a better dental health, and lower caries prevalence. The main risk factors related to decayed teeth of children with disabilities are frequency of sweets intake, ability to brush teeth and with plaque or not. The dental health education, prevention program and periodical oral check-up to children with disabilities and their parents/caregivers should be reinforced. Brushing skill should be taught to children according to their type, severity and individual characteristics of disability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence of dental fluorosis and associated risk factors in 11-15 year old school children of Kanyakumari District, Tamilnadu, India: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaradoss, Jagan Kumar; Clement, Roger B; Narayanan, Aswath

    2008-01-01

    This study presents data on the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in 11-15-years-old school children of Kanyakumari district, TamilNadu, India, and also the relationships between prevalence of dental fluorosis and selected risk factors. A total of 1800 children, from all the nine blocks of Kanyakumari district, studying in classes 6-10 were examined using type III examination. The assessment form designed specifically for this study was used while examining each student. Dental fluorosis was present in 15.8% (285 children) of the study population and the community fluorosis index was calculated to be 0.27. The prevalence of dental fluorosis varied from as low as 1.4% in some blocks to as high as 29.4% in some others. There was a significant difference in the level of dental fluorosis between rural and urban residents ( P pipe water as compared to children who consumed ground water. 65% of the children with dental fluorosis had no caries, indicating the positive effects of fluoride. The prevalence of dental fluorosis can be attributed to the level of fluoride in the drinking water as it exhibited a step-wise increase when the water fluoride levels increased from 1.5-1.7 ppm. Measures for defluoridation of drinking water before distribution has to be taken in the high prevalence blocks to lower the burden of dental fluorosis in this community.

  1. Dental caries and the associated factors influencing it in tribal, suburban and urban school children of Tamil Nadu, India: a cross sectional study

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    J. Baby John

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The study was planned to assess the prevalence of dental caries among tribal, suburban and urban children of Tiruchengode and Erode of Tamil Nadu state, India. The objective of the study was to assess the association of dental caries with family background, dental service availability, transportation and knowledge on preventive dental measures among these three groups. Design and methods. Cross-sectional study. A total of 1028 school children in the age range of 9-12 years from various government schools located in Palamalai and Kolli Hills (tribal, Tiruchengode (suburban and Erode (urban, Tamil Nadu, were included in the study. Decayed, filled, and missing teeth (DMFT, decayed and filled teeth (dft and Significant Caries Index were recorded. A specially prepared questionnaire was used to record all the data regarding oral hygiene practices, socioeconomic background, dental treatment availability, parent’s education level were used for the study. ANOVA t-test and post hoc test were used for comparing quantitative variables between the 3 subgroups. Results. The tribal school children had 89.3% caries prevalence, where as it was 77% in suburban and 55% in urban school children. The mean DMFT score among tribal, suburban and urban school children were statistically significant different (P=0.001 between the three groups. There was a highly significant difference (P=0.001 in the mean DMFT score based on brushing frequency. There was a statistically significant difference (P=0.018 in the mean DMFT scores in the urban group based on the mothers education status. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean DMFT scores based on the presence or absence of television in their house and the parents’ income. Conclusions. Oral hygiene practices, dietary habits and access to dental care services played an important role in prevalence of dental caries. It was observed that the socioeconomic status, parents’ educational

  2. Dental Caries and Related Factors among 7-12 Year-old School Children in Yasuj, Iran, in 2014

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    M Yousofi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Tooth caries is the most prevalent infectious disease in children. The purpose of this study was to assess carries experience indexes and related factors among 7-12 year-old school children in Yasuj, Iran, in 2014. Materials and methods: In the present Cross-sectional and analytical study, using a two-stage random sampling, 460 students from primary schools of Yasuj city and surrounding villages were selected. The children were clinically examined at their school by a professional calibrated dentistry team. Their demographic and socioeconomic status, mouth health behaviors and teeth carries status and consumed nutritional materials were gathered by a questioner and a dental chart. The data were analyzed using inferential statistical methods. The SPSS software version 22 was used to extract the outputs and &alpha=0.05 was considered as the significant level. Results: The dental caries prevalence of deciduous, permanent and total of  two type of dents were  75.2, 41.1 and  89.8 percent, respectively and the dmft, DMFT and dmft+DMFT indexes were 3.57, 0.87, and 4.44, respectively.. The caries prevalence of permanent teeth and DMFT in girls were significantly higher than boys (p=0.046, but the caries prevalence in total of dents in boys was significantly higher than girls ( p=0.32. Furthermore, the dental caries prevalence in permanent teeth and DMFT in children resident in rural areas were significantly higher than those in urban areas (p0.1.  Conclusions: Prevalence and severity score of dental caries among 7 - 12 year-old Yasuj students were higher than the WHO standards. The tooth caries experiences were more prevalent in boys and in children resident in rural areas, increased with age and decreased with BMI and less prevalent in children with higher family socioeconomic status. Tooth brushing and flossing and consuming dairy foods were protective agents in occurring tooth caries in primary school children in

  3. Infection control practices in dental school: A patient perspective from Saudi Arabia

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    Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Patients revealed adequate knowledge towards the use of gloves, face mask and spectacles by dentist. However, their knowledge regarding the spread of Hepatitis-B, HIV infection and use of autoclave was poor. Previous visitor of dental clinics showed higher knowledge of infection control as compared to the first time visitors. Many patients expressed their negative attitudes towards dental care due to AIDS and Hepatitis-B concerns.

  4. Development and implementation of an online screening application at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Joseph P; Hendricson, William D; Guest, Gary F; Dodge, William W

    2010-11-01

    This article describes a quality improvement (QI) initiative that is in process at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) Dental School and the website that grew out of this effort. The process of screening and assignment of patients was selected for improvement in 2006. QI methods were used to develop a website that improves access to care for patients and assists in the matching of patients and students. The website (www.dentalscreening.com) has received more than 15,000 screening applications in the period from May 2007 to January 2010 and has provided unprecedented insight into the needs of our patients. This article outlines the process by which the website was created, the rationale for the design, and the benefits of establishing a screening website for any dental school. The program was developed entirely at UTHSCSA, but it addresses a problem that may affect many dental schools.

  5. Dietary Fluoride Intake and Associated Skeletal and Dental Fluorosis in School Age Children in Rural Ethiopian Rift Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Aweke; Retta, Negussie; Abuye, Cherinet; Whiting, Susan J; Kassaw, Melkitu; Zeru, Tesfaye; Tessema, Masresha; Kjellevold, Marian

    2016-07-26

    An observational study was conducted to determine dietary fluoride intake, diet, and prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis of school age children in three fluorosis endemic districts of the Ethiopian Rift Valley having similar concentrations of fluoride (F) in drinking water (~5 mg F/L). The duplicate plate method was used to collect foods consumed by children over 24 h from 20 households in each community (n = 60) and the foods, along with water and beverages, were analyzed for fluoride (F) content. Prevalence of dental and skeletal fluorosis was determined using presence of clinical symptoms in children (n = 220). Daily dietary fluoride intake was at or above tolerable upper intake level (UL) of 10 mg F/day and the dietary sources (water, prepared food and beverages) all contributed to the daily fluoride burden. Urinary fluoride in children from Fentale and Adamitulu was almost twice (>5 mg/L) the concentration found in urine from children from Alaba, where rain water harvesting was most common. Severe and moderate dental fluorosis was found in Alaba and Adamitulu, the highest severity and prevalence being in the latter district where staple foods were lowest in calcium. Children in all three areas showed evidence of both skeletal and non-skeletal fluorosis. Our data support the hypothesis that intake of calcium rich foods in addition to using rain water for household consumption and preparation of food, may help in reducing risk of fluorosis in Ethiopia, but prospective studies are needed.

  6. Dental caries and the associated factors influencing it in tribal, suburban and urban school children of Tamil Nadu, India: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, J Baby; Asokan, Sharath; Aswanth, K P; Priya, P R Geetha; Shanmugaavel, A K

    2015-02-20

    The study was planned to assess the prevalence of dental caries among tribal, suburban and urban children of Tiruchengode and Erode of Tamil Nadu state, India. The objective of the study was to assess the association of dental caries with family background, dental service availability, transportation and knowledge on preventive dental measures among these three groups. Cross-sectional study. A total of 1028 school children in the age range of 9-12 years from various government schools located in Palamalai and Kolli Hills (tribal), Tiruchengode (suburban) and Erode (urban), Tamil Nadu, were included in the study. Decayed, filled, and missing teeth (DMFT), decayed and filled teeth (dft) and Significant Caries Index were recorded. A specially prepared questionnaire was used to record all the data regarding oral hygiene practices, socioeconomic background, dental treatment availability, parent's education level were used for the study. ANOVA t-test and post hoc test were used for comparing quantitative variables between the 3 subgroups. The tribal school children had 89.3% caries prevalence, where as it was 77% in suburban and 55% in urban school children. The mean DMFT score among tribal, suburban and urban school children were statistically significant different (P=0.001) between the three groups. There was a highly significant difference (P=0.001) in the mean DMFT score based on brushing frequency. There was a statistically significant difference (P=0.018) in the mean DMFT scores in the urban group based on the mothers education status. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean DMFT scores based on the presence or absence of television in their house and the parents' income. Oral hygiene practices, dietary habits and access to dental care services played an important role in prevalence of dental caries. It was observed that the socioeconomic status, parents' educational status and mass media influenced the oral health of these children but

  7. A survey of primary tooth pulp therapy as taught in US dental schools and practiced by diplomates of the American Board Of Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunston, Bryan; Coll, James A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to repeat a 1997 survey of current pulp therapy practice. The directors of dental school predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs (N=56) and board certified pediatric dentists (N=1200) were surveyed in 2005. More dental schools (83%) taught indirect pulp therapy (IPT) compared to 1997. Significantly more used glass ionomer for IPT with most dental schools and diplomates not re-entering a tooth after IPT. Over 30% of schools and diplomates do direct pulp cops using glass ionomer. For pulpotomy, diluted formocresol usage decreased in dental schools (54%) while ferric sulfate significantly increased (24%) and full strength remained at 22%. Shorter placement of pulpotomy medication was noted and ZOE alone the preferred base. Pulpectomy was advocated by 85% of 2005 schools and diplomates with ZOE filler use decreasing while iodoform/calcium hydroxide filler use increasing. More pediatric dentists are using glass ionomer for IPT and direct pulp capping, and there was a trend away from the use of 1:5 diluted formocresol with more using ferric sulfate for pulpotomy. For pulpectomy, most use ZOE but iodoform pastes and calcium hydroxide have increased in usage since 1997 Disagreements continue concerning when to use certain pulp therapies and some directors and diplomates did not follow the AAPD guidelines.

  8. Prevalence and factors related to dental caries among pre-school children of Saddar town, Karachi, Pakistan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawani, Narendar; Nisar, Nighat; Khan, Nazeer; Syed, Shahbano; Tanweer, Navara

    2012-12-27

    Dental caries is highly prevalent and a significant public health problem among children throughout the world. Epidemiological data regarding prevalence of dental caries amongst Pakistani pre-school children is very limited. The objective of this study is to determine the frequency of dental caries among pre-school children of Saddar Town, Karachi, Pakistan and the factors related to caries. A cross-sectional study of 1000 preschool children was conducted in Saddar town, Karachi. Two-stage cluster sampling was used to select the sample. At first stage, eight clusters were selected randomly from total 11 clusters. In second stage, from the eight selected clusters, preschools were identified and children between 3- to 6-years age group were assessed for dental caries. Caries prevalence was 51% with a mean dmft score being 2.08 (±2.97) of which decayed teeth constituted 1.95. The mean dmft of males was 2.3 (±3.08) and of females was 1.90 (±2.90). The mean dmft of 3, 4, 5 and 6-year olds was 1.65, 2.11, 2.16 and 3.11 respectively. A significant association was found between dental caries and following variables: age group of 4-years (p-value dental plaque (p-value dental caries coupled with a high prevalence of unmet dental treatment needs. Association between caries experience and age of child, consumption of non-sweetened milk, dental plaque and poor oral hygiene had been established.

  9. A blended learning course taught to different groups of learners in a dental school: follow-up evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahinis, Kimon; Stokes, Christopher W; Walsh, Trevor F; Tsitrou, Effrosyni; Cannavina, Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    This article reports the results of a follow-up study conducted to investigate students' perceptions about a blended learning health informatics course that combined online and traditional classroom instruction. The course is taught to five different groups of students at the School of Clinical Dentistry of the University of Sheffield each academic year: first-, third-, and fourth-year dental students, dental hygiene and therapy students, and postgraduate dental students. The goal of the study was to determine the impact of the modifications made to the course after the first year of implementation. To accomplish this goal, students' perceptions of this blended learning course were compared after the first and second implementations. The methodology used for this study was action research. The data were collected using three processes: questionnaires were used to collect contextual data from the students taking the course; a student-led, nominal group technique was used to collect group data from the participants; and a non-participant observer technique was used to record the context in which certain group and individual behaviors occurred. Depending on group assignment, between 41.5 and 91.5 percent of students believed that the blended-learning course had added to their skills. The online learning environment was perceived as a useful resource by 75 percent of students in four of the five student groups, but only 45 percent of the fourth-year dental students indicated it was a useful resource. The perceived lack of sufficient online support material was one of the main concerns of the students at the nominal group evaluation sessions. The non-participant observer technique identified different engagement levels among the student groups. Discernible differences were identified, with improvement in some areas and a decline in others compared to a previous evaluation. The change in the delivery method influenced the students' comprehension of the material

  10. Emergency care provided in a Greek dental school and analysis of the patients' demographic characteristics: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmakis, Eleftherios-Terry R; Palamidakis, Fotios D; Skondra, Foteini G; Nikoloudaki, Georgia; Pantazis, Nikos

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of pain of endodontic origin and its relationship with socio-economic and demographic factors among patients seeking unscheduled urgent dental care. Patients attending the Emergency Clinic of Athens Dental School, Greece, between November 2011 and June 2012, were evaluated to determine their socio-economic profile, dental problem and treatment required. The facility operated from Monday to Friday, from 8.30 am to 1.00 pm, excluding the 4 weeks encompassing the Christmas and Easter holidays. In total, 533 patients were assessed regarding gender, age, ethnicity, occupation, reason for visiting, diagnosis and treatment provided. The data obtained were recorded, reviewed, coded and analysed using Poisson regression models. Mondays and Wednesdays were the busiest days of the week. The most common occupation among the patients was 'unemployed'. Pain of endodontic origin (reversible or irreversible pulpitis, or acute apical periodontitis) was the prevailing reason for the visit. The most frequent treatments administered were pulpectomy and drainage. Prescriptions for medications were rare. Services were requested primarily by individuals who were experiencing acute pain of endodontic origin, had low or no income and were available during morning hours, probably because of the service's low cost and operational hours. Prospective studies, such as the present investigation, can provide epidemiological evidence and indicate areas in the infrastructure of emergency services which may be improved. Additionally, such studies can provide rationale for public insurance programs and can generate profiles of the patients who utilise these low-cost public services. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Relationship Between Drinking Water Fluoride Levels, Dental Fluorosis, Dental Caries and Associated Risk Factors in 9-12 Years Old School Children of Nelakondapally Mandal of Khammam District, Andhra Pradesh, India: A Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthi, M; Reddy, B Vishnuvardhan; Venkataramana, V; Gowrisankar, S; Reddy, B V Thimma; Chennupati, Sireesha

    2014-06-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the relationship between drinking water fluoride (F) levels, dental fluorosis and dental caries among 9-12 years old school children of Nelakondapally Mandal, Khammam district, Andhra Pradesh. A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on 1500 school children aged 9-12 years, selected by stratified random sampling from different areas with different levels of naturally occurring F in drinking water. The children were assessed for dental fluorosis according to WHO basic survey guidelines. The overall oral health status of the child was assessed by decayed missing filled teeth (DMFT)/dmft index. Statistical analysis was done using mean, standard deviation, standard error, Z-test, ANOVA test, and Chi-square test. The results of the present study revealed that the prevalence of fluorosis was 74.9%. Number of children having dental fluorosis was highest in children who consume water from bore wells. Caries prevalence in the study population was about 56.5%. Caries prevalence and mean DMFT/dmft scores were least in children with optimal F areas and highest in children with below optimal F areas. There was moderate prevalence of fluorosis in Nelakondapally Mandal of Khammam district, and caries prevalence is high in areas below optimal F areas. How to cite the article: Shanthi M, Reddy BV, Venkataramana V, Gowrisankar S, Reddy BV, Chennupati S. Relationship between drinking water fluoride levels, dental fluorosis, dental caries and associated risk factors in 9-12 year old school children of Nelakondapally Mandal of Khammam district, Andhra Pradesh, India: A cross-sectional survey. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):106-10.

  12. ORO‐DENTAL STATUS OF SCHOOL CHILDREN AGED BETWEEN 7‐12 YEARS, IN THE RURAL AREAS OF DOLJ COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilena BĂTĂIOSU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The World Health Organization has a long tradition on the methodology and monitorization of oral health epidemiological investigations, even in the field of dental caries. According to the targets to be attained in 2020, at the age of 6 years, 80% of children should be cavity‐free and, at the age of 12, DMFT should be no more than 1.5. Based on WHO targets for 2020, an epidemio‐ logical study was performed on school children affected by dental caries, aged between 7‐12 years, from the rural areas of the Dolj County. Methodology: The study protocol included conventional and meticulous visual clinical examination of students, according to WHO methodology, in the Pedodontic Clinics of Craiova ‐ Faculty of Medical Dentistry. Also calculated was the DMFT index, by analy‐ sis of the DT, MT, FT components, as well as the dmft index, by analysis of the dt, mt, ft components. Results: The mean indices of carious experience in temporary den‐ tition decrease with age, due to the progressive disappear‐ ance of milk teeth. The DMFT index values are given, in particular, by components that indicate the number of teeth affected by caries and not of the blocked ones. Con‐ clusions: The results obtained emphasize the need for den‐ tal health education programs at national and community level, the kindergartens and schools having a great poten‐ tial to influence dental health care habits in children. Also emphasized was the need for regional prevention pro‐ grams, as part of an overall national program, which has to consider the socio‐economic and cultural factors.

  13. Arab dentists' refusal to treat HIV positive patients: a survey of recently graduated dentists from three Arab dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arheiam, Arheiam; El Tantawi, Maha; Al-Ansari, Asim; Ingafou, Mohamed; El-Howiti, Asma; Gaballah, Kamis; AbdelAziz, Wafaa

    2017-07-01

    To assess intended refusal of recent graduates from three Arab dental schools to treat HIV + patients and factors associated with this intention. In 2015, convenience samples of recent dental graduates were included from Libya, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates. Participants responded to a questionnaire assessing personal background, knowledge of oral manifestations and fluids transmitting HIV, perceived adequacy of training and self-efficacy to manage blood exposures, attitude to risk of infection, moral beliefs and willingness to treat HIV + patients. Logistic regression assessed factors associated with intended refusal to treat HIV + patients. The overall response rate was 552/710 (77.8%), mean age = 23.7 years with 41.8% males. The mean (SD) scores for knowledge of oral manifestations and fluids transmitting HIV were 5.5 (1.3)/8 and 4.2 (1.7)/7. The mean (SD) scores for attitude to risk of infection and moral beliefs were 2.9 (1.0)/4 and 2 (0.9)/3, respectively. One-third of respondents indicated intention to refuse treating HIV + patients. Knowledge of body fluids transmitting HIV and moral beliefs were associated with lower odds of refusing to treat HIV + patients (OR = 0.86 and 0.38) whereas attitude indicating greater concern for risk of infection was associated with higher odds (OR = 1.54). One third of dentists from three Arab dental schools indicated they would refuse to treat HIV + patients. Adequate knowledge and moral beliefs reflecting professional ethics were associated with lower odds of refusal counterbalancing the association with attitude indicating increased concern for risk of infection with implications for dentist education and training.

  14. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M; ElRefae, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the level of participation of dental undergraduate students in extracurricular activities (ECAs) and the factors affecting this participation. The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed to collect background information about students, their participation in ECAs, and time allocated for these activities. Students were asked about their perceptions of the relationship between ECAs and academic studies, and their reasons for participating in and satisfaction with ECAs. The study included 199 students from Alexandria and 146 students from Dammam, with response rates of 99.5% and 73%, respectively. The percentages of those reporting ECA participation were 27.1% and 43.8%, respectively, mostly in community service, sports, and social activities. About 60% of students did not think that ECAs affected their studies, although the perceived difficulty of balancing ECAs and academics was associated with lower odds of participation (odds ratio = 0.51). Most students participated in ECAs to socialize and make friends, and the majority was dissatisfied with school-organized ECAs (52% and 59%, respectively). Gender and/or perceived relation between ECAs and academic studies affected actual participation in ECAs in one school but not the other. ECA participation among these students was low. Gender and perception of ECAs in relation to academic studies affected ECA participation differently in the two schools. Better planning and management of ECAs that incorporate students' preferences and reasons for participation is needed. Gender issues and the relationship between ECAs and academic performance should be addressed in relation to school and social characteristics.

  15. Factors affecting student participation in extra-curricular activities: A comparison between two Middle Eastern dental schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; AbdelSalam, Maha; El Tantawi, Maha M.; ElRefae, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to assess the level of participation of dental undergraduate students in extracurricular activities (ECAs) and the factors affecting this participation. Methods The study included dental students enrolled in undergraduate programs at the Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Egypt, and the College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire was developed to collect background information about students, their participation in ECAs, and time allocated for these activities. Students were asked about their perceptions of the relationship between ECAs and academic studies, and their reasons for participating in and satisfaction with ECAs. Results The study included 199 students from Alexandria and 146 students from Dammam, with response rates of 99.5% and 73%, respectively. The percentages of those reporting ECA participation were 27.1% and 43.8%, respectively, mostly in community service, sports, and social activities. About 60% of students did not think that ECAs affected their studies, although the perceived difficulty of balancing ECAs and academics was associated with lower odds of participation (odds ratio = 0.51). Most students participated in ECAs to socialize and make friends, and the majority was dissatisfied with school-organized ECAs (52% and 59%, respectively). Gender and/or perceived relation between ECAs and academic studies affected actual participation in ECAs in one school but not the other. Conclusions ECA participation among these students was low. Gender and perception of ECAs in relation to academic studies affected ECA participation differently in the two schools. Better planning and management of ECAs that incorporate students’ preferences and reasons for participation is needed. Gender issues and the relationship between ECAs and academic performance should be addressed in relation to school and social characteristics. PMID:26792968

  16. Dental caries experience among Albanian pre-school children: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysi, D; Caglar, E; Droboniku, E; Toti, C; Kuscu, O O

    2017-03-01

    To determine the dental caries experience and treatment needs among 5-year-olds in Albania. This cross sectional study was conducted in 2015 by using a cluster sampling technique. The dmft was used to assess dental caries experience and caries prevalence as percentages of children with dmf⟩0. Caries treatment needs were assessed with dt/dmft x 100, missing teeth with mt/dmft x 100 and ft /dmft x 100 as the Care Index. 2,039 five-year-olds, from 17 districts of Albania were selected . Children's residency was divided into 3 main regions (South, West, Central and North). WHO 2013 diagnostic criteria were used and dental caries was recorded at cavity level d3. The mean age was 5.4 (SD 0.5) years. The caries prevalence (dmf⟩0) was 84.1%. The prevalence of children without cavitated lesions (d=0) was 20.1%. The mean dmft index was 4.41 (SD 3.83). The caries treatment needs were 84% (SD 26%). The Albanian 5-year-olds assessed in this survey had a high dental caries experience and untreated cavities in the primary dentition. The national health authorities should introduce preventive programs and improved dental care access for this age group.

  17. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part A: Benefits, Challenges, and Recommendations for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    Social media consist of powerful tools that impact not only communication but relationships among people, thus posing an inherent challenge to the traditional standards of who we are as dental educators and what we can expect of each other. This article examines how the world of social media has changed dental education. Its goal is to outline the complex issues that social media use presents for academic dental institutions and to examine these issues from personal, professional, and legal perspectives. After providing an update on social media, the article considers the advantages and risks associated with the use of social media at the interpersonal, professional, and institutional levels. Policies and legal issues of which academic dental institutions need to be aware from a compliance perspective are examined, along with considerations and resources needed to develop effective social media policies. The challenge facing dental educators is how to capitalize on the benefits that social media offer, while minimizing risks and complying with the various forms of legal constraint.

  18. The Future of Dental Schools in Research Universities and Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Laurie K

    2017-09-01

    As a profession, dentistry is at a point of discernible challenge as well as incredible opportunity in a landscape of evolving changes to health care, higher education, and evidence-based decision making. Respecting the past yet driving forward, a well-mapped future course is critical. Orchestrating this course in a collaborative manner is essential for the visibility, well-being, and potentially the existence of the dental profession. The research performed in dental institutions needs to be contemporary, aligned with biomedical science in general, and united with other disciplines. Dentistry is at risk of attrition in the quality of its research and discovery mission if participation with bioscience colleagues in the collaborative generation of new knowledge is underoptimized. A fundamental opportunity dentistry has is to contribute via its position in academic health centers. Rigorous research as to the impact of interprofessional education and collaborative care on population health outcomes provides significant potential for the dental profession to participate and/or lead such evidence-centered efforts. It is imperative that academic dental institutions are part of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary organizations that move health care into its new day. Strategizing diversity by bringing together people who have different ways of seeing problems to share perspectives, heuristics, interpretations, technologies, and predictive models across disciplines will lead to impactful progress. Academic dental institutions are a natural part of an emphasis on translational research and acceleration of implementing new scientific discoveries. Dentistry needs to remain an essential and integrated component of higher education in the health professions; doing so necessitates deliberate, respectful, and committed change. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  19. A comparative study of fluoride ingestion levels, serum thyroid hormone & TSH level derangements, dental fluorosis status among school children from endemic and non-endemic fluorosis areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navneet; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Verma, Pradhuman; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Sachdeva, Suresh

    2014-01-03

    The study was undertaken to determine serum/urinary fluoride status and comparison of free T4, free T3 and thyroid stimulating hormone levels of 8 to 15 years old children with and without dental fluorosis living in an endemic and non-endemic fluorosis area. A sample group of 60 male and female school children, with or without dental fluorosis, consuming fluoride-contaminated water in endemic fluoride area of Udaipur district, Rajasthan were selected through a school dental fluorosis survey. The sample of 10 children of same age and socio-economic status residing in non endemic areas who did not have dental fluorosis form controls. Fluoride determination in drinking water, urine and blood was done with Ion 85 Ion Analyzer Radiometer with Hall et al. method. The thyroid gland functional test was done by Immonu Chemiluminiscence Micropartical Assay with Bayer Centaur Autoanalyzer. The significantly altered FT3, FT4 and TSH hormones level in both group1A and 1B school children were noted. The serum and urine fluoride levels were found to be increased in both the groups. A significant relationship of water fluoride to urine and serum fluoride concentration was seen. The serum fluoride concentration also had significant relationship with thyroid hormone (FT3/FT4) and TSH concentrations. The testing of drinking water and body fluids for fluoride content, along with FT3, FT4, and TSH in children with dental fluorosis is desirable for recognizing underlying thyroid derangements and its impact on fluorosis.

  20. Prevalencia de lesiones incipientes de caries dental en niños escolares Prevalence of incipient lesions of dental caries in school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayda Nasco Hidalgo

    2008-06-01

    School in Plaza de la Revolución municipality from January to December 2006, and to identify in the studied group the frequency of children according to the number of incipient lesion, as well as the frequency of incipient lesions per tooth localization in the arcade and per dental surface. METHODS: an observational descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken. The universe consisted of all the children aged 6-11 that fulfilled the inclusion criteria for a total of 236, who were examined in the open-air and with natural light by using the soft visual-tactile method. The teeth were cleaned with cotton and were dried with air to detect the presence of incipient carious lesions, which were indicated in a dentigram model in the place corresponding to the surface affected. RESULTS: it was found that 22.5 % of the school children examined presented these lesions. Of them, 60.1 % were females, 19.5 % of the total of children presented a lesion and just 3 % had 2 incipient lesions of dental caries; 79.2 % of them were observed in the posterior tooth. The smooth surfaces were the most affected with 45.3 %. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately the fourth part of the studied children presented incipient carious lesions. Females were the most affected. Of all the children with incipient lesions, the highest figure corresponded to those having a lesion. The posterior teeth were the most affected by incipient lesions. The smooth surfaces showed more incipient lesions than the occlusal and proximal

  1. Knowledge and Attitude of Primary School Teachers toward Tooth Avulsion and Dental First Aid in Davangere City: A Cross-sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Sapna; Narayan, Nagesh Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Aim of the study Traumatic dental injuries including avulsed tooth is a tragic and ignored problem among school children. As children spend much of their time in schools, school teachers form the group who commonly supervise the physical activity of the children, so awareness about avulsed tooth emergency management among school teachers is an important concept for long-term success and to prevent its future consequences. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitude regarding tooth avulsion and dental first aid among primary school teachers in Davangere city. Methods The study was performed by administering a self-designed questionnaire on a sample of 300 primary school teachers. Results Sixty-eight percent of the school teachers (government, semi-aided and aided schools) admitted the possibility of an avulsed tooth to be replanted and thirty-two percent had no idea on tooth replantation and only twenty-three percent of the teachers knew the procedures taken in cases of avulsed teeth. Seventy-seven percent of all teachers did not feel the possibility of tooth replantation. Conclusion There is poor knowledge in the management of avulsed teeth among the school teachers of Davangere city. They do not feel capable of replanting an avulsed tooth. As one of the child supervisors, all the school teachers should have the basic knowledge to recognize oral emergencies and regarding conservation of avulsed teeth to prevent its consequences in the child’s future. PMID:27678227

  2. Prevalence of dental fluorosis and associated risk factors in 11-15 year old school children of Kanyakumari District, Tamilnadu, India: A cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskaradoss Jagan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study presents data on the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in 11-15-years-old school children of Kanyakumari district, TamilNadu, India, and also the relationships between prevalence of dental fluorosis and selected risk factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 1800 children, from all the nine blocks of Kanyakumari district, studying in classes 6-10 were examined using type III examination. The assessment form designed specifically for this study was used while examining each student. Results: Dental fluorosis was present in 15.8% (285 children of the study population and the community fluorosis index was calculated to be 0.27. The prevalence of dental fluorosis varied from as low as 1.4% in some blocks to as high as 29.4% in some others. There was a significant difference in the level of dental fluorosis between rural and urban residents ( P < 0.001. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was higher in children who consumed pipe water as compared to children who consumed ground water. 65% of the children with dental fluorosis had no caries, indicating the positive effects of fluoride. Conclusions: The prevalence of dental fluorosis can be attributed to the level of fluoride in the drinking water as it exhibited a step-wise increase when the water fluoride levels increased from 1.5-1.7 ppm. Measures for defluoridation of drinking water before distribution has to be taken in the high prevalence blocks to lower the burden of dental fluorosis in this community.

  3. U.S. Dental School Applicants and Enrollees: A Ten Year Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Richard G.; Haden, N. Karl; Valachovic, Richard W.

    2000-01-01

    Uses data from the annual American Dental Education Association survey of applicants and enrollees to assess trends over the past 10 years, including the decline in applications beginning in 1998 after several years of increases. Also provides information on quality of applicants, gender, and race/ethnicity. Discusses reasons for the application…

  4. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part B: Curricular Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this article is to describe the broad curricular constructs surrounding teaching and learning about social media in dental education. This analysis takes into account timing, development, and assessment of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors needed to effectively use social media tools as a contemporary dentist. Three developmental stages in a student's path to becoming a competent professional are described: from undergraduate to dental student, from the classroom and preclinical simulation laboratory to the clinical setting, and from dental student to licensed practitioner. Considerations for developing the dental curriculum and suggestions for effective instruction at each stage are offered. In all three stages in the future dentist's evolution, faculty members need to educate students about appropriate professional uses of social media. Faculty members should provide instruction on the beneficial aspects of this communication medium and help students recognize the potential pitfalls associated with its use. The authors provide guidelines for customizing instruction to complement each stage of development, recognizing that careful timing is not only important for optimal learning but can prevent inappropriate use of social media as students are introduced to novel situations.

  5. Dental caries in 12-year-old schoolchildren: multilevel analysis of individual and school environment factors in Goiânia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lorena Batista de Oliveira; Rafael da Silveira Moreira; Sandra Cristina Guimarães Bahia Reis; Maria do Carmo Matias Freire

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dental caries index among 12-year-old schoolchildren and individual and contextual factors related to the schools in the city of Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil...

  6. Digital Denture Fabrication in Pre- and Postdoctoral Education: A Survey of U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Monica A; Nimmo, Arthur; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    To survey chairs of prosthodontics or restorative departments and program directors of postdoctoral prosthodontic programs in the United States regarding digital denture fabrication. The key objectives of the survey were to identify the current trends in complete denture fabrication using CAD/CAM technology and to determine how and to what extent this technique is taught and used in U.S. pre- and postdoctoral prosthodontic programs. An invitation to participate in an online survey was sent to 52 prosthodontics/restorative chairs of U.S. dental schools and to all of the 50 program directors of postdoctoral prosthodontics programs. A version of the survey with the same questions was sent to a national sample of prosthodontics/restorative chairs and program directors of postdoctoral prosthodontics. The 20-item survey took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Dependent samples paired t-test was run on items that were the same in both surveys. The response rate for the survey was 63% for department chairs and 44% for program directors. All respondents with the exception of one department chair were aware of CAD/CAM technology used for denture fabrication. More than half of the program directors (52.4%) compared to 12.1% of chairs have incorporated some aspects of CAD/CAM denture fabrication technology into their curriculum. When asked if the fabrication cost prevented introducing this technology in the predoctoral/postdoctoral curriculum, 52.4% of the department chairs affirmed this response compared to 12.1% of the program directors. There was a significant difference between groups when asked if they had incorporated the CAD/CAM denture fabrication technique into the postgraduate/predoctoral curriculum. Department chairs reported less usage of CAD/CAM technology. Only 12.1% of department chairs reported using some aspects of CAD/CAM technology in the predoctoral curriculum compared to 52.4% in the postdoctoral curriculum (F = 13.528, p ≤ 0.001). While this

  7. Child dental fear in low-income and non-low-income families: A school-based survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ling Lin

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Previous negative dental experiences learned by children or from others were found to be associated with children's dental fear. The findings suggest that pediatric dentists attempting by gentle care to reduce children's level of dental fear at their first dental visit may have a positive influence.

  8. Assessment of determinant factors of dental flossing based on transtheoretical model in pakdasht high school students in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Mazloomima

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion:The findings showed a high percentage of students were in pre-contemplation and contemplation stages in dental flossing behaviorthus probably will expose with inter-dental decays in the future. Self efficacy, perceived benefits and barriers are determinant factors of dental flossing which should be considered in educational programs. Keywords: Dental floss, Educational model, Students

  9. Prevalence of Dental Occlusal Patterns and Their Association with Obstractive Upper Airway Diseases in Primary School Children, Isfahan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Sonbolestan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teeth, apart from their physiologic function, play an important role in general appearance of indivduals. Therefore any disorder in their growth and evolution, will cause psychologic, social and even economic problems for the person. This observational cross- sectional study aimed to investigate relationship between dental occlusal patterns and obstructive nasal-upper airway- diseases. Methods: This study was perfromed in schools of No.4 Education at district of Isfahan in educational year 1381-82 between 607 students (277 male, 330 female aged 9-12 years old. Results of accurate ENT and dentistry physical examination were registered and analyzed using SPSS software and Chi-square and Mantel - Hanzel test. Results: With increasing age, The frequency of abnormal occlusal patterns increases (from 45.5% to 68.2% in males and 25.8% to 48.5% in females, p=0.015. The increasing in degree of palatal tonsilar hypertrophy was related to higher frequency of abnormal occlusal patterns (36.7% in +1 tonsilar hypertrophy, and 70% in +4 tonsilar hypertrophy, p=0.02. Also, history of frequent common colds, and history of previous nasal fractures were related with abnormal patterns [58.9% (p=0.032, and 83.4% (p= 0.043%, respectively].Five other parameters including sinusitis, hypertrophy of nasal turbinates, rhinitis, nasal polyposis and nasal septal deviation were not associated with abnormal occlusal patterns (p>0.1. Conclusion: Some of obstructive upper airwacy diseases are related with abnormal dental occlusal patterns. These parameters can be simply diagnosed, treated or prevented. Key words: dental occlusion, malocclusion, obstructive nasal disorders, nasal turbinates, adenoid, rhinitis, tonsillectomy, open mouth breathing

  10. The Effect of Using an Educational Poster on Elementary School Health Teachers’ Knowledge of Emergency Management of Traumatic Dental Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadimi, Sara; Seraj, Bahman; Keshavarz, Hooman; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza; Abiri, Razieh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an educational poster on elementary school health teachers’ knowledge about emergency management of traumatic dental injuries. Materials and Methods: Before poster presentation, a questionnaire was distributed to 40 health teachers (30 in the study group and 10 in the control group). One month after poster distribution, the subjects were re-evaluated in both groups using the same questionnaire. Results: The percentage of participating health teachers who answered the questions correctly after poster distribution regarding crown fracture was 93.3% in the test group vs. 60% in controls; for management of luxation and avulsion, the percentages for cases and controls were 63.3% vs. 40% and 100% vs. 60%, respectively. One month after distribution of the educational poster, rate of correct responses increased in management of crown fracture, luxation, and avulsion in the test group, but there was no improvement in controls (Pteachers. Use of posters is an effective way to inform teachers of the management of traumatic dental injuries. PMID:25628691

  11. The implementation of a tobacco dependence education curriculum in a Swiss Dental Hygiene School - an 8-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, C A; Burri, M; Berres, F; Davis, J M

    2013-05-01

    The aim of our investigation was to review the implementation of a comprehensive tobacco dependence education (TDE) curriculum at the Medi School of Dental Hygiene (MSDH), Bern, Switzerland, 2001-2008. In 2001, new forms to record patients' tobacco use history and willingness to quit were created for all the MSDH patients. In 2002, a new theoretically based tobacco dependence treatment protocol was implemented into the MSDH curriculum. Students received instruction on how to provide brief tobacco use dependence interventions as well as maintain detailed records of patient tobacco use and cessation interventions for every smoker at all dental hygiene visits. In 2002, 17 lecture hours were added to the following subjects: pathology, periodontology, preventive dentistry, pharmacology and psychology. During the same time period, 2213 patients (56.9% women) have visited the MSDH. Smoking status was recorded in 85.7% of all the patients (30.2% smokers). Brief tobacco use interventions were recorded in 36.8% of all smokers while 7.6% of these have reported to quit smoking. Overall, the new TDE curriculum was successfully implemented and accepted by the MSDH faculty. Applications in the clinical practice, however, may still be improved to better identify smokers and increase initial and follow-up interventions potentially leading to higher quit rates. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Knowledge, attitude and practice in emergency management of dental injury among physical education teachers: a survey in Bangalore urban schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, U; Chandan, G D

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of physical education teachers in Bangalore city with regards to emergency management of dental injuries. The questionnaire surveyed the physical education teacher's background, knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, luxation injuries, it also investigated physical education teacher's attitude and the way they handle the injuries. The sample consisted 580 teachers from 700 selected schools in Bangalore city. Chi-square test was applied to test the significance between trained and untrained teachers. Among the population 70% were males physical education teachers 30% were females. 95% of the teachers had physical education training and 5% did not have the training. 95% of the population had first aid component and 5% did not have. Only 25% of trained physical education teachers had correct knowledge about tooth identification and 17% among untrained teachers. 81% of trained teachers answered correctly regarding management of fractured anterior teeth against 27.5% of untrained teachers (Pteachers in Bangalore city regarding emergency management of dental trauma. Educational programs to improve the knowledge and awareness among the teachers have to be implemented.

  13. Knowledge, attitude and practice in emergency management of dental injury among physical education teachers: A survey in Bangalore urban schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohandas U

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess, by means of a self administered structured questionnaire, the level of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of physical education teachers in Bangalore city with regards to emergency management of dental injuries. The questionnaire surveyed the physical education teacher′s background, knowledge of management of tooth fracture, avulsion, luxation injuries, it also investigated physical education teacher′s attitude and the way they handle the injuries. The sample consisted 580 teachers from 700 selected schools in Bangalore city. Chi-square test was applied to test the significance between trained and untrained teachers. Among the population 70% were males physical education teachers 30% were females. 95% of the teachers had physical education training and 5% did not have the training. 95% of the population had first aid component and 5% did not have. Only 25% of trained physical education teachers had correct knowledge about tooth identification and 17% among untrained teachers. 81% of trained teachers answered correctly regarding management of fractured anterior teeth against 27.5% of untrained teachers (P< 0.0002. The present report indicates that there is lack of knowledge and practice among physical education teachers in Bangalore city regarding emergency management of dental trauma. Educational programs to improve the knowledge and awareness among the teachers have to be implemented.

  14. Dental health awareness, attitude, and dental health-care seeking practices as risk indicators for the prevalence of periodontal disease among 15–17-year-old school children in Kozhikode district, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Mohan Das

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal disease prevalence in children is an indicator of future disease burden in the adult population. Knowledge about the prevalence and risk status of periodontal disease in children can prove instrumental in the initiation of appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures. Aim: This school-based cross-sectional survey estimated the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease among 15–17-year-old children in Kozhikode district and assessed the risk factors. Materials and Methods: Multistage stratified random sampling and randomized cluster sampling were used in the selection of schools and study participants, respectively, in three educational districts of Kozhikode. Periodontal disease was assessed among 2000 school children aged 15–17 years, by community periodontal index. A content validated questionnaire was used to evaluate the sociodemographic characteristics and other risk factors. Results: The prevalence of periodontal disease was estimated as 75% (72% gingivitis and 3% mild periodontitis. The prevalence was higher in urban population (P = 0.049 and males had significantly (P = 0.001 higher prevalence. Lower socioeconomic strata experienced slightly more periodontal disease burden. Satisfactory oral hygiene practices (material and frequency were observed, but oral hygiene techniques were erroneous. Unhealthy dental treatment-seeking practices and unfavorable attitude toward dental treatment (ATDT significantly influenced periodontal health status. Overall awareness about dental treatment was poor in this study population. Conclusion: The prevalence of periodontal disease among 15–17-year-old school children in Kozhikode district is 75% and is influenced by sociodemographic characteristics. Other risk factors identified were unhealthy dental treatment-seeking practices and unfavorable ATDT. Implementation of well-formulated oral health education programs is thus mandatory.

  15. Integration of Basic-Clinical Sciences, PBL, CBL, and IPE in U.S. Dental Schools' Curricula and a Proposed Integrated Curriculum Model for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Venugopalan, Shankar Rengasamy; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Weistroffer, Paula; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2016-03-01

    The integration of basic and clinical sciences in dental curricula enhances the application of basic science principles to clinical decision making and improves students' critical thinking. The aim of this study was to define the characteristics of U.S. dental schools' curricula with regard to level of course integration and degree of incorporation of problem-based and case-based learning. A second aim was to propose a dental curriculum that supports effective integration of courses and addresses some of the concerns facing academic dentistry. A survey was sent to 58 academic deans in U.S. dental schools. The survey included questions about integrating courses in the schools' curricula and major changes in curricular structure or teaching pedagogy that respondents anticipated in the immediate future. A total of 31 schools responded to the survey, for a 53.4% response rate. The results showed that three-quarters of the responding schools still teach basic and clinical sciences separately, although 61.3% reported having an integrated curriculum. Among the responding schools, 16 had a PBL component integrated into their curricula (two had integrated PBL in all courses and 14 used a hybrid PBL approach). Two schools had CBL integrated in all courses, and ten had CBL integrated in >75% of courses. Only slightly more than half agreed that their curricula foster students' thinking "outside the box." Faculty shortages and lack of protected time and resources were the most frequent reasons given for a lack of integrated courses. The integrated model proposed in this article has the potential to provide a low stress environment for students and to address important issues like faculty shortages.

  16. Assessment of Stress Level among Dental School Students: An Indian Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangade, Pradeep S; Mathur, Anmol; Gupta, Rahul; Chaudhary, Shikha

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the factors influence student perception, might allow programmatic changes designed to enhance students' psychosocial well-being and academic performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate perceived sources of stress on dental students and the role of parents in their career choice decisions. In a cross-sectional design, a modified dental environmental stress questionnaire was administered to all dental students. The responses to the questionnaire were based on a four-point Lickert scale, not stressful to severely stressful. Means and standard deviations were determined for stress scores of individuals for each item and were used to compare the classes, genders, and choices. Student's t, one way ANOVA, and Newman Keuls multiple comparison post hoc tests were used to analysed the data at the significant level of P ≤ 0.05. A total of 304 undergraduate students constituted the study population. Of the respondent, 60% were men and 40% were women. The final year students presented with higher stress scores. In gender comparison, men suffered more stress (62.9%) than women (60.1%). According to the career choice decision, students forced by parents had more perception of stress (69.0%) and the students staying in the hostel (62.7%) showed more perception of stress than day scholars (56.3%). The study indicates that the congenial environment needs to be created for dental education and the parents also need to be counselled against forcing their children to join an educational programme i.e. not of their choice.

  17. Assessment of stress level among dental school students: An Indian outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep S Tangade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evaluating the factors influence student perception, might allow programmatic changes designed to enhance students′ psychosocial well-being and academic performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate perceived sources of stress on dental students and the role of parents in their career choice decisions. Methods : In a cross-sectional design, a modified dental environmental stress questionnaire was administered to all dental students. The responses to the questionnaire were based on a four-point Lickert scale, not stressful to severely stressful. Means and standard deviations were determined for stress scores of individuals for each item and were used to compare the classes, genders, and choices. Student′s t, one way ANOVA, and Newman Keuls multiple comparison post hoc tests were used to analysed the data at the significant level of P ≤ 0.05. Results: A total of 304 undergraduate students constituted the study population. Of the respondent, 60% were men and 40% were women. The final year students presented with higher stress scores. In gender comparison, men suffered more stress (62.9% than women (60.1%. According to the career choice decision, students forced by parents had more perception of stress (69.0% and the students staying in the hostel (62.7% showed more perception of stress than day scholars (56.3%. Conclusion: The study indicates that the congenial environment needs to be created for dental education and the parents also need to be counselled against forcing their children to join an educational programme i.e. not of their choice.

  18. Blood lead level and dental caries in school-age children.

    OpenAIRE

    Gemmel, Allison; Tavares, Mary; Alperin, Susan; Soncini, Jennifer; Daniel, David; Dunn, Julie; Crawford, Sybil; Braveman, Norman; Clarkson, Thomas W.; McKinlay, Sonja; Bellinger, David C.

    2002-01-01

    The association between blood lead level and dental caries was evaluated in cross-sectional analyses of baseline data for 543 children 6-10 years old screened for enrollment in the Children's Amalgam Trial, a study designed to assess potential health effects of mercury in silver fillings. Approximately half of the children were recruited from an urban setting (Boston/Cambridge, MA, USA) and approximately half from a rural setting (Farmington, ME, USA). Mean blood lead level was significantly ...

  19. Evaluation of a pilot peer observation of teaching scheme for chair-side tutors at Glasgow University Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, A M; Bissell, V; Bovill, C

    2013-06-01

    To introduce and examine a pilot peer observation of teaching (POT) scheme within the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at Glasgow Dental School and its associated outreach centres. All tutors teaching paediatric dentistry were invited to be involved in evaluation of the POT scheme. Participants were randomly paired with a peer, who then observed their teaching and provided constructive feedback. For those consenting to be involved in the evaluation of the scheme, semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were carried out by the principal investigator. POT was found by all participants to be a beneficial process, reassuring those of their teaching styles and giving them ideas to adapt their teaching. POT is an effective method for engaging chair-side tutors in the reflection and development of their teaching practice via observations and scholarly discussion.

  20. The Prevalence of Bruxism and Correlated Factors in Children Referred to Dental Schools of Tehran, Based on Parent's Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraj, Bahman; Shahrabi, Mehdi; Ghadimi, Sara; Ahmadi, Rahil; Nikfarjam, Jaleh; Zayeri, Farid; Taghi, Fatemeh Pour; Zare, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    Objective Bruxism is defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bruxism and correlated factors in children referred to dental schools of Tehran, based on Parent's report. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 600 4-12 year-old children with a mean age of 7.4±2.4 years, who were referred to four dental schools in Tehran. After collecting information with questionnaire filled out by parents, χ2, Fisher Test, Mann-Whitney and t-Test were used to analyze the data. Findings The prevalence of bruxism was 26.2%. Bruxism begun in average at the age of 4.9±2 years. Also it occurred 2.6 times more in children who had a family history of bruxism (father-mother), compared to children who didn't have such a history. 87% of children with bruxism had a history of distressing events in their life, and 13% of children with bruxism did not report any history of distressing events in their life. In this study most common oral habit was nail biting. In study of parasomnias, drooling was the most, and snoring the least reported sleep disorder. Bruxism in children with drooling was twice more than in other children. The prevalence of bruxism in children with temporomandibular disorder was 63.6% and in children without TMD was 24.7%. Conclusion Based on Parent's report, 26.2% of children showed bruxism and there was a significant relation between bruxism and mother's job, family history, distressing event in life, parasomnias, especially drooling and sleep walking, TMD, hyperactivity, depression, acrophobia and lygophobia. PMID:23056700

  1. The Prevalence of Bruxism and Correlated Factors in Children Referred to Dental Schools of Tehran, Based on Parent's Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraj, Bahman; Shahrabi, Mehdi; Ghadimi, Sara; Ahmadi, Rahil; Nikfarjam, Jaleh; Zayeri, Farid; Taghi, Fatemeh Pour; Zare, Hadi

    2010-06-01

    Bruxism is defined as the habitual nonfunctional forceful contact between occlusal tooth surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bruxism and correlated factors in children referred to dental schools of Tehran, based on Parent's report. This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 600 4-12 year-old children with a mean age of 7.4±2.4 years, who were referred to four dental schools in Tehran. After collecting information with questionnaire filled out by parents, χ(2), Fisher Test, Mann-Whitney and t-Test were used to analyze the data. The prevalence of bruxism was 26.2%. Bruxism begun in average at the age of 4.9±2 years. Also it occurred 2.6 times more in children who had a family history of bruxism (father-mother), compared to children who didn't have such a history. 87% of children with bruxism had a history of distressing events in their life, and 13% of children with bruxism did not report any history of distressing events in their life. In this study most common oral habit was nail biting. In study of parasomnias, drooling was the most, and snoring the least reported sleep disorder. Bruxism in children with drooling was twice more than in other children. The prevalence of bruxism in children with temporomandibular disorder was 63.6% and in children without TMD was 24.7%. Based on Parent's report, 26.2% of children showed bruxism and there was a significant relation between bruxism and mother's job, family history, distressing event in life, parasomnias, especially drooling and sleep walking, TMD, hyperactivity, depression, acrophobia and lygophobia.

  2. A cross sectional study of nutritional status among a group of school children in relation with gingivitis and dental caries severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Achmad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To determine nutritional status among a school children of Barru Regency, South Sulawesi, Indonesia, in relation with gingivitis and dental caries severity. Cross-sectional study. A total of 127 school children in the age range of 9-12 years from Barru Regency were included in this study as a sample of simple random sampling. Nutritional status of children (BMI index, degree of gingival inflammation (using chi-square test statistic, and missing teeth (DMF-T index were recorded. Additional information was collected using a questionnaire survey regarding knowledge about dental health, dietary habits, and oral health behaviors. The data were processed using the program Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS. A group of who severe underweight (102 children, had higher odds for mild gingivitis (GI 79.4% than others group of who has an ideal weight (16 children, had mild gingivitis (GI 62.5%. Children, who severe underweight, had higher odds for moderate caries (38.2% than others group of who has an ideal weight, had moderate caries (18.8%. Based on chi-square test, there are correlation of nutritional status and dental caries severity (p=0.000dental caries severity among a school children.

  3. Assessment of dental caries predictors in 6-year-old school children - results from 5-year retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Mohd

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This was a retrospective cohort study undertaken to assess the rate and pattern of dental caries development in 6-year-old school children followed-up for a period of 5 years, and to identify baseline risk factors that were associated with 5 years caries experience in Malaysian children. Methods This 5-years retrospective cohort study comprised primary school children initially aged 6 years in 2004. Caries experience of each child was recorded annually using World Health Organization criteria. The rates of dental caries were recorded in prevalence and incidence density of carious lesions from baseline to final examination. Risk assessment was done to assess relative risk for caries after 5 years in children with baseline caries status. Simple and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to identify significant independent risk factors for caries. Results The sample consisted of 1830 school children. All components of DMFT showed significant differences between baseline and final examination. Filled teeth (FT component of the DMFT showed the greatest increases. Results revealed the initial baseline caries level in permanent dentition was a strong predictor for future caries after 5 years (RR=3.78, 95% CI=3.48-4.10, P0.001. Logistic regression analysis showed significant association between caries occurrence and residence (urban/rural (OR=1.80, Pp observed from baseline and after 5 years was 5.80 persons/100 person-year of observation. The rate of new caries-affected tooth (IDt in the period from baseline and after 5-years was 0.76 teeth/100 teeth-year of observation. Conclusion The majority of 12-year-old school children (70% were caries-free and most of the caries were concentrated in only a small proportion (30% of them. We found that the presence of caries in permanent teeth at the age of 6 years was a strong predictor of future caries development in this population. The strong evidence of early permanent teeth

  4. Current State of Dental Education: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J

    2017-08-01

    This executive summary for Section 1 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century" project provides a composite picture of information from 12 background articles on the current state of dental education in the United States. The summary includes the following topics: the current status of the dental curriculum, the implications of student debt and dental school finances, the expansion of enrollment, student diversity, pre- and postdoctoral education, safety net status of dental school clinics, and trends in faculty.

  5. Comparison of traditional and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) exams in terms of clinical skills assessment and attitudes of dental students of Qazvin dental school

    OpenAIRE

    S Basir shabestari; I Shirinbak; Sefidi, F; R Sarchami

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A practical exam is important for evaluation of university students but there is not any satisfaction of traditional exams among clinical teachers. There are limited studies done for modification of traditional exams. This study aimed to compare the traditional and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) exams in term of clinical skills and satisfaction among dental students. Methods: Evaluation of thirty dental students was done with OSCE and traditional exams. A st...

  6. X-Ray Equipment and Protective Devices of Dental Assistant Programs in Pennsylvania Vocational Technical Schools. Vocational-Technical Education Research Report, Health Occupations, Monograph No. 7, Vol. 16, No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hominsky, Dolores J.; Hole, F. Marvin

    Objectives of a Pennsylvania study were (1) to investigate the ways in which the vocational technical schools of the state have met the recommendations of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources for classroom structural design and dental x-ray machines in dental assistant training programs and (2) to collect data on the methods by…

  7. Blood lead level and dental caries in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmel, Allison; Tavares, Mary; Alperin, Susan; Soncini, Jennifer; Daniel, David; Dunn, Julie; Crawford, Sybil; Braveman, Norman; Clarkson, Thomas W; McKinlay, Sonja; Bellinger, David C

    2002-10-01

    The association between blood lead level and dental caries was evaluated in cross-sectional analyses of baseline data for 543 children 6-10 years old screened for enrollment in the Children's Amalgam Trial, a study designed to assess potential health effects of mercury in silver fillings. Approximately half of the children were recruited from an urban setting (Boston/Cambridge, MA, USA) and approximately half from a rural setting (Farmington, ME, USA). Mean blood lead level was significantly greater among the urban subgroup, as was the mean number of carious tooth surfaces. Blood lead level was positively associated with number of caries among urban children, even with adjustment for demographic and maternal factors and child dental practices. This association was stronger in primary than in permanent dentition and stronger for occlusal, lingual, and buccal tooth surfaces than for mesial or distal surfaces. In general, blood lead was not associated with caries in the rural subgroup. The difference between the strength of the associations in the urban and rural settings might reflect the presence of residual confounding in the former setting, the presence of greater variability in the latter setting in terms of important caries risk factors (e.g., fluoride exposure), or greater exposure misclassification in the rural setting. These findings add to the evidence supporting a weak association between children's lead exposure and caries prevalence. A biologic mechanism for lead cariogenicity has not been identified, however. Our data are also consistent with residual confounding by factors associated with both elevated lead exposure and dental caries.

  8. Perspectives on Dental Education in the Nordic Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiehn, Nils-Erik

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the state of dental education and current developments at Nordic dental schools. Discusses similarities and differences in the institutional circumstances of the schools, including demands on the schools, their educational philosophies, and the educational system and its regulation. (EV)

  9. Prevalence and factors related to dental caries among pre-school children of Saddar town, Karachi, Pakistan: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental caries is highly prevalent and a significant public health problem among children throughout the world. Epidemiological data regarding prevalence of dental caries amongst Pakistani pre-school children is very limited. The objective of this study is to determine the frequency of dental caries among pre-school children of Saddar Town, Karachi, Pakistan and the factors related to caries. Methods A cross-sectional study of 1000 preschool children was conducted in Saddar town, Karachi. Two-stage cluster sampling was used to select the sample. At first stage, eight clusters were selected randomly from total 11 clusters. In second stage, from the eight selected clusters, preschools were identified and children between 3- to 6-years age group were assessed for dental caries. Results Caries prevalence was 51% with a mean dmft score being 2.08 (±2.97) of which decayed teeth constituted 1.95. The mean dmft of males was 2.3 (±3.08) and of females was 1.90 (±2.90). The mean dmft of 3, 4, 5 and 6- year olds was 1.65, 2.11, 2.16 and 3.11 respectively. A significant association was found between dental caries and following variables: age group of 4-years (p-value ² 0.029, RR = 1.248, 95% Bias corrected CI 0.029-0.437) and 5-years (p-value ² 0.009, RR = 1.545, 95% Bias corrected CI 0.047-0.739), presence of dental plaque (p-value ² 0.003, RR = 0.744, 95% Bias corrected CI (−0.433)-(−0.169)), poor oral hygiene (p-value ² 0.000, RR = 0.661, 95% Bias corrected CI (−0.532)-(−0.284)), as well as consumption of non-sweetened milk (p-value ² 0.049, RR = 1.232, 95% Bias corrected CI 0.061-0.367). Conclusion Half of the preschoolers had dental caries coupled with a high prevalence of unmet dental treatment needs. Association between caries experience and age of child, consumption of non-sweetened milk, dental plaque and poor oral hygiene had been established. PMID:23270546

  10. Mouthguard use and dental injury in sport: a questionnaire study of national school children in the west of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, Margaret

    2012-10-15

    The risk of children getting dental injuries during sport can be minimised by using a mouthguard. Within Ireland, information on mouthguard use and policy is limited. The extent of dental trauma experienced by children during sport is also unclear.

  11. Electronic patient records for dental school clinics: more than paperless systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jane C; Zeller, Gregory G; Shah, Chhaya

    2002-05-01

    The Electronic Patient Record (EPR) or "computer-based medical record" is defined by the Patient Record Institute as "a repository for patient information with one health-care enterprise that is supported by digital computer input and integrated with other information sources." The information technology revolution coupled with everyday use of computers in clinical dentistry has created new demand for electronic patient records. Ultimately, the EPR should improve health care quality. The major short-term disadvantage is cost, including software, equipment, training, and personnel time involved in the associated business process re-engineering. An internal review committee with expertise in information technology and/or database management evaluated commercially available software in light of the unique needs of academic dental facilities. This paper discusses their deficiencies and suggests areas for improvement. The dental profession should develop a more common record with standard diagnostic codes and clinical outcome measures to make the EPR more useful for clinical research and improve the quality of care.

  12. Use of social media in dental schools: pluses, perils, and pitfalls from a legal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Joseph W; Turner, Sharon P

    2014-11-01

    One of the ways dental education is changing the way it is preparing the next generation of learners is through efficient utilization of interactive social media. Social media, which facilitates interaction and sharing of new ideas, is being utilized to educate students, residents, and faculty. Unfortunately, as with most improvements in technology, there are growing pains. Faculty, student, and patient interaction on social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, can lead to inappropriate or embarrassing situations. Striking the appropriate balance between free speech rights of students and faculty and the need for colleges and universities to have efficient operations is often left to the judicial system. The concepts of free speech and contract law and how each is applied in educational settings should be understood by students, faculty, and administrators. This article provides a review of legal cases that led to current social media policies, as well as present-day cases that exemplify the application of these principles, to help dental educators gain a greater understanding of the boundaries of protected speech. It also provides a set of sample guidelines for communicating through these media.

  13. Socioeconomic inequalities in caries experience, care level and dental attendance in primary school children in Belgium: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Martijn J; Vanobbergen, Jacques S N; Martens, Luc C; De Visschere, Luc M J

    2017-07-20

    Oral health inequality in children is a widespread and well-documented problem in oral healthcare. However, objective and reliable methods to determine these inequalities in all oral health aspects, including both dental attendance and oral health, are rather scarce. To explore oral health inequalities and to assess the impact of socioeconomic factors on oral health, oral health behaviour and dental compliance of primary school children. Data collection was executed in 2014 within a sample of 2216 children in 105 primary schools in Flanders, by means of an oral examination and a validated questionnaire. Intermutual Agency database was consulted to objectively determine individuals' social state and frequency of utilisation of oral healthcare services. Underprivileged children were compared with more fortunate children for their mean DMFt, DMFs, plaque index, care index (C, restorative index (RI), treatment index (TI), knowledge and attitude. Differences in proportions for dichotomous variables (RI100%, TI100% and being a regular dental attender) were analysed. The present study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the University Hospital Ghent (2010/061). All parents signed an informed consent form prior to data collection. All schools received information about the study protocol and agreed to participate. Children requiring dental treatment or periodic recall were referred to the local dentist. Underprivileged children had higher D1MFT (95% CI 0.87 to 1.36), D3MT (95% CI 0.30 to 0.64), plaque scores (95% CI 0.12 to 0.23) and lower care level (pchildren. Half of the low-income children could be considered as regular dental attenders, while 12.6% did not have any dental visit during a 5-year period. Oral health, oral hygiene, oral healthcare level and dental attendance patterns are negatively affected by children's social class, leading to oral health inequalities in Belgian primary school children. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  14. Utilization of teledentistry as a tool to screen for dental caries among 12-year-old school children in a rural region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Bharathi M; Singh, Abhinav; Dwivedi, Ashish

    2017-03-01

    The study aims to assess the reliability of video-graphic method as a tool to screen the dental caries among 12-year-old school children in a rural region of India. A total of 139 school children participated in the study. Visual tactile examinations were conducted using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index. Simultaneously, standardized video recording of the oral cavity was performed. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for video-graphic assessment of dental caries. Bland-Altman plot was used to assess agreement between the two methods of caries assessment. Likelihood ratio (LR) and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve were used to assess the predictive accuracy of the video-graphic method. Mean DMFT for the study population was 2.47 ± 2.01 and 2.46 ± 1.91 by visual tactile and video-graphic assessment (P = 0.76; > 0.05). Sensitivity and specificity values of 0.86 and 0.58 were established for video-graphic assessment. A fair degree of agreement was noted between the two methods with Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) value of 0.56. LR for video-graphic assessment was 2.05. Bland-Altman plot confirmed the level of agreement between the two assessment methods. The area under curve was 0.69 (CI 0.57, 0.80, P = 0.001). Teledentistry examination is comparable to clinical examination when screening for dental caries among school children. This study provides evidence that teledentistry may be used as an alternative screening tool for assessment of dental caries and is viable for remote consultation and treatment planning. Teledentistry offers to change the dynamics of dental care delivery and may effectively bridge the rural-urban oral health divide. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. Effectiveness of an Alternative Dental Workforce Model on the Oral Health of Low-Income Children in a School-Based Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia; Liu, Ying; Kelly, Patricia; Branson, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effect of an alternative dental workforce program—Kansas’s Extended Care Permit (ECP) program—as a function of changes in oral health. Methods. We examined data from the 2008 to 2012 electronic medical records of children (n = 295) in a Midwestern US suburb who participated in a school-based oral health program in which preventive oral health care was delivered by ECP dental hygienists. We examined changes in oral health status as a function of sealants, caries, restorations, and treatment urgency with descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis test, and Pearson correlations. Results. The number of encounters with the ECP dental hygienist had a statistically significant effect on changes in decay (P = .014), restorations (P = .002), and treatment urgency (P = .038). Based on Pearson correlations, as encounters increased, there was a significant decrease in decay (–0.12), increase in restorations (0.21), and decrease in treatment urgency (–0.15). Conclusions. Increasing numbers of encounters with alternative providers (ECP dental hygienists), such as with school-based oral health programs, can improve the oral health status of low-income children who would not otherwise have received oral health services. PMID:26180957

  16. Correlation of Dental Caries Experience with pH, Buffering Capacity and Flow Rate of Saliva among 15-year-old School Children in Mangalore

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