WorldWideScience

Sample records for school-to-home literacy practices

  1. The Value of Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Lucio; Kebede, Bereket; Maddox, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    The concepts of literacy events and practices have received considerable attention in educational research and policy. In comparison, the question of value, that is, "which literacy practices do people most value?" has been neglected. With the current trend of cross-cultural adult literacy assessment, it is increasingly important to…

  2. Gaming as a Literacy Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Amy Conlin

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study was designed to be a detailed, informative study of a group of adult males who have been gamers since adolescence. The purposes of the study are to provide information regarding gaming as a literacy practice and to explore other vernacular technological literacy practices. The study sheds light on the merits of gaming and other new literacies by examining the literacy development of a select group of adult males. This research was centered on vernacular technological...

  3. Literacy testing practices in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Literacy testing has been researched as a social practice from different perspectives (McNamara & Roewer, 2006; Shohamy, 2001). Drawing on a Faucault inspired concept og governmentality in which literacy testing practices are seen as social technologies (Dean, 1999) and as a phenomenon closely...... related to supra- and transnational agencies this paper investigates the relation between state, pedagogy and conceptualizations of literacy. Drawing on data and findings from three ethnographic oriented studies of institutional testing practices of literacy in preschool, primary school and adult second...... language teaching in Denmark (Holm, 2004; 2007; 2009) this paper reveals the construction of values, ideologies and practices around institutional testing of litaracy in education. The analyses of testing instruments and assessment practices indicate among other things that testing of literacy have become...

  4. Morphing Literacy: Boys Reshaping Their School-Based Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Heather A.; Stanford, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Details about a two-year ethnographic case study research in middle school boys to understand school literacy are presented. The study revealed that boys resist many school-based practices by transforming the assigned literacy work.

  5. Researching literacy practices in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Researching literacy practices in transition Postmodern societies are characterized by constant, fast and unpredictable mobility of people, goods, ideas and values. These mobilities are often visualized as a movement from one place to another, as a temporary interference of the stability of fixed...... places. An alternative take on mobilty sees movement as the default and change as the normal way of being rather than the exception (Barton, 2012). This understanding of change is central to the framing concept of this symposium: transition. Transitional processes around literacy are significant because...... literacy is something that is taught and learned, that is adopted, transformed and appropriated and that is used to categorize and classify people (Holm & Pitkänen-Huhta, 2012). Based on detailed empirical studies in the Nordic countries, the aim of this symposium is to discuss how to explore and research...

  6. Adult literacy, learning identities and pedagogic practice

    OpenAIRE

    Crowther, Jim; Maclachlan, Kathy; Tett, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the relationship between persistence in adult literacy and numeracy\\ud programs, changes in the participants’ attitudes to engaging in learning and pedagogic practices\\ud using data from eight Scottish literacy education organizations. It argues that literacy learning can act as a resource that enables vulnerable adults to change their dispositions to learning, achieve their goals and make a transition towards their imagined futures. Pedagogic practices that operate fro...

  7. Communities of Practice: Literacy and Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to discuss young deaf children's access to literacy within a sociocultural perspective. We introduce the concept of communities of practice as an aspect in early literacy development for young deaf children. Preschools are learning communities and thus constitute communities of practice. Our discussion on the use of communities…

  8. Teachers' professional development: Awareness of literacy practices

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    professional development and deepen teachers' understanding of literacy practices and teaching. Interviews and ... these disadvantages, linked to both material and human resources, have continued, and in fact become .... given access to literacy usage and variation, but ... English as their LoLT, though it may be their.

  9. Literacy as a Translocal Practice: Digital Multimodal Literacy Practices among Girls Resettled as Refugees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omerbašic, Delila

    2015-01-01

    Situated in critical sociocultural theory of literacy with a particular focus on literacy in relation to space and displacement, this qualitative study considers how nine teenage girls who were resettled as refugees from Thailand engage in productions of translocality through multimodal literacy practices in digital spaces. The girls are…

  10. Measuring Practicing Clinicians’ Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E.; Bennett, Katelyn J.; Sherman, Scott E.; Schwartz, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. Objectives This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans’ Affairs (VA) medical center. Methods Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach’s a=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson’s correlations. Results Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. Conclusions While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians’ information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs. PMID:28197620

  11. Techno-Literacy Practices of Emergent Readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razeale G. Fernandez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available – This research explored the techno-literacy practices of emergent readers. The study found that young children experienced a multi-literate practices in their homes that comprised not only print and paper-based literacies but also techno-literacies. That television, games on tablets and phones are the sources of textual pleasure of young children.Families reported that children watched television and play games on tablets/phones regularly. This is due to the limited options of leisure activities available to younger children. Emergent readers are highly focused to televisual text as they demonstrate meaningmaking practices when they constantly ask questions and talk about what they are watching,hence they are active meaning-makers. The learning opportunities which include hand eye coordination, parallel processing, and problem solving skills young children acquired through playing computer games and games on tablet/iPad . Aside from these, they also developed a number of literacy skills as well as how to behave as players.It can be concluded thatexposure to imagery in electronic technologies contributed to the children’s literacy development. The literate identities of emergent readers can be further enhanced as they begin formal schooling. Data indicated that young children are developing techno-literacy practices and this concurs to the findings of Marsh (2010. Therefore, technology serves as a tool for the literacy development of young children. That techno-literacy practices of young children should be valued in school. Future research should also consider attitude, behavior and practices of parents towards the use of technology by children.

  12. Visual Literacy Practices in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Schellenberg, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Joint Master Degree in Digital Library Learning (DILL) In our media-driven age visuals are increasingly frequent and prominently present in society and their importance and influence across academic disciplines is growing. This makes it essential to enable learners to become visually literate and justifies the need for teaching visual literacy competencies. Yet, there has been little research on visual literacy practices undertaken across academic subjects and institutions in h...

  13. Online Book Clubs: Bridges between Old and New Literacies Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharber, Cassandra

    2009-01-01

    In this Digital Literacies column, online book clubs are offered as one example of how to effectively bridge old and new literacy practices. These Internet-based book clubs capitalize on children's interest in new literacy practices while complementing, and hopefully encouraging, traditional reading practices. Examples from online book clubs…

  14. New Literacies Practices of Teenage "Twitter" Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This study is an empirical study into the new literacy practices of five teenage "Twitter" users on Twitter. Qualitative methods were used to describe the most prominent ways of participating on "Twitter." Results indicate that teenagers used "Twitter" for self-expression, communication, friendship maintenance, and…

  15. Resources, mediators, and identities: Home literacy practices of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Everyday home literacy practices of bilingual students who are learning English as an Additional Language (EAL) is an under-explored topic in South Africa. In this qualitative case study, home literacy practices of these students are viewed as a resource that can enhance their literacy development, while affirming their lived ...

  16. Children's Literacy Interest and Its Relation to Parents' Literacy-Promoting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Laura E.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; McQueen, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how children's literacy interests related to parent literacy-promoting practices across time. Using a sample of 909 preschool-age children and the newly developed Child Activities Preference Checklist, literacy interest appeared to be a complex construct, not easily captured by a single measure. In a subsample of 230 children…

  17. Literacy Practices and Linguistic Choices: A Sociocultural Study of a Multilingual Adult Literacy Student Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Stephen R.; Thorp, Kay

    The report describes a study of a multilingual group of six adult literacy students, five women and one man, enrolled in an English literacy class at an Australian college. Subjects' countries of origin include Afghanistan, Indonesia/China, Lebanon, Iran, and China. The study examined factors affecting subjects' daily literacy practices and…

  18. Literacy teacher education principles and effective practices

    CERN Document Server

    Litt, Deborah G; Place, Nancy A

    2014-01-01

    Few resources exist to give literacy teacher educators a comprehensive view of effective, innovative practices in their field, making this uniquely practical volume an important addition to the literature. Each chapter describes research findings and pedagogical methods, with an emphasis on what teachers really need to know to succeed. Woven into the text are more than 30 detailed activities and assignments to support teacher development, written by outstanding teacher educators. Links to professional teaching standards and the Common Core State Standards are highlighted throughout. Suppleme

  19. Information Literacy Practices and Student Protests: Mapping Community Information Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špiranec, Sonja; Kos, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper provides a contribution to understandings of information literacy regarding context and transferability of information practices. Specifically, the paper analyses the subset of information practices in situations of student protests and addresses issues of transfer of information literacy practice from a highly formal…

  20. Practice of New Style Information Literacy Education Attached Internet Enviroment

    OpenAIRE

    堀内, 泰輔

    1996-01-01

    Nowadays, to say nothing of importance of Information education. And Internet technology is developed more and more. Accordingly, at elemental information processing education, it is important to teach not only information literacy but also network literacy. In this paper, we describe about practice of new style information literacy education for freshman of our technical college, and we mention about the results and problems of this education.

  1. Rural Media Literacy: Youth Documentary Videomaking as a Rural Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyles, Damiana Gibbons

    2016-01-01

    Through an analysis of a corpus of youth-produced documentary video data collected at a youth media arts organization in rural Appalachia, I explore how these rural youth engaged in media literacy practices through creating documentary videos about themselves and their community. Using a theoretical foundation in literacies research, especially…

  2. Linguistic diversity and literacy practices in multilingual classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Pia

    & Leung, 2001). In search of a critical postmodern perspective on classroom studies, as advocated by Lin & Luk (2002), the study 'Signs of language‘ (2008-2014) aims to investigate the possibilities of restructuring the literacy practices in multilingual classrooms by giving attention to the children‘ s......In the context of an increasing multilingualism, literacy teaching has become a central and contested issue in public and political debate. International comparisons of levels of literacy have been interpreted as an indication of a prevailing literacy crisis that demands political actions to avoid...

  3. Cultural Shifts: Putting Critical Information Literacy into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Alison

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses the example of foreign languages to explore the integration of critical information literacy into the curriculum of various disciplines. By closely examining the practices and values inherent in the foreign language information environment, the paper suggests that a critical vision of information literacy provides the most…

  4. Multicultural Issues in Literacy Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Arlette Ingram, Ed.; Garcia, Georgia Earnest, Ed.; Barrera, Rosalinda B., Ed.; Harris, Violet J., Ed.

    This book addresses the lack of research and scholarly discussion on multicultural literacies. A common theme across chapters is the ways in which elements of difference--race, ethnicity, gender, class, and language--create tensions that influence students' literacy experiences and achievements. Sections explore the relationships among culture,…

  5. Observing Literacy Practices in Neighbor Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusch, Charlotte

    ’procedures on language and literacy. Based on this material, we developed an observation scheme and a guide for preschool teachers to follow, inspired by an action learning concept.During fall 2015, a pilot project is carried out. Preschool teachers from one institution visit a neighbor institution one by one during...... work hours, in order to observe and register how language and literacy events look like there. Afterwards, they share their registrations at a team meeting, and discuss and decide which procedures to test in their own institution. Thus, they form a professional learning network. In the pilot project......The Danish National Centre for Reading and a municipality in southern Denmark cooperate to develop a program to improve preschool children’s early literacy skills. The project aims to support preschool teachers’ ability to create a rich literacy environment for children age 3‒6. Recent research...

  6. Language and Literacy in Social Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybin, Janet, Ed.

    Readings on language and literacy within their social context include: "The Problem of Meaning in Primitive Languages" (Bronislaw Malinowski); "Toward Ethnographies of Communication" (Dell Hymes); "Language as Social Semiotic" (M. A. K. Halliday); "Language and Ideology" (V. N. Volosinov); "Family…

  7. An Investigation of Literacy Practices in High School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Jade; Mitchell, Marisa A.; Clancy, Erin E.; Silverman, Rebecca D.

    2017-01-01

    This study reports findings from an exploration of the literacy practices of 10 high school science teachers. Based on observations of teachers' instruction, we report teachers' use of text, evidence-based vocabulary and comprehension practices, and grouping practices. Based on interviews with teachers, we also report teachers' perceptions…

  8. Adapting Practices of Science Journalism to Foster Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polman, Joseph L.; Newman, Alan; Saul, Ellen Wendy; Farrar, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe how the practices of expert science journalists enable them to act as "competent outsiders" to science. We assert that selected science journalism practices can be used to design reform-based science instruction; these practices not only foster science literacy that is useful in daily life, but also…

  9. Texting literacies as social practices among older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyers, Charlyn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While many studies on mobile messaging have tended to focus on the communicative practices of the urban young, this paper considers the role of mobile messaging (also called texting both as a social practice as well as a form of literacy enhancement among a group of older working class women between the ages of 50 and 80 in a Cape Town township. The paper examines how these women, with little or no formal education, acquire this form of literacy, as well as the purposes for which they use texting. It also explores how this form of late-modern communication is adding to four of their existing or developing literacies – text, numeracy, visual and personal. The paper therefore adopts a multiliteracies approach within the context of portable literacies.

  10. Heritage-Language Literacy Practices: A Case Study of Three Japanese American Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kumi; Lee, Jin Sook

    2011-01-01

    This article documents the heritage-language (HL) literacy practices of three Japanese American families residing in a predominantly Anglo and Latino community. Through interviews and observations, this study investigates Japanese children's HL-literacy practices, parental attitudes toward HL literacy, and challenges in HL-literacy development in…

  11. The Case of Three Karen Refugee Women and Their Children: Literacy Practices in a Family Literacy Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Sabrina; Sarroub, Loukia K.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of research about the Karen, one of 135 ethnic groups from Myanmar limits literacy educators charged with educating this refugee population in public schools. In this case study the authors explore the literacy practices of Karen families when at school and in their homes and within an ESL family literacy program. The case of these…

  12. Using Mobile Technology to Support Literacy Coaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, C. C.; Martin, Aqueasha

    2013-01-01

    This article examines literacy coaches' (n = 7) digital note-taking practices using mobile technology and their influence on reflective practice. The study, which employed a design-based approach, investigated the coaches' transition from note-taking by paper and pencil to the note-taking application Evernote. Data included interviews with the…

  13. Preschool Teachers' Language and Literacy Practices with Dual Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brook E.; Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Cycyk, Lauren M.; López, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Sandilos, Lia; Komaroff, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the degree to which teachers used linguistically responsive practices to support the language and literacy development of Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLL) and (b) to investigate the associations between these practices and select teacher-level factors. The sample consisted of 72 preschool…

  14. Activist Literacies: An Analysis of the Literacy Practices of a School-Based Human Rights Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Ross

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine the literacy practices of a high school-based human rights club. I investigate how the group engages in certain kinds of textual production to sponsor and arrange advisory sessions (school-wide meetings between teachers and small groups of students). More specifically, I consider how the club adapts school genres to…

  15. Situated Literacy Practices Amongst Artisans in the South West of Nigeria: Developmental and Pedagogical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade-Ojo, Gordon O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an aspect of a larger study on literacy practices, needs and perceptions of artisans in a part of the South West region of Nigeria. Using an ethnographic approach to research, it identified a variety of literacy practices, events and mediums, thus confirming the notion of literacy as social practice. The study employed a…

  16. Inclusive education for Deaf students: Literacy practices and South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inclusive education for Deaf students: Literacy practices and South African Sign Language. ... Southern African Linguistics and Applied Language Studies ... of inclusive education for Deaf students in a mainstream Further Education and Training (FET) classroom through the use of a South African Sign Language interpreter.

  17. Let's Play: Exploring Literacy Practices in an Emerging Videogame Paratext

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Catherine; Miller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the literacy practices associated with Let's Play videos (or LPs) on YouTube. A hybrid of digital gaming and video, LPs feature gameplay footage accompanied by simultaneous commentary recorded by the player. Players may set out to promote, review, critique or satirize a game. In recent years, LPs have become hugely popular…

  18. Toward Community Research and Coalitional Literacy Practices for Educational Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campano, Gerald; Ghiso, María Paula; Yee, Mary; Pantoja, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Community-based research can provide an avenue for understanding the complexities of students' and families' lives and working together for educational justice through what we refer to as coalitional literacy practices. In this article, we share a critical incident about a student's absence from school as an illustrative case of the grass-roots…

  19. Digital Literacies in Higher Education: Exploring Textual and Technological Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Mary R.; Jones, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Concerns are frequently raised about undergraduates being so immersed in web-based technologies in their broader lives that they have difficulties engaging in more conventional study practices, such as academic reading and writing essays. The research reported on here examines this issue through a literacies lens. The project findings illustrate…

  20. Preschool Teachers' Language and Literacy Practices with Dual Language Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brook E; Hammer, Carol Scheffner; Cycyk, Lauren M; López, Lisa; Blair, Clancy; Sandilos, Lia; Komaroff, Eugene

    The purposes of this study were to (a) examine the degree to which teachers used linguistically responsive practices to support the language and literacy development of Spanish-speaking Dual Language Learners (DLL) and (b) to investigate the associations between these practices and select teacher-level factors. The sample consisted of 72 preschool teachers. Observational data were collected on practices. Teachers self-reported on language and culture beliefs, Spanish speaking ability, and classroom composition. Results indicated that teachers, including those who spoke Spanish, used few linguistically responsive practices to support preschool DLLs. Only Spanish-speaking ability was related to practices. Implications for targeted professional development are discussed.

  1. Exploring Practical Responses of M3LC for Learning Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah; Baharman

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to explore the responses of participants toward Mathematics-Language Literacy Learning Courseware (M3LC) for learning literacy. There are five practical aspects concerned by involving 30 participants in the focus group discussion. In the beginning, participants were given some response sheet and introduced to M3LC by watching learning video of M3LC. At the end, they were asked to concern about response sheet and give comments related what they saw during the introduction session. The results show that the responses of users’ agree and strongly agree are still higher than those of users’ disagree or strongly disagree, with below 30% of responses are in the fair category. It means that the participants tend to give a positive opinion that M3LC is a useful courseware since it is qualified to satisfy 5 practical aspects, including knowledge use, knowledge construction, evaluation practice, social programming, and valuing to support literacy learning. In future, the implementation of using this courseware can be enhanced to further recognition of literacy level so that students can be well-prepared before starting learning activities in the classroom.

  2. An exploration of workplace literacy as a catalyst to support employees in dealing with changing workplace literacy practices

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Hester

    2009-01-01

    The changing workplace requires employees to engage with new ways of working that rely increasingly on a variety of literacy skills. This study used action research to answer the research question whether a workplace literacy initiative could act as a catalyst to support employees to manage these new literacy practices in the workplace with confidence. A multi-national high-tech manufacturing plant in Ireland which is in a process of continuous change was selected as research site. A 45 ho...

  3. Aligning Literacy Practices in Secondary History Classes with Research on Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jeffery D.

    2008-01-01

    Literacy is a basic element of the discipline of history and of traditional secondary history instruction. However neither the growing body of research on learning with texts nor modern learning theories support the traditional literacy practices that are taking place in many secondary history classrooms. Nor are classroom literacy practices a…

  4. The Literacy Practices of Vocational Training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Jean; Mackay, James

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies indicate that vocational students' literacy practices are more demanding than is generally recognised. Employing a view of literacy acquisition as socialisation, we investigated the literacy practices of trades training in Carpentry and Automotive Technology, by interviewing tutors and examined course books and student writing. A…

  5. No Selling the Genie Lamp: A Game Literacy Practice in "The Sims"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Elisabeth R.; Gee, James Paul

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the New Literacy Studies, the authors argue that game literacy takes multiple forms and is embedded in different practices associated with particular games and gaming communities. They examine one specific game literacy practice that involves players of "The Sims" creating challenges for other players, and they identify how playing and…

  6. Making health information meaningful: Children's health literacy practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Fairbrother

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Children's health and wellbeing is high on the research and policy agenda of many nations. There is a wealth of epidemiological research linking childhood circumstances and health practices with adult health. However, echoing a broader picture within child health research where children have typically been viewed as objects rather than subjects of enquiry, we know very little of how, in their everyday lives, children make sense of health-relevant information.This paper reports key findings from a qualitative study exploring how children understand food in everyday life and their ideas about the relationship between food and health. 53 children aged 9-10, attending two socio-economically contrasting schools in Northern England, participated during 2010 and 2011. Data were generated in schools through interviews and debates in small friendship groups and in the home through individual interviews. Data were analysed thematically using cross-sectional, categorical indexing.Moving beyond a focus on what children know the paper mobilises the concept of health literacy (Nutbeam, 2000, explored very little in relation to children, to conceptualise how children actively construct meaning from health information through their own embodied experiences. It draws on insights from the Social Studies of Childhood (James and Prout, 2015, which emphasise children's active participation in their everyday lives as well as New Literacy Studies (Pahl and Rowsell, 2012, which focus on literacy as a social practice. Recognising children as active health literacy practitioners has important implications for policy and practice geared towards improving child health. Keywords: Children, Health literacy, Qualitative, UK

  7. Promotion of scientific literacy: Bangladeshi teachers' perspectives and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Mahbub; Corrigan, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    Background: In Bangladesh, a common science curriculum caters for all students at the junior secondary level. Since this curriculum is for all students, its aims are both to build a strong foundation in science while still providing students with the opportunities to use science in everyday life - an aim consistent with the notion of scientific literacy. Purpose: This paper reports Bangladeshi science teachers' perspectives and practices in regard to the promotion of scientific literacy. Sample: Six science teachers representing a range of geographical locations, school types with different class sizes, lengths of teaching experience and educational qualifications. Design and method: This study employed a case study approach. The six teachers and their associated science classes (including students) were considered as six cases. Data were gathered through observing the teachers' science lessons, interviewing them twice - once before and once after the lesson observation, and interviewing their students in focus groups. Results: This study reveals that participating teachers held a range of perspectives on scientific literacy, including some naïve perspectives. In addition, their perspectives were often not seen to be realised in the classroom as for teachers the emphasis of learning science was more traditional in nature. Many of their teaching practices promoted a culture of academic science that resulted in students' difficulty in finding connections between the science they study in school and their everyday lives. This research also identified the tension which teachers encountered between their religious values and science values while they were teaching science in a culture with a religious tradition. Conclusions: The professional development practice for science teachers in Bangladesh with its emphasis on developing science content knowledge may limit the scope for promoting the concepts of scientific literacy. Opportunities for developing pedagogic

  8. Hymns, Prayers and Bible Stories: The Role of Religious Literacy Practices in Children's Literacy Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papen, Uta

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the role of religious literacy practices such as hymns, prayers and Bible stories in the context of literacy teaching in primary schools in England. Drawing on data collected through a classroom ethnography of a year 1 class (five and six-year-olds) conducted in a Catholic primary school in 2013 and 2014, I suggest that…

  9. Endangered Literacies? Affordances of Paper-Based Literacy in Medical Practice and Its Persistence in the Transition to Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterponi, Laura; Zucchermaglio, Cristina; Alby, Francesca; Fatigante, Marilena

    2017-01-01

    Under the rapid advances of digital technology, traditional paper-based forms of reading and writing are steadily giving way to digital-based literacies, in theory as well as in application. Drawing on a study of literacy in a medical workplace context, this article examines critically the shift toward computer-mediated textual practices. While a…

  10. Exploring the Literacy Practices of Refugee Families Enrolled in a Book Distribution Program and an Intergenerational Family Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sunita; Sylvia, Monica R.; Ridzi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study presents findings of the literacy practices of Burmese refugee families and their interaction with a book distribution program paired with an intergenerational family literacy program. The project was organized at the level of Bronfenbrenner's exosystem (in "Ecology of human development". Cambridge, Harvard…

  11. Literacy in Cross-Cultural Perspective: Implications for Policy and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, B.

    This paper reviews some of the issues in the new literacy studies and the questions, from an anthropological perspective, of self, person, and identity that affect literacy practices. It is suggested that in discussing literacy, it is better to start from a cultural viewpoint rather than an educational one. The traditional autonomous model of…

  12. Adolescent Literacy Practices and Positive Youth Development through Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Greathouse, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was not to disprove the effects of the current, common remedial literacy course design and the literacy practices within that help adolescent RLLs pass statewide assessment tests, but to describe the potential long-term impact of an innovative comprehensive approach to literacy (CAL) framed through an integrated course…

  13. Transnational Chinese Students' Literacy and Networking Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqiao

    2017-01-01

    Situated in the context of a first-year writing course at a Midwestern public university in the United States, this study examines Chinese international students' networking practices through the mediation of WeChat, a popular social networking application for smartphones. Based on interviews with 36 students and detailed accounts of one focal…

  14. Literacy, learning and health - a social practices view of health literacu

    OpenAIRE

    Papen, Uta

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I use a social practices view of literacy to challenge dominant conceptions of health literacy. Health literacy is frequently defined as an abstract skill that can be measured through individual performance tests. The concept of health literacy as a skill neglects the contextual nature of reading and writing in health care settings. It risks ignoring the many ways in which patients access and comprehend health information, make sense of their experience and the resources they d...

  15. Multilingual Language and Literacy Practices and Social Identities in Sunni Madrassahs in Mauritius: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owodally, Ambarin Mooznah Auleear

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the connections among multilingual language practices, multilingual literacy practices, and social identities in two Sunni madrassahs in Mauritius. The study is framed by sociolinguistic and poststructuralist perspectives on language and identity, and social practice views of literacy. Data collection and analysis involved…

  16. The Relationships among Early Childhood Educators' Beliefs, Knowledge Bases, and Practices Related to Early Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Chhanda

    A study was conducted to determine and compare the literacy beliefs, knowledge bases, and practices of early childhood educators who espouse emergent literacy and reading readiness philosophies; to explore the relationship among beliefs, knowledge bases, and practices; and to examine the degree to which beliefs, knowledge bases, and practices were…

  17. Adolescent Worlds and Literacy Practices on the United States-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article presents partial results of an ethnographic study about literacy practices among adolescents living near the United States-Mexico border. The students became involved in literacy practices with their friends and family at home. These practices were related to the adolescents' interests in popular culture such as reading magazines or…

  18. Academic literacy and student diversity the case for inclusive practice

    CERN Document Server

    Wingate, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of approaches to academic literacy instruction and their underpinning theories and a synthesis of the debate on academic literacy. It aims to raise awareness of innovative literacy pedagogies and argues for the transformation of academic literacy instruction in all universities with diverse student populations.

  19. Bilingual Intertextuality: The Joint Construction of Bi-Literacy Practices between Parent and Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Vadeboncoeur, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    Based on sociocultural theory, this article examines two activities constituted by a parent and child as jointly constructed bi-literacy practices. Bi-literacy practices enable the parent and child to co-construct conceptual meanings and sense across two languages. Concept development in young children "begins" with meaning in one language and…

  20. Literacy Practices in the Homes of African American Families and the Perceived Affects on the Language and Literacy Development of Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Delilah A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the tenacities, practices, and discourse of family-based literacy practices and their connection in African American families. It scrutinized the influence of the practices of African American families on the multiple contexts of literacy practices in their passageway across the school-community periphery.…

  1. Digital Literacies Go to School: A Cross-Case Analysis of the Literacy Practices Used in a Classroom-Based Social Network Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Denise L.; Niederhauser, Dale S.

    2016-01-01

    The authors, working from a "new literacies studies" perspective, suggest that educators can better teach their students if they develop their own knowledge of the purposes, types, and language conventions students use in their informal out-of-school literacy practices. The purpose of this study was to identify the literacy practices…

  2. Reconceptualising Science Education Practices from New Literacies Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K. S.

    2015-01-01

    In light of profound socio-economic and technological changes, the research from New Literacies has raised fundamental questions on the nature of literacy in the way we read, write, and communicate. Yet, in science education, research in literacy has been largely restricted to the domain of print-oriented academic language. This paper aims to set…

  3. Adult Literacy: Monitoring and Evaluation for Practice and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of the UN Literacy Decade launched in 2003, there is increased emphasis on monitoring and evaluation of adult literacy around the globe. The present paper presents an overview of the main approaches that have been taken to measure adult literacy within and across countries. A particular focus of the present review is to compare and…

  4. Understanding and Practice of Information Literacy in Australian Government Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, Jennifer; Barham, Lyn; Brady, Sean

    2008-01-01

    Most research on information literacy has emerged from the academic sector and there is a lack of research undertaken in the workplace. To further expand on this area of study, a survey was undertaken to investigate librarians' understanding of information literacy and the application of information literacy in government libraries in Australia.…

  5. Understanding game-based literacy practices in a school context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper; Brok, Lene Storgaard

    methodology, and the interventions will be carried out at 20 schools in Denmark and will consist of 4 specially designed game-based units in each of the subjects Danish (as L1), mathematics, and science in both 5th and 7th grade. Games include digital as well as analogue games, and we understand game...... in the 21st Century (GBL21), a five years large-scale intervention project launched in December 2017. The overall aim is to explore how and to what degree students develop 21st century skills through a game-based pedagogy in different school subjects. The GBL21 project is based on a mixed methods......-based learning as relating to the process of designing games, exploring game worlds, and reflecting on game activities in an educational context. The purpose of the qualitative strand is to explore how the game-based learning activities influence the literacy practices in the different classrooms. This includes...

  6. Scientific literacy and academic identity: Creating a community of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveles, John Michael

    2005-07-01

    This one-year ethnographic study of a third grade classroom examined the construction of elementary school science. The research focused on the co-development of scientific literacy and academic identity. Unlike much research in science education that views literacy as merely supportive of science; this dissertation research considers how students learned both disciplinary knowledge in science as well as about themselves as learners through language use. The study documented and analyzed how students came to engage with scientific knowledge and the impact this engagement had upon their academic identities over time. Ethnographic and discourse analytic methods were employed to investigate three research questions: (a) How were the students in a third grade classroom afforded opportunities to acquire scientific literate practices through the spoken/written discourse and science activities? (b) In what ways did students develop and maintain academic identities taken-up over time as they discursively appropriated scientific literate practices via classroom discourse? and (c) How did students collectively and individually inscribe their academic identities and scientific knowledge into classroom artifacts across the school year? Through multiple forms of analyses, I identified how students' communication and participation in science investigations provided opportunities for them to learn specific scientific literate practices. The findings of this empirical research indicate that students' communication and participation in science influenced the ways they perceived themselves as active participants within the classroom community. More specifically, students were observed to appropriate particular discourse practices introduced by the teacher to frame scientific disciplinary knowledge and investigations. Thus, emerging academic identities and developing literate practices were documented via analysis of discursive (spoken, written, and enacted) classroom interactions. A

  7. Frame Works: Using Metaphor in Theory and Practice in Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Wendy

    2017-01-01

    The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education generated a large amount of discourse during its development and adoption. All of this discourse is rich in metaphoric language that can be used as a tool for critical reflection on teaching and learning, information literacy, and the nature and role of theory in the practice of…

  8. Young Children's Initiation into Family Literacy Practices in the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jackie; Hannon, Peter; Lewis, Margaret; Ritchie, Louise

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a study that explored young children's digital literacy in the home. The aim of the study was to identify the range of digital literacy practices in which children are engaged in the home and to explore how these are embedded into family life and involve family members. Four children, two girls and two boys aged between 2 and…

  9. Production-on-the-Go Practice: Storyboarding as a Retrospective and Redundant School Literacy Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lynde

    2013-01-01

    Storyboarding is one common strategy used in teaching young people digital media. This paper argues that in adolescents' literacy practices, they engage in production on the go. The metaphor is described in this paper to put forward the argument that storyboarding can be a retrospective and redundant literacy activity in adolescents' school…

  10. Remix as Professional Learning: Educators’ Iterative Literacy Practice in CLMOOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Smith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Connected Learning Massive Open Online Collaboration (CLMOOC is an online professional development experience designed as an openly networked, production-centered, participatory learning collaboration for educators. Addressing the paucity of research that investigates learning processes in MOOC experiences, this paper examines the situated literacy practices that emerged as educators in CLMOOC composed, collaborated, and distributed multimediated artifacts. Using a collaborative, interactive visual mapping tool as participant-researchers, we analyzed relationships between publically available artifacts and posts generated in one week through a transliteracies framework. Culled data included posts on Twitter (n = 678, a Google+ Community (n = 105, a Facebook Group (n = 19, a blog feed (n = 5, and a “make” repository (n = 21. Remix was found to be a primary form of interaction and mediator of learning. Participants not only iterated on each others’ artifacts, but on social processes and shared practices as well. Our analysis illuminated four distinct remix mobilities and relational tendencies—bursting, drifting, leveraging, and turning. Bursting and drifting characterize the paces and proximities of remixing while leveraging and turning are activities more obviously disruptive of social processes and power hierarchies. These mobilities and tendencies revealed remix as an emergent, iterative, collaborative, critical practice with transformative possibilities for openly networked web-mediated professional learning.

  11. Writing Information Literacy Assessment Plans: A Guide to Best Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Oakleaf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic librarians throughout higher education add value to the teaching and learning missions of their institutions though information literacy instruction. To demonstrate the full impact of librarians on students in higher education, librarians need comprehensive information literacy assessment plans, composed of instructional program-level and outcome-level components, that summarize the purpose of information literacy assessment, emphasize the theoretical basis of their assessment efforts, articulate specific information literacy goals and outcomes, describe the major assessment methods and tools used to capture evidence of student learning, report assessment results, and highlight improvements made as a consequence of learning assessment.

  12. Girls, identities and agency in adolescents' digital literacy practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Adampa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the ways girls use digital environments, like Word, PowerPoint and chatting programmes, for writing and communication purposes. By combining quantitative and qualitative methods of analysis and by adopting a critical discourse framework, we will explore the relationship between girls and new media, especially the ones related to digital writing, in terms of three interconnected variables. The first one is related to the role of the two most important socialisation institutions, home and school, at the present historical juncture, characterised by intense mobility and an expansion of traditional forms of literacy. The strategic choices of the girls' families and their schools' teaching practices contributed significantly to the formulation of their digital writing practices. The second variable is gender. Our data clearly show that a substantial number of girls were more inclined than their male peers to use word-processing and presentation software, performing, thus, the school discourses of 'diligent students'. The third key variable concerns the personality of the girls who filtered in their own unique ways their social experiences, overcame limitations, took initiatives and appropriated technologically-mediated writing media for personally meaningful ends that enhanced their school and/or entertainment Discourses.

  13. Reconnecting Proficiency, Literacy, and Culture: From Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warford, Mark K.; White, William L.

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to capably communicate across languages? This article introduces two theoretical models and a lesson plan format designed to facilitate the integration of proficiency, literacy, and culture teaching in foreign language teaching. The Second Symbolic Competencies Model configures proficiency and literacy as subordinate clusters of…

  14. Developing Psychological Literacy: Is There a Role for Reflective Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Debra; Homewood, Judi

    2016-01-01

    Psychological literacy is an umbrella term that is widely used to describe the attributes or capabilities of psychology graduate (Cranney & Dunn 2011). This article explores some of the complexities inherent in the learning and teaching of psychological literacy by exploring challenges to the development of self-awareness and cultural…

  15. Language, Literacy and Learning in Educational Practice. A Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierer, Barry, Ed.; Maybin, Janet, Ed.

    Articles presented include: "Introducing the New Literacy" (John Willinsky); "The Emergence of Literacy" (Nigel Hall); "Media Education: The Limits of a Discourse" (David Buckingham); "Extracts from 'Thought and Language' and 'Mind in Society'" (L. S. Vygotsky); "From Communicating to Talking" (Jerome Bruner); "What Does It Mean To Be Bilingual?"…

  16. A phenomenographic investigation into Information Literacy in nursing practice - preliminary findings and methodological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Information Literacy is essential to 'evidence-based practice'; without the ability to locate evidence, evidence-based practice is rendered extremely difficult if not impossible. There is currently little evidence to show how Information Literacy is experienced by nurses or what its parameters are within evidence-based practice and therefore whether Information Literacy educational interventions are actually promoting the correct knowledge and skills. Using phenomenographic interviews the author will attempt to discover how nurses experience Information Literacy. Insights from the findings will be used to map out its parameters and to put forward a theoretical model for a course or module to develop it effectively. This article presents preliminary findings, including 7 draft categories of description of how Information Literacy is experienced in nursing. This pilot study indicates that the complete findings may be of significant potential value in the promotion and development of Information Literacy education in nursing. It is argued that such insights into how nurses actually experience the phenomenon of Information Literacy can be used to develop potentially more effective, research-based, educational interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Geographic Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  18. Mexican parents' and teachers' literacy perspectives and practices: construction of cultural capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Leslie; Arauz, Rebeca Mejía; Bazán, Antonio Ray

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the relationships among the literacy practices engaged in by first-grade children and parents at home and the ways in which these practices are communicated, shaped, and fostered by teachers and administrators in two different sociocultural environments in urban Mexico. The differences observed between the home literacy experiences of children in a working class and a middle class community included transgenerational communication of assumptions regarding literacy and schooling, as well as attitudes associated with the parents' own school experiences. Class-based expectations on the part of teachers not only shaped interactions with parents, but were also reflected in the way the national curriculum was delivered, with a greater emphasis on rote skills and traditional reading instruction in the working class community. The authors argue that the school plays a role in the co-production of cultural capital in the home through its shaping of some of the literacy practices that children and families undertake.

  19. Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bremholm, Jesper

    I løbet at de seneste 10 år har literacy-begrebet for alvor vundet indpas som et etableret begreb i den nordiske forsknings- og uddannelsesverden, ikke mindst inden for læse-/skriveområdet. Der er dog langt fra konsensus om den præcise betydning af begrebet, og af samme grund hersker der en udbredt...... forvirring om hvorledes det skal forstås. Man kan på den baggrund stille spørgsmålet om hvorvidt literacy overhovedet er et brugbart og produktivt begreb i en nordisk kontekst. Når man i PISA-undersøgelserne giver læseområdet den pleonastiske betegnelse reading literacy, kunne det give anledning til...... at tvivle på at det er tilfældet. Med afsæt i forskellige begrebs- og forskningsmæssige perspektiver diskuteres i oplægget literacy-begrebets berettigelse, og i forlængelse heraf præsenteres et bud på en trifokal optik som teoretisk blik på literacy i undervisningskontekster. Eksempler fra forskellige...

  20. Analytical implications of using practice theory in workplace information literacy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moring, Camilla Elisabeth; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper considers practice theory and the analytical implications of using this theoretical approach in information literacy research. More precisely the aim of the paper is to discuss the translation of practice theoretical assumptions into strategies that frame the analytical...... focus and interest when researching workplace information literacy. Two practice theoretical perspectives are selected, one by Theodore Schatzki and one by Etienne Wenger, and their general commonalities and differences are analysed and discussed. Analysis: The two practice theories and their main ideas...... of what constitute practices, how practices frame social life and the central concepts used to explain this, are presented. Then the application of the theories within workplace information literacy research is briefly explored. Results and Conclusion: The two theoretical perspectives share some...

  1. Family Digital Literacy Practices and Children's Mobile Phone Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, Melody M; Ramsay, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Smart phones are ubiquitous in everyday life and are having a major impact on work, education, social relationships and modes of communication. Children are the fastest growing population of smart phone users, with use often focusing around internet access, e.g., 1 in 3 internet users in the UK are under 18 years of age. Despite their widespread use, relatively little is known about the factors that underpin children's use. The home is a significant ecological context of development and recent research has highlighted the importance of the home environment in promoting and supporting the development of both safe and unsafe online behavior. Yet the importance of these influences currently remains relatively unrecognized. Therefore, in this paper we present a narrative review of evidence examining parental practices concerning digital communication technologies and applications, with a particular focus on smartphones, and how they relate to the use of technology by their children. Emerging evidence to date indicates that two important factors are at play. Firstly, parental technology use is closely related to that of their child. Secondly, that despite parents frequently voiced concerns about the nature and extent of their child's mobile phone use, parents themselves often engage in a number of unsafe internet behaviors and excessive phone use in the home environment. Our review identifies two crucial lines of enquiry that have yet to be comprehensively pursued by researchers in the field: firstly, the adoption of a psychological perspective on children's emergent behaviors with mobile devices and secondly, the influential role of context. Given parental concerns about the possible negative impact of technologies, parental awareness should be raised about the influence of their behavior in the context of internet safety along with the adoption of good digital literacy practices. It is anticipated that a comprehensive characterization of the associated contextual

  2. Teaching for Scientific Literacy? An Examination of Instructional Practices in Secondary Schools in Barbados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer-Bradshaw, Ramona E.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which the instructional practices of science teachers in Barbados are congruent with best practices for teaching for scientific literacy. Additionally, through observation of practice, it sought to determine the teachers' demonstrated role in the classroom, their demonstration of learning through discourse,…

  3. Plating up Information Literacy as a Social Practice: A Slice of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fafeita, Jenny; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2012-01-01

    Few studies in the Library and Information Studies field investigate how vocational workers use information in their learning and workplace practice. This paper introduces doctoral research that explores how apprentice chefs develop information literacy practices that enable them to learn their trade and engage with the professional practices of…

  4. Teachers’ discourses of literacy as social practice in advantaged and disadvantaged early childhood contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn D. Martin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two teachers’ discourses of literacy as social practice in advantaged and disadvantaged early childhood centres for three- to four-year-olds. The intention is to make sense of the dominant discourse of literacy, its constitutive nature and its effects on children, teaching and learning. Foucault’s theory of discourse is used to make salient the influence of interpretive frames of references on the understanding and practice of literacy. The data for the study was produced through a qualitative approach using in-depth semi-structured interviews. The findings show that teachers in both the advantaged and disadvantaged contexts are located in the dominant discourse of early literacy as a technical, autonomous skill. This discourse foregrounds children as adults-in-the-making (the becoming child and a maturationist-environmentalist view of readiness for early literacy development. This narrow view of literacy discounts young children’s positioning as social actors, issues of diversity and contextually situated practice.

  5. Information Literacy Education in the UK: Reflections on Perspectives and Practical Approaches of Curricular Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Andretta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper has two main aims, to present the current position of information literacy education in UK-based academic institutions and to propose a strategy that ensures the integration of this phenomenon in learning and teaching institutional practices. The first part of the paper offers an insight into the perceptions of information literacy by exploring four distinct perspectives, including the institutional angle and the views associated with faculty staff, library staff and students. What transpires from the findings is that information literacy from an institutional perspective is dominated by the need to measure information skills within the context of information as a discipline in its own right. Another issue that is raised by the data points to a great deal of misinformation regarding information literacy, and that, as a result, a clear marketing strategy must be adopted by information professionals to address the misconceptions held by faculty staff and students alike. We aim to address these points by drawing on recent scholarship and research in the field which demonstrates the validity of information literacy as a process for fostering independent learning. The second part of the paper explains how a Fellowship project has placed information literacy on the pedagogical agenda of the University of Staffordshire in the UK by promoting information literacy education as an integrated element of the curriculum.

  6. Exploring Literacy and Numeracy Teaching in Tanzanian Classrooms: Insights from Teachers' Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmasa, Mussa; Anney, Vicent Naano

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the literacy teaching practices in Tanzanian classrooms in the provision of Primary education. It comprehensively assessed why primary school leavers are graduating without skills of reading, writing and numeracy competencies. Three objectives guided this study, first, was to explore teachers classroom practices in the…

  7. Good Practice Guide: Bringing a Social Capital Approach into the Teaching of Adult Literacy and Numeracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This good practice guide is based on research that looked at how to teach adult literacy and numeracy using a social capital approach. The guide suggests ways vocational education and training (VET) practitioners can adopt a social capital approach to their teaching practice. A social capital approach refers to the process in which networks are…

  8. Digital Storytelling Revisited: An Educator's Use of an Innovative Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby-Caffey, Crystal; Úbéda, Edwin; Jenkins, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    Digital storytelling has emerged as an innovative practice that allows students deeper engagement with content while encouraging the use of critical thinking and technological skills needed to navigate the ever changing digital terrain of the 21st century. The integration of traditional and new literacy practices is evident throughout the process…

  9. "La Historia de Mi Nombre": A Culturally Sustaining Early Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Kindel; Panther, Leah; Arce-Boardman, Alicia

    2018-01-01

    This article features a culturally sustaining practice that many early literacy teachers can adapt and use: "la historia de mi nombre"/the story of my name. The practice is described in the context of a second-grade bi/multilingual class as the Latinx students are learning about their names through culturally authentic literature,…

  10. Analytical Implications of Using Practice Theory in Workplace Information Literacy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moring, Camilla; Lloyd, Annemaree

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper considers practice theory and the analytical implications of using this theoretical approach in information literacy research. More precisely the aim of the paper is to discuss the translation of practice theoretical assumptions into strategies that frame the analytical focus and interest when researching workplace…

  11. Making Use of Theories about Literacy and Justice: Teachers Re-Searching Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Barbara

    This paper explores the way teachers make use of and work on theory to disrupt and ultimately improve everyday educational practice. The paper argues that teachers working on and with theory can and do generate new forms of educative practices in the field of literacy education, which are based on explicit standpoints towards social justice in…

  12. Integration of Information Literacy into the Curriculum: Constructive Alignment from Theory into Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Dahlqvist

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Librarian-teacher cooperation is essential for the integration of information literacy into course syllabi. Therefore, a common theoretical and methodological platform is needed. As librarians at Kristianstad University we have had the opportunity to develop such a platform when teaching information literacy in a basic course for teachers in higher education pedagogy. Information literacy is taught in context with academic writing, distance learning and teaching, and development of course syllabi. Constructive Alignment in Theory: We used constructive alignment in designing our part of the course. John Biggs’ ideas tell us that assessment tasks (ATs should be aligned to what is intended to be learned. Intended learning outcomes (ILOs specify teaching/learning activities (TLAs based on the content of learning. TLAs should be designed in ways that enable students to construct knowledge from their own experience. The ILOs for the course are to have arguments for the role of information literacy in higher education and ideas of implementing them in TLAs. The content of learning is for example the concept of information literacy, theoretical perspectives and constructive alignment for integration in course syllabi. TLAs are written pre-lecture reflections on the concept of information literacy, used as a starting point for the three-hour seminar. Learning reflections are written afterwards. The AT is to revise a syllabus (preferably using constructive alignment for a course the teacher is responsible for, where information literacy must be integrated with the other parts and topics of the course. Constructive Alignment in Practice: Using constructive alignment has taught us that this model serves well as the foundation of the theoretical and methodological platform for librarian-teacher cooperation when integrating information literacy in course syllabi. It contains all important aspects of the integration of information literacy in course

  13. Teaching Climate Social Science and Its Practices: A Two-Pronged Approach to Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwom, R.; Isenhour, C.; McCright, A.; Robinson, J.; Jordan, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Essential Principles of Climate Science Literacy states that a climate-literate individual can: "understand the essential principles of Earth's climate system, assess scientifically credible information about climate change, communicate about climate and climate change in a meaningful way, and make informed and responsible decisions with regard to actions that may affect climate." We argue that further integration of the social science dimensions of climate change will advance the climate literacy goals of communication and responsible actions. The underlying rationale for this argues: 1) teaching the habits of mind and scientific practices that have synergies across the social and natural sciences can strengthen students ability to understand and assess science in general and that 2) understanding the empirical research on the social, political, and economic processes (including climate science itself) that are part of the climate system is an important step for enabling effective action and communication. For example, while climate literacy has often identified the public's faulty mental models of climate processes as a partial explanation of complacency, emerging research suggests that the public's mental models of the social world are equally or more important in leading to informed and responsible climate decisions. Building student's ability to think across the social and natural sciences by understanding "how we know what we know" through the sciences and a scientific understanding of the social world allows us to achieve climate literacy goals more systematically and completely. To enable this integration we first identify the robust social science insights for the climate science literacy principles that involve social systems. We then briefly identify significant social science contributions to climate science literacy that do not clearly fit within the seven climate literacy principles but arguably could advance climate literacy goals. We conclude

  14. A Problem-Solving Model for Literacy Coaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, Cathy A.

    2017-01-01

    Literacy coaches are more effective when they have a clear plan for their collaborations with teachers. This article provides details of such a plan, which involves identifying a problem, understanding the problem, deciding what to do differently, and trying something different. For each phase of the problem-solving model, there are key tasks for…

  15. The Written Literacy Forum: Combining Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher M.; Florio, Susan

    1983-01-01

    Writing teachers and researchers collaborate in the Written Literacy Forum at Michigan State University to: (1) heighten teachers' awareness of the complexity of writing; (2) stimulate discussion across grade levels; and (3) focus research on areas concerning teachers. Discussion formats and inservice activities are described, and materials…

  16. Learning through Play: Portraits, Photoshop, and Visual Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyford, Michelle A.; Boyd, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Play has a significant role in language and literacy learning. However, even when valued in schools, opportunities for play are limited beyond early childhood education. This study of an after-school program for adolescents looks closely at several forms of play that students engaged in to produce self-portraits. The study suggests that play and…

  17. The Literacy Practices of "Transfronterizos" in a Multilingual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa; Guerra, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    This introduction provides the background for this special issue by first describing the US-Mexico border, a fascinating context in which to research issues related to Spanish-English biliteracy and multilingualism. We present main points in the prevailing discussion within the field of literacy studies about issues of multilingualism and…

  18. The Role of Community Book Club in Changing Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dail, Alanna Rochelle; McGee, Lea M.; Edwards, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Community Book Club began as an experimental approach intended to combine professional development for teachers and family literacy for the parents of the preschoolers involved in an Early Reading First project. We collected data on 11 book club meetings over a 2-year time period. Meetings were held at local churches and at each meeting,…

  19. Multimodal Literacy Practices in the Indigenous Sámi Classroom: Children Navigating in a Complex Multilingual Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietikäinen, Sari; Pitkänen-Huhta, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article explores multimodal literacy practices in a transforming multilingual context of an indigenous and endangered Sámi language classroom. Looking at literacy practices as embedded in a complex and shifting terrain of language ideologies, language norms, and individual experiences and attitudes, we examined how multilingual Sámi children…

  20. Laying a Firm Foundation: Embedding Evidence-Based Emergent Literacy Practices Into Early Intervention and Preschool Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Pamela; Watson, Maggie

    2018-04-05

    As part of this clinical forum on curriculum-based intervention, the goal of this tutorial is to share research about the importance of language and literacy foundations in natural environments during emergent literacy skill development, from infancy through preschool. Following an overview of intervention models in schools by Powell (2018), best practices at home, in child care, and in preschool settings are discussed. Speech-language pathologists in these settings will be provided a toolbox of best emergent literacy practices. A review of published literature in speech-language pathology, early intervention, early childhood education, and literacy was completed. Subsequently, an overview of the impact of early home and preschool literacy experiences are described. Research-based implementation of best practice is supported with examples of shared book reading and child-led literacy embedded in play within the coaching model of early intervention. Finally, various aspects of emergent literacy skill development in the preschool years are discussed. These include phonemic awareness, print/alphabet awareness, oral language skills, and embedded/explicit literacy. Research indicates that rich home literacy environments and exposure to rich oral language provide an important foundation for the more structured literacy environments of school. Furthermore, there is a wealth of evidence to support a variety of direct and indirect intervention practices in the home, child care, and preschool contexts to support and enhance all aspects of oral and written literacy. Application of this "toolbox" of strategies should enable speech-language pathologists to address the prevention and intervention of literacy deficits within multiple environments during book and play activities. Additionally, clinicians will have techniques to share with parents, child care providers, and preschool teachers for evidence-based literacy instruction within all settings during typical daily

  1. Libraries and Librarians: Key Partners for Progress in Health Literacy Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Wanda; Keselman, Alla; Humphreys, Betsy

    2017-01-01

    The field of librarianship has a history of involvement in patient education, general literacy and information literacy efforts. This history and prominent placement in communities make libraries and librarians an excellent resource in advancing health literacy practice and research. This chapter provides an overview of health literacy and health information literacy efforts in US libraries over the past two decades. The chapter begins with the description of the role of the US National Library of Medicine in developing resources, programs, and partnerships serving health information needs of the public. It then overviews special training programs for increasing librarians' expertise with health information and health literacy support. The narrative also presents different models of health information outreach programs in diverse communities, focusing on serving special populations that may suffer from health disparities. The second half of the chapter describes libraries' and librarians' health information response to continuously evolving contexts, mediums, and requirements. One subsection describes librarians' outreach effort with cutting-edge technologies, such as virtual worlds and gaming. Another focuses on supporting patients' information needs in clinical settings. Two more describe how libraries meet patrons' health information needs in the context of disaster preparedness and health insurance market place sign-up. While presenting the information, to the extent possible, the chapter draws upon research and evaluation of the effectiveness of different types of programs. It also discusses enablers of successes, limitations of the existing data, and directions for future research.

  2. Global Health Systems and Policy Development: Implications for Health Literacy Research, Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Gillian; Dodson, Sarity; Leung, Angela; Levin-Zamir, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Accessible and responsive health systems are critical to population health and human development. While progress has been made toward global health and development targets, significant inequities remain within and between countries. Expanding health inequities suggest a widespread and systemic neglect of vulnerable citizens, and a failure to enshrine within policies a responsibility to tailor care to the variable capabilities of citizens. Implementation of health and social policies that drive the design of accessible health systems, services, products and infrastructure represents the next frontier for health reform. Within this chapter we argue the need to consider health and health literacy across policy domains, to operationalize the intent to address inequities in health in meaningful and pragmatic ways, and to actively monitor progress and impact within the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We contend that viewing and developing policies and systems within a health literacy framework will assist in placing citizens and equity considerations at the center of development efforts. In this chapter, we explore the relationship between health literacy and equitable access to health care, and the role of health system and policy reform. We first explore international policies, health literacy, and the SDGs. We then explore national policies and the role that national and local services and systems play in building health literacy, and responding to the health literacy challenges of citizens. We discuss the World Health Organization's (WHO) Framework for Integrated People-Centered Health Services and the way in which health services are being encouraged to understand and respond to citizen health literacy needs. Each section of the chapter ends with a summary and a review of health literacy research and practice. Throughout, we illustrate our points through 'vignettes' from around the world.

  3. Honoring and Building on the Rich Literacy Practices of Young Bilingual and Multilingual Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author invites teachers of children who are bilingual, multilingual, and at promise for bi-/multilingualism to honor and build on their rich literacy practices. To do so, she challenges ideas and labels that continuously disempower bilingual and multilingual learners. Souto-Manning establishes the understanding that education…

  4. Expanding Opportunities to Learn to Support Inclusive Education through Drama-Enhanced Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilinc, Sultan; Farrand, Kathleen; Chapman, Kathryn; Kelley, Michael; Millinger, Jenny; Adams, Korbi

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how the Early Years Educators at Play (EYEPlay) professional development (PD) programme supported inclusive learning settings for all children, including English language learners and students with disabilities. The EYEPlay PD model is a year-long programme that integrates drama strategies into literacy practices within…

  5. Exploring the Classroom Practices That May Enable a Compassionate Approach to Financial Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2018-01-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The…

  6. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Literacy and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, H. Rae

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based Practice Guidelines for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) and Literacy and Learning are derived from an inductive analysis of qualitative data collected in field research. FASD is the umbrella term for a spectrum of neurocognitive and physical disabilities caused by prenatal exposure to alcohol. Data from a sample of N =150 was…

  7. Inquiring into Pre-Service Content Area Teachers' Development of Literacy Practices and Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton Kukner, Jennifer; Murray Orr, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative multi-year case study is on preservice teachers' experiences related to the development of their literacy practices in teaching high school science, math, social studies and other content area courses during their final field placement in a teacher education program. Results indicate tangible indicators of overall…

  8. Documenting Instructional Practices in a Literacy-infused Arts Program: Respecting Pedagogues from the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wanda; Smith, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the instructional practices around literacy that characterized the work of a community based arts program designed for urban adolescents. Two primary sources of data were collected: field notes on approximately 35 hours of instruction spread across seven months and interviews with the program's staff and students. Four…

  9. Finnish Media Literacy Education Policies and Best Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care since 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Leena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe Finnish media literacy policies and good media education practices in early childhood education and care. This article will focus on describing two central action lines related to the Children and Media Program, initiated by the Division for Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2004.…

  10. From digital to Academic Literacy: Interactional Dynamic and Writing Practices on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Braga Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the results obtained in an educational project carried out in a Portuguese undergraduate course at Universidade Federal do Pará. We analyzed the interactional dynamic experienced by students in Facebook when it is used as a teaching platform, as well as the use of writing in these interactions. We understand that the use of digital literacy tools can greatly contribute to the training of future Portuguese language teachers, considering that such tools have directly influenced language practices. Integral formation of our students is one of our main objectives, so we intent not just preparing them for academic practice, but also for future teaching practice in a context which technology and digital tools will be increasingly present. Thus, we aim at contributing to the expansion of digital and academic literacy of our students. Blended Learning, a mix of face-to-face and on line teaching was the methodology used in the project. That way, we believe that learning could become a more continuous process. Our research is theoretically founded on the Studies about Literacy, as Martin (2008, Street (2014 and Lankshear and Knobel (2008 and by Levy (2010 Cyberculture. This ethnographic research analyses the, literacy in context, understood as social practice.

  11. Religious and Self-Generated Quechua Literacy Practices in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses Quechua speakers' religious literacy practices in the native language in a rural community located in the department of Cuzco (Peru). I argue that in a situation where the school did not play the role of developing or maintaining the written vernacular, a group of community members found specific situations where they felt…

  12. Modern Scientific Literacy: A Case Study of Multiliteracies and Scientific Practices in a Fifth Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Elizabeth; Goldston, M. Jenice

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the convergence of multiliteracies and scientific practices in a fifth grade classroom. As students' lives become increasingly multimodal, diverse, and globalized, the traditional notions of literacy must be revisited (New London Group 1996). With the adoption of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States 2013a) in many states, either in their entirety or in adapted forms, it becomes useful to explore the interconnectedness multiliteracies and scientific practices and the resulting implications for scientific literacy. The case study included a fifth grade classroom, including the students and teacher. In order to create a rich description of the cases involved, data were collected and triangulated through teacher interviews, student interviews and focus groups, and classroom observations. Findings reveal that as science activities were enriched with multiliteracies and scientific practices, students were engaged in developing skills and knowledge central to being scientifically literate. Furthermore, this study establishes that characteristics of scientific literacy, by its intent and purpose, are a form of multiliteracies in elementary classrooms. Therefore, the teaching and learning of science and its practices for scientific literacy are in turn reinforcing the development of broader multiliteracies.

  13. Survey of Information Literacy Instructional Practices in U.S. Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Heidi; Gross, Melissa; Latham, Don

    2018-01-01

    An online survey sent to the community of professional librarians in the United States who provide information literacy instruction in academic libraries provided insights into their practices and the challenges they face. Data include current pedagogical methods, client groups of focus, assessment and evaluation, marketing, instructional…

  14. Thinking in Hashtags: Exploring Teenagers' New Literacies Practices on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    This research investigates how three high school students in the USA developed new literacies practices through their participation in teenage Twitter. Data was collected from two sources, including archival data from participants' Twitter over a two-year span, and semi-structured interviews. Results found that teenagers developed a number of…

  15. Family Child Care Learning Environments: Caregiver Knowledge and Practices Related to Early Literacy and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Beth M.; Morse, Erika E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a stratified-random survey of family child care providers' backgrounds, caregiving environments, practices, attitudes, and knowledge related to language, literacy, and mathematics development for preschool children. Descriptive results are consistent with prior studies suggesting that home-based providers are…

  16. Cultivating the Spatial Politics of Community-Based Literacy Practices in Hip-Hop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prier, Darius D.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the social imagination of community-based sites of urban resistance enable out-of-school literacy practices in Black popular culture to foreground the contemporary context in which youth empowerment is nurtured in out-of-school learning settings. Second, the author chronicles how youth advocates in hip-hop--based community…

  17. Literacy as Self-Expression: Interpreting the Subject Areas through the Arts. Research into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen D.; Finke, Janet; Douville, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Examines self-expression in art, drama, and gesture, offering practical strategies that can be used across subject areas to enhance students' literacy performance. Discusses the way creative projects can motivate student language use and participation in history and science projects. (JPB)

  18. Co-Constructed Identities and Literacy Practices: How Identities of One Teacher and Her First Grade Students Are Enacted and Co-Constructed through Literacy Practices and a Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlal, Sasha R.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation explored how identities of students and a teacher in a first grade classroom were co-constructed through various literacy practices and within a third space. Drawing on research that documented the strong connection between literacy and identity and its socio-cultural connections, this qualitative study incorporates ethnographic…

  19. Bilingual proposal in deaf education: educational practices in literacy process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina Florêncio Fernandes Moret

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The teaching and use of the LIBRAS, in the deaf people education are indispensable for their development, building of their identity, autonomy, beside the communication with the world. The acquisition of the Portuguese Language is part of the regular school curriculum, and its command provides a relationship between language and society, which is mostly formed by hearing and users of this language. There is a concern related to the deaf people education, especially in literacy phase, which consequently extends through all the regular schooling, where the most part of the deaf students are finishing the high school without knowing how to read and/or produce in Portuguese Language. This problem affects the social development of these subjects, since the Portuguese Language is still required as if it were the deaf mother tongue, not respecting his/her culture, that has LIBRAS as their first language. The object of this research it to verify the methods and techniques in the deaf people literacy process and seek for other models, based on bilingual theory, ensuring the acquisition of LIBRAS, as a natural language and the teaching of Portuguese Language in a second language methodology, so that, in fact, the acquisition of reading and writing skills to materialize.

  20. Exploring the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2018-06-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The financial maths task asked students to decide on the best fundraising option for the school. We used the theory of practice architectures to analyse the interactions in the classroom in order to understand what may have enabled and constrained classroom practices. We found that classroom practices such as engaging with peers through positive and collaborative learning opportunities, making ethical, social and mathematical connections of the task, and considering the impact of financial decisions on others may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education.

  1. Exploring the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2017-08-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The financial maths task asked students to decide on the best fundraising option for the school. We used the theory of practice architectures to analyse the interactions in the classroom in order to understand what may have enabled and constrained classroom practices. We found that classroom practices such as engaging with peers through positive and collaborative learning opportunities, making ethical, social and mathematical connections of the task, and considering the impact of financial decisions on others may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education.

  2. Literacies Crossing Borders: Transfronterizo Literacy Practices of Students in a Dual Language Program on the USA-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Piedra, Maria Teresa; Araujo, Blanca E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on transnational literacies has generally focused on youth who live in one country and communicate using digital literacies across national boundaries. Our work contributes to this literature by providing a view of transnational literacies that are unique to the USA-Mexico border region. The students in this ethnographic study navigate…

  3. Tools for evidence-based vascular nursing practice: Achieving information literacy for lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Jodi; Walsh, M Eileen

    2017-12-01

    Information literacy is essential in facilitating evidence-based practice (EBP) activities. In vascular nursing, the implementation of EBP is of utmost importance. Best practice grounded in research evidence can contribute to improved patient care outcomes for individuals with vascular disease. The following paper discusses information literacy competencies for nurses to develop in the context of EBP, with an emphasis on formulating a clinical question and searching for evidence. Relevant health science information resources are described, including their value and purpose in the 6S model of evidence. Also discussed are practical and supportive solutions with proven effectiveness in ensuring nurses' success with EBP. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Empowering Students in Information Literacy Practices Using a Collaborative Digital Library for School Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrizah Abdullah

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the affordances that a collaborative digital library (CDL can bring to bear on supporting information literacy practices in the digital information environment. It suggests that the digital library can contribute to student empowerment in information literacy practices while searching, using and collaboratively building the digital library resources. To illustrate this, the authors have been experimenting with the implementation of an integrated information literacy model based on Eisenberg and Berkowitz’ Big 6 Model and describes the CDL features in association with the information literacy dimensions in this model. The CDL focuses on the project-based learning approach to conduct students’ project, which supports specific information behaviors that underpin research and learning such as information seeking, browsing, encountering, foraging, sharing, gathering, filtering, and using. Findings regarding teachers’ reception of the digital library are encouraging as they feel the relevance of the digital library to the current requirement of the students’ project and its potential to entrench information and resource study skills through project-based learning.

  5. The home literacy and numeracy environment in preschool: Cross-domain relations of parent-child practices and child outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Amy R; Purpura, David J

    2018-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence indicating that home literacy and numeracy environments are predictive of children's literacy and numeracy skills within their respective domains. However, there is limited research on the relations between the home literacy environment and numeracy outcomes and between the home numeracy environment and literacy outcomes. Specifically, there is limited information on relations between the home numeracy environment and specific literacy outcomes (e.g., vocabulary). The purpose of the current study was to investigate the relations of the home literacy and numeracy environments to children's literacy and numeracy outcomes both within and across domains. Participants were 114 preschool children and their parents. Children ranged in age from 3.01 to 5.17 years (M = 4.09 years) and were 54% female and 72% Caucasian. Parents reported the frequency of parent-child literacy (code-related practices and storybook reading) and numeracy practices. Children were assessed in the fall and spring of their preschool year on their literacy (definitional vocabulary, phonological awareness, and print knowledge) and numeracy skills. Four mixed-effects regression analyses were conducted to predict each of the child outcomes. Results indicate that although code-related literacy practices and storybook reading were not broadly predictive of children's literacy and numeracy outcomes, the home numeracy environment was predictive of numeracy and definitional vocabulary outcomes. These findings demonstrate a relation between the home numeracy environment and children's language development and contribute to the growing body of research indicating the important relations between early numeracy and language development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. "So we would all help pitch in:" The family literacy practices of low-income African American mothers of preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Robin L; Hamilton, Megan-Brette; Coba-Rodriguez, Sarai

    2015-01-01

    The development of emergent literacy skills are important for the development of later literacy competencies and affect school readiness. Quantitative researchers document race- and social class-based disparities in emergent literacy competence between low-income African American and middle-income White children. Some researchers suggest that deficits in parenting practices account for limited literacy skills among low-income African American children. A small body of qualitative research on low-income African American families finds that despite economic challenges, some African American families were actively engaged in promoting child literacy development. Using qualitative interviews that emphasize family strengths, we add to this small body of research to highlight positive family practices obscured in many quantitative analyses that concentrate on family shortcomings. Specifically, we examine in-home literacy practices and child literacy development with a sample of low-income African American mothers (families) of preschoolers. Key findings include identification of various literacy activities promoting child literacy development and inclusion of multiple family members assisting in literacy activities. These findings add to substantive discussions of emergent literacy and resilience. Insights from the qualitative interviews also provide culturally-sensitive recommendations to childhood educators and speech-language pathologists (SLP) who work with low-income African American families and children. Reader should recognize that (1) there is not a 'right' phenotype and therefore not a right form of environmental input and (2) that context matters (at both the level of the cell and the individual organism). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Culturally Diverse Students in Higher Education: Challenges and Possibilities within Academic Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tkachenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With growing diversity in the population, higher education faces a new situation with increasing student diversity. In our paper, we will explore questions concerning the consequences student diversity has for higher-education institutions. Based on our experience from three different R&D projects, the differences in culture and academic literacy practices give culturally diverse students challenges that have often been ignored in academia. Some other studies also document that this group of students has a much higher risk of dropping out and underachieving than majority students (Andersen & Skaarer- Kreutz, 2007; Støren, 2009. In our paper, we are going to discuss the students’ challenges and discourse of remediation that is often associated with their challenges and suggest how higher-education institutions can adjust their practices to be more oriented to intercultural communication. Intercultural communication as a dialogic approach may create dynamics in academic tutoring and lead to mutual change/transformation instead of a one-way adaptation of existing academic literacy norms. We argue that all teachers should be aware of cultural differences in literacy practices in the education systems and strive to adjust their teaching practices to the diversity in the classroom. This approach, we believe, can contribute to a better learning environment for all students, independently of their backgrounds. 

  8. Association of eHealth literacy with colorectal cancer knowledge and screening practice among internet users in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Seigo; Shibata, Ai; Ishii, Kaori; Oka, Koichiro

    2012-11-13

    In rapidly developing Internet-user societies, eHealth literacy has become important in promoting wellness. Although previous studies have observed that poor health literacy is associated with less knowledge and screening practice of colorectal cancer (CRC), little is known about whether eHealth literacy is associated with these variables. The present study examined associations between eHealth literacy, knowledge of CRC, and CRC screening practices. Data were analyzed for 2970 Japanese adults (men, 49.9%; mean age±SD, 39.7±10.9 years) who responded to an Internet-based cross-sectional survey. Knowledge of the definition of CRC, its risk factors and screening practice, previous experience of CRC screening, score on the Japanese version of the eHEALS (J-eHEALS), sociodemographic attributes (sex, age, marital status, educational attainment, and household income level), and frequency of Internet usage were obtained. Sociodemographic attributes and frequency of Internet usage were used as control variables in the multiple regression and logistic regression models. eHealth literacy was positively associated with CRC knowledge (β=.116, increase of 1 point in the eHEALS score signified that participants were 1.03 times (95% CI=1.01-1.05) more likely to undergo CRC screening. Internet users with high eHealth literacy are more likely to have knowledge and previous screening practice related to CRC compared to those with low eHealth literacy.

  9. Emergent Literacy Development Through Storybook Reading: One Head Start Teacher's Explanations and Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Jawhar, Salwa Baker

    2000-01-01

    My goal in undertaking this research was to contribute to strengthening kindergarten educational practices in Kuwait with particular focus on literacy development. I was interested in the instructional techniques, tools, methods, language activities that would make sense to Arabic kindergartners and help them learn the formal, written register (i.e., formal literary Arabic) required in Kuwait. To this end, I used part of my graduate studies in education visiting and observing several kinderga...

  10. Information literacy skills and training of licensed practical nurses in Alberta, Canada: results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadson, Kelley; Phillips, Leah Adeline

    2018-06-01

    Although information literacy skills are recognized as important to the curriculum and professional outcomes of two-year nursing programs, there is a lack of research on the information literacy skills and support needed by graduates. To identify the information literacy skills and consequent training and support required of Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) in Alberta, Canada. An online survey using a random sample of new graduates (graduated within 5 years) from the registration database of the College of Practical Nurses of Alberta (CLPNA). There was a 43% response rate. Approximately 25-38% of LPNs felt they were only moderately or to a small extent prepared to use evidence effectively in their professional practice. LPNs use the internet and websites most frequently, in contrast to library resources that are used least frequently. Developing lifelong learning skills, using information collaboratively, and locating and retrieving information are areas where LPNs desire more effective or increased training. The results suggest there are significant gaps in the preparedness and ability of LPNs to access and apply research evidence effectively in the workplace. There are several areas in which the training provided by Librarians appears either misaligned or ineffective. © 2018 Health Libraries Group.

  11. Master teachers' responses to twenty literacy and science/mathematics practices in deaf education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrooks, Susan R; Stephenson, Brenda; Mertens, Donna

    2006-01-01

    Under a grant to improve outcomes for students who are deaf or hard of hearing awarded to the Association of College Educators--Deaf/Hard of Hearing, a team identified content that all teachers of students who are deaf and hard of hearing must understand and be able to teach. Also identified were 20 practices associated with content standards (10 each, literacy and science/mathematics). Thirty-seven master teachers identified by grant agents rated the practices on a Likert-type scale indicating the maximum benefit of each practice and maximum likelihood that they would use the practice, yielding a likelihood-impact analysis. The teachers showed strong agreement on the benefits and likelihood of use of the rated practices. Concerns about implementation of many of the practices related to time constraints and mixed-ability classrooms were themes of the reviews. Actions for teacher preparation programs were recommended.

  12. Remix as a literacy for future anthropology practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markham, Annette

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses how remix functions as a generative metaphor for thinking about ethnographic research methods. By dismantling and reconfiguring past (mostly taken for granted) terminology for ‘what counts’ as appropriate data, research practices, and research products, scholars can explore...

  13. Storytelling in Mexican Homes: Connections between Oral and Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on storytelling among Mexican families, documenting the frequency of storytelling in the homes of working- and middle-class Mexican families, the range of topics of the stories, characteristics and genres of stories, and intergenerational continuity of storytelling practices. Also examined are potential associations between…

  14. Improving access to important recovery information for heart patients with low health literacy: reflections on practice-based initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Biuso, Catuscia; Jennings, Amanda; Patsamanis, Harry

    2018-05-29

    Evidence exists for the association between health literacy and heart health outcomes. Cardiac rehabilitation is critical for recovery from heart attack and reducing hospital readmissions. Despite this, literacy. This brief case study reflects and documents practice-based initiatives by Heart Foundation Victoria to improve access to recovery information for patients with low literacy levels. Three key initiatives, namely the Six Steps To Cardiac Recovery resource, the Love Your Heart book and the nurse ambassador program, were implemented informed by mixed methods that assessed need and capacity at the individual, organisational and systems levels. Key outcomes included increased access to recovery information for patients with low health literacy, nurse knowledge and confidence to engage with patients on recovery information, improved education of patients and improved availability and accessibility of information for patients in diverse formats. Given the challenges involved in addressing heart health literacy, multifaceted practice-based approaches are essential to improve access to recovery information for patients with low literacy levels. What is known about the topic? Significant challenges exist for patients with lower health literacy receiving recovery information after a heart attack in hospitals. What does this paper add? This case study provides insights into a practice-based initiative by Heart Foundation Victoria to improve access to recovery information for patients with low literacy levels. What are the implications for practitioners? Strategies to improve recovery through increased heart health literacy must address the needs of patients, nursing staff and the health system within hospitals. Such strategies need to be multifaceted and designed to build the capacity of nurses, heart patients and their carers, as well as support from hospital management.

  15. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce.

  16. Factors in the development of higher levels of reading literacy: Argumentation skills in educational practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branković Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The highest levels of reading literacy, as defined within PISA study, include the ability to use various cognitive skills, with argumentative skills being one of the most important among them. In the present study our goal was to reveal some of the factors that influence the development of argumentative skills in Serbian schools. We investigated the extent to which argumentative skills are required in PISA reading literacy tasks, as well as the specific difficulties our students have faced on these tasks, through an analysis of student performance. We also conducted an analysis of the educational practice - by doing in-depth interviews with teachers and content analysis of students' textbooks. The results revealed that: 1 Argumentations skills are an important requirement within PISA tasks; 2 Serbian students are mostly successful at basic tasks of recognizing arguments or providing arguments for the given position; they face difficulties answering the tasks which require precise formulation of relevant arguments as well as those demanding meta-cognitive skills (e.g. recognizing persuasive strategies in the given text. Their performance is particularly poor on tasks requiring the combination of information from different sources or information presented in different formats (text, tables, or graphs; 3 There is a significant gap between the requirements for argumentation skills our students usually encounter and PISA reading literacy tasks. In this paper we discuss some of the difficulties and obstacles to encouraging the development of argumentative thinking.

  17. The importance of academic literacy for undergraduate nursing students and its relationship to future professional clinical practice: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, Diana; McNally, Stephen; Roberts, Katriona; Wallace, Anna; Stunden, Annette; D'Souza, Suzanne; Glew, Paul

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review was designed to assess the importance of academic literacy for undergraduate nursing students and its relationship to future professional clinical practice. It aimed to explore the link between academic literacy and writing in an undergraduate nursing degree and the development of critical thinking skills for their future professional clinical practice. A systematic review of qualitative studies and expert opinion publications. A systematic literature search was undertaken of the following databases: ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE and Scopus. All papers reviewed were from 2000 to 2016 and were written in English. We identified 981 studies and expert opinion papers from the selected databases. After reviewing key words and abstracts for the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 48 papers were selected for review. These were read and reread, with 22 papers, including one thesis, selected for quality appraisal. One paper was discarded due to the exclusion criteria. Three major themes were evident from this study. First, students need assistance to develop tertiary level academic literacy skills when they commence their undergraduate nursing degree. Second, that teaching practices need to be consistent in both designing assessments and in giving feedback to students, in order to assist improvement of academic literacy skills. And finally, academic literacy can facilitate critical thinking when students are assessed using discipline specific genres that relate to their future professional nursing practice. This review highlights the importance of critical thinking in clinical nursing practice and its strong relationship with academic writing skills. It has shown critical thinking is discipline specific and nursing students need to be taught discipline specific literacy genres in undergraduate nursing degrees. Nursing has a diverse educational and cultural mix of students, and educators should not assume academic literacy skills upon commencement of an

  18. Exploring the Literacy Beliefs of Refugee Mothers: Implications for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize an exploratory and descriptive lens to examine the literacy beliefs of refugee mothers of preschool aged children, who were enrolled in a refugee family literacy program (n = 19). Through use of a survey, mothers' literacy beliefs as related to the home literacy environment and schooling were examined. Results…

  19. Designing for Engagement: Using the ADDIE Model to Integrate High-Impact Practices into an Online Information Literacy Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols Hess, Amanda Kathryn; Greer, Katie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors share how a team of librarians used the ADDIE instructional design model to incorporate best practices in teaching and learning into an online, four-credit information literacy course. In this redesign process, the Association of American Colleges and Universities' high-impact practices and e-learning best practices…

  20. Educational laptops in public schools: digital literacy and possibilities of transforming pedagogical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Beatris Valentini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of educational laptops in the routine of students and teachers might contribute for the construction of innovative alternatives for the teaching practice. With that in mind, this paper starts with the idea that the insertion of educational laptops in 1:1 model might be a disturbing element, triggering a process of reflection and awareness of the teaching practice on teachers themselves. That could lead to redimensioning the pedagogical practice in a movement towards including the laptop significantly in the school routine. We present a case study from an exploratory perspective about the insertion of laptops in a public school (from elementary to junior high, analyzing the process of digital literacy taking place in that school community. In that sense, digital literacy implies on the interaction in social networks that allow exploration and research, teaching and criticizing in a construction process of learning and knowing mediated by digital technologies. To do so, from the non-linearity that accompanies the communication flows emerging from these technologies, students and teachers are instigated to find new meanings, where reading and writing consist in sharing knowledge and opinions and not only an assignment to hand in.

  1. Re-mastering the Master's Tools: Recognizing and affirming the life experiences and cultural practices of urban youth in critical computational literacy through a video game project

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how a video game project that focuses on students' lived experiences and cultural practices teach critical literacies and computational thinking. Specifically, this research looked at how the pedagogy, processes, and student products demonstrated culturally relevant pedagogy practices, critical literacy, and computational thinking. This design-based research study utilizes critical literacy, sociocultural learning theory, and culturally relevant pedagogy in the framing, st...

  2. Practice and Evaluation of Ability Grouping Lecture on Information Literacy Using a Chat Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaga, Kiyohisa

    A teaching methodology on information literacy that skilled and inexperienced students learn through different specific contents in a class is proposed. Skilled students collaboratively work using an e-Learning environment while a conventional projector-based lecture on how to use a computer is given for inexperienced students. The methodology had been put into practice for two years. Skilled students were divided into a few groups and members in a group collaboratively made a PowerPoint slide show using a chat tool as the communication media. The slide shows were evaluated by means of questionnaire to the inexperienced students. The results were nearly the same as those of teachers. The practice of the methodology resulted in that the concentration of the skilled students was promoted and the learning attitude of the inexperienced students was improved, compared with the case that the both skilled and inexperienced students learned through the same contents.

  3. Designing for Engagement: Using the ADDIE Model to Integrate High-Impact Practices into an Online Information Literacy Course

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Nichols Hess; Katie Greer

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors share how a team of librarians used the ADDIE instructional design model to incorporate best practices in teaching and learning into an online, four-credit information literacy course. In this redesign process, the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ high-impact practices and e-learning best practices were integrated as scaffolds for course content. The authors' experience with this systematic process and the concepts of instructional design suggest...

  4. Enabling Digital Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    There are some tensions between high-level policy definitions of “digital literacy” and actual teaching practice. We need to find workable definitions of digital literacy; obtain a better understanding of what digital literacy might look like in practice; and identify pedagogical approaches, which...... support teachers in designing digital literacy learning. We suggest that frameworks such as Problem Based Learning (PBL) are approaches that enable digital literacy learning because they provide good settings for engaging with digital literacy. We illustrate this through analysis of a case. Furthermore......, these operate on a meso-level mediating between high-level concepts of digital literacy and classroom practice....

  5. Literacy practices in multi-graded classrooms in the context of the National Pact for Literacy at the Right Age (PNAIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Figueiredo de Sá

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study aimed to analyze the literacy practices in a multi-graded rural classroom of a PNAIC participating teacher. As methodological procedures, we conducted classroom observations and semi-structured interviews, analysed through Bardin’s (2002 content analysis. We carried out a diagnostic class evaluation through written words, which were analyzed based on the theory of Psychogenesis of written language, and document analysis of PNAIC education notebooks - Rural Education (2013 edition. We noticed some “marks” of PNAIC during the observations, particularly concerning to the pedagogical perspective (CHARTIER, 2002 in working with literature books, literacy games and the appropriation of methodological appropriation of projects and didactic sequences.

  6. The Politics and Practice of Literacy Pedagogy: Ideology and Outcomes in Two Racially Diverse Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedson, Margaret; Eastman, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Discussing ideologically opposing views of beginning reading, the authors trace the politics of reading curriculum in two racially diverse New Jersey school districts working to raise the literacy achievement of traditionally underserved students through socially just literacy education.

  7. Developing educational material on chronic kidney disease using best practices in health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luanda Thaís Mendonça; Bastos, Marcus Gomes

    2017-03-01

    Based in the precepts of Health Literacy (HL), an educational booklet "Do you know the Chronic Kidney Disease?" was written. It was used as a basic text for development of a Brazilian instrument for Assessment of Health Literacy (Teste de Avaliação de Letramento em Saúde or TALES). The guideline used to create the TALES obeyed four steps: systematization of content; creation and drawing of images by an expert designer; submission to a Committee of Experts on nephrology and linguistics; and editing and printing of the content. The content covering six aspects of chronic kidney disease (definition, diagnosis, signs and symptoms, prevention, risk factors and treatment) was developed utilizing multimodality techniques such as: creation of personages; verbal and visual metaphors; metonymy; personifications; direct dialogue; and plain language avoided of technicalities. During the development of TALES, the booklet proved to be useful in translating complicated scientific concepts on kidney disease into meaningfuly health messages. In conclusion, besides of being used as basic text for the development of TALES, the booklet "Do you know chronic kidney disease?", based in best practices in HL, can assist health professionals in communicating to patients using consumer-friendly educational materials that might impact positive health-related behaviors and results.

  8. Developing educational material on chronic kidney disease using best practices in health literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luanda Thaís Mendonça Santos

    Full Text Available Abstract Based in the precepts of Health Literacy (HL, an educational booklet "Do you know the Chronic Kidney Disease?" was written. It was used as a basic text for development of a Brazilian instrument for Assessment of Health Literacy (Teste de Avaliação de Letramento em Saúde or TALES. The guideline used to create the TALES obeyed four steps: systematization of content; creation and drawing of images by an expert designer; submission to a Committee of Experts on nephrology and linguistics; and editing and printing of the content. The content covering six aspects of chronic kidney disease (definition, diagnosis, signs and symptoms, prevention, risk factors and treatment was developed utilizing multimodality techniques such as: creation of personages; verbal and visual metaphors; metonymy; personifications; direct dialogue; and plain language avoided of technicalities. During the development of TALES, the booklet proved to be useful in translating complicated scientific concepts on kidney disease into meaningfuly health messages. In conclusion, besides of being used as basic text for the development of TALES, the booklet "Do you know chronic kidney disease?", based in best practices in HL, can assist health professionals in communicating to patients using consumer-friendly educational materials that might impact positive health-related behaviors and results.

  9. Exploring Cumulative Risk and Family Literacy Practices in Low-Income Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcella, Jennifer; Howes, Carollee; Fuligni, Allison Sidle

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The home literacy environment and other early learning settings such as preschool play a role in children's language and literacy outcomes, yet research suggests that Latino, Spanish-speaking families are less likely than other families to participate in family literacy activities. This study explored the relations among…

  10. Merging Information Literacy and Evidence-Based Practice in an Undergraduate Health Sciences Curriculum Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Susan; Bannon, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    The ACRL's "Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education" offers the opportunity to rethink information literacy teaching and curriculum. However, the ACRL's rescinded "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education" correlate with the preferred research and decision-making model of the health…

  11. Readability of Patient Education Materials in Hand Surgery and Health Literacy Best Practices for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Kristie; Prince, Latrina Y; Schnaekel, Asa; Couch, Cory G; Stephenson, John M; Wyrick, Theresa O

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to update a portion of a 2008 study of patient education materials from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Web site with new readability results, to compare the results to health literacy best practices, and to make recommendations to the field for improvement. A sample of 77 patient education documents were downloaded from the American Society for Surgery of the Hand Web site, handcare.org, and assessed for readability using 4 readability tools. Mean readability grade-level scores were derived. Best practices for plain language for written health materials were compiled from 3 government agency sources. The mean readability of the 77 patient education documents in the study was 9.3 grade level. This reading level is reduced from the previous study in 2008 in which the overall mean was 10.6; however, the current sample grade level still exceeds recommended readability according to best practices. Despite a small body of literature on the readability of patient education materials related to hand surgery and other orthopedic issues over the last 7 years, readability was not dramatically improved in our current sample. Using health literacy as a framework, improvements in hand surgery patient education may result in better understanding and better outcomes for patients seeing hand surgeons. Improved understanding of patient education materials related to hand surgery may improve preventable negative outcomes that are clinically significant as well as contribute to improved quality of life for patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. "A Rainforest in Front of a Bulldozer": The Literacy Practices of Teacher Candidates Committed to Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Janet D.

    2012-01-01

    This critical ethnographic study explores how two teacher candidates in English education used specific and varied literacy practices to enact their social justice priorities at a troubled high school in a high-need district. Data include interviews before and after the student teaching experience; observations of teaching, blogs, journals, and…

  13. Listening to Graduates of a K-12 Bilingual Program: Language Ideologies and Literacy Practices of Former Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworin, Joel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the language and literacy practices of five graduates of a Spanish-English K-12 dual language immersion program through semistructured interviews to understand the residual impact of thirteen years in a Spanish-English bilingual school program. Drawing from sociocultural theory, the interviews also sought to provide an…

  14. Community-Based Financial Literacy Education in a Cultural Context: A Study of Teacher Beliefs and Pedagogical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Taylor, Edward W.; Forte, Karin Sprow

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the findings related to teaching beliefs and pedagogical practices of a study that examined how financial literacy educators educate adults from underserved population groups in community-based settings. The study is theoretically framed in the teaching beliefs and culturally responsive education literature. Findings reveal a…

  15. Enhancing Literacy Practices in Science Classrooms through a Professional Development Program for Canadian Minority-Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Léonard P.; Gueye, Ndeye R.

    2016-01-01

    'Literacy in the Science Classroom Project" was a three-year professional development (PD) program supporting minority-language secondary teachers' use of effective language-based instructional strategies for teaching science. Our primary objective was to determine how teacher beliefs and practices changed over time and how these were enacted…

  16. Differential Influences of Parental Home Literacy Practices and Anxiety in English as a Foreign Language on Chinese Children's English Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Bonnie Wing-Yin; Chui, Barbie Hiu-Tung; Lai, Michael Wei-Chun; Kwok, Sylvia Y. C. L.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the differential influences of maternal and paternal factors on Chinese children's English as a foreign language development. It took into account both behavioral (i.e. parental home literacy practices, HLP; and children's vocabulary knowledge) and emotional (i.e. parental and children's foreign language reading anxiety,…

  17. The Importance of SES, Home and School Language and Literacy Practices, and Oral Vocabulary in Bilingual Children's English Reading Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Elizabeth R.; Páez, Mariela M.; August, Diane L.; Barr, Christopher D.; Kenyon, Dorry; Malabonga, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the role that socioeconomic status (SES), home and school language and literacy practices, and oral vocabulary play in the development of English reading skills in Latino English language learners (ELLs) and how these factors contribute differentially to English reading outcomes for children of different ages and in different…

  18. Fostering and Sustaining Diverse Literacy Practices in the Early Childhood Classroom: Reviewing the Literature in Three Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Emily

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I synthesize extant research that documents how teachers foster and sustain children's diverse literacy practices within the early childhood classroom. Framing this review with Bakhtin's heteroglossia, I draw on theoretical and empirical scholarship in the fields of biliteracy, translanguaging, and culturally sustaining pedagogy.…

  19. The Impact of Professional Development on Poverty, Schooling, and Literacy Practices: Teacher Narratives and Reformation of Mindset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffetelli Parker, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    The study examines the impact of professional development on the topic of poverty in one high poverty school community located in a small city in southern Ontario, Canada. It considers narrative-based experiences of teachers' collaborative inquiry on literacy practices after a significant amount of professional development was provided to…

  20. Teaching to Exceed the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: A Literacy Practices Approach for 6-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard; Thein, Amanda Haertling; Webb, Allen

    2012-01-01

    As the new English Language Arts Common Core State Standards take hold across the United States, the need grows for pre-service and in-service teachers to be ready to develop curriculum and instruction that addresses their requirements. This timely, thoughtful, and comprehensive text directly meets this need. It delineates a literacy practices and…

  1. "Critical Literacy Helps Wipe Away the Dirt on Our Glasses": Towards an Understanding of Reading as Ideological Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shin-Ying

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative teacher inquiry conducted in a tertiary, English-as-a-foreign-language classroom in Taiwan. The purpose of the study was, first, to implement a poststructuralist view of critical literacy that focuses not only on texts but also on the practice of reading as constructed and contested, and second, to examine the…

  2. Television, Language, and Literacy Practices in Sudanese Refugee Families: "I Learned How to Spell English on Channel 18"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kristen H.; Moses, Annie M.

    2011-01-01

    This ethnographic study explored the ways in which media, particularly television, connected with English language and literacy practices among Sudanese refugees in Michigan. Three families with young children participated in this study. Data collection included participant observation, interviews, and collection of artifacts over 18 months, with…

  3. "Seeing the Everyday through New Lenses": Pedagogies and Practices of Literacy Teacher Educators with a Critical Stance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharamshi, Pooja

    2018-01-01

    This article explores the practices and pedagogies of six literacy teacher educators with a critical stance. In this qualitative research study, three semi-structured interviews were conducted with each participant over a three-year period. They were able to negotiate a critical stance into their teacher education courses in several ways: using an…

  4. Teacher change in beliefs and practices in science and literacy instruction with English language learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhee

    2004-01-01

    This study examined patterns of change in beliefs and practices as elementary teachers learned to establish instructional congruence, a process of mediating academic disciplines with linguistic and cultural experiences of diverse student groups. The study focused on six bilingual Hispanic teachers working with fourth-grade, mostly Hispanic students. The results indicated that teacher learning and change occurred in different ways in the areas of science instruction, students' language and culture, English language and literacy instruction, and integration of these areas in establishing instructional congruence. The results also indicated that establishing instructional congruence was a gradual and demanding process requiring teacher reflection and insight, formal training, and extensive support and sharing. Implications for further research in promoting achievement for all students are discussed.

  5. Information literacy as the foundation for evidence-based practice in graduate nursing education: a curriculum-integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Susan Kaplan; Rosenfeld, Peri; Haber, Judith

    2003-01-01

    As part of a system-wide initiative to advance evidence-based practice among clinicians, graduate students, and educators, the New York University Division of Nursing embarked on a curricular initiative to integrate components of information literacy in all core courses of the master's program. Increasing competency in information literacy is the foundation for evidence-based practice and provides nursing professionals with the skills to be literate consumers of information in an electronic environment. Competency in information literacy includes an understanding of the architecture of information and the scholarly process; the ability to navigate among a variety of print and electronic tools to effectively access, search, and critically evaluate appropriate resources; synthesize accumulated information into an existing body of knowledge; communicate research results clearly and effectively; and appreciate the social issues and ethical concerns related to the provision, dissemination, and sharing of information. In collaboration with the New York University Division of Libraries' Health Sciences Librarian, instructional modules in information literacy relevant to each of the 5 core nursing master's courses were developed, complemented by a Web-based tutorial: http://library.nyu.edu/research/health/tutorial. The Web site is multifaceted, with fundamentals for the beginner, as well as more complex content for the advanced user. Course assignments were designed to promote specific competencies in information literacy and strategies for evaluating the strength of the evidence found. A survey of information literacy competencies, which assessed students' knowledge, misconceptions, and use of electronic information resources, was administered when students entered the program and at 1-year intervals thereafter.

  6. Making the Invisible of Learning Visible: Pre-Service Teachers Identify Connections between the Use of Literacy Strategies and Their Content Area Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitton-Kukner, Jennifer; Orr, Anne Murray

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe four ways secondary pre-service teachers appeared to be developing assessment practices during field experience, after taking a content area literacy course. This paper arises from a multi-year study exploring pre-service and beginning content area teachers' use of literacy strategies in teaching mathematics, science, and…

  7. "El Alfabetismo Y Las Familias Latinas": A Critical Perspective on the Literacy Values and Practices of Latino Families with Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Elsa S.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated literacy values and practices among Latino families with preschool-age children. Results are part of a larger study that looked at the efficacy of a pediatric-based early literacy promotion program called Reach Out and Read (ROR). Participants included families participating in a ROR program in which…

  8. A Young Child's Intergenerational Practices through the Use of Visual Screen-Based Multimodal Communication to Acquire Qur'anic Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Parven

    2016-01-01

    This paper is derived from a wider small-scale study of digital literacy practice that explores the ways in which a multilingual seven-year-old child, Bablu, interacts with his grandmother during Internet activities connected to Qur'anic literacy. The study aims to reveal how intergenerational learning support was given to Bablu by his…

  9. Designing for Engagement: Using the ADDIE Model to Integrate High-Impact Practices into an Online Information Literacy Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Nichols Hess

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors share how a team of librarians used the ADDIE instructional design model to incorporate best practices in teaching and learning into an online, four-credit information literacy course. In this redesign process, the Association of American Colleges and Universities’ high-impact practices and e-learning best practices were integrated as scaffolds for course content. The authors' experience with this systematic process and the concepts of instructional design suggest that the ADDIE model can be used to achieve several different ends in information literacy instruction. First, it can provide a structure around which librarians can develop a variety of instructional interactions. Second, it can help librarians consider student engagement, learning, and assessment more intentionally. And third, it can help to marry information literacy-specific standards and other learning guidelines, such as high-impact practices and e-learning best practices. From the authors' experience, other academic librarians may find applications for instructional design constructs into their own teaching practices, both in online and face-to-face learning environments.

  10. Integration of literacy into speech-language therapy: a descriptive analysis of treatment practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambyraja, Sherine R; Schmitt, Mary Beth; Justice, Laura M; Logan, Jessica A R; Schwarz, Sadie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was: (a) to examine the extent to which speech-language therapy provided to children with language disorders in the schools targets code-based literacy skills (e.g., alphabet knowledge and phonological awareness) during business-as-usual treatment sessions, and (b) to determine whether literacy-focused therapy time was associated with factors specific to children and/or speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Participants were 151 kindergarten and first-grade children and 40 SLPs. Video-recorded therapy sessions were coded to determine the amount of time that addressed literacy. Assessments of children's literacy skills were administered as well as questionnaires regarding characteristics of SLPs (e.g., service delivery, professional development). Results showed that time spent addressing code-related literacy across therapy sessions was variable. Significant predictors included SLP years of experience, therapy location, and therapy session duration, such that children receiving services from SLPs with more years of experience, and/or who utilized the classroom for therapy, received more literacy-focused time. Additionally, children in longer therapy sessions received more therapy time on literacy skills. There is considerable variability in the extent to which children received literacy-focused time in therapy; however, SLP-level factors predict time spent in literacy more than child-level factors. Further research is needed to understand the nature of literacy-focused therapy in the public schools. Readers will be able to: (a) define code-based literacy skills, (b) discuss the role that speech-language pathologists have in fostering children's literacy development, and (c) identify key factors that may currently influence the inclusion of literacy targets in school-based speech-language therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ICT Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The entanglement of ethics and technology makes it necessary for us to understand and reflect upon our own practices and to question technological hypes. The information and communication technology (ICT) literacy required to navigate the twenty-first century has to do with recognizing our own...... human limitations, developing critical measures and acknowledging feelings of estrangement, puzzlement as well as sheer wonder of technology. ICT literacy is indeed all about visions of the good life and the art of living in the twenty-first century. The main focus of this paper is to explore...... sensitivity with regard to ICT in the ‘classic’ literacy context of the educational system....

  12. Digital literacies

    CERN Document Server

    Hockly, Nicky; Pegrum, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic shifts in our communication landscape have made it crucial for language teaching to go beyond print literacy and encompass the digital literacies which are increasingly central to learners' personal, social, educational and professional lives. By situating these digital literacies within a clear theoretical framework, this book provides educators and students alike with not just the background for a deeper understanding of these key 21st-century skills, but also the rationale for integrating these skills into classroom practice. This is the first methodology book to address not jus

  13. Community Resilience Education: Lessons Learned from an Emerging Community of Practice - NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grantees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; McDougall, C.

    2017-12-01

    NOAA supports community resilience to extreme weather events, climate change and other environmental hazards by preparing communities through Weather Ready Nation and through programs addressing coastal community needs. These programs primarily target adult decisions makers in a professional capacity (emergency managers, city planners, et al.), leaving non-professional audiences without opportunities to understand and develop the skills to prepare for the threats and vulnerabilities that their communities face. As a result, resilience became the focus of NOAA's Environmental Literacy Grants in 2015. The goal of these investments is to strengthen the public's and/or K-12 students' environmental literacy to enable informed decision-making necessary for community resilience to extreme weather events and other environmental hazards. Funded projects build an understanding of Earth systems and the threats and vulnerabilities that are associated with a community's location, are aligned with existing adaptation/resilience plans, and connect audiences to relevant tools and resources to prepare for and respond to these hazards. These first few years of investment will create new models for how education can improve community resilience. Although these projects incorporate a variety of approaches, a few common themes stand out: empowering youth and adults to increase their understanding of locally relevant natural hazards and stresses; giving youth a voice in resilience planning; and student-led vulnerability assessments of their schools and communities. In this session we will report on the first convening of the principal investigators of our 13 funded projects, which represents the beginning of a new community of practice focused on resilience education. We will specifically share lessons learned about: engaging youth and adults about climate change and resiliency; working with local resilience/adaptation planners; and case studies on the use of NOAA's Digital Coast and

  14. Considering children's advertising literacy from a methodological point of view : past practices and future recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Zarouali, Brahim; Pauw, De, Pieter; Ponnet, Koen; Walrave, Michel; Poels, Karolien; Cauberghe, Veroline; Hudders, Liselot

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Childrens advertising literacy is a well-documented research area. Yet, the literature on how to measure advertising literacy is not straightforward due to conceptual and operational differences in the existing studies. This has led to inconsistent results with regard to the development, possession and application of advertising literacy. The aim of this article is to give an overview of the different measurement methodologies used in past research efforts to assess childrens advert...

  15. Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Basili, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy is a concept which is well established in theory while in practice it is only slowly breaking ground in accordance with the understanding of its significance and the possibilities of its realisation. Based on fundamental works, the characteristics of information literacy, its cognitive foundations and significance for individuals as well as for society, are argumented in the article. The analyzed content of this concept is connected with the content of a librarian’s knowl...

  16. Secular and Koranic Literacies in South Asia: From Colonisation to Contemporary Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the distinction between "secular" and "Koranic" schooling and literacy in South Asia. It begins by tracing an archaeology of the distinction between secular "literacy" and religious "illiteracy". It locates the emergence of the distinction in the colonial census of the 19th century, in…

  17. Teaching Literacy through Braille in Mainstream Settings whilst Promoting Inclusion: Reflections on Our Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Joao; Rogers, Sue; Donaldson, Marion; Gordon, Clare; Meager, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    We would describe teaching literacy through braille as one of the most rewarding and challenging aspects of the role of a Qualified Teacher for the Visually Impaired (QTVI). This article focuses on teaching literacy through braille in mainstream settings whilst promoting inclusion and meeting the social-emotional needs of children who use braille.…

  18. Information Literacy in the Tension between School's Discursive Practice and Students' Self-Directed Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärdén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-guided learning has had a major impact on adult education, where information seeking and use are key aspects of learning. With their lack of experience in study contexts, the students are nevertheless assumed to develop information literacy. Method: The paper aims to create an understanding of how information literacy can be…

  19. Adolescent Literacy in the Academic Disciplines: General Principles and Practical Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetton, Tamara L., Ed.; Shanahan, Cynthia, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    From leading authorities in both adolescent literacy and content-area teaching, this book addresses the particular challenges of literacy learning in each of the major academic disciplines. Chapters focus on how to help students successfully engage with texts and ideas in English/literature, science, math, history, and arts classrooms. The book…

  20. Cherokee Practice, Missionary Intentions: Literacy Learning among Early Nineteenth-Century Cherokee Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, M. Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how archival documents reveal early nineteenth-century Cherokee purposes for English-language literacy. In spite of Euro-American efforts to depoliticize Cherokee women's roles, Cherokee female students adapted the literacy tools of an outsider patriarchal society to retain public, political power. Their writing served…

  1. To Move Forward, We Must Be Mobile: Practical Uses of Mobile Technology in Literacy Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbye, Nicholas E.; Elsener, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to shift the definition of what it means to be literate. As literacy educators in teacher preparation programs, we must consider how emerging and mobile technology may be used within coursework to not only create multiple ways to conceptualize teaching 21st century literacy, but also as a professional imperative. This article…

  2. Critical Media Literacy in Action: Uniting Theory, Practice and Politics in Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenin, Benjamin Joseph

    2012-01-01

    As media literacy is a growing field, there exist a number of distinct approaches to media education with varied political significance. Approaches such as protectionism, media arts education, and critical media literacy draw upon diverse theoretical traditions. Often overlooked in these traditions is the Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School.…

  3. Practicing Critical Media Literacy Education: Developing a Community of Inquiry among Teachers Using Popular Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Koulish, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Media literacy compels us to look anew at the most mundane, that which surrounds us: the media and our popular culture. From there media literacy compels us to accept that the media are constructed and to seek various ways to analyze them, while considering our own beliefs to evaluate for ourselves an ultimate interpretation. This process has the…

  4. Learning to Queer Text: Epiphanies from a Family Critical Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClung, Nicola A.

    2018-01-01

    Critical literacy provides the opportunity to queer picture books and challenge normative depictions of family. In this autoethnography, the author describes her 4-year-old's journey of learning to talk back to texts as she actively constructs a better, more just world. The author argues that a critical literacy tool kit is vital to every child's…

  5. Information Literacy for Social Workers: University at Albany Libraries Prepare MSW Students for Research and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jane Brustman

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In a series of workshops, University at Albany librarians collaborate with the School of Social Welfare to impart information literacy skills to Master in Social Work students. The rationale, curriculum, and embedded ACRL information literacy standards are discussed. Also presented are assessments and a discussion of the challenges of implementation.

  6. Secondary Science Teachers' Implementation of CCSS and NGSS Literacy Practices: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Sally Valentino; Thomas, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Most middle and high school students struggle with reading and writing in science. This may be because science teachers are reluctant to teach literacy in science class. New standards now require a shift in the way science teachers develop students' literacy in science. This survey study examined the extent to which science teachers report…

  7. Promoting Climate And Data Literacy: University Courses Engaging Students In Effective Teaching, Learning, Communication And Outreach Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halversen, C.; McDonnell, J. D.; Apple, J. K.; Weiss, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    Two university courses, 1) Promoting Climate Literacy and 2) Climate and Data Literacy, developed by the University of California Berkeley provide faculty across the country with course materials to help their students delve into the science underlying global environmental change. The courses include culturally responsive content, such as indigenous and place-based knowledge, and examine how people learn and consequently, how we should teach and communicate science. Promoting Climate Literacy was developed working with Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of Washington, and Western Washington University. Climate and Data Literacy was developed with Rutgers University and Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, WA. The Climate and Data Literacy course also focuses on helping students in science majors participating in U-Teach programs and students in pre-service teacher education programs gain skills in using real and near-real time data through engaging in investigations using web-based and locally-relevant data resources. The course helps these students understand and apply the scientific practices, disciplinary concepts and big ideas described in the Framework for K-12 Science Education and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). This course focuses on students interested in teaching middle school science for three reasons: (1) teachers often have relatively weak understandings of the practices of science, and of complex Earth systems science and climate change; (2) the concepts that underlie climate change align well with the NGSS; and (3) middle school is a critical time for promoting student interest in science and for recruitment to STEM careers and lifelong climate literacy. This course is now being field tested in a number of U-Teach programs including Florida State University, Louisiana State University, as well as pre-service teacher education programs at California State University East Bay, and Western Washington University

  8. Literacies in the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, the author invites readers to consider the body and its central place in literacy pedagogy, practice and research. She emphasizes two interrelated paths for teachers and researchers interested in literacies to tend to the body: (1) the ways literacies are engaged and cultivated for making sense of bodies, and (2) the literacies…

  9. Are we teaching critical literacy? Reading practices in a township classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glynis Lloyd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in educational provision in South Africa since 1994, the opportunities for learners from historically under-resourced schools to gain access to powerful English resources remain limited and unequal (Prinsloo 2012. In this article I will provide a detailed description of literacy practices in a township high school in Cape Town, specifically of the orientations to text that are made available to learners. I will draw on feminist poststructuralist theory, in which the subject is theorised as constructed and contested in language to construct difference. The analysis of classroom discourse and text-based tasks shows that the orientations to reading that were offered were characterised by a focus on the surface meaning of the texts and by an absence of critical engagement, despite the latter being required in the new Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement. The analysis reveals how the power dynamics of our racialised past and dominant ideologies about gender, class and race continue to define teaching in our classrooms in ways that limit access to the English resources that learners in under-resourced schools need for academic success.

  10. Current status of information literacy instruction practices in medical libraries of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Midrar; Ameen, Kanwal

    2014-10-01

    The research explored the current practices of information literacy (IL) instruction in medical libraries of Pakistan. A semi-structured questionnaire was mailed to the head librarians of all 114 academic medical libraries in Pakistan. It investigated the types of IL instruction provided, topics covered, methods of delivery and assessment, level of integration in the curriculum, and level of collaboration with teaching staff. The study revealed that 74% of the respondents had offered some types of IL instruction in their institutions during the previous year, ranging from library orientation to research-level skills. IL instruction is typically only offered to new students or first-time library users or on demand. A majority of the respondents developed IL instruction programs without faculty involvement. Librarians were primarily responsible for offering IL instruction in medical institutions. Face-to-face instruction in computer labs or lecture halls and individual instruction at reference desks were identified as the most common IL instruction delivery methods. The data indicated that oral feedback, written feedback, and searching in a computer lab were the most popular assessment methods that medical librarians used. IL instruction activities in medical libraries of Pakistan are in their infancy. Medical librarians also lack systematic approaches to IL instruction. Medical librarians need to develop educational partnerships with faculty for integrating IL instruction into the mainstream curriculum.

  11. Measuring Practicing Clinicians' Information Literacy. An Exploratory Analysis in the Context of Panel Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brian E; Barboza, Katherine; Jensen, Ashley E; Bennett, Katelyn J; Sherman, Scott E; Schwartz, Mark D

    2017-02-15

    As healthcare moves towards technology-driven population health management, clinicians must adopt complex digital platforms to access health information and document care. This study explored information literacy, a set of skills required to effectively navigate population health information systems, among primary care providers in one Veterans' Affairs (VA) medical center. Information literacy was assessed during an 8-month randomized trial that tested a population health (panel) management intervention. Providers were asked about their use and comfort with two VA digital tools for panel management at baseline, 16 weeks, and post-intervention. An 8-item scale (range 0-40) was used to measure information literacy (Cronbach's α=0.84). Scores between study arms and provider types were compared using paired t-tests and ANOVAs. Associations between self-reported digital tool use and information literacy were measured via Pearson's correlations. Providers showed moderate levels of information literacy (M= 27.4, SD 6.5). There were no significant differences in mean information literacy between physicians (M=26.4, SD 6.7) and nurses (M=30.5, SD 5.2, p=0.57 for difference), or between intervention (M=28.4, SD 6.5) and control groups (M=25.1, SD 6.2, p=0.12 for difference). Information literacy was correlated with higher rates of self-reported information system usage (r=0.547, p=0.001). Clinicians identified data access, accuracy, and interpretability as potential information literacy barriers. While exploratory in nature, cautioning generalizability, the study suggests that measuring and improving clinicians' information literacy may play a significant role in the implementation and use of digital information tools, as these tools are rapidly being deployed to enhance communication among care teams, improve health care outcomes, and reduce overall costs.

  12. Family Digital Literacy Practices and Children’s Mobile Phone Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terras, Melody M.; Ramsay, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Smart phones are ubiquitous in everyday life and are having a major impact on work, education, social relationships and modes of communication. Children are the fastest growing population of smart phone users, with use often focusing around internet access, e.g., 1 in 3 internet users in the UK are under 18 years of age. Despite their widespread use, relatively little is known about the factors that underpin children’s use. The home is a significant ecological context of development and recent research has highlighted the importance of the home environment in promoting and supporting the development of both safe and unsafe online behavior. Yet the importance of these influences currently remains relatively unrecognized. Therefore, in this paper we present a narrative review of evidence examining parental practices concerning digital communication technologies and applications, with a particular focus on smartphones, and how they relate to the use of technology by their children. Emerging evidence to date indicates that two important factors are at play. Firstly, parental technology use is closely related to that of their child. Secondly, that despite parents frequently voiced concerns about the nature and extent of their child’s mobile phone use, parents themselves often engage in a number of unsafe internet behaviors and excessive phone use in the home environment. Our review identifies two crucial lines of enquiry that have yet to be comprehensively pursued by researchers in the field: firstly, the adoption of a psychological perspective on children’s emergent behaviors with mobile devices and secondly, the influential role of context. Given parental concerns about the possible negative impact of technologies, parental awareness should be raised about the influence of their behavior in the context of internet safety along with the adoption of good digital literacy practices. It is anticipated that a comprehensive characterization of the associated

  13. Critical Spaces for Critical Times: Global Conversations in Literacy Research as an Open Professional Development and Practices Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Albers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reflects an OER (Open Educational Resources critical literacy project, Global Conversations in Literacy Research (GCLR, (www.globalconversationsinliteracy.wordpress.com, now in its fourth year. GCLR annually hosts seven web seminars presented by internationally recognized literacy and education scholars. We outline key dimensions of GCLR not only as an OER but as an open educational practice (OEP (Andrade et al., 2011 that through its design, not only provides open access to scholarship, but also understands the critical nexus among resources, practices and theory. Informed by data from a longitudinal study, this paper situates these dimensions within professional development literature, and outlines GCLR as a critical space designed for critical times, and the importance of intentionality when accessing OER. Like scholars before us, we argue that that availability is not the only consideration when using OER (Andrade et al., 2011; OER must be considered in relation to pedagogical considerations and how OER are used as a critical component to online professional development.

  14. Health promotion in pediatric primary care: importance of health literacy and communication practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Deborah Winders; Jones, V Faye; Logsdon, M Cynthia; Ryan, Lesa; Wilkerson-McMahon, Mandie

    2013-12-01

    Health literacy has been shown to predict health behaviors and outcomes above the effects of education or socioeconomic status. Much remains unknown about the health literacy of parents and the role it plays in children's health outcomes or in health disparities. The current study explored the health communication needs and health literacy indicators in a diverse sample of parents (n = 75) to identify potential areas for future interventions. The sample consisted of parents of children 18 to 36 months old who were visiting 3 different pediatric medical offices, 2 of which served low-income families and 1 located in an affluent suburb. When comparisons were made between 2 educational attainment groups, there were variations in indicators of health literacy and health communication needs. These data can be used to guide the development of interventions by primary care providers to improve parent education.

  15. Popular Culture and Critical Media Literacy in Adult Education: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter introduces the volume, provides an overview of the theory and literature on popular culture and critical media literacy in education, and discusses ways to use popular culture in adult education.

  16. Information Literacy Instruction Assessment and Improvement through Evidence Based Practice: A Mixed Method Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana K. Wakimoto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective — This study explored first-year students’ learning and satisfaction in a required information literacy course. The study asked how students understand connections between themselves and information literacy in terms of power, society, and personal relevance to assess if students’ understanding of information literacy increased after taking the course. Student satisfaction with the course also was measured.Methods — The study used pre- and post tests and focus group session transcripts which were coded and analyzed to determine student learning and satisfaction during the regular 2008-2009 academic year at California State University, East Bay.Results — Many students entered the course without any concept of information literacy; however, after taking the course they found information literacy to be personally relevant and were able to articulate connections among information, power, and society. The majority of students were satisfied with the course. The results from analyzing the pre- and post-tests were supported by the findings from the focus group sessions.Conclusion — The results of this study are supported by other studies that show the importance of personal relevancy to student learning. In order to fully assess information literacy instruction and student learning, librarians should consider incorporating ways of assessing student learning beyond testing content knowledge and levels of competency.

  17. The Grit in the Oyster – does an appreciation of threshold concepts in an adult literacies teaching qualification result in pearls of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wallace

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws from the experiences of a new adult literacies teaching qualification in Scotland that has been designed for experienced but unqualified adult literacies tutors.  Created to respond to an approach to adult literacies as social practices (Scottish Executive 2001, 2005, Tett et al 2006, the course team employs a sociocultural pedagogy that explicitly rejects transmission and seeks to build critical reflection through learning from experience, collaborative activities and the creation of an on-line community (Ackland and Wallace 2006.  Recognising that ‘moments of conflict and disjuncture may form the spaces in which learning occurs’ (Lewis, Enciso and Moje 2007:5 the paper explores whether ideas about liminality and threshold concepts (Cousin 2006:1, Land, Meyer and Smith 2008 illuminate the learning process.  It concludes that engagement with these concepts may assist adult literacies tutors to develop transformed practice (Cope and Kalantzis 2003:35.

  18. The Practical Integration of Action Research into Building Climate Literacy and Partnership with Key Influentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, M.

    2015-12-01

    Climate Education Partners (CEP) has been using an action research approach to build climate literacy and partnership with key influential (KI) leaders in the San Diego community. After identifying 6 key sectors that either (a) could reduce green house gas emissions and adapt to impacts, or (b) would be highly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, we conducted 89 interviews with KIs from the San Diego region -- including elected officials, academics, laborers, and representatives from local businesses, non-profits, ethnic and cultural communities, faith-based groups, and special interest groups -- to assess their science knowledge and opinions about climate change and the impacts of climate change. Other questions asked were about KIs' personal efficacy, identity, values and engagement in pro-environmental behaviors related to climate change. The results of the interviews contributed to CEP's action research approach in two ways: 1) it provided critical data regarding which leaders wanted further engagement with CEP and what that engagement should entail (e.g., being a connector to other leaders, a spokesperson, or a participant in future educational activities), and 2) it provided key information about the extent to which "knowledge deficit" is related to use of climate change knowledge to inform engagement in mitigation and adaptive behaviors. Practically, the results were used to create a database that is being used to inform the contact and education of KIs. We were able to show, consistent with previous research and identity theory, that liberal leaders were more likely than conservatives to believe in, feel concern for, and be knowledgeable about climate change. However, engagement in mitigation behaviors- specifically making decisions that would reduce electricity, gas, or water use- were similar for both groups. These results are being used to create resources and direct climate education activities going forward.

  19. Widened Frameworks and Practice: From Bibliotherapy to the Literacy of Testimony and Witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpow, Ray; Askov, Eunice N.

    2001-01-01

    Considers what literacy teachers can do to prevent subsequent school failure and lowered test scores with media attention on school violence and trauma in and out of schools. Suggests bibliotherapy, a familiar tool used in earlier decades by teachers to counsel students with problems, is useful today in dealing with students who suffer from…

  20. Children Working with Text in Science: disparities with 'Literacy Hour' practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Alan; Weedon, Helen

    2002-02-01

    The National Literacy Strategy (NLS) provides a coherent plan of what and how children should be taught about non-fiction text. Nevertheless, the difficulties that children actually experience when using science texts are not fully addressed: in particular, the use and interpretation of the visual elements of science text is given limited attention in the prescriptions for teaching the 'Literacy Hour'. Such disparities identified by prior research and by a content analysis of the NLS Framework Document are considered alongside evidence of the difficulties encountered by a class of Year 5 pupils working with a range of non-fiction texts during science lessons. Pupils' text use is studied through observations and interviews with children, through interviews with their teachers and through a questionnaire about text use strategies. The findings suggest that (1) the pupils experienced considerable difficulty in making sense of the science content of non-fiction text, particularly in terms of interpretation of visual elements and their links to written text and (2) use of retrieval strategies taught during the Literacy Hour was not transferred to learning from text during science lessons. The study proposes closer planning of text use in science and literacy lessons.

  1. Recognizing the "Social" in Literacy as a Social Practice: Building on the Resources of Nonmainstream Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Courtney R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an after-school program in which immigrant and urban low-income middle school students collaborated to create social maps of their school and to produce a multilingual video against gossip. These literacy-based projects combined critical pedagogy and culturally relevant pedagogy to promote meaningful interactions between…

  2. The Practice and Principles of Teaching Critical Literacy at the Educational Video Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven

    2005-01-01

    The Educational Video Center (EVC) is an independent nonprofit media organization that has worked to build students' skills in documentary production and media literacy while nurturing their intellectual development and civic engagement. As founding director of EVC, the author has spent more than 20 years working with students and teachers in New…

  3. Seeing and Hearing: Examining Production Workers' Literacy and Numeracy Practices in a Context of Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tony; Yasukawa, Keiko; Black, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    A policy consensus has emerged in Australia that there is a workforce literacy and numeracy crisis, similar to many other Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. The study informing this paper examined this framing of crisis by interviewing and observing production workers in three manufacturing companies. Each company was…

  4. Concentrated Language Encounter Approach in Practice for Global Teaching of Literacy: Lighthouse Strategy Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavich, Saowalak

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the lighthouse literacy strategies model using the concentrated language encounter (CLE) approach that has been successfully replicated in many countries in different languages and cultures. A review of CLE research studies and the project implementation in Thailand showed highly significant results in students' literacy…

  5. Promoting Early Literacy via Practicing Invented Spelling: A Comparison of Different Mediation Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Iris; Aram, Dorit

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of different mediation routines provided to kindergartners from families of low socioeconomic status on the students' invented spelling attempts and on their gains obtained on spelling and other early literacy skills (letter naming, sounds of letters, word segmentation, and word decoding). The effects of the…

  6. The Role of Digital Literacy Practices on Refugee Resettlement: The Case of Three Karen Brothers

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    Gilhooly, Daniel; Lee, Eunbae

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the social and cultural uses of digital literacies by adolescent immigrants to cope with their new lives in the United States. This case study focuses on three adolescent ethnic Karen brothers. Two years of participant observations in their home and Karen community, accompanied by formal and informal interviews, served as the…

  7. A Comparative Study of Family Social Capital and Literacy Practices in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Li; Hu, Guangwei

    2013-01-01

    Social capital--the social relations between people--is an important component of the family environment and is crucial for the creation of human capital for the next generation. Drawing on James S. Coleman's theory of family capital, this study focuses on parents' utilization of social capital to support children's literacy acquisition in four…

  8. Rethinking Normative Literacy Practices, Behaviors, and Interactions: Learning from Young Immigrant Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Manning, Mariana; Dernikos, Bessie; Yu, Hae Min

    2016-01-01

    In light of the historical failure of boys of color in US schools, this article sheds light onto the ways in which normative discourses of literacy and learning shape the experiences of immigrant boys and how they are perceived and defined as un/successful students. Findings indicate that although these boys--deemed to be "at-risk" or…

  9. IALS and Essential Skills in Canadian Literacy Policy and Practice: A Descriptive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centre for Literacy, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper gathers descriptions on the use of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and essential skills cross Canada. IALS was developed as a population measure to lay out the distribution of skills and their relationship to other social and economic attributes. The information was taken from federal, provincial, and territorial…

  10. Teaching Writing in Adult Literacy: Practices to Foster Motivation and Persistence and Improve Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Writing is critical to success in education, the workplace, and everyday communication yet receives limited attention in the research, particularly the topic of writing instruction in adult education. Adult literacy practitioners frequently lack training in writing instruction and must rely on a confusing array of information, primarily derived…

  11. The Information Book Genre: Its Role in Integrated Science Literacy Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christine C.

    2006-01-01

    There has been a call for approaches that connect science learning with literacy, yet the use of, and research on, children's literature information books in science instruction has been quite limited. Because the discipline of science involves distinctive generic linguistic registers, what information books should be integrated in science…

  12. Arts-Integrated Literacy Instruction: Promising Practices for Preservice Teaching Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Laurie A.; Coneway, Betty; Hindman, Janet Tipton; Garcia, Beth; Bingham, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Classroom teachers are facing increasing responsibility to integrate the arts during literacy instruction. In order to address the arts effectively, teachers require understandings, confidence, and competence with visual arts, music, dance, and theater. Therefore, educator preparation programs must develop the knowledge and skills of preservice…

  13. Network analysis literacy a practical approach to the analysis of networks

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    Zweig, Katharina A

    2014-01-01

    Network Analysis Literacy focuses on design principles for network analytics projects. The text enables readers to: pose a defined network analytic question; build a network to answer the question; choose or design the right network analytic methods for a particular purpose, and more.

  14. Family Literacy Practices and Parental Involvement of Latin American Immigrant Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Lorna; Lavan, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This article draws upon three years of interviews and participant observation research in the Chelsea Public Schools, to discuss the impact of the Chelsea Family Literacy Program on promoting Latin American immigrant mothers' involvement in their children's education. The authors present the voices of Latin American immigrant mothers who describe…

  15. Approximating Literacy Practices in Tutorials: What Is Learned and What Matters for Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James V.; Wetzel, Melissa Mosley; Peterson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the learning of preservice teachers associated with the features of a literacy tutorial experience. Our qualitative study focused on the close inspection of the experiences of 7 focus cases out of the 19 preservice teachers enrolled in our program across a one-semester tutorial experience. Through our research we…

  16. Curriculum-Integrated Information Literacy (CIIL) in a Community College Nursing Program: A Practical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a strategy to integrate information literacy into the curriculum of a nursing program in a community college. The model is articulated in four explained phases: preparatory, planning, implementation, and evaluation. It describes a collaborative process encouraging librarians to work with nursing faculty, driving students to…

  17. Collaborative Metaliteracy: Putting the New Information Literacy Framework into (Digital) Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Beate; Lampner, Wendy; Turner, Dudley

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a course-integrated collaborative project between a subject librarian, a communication professor, and an instructional designer that illustrates how the TPACK (Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge) framework, developed by Mishra and Koehler (2006), and the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy (Framework)…

  18. Building on research evidence to change health literacy policy and practice in England

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rowlands, Gillian; Berry, Jonathan; Protheroe, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health literacy is important because of the high proportion of the population with skills below those needed to become and stay healthy, and the resultant negative impact on people’s lives. A recent study in England has shown that, as is true in other industrialized nations, a signifi...

  19. Tanzania Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy : Volume 2. Comparison with Good Practices

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, only 17.3 percemt of adults in Tanzania had an account at a formal financial institution and 56 percemt did not have any access to financial services. Most of the population lives in rural areas with very low incomes and poor infrastructure, and women are especially disadvantaged. Such limited access to formal financial services also inhibits financial literacy – awareness of bene...

  20. Evaluating the impact of geologic heritage on Earth science literacy: Adapting best practices from pedagogy and interpretation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    How might we authentically and practically evaluate the effects of a geologic heritage place or program on public Earth science literacy? This pedagogical form of evaluation is distinct from the evaluation of a place for its geological importance, heritage value, economic or cultural impact, and so on. Best evaluation practices from the realms of formal education, informal education, and interpretation start with a coherent set of evaluable learning outcomes, ideally recapitulated in one or more 'big ideas' that capture the essential attributes of the place or program. Learning outcomes may be classified as cognitive, affective, or psychomotor. Cognitive learning outcomes in a geoheritage context are the Earth-science concepts a visitor or student would be expected to uncover through on-site or virtual exploration of the stratigraphy, structure, landforms, and processes in a place. The Earth Science Literacy Principles (ESLP), and similar literacy documents relating to atmosphere, oceans, and climate; offer a template for mapping localized concepts onto more global ones. Quantitative instruments to evaluate understanding of the ESLP are in development, and the ESLP also map directly onto measures used in formal educational assessment, notably the Next Generation Science Standards in the USA. Nongeological place meanings (a component of sense of place) may suggest other cognitive outcomes. Affective learning outcomes for visitors and students in geoheritage sites are less readily defined, but may include place attachment (also a component of sense of place), attitudes, and interest. Multiple quantitative and qualitative methods of evaluating these outcomes exist. Psychomotor learning outcomes are even muddier, but accessibility (defined by statutes) offers a potential starting point. In practice, evaluation may be conducted synchronously or asynchronously with visitors' or students' interaction with the geoheritage place or program. Evaluation programs are typically

  1. Playful Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froes, Isabel

    these practices, which compose the taxonomy of tablet play. My contribution lies in identifying and proposing a series of theoretical concepts that complement recent theories related to play and digital literacy studies. The data collected through observations informed some noteworthy aspects, including how...... with tablets’ physical and digital affordances shape children’s digital play. This thesis presents how young children’s current practices when playing with tablets inform digital experiences in Denmark and Japan. Through an interdisciplinary lens and a grounded theory approach, I have identified and mapped...... vocabulary in children’s digital play experiences. These early digital experiences set the rules for the playgrounds and assert digital tablets as twenty-first-century toys, shaping young children’s playful literacy....

  2. Making the Invisible More Visible: Home Literacy Practices of Middle-Class and Working-Class Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthey, Sarah J.

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with eight families showed that literacy materials and goals for using literacy differed between middle and working class families, with middle class families drawing on more resources to learn about the child's classroom. However, all families expressed value for literacy activities, challenging the myth that working-class families do…

  3. Combining Self-Assessments and Achievement Tests in Information Literacy Assessment: Empirical Results and Recommendations for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosman, Tom; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Krampen, Günter

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the significance of information literacy self-assessments in higher education with a special focus on situational conditions increasing their explanatory power. First, it was hypothesised that self-assessments of information literacy correlate higher with factual information literacy if measured after the administration of…

  4. Critical Spaces for Critical Times: Global Conversations in Literacy Research as an Open Professional Development and Practices Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peggy; Cho, A. Ram; Shin, Ji Hye; Pang, Myoung Eun; Angay-Crowder, Tuba; Jung, Jin Kyeong; Pace, Christi L.; Sena, Mandi; Turnbull, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects an OER (Open Educational Resources) critical literacy project, Global Conversations in Literacy Research (GCLR), (www.globalconversationsinliteracy.wordpress.com), now in its fourth year. GCLR annually hosts seven web seminars presented by internationally recognized literacy and education scholars. We outline key dimensions of…

  5. Literacy in Social Studies: The Influence of Cognitive and Motivational Practices on the Reading Comprehension of English Learners and Non-English Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada Barber, Ana; Buehl, Michelle M.; Beck, Jori S.; Ramirez, Erin M.; Gallagher, Melissa; Richey Nuland, Leila N.; Archer, Casey J.

    2018-01-01

    We examined the impact of cognitive and motivation practices within a social studies literacy intervention (United States History for Engaged Reading [USHER]) on Grade 6 English learners' (ELs) and non-ELs' history reading comprehension, cognitive strategy use, reading self-efficacy, and reading engagement. We used a switching replications…

  6. Connecting Research in Science Literacy and Classroom Practice: A Review of Science Teaching Journals in Australia, the UK and the United States, 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian; Yore, Larry D.; Jagger, Susan; Prain, Vaughan

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years (1994-2009), there has been considerable increased research interest in: (1) characterising the distinctive nature and constitutive elements of science literacy and (2) investigating classroom practices or necessary conditions that enable students to acquire this disciplinary capacity. This raises the question of the extent to…

  7. Schoolgirls in Cyberspace: A Cross-Case Analysis of the Literacy Practices of Three Fifth-Grade Girls in a Social Network Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Denise Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an exploratory study of the literacy practices of three fifth-grade girls as they used a social network site (SNS) for school related purposes. SNSs are widely used by adolescents, and because communication in these sites is accomplished mainly through writing, it is important to improve our understanding of what this kind of…

  8. Missing in Action: Writing Process-Based Instructional Practices and Measures of Higher-Order Literacy Achievement in Predominantly Urban Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briddell, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This study of 1,974 fifth grade students investigated potential relationships between writing process-based instruction practices and higher-order thinking measured by a standardized literacy assessment. Writing process is defined as a highly complex, socio-cognitive process that includes: planning, text production, review, metacognition, writing…

  9. Enseñar a Leer y a Escribir: ¿En qué Conceptos Fundamentar las Prácticas Docentes? Teaching Literacy: Which Concepts can Support Literacy Practices?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Medina

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo postula que las deficiencias de los niños y niñas en lectura y escritura, medidas a través de pruebas nacionales e internacionales, podrían explicarse, entre otros factores, debido a los conceptos sobre los actos de leer y escribir reflejados en las prácticas docentes. En contraposición, destaca la necesidad de concebir la lectura y la escritura como prácticas culturales, como actos de construcción y comunicación de significados y como actos de movilización de la inteligencia; y propone un Programa Integrado de Desarrollo de las Competencias Lingüísticas y Comunicativas que apunta a un modelo equilibrado de enseñanza y aprendizaje del lenguaje oral y escrito.This article puts forward the idea that one of the factors that could explain children's deficiencies in literacy skills, measured through national and international tests, are the concepts that support teacher's literacy instruction. In comparison with the former, it emphasizes the need to conceive the act of reading and writing as a cultural practice, as acts of construction and communication of meaning, as an intelligent act; it ends by proposing an Integrated Program to Develop Literacy Skills, that aims to a balanced model for literacy instruction.

  10. Critical Literacy: Foundational Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The term "critical literacy" refers to use of the technologies of print and other media of communication to analyze, critique, and transform the norms, rule systems, and practices governing the social fields of everyday life (A. Luke, 2004). Since Freire's (1970) educational projects in Brazil, approaches to critical literacy have been…

  11. Commercial Literacy Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    Presents the first year's results of a continuing project to monitor the availability of software of relevance for literacy education purposes. Concludes there is an enormous amount of software available for use by teachers of reading and literacy--whereas drill-and-practice software is the largest category of software available, large numbers of…

  12. Relocalising academic literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine the negot......This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students’ educational and discursive experiences, we examine...... the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among students of the international master’s programme, Anthropology of Education and Globalisation (AEG), University of Aarhus, Denmark. The article draws on an understanding of academic literacy as a local practice situated in the social and institutional...... contexts in which it appears. Based on qualitative interviews with eleven AEG-students, we analyse students’ individual experiences of, and perspectives on, the academic literacy practices of this study programme. Our findings reveal contradictory understandings of internationalism and indicate a learning...

  13. Multiple literacies: Linking the research on bilingualism and biliteracies to the practical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Therese; Masny, Diana

    2006-11-01

    The present article addresses the fundamental developmental differences between monolingualism and bilingualism, as outlined in the literature. It takes into account research using qualitative and quantitative methodologies and reviews the advantages and possible disadvantages of bilingualism in preschool children. It then moves on to biliteracies in early childhood education. The questions addressed are: Will the early learning of a second language delay a child's language development? What effect does bilingualism have on the development of phonemic awareness, and does that have an impact on reading development? Do bilingual children have an advantage over monolingual children? What happens when a child with language impairment is called upon to develop two languages? What are some challenges regarding the acquisition of biliteracies? The present article concludes with recommendations for physicians who counsel bilingual families regarding early childhood literacy promotion and development.

  14. Patient information materials in general practices and promotion of health literacy: an observational study of their effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protheroe, Joanne; Estacio, Emee Vida; Saidy-Khan, Sirandou

    2015-03-01

    Government policy in the UK emphasises providing patients with good health information to encourage participation in their health care. Patient information leaflets (PILs) form part of this policy and have been shown to affect patient health outcomes; however, many are poorly written. To describe the PILs in general practice surgeries in Stoke-on-Trent in terms of readability and variety of content. An observational study of randomly selected GP practices (n = 17) across Stoke-on-Trent. PILs were assessed for readability (Flesch Reading Ease and Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level) and compared with national skills level data and with the recommended level for medical information. The PILs were also categorised for content using the Rudd (2007) health material classification framework. A total of 345 PILs were collected and assessed. Only 24.3% meet recommended reading-level criteria. Compared with national skills levels, over 75% of the PILs collected were too complex for at least 15% of the English population. Of the PILs, 47.8% were classified as 'systems navigation' (information regarding services); 22.9% were disease prevention (screening and immunisations); 14.2% personal and public safety; and less than 10% were for managing illness or health promotion. Current PILs in general practices do not all promote health literacy. Information only accessible to a proportion of higher skilled patients may increase inequalities in health. Less than 10% of PILs promote managing illness or healthy lifestyles. Processes must be put in place to improve the readability and variety of content of PILs in GP practices. © British Journal of General Practice 2015.

  15. Validity of the toddler feeding questionnaire for measuring parent authoritative and indulgent feeding practices which are associated with stress and health literacy among Latino parents of preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerman, William J; Lounds-Taylor, Julie; Mitchell, Stephanie; Barkin, Shari L

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the contribution of parental feeding practices to childhood obesity among Latino children is a solution-oriented approach that can lead to interventions supporting healthy childhood growth and lowering rates of obesity. The purpose of this study was to confirm the reliability and validity of the Toddler Feeding Questionnaire (TFQ) to measure parental feeding practices among a sample of Spanish-speaking parent-preschool child pairs (n = 529), and to test the hypothesis that parent characteristics of body mass index (BMI), stress, and health literacy are associated with more indulgent and less authoritative feeding practices. Standardized parent-report questionnaires were completed during baseline interviews in a randomized controlled trial of an obesity prevention intervention. The TFQ includes subscales for indulgent practices (11 items), authoritative practices (7 items), and environmental influences (6 items) with response options scored on a 5-point Likert scale and averaged. Factor analysis confirmed a three-factor structure. Internal consistency was good for indulgent (α = 0.66) and authoritative (α = 0.65) practices but lower for environmental (α = 0.48). Spearman correlation showed indulgent practices and environmental influences were associated with unhealthy child diet patterns, whereas authoritative practices were associated with a healthier child diet. Multivariate linear regression showed higher parent stress was associated with higher indulgent and lower authoritative scores; higher parent health literacy was positively associated with indulgent scores. These results indicate the TFQ is a valid measure of authoritative and indulgent parent feeding practices among Spanish-speaking parents of preschool-age children and that stress and health literacy, potentially modifiable parent characteristics, could be targeted to support healthy feeding practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Information literacy during entry to practice: information-seeking behaviors in student nurses and recent nurse graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahoush, Olive; Banfield, Laura

    2014-02-01

    The ability to locate information pertinent to guide clinical practice is important for quality nursing care and patient safety. To date, little is known about the transfer of information literacy skills as student nurses transition to clinical practice as new graduates. This study begins to address this gap from the perspective of student nurses, recent nurse graduates (RNs), nurse leaders and library staff. To describe the information-seeking behaviors of student nurses and RNs within their clinical settings. This is a descriptive study that included both cross-sectional surveys and key informant interviews. Participants were senior-level undergraduate students and recently graduated RNs (graduated since 2008), and nurse leaders and library staff employed in one of the clinical sites accepting undergraduate students from the McMaster Mohawk and Conestoga BScN program. The study was completed in two large hospital corporations in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Student nurses and RNs were invited to complete online surveys to assess their access to and use of information sources and resources within clinical practice. Students completed a survey comprised of five open-ended questions, while RNs completed a survey comprised of 13 fixed choice and open-ended questions. Nurse leaders and library staff participated in qualitative interviews to verify the extent and availability of information resources. Eighteen RNs and 62 students completed their respective surveys. Three categories of information sources and resources were identified: electronic, print and interpersonal. Electronic sources of information were the most used resource by both students and RNs. More RNs reported using interpersonal sources, while students reported using more print sources of information. Recent RN graduates meet the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing performance indicators related to information access for the entry to practice Nursing Informatics competencies. Crown Copyright

  17. Teachers' Beliefs about Integrating Digital Literacy into Classroom Practice: An Investigation Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaf, Ayesha; Johnson, Barbara L.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored teachers' behavioral, normative, and control beliefs related to digital literacy integration into their classrooms. Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used as a theoretical framework to collect and analyze data. Findings revealed that teachers' integration of digital literacy were related to their behavioral beliefs…

  18. Independent Contributions of Mothers' and Fathers' Language and Literacy Practices: Associations with Children's Kindergarten Skills across Linguistically Diverse Households

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jacqueline; Coley, Rebekah Levine

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Home language and literacy inputs have been consistently linked with enhanced language and literacy skills among children. Most studies have focused on maternal inputs among monolingual populations. Though the proportion of American children growing up in primarily non-English-speaking homes is growing and the role of fathers in…

  19. Spatial and Literacy Practices of Chinese International Students across a Bridge Writing Classroom and WeChat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiqiao

    2017-01-01

    The study is situated in a bridge writing course that serves multilingual international students during their first year in college. Based on interviews with 36 Chinese international students and detailed tracing of one focal student's literacy activities, this study examines the social production of a translocal literacy learning space that spans…

  20. Preschool Teachers' Beliefs about the Teaching and Learning of Language and Literacy: Implications for Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jacqueline; Owston, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Given the limited research on preschool teachers' beliefs about teaching language and literacy in the preschool years, as well as on their conceptual understanding of children's language and literacy development, this study examined the beliefs of 79 preschool teachers who had at least a 2-year diploma in early childhood education. All were…

  1. Co-Constructing Practice in an Online ESOL Literacy Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peercy, Megan Madigan; DeStefano, Megan; Kidwell, Tabitha; Ramirez, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how online approaches to teacher education can support teacher candidates (TCs) in the central work of teaching, that of engaging in practice with learners, has become increasingly important. This study is aligned with scholarship in core practices, which asserts that opportunities to examine, engage in and reflect upon the…

  2. Vernacular Literacy on the Lake Titicaca High Plains, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Frank; Apaza, Emilio Chambi

    2006-01-01

    Ethnographic "New Literacy Studies" question the idea that literacy as such has any uniform effects, arguing instead that effects of literacy inhere in the social practices that impart it. What change, then, does literacy produce where it arrived from two opposed sets of practices? In Quechua-and Aymara-speaking villages on the high…

  3. Awareness, self-management behaviors, health literacy and kidney function relationships in specialty practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devraj, Radhika; Borrego, Matthew E; Vilay, A Mary; Pailden, Junvie; Horowitz, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    AIM To determine the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD) awareness (CKD-A), self-management behaviors (CKD-SMB) knowledge, performance of CKD-SMBs, health literacy (HL) and kidney function. METHODS Participants were eligible patients attending an outpatient nephrology clinic. Participants were administered: Newest Vital Sign to measure HL, CKD self-management knowledge tool (CKD-SMKT) to assess knowledge, past performance of CKD-SMB, CKD-A. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was determined using the MDRD-4 equation. Duration of clinic participation and CKD cause were extracted from medical charts. RESULTS One-hundred-fifty patients participated in the study. eGFRs ranged from 17-152 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Majority (83%) of respondents had stage 3 or 4 CKD, low HL (63%), and were CKD aware (88%). Approximately 40% (10/25) of patients in stages 1 and 2 and 6.4% (8/125) in stages 3 and 4 were unaware of their CKD. CKD-A differed with stage (P level, duration of clinic participation, or CKD cause. Majority of respondents (≥ 90%) correctly answered one or more CKD-SMKT items. Knowledge of one behavior, “controlling blood pressure” differed significantly by CKD-A. CKD-A was associated with past performance of two CKD-SMBs, “controlling blood pressure” (P = 0.02), and “keeping healthy body weight” (P = 0.01). Adjusted multivariate analyses between CKD-A and: (1) HL; and (2) CKD-SMB knowledge were non-significant. However, there was a significant relationship between CKD-A and kidney function after controlling for demographics, HL, and CKD-SMB (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION CKD-A is not associated with HL, or better CKD-SMBs. CKD-A is significantly associated with kidney function and substantially lower eGFR, suggesting the need for focused patient education in CKD stages 1. PMID:29359119

  4. Understanding the Development of Chinese EFL Learners' Email Literacy through Exploratory Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-shan

    2016-01-01

    While many empirical studies demonstrate the effects of instruction on enhancing second language (L2) learners' pragmatic competence (Rose, 2005), few have attempted to gain an understanding of the quality of classroom life in addition to instructional efficacy. Drawing on the framework of Exploratory Practice (Allwright, 2005), the present study…

  5. Navigating the Complex Practices of Specialized Literacy Professionals in Formalized Teacher Leadership Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurkewecz, Thea A.

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation reports on how one school community engaged in a professional development grant initiative that incorporated teacher leadership. Teacher leaders may have numerous roles and responsibilities that support the professional learning and instructional practices of school communities. This study examined the experiences of three…

  6. Communicative Interactions in Everyday and College-Assessed Digital Literacy Practices: Transcribing and Analysing Multimodal Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creer, Adele

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores integrating a range of digital media into classroom practice to establish the effectiveness of the media and its encompassing modes as a pedagogical tool with a focus on assessment. Directing attention on a communication skills module, research indicated that bringing a range of digital media into the classroom motivated and…

  7. Educating Emergent Bilinguals: Policies, Programs, and Practices for English Learners. Second Edition. Language and Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ofelia; Kleifgen, Jo Anne

    2018-01-01

    Now available in a revised and expanded edition, this accessible guide introduces readers to the issues and controversies surrounding the education of language minority students in the United States. What makes this book a perennial favorite are the succinct descriptions of alternative practices for transforming our schools and students' futures,…

  8. Examining University Students' Scholarly Publication in English Journals: A Case for Postgraduate Students' Written Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Vosoughi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This  research  aimed  to  screen  'essay  writing'  difficulties  that  non-native  university students  at  postgraduate  levels  usually  experience  regarding  scholarly  publication  in mainstream, English journals. Two sets of variables including written literacy competencies in Persian and English languages were mapped over language uses (General vs. Academic. Initial screenings  from  one  hundred  Iranian  students  at  PhD  and  MA  levels  with  publication experiences  in  both  Persian  and  English  languages  gave  rise  to  some  fifty-five  participants randomly  selected  from  different  university  disciplines  (Humanities,  Engineering,  Medicine and Basic Sciences and diverse university settings (Public and Private across the country and classified  via  stratified  sampling.  A  validated  questionnaire  from  a  large-scale  project  called ENEIDA (Moreno, 2011 was used for collecting the required data. Two measures were used to assess  written  literacy  competencies  across  language  uses:  1  participants'  assumed,  self-reported written literacy competencies in using English and Persian languages for General and Academic  purposes  were  denoted  as  'perceived'  measures  and  2  further  supported  by  actual measures:  mostly  received  comments  from  reviewers  in  the  mainstream,  English  journals  by the  target  group  above.  Findings  were  discussed  in  the  light  of  recent  lines  of  enquiries  in Academic Literacy (AL trends بررسی تجربیات دانشجویان در نگارش وچاپ مقاله درمجلات انگلیسی زبان؛ مطالعه موردی بر روی فعالیت های سواد نوشتاری دانشجویان تحصیلات تکمیلی چکیده: هدف از نگارش مقاله حاضر انعکاس مشکلات رایج درخصوص نگارش و

  9. 當代傳播思潮中的數位素養: 評介Digital Literacy for Technical Com Digital Literacy in Contemporary Communication: A Review of Digital Literacy for Technical Communication: 21st Century Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Tzong-Sheng, Deng

    2010-01-01

    The ever-advancing technology has reformed our work environment and also redefined our life styles. The advancement of computer and cyber technology has allowed “digital” jobs and products to infiltrate different aspects of our society, influencing the ways of modern communication as well as the future course of education practices. Comparing with conventional literacy concepts about “reading, writing, listening, and speaking”, “digital literacy” lays more emphasis on the effects and changes ...

  10. Literacy in the contemporary scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B. Kleiman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I examine the relationship between literacy and contemporaneity. I take as a point of departure for my discussion school literacy and its links with literacies in other institutions of the contemporary scene, in order to determine the relation between contemporary ends of reading and writing (in other words, the meaning of being literate in contemporary society and the practices and activities effectively realized at school in order to reach those objectives. Using various examples from teaching and learning situations, I discuss digital literacy practices and multimodal texts and multiliteracies from both printed and digital cultures. Throughout, I keep as a background for the discussion the functions and objectives of school literacy and the professional training of teachers who would like to be effective literacy agents in the contemporary world.

  11. The Relationship of Health Literacy With Use of Digital Technology for Health Information: Implications for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer; Gerstner, Gena; Pergolino, Kristen; Graham, Yvonne; Falisi, Angela; Strogatz, David

    An understanding of the association of health literacy with patterns related to access and usage of digital technologies and preferences for sources of health information is necessary for public health agencies and organizations to appropriately target channels for health information dissemination. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted in New York State. Health literacy was assessed using the Morris Single-Item Screener, a self-report question. A weighted analysis was conducted utilizing Stata/SE. The final sample size of New York State residents used for analysis was 1350. In general, self-report health literacy did not predict digital technology use (ie, Internet and smartphone use, text messaging) but was associated with certain digital activities. People with low self-report health literacy were less likely to use search engines (P = .026) but more likely to get health information from social networking sites (P = .002) and use health-related phone apps (P = .046). With respect to health information seeking, those with lower self-report health literacy reported greater difficulty with their most recent search for health information. Furthermore, they were more likely to prefer text messages (P = .013) and radio (P = .022), 2 text-limited communication channels, to receive health information than those with higher self-report health literacy. While self-report health literacy does not appear to influence access to and use of digital technologies, there is a strong association with experiences searching for health information and preferences for health information sources. Public health agencies and organizations should consider the needs and preferences of people with low health literacy when determining channels for health information dissemination. They should also consider implementing interventions to develop health information-seeking skills in populations they serve and prepare information and materials that are easily accessible and

  12. Physical literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Roučka, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Topic: Physical literacy Goals: The aproximation of physical literacy, collection and evaluation questionnaires of physical literacy knowledge and students anamnesis. Description of applicants progress in the specific movement skills. Method: Unified questionnaires was used for obtaining informations. We make video for movement analysis. Results: The results didn't obtain our expectation that students are able to express precisely the content of physical literacy by specific skills. However, ...

  13. Maternal Literacy, Facility Birth, and Education Are Positively Associated with Better Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices and Nutritional Status among Ugandan Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Scott B; Hurst, Taylor E; Flax, Valerie L

    2015-11-01

    Understanding maternal factors that influence child feeding is necessary to inform intervention planning in settings in which mothers experience substantial social vulnerabilities. The purpose of this study was to assess maternal sociodemographic factors that may constrain women's caring capabilities and subsequent child nutrition in Uganda. We analyzed data from the 2006 and 2011 Uganda Demographic and Health Surveys to model the associations between maternal sociodemographic factors, child feeding practices, and anthropometry with multivariate logistic regression models. The proportion of children fed according to recommended guidelines declined in Uganda from 2006 to 2011. Mothers who lacked literacy skills were less likely to achieve recommended complementary feeding indicators; however, literacy was not associated with breastfeeding practices. Mothers in the upper 60% wealth percentile were more likely to meet minimum meal frequency, diversity, and adequacy indicators. Mothers who gave birth at health facilities (2006 OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.26, 0.91; P education, and infant and young child feeding practices. Women with a formal education had children with lower stunting and underweight probabilities in both time periods (OR range: 0.43-0.74). Women who delivered in childbirth facilities were less likely to have a child with low weight-for-age, length-for-age, or weight-for-length z scores (OR range: 0.59-0.82). Marital status, the age at first child birth, not accepting domestic violence, freedom to travel away from home, and involvement in household and reproductive decisions were not associated with child anthropometry in either time period. Mothers with low literacy skills, who deliver their children at home, and who lack formal education are particularly at risk of poor child feeding and represent a group that may benefit from enhanced interventions that address their particular vulnerabilities. Factors that contribute to improved maternal feeding

  14. A Platform of Constructivist Learning in Practice: Computer Literacy Integrated into Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In Mexico, the conventional teaching approach, when applied specifically to elementary school, seems to fall short of attaining the overall quality objective. The main consequence of this problem is when teachers are not sure that their students really understand the dynamic nature of concepts and mechanism since an early age, particularly in elementary school. This paper presents a pedagogical/technological platform, based on constructivism ideas, as a means of making the learning process in elementary school more efficient and interesting. The constructivist platform presented here uses graphical simulators developed for Web 2.0 as a support tool, creating a teaching and learning environment in which practical experiments can be undertaken as each topic is introduced and explained.

  15. Mainstreaming academic literacy teaching: Implications for how ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article draws on research into the role of academic literacies within a range of disciplines and its implications for academic literacy teaching in Higher Education. The study explored ways of transforming current academic literacy teaching practices with a view to developing better synergy between the academic ...

  16. Why History Matters for Media Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    RobbGrieco, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ways people have publicly discussed and written about media literacy in the past have great bearing on how citizens, educators and learners are able to think about and practice their own media literacy. Our concepts of media literacy have evolved over time in response to changing contexts of media studies and educational discourses as well as…

  17. Online Literacies at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Jean

    1999-01-01

    Uses examples drawn from research across several sites in tourism and hospitality in which employees are required to interact with technology, in order to highlight issues relating to new online literacies that are now required for efficient work practices and to discuss implications for practice. (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse for ESL Literacy…

  18. Narrowing the Gender Gap:Empowering Women through Literacy Programmes: Case Studies from the UNESCO Effective Literacy and Numeracy Practices Database (LitBase) http://www.unesco.org/uil/litbase/. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanemann, Ulrike, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    UIL has published a second edition of a collection of case studies of promising literacy programmes that seek to empower women. "Narrowing the Gender Gap: Empowering Women through Literacy Programmes" (originally published in 2013 as "Literacy Programmes with a Focus on Women to Reduce Gender Disparities") responds to the…

  19. Political Literacy as Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Ross Cory Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This paper contends that political literacy and information literacy are compatible concepts that are inextricably linked and should therefore be taught and stressed simultaneously to students in the classroom. Improving the information literacy and political literacy skills of students will allow them to not only perform better academically, but also empower them to become better citizens who form opinions and make decisions based on appropriate and quality information.

  20. What Is Physical Literacy, Really?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurbala, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Physical literacy has become an increasingly influential concept in the past few decades, and is being woven into education, sport, and recreation policy and practice, particularly in Canada. The term is based on a metaphor that likens movement fluency to language literacy. Use of a metaphoric rather than a theoretical foundation has enabled…

  1. Data Literacy is Statistical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Past definitions of statistical literacy should be updated in order to account for the greatly amplified role that data now play in our lives. Experience working with high-school students in an innovative data science curriculum has shown that teaching statistical literacy, augmented by data literacy, can begin early.

  2. Critical Thinking: Foundational for Digital Literacies and Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    This column addresses the importance of developing critical thinking to meet the demands of 21st-century literacies and participatory democracy. The author argues for a critical approach to digital literacies that explores the sociological nature of literacy practices. Students examine examples of new literacies and analyze how ideologies are…

  3. The Impact of Library Tutorials on the Information Literacy Skills of Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Students in an Evidence-Based Practice Course: A Rubric Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, April J; Hoberecht, Toni; Peterson, Alyssa; Randall, Ken

    2018-01-01

    This study measures how online library instructional tutorials implemented into an evidence-based practice course have impacted the information literacy skills of occupational and physical therapy graduate students. Through a rubric assessment of final course papers, this study compares differences in students' search strategies and cited sources pre- and post-implementation of the tutorials. The population includes 180 randomly selected graduate students from before and after the library tutorials were introduced into the course curriculum. Results indicate a statistically significant increase in components of students' searching skills and ability to find higher levels of evidence after completing the library tutorials.

  4. Developing a Practical Readability Tool for Assessing Written Oral Health Promotion Material for People with Low Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Andrea M.; Martin-Kerry, Jacqueline M.; Van, Kelly; Hegde, Shalika; Heilbrunn-Lang, Adina

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Oral health promotion resources need to be simple, useful, accessible and understandable to be effective. The importance of this is magnified for population groups who are at increased risk of poor oral health, have low literacy or language barriers. Consultation with health service providers identified the need for a readability tool…

  5. Reading and Writing as Scientists? Text Genres and Literacy Practices in Girls' Middle-Grade Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, S. Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    Science teachers are often charged with providing discipline-specific literacy instruction. However, little is known about the reading and writing genres, or text types, typically found in these classrooms. In particular, there is a lack of knowledge about what opportunities adolescents have to engage with the genres privileged in science to learn…

  6. The Relationships between Leadership Practice and Teacher Motivation, Capacity, and Work Setting as Related to Change in Literacy Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Linda Marie

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the necessity for changes in literacy assessment and instruction. Well respected authorities have agreed that direct, explicit, and systematic instruction in the five basic components of reading (i.e., phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension) is essential to ensure that all students have an…

  7. Exceeding Boundaries: Chinese Children's Playful Use of Languages in Their Literacy Practices in a Mandarin-English Bilingual Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Chinese children of immigrant families are often perceived as good at memorization and rote learning or as polite, obedient, and passive students lacking creativity and criticality. Guided by Multiple Literacies Theory and translanguaging, this study explores how Chinese children in a Mandarin-English bilingual program skillfully navigate…

  8. The Practice and Promise of Critical Information Literacy: Academic Librarians' Involvement in Critical Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewell, Eamon C.

    2018-01-01

    Critical information literacy is a way of thinking and teaching that examines the social construction and political dimensions of libraries and information, problematizing information's production and use so that library users may think critically about such forces. Being an educational approach that acknowledges and emboldens learners' agency,…

  9. Latino Maternal Literacy Beliefs and Practices Mediating Socioeconomic Status and Maternal Education Effects in Predicting Child Receptive Vocabulary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Acosta, Sandra; Davis, Heather; Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn; Saenz, Laura; Soares, Denise; Resendez, Nora; Zhu, Leina

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This study investigated the association between Mexican American maternal education and socioeconomic status (SES) and child vocabulary as mediated by parental reading beliefs, home literacy environment (HLE), and parent-child shared reading frequency. As part of a larger study, maternal reports of education level, SES, HLE, and…

  10. 當代傳播思潮中的數位素養: 評介Digital Literacy for Technical Com Digital Literacy in Contemporary Communication: A Review of Digital Literacy for Technical Communication: 21st Century Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Sheng, Deng

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The ever-advancing technology has reformed our work environment and also redefined our life styles. The advancement of computer and cyber technology has allowed “digital” jobs and products to infiltrate different aspects of our society, influencing the ways of modern communication as well as the future course of education practices. Comparing with conventional literacy concepts about “reading, writing, listening, and speaking”, “digital literacy” lays more emphasis on the effects and changes caused by a digital context. Based on the standpoints of social constructivism and with experts in communication studies and educators as subjects, this paper reviews the book Digital Literacy for Technical communication: 21st Century Theory and Practice to analyze and discuss key knowledge and abilities required for the future and possible development of related research. Based on the compilation of the book, this review is divided into four parts. The first raises questions about the ontology of “digital literacy”, identifies the scope and meaning of “digital literacy” as defined by Spilkaet al., and confirms the discourse of this review. The second introduces the evolvement of a digital context and describes its three characteristics –authoring, publishing, and management technology – as the preconditions for developing digital literacy. The third discusses the “ fundamental knowledge” for the practice of “digital literacy” and introduces “shaping tools, information design, and content management” as references for communication and education works. The last part concludes the cultural, crosscultural, audience, and ethical perspectives introduced in this book and discusses how to connect “human and technology” for the future development of communication studies and education.

  11. Where Are "Their" Voices? Examining Power and Privilege in a Family Literacy Text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Tracey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how a family literacy text linked to a large-scale, U.S.-based family literacy program either privileged or disprivileged dominant, Eurocentric literacy practices. More specifically, this study investigated the ways in which the family literacy text: (1) conceptualized literacy; and (2) constructed the role…

  12. Literacy Standards for Preschool Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodrova, Elena; Leong, Deborah J.; Paynter, Diane E.

    1999-01-01

    Preschool and kindergarten teachers can help young learners meet early literacy standards without sacrificing developmentally appropriate practice. Several professional associations have described appropriate expectations for children of different age levels known as milestones, developmental accomplishments, and benchmarks. (MLH)

  13. Preparing Content Area Teachers for Disciplinary Literacy Instruction: The Role of Literacy Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhihui

    2014-01-01

    The recent call for secondary reading instruction to move away from a focus on generic literacy strategies to discipline-specific language and literacy practices presents new challenges for secondary teacher preparation. This column identifies some of the roles literacy teacher educators can play in helping address these challenges.

  14. Writing and Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Magasic, Coleen

    2012-01-01

    Writing activities are a sure way to assess and enhance students' science literacy. Sometimes the author's students use technical writing to communicate their lab experiences, just as practicing scientists do. Other times, they use creative writing to make connections to the topics they're learning. This article describes both types of writing…

  15. Literacy and Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the ambiguous attitude toward literacy in ancient Athenian society. Asserts that few Athenian citizens could read, yet reading was regarded as intrinsic to democratic practices. Maintains that the democratic power of writing rests in the active, social interaction of citizens. (CFR)

  16. Disciplinary Literacy in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Lopez, Amy; Minichiello, Angela

    2017-01-01

    People who practice engineering can make a difference through designing products, procedures, and systems that improve people's quality of life. Literacy, including the interpretation, evaluation, critique, and production of texts and representations, is important throughout the engineering design process. In this commentary, the authors outline…

  17. Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Improvement, April 19, 2017 Considerations for a New Definition of Health Literacy, April 04, 2016 Health Literacy Online, Office of Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Connect with Us Contact Us Twitter Facebook Instagram YouTube Flickr More Social Media from NIH ...

  18. Early literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings from the Danish contribution to the EASE project, a European research project running from 2008 to 2010 on early literacy in relation to the transition from childcare to school. It explores a holistic, inclusive approach to early literacy that resists a narrow...... and schools. The paper also draws on Gee’s (2001, 2003, 2004, 2008) sociocultural approach to literacy, and Honneth’s (2003, 2006) concept of recognition. Emphasizing participation and recognition as key elements, it claims that stakeholders in early liter- acy must pay attention to how diverse early literacy...... opportunities empower children, especially when these opportunities are employed in a project-based learning environ- ment in which each child is able to contribute to the shared literacy events....

  19. Adult Literacy: Policies, Programs and Practices. Lessons Learned. Final Report = Alphabetisation des adultes: politiques, programmes et pratiques. Etude bilan. Rapport final.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    Studies and reports examining the problems associated with adult literacy and efforts to address those problems were reviewed to identify lessons for adult literacy programs in Canada and elsewhere. Low literacy levels were linked to above-average rates of personal and/or learning difficulties, low self-esteem, associated social problems, and…

  20. Examining the Impacts of Systematic and Engaging Early Literacy (SEEL): Attention to Teacher Practices and Classroom Effects across the Kindergarten Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Gary E.; Culatta, Barbara; Hall-Kenyon, Kendra M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined teachers' implementation of an early literacy intervention, Systematic and Engaging Early Literacy (SEEL), on kindergarten children's development of early literacy skills. One hundred forty-nine kindergarten children (102 treatment) across six classrooms participated in this study. Results reveal that children who received SEEL…

  1. Accelerating the health literacy agenda in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglio, Gianluca; Sørensen, Kristine; Rübig, Paul; Bertinato, Luigi; Brand, Helmut; Karapiperis, Theodoros; Dinca, Irina; Peetso, Terje; Kadenbach, Karin; Dario, Claudio

    2017-12-01

    Health literacy can be defined as the knowledge, motivation and competence to access, understand, appraise and apply information to make decisions in terms of healthcare, disease prevention and health promotion. Health literacy is a European public health challenge that has to be taken seriously by policy-makers. It constitutes an emerging field for policy, research and practice. However, recent research has shown that health literacy advancement is still at its infancy in Europe, as reflected in the scarce scientific health literacy literature published by European authors. From a total of 569 articles published until 2011 on this subject, the first author of only 15% of them is from Europe. This article conveys recommendations of different European stakeholders on how to accelerate the health literacy agenda in Europe. A general introduction on the current status of health literacy is provided, followed by two cases applying health literacy in the areas of prevention of communicable diseases and promotion of digital health. The current EU strategies integrating health literacy are listed, followed by examples of challenges threatening the further development of health literacy in Europe. Recommendations as to how European stakeholders involved in research, policy, practice and education can promote health literacy are given. It is vital that the European Commission as well as European Union Member States take the necessary steps to increase health literacy at individual, organizational, community, regional and national levels. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Literacy Programmes with a Focus on Women to Reduce Gender Disparities: Case Studies from UNESCO Effective Literacy and Numeracy Practices Database (LitBase). http://www.unesco.org/uil/litbase/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairies, Jan, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Literacy is the foundation of lifelong learning and a crucial element in the universally recognised right to education. However, illiteracy continues to exist as a global challenge, and many individuals still lack the basic literacy skills that are needed to engage in further learning opportunities and for the economic and social development of…

  3. In- and Out-of-Character: The Digital Literacy Practices and Emergent Information Worlds of Active Role-Players in a New Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation explores and describes the in-character and out-of-character information worlds and digital literacy practices of role-players, those that create and enact their characters' or avatars' stories, both within and outside of WildStar, a Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game (MMORPG) (Carbine Studios, 2015). Utilizing Jaeger…

  4. Learning Music Literacies across Transnational School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerrett, Allison

    2018-01-01

    This article examines an adolescent's music literacy education across Caribbean and U.S. schools using qualitative research methods and theories of multimodality, transnationalism, and global cultural flows. Findings include that the youth's music literacy practices continuously shifted in response to the cultural practices and values of the…

  5. Applying Disciplinary Literacy in Elementary Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Judy; Ming, Kavin

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a social studies teacher and a literacy teacher describe a vision for social studies that highlights reading practices that foster disciplinary literacy in elementary geography. Their purpose is to share a practical approach for enriching elementary social studies lessons and activities with a geographic lens. During the…

  6. An Activity Promoting the Practice of Quantitative Literacy for Pre– and In–Service Teachers of Mathematics and Science

    OpenAIRE

    Timothy L. Sorey; Teri Willard; Duane Sholz

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a hands-on, laboratory activity that provided pre-service teachers in mathematics and science methods courses, and also some in-service mathematics teachers, with the opportunity to exercise quantitative literacy (QL) skills. The focus of the activity is electrical resistance, more particularly the resistance (in ohms) that is painted on small resistors by the use of color-coded bands, one of which is a band for % error. The activity consists of four...

  7. The Use of English Songs with Social Content as a Situated Literacy Practice: Factors that Influence Student Participation in the EFL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsen Palacios Mena

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This action research study examines the factors that influence student participation when songs with social content are utilised in the EFL classroom. The study proposes the use of English songs as a situated social practice under the perspective of critical pedagogy. The study was done in the 11th English class of a public high school located in the south of Bogota, Colombia. Data was collected through field observations, semistructured interviews, questionnaires and artefacts made by the students. The results indicate that factors relate to the songs and the students themselves. The study suggests that providing different opportunities for students to explore different dimensions of literacy that go beyond the linguistic aspects of a foreign language can encourage meaningful participation and interest in learning English as a Foreign Language.

  8. Literacy and Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther; Mooney, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the relationship between literacy and health disparities, focusing on the concept of health literacy. Recommendations are provided for ways to bridge the health literacy gap for learners in adult basic education and family literacy programs.

  9. Functional Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani Nolimal

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author first defines literacy as the ability of co-operation in all fields of life and points at the features of illiterate or semi-literate individuals. The main stress is laid upon the assessment of literacy and illiteracy. In her opinion the main weak­ ness of this kind of evaluation are its vague psycho-metric characteristics, which leads to results valid in a single geographical or cultural environment only. She also determines the factors causing illiteracy, and she states that the level of functional literacy is more and more becoming a national indicator of successfulness.

  10. Computational Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chongtay, Rocio; Robering, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in and recognition of the importance of Computational Literacy, a skill generally considered to be necessary for success in the 21st century. While much research has concentrated on requirements, tools, and teaching methodologies for the acquisit......In recent years, there has been a growing interest in and recognition of the importance of Computational Literacy, a skill generally considered to be necessary for success in the 21st century. While much research has concentrated on requirements, tools, and teaching methodologies...... for the acquisition of Computational Literacy at basic educational levels, focus on higher levels of education has been much less prominent. The present paper considers the case of courses for higher education programs within the Humanities. A model is proposed which conceives of Computational Literacy as a layered...

  11. Information Literacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ian

    Institutions are consequently introducing information literacy programmes in their curricula in a bid to ..... Brazil, Chile and Mexico (Lau 2007:31). Lau (2007) reported that these initiatives rarely involve IL inclusion in curricula and are scattered ...

  12. Mothers literacy status and its association with feeding practices and PEM among 1-5 year aged children in southern part of India, Mysore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the prevalence of PEM in children aged 1 to 5 years and to study the association of mothers educational status with feeding practices and nutritional status of children aged 1 to 5 years. Methods: A cross sectional study of 600 children of 1-5 year age group in urban slums of Mysore city was carried out with cluster random sampling method. The data was collected by using a predesigned and pretested proforma. Assessment of the nutritional status was done by clinical examination and anthropometry. WHO child growth standards, 2006 reference data were used to classify malnutrition. Results: Among 600 children examined, 285 (47.5% were males and 315 (52.5% were females. Exclusive breast feeding was given in 295 (49.2% of children. Pre lacteal feeds and top milk feeds were given in 123 (20.5% and 108 (18% of children respectively. The prevalence of underweight, stunting and wasting was observed to be 31.3%, 42.2% and 14.2% respectively. About 12.8% of mothers were illiterate and this was significantly associated with feeding practices and nutritional status of children. Conclusions: Mothers literacy status plays important role in feeding practices of their children which inturn is an important factor in determining the nutritional status of child

  13. Information literacy: Educate through literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Atjo, Nur Amanah Ilham; Pratama, Muhammad Fadhil

    2017-01-01

    The concepts and terms about “Information Literacy” has become general study in education studies. Information literacy is pivotal in this global world where the information literacy equip a person’s ability to access, understand and use the information intelligently. In higher education, in the learning process, students should be able to get used to a new way in education. Students must independently by finding, training themselves and absorbing the education material from lecturers. The de...

  14. What Digital Games and Literacy Have in Common: A Heuristic for Understanding Pupils' Gaming Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperley, Thomas; Walsh, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that digital games and school-based literacy practices have much more in common than is reported in the research literature. We describe the role digital game paratexts--ancillary print and multimodal texts about digital games--can play in connecting pupils' gaming literacy practices to "traditional" school-based literacies…

  15. Literacy Benefits for Latina/o Parents Engaged in a Spanish Literacy Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrotta, Clarena; Ramirez, Ysabel

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study reports on a Latina/o parent literacy project teaching literacy lessons in Spanish to Latina mothers and their children enrolled at a public elementary school. The participating mothers study and practice reading strategies to later put them into practice with their children. Data sources include: Parents' reflective…

  16. BUENAS PRÁCTICAS TIC. LA ALFABETIZACIÓN DIGITAL EN MAYORES GOOD PRACTICE TIC. DIGITAL LITERACY IN OLDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Huelves Martín

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Los equipos informáticos y sus periféricos están diseñados para el uso de un único usuario, constan de un único teclado, ratón; y de una única pantalla. De modo que en una clase de iniciación a la informática, la mejor opción parece ser un equipo por persona. Así, aparentemente, al interactuar individualmente se avanzará más. ¿Pero, y si no es posible contar con suficientes medios? ¿Es realmente imprescindible el “monopuesto” para lograr un aprendizaje significativo? Gracias a la experiencia durante varios cursos de alfabetización digital con adultos utilizando una metodología afín a los objetivos expondremos una buena práctica formativa, haciendo frente a factores adversos como la escasez de recursos. Sin lugar a dudas, sin descuidar la psicología del adulto, educando la adquisición de capacidades tecnológicas haciendo a la persona autónoma en su aprendizaje.Computer equipment and their peripherals are designed for use by a single user, there is only one keyboard, only one mouse, and of course, a single screen. Therefore in the moment to provide a literacy class, the best option seems to be one computer per person. So each student seemed to learn more, have greater interaction with media, and therefore more learning time. But, Is it possible to have the number of computer needed for each student, always? Is it really essential the Single Computers in classroom for effective learning? Thanks to the experience in lot of adults´ literacy courses, using a methodology consistent with the goal of learning, we show a good formative experience, which although obvious, it allows us to realize factors such as the shortage of technological resources, adult psychology and the need to educate not only new technological capabilities but also to transmit values essential to ease management in the knowledge society.

  17. Thrown Together: Incorporating Place and Sustainability into Early Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Catarina

    2017-01-01

    The development of language and literacy abilities of young multilingual children is important to their future educational engagement and success in school. In this study, the value of taking account of place and sustainability in early literacy education is considered. This research provides ideas for practice-based research on early literacy in…

  18. Preparing Novice History Teachers to Meet Students' Literacy Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokes, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of calls for increased literacy instruction in secondary content classes, there appears to be little change in practice. One reason for this may be that content area literacy courses inadequately prepared teachers to teach literacy skills specific to their content area. This article describes a program that embeds content area literacy…

  19. Addressing health literacy in patient decision aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Effective use of a patient decision aid (PtDA) can be affected by the user’s health literacy and the PtDA’s characteristics. Systematic reviews of the relevant literature can guide PtDA developers to attend to the health literacy needs of patients. The reviews reported here aimed to assess: 1. a) the effects of health literacy / numeracy on selected decision-making outcomes, and b) the effects of interventions designed to mitigate the influence of lower health literacy on decision-making outcomes, and 2. the extent to which existing PtDAs a) account for health literacy, and b) are tested in lower health literacy populations. Methods We reviewed literature for evidence relevant to these two aims. When high-quality systematic reviews existed, we summarized their evidence. When reviews were unavailable, we conducted our own systematic reviews. Results Aim 1: In an existing systematic review of PtDA trials, lower health literacy was associated with lower patient health knowledge (14 of 16 eligible studies). Fourteen studies reported practical design strategies to improve knowledge for lower health literacy patients. In our own systematic review, no studies reported on values clarity per se, but in 2 lower health literacy was related to higher decisional uncertainty and regret. Lower health literacy was associated with less desire for involvement in 3 studies, less question-asking in 2, and less patient-centered communication in 4 studies; its effects on other measures of patient involvement were mixed. Only one study assessed the effects of a health literacy intervention on outcomes; it showed that using video to improve the salience of health states reduced decisional uncertainty. Aim 2: In our review of 97 trials, only 3 PtDAs overtly addressed the needs of lower health literacy users. In 90% of trials, user health literacy and readability of the PtDA were not reported. However, increases in knowledge and informed choice were reported in those studies

  20. Localising supranational concepts of literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    According to Blommaert (2003) conceptualizations of literacy within education might be seen as a variety of language that should be “read locally as well as translocally” by examining how conceptualizations of literacy are being both globalized and localized by whom, for whom and how...... – and with what impact for education. Following this research agenda I would like to argue for a Latour-inspired research approach that theorizes the material dimension of literacy and its capacity to travel. It is central to Latours´ sociology that humans are seen delegating roles and responsibilities to objects......, and Latour argues that it is by tracing the objects that circulate within and between sites of human social interaction that an account of the social becomes possible (Latour, 1999). An application of Latours theoretical perspective allows for an examination of literacy practices that can follow...

  1. FINANCIAL LITERACY AS A PATH TO SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Krechovská

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to highlight the important role of financial literacy as one of the factors that ensures sustainable development in society. First, the paper deals with the definition of financial literacy and the importance of financial literacy for society. It analyses various symptoms associated with the level of financial literacy in the form of household debt and the number of ordered property repossessions. Furthermore, the paper focuses on the measurement of financial literacy and, in this context, presents selected results of the survey of financial literacy from a selected group of respondents (university students in the Czech Republic that were acquired as part of the "V4 Scientific Centers for the Enhancement of Financial Literacy and Entrepreneurship Education" project focused on research in the field of entrepreneurship education and financial literacy in Visegrad Group countries. Financial literacy is seen as one of the most important characteristics that can determine the behaviour of individuals in the world of finance, their approaches to payment discipline, debt and thinking for the future. In this regard, it is important to put emphasis on financial education as a tool for heightening and developing practical financial literacy.

  2. Playing Their Way into Literacies: Reading, Writing, and Belonging in the Early Childhood Classroom. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlwend, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Karen Wohlwend provides a new framework for rethinking the boundaries between literacy and play, so that play itself is viewed as a literacy practice along with reading, writing, and design. Through a variety of theoretical lenses, the author presents a portrait of literacy play that connects three play groups: the girls and, importantly, boys,…

  3. Academic literacy and the decontextualised learner | Boughey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The literacy practices that are valued in the university emerge from specific disciplinary histories yet students are often expected to master these as if they were common sense and natural. This article argues that the autonomous model of literacy, which sees language use as the application of a set of neutral skills, continues ...

  4. Some "Wonderings" about Literacy Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvermann, Donna E.

    2001-01-01

    Ponders whether there exists a knowledge base for teaching others how to teach reading. Discusses the distinction between "social constructionism" and "social constructivism." Notes that literacy teacher educators who conceive of literacy as critical social practice do not deny the cognitive or behavioral aspects of reading, writing, and speaking,…

  5. Digital Literacy: A Palestinian Refugee Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, John

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the first attempt to explore digital literacy in the specific context of the Palestinian refugee community in the Middle East by looking at the cultural specificity of digital literacy theorising and practice, by analysing current digital education policy in the countries hosting the Palestinian refugee community and by documenting…

  6. Media Literacy Education at the University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the media literacy education movement has developed to help individuals of all ages acquire the competencies necessary to fully participate in the modern world of media convergence. Yet media literacy education is not practiced uniformly at all educational levels. This study used a survey to compare the extent to which students…

  7. Literacy as Social Action in City Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cridland-Hughes, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This study examines critical literacy and the intersections of oral, aural, written, and performative literate practices in City Debate, an afterschool program dedicated to providing debate instruction to students in a major Southeastern city. Previous research into definitions and beliefs about literacy in an urban debate program over its twenty…

  8. Beyond the Hyperbole: Information Literacy Reconsidered

    OpenAIRE

    Heidi Julien

    2016-01-01

    Information literacy, as a concept, has suffered from terminological confusion and has been burdened with untenable expectations. In addition, insufficient attention has been given to the place of information with the context of information behavior or information practices generally. Significant challenges remain to developing information literacy, but its value remains relevant.

  9. Emotionally Crafted Experiences: Layering Literacies in Minecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Sandra Schamroth; Rowsell, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Digital literacies play a foundational role in the rhythm and pattern of our lives, yet debates continue about how to harness them for educational purposes. In an effort to humanize digital literacies, this column provides a venue for research and practical applications that depict technology use as part of the fabric of being human. This…

  10. Health literacy and its importance for effective communication. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Veronica; Keogh, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    This is the second of two articles exploring the concept of health literacy, an often hidden barrier to effective healthcare communication. Part 1 was published in April ( Lambert and Keogh 2014 ). This article explains how to detect low levels of health literacy among parents and children, and outlines the challenges to assessing health literacy levels, including the stigma and discrimination some people experience. Some basic healthcare communication strategies for supporting health literacy in practice are suggested.

  11. Magic or Mayhem? New Texts and New Literacies in Technological Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Catherine

    Questions about the implications of the new technologies for literacy, literacy teaching, and literacy practices provoke diverse and contradictory responses in the media, in policy documents, in state and national assessment surveys, and among teachers themselves. On one hand, the need for literacy to be reconceptualized and redefined in the face…

  12. Faith in Action: Heritage Literacy as a Synchronisation of Belief, Word and Deed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Suzanne Kesler

    2010-01-01

    The concept that literacies are best understood when examined in their context has been promoted for decades by socio-cultural literacy researchers such as Brian Street and Shirley Brice Heath. Street's term "literacy practice" is a combination of the actual "events of literacy" and the cultural, social and political…

  13. Literacy in Francophone Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokora, Pascal D.

    1991-01-01

    Literacy in francophone Africa, where literacy is still a privilege, is reviewed in terms of the complex linguistic situation, effects of population change, concepts and definitions of literacy, promotion of literacy in adult nonformal settings (e.g., African language literacy materials, multilingual settings). (23 references) (LB)

  14. VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE MULTIPLE LITERACY COMUNIDADES VIRTUALES PRÁCTICAS DE ALFABETIZACIÓN MÚLTIPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Melaré Varros

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Technologies have transformed the way we interact with others. Are expanding the dimensions of the participatory process in digital environments such as educational settings, thanks to social networks for learning. At the present time have created new ways to communicate and learn, a group of social networks that facilitate the participation of all involved, and therefore are also tools of social learning. Communication possibilities expand educational dimensions in digital scenarios. Participation goes from being a chance to become the main source of teaching and learning collaborative. It is necessary to the review of pedagogical approaches and methodologies to create a scenario, which arises in the virtual mode. The challenge now is training and developing literacy skills through providing multiple virtual learning communities.Las tecnologías han transformado nuestra forma de interactuar con los demás. Se están ampliando las dimensiones del proceso participativo en los entornos digitales, como escenarios educativos, gracias a las redes sociales de aprendizaje. En la actualidad se han creado nuevas maneras de comunicarnos y aprender, un colectivo de redes sociales que posibilitan la participación de todos los involucrados, y por tanto también son herramientas de aprendizaje social. Las posibilidades comunicativas amplían las dimensiones educativas en los escenarios digitales. La participación pasa de ser una posibilidad para convertirse en la fuente principal del proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje colaborativo. Es necesario la revisión de los enfoques pedagógicos y la creación de metodologías apropiadas al escenario educativo que surge en la modalidad virtual. El desafío actual es la formación y desarrollo de competencias gracias a la alfabetización múltiple que proporcionan las comunidades virtuales de aprendizaje.

  15. A study of knowledge, attitude and practice regarding administration of pediatric dosage forms and allied health literacy of caregivers for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Sil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Caregivers of sick children have to be careful with medicine dosing and giving medicines to a reluctant child can be challenging. Aim: To assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices of caregivers regarding pediatric medicine administration and health literacy allied to this task. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was carried out on outpatient and inpatient basis in the pediatrics department of a teaching hospital over 6 months. Subjects and Methods: Data regarding sociodemographic profile of patient and caregiver, idea regarding pediatric dosage forms, dosing of medicines, and medication errors during administration were recorded from 377 caregivers. Reconstitution of dry powder and measurement of 5 mL liquid medicine using measuring cup of the medicine phial was demonstrated by the caregivers. Statistical Analysis: Association assessed by point biserial correlation and Spearman's rank correlation. Results: Majority of the primary caregivers surveyed were young, educated, homemaker mothers. Liquid medicines were used maximally (88.9%. Majority (87.3% of the caregivers used standardized dosing instruments to measure liquids and reconstitution (85.9%, and teaspoon measurement task (91% was performed satisfactorily by most. Some potentially wrong practices (e.g., adding medicine to milk, redilution of reconstituted medicine, and storing beyond the recommended period were recorded. Medication errors were reported by 44.5% caregivers, significantly more in the outpatient setting. Although the statistical correlation was weak, the chance of medication error was less, and the precision of measurement was better with increasing education of the caregiver. Conclusions: Physicians need to be aware of the limitations of knowledge and the possibility of wrong administration practices among caregivers of children. Remedial measures in this regard can reduce the risk of medication errors.

  16. Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical words, and of how their health care system works Abilities, such as physical or mental limitations Personal factors, such as age, education, language abilities, and culture More than 90 million adults in the United States have low health literacy. It affects their ability ...

  17. Home Literacy Environment of African American Head Start Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janese Daniels

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have documented culturally specific family literacy practices in which low-income families engage, which are often a function of the context in which the family is currently embedded.  These practices are well documented in ethnographic literature. Although this evidence exists, its utility is limited due to small sample sizes and lack of quantitative documentation on their contribution to children’s language and literacy development.  This study attempted to quantify those culturally specific family literacy practices.  51 low-income African-American mother-child dyads participated.  The contribution of multiple literacy practices was examined in relation to child language and literacy outcomes.  Most low-income African-American families engaged in multiple literacy practices.  Recommended areas for future research directions are discussed.

  18. Learning and Literacy in an Online Gaming Community: Examples of Participatory Practices in a Sims Affinity Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonhee Naseef

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the different kinds of learning that take place in "Mod The Sims" (MTS), an online "Sims" gaming community. The study aimed to explore users' experiences and to understand learning practices that are not commonly observed in formal educational settings. To achieve this goal, the…

  19. Early Childhood Educators' Self-Efficacy in Science, Math, and Literacy Instruction and Science Practice in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerde, Hope K.; Pierce, Steven J.; Lee, Kyungsook; Van Egeren, Laurie A.

    2018-01-01

    Research Findings: Quality early science education is important for addressing the low science achievement, compared to international peers, of elementary students in the United States. Teachers' beliefs about their skills in a content area, that is, their content self-efficacy is important because it has implications for teaching practice and…

  20. Better Assessments Require Better Assessment Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiggins, Rick

    2018-01-01

    Stiggins says that, to build better assessment systems, educators and education leaders need more opportunities to learn the basic principles of sound assessment practice. He lays out what he views as the fundamental elements of assessment literacy.

  1. Financial Literacy: An Essential Component of Mathematics Literacy and Numeracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Marla A.

    2014-01-01

    With rising personal and public debt, public and private employers increasingly shifting financial responsibility to individuals, and an increase in both the number of financial investment options and predatory lending practices, today's students need to be financially literate. This paper defines financial literacy and justifies its place in the…

  2. Literacy for QTLS achieving the minimum core

    CERN Document Server

    Hickey, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Literacy for QTLS is written specifically with the needs of all those training to teach or currently working in the lifelong learning sector in mind. This highly practical and easy-to-use text will help you identify your areas of strength and weakness, develop your knowledge and skills in order to pass the national literacy test and adopt strategies that you can use to support the language and literacy skills of your own learners.Packed with test-your-knowledge questions, examples and recommendations for best practice, this book, closely linked to the QTLS standards, is essential reading for a

  3. Constructivism as a Framework for Literacy Teacher Education Courses: The Cases of Six Literacy Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosnik, Clare; Menna, Lydia; Dharamshi, Pooja; Beck, Clive

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents findings from the large-scale study "Literacy Teacher Educators: Their Backgrounds, Visions, and Practices" that includes 28 literacy/English teacher educators (LTEs) from four countries. The participants were interviewed three times and shared their course outlines. Six pre-service LTEs who use a constructivist…

  4. Global Ill-Literacies: Hip Hop Cultures, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, H. Samy

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the emergence of what the author refers to as "global ill-literacies," that is, the hybrid, transcultural linguistic and literacy practices of Hip Hop youth in local and global contexts, as well as the pedagogical possibilities that scholars open up as they engage these forms. By reviewing a broad but focused range of…

  5. Unpacking New Media Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Thanq “victor” Chen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century has marked an unprecedented advancement of new media. New media has become so pervasive that it has penetrated into every aspect of our society. New media literacy plays an essential role for any citizen to participate fully in the 21st century society. Researchers have documented that literacy has evolved historically from classic literacy (reading-writing-understanding to audiovisual literacy to digital literacy or information literacy and recently to new media literacy. A review of literature on media literacy reveals that there is a lack of thorough analysis of unique characteristics of new media and its impacts upon the notion of new media literacy. The purpose of the study is to unpack new media literacy and propose a framework for a systematic investigation of new media literacy.

  6. Leading the Way in Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Bonnie; Novak, Sandi

    2017-01-01

    Schools and districts are required to have improvement plans that specify instructional and curricular ideas to enhance teachers' ongoing practice and assist students in performing at higher levels. Yet little has been done to examine the specific knowledge that principals need regarding literacy teaching and learning or how districts can build…

  7. Information Literacy in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Inskip, C.

    2015-01-01

    This talk aims to provide an overview of thinking and practice in workplace information literacy, an important developing area. It will consider the semantic gap between education and workplace settings and identify key issues around the challenges to library and information professionals in bridging that gap.

  8. Framing Information Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Dirkx

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2000 the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL published the Standards for Information Literacy. After 15 years these standards were in desperate need of revision. Instead of releasing a revised edition of the Standards, in 2015 ACRL presented a completely new vision on information literacy in higher education. In this keynote we will explore the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in all its glory. We will compare it to the old standards. Is this new American Framework an opportunity for librarians to promote their courses to faculty in a new light, with the aim to integrate them into the curriculum? Do we really need a framework for information literacy to achieve this integration? Or is there another way? We will take a closer look at an interesting British alternative: the Researcher Development Framework from Vitae and The Society of College, National and University Libraries (SCONUL. We will compare both frameworks and list the pros and cons. It is a complicated situation: there are Standards, there is a new Framework in an early stage of implementation and there is this Researcher Development Framework. What do we, the librarians, have to do? Should we bid the old standards farewell and switch to the new framework? Or does the Researcher Development Framework provide a better alternative? We have to think and talk about our teaching role in our institutions. At this conference we can think and spar with our colleague librarians, putting one of the ACRL framework concepts, “scholarship as conversation”, into practice.

  9. Preschool literacy and second language learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    in the literacy events they meet in their day-care centers and kindergartens? Examining these social practices in pre-schools might illuminate the interplay between language and literacy and the learning processes of second language learners and contribute to the discussion about the need for re...... intending to enhance children´s language and literacy learning. The poor results of the PISA-measurement have in Denmark, Norway and Sweden drawn much attention to literacy and language in day-care centers and kindergartens and resulted in the development of a considerable number of social technologies...... (programs and concepts) intended to improve pre-school children’s literacy and language skills. Seen in a knowledge-society perspective the development might be characterized as an expansion of a life-long-learning evidence-based strategy into early childhood. The importance of development of early...

  10. Literacy in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graubard, Stephen R., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This collection of essays addresses issues related to basic literacy and mathematical competence in the United States. Articles include the following: "The Roots of Literacy" (David Hawkins); "Historical Perspectives on Literacy and Schooling" (Daniel P. Resnick); "Reconciling the Literacies of Generations" (William…

  11. Broadening the Conceptualization of Literacy in the Lives of Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michelle F.; Cuskelly, Monica; Moni, Karen B.

    2011-01-01

    Current pedagogical approaches recognize literacy as a social practice and yet school-based conceptualizations continue to dominate understandings of literacy learning of individuals with intellectual disability. Such understandings lead to local or everyday literacy practices being devalued and overlooked. Thus, for adults with intellectual…

  12. Multimodal Play-Literacy: A Preschooler's Storytelling, Drawing, and Performing of Dinosaur Extinction Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Koeun; Kim, Koomi

    2017-01-01

    Building on relevant research concerning the play-literacy relationship, the social-semiotic theory of multimodality, and the notion of embodiment, this article seeks to explore the possibilities of children's play as a meaningful context for literacy practices and, more importantly, of play itself as a form of literacy practice. This article…

  13. Making Use of the New Student Assessment Standards To Enhance Technological Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jill

    2003-01-01

    Describes the student assessment standards outlined in "Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy: Student Assessment, Professional Development, and Program Standards," a companion to the "Standards for Technological Literacy." Discusses how the standards apply to everyday teaching practices. (JOW)

  14. Preparing Preservice Educators to Teach Critical, Place-Based Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Secondary education means helping students develop a diverse repertoire of literacy skills, but the focus has been on disciplinary and digital literacies practiced by geographically distributed communities (an international, middle class curriculum) rather than on practices associated with orality, the trades, and minority, immigrant, and…

  15. Rhetorical Recipes: Women's Literacies in and out of the Kitchen

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Farnham, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on interview data regarding literacy practices done in tandem with housework, this article presents an array of recipe uses among retirement-age women. Given their backgrounds as professionals who come of age during second-wave feminism, the women see little value in "domestic" practices such as cooking literacies (Barton & Hamilton).…

  16. Position paper: Web tutorials and Information Literacy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    2011-01-01

    Position paper on future research challenges regarding web tutorials with the aim of supporting and facilitating Information Literacy in an academic context. Presented and discussed at the workshop: Social media & Information Practices, track on Information literacy practices, University of Borås...

  17. Desdobramentos recentes da educação inclusiva no Brasil: discursos e práticas de letramento Recent developments in inclusive education in Brazil: discourses and literacy practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Tamaê Borges Sato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A oferta da educação para pessoas com deficiência sofreu modificações significativas no contexto social brasileiro. Desse contexto de transformações, surgiram os projetos integrados "Discursos, Identidades e Práticas de Letramento no Ensino Especial" e "Múltiplos Letramentos, Identidades e Interdisciplinaridades no Atendimento Educacional à Pessoa Deficiente", em que se aliou a pesquisa etnográfica à Análise de Discurso Crítica e aos Novos Estudos do Letramento para examinar discursos e identidades profissionais que emergem desse contexto.¹ Ao longo de cinco anos de investigação, os resultados sugerem que as identidades de professores e professoras são levadas à transformação como parte de um processo criado pela formação inadequada nos níveis iniciais para atuação no Ensino Especial, bem como pela tentativa de suprir lacunas por meio de seus letramentos diários e pedagógicos.Education provision for people with disabilities has undergone considerable changes in the Brazilian social context. As part of these changes, two research projects have been developed: "Discourses, Identities and Literacy Practices in Special Education", and "Multiple Literacies, Identities and Interdisciplinarities in the Specialized Educational Care for Learners with Disabilities". These projects propose to relate ethnographic research, Critical Discourse An alysis and the New Literacy Studies in order to examine professional discourses and identities emerging from this context. Over five years of research, the results suggest that teachers' identities have changed as part of a process stemming from inadequate education in the initial stages to teach learners with disabilities and the teachers' attempt to overcome this gap through their daily and pedagogic literacies.

  18. Family literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    I Projekt familielæsning, der er et samarbejde mellem Nationalt Videncenter for Læsning og Hillerød Bibliotek, arbejder vi med at få kontakt til de familier, som biblioteket ellers aldrig ser som brugere og dermed også de børn, der vokser op i familier, for hvem bøger og oplæsningssituationer ikk...... er en selvfølgelig del af barndommen. Det, vi vil undersøge og ønsker at være med til at udvikle hos disse familier, er det, man kan kalde family literacy....

  19. The impact of health literacy, patient-centered communication and shared decision-making on patients' satisfaction with care received in German primary care practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, Sibel Vildan; Stock, Stephanie

    2016-08-30

    Findings on the association between health literacy skills and patient-reported outcomes such as satisfaction with health care delivery are scarce. We explored the extent to which subjective health literacy skills and the perception of the application of patient-centered communication and shared decision-making are associated with patient's satisfaction with care received by their general practitioner (GP). A nationwide cross sectional survey was administered in a random sample of 1125 German adults. A binary logistic regression model controlling for demographics and health status was used to examine the independent contributions of predictor variables (i.e. subjective health literacy, shared decision-making, patient-centered communication) on satisfaction with care received by the GP. Respondents with sufficient health literacy skills were 2.06 times as likely (95 % [CI]: 1.002-4.264) and those who were involved in shared decision-making by their GP were 4.02 times as likely (95 % [CI]: 1.849-8.744) to be satisfied with care received by their GP. Respondents who experienced that their GP explained things in an easy to understand way (OR: 4.44; 95 % [CI]: 1.817-10.869), knew important things about their medical history (OR: 3.46; 95 % [CI]: 1.502-7.994) and spent enough time with them, also reported to be more satisfied (OR: 3.12; 95 % [CI]: 1.410-6.905). German adults having sufficient subjective health literacy skills and experiencing a more patient-centered relationship with their GP are more likely to be satisfied with care. These findings are important for health care organizations aiming to respond to health literacy needs of patients.

  20. The Role of Health Literacy in Professional Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoory, Linda

    2017-01-01

    This chapter marks the territory and leadership potential found in research, practice and policy related to the role of health literacy in higher education and professional training. There is limited published work that has summarized the role and scope of health literacy in higher education and professional training. This chapter will provide a review of the research in the area, a description of some of the educational practices in health literacy, and a case example of how policy might influence the role of health literacy in professional higher education.

  1. Reading the Water Table: The Interaction between Literacy Practices and Groundwater Management Training in Preparing Farmers for Climate Change in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavva, Konda Reddy; Smith, Cristine A.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on farmers' use of literacy for individual decision-making on crop-water management and crop choices and investigates how farmer participants perceive the usefulness of Farmer Water School (FWS) training. It draws upon a study conducted with farmers of Kurnool district of Andhra Pradesh, India. This study has demonstrated that…

  2. Evidence-Based Literacy Interventions for East/Southeast Asian English Language Learners: A Review of the Research and Recommendations for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneville, Margaret A.; Li, Chieh

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: There is a notable dearth of interventions that have been specifically designed for Asian English Language Learner (ELL) students, and the existing research on ELL students often lacks population validity and sample diversity. In response to this need, this paper aims to review current research on literacy interventions for East/Southeast…

  3. Elizabeth Usher Memorial Lecture: Language is literacy is language - Positioning speech-language pathology in education policy, practice, paradigms and polemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Pamela C

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the fundamental and intrinsic links between early receptive and expressive oral language competence on the one hand and the transition to literacy in the early school years and achievement of academic (and life) success on the other. Consequently, it also concerns the professional knowledge base of two key disciplines whose work is central to children's early language and literacy success: teachers and speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Oral language competence underpins the transition to literacy, which in turn underpins academic achievement. Academic achievement is significant in its own right, conferring opportunities for further education and training post-secondary school, contributing to psychological health and mitigating some of the mental health risks and adversities that can be associated with adolescence and early adulthood. The central thesis is that the linguistic basis of the transition to literacy makes early reading success core business for SLPs. Further, SLPs need a firm grasp of the political and ideological factors that have exerted historical and continuing influence on reading instruction in western nations such as Australia, the US and the UK. This will facilitate the establishment of meaningful working relationships with teaching colleagues, to achieve optimal education outcomes for all children.

  4. Novas práticas de leitura e escrita: letramento na cibercultura New reading and writing practices: literacy in the cyberculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Soares

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available No contexto de uma diferenciação entre a cultura do papel e a cultura da tela, ou cibercultura, o artigo busca uma melhor compreensão do conceito de letramento, confrontando tecnologias tipográficas e tecnologias digitais de leitura e de escrita, a partir de diferenças relativas ao espaço da escrita e aos mecanismos de produção, reprodução e difusão da escrita; argumenta que cada uma dessas tecnologias tem determinados efeitos sociais, cognitivos e discursivos, resultando em modalidades diferentes de letramento, o que sugere que a palavra seja pluralizada: há letramentos, não letramento.In the context of two different cultures - print culture and electronic culture, or cyberculture -, this article seeks a clearer comprehension of literacy opposing typographic and digital technologies of reading and writing. Through the differences regarding the writing space and the mechanisms of producing, reproducing and diffusing ideas, it argues that different kinds of literacy - that is, different social, cognitive and discursive effects - have resulted from such different modalities of written communication. Since literacy is not a single, homogeneous phenomenon, it finally suggests this word should be used in its plural rather than singular form: literacies.

  5. Just a subtle difference? Findings from a systematic review on definitions of nutrition literacy and food literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Corinna; Sommerhalder, Kathrin; Beer-Borst, Sigrid; Abel, Thomas

    2018-06-01

    Nutrition literacy and food literacy have become increasingly important concepts in health promotion. Researchers use one or the other term to describe the competencies needed to maintain a healthy diet. This systematic review examines whether these terms are synonymous or if their meanings are substantially different.We searched major bibliographic databases (Web of Science, PubMed, ScienceDirect, CINAHL, SocIndex and ERIC) for publications that provided an original definition of nutrition or food literacy. Then we used Nutbeam's tripartite health literacy model as an analytical grid. The definitions we found included specific competencies, which we mapped to the domains of functional, interactive, or critical literacy.In the 173 full-text publications we screened, we found six original definitions of nutrition literacy, and 13 original definitions of food literacy. Seven food literacy definitions were integrated into a conceptual framework. Analysing their structure revealed that nutrition literacy and food literacy are seen as specific forms of health literacy, and represent distinct but complementary concepts. Definitions of nutrition literacy mainly described the abilities necessary to obtain and understand nutrition information. Definitions of food literacy incorporated a broader spectrum of theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. To be food literate also means to apply information on food choices and critically reflect on the effect of food choice on personal health and on society. Since food literacy is based on a more comprehensive understanding of health behaviours, it is the more viable term to use in health promotion interventions. For the practical implication, a harmonization of the different definitions is desirable.

  6. Reflexões sobre práticas de letramento em contexto escolar de língua minoritária Reflections on literacy practices developed in minority language school context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Pereira Fritzen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetiva-se neste artigo refletir sobre as práticas de letramento em alemão, introduzidas em uma escola rural a partir da implementação de mudanças nas políticas linguísticas municipais, e sua interface com as práticas de letramento locais em uma comunidade bilíngue de imigração alemã. Os dados da pesquisa, gerados a partir de um estudo de cunho etnográfico e analisados à luz dos Novos Estudos do Letramento e do bi/ multilinguismo de grupos de minorias linguísticas, sugerem que as professoras pertencentes ao grupo étnico-linguístico local esforçam-se por reconhecer a língua de herança das crianças e da comunidade, embora sofram pressão do currículo escolar, assentado, prioritariamente, no monolinguismo em português. Dentro de um cenário sociolinguístico complexo, as professoras necessitam tomar decisões pedagógicas sobre que práticas de letramento e em que língua valorizar na escola.We aim, in this article, to reflect on literacy practices in German language introduced in a rural school from the implementation of changes in the municipal language policies, and their interface with local literacy practices within a bilingual community of German immigration. The research data, which came from an ethnographic study and was analyzed under the light of the New Literacy Studies and of the bi/multilingualism of minority language groups, suggest that the teachers belonging to the local ethnic-linguistic group try to recognize the inherited language of both the children and the community, although they suffer the pressure of the school curriculum, based, mainly, in the Portuguese monolingualism. Within a complex sociolinguistic scenario, teachers should take pedagogic decisions over the literacy practices and language they should value at school.

  7. Rethinking literacy education in new times: Multimodality, multiliteracies, and new literacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenniffer Rowsell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a theoretical overview of new fields of research, pedagogy, and practice in literacy education. In a digital, media-driven, globalized world, educators are faced with the challenge of mediating traditional notions of what it means to be literate (e.g., read and writing print-based texts with new and ever-emerging skills and interests in technology and digital media. Focusing on a pilot study in Oakville, ON and a longitudinal research study in Sydney, Australia, we compel readers to think about literacy in a new light. Without a push to redefine literacy, educators run the risk of teaching and learning language and literacy skills in anachronistic paradigms and frameworks. While research has not been able to fully establish the impact of multimodal communication, it is essential that educators learn to use these different modes of communication to teach literacy.

  8. Toward Transnational Feminist Literacy Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sato, C.

    2014-01-01

    This essay expands transnational feminist methodology such that it better affirms both women's agency and noncapitalism. By bridging transnational feminism and antiessentialist Marxism in the context of feminist development studies, it builds on the contributions of Chandra Talpade Mohanty, which

  9. Learn about Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button What is Health Literacy? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Low Resolution ... and services to make appropriate health decisions. Health Literacy Capacity and Skills Capacity is the potential a ...

  10. Health Literacy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Health Literacy URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Health Literacy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  11. Health literacy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der Iris; Uiters, Ellen; Sørensen, Kristine; Röthlin, Florian; Pelikan, Jürgen; Rademakers, Jany; Boshuizen, Hendriek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health literacy is an important determinant of health, but national health literacy levels are known for only some European countries. This study aims to examine to what extent national health literacy levels can be estimated based on publicly available census data. Method:

  12. Health literacy in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diemer, Frederieke S.; Haan, Yentl C.; Nannan Panday, Rani V.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Oehlers, Glenn P.; Brewster, Lizzy M.

    2017-01-01

    Low health literacy is an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality. However, data on health literacy in low- and middle-income countries are scarce. Therefore, we assessed the level of health literacy in Suriname, a middle-income country with a high cardiovascular mortality. We estimated

  13. Literacy in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1991-01-01

    Literacy in South America must be understood in terms of the linguistic diversity there, where only 2 of 14 nations and territories are monolingual. Oral traditions, standardization of indigenous languages, nonstandard varieties of colonial languages, bilingual education and mother tongue literacy, literacy teaching, and politics are discussed.…

  14. Measuring News Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  15. A Review of the "Digital Turn" in the New Literacy Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kathy Ann

    2010-01-01

    Digital communication has transformed literacy practices and assumed great importance in the functioning of workplace, recreational, and community contexts. This article reviews a decade of empirical work of the New Literacy Studies, identifying the shift toward research of digital literacy applications. The article engages with the central…

  16. "What's Wrong with Papa Bear's Chair?": Toward Literacy as Involvement in the Second Grade Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Tim

    The purpose of this essay is to compare the "strong-text" approach to literacy (which equates literacy with a tool for the representation of reality) with the approach that views literacy as involvement through the intersection of theory and practice. Theoretical expositions have limits placed on their explanatory power; the effort of this paper…

  17. The Integration of Cognitive and Sociocultural Theories of Literacy Development: Why? How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive and sociocultural theories of literacy development are historically considered incommensurable in practice and in research. Cognitivists view literacy development as a succession of qualitatively varied skills whereas socioculturalists view literacy as socially and culturally embedded. Traditional educational discourses tend to reflect…

  18. Writing Programs as Distributed Networks: A Materialist Approach to University-Community Digital Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses how community-university digital media literacy projects are redefining literacy, literate practices, and institutions. Using Actor-Network Theory (ANT), which emphasizes the organizing process itself, I analyze the shifting definitions of literacy within one particular university-community collaboration. My analysis…

  19. New Literacies in a Web 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, ... [infinity] World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Donald J.; Forzani, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The rapid emergence of the Internet is having an historic impact on literacy practices and on the very nature of literacy itself. Each article in this issue has articulated these changes. Each brings a unique and important perspective to its analysis. They illustrate that, today, literacy means many different things to many different people. This…

  20. Don't Believe the Hype: Hip-Hop Literacies and English Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    Current scholarship suggests that many youths identify with hip-hop, especially youths of color. Study of this artistic form has been suggested as a means of helping youths acquire and become fluent in literacy practices. This article explores how the use of a hip-hop literacies curriculum addressed the literacy skills of urban ninth-grade English…

  1. Promoting Health Literacy in the Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruselius-Jensen, Maria; Bonde, Ane Høstgaard; Christensen, Julie Hellesøe

    2017-01-01

    counts and associated reflections positively influencing learning. However, in this study, classroom teaching was limited to a focus on cognitive skills and only partially supported the development of more critical health literacy skills. Our findings call for further research into approaches to support...... and teachers could change their daily practices. Only a limited number of discussions supported the development of critical health literacy. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that educators can successfully integrate health literacy development into classroom-based curriculum teaching, with pupils’ own step......Objective: Research has shown that developing health literacy in early life is critical to reducing lifestyle-related diseases, with schools being identified as central settings for this purpose. This paper examines how one classroom-based health educational programme, IMOVE, helped Danish primary...

  2. Linguistic Ethnography, Literacy Teaching and Teacher Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Grete; Nielsen, Henrik Balle

    in current attempts to research-base teacher education. Lefstein, A. & J. Snell. 2014. Better than best practice. Developing teaching and learning through dialogue. London: Routledge. Keywords: literacy teaching classroom dialogue teacher feedback linguistic ethnography research-based teacher education...... material consists of field notes and video observations from the literacy classroom combined with reflective interviews with the literacy teacher and analyses of pupils’ oral and written texts. Taking a linguistic ethnographic approach, the case study investigates the interplay between teacher, pupil...... eclecticism, openness and systematicity characteristic of a linguistic ethnographic analysis (Lefstein & Snell 2014, 185-86). In the poster, we will focus on emergent data analysis. Our main points of interest are 1) the classroom dialogue between teacher and pupils and 2) the literacy teacher’s assessment...

  3. Accessibility: global gateway to health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlow, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Health literacy, cited as essential to achieving Healthy People 2010's goals to "increase quality and years of healthy life" and to "eliminate health disparities," is defined by Healthy People as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions." Accessibility, by definition, the aforementioned "capacity to obtain," thus is health literacy's primary prerequisite. Accessibility's designation as the global gateway to health literacy is predicated also on life's realities: global aging and climate change, war and terrorism, and life-extending medical and technological advances. People with diverse access needs are health professionals' raison d'être. However, accessibility, consummately cross-cultural and universal, is virtually absent as a topic of health promotion and practice research and scholarly discussion of health literacy and equity. A call to action to place accessibility in its rightful premier position on the profession's agenda is issued.

  4. Literacy & Numeracy Studies Volume 15 No 2 Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Lee

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Literacy and Numeracy Studies takes up two major themes shaping the landscape of research and practice in adult literacy. The first of these is the more recent of the two: the intersections between literacy and professional and workplace practice. The second is perhaps a more sustained and enduring concern in the field with the relationship of literacy to context, place and culture. In this sense, this issue of the journal is an expression of the reach and diversity of concerns with literacy in ‘social participation, the utilisation of social resources and the quality of life’ (Green, Lo Bianco and Wyn, this volume and carries forward critical debates for the field across the span of practice from the workplace, to the classroom to the community.

  5. Effective Literacy Instruction for Students with Moderate or Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Susan R.; Keefe, Elizabeth B.

    2007-01-01

    For students with moderate or severe disabilities, developing literacy skills is a critical component of successful communication, employment, and community participation. Finally, educators have a practical, concise guidebook for helping these students meet NCLB's academic standards for literacy. Appropriate for use in all settings, including…

  6. Flowing toward Understanding: Suffering, Humility, and Compassion in Literacy Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie; Rainville, Kristin N.

    2014-01-01

    Literacy coaches are in the business of helping to create some kind of change--change in teaching practice, change in school policy, change in curriculum, or change in teachers and children themselves. But the social interactions necessary for change to happen, such as in-classroom consultations conducted by a literacy coach, are often fraught…

  7. Surveying Parental Mediation: Connections, Challenges and Questions for Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines three strategies of parental mediation--coviewing, restrictive mediation, and active mediation--in order to make connections, challenge, and raise questions for media literacy. Coviewing, whether it is intentional practice, or whether it functions to promote media literacy, is explored. Restrictive mediation, how it connects to…

  8. Toward Dialogic Literacy Education for the Internet Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegerif, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    In order to reconceptualize literacy education for the Internet Age, we first need to understand the extent to which our thinking has already been shaped by literacy practices. I begin this article with an exploration of the relationship between ways of communicating, ways of thinking, and the way in which we understand education. Face-to-face…

  9. Creating a Critical Literacy Milieu in a Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribling, Stacia M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the process of engaging in critical literacy practices with kindergarteners. The researcher spent six months in a kindergarten classroom taking extensive field notes on the ways in which the teacher and students explored issues of social justice through literacy activities. Data analysis using a…

  10. Journey through Transformation: A Case Study of Two Literacy Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Vicky; Ade-Ojo, Gordon O.

    2016-01-01

    The study draws on life history, literacy studies, and ethnographic approaches to exploring social practices as a frame to explore the narratives of two UK adult literacy learners who provide a description of their engagement with a transformative curriculum and pedagogical approach. One of the learners reveals his frustration at the lack of…

  11. Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary?

    OpenAIRE

    Rosanne Marie Cordell

    2013-01-01

    Digital Literacy is a more recent term than Information Literacy and is used for multiple categories of library users in multiple types of libraries. Determining the relationship between Information Literacy and Digital Literacy is essential before revision of the Information Literacy Standards can proceed.

  12. Literacy Instruction in Multilingual Classrooms: Engaging English Language Learners in Elementary School. Language & Literacy Series--Practitioners Bookshelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helman, Lori

    2012-01-01

    This hands-on guide shows elementary school teachers how to create multilingual classroom communities that support every learner's success in reading, writing, and general literacy development. The author provides a practical overview of key ideas and techniques and describes specific literacy activities that lead to vocabulary and oral English…

  13. Development, Validation, and Evaluation of Literacy 3D: A Package Supporting Tier 1 Preschool Literacy Instruction Implementation and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Abbott, Mary; Beecher, Constance; Atwater, Jane; Petersen, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, prekindergarten programs with literacy outcome goals are seeking to implement evidence-based practices to improve results. Such efforts require instructional intervention strategies to engage children as well as strategies to support teacher implementation. Reported is the iterative development of Literacy 3D, an enhanced support…

  14. Studying bilingual students’ literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Pia

    2012-01-01

    In the official educational discourse in the Nordic countries literacy teaching has become a central and contested issue. In both public and political debate literacy seems to be constructed as a unified concept streamlined for administration and measurement (Prinsloo & Baynham, 2008...... conceived of as a threat to a school’s profile (Rampton, Harris & Leung, 2001). In this paper, I focus on different conceptualizations of literacy and discuss the implications for research on bilingual children's literacy acquisition and the need to expand the understanding of literacy in ways, which might...... contribute to lift the basic understanding of bilinguals’ literacy out of a disqualifying political discourse. Drawing on the ongoing study Sign of Language (Laursen, 2011), I reflect on how a social semiotic framework might help open new research perspectives on bilingual children’s literacy acquisition...

  15. Health literacy in Europe: comparative results of the European health literacy survey (HLS-EU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Kristine; Pelikan, Jürgen M; Röthlin, Florian; Ganahl, Kristin; Slonska, Zofia; Doyle, Gerardine; Fullam, James; Kondilis, Barbara; Agrafiotis, Demosthenes; Uiters, Ellen; Falcon, Maria; Mensing, Monika; Tchamov, Kancho; van den Broucke, Stephan; Brand, Helmut

    2015-12-01

    Health literacy concerns the capacities of people to meet the complex demands of health in modern society. In spite of the growing attention for the concept among European health policymakers, researchers and practitioners, information about the status of health literacy in Europe remains scarce. This article presents selected findings from the first European comparative survey on health literacy in populations. The European health literacy survey (HLS-EU) was conducted in eight countries: Austria, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Ireland, the Netherlands, Poland and Spain (n = 1000 per country, n = 8000 total sample). Data collection was based on Eurobarometer standards and the implementation of the HLS-EU-Q (questionnaire) in computer-assisted or paper-assisted personal interviews. The HLS-EU-Q constructed four levels of health literacy: insufficient, problematic, sufficient and excellent. At least 1 in 10 (12%) respondents showed insufficient health literacy and almost 1 in 2 (47%) had limited (insufficient or problematic) health literacy. However, the distribution of levels differed substantially across countries (29-62%). Subgroups within the population, defined by financial deprivation, low social status, low education or old age, had higher proportions of people with limited health literacy, suggesting the presence of a social gradient which was also confirmed by raw bivariate correlations and a multivariate linear regression model. Limited health literacy represents an important challenge for health policies and practices across Europe, but to a different degree for different countries. The social gradient in health literacy must be taken into account when developing public health strategies to improve health equity in Europe. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association.

  16. "So Many Books They Don't Even All Fit on the Bookshelf": An Examination of Low-Income Mothers' Home Literacy Practices, Beliefs and Influencing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Brook E.; Cycyk, Lauren M.; Sandilos, Lia E.; Hammer, Carol S.

    2016-01-01

    Given the need to enhance the academic language and early literacy skills of young children from low-income homes and the importance of the home literacy environment in supporting children's development, the purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the home literacy environment of low-income African-American and Latino mothers of…

  17. Adapting to Teach Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, B.; Schwartz, K. L.

    2017-12-01

    Adaptation is a key strategy to deal with the effects of climate change, and it can also be a key strategy in teaching climate literacy. Adapting curriculum to include utilizing new instructional practices, modifying existing lessons, evaluating evidence and engaging students in real-world projects are strategies employed in Recharge the Rain. Arizona Project WET and Watershed Management Group developed the Recharge the Rain project, through a NOAA Environmental Literacy Grant, to build community resiliency to hazards associated with increased temperatures, drought and flooding in Arizona. Sixth through twelfth grade teachers, students and the public will move through a continuum from awareness, to knowledge gain, to conceptual understanding, to action. During the first year of the project, through professional development and ongoing guidance, teachers developed a climate literacy curriculum to use in their classrooms. Using systems thinking language and structure from the Cabrera Research Labs, teachers and students gain the thinking tools necessary to increase understanding of Earth's climate system. Lessons and resources for teaching about climate change are abundant and many, such as those on the Climate Literacy Education Awareness Network (CLEAN), have gone through an extensive review process. By cataloguing online resources and sharing these with teachers through a social bookmarking tool, wakelet.com, teachers are easily able to find appropriate teaching material. Engaging students in evaluating evidence requires the data to be relevant to their everyday lives. Online data resources are readily available from NOAA and other sources at both the global and local levels. When teachers, students and the public contribute to the data collection process in citizen science projects such as CoCoRaHS, iSeeChange, and USA National Phenology Network, the data empowers them to act in ways to mitigate the climate threats in their community. Adapting to teach climate

  18. Enhancing Literacy Skills through Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistek-Chandler, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    Discusses how to use technology to enhance literacy skills. Highlights include defining literacy, including information literacy; research to support reading and writing instruction; literacy software; thinking skills; organizational strategies for writing and reading; how technology can individualize literacy instruction; and a new genre of…

  19. Undergraduate Information Literacy Instruction Is Not Enough to Prepare Junior Doctors for Evidence Based Practice. A Review of: Cullen, R., Clark, M., & Esson, R. (2011. Evidence-based information-seeking skills of junior doctors entering the workforce: An evaluation of the impact of information literacy training during pre-clinical years. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 28(2, 119-129. doi:10.1111/j.1471-1842.2011.00933.x

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol D. Howe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine if junior doctorsentering the workforce retain the informationliteracy skills they learned as undergraduates.Design – Structured interviews andobservations.Setting – Wellington Medical School of theUniversity of Otago in New Zealand. Medicinein New Zealand is an undergraduate program.Subjects – Thirty-eight University of Otagostudents who were starting their fourth year ofundergraduate medical training between 1994and 2004. At the time of this study, thestudents had graduated and were a number ofyears into advanced training for theirspeciality, i.e., junior doctors. The participantsrepresented five cohorts, each having receiveda different level of information literacyinstruction as undergraduates. Cohort 1, withthe most years in clinical practice at the time ofthe study, received no formal informationliteracy instruction as undergraduates. Cohorts2 to 5 received information literacy instructionin their fourth undergraduate year. The focusof instruction for cohorts 2 and 3 was ondeveloping an effective search strategy,whereas the instruction for cohorts 4 and 5focused more on the critical appraisal ofarticles. Methods – In 2008 and 2009, the authors contacted cohort graduates. Two medical librarians from the Wellington Medical Library interviewed and observed participants to establish their level of information literacy. The librarians asked an initial six questions to determine how much participants remembered of their undergraduate information literacy instruction, how they search for clinical information, what databases they use, how they evaluate information, and if they have had any formal or informal information literacy instruction since graduating. For question seven, participants described a recent situation in which they searched for clinical information relating to a given patient. For question eight, participants rated their own skill level as “no skills”, “some skills”, or “highly skilled

  20. Health Literacy Among Parents of Newborn Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackley, Amy; Winter, Michael; Guillen, Ursula; Paul, David A.; Locke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Health Literacy is the ability to obtain, process, and understand health information to make knowledgeable health decisions. PURPOSE To determine baseline health literacy of NICU parents at a tertiary care hospital during periods of crucial information exchange. METHODS Health Literacy of English speaking NICU parents was assessed using the Newest vital Sign (NVS) on admission (n=121) and discharge (n=59). A quasi-control group of well newborn (WBN) parents (n=24) and prenatal obstetric clinic (PRE) parents (n=18) were included. A single, Likert-style question measured nurse’s assessment of parental comprehension with discharge teaching. Suspected limited health literacy (SLHL) was defined as NVS score of ≤3. FINDINGS / RESULTS Forty-three percent of parents on NICU admission and 32% at NICU discharge had SLHL (pNICU parents and 25% of WBN parents with SLHL at time of admission/infant birth had a college education. Nurse subjective measurement of parental comprehension of discharge instructions was not correlated to the objective measurement of health literacy (p=0.26). IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE SLHL is common during peak time periods of complex health discussion in the NICU, WBN, and PRE settings. NICU providers may not accurately gauge parent’s literacy status. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH Methods for improving health communication are needed. Studies should evaluate SLHL in a larger NICU population and across different languages and cultures. PMID:27391562

  1. Education, Technology and Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Koldkjær Sølling, Ina; Carøe, Per; Siggaard Mathiesen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration creates natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between these three areas of expertise is to create an understanding of skills and cultural differences in each area. Futhermore, the aim is to enable future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve health literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view of welfare technology, a Student Academy was created as a theoretically- and practically-oriented learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management related to e-health and health literacy. The Student Academy inspires students, stakeholders, politicians, DanAge Association members, companies, and professionals to participate in training, projects, workshops, and company visits.

  2. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between the 3...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  3. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... between the 3 areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  4. Health Literacy Based Communication by Illinois Pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Devraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Health literacy has received attention as an important issue for pharmacists to consider when interacting with patients. Yet, there is little information about methods pharmacists use to communicate with patients and their extent of use of health literacy based interventions during patient interactions. The purpose of this study was to examine methods of communication and types of health literacy based interventions that practicing pharmacists use in Illinois. Methods: A survey instrument addressing the study purpose was designed along with other items that were part of a larger study. Eleven items in the survey referred to pharmacist-patient communication. The instrument was pilot tested before administering to a random sample of 1457 pharmacists from the Illinois Pharmacists Association. Data were primarily collected via a mailed survey using Dillman’s five step total design method (TDM. Two reminder letters were mailed at two week intervals to non-respondents. Results: Usable responses were obtained from 701 respondents (48.1% response rate. Using simple words (96% and asking patients open-ended questions to determine comprehension (85% were the most frequent methods that pharmacists used to communicate with patients. Only 18% of respondents always asked patients to repeat medication instructions to confirm understanding. The various recommended types of health literacy interventions were “always” performed by only 8 to 33% of the respondents. More than 50% of respondents indicated that they rarely or never had access to an interpreter (51%, or employed bilingual pharmacists (59%. Only 11% of pharmacists said that they rarely/never pay attention to nonverbal cues that may suggest low health literacy. Conclusions: Pharmacists infrequently use action oriented health literacy interventions such as using visual aids, having interpreter access, medication calendars, etc. Additional training on health literacy, its scope, and

  5. Academic Literacies: Providing a Space for the Socio-Political Dynamics of EAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights the potential of academic literacies as a theoretical framework for EAP, encompassing not only work on texts, but the wider, socio-political, geopolitical, and institutional contexts and practices in and with which EAP operates. An academic literacies approach foregrounds social practices, and one particular practice, that…

  6. Tres retos para la investigación y formación de docentes en inglés Three Challenges for Research and English Teacher Education: A Reflexivity on Literacy Beliefs and Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mora Raúl Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo está basado en el trabajo de investigación que culminó en la disertación doctoral sobre la evolución de las creencias y prácticas en literacidad de docentes y egresados de un programa de educación en enseñanza del inglés. Inspirado en la idea de reflexividad como un proceso de reflexión social que lleva a repensar el quehacer de las prácticas educativas, este artículo plantea tres retos: (a En vez de indagar sobre las contradicciones en los mensajes que se transmiten en los cursos de preparación docente, tenemos que mirar las yuxtaposiciones que se están presentando y que aún no son completamente reconocidas; (b Tenemos que repensar la idea de lecto-escritura y empezar a hablar más acerca de literacidad y (c Tenemos que repensar qué significa el preparar docentes involucrados en procesos de literacidad y segunda lengua en el contexto social, político y tecnológico de este milenio. This article is based on the research work that comprised my doctoral dissertation about the evolution of the literacy beliefs and practices of a group of faculty and graduates from an English teacher education program. Inspired by the idea of reflexivity as a social reflection process that leads to rethinking educational practices, this article poses three challenges: (a Instead of inquiring about the messages found in teacher education courses, we need to look at the unrecognized overlaps that are taking place; (b we need to rethink literacy as a construct much larger than just talking about reading and writing; and (c we need to rethink the characteristics of teachers education in regards to issues of literacy and second language in the social, political, and technological contexts of the new millennium.

  7. Internet at school: possibility for information literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conceição da Silva Linhares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the contribution of teaching practices using social networking tools and computer literacy of high school students the Internet is analyzed. According to authors like Gasque (2012, Cervero (2007 Area (2006, Smith (2002 and Freire (1987, knowing how to use the information and the means to express it, a creative approach, understanding of what we read in conjunction keywords, concepts and ideas on how to intertextuality. This knowledge is evaluative in today's society, adjective by the exponential increase of information available in various formats and languages device through information and communication, including Internet technologies. The qualitative approach in the perspective of participant observation is the option that the object of this study suits to consider in its analysis, the relationships between subjects and cultural mediations, objectified by Internet spaces and tools to illuminate computer literacy. Develop pedagogical practices using social media and Internet tools for computer literacy work contributes to a significant experience with information.

  8. The Construction of Mathematical Literacy Problems for Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasari, P. N.; Herman, T.; Jupri, A.

    2017-09-01

    The students of junior high school should have mathematical literacy ability to formulate, apply, and interpret mathematics in problem solving of daily life. Teaching these students are not enough by giving them ordinary mathematics problems. Teaching activities for these students brings consequence for teacher to construct mathematical literacy problems. Therefore, the aim of this study is to construct mathematical literacy problems to assess mathematical literacy ability. The steps of this study that consists of analysing, designing, theoretical validation, revising, limited testing to students, and evaluating. The data was collected with written test to 38 students of grade IX at one of state junior high school. Mathematical literacy problems consist of three essays with three indicators and three levels at polyhedron subject. The Indicators are formulating and employing mathematics. The results show that: (1) mathematical literacy problems which are constructed have been valid and practical, (2) mathematical literacy problems have good distinguishing characteristics and adequate distinguishing characteristics, (3) difficulty levels of problems are easy and moderate. The final conclusion is mathematical literacy problems which are constructed can be used to assess mathematical literacy ability.

  9. Framing Information Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Anneke Dirkx

    2016-01-01

    In 2000 the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) published the Standards for Information Literacy. After 15 years these standards were in desperate need of revision. Instead of releasing a revised edition of the Standards, in 2015 ACRL presented a completely new vision on information literacy in higher education. In this keynote we will explore the new ACRL Framework for Information Literacy in all its glory. We will compare it to the old standards. Is this new American Fram...

  10. 'New’ literacies: technologies and values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Lankshear

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is too easy to make light of ‘new literacies’ by saying things like: “Well, there are always newer ones coming along”. Such remarks suggest new literacies have a similar kind of life trajectory to an automobile: new in 2009, semi-new in 2010, and old hat by 2011. Against this kind of “that’s so yesterday” perspective, we suggest in this article that ‘new literacies’ are best understood in terms of an historical period of social, cultural, institutional, economic, and intellectual change that is likely to span many decades – some of which are already behind us. We associate new literacies with an historical conjuncture and an ascending social paradigm. From this perspective we suggest that the kinds of practices we currently identify as new literacies will cease to be ‘new’ once the social ways characterizing the ascending paradigm have become sufficiently establised and grounded to be regarded as conventional. Furthermore we suggest that at the heart of the idea of new ethos stuff is the idea of technological change aligning with a range of increasingly popular values.

  11. Youth Texting: Help or Hindrance to Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebroff, Dmitri

    2018-01-01

    An extensive amount of research has been performed in recent years into the widespread practice of text messaging in youth. As part of this broad area of research, the associations between youth texting and literacy have been investigated in a variety of contexts. A comprehensive, semi-systematic review of the literature into texting and literacy…

  12. Information Literacy in Croatia: An Ideological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poler Kovacic, Melita; Zgrabljic Rotar, Nada; Erjavec, Karmen

    2012-01-01

    New information and communication technologies were widely perceived as something that would lead post-socialist European countries towards the technologically developed information society. In this article, a critical perspective is taken in examining information literacy as an ideological form. The deconstruction of ideological practice was…

  13. Beyond the Hyperbole: Information Literacy Reconsidered

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Information literacy, as a concept, has suffered from terminological confusion and has been burdened with untenable expectations. In addition, insufficient attention has been given to the place of information with the context of information behavior or information practices generally. Significant challenges remain to developing information…

  14. Servant Leadership and Instructional Literacy Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Thelma Jodale

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to enhance student achievement in reading, many high schools have integrated instructional literacy coaches into the teaching staff to provide support for the English teachers. The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to explore the relationship between the self-reported servant leadership practices used by…

  15. Building Communities: Teachers Researching Literacy Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremin, Teresa; Mottram, Marilyn; Collins, Fiona; Powell, Sacha; Drury, Rose

    2012-01-01

    In the light of wide recognition that the traffic between home and school is traditionally one-way, this article reports on a deliberately counter-cultural project that involved teachers in researching children's everyday literacy practices and "funds of knowledge" (Gonzalez, Moll, & Amanti, 2005) over a year. Eighteen primary…

  16. Academic Literacies: The Word Is Not Enough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Kendall; Pilcher, Nick

    2018-01-01

    For Academic Literacies, the world is textually mediated; written texts and what informs them reveal elements such as subject-discipline practices. Furthermore, multi-modalities, for example, visual representation, inform written text, and multiple methods of inquiry, including interviews, shed light on written text production. In this article we…

  17. Information Literacy and Digital Literacy: Competing or Complementary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordell, Rosanne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Digital literacy is a more recent concept than information literacy and can relate to multiple categories of library users in multiple types of libraries. Determining the relationship between information literacy and digital literacy is essential before revision of the ACRL "Standards" can proceed.

  18. Assessing the Development of Educational Research Literacy: The Effect of Courses on Research Methods in Studies of Educational Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß Ophoff, Jana; Schladitz, Sandra; Leuders, Juliane; Leuders, Timo; Wirtz, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to purposefully access, reflect, and use evidence from educational research (Educational Research Literacy) is expected of future professionals in educational practice. Based on the presented conceptual framework, a test instrument was developed to assess the different competency aspects: Information Literacy, Statistical Literacy, and…

  19. The Essence of the Distributed Leadership Experience of a High School Literacy Coaching Team: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniak, Nancy Milwee

    2012-01-01

    This is a phenomenological study of a high school literacy coaching team's experience during the 2010-2011 school year, the first year of its existence. As a distributed leadership organizational routine, the practice of literacy coaching was adopted by a large suburban high school to promote its initiative to infuse literacy strategies into…

  20. The Pedagogy of Critical Enjoyment: Teaching and Reaching the Hearts and Minds of Adolescent Learners through Media Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Theresa Anne

    2012-01-01

    While there is consensus regarding the definition of media literacy, classroom-based studies of media literacy education in action are few and research that investigates how teachers implement media literacy in practice are needed, including information about why it is taught, what is taught, and how it is taught. Through a purposefully selected…

  1. Visual literacy in HCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overton, K.; Sosa-Tzec, O.; Smith, N.; Blevis, E.; Odom, W.; Hauser, S.; Wakkary, R.L.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this workshop is to develop ideas about and expand a research agenda for visual literacy in HCI. By visual literacy, we mean the competency (i) to understand visual materials, (ii) to create visuals materials, and (iii) to think visually [2]. There are three primary motivations for this

  2. Invest in Financial Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Sarah B.; McGatha, Maggie B.; Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of the economy elevates the need to build awareness of financial markets and personal finance among the nation's young people through implementing a financial literacy curriculum in schools. A limited amount of time spent on financial literacy can have a positive effect on students' budgeting skills. This knowledge will only add…

  3. Literacy, Learning, and Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Considers the expanding definition of literacy from traditional reading and writing skills to include technological, visual, information, and networking literacy. Discusses the impact of media on social interactions and intellectual development; linking technology to educational goals; influences of new media symbol systems on communication;…

  4. Computer Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Cognitive Aspect ," AEDS Journal, 18, 3 (Spring 1985) 150. "°Geoffrey Akst, "Computer Literacy: An Interview with Dr. Michael Hoban." Journal of Develop- m...1984. Cheng, Tina T.; Plake, Barbara; and Stevens, Dorothy Jo. "A Validation Study of the Computer Literacy Examination: Cognitive Aspect ." AEDS

  5. Marketing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, more than a decade after the original Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter the Standards) were institutionalized as the goal of academic library instruction, the Information Literacy Competency Standards Review Task Force convened by ACRL recommended…

  6. Institutionalizing Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sharon A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that information literacy is essential for individual and community empowerment, workforce readiness, and global competitiveness. However, there is a history of difficulty in integrating information literacy with the postsecondary educational process. This paper posits that a greater understanding of the…

  7. Literacy in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the various facets and dimensions of literacy programs in South Asia indicates that literacy is viewed as a means of human resource development geared toward meaningful participation of all sectors in society, with individual programs varying according to the magnitude of illiteracy, national goals, linguistic setting, and regional…

  8. Levels of Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, Keith

    Democracy in western countries now depends on literacy at every level: censuses by which governments can plan for the future; elections which are the cornerstone of democratic choice; local meetings which have agendas and minutes--the whole apparatus of social living is organized and recorded through literacy. This paper is concerned with how…

  9. Why Does Media Literacy Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargant, Naomi

    2004-01-01

    Media literacy is taking its place in the array of literacies increasingly recognised as necessary for participating actively in democracy or, indeed, in day-to-day life. Financial literacy is another current example. "Literacy" is a term now widely used in relation to adults. The Oxford English Dictionary describes it as a…

  10. Literacy in the 21st century: Towards a dynamic nexus of social relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavot, Aaron

    2015-06-01

    Literacy is an essential means of communication. It enables individuals, communities and institutions to interact, over time and across space, as they develop a web of social relations via language. Effective literacy policies, programmes and practices expand the scale of social communication and interaction. Thus, literacy thrives when a state of connectedness - or social nexus of relations - is forged and sustained among individuals, households, communities and social institutions. This paper provides an overview of recent literacy trends and challenges as well as core aspects of the policy strategies which seek to address them. It reviews the main barriers or complicating factors which limit the effective implementation of literacy policies. The paper describes how the notion of non-formal education, which frames many scholarly and policy accounts of adult literacy work today, is under-conceptualised. One result of this is a relatively undifferentiated view of literacy programmes and their specific non-formal components. The author argues that the concept of the social nexus of literacy is implicit in many analyses of literacy policies and strategies. Thus, well-defined, context-specific and sharply conceived literacy policies, which enhance the social nexus of literacy, are crucial for improving the effectiveness of literacy work.

  11. Argumentation to Foster Pre-Service Science Teachers' Knowledge, Competency, and Attitude on the Domains of Chemical Literacy of Acids and Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigdemoglu, C.; Arslan, H. O.; Cam, A.

    2017-01-01

    Argumentative practices have the potential to contribute to scientific literacy. However, these practices are not widely incorporated in science classrooms and so their effect on the domains of literacy is still not revealed. Therefore, this study proposes to reveal the effect of argumentation on the three domains of chemical literacy related to…

  12. Why Information Literacy Is Invisible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Badke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many information literacy programs on higher education campuses, the literature of information literacy and the concept of information literacy as a viable academic subject remain hidden to most professors and academic administrators. Information literacy is invisible to academia because it is misunderstood, academic administrators have not put it on their institutions' agendas, the literature of information literacy remains in the library silo, there is a false belief that information literacy is acquired only by experience, there is a false assumption that technological ability is the same as information literacy, faculty culture makes information literacy less significant than other educational pursuits, faculty have a limited perception of the ability of librarians. and accrediting bodies have not yet advanced information literacy to a viable position in higher education. The new information age demands that these barriers be overcome and information literacy take a prominent place within the academic experience.

  13. Why Information Literacy Is Invisible

    OpenAIRE

    William Badke

    2011-01-01

    Despite the many information literacy programs on higher education campuses, the literature of information literacy and the concept of information literacy as a viable academic subject remain hidden to most professors and academic administrators. Information literacy is invisible to academia because it is misunderstood, academic administrators have not put it on their institutions' agendas, the literature of information literacy remains in the library silo, there is a false belief that infor...

  14. Researching Critical Literacy: A Critical Study of Analysis of Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sluys, Katie; Lewison, Mitzi; Flint, Amy Seely

    2006-01-01

    Studying critical literacies includes examining how research practices influence what is learned about classroom activity and the world. This article highlights the processes and practices used in studying 1 classroom conversation. The data, drawn from an elementary school classroom of a Critical Literacy in Action teacher-researcher group member,…

  15. Literacy and Capital in Immigrant Youths' Online Networks across Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wan Shun Eva

    2014-01-01

    Communication technologies are playing an increasingly prominent role in facilitating immigrants' social networks across countries and the transnational positioning of immigrant youth in their online language and literacy practices. Drawing from a comparative case study of the digital literacy practices of immigrant youth of Chinese descent,…

  16. A practical report of “Studies in School Mental Health” at graduate school coursework toward the development of mental health literacy education in elementary and secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    今田, 雄三

    2018-01-01

    According to changes in social environment, practicing regional psychological assistance should be extended to nationwide contribution for people’s mental health enhancement. In response to the changes, the author reports the details of the 2017 coursework "Studies School Mental Health" at graduate school. As the unique practice of this university, graduate students training for psychological experts at elementary and secondary school education cultivate practical skills for mental health lit...

  17. Applying Earlier Literacy Research in Iran to Current Literacy Theory and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Street

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I attempt to bring together approaches toliteracy in theory and in practice, drawing upon variousactivities I have been involved in over the years–research inIranian villages during the 1970s; linking research andtheory to literacy policy, with particular reference to acontribution to the Unesco Global Monitoring Report in2004 and involvement in an ongoing adult literacy trainingprogramme appropriately entitled Learning Empowermentthrough Training in Ethnographic Research (LETTER.IJSCL is interested in publishing original research andreview articles on the relationship between society, culture,and language and in particular ‘linking sound theoreticalapproaches on these fields with visible practical applicationsthat can be used by specialists in anthropology, sociology,linguistics, education, intercultural studies, and policymaking’. I hope that this piece on literacy, with duereference to work in Iran, will fit with that brief.

  18. Envisioning New Technologies in Teacher Practice: Moving Forward, Circling Back Using a Teacher Action Research Approach. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 47

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong-Wilson, Teresa, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    How do classroom teachers envision new technologies within their practice? In the conversation on incorporating new technologies into classrooms, teachers are often sidelined. "Envisioning New Technologies in Teacher Practice" looks at the complex ways in which teachers move forward to embrace change as well as how they circle back, continually…

  19. Using apps for learning across the curriculum a literacy-based framework and guide

    CERN Document Server

    Beach, Richard

    2014-01-01

    How can apps be used to foster learning with literacy across the curriculum? This book offers both a theoretical framework for considering app affordances and practical ways to use apps to build students' disciplinary literacies and to foster a wide range of literacy practices.Using Apps for Learning Across the Curriculumpresents a wide range of different apps and also assesses their value features methods for and apps related to planning instruction and assessing student learning identifies favorite apps whose affordances are most likely to foster certain disciplinary literacies includes reso

  20. The Vocational Turn in Adult Literacy Education and the Impact of the International Adult Literacy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druine, Nathalie; Wildemeersch, Danny

    2000-09-01

    The authors critically examine some of the underlying epistemological and theoretical assumptions of the IALS. In doing so, they distinguish among two basic orientations towards literacy. First, the standard approach (of which IALS is an example) subscribes to the possibility of measuring literacy as abstract, cognitive skills, and endorses the claim that there is an important relationship between literacy skills and economic success in the so-called 'knowledge society.' The second, called a socio-cultural approach, insists on the contextual and power-related character of people's literacy practices. The authors further illustrate that the assumptions of the IALS are rooted in a neo-liberal ideology that forces all members of society to adjust to the exigencies of the globalised economy. In the current, contingent conditions of the risk society, however, it does not seem very wise to limit the learning of adults to enhancing labour-market competencies. Adult education should relate to the concrete literacy practices people already have in their lives. It should make its learners co-responsible actors of their own learning process and participants in a democratic debate on defining the kind of society people want to build.

  1. Video Game Literacy - Exploring new paradigms and new educational activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Felini

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Literacy is a complex concept of relevance for both traditional and most recent educational theories. Today, concepts of media literacy are being discussed widely. In this article a simple theoretical model and an action-research project are presented. The research project focuses on a training course aiming at the development and strengthening of critical thinking and communicative skills of young people by way of making use of video games. Practical aspects of how to produce a video game with teens and conceptual aspects towards a "video game literacy" are discussed.

  2. Video Game Literacy - Exploring new paradigms and new educational activities

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano Felini

    2010-01-01

    Literacy is a complex concept of relevance for both traditional and most recent educational theories. Today, concepts of media literacy are being discussed widely. In this article a simple theoretical model and an action-research project are presented. The research project focuses on a training course aiming at the development and strengthening of critical thinking and communicative skills of young people by way of making use of video games. Practical aspects of how to produce a video game wi...

  3. Building a New Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culkin, John; Drexel, John

    1981-01-01

    Media education specialist John Culkin talks with editor John Drexel about learning to read in the television age--and discusses a new alphabet, UNIFON, that may help solve the literacy crisis. (Editor)

  4. The Balanced Literacy Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willows, Dale

    2002-01-01

    Describes professional development program in Ontario school district to improve student reading and writing skills. Program used food-pyramid concepts to help teacher learn to provide a balanced and flexible approach to literacy instruction based on student needs. (PKP)

  5. Does literacy improve finance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Martha; Olen, Helaine

    2015-04-01

    When economists ask questions about basic financial principles, most ordinary people answer incorrectly. Economic experts call this condition "financial illiteracy," which suggests that poor financial outcomes are due to a personal deficit of reading-related skills. The analogy to reading is compelling because it suggests that we can teach our way out of population-wide financial failure. In this comment, we explain why the idea of literacy appeals to policy makers in the advanced industrial nations. But we also show that the narrow skill set laid out by economists does not satisfy the politically inclusive definition of literacy that literacy studies fought for. We identify several channels through which people engage with ideas about finance and demonstrate that not all forms of literacy will lead people to the educational content prescribed by academic economists. We argue that truly financial literate people can defy the demands of financial theory and financial institutions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Embracing early literacy indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig; Hansen, Ole Henrik; Jensen, Anders Skriver

    2010-01-01

    Abstract til paper om early literacy indikatorer. Det paper abstractet er knyttet til var en del af et inviteret, selvorganiseret symposium som afrapporterede EASE-projektet (www.ease-eu.com) på OMEP's 26. verdenskongres.......Abstract til paper om early literacy indikatorer. Det paper abstractet er knyttet til var en del af et inviteret, selvorganiseret symposium som afrapporterede EASE-projektet (www.ease-eu.com) på OMEP's 26. verdenskongres....

  7. The Ocean Literacy Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; Strang, C.

    2008-12-01

    "Ocean Literacy is an understanding of the ocean's influence on you and your influence on the ocean." This simple statement captures the spirit of a conceptual framework supporting ocean literacy (COSEE et al., 2005). The framework comprises 7 essential principles and 44 fundamental concepts an ocean literate person would know (COSEE et al., 2005). The framework is the result of an extensive grassroots effort to reach consensus on (1) a definition for ocean literacy and (2) an articulation of the most important concepts to be understood by ocean-literate citizen (Cava et al., 2005). In the process of reaching consensus on these "big ideas" about the ocean, what began as a series of workshops has emerged as a campaign "owned" by an ever-expanding community of individuals, organizations and networks involved in developing and promoting the framework. The Ocean Literacy Framework has provided a common language for scientists and educators working together and serves as key guidance for the ocean science education efforts. This presentation will focus on the impact this Ocean Literacy Campaign has had to date as well as efforts underway to provide additional tools to enable educators and educational policy makers to further integrate teaching and learning about the ocean and our coasts into formal K-12 education and informal education. COSEE, National Geographic Society, NOAA, College of Exploration (2005). Ocean Literacy: The Essential Principles of Ocean Sciences Grades K-12, a jointly published brochure, URL: http://www.coexploration.org/oceanliteracy/documents/OceanLitChart.pdf Cava, F., S. Schoedinger , C. Strang, and P. Tuddenham (2005). Science Content and Standards for Ocean Literacy: A Report on Ocean Literacy, URL: http://www.coexploration.org/oceanliteracy/documents/OLit2004-05_Final_Report.pdf.

  8. Family Literacy and Second Language Literacy Research: Focus on Language Minority Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Yıldırım

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Countries like the U. S. A. or Canada have citizens from various ethnic backgrounds. Although English is the dominant language in many parts of these countries, immigrants generally prefer speaking their native language when they are in their homes. Whatever the reason for using native language at home is, when we consider the children in these families, we can say that being exposed to different languages at home and at school may be a problem for their language development.Purpose of Study: There are many studies conducted in order to better understand the problems of language minority children. A great deal of literature on language minority students focuses on the ties between these children‟s literacy development and their literacy practices at home. In other words, these studies aim to see how the literacy events these children are exposed to at home affect their literacy learning in the second language.Methods: This paper is an attempt to put together and discuss various theoretical and empirical studies conducted on the literacy development of language minority children in English speaking countries.Findings: Literacy education of language minority students is not an easy task. It is very complicated and difficult to achieve as it requires a complete collaboration among all the responsible parties (teachers, families, researchers, education policy makers, school administrators. Conclusion and Recommendations: Successful collaboration among all the involved parties would bring successful outcomes in terms of children‟s healthy literacy development. The collaboration between teachers and families is the most vital one because these two parties are the ones that have one-to-one interaction with children.

  9. A Design-Based Research Capturing Science Teachers' Practices of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) Integration Using the New Literacy Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiang-Kwei; Hsu, Hui-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Technology integration in K-12 classrooms is usually teacher-centered and has insufficient impact on students' learning. The purpose of this project is to facilitate science teachers' use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) as cognitive tools to shift their practices from teacher-centered methods to constructivist,…

  10. Talking Circles for Adolescent Girls in an Urban High School: A Restorative Practices Program for Building Friendships and Developing Emotional Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Martha Ann

    2012-01-01

    Restorative Practices and Restorative Justice programs in schools are a new and emerging field. Meeting in Circles to build community, resolve conflict, and learn interactively are core components of these programs. This ethnographic study, which took place February 2010 to December 2011, evaluates 12 small, out-of-classroom Talking Circles for 60…

  11. Coaching and Demonstration of Evidence-Based Book-Reading Practices: Effects on Head Start Teachers' Literacy-Related Behaviors and Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettinger, Maribeth; Stoiber, Karen C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of coaching with versus without demonstrations of evidence-based book-reading practices on teachers' use of strategies during independent book-reading periods. A total of 22 Head Start teachers were randomly assigned to one of two cohorts. One cohort (n = 12) participated in biweekly coaching sessions that included…

  12. Literacy of the Other: The Inner Life of Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarc, Aparna Mishra

    2015-01-01

    My paper situates literacy in the pre-symbolic implications of the maternal relation. Turning to child psychoanalysis, particularly Melanie Klein's theories of infancy and symbolization, my paper discusses the role the child's inner life plays in her engagements with literacy. Citing cases of second language learning, I pose literacy as…

  13. Reform in Literacy Education in China. Literacy Lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yianwei, Wang; Jiyuan, Li

    Literacy in China is mainly concerned with illiteracy in rural areas. Therefore, reforming literacy education is largely a problem of how to eliminate rural literacy within the general framework of reform in contemporary China. From 1949 to 1988, the illiteracy rate among the population decreased from 80 percent to 20 percent. There are still…

  14. New literacies, multiple literacies, unlimited literacies: what now, what next, where to? A response to blue listerine, parochialism and ASL literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter V

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to Blue Listerine, Parochialism, and ASL Literacy (Czubek, 2006). The author presents his views on the concepts of literacy and the new and multiple literacies. In addition, the merits of print literacy and other types of literacies are discussed. Although the author agrees that there is an American Sign Language (ASL) literacy, he maintains that there should be a distinction between conversational "literacy" forms (speech and sign) and secondary literacy forms (reading and writing). It might be that cognitive skills associated with print literacy and, possibly, other captured literacy forms, are necessary for a technological, scientific-driven society such as that which exists in the United States.

  15. Advancing organizational health literacy in health care organizations serving high-needs populations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Nancy L; Wray, Ricardo J; Zellin, Stacie; Gautam, Kanak; Jupka, Keri

    2012-01-01

    Health care organizations, well positioned to address health literacy, are beginning to shift their systems and policies to support health literacy efforts. Organizations can identify barriers, emphasize and leverage their strengths, and initiate activities that promote health literacy-related practices. The current project employed an open-ended approach to conduct a needs assessment of rural federally qualified health center clinics. Using customized assessment tools, the collaborators were then able to determine priorities for changing organizational structures and policies in order to support continued health literacy efforts. Six domains of organizational health literacy were measured with three methods: environmental assessments, patient interviews, and key informant interviews with staff and providers. Subsequent strategic planning was conducted by collaborators from the academic and clinic teams and resulted in a focused, context-appropriate action plan. The needs assessment revealed several gaps in organizational health literacy practices, such as low awareness of health literacy within the organization and variation in perceived values of protocols, interstaff communication, and patient communication. Facilitators included high employee morale and patient satisfaction. The resulting targeted action plan considered the organization's culture as revealed in the interviews, informing a collaborative process well suited to improving organizational structures and systems to support health literacy best practices. The customized needs assessment contributed to an ongoing collaborative process to implement organizational changes that aided in addressing health literacy needs.

  16. Literacy: a discussion of graphocentrism in microculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Donizeth Euzébio

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the characterization of graphocentrism in microculture. We aim to describe, based on literacy studies, the presence of written language in the life of socially and historically situated subjects, thematizing the axiological capital of less favored socioeconomic contexts. Subjects are children undergoing schooling process, living in a district of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Discussions on the theme are based on Barton (1994, Barton, Hamilton and Ivanic (2000, Heath (1982, and Street (1994, 2003. Looking at literacy from a sociocultural perspective implies understanding that subjects deal with written language in their daily life in different ways. It seems that school tends to teach subject matters defined beforehand, and this hampers the dialog with different social practices played by students who come from family environments with different schooling levels. This study is inserted in a project whose focus is the defense of a more sensible look of school concerning the different realities which constitute school itself, regarding the teaching of written language. The present research aims to answer the following questions: How can we configure the microculture (family, school, church, neighborhood – more or less graphocentric – where children attending 1st to 5th grade live, in an economically less privileged community of Florianópolis? How can we delineate the axiological capital regarding the mastering of written language by those children? What literacy events are more recurrent within that microculture? The data were collected by means of interviews, observations and field annotations, focusing on the visible elements of literacy events, similarly to what has been done by Hamiton (2000, such as participants, environments, artifacts, and activities. On the hand, the non-visible constituents of literacy practices, such as hidden participants, domain, resources, and routines, were observed during

  17. The Geography of Financial Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Bumcrot; Judy Lin; Annamaria Lusardi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how well equipped today’s households are to make complex financial decisions in the face of often high-cost and high-risk financial instruments. Specifically we focus on financial literacy. Most importantly, we describe the geography of financial literacy, i.e., how financial literacy is distributed across the fifty US states. We describe the correlation of financial literacy and some important aggregate variables, such as state-level poverty rates. Finally, we examine the...

  18. Pediatric injury information seeking for mothers with young children: The role of health literacy and ehealth literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganello, Jennifer A; Falisi, Angela L; Roberts, Kristin J; Smith, Katherine C; McKenzie, Lara B

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of preferred sources of injury information among parents is needed to develop best practices for information dissemination. Yet, almost no research examines injury information seeking for a national sample of mothers. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in 2013 with 1081 mothers in the United States (U.S.) with at least one child literacy with the Morris Single-Item Screener (18% low), and eHealth literacy using the eHEALS (28% low). The internet was the most preferred source for injury information (76%), followed by health providers (44%), and family/friends (35%). Most mothers selected the internet as the first choice for information about bicycle helmets (65%) and car seats (63%). For poison prevention, preferences were mixed; 48% internet compared with 41% health providers. Mothers with low health literacy were more likely to have discussed injury prevention with their doctors ( P = 0.022) and searched for injury information ( P = 0.001), but less likely to report the internet as a top source ( P literacy were less likely to search for injury information ( P information ( P = 0.028). Findings suggest the internet is a common source of injury prevention information, but health providers remain a valuable resource for mothers, especially those with lower literacy skills. Despite widespread internet use, health providers should be sure to communicate injury prevention information to mothers, especially those at risk for low health literacy and eHealth literacy.

  19. Literacy in an Information Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Patricia Senn

    1991-01-01

    Today's definition of literacy must include the ability to find and evaluate needed information. Proposes a national literacy agenda to change the way information is used in educational settings and provide greater access to expanding information resources. Considers information literacy a means of personal and national empowerment. (DMM)

  20. Information Literacy: A Bogus Bandwagon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrank, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the concept of information literacy and its target audience of library users. Topics discussed include the relationship of information literacy to bibliographic instruction (BI) and other library instruction; the role of librarians; terminology problems in librarianship; and the effects of information literacy on the value of information…

  1. Writing, Literacy, and Applied Linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leki, Ilona

    2000-01-01

    Discusses writing and literacy in the domain of applied linguistics. Focus is on needs analysis for literacy acquisition; second language learner identity; longitudinal studies as extensions of identity work; and applied linguistics contributions to second language literacy research. (Author/VWL)

  2. The Comprehensive Emergent Literacy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Leigh Rohde

    2015-01-01

    The early skills of Emergent Literacy include the knowledge and abilities related to the alphabet, phonological awareness, symbolic representation, and communication. However, existing models of emergent literacy focus on discrete skills and miss the perspective of the surrounding environment. Early literacy skills, including their relationship to one another, and the substantial impact of the setting and context, are ...

  3. Scientific literacy and the social constructivist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antić Slobodanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term scientific literacy is already common in our educational rhetoric. Although the term is widely used, there are no papers that analyse the definition of the term and the rangeitencompasses in Serbia. If scientific literacy is a necessary outcome of education, this analysis is an important base for designing the teaching/learning process which is intended to develop such an outcome. Therefore, this paper provides an analysis of the concept of scientific literacy (SL, the different viewpoints on SL and the nature of the concept. Furthermore, five key lines as courses of action in the teaching/learning process, necessary for the development of these competencies, are defined: appreciation ofstudents' previous knowledge, encouragement of students' basic functional literacy and reading comprehension skills, the development of students' understanding of the socio-cultural perspective on the origin and use of scientific knowledge and technological products, and practicing of scientific research, either through school science or science applied in the context of cooperation between school and the local community, i.e. in the socio-cultural background where students live.

  4. Examining a Social-Participatory Youth Co-Researcher Methodology: A Cross-Case Analysis Extending Possibilities of Literacy and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Vaughn W. M.; Marciano, Joanne E.

    2015-01-01

    At a time when youth are increasingly negotiating new media literacy practices across multiple contexts, literacy researchers are compelled to take notice and reconsider methodologies that centre the researcher, to purposefully engage youth's knowledge, identities and new media literacies as research methodologies. To that end, the authors…

  5. Bridging Divides through Technology Use: Transnationalism and Digital Literacy Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueron, Silvia Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, I investigate the digital literacy practices of adult immigrants, and their relationship with transnational processes and practices. Specifically, I focus on their conditions of access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) in their life trajectories, their conditions of learning in a community center, and their…

  6. Which Techno-mathematical Literacies Are Essential for Future Engineers?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Nathalie J.; Bakker, Arthur; Drijvers, Paul

    Due to increased use of technology, the workplace practices of engineers have changed. So-called techno-mathematical literacies (TmL) are necessary for engineers of the 21st century. Because it is still unknown which TmL engineers actually use in their professional practices, the purpose of this

  7. Climate Literacy Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Mooney, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Climate Literacy Ambassadors program is a collaborative effort to advance climate literacy led by the Cooperative Institute of Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. With support from NASA, CIMSS is coordinating a three-tiered program to train G6-12 teachers to be Ambassadors of Climate Literacy in their schools and communities. The complete training involves participation at a teacher workshop combined with web-based professional development content around Global and Regional Climate Change. The on-line course utilizes e-learning technology to clarify graphs and concepts from the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Summary for Policy Makers with content intricately linked to the Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science. Educators who take the course for credit can develop lesson plans or opt for a project of their choosing. This session will showcase select lesson plans and projects, ranging from a district-wide action plan that engaged dozens of teachers to Ambassadors volunteering at the Aldo Leopold Climate Change Nature Center to a teacher who tested a GLOBE Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) learning project with plans to participate in the SCRC program. Along with sharing successes from the CIMSS Climate Literacy Ambassadors project, we will share lessons learned related to the challenges of sustaining on-line virtual educator communities.

  8. Integrating health literacy and ESL: an interdisciplinary curriculum for Hispanic immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Mas, Francisco; Mein, Erika; Fuentes, Brenda; Thatcher, Barry; Balcázar, Héctor

    2013-03-01

    Adult Hispanic immigrants are at a greater risk of experiencing the negative outcomes related to low health literacy, as they confront cultural and language barriers to the complex and predominately monolingual English-based U.S. health system. One approach that has the potential for simultaneously addressing the health, literacy, and language needs of Hispanics is the combination of health literacy and English as a second language (ESL) instruction. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of using ESL instruction as a medium for improving health literacy among Hispanic immigrants. Objectives included the development, implementation, and evaluation of an interdisciplinary health literacy/ESL curriculum that integrates theories of health literacy and health behavior research and practice, sociocultural theories of literacy and communication, and adult learning principles. This article describes the curriculum development process and provides preliminary qualitative data on learners' experiences with the curriculum. Results indicate that the curriculum was attractive to participants and that they were highly satisfied with both the format and content. The curriculum described here represents one example of an audience-centered approach designed to meet the specific health and literacy needs of the Hispanic population on the U.S.-Mexico border. The combination of ESL and health literacy contributed to a perceived positive learning experience among participants. Interdisciplinary approaches to health literacy are recommended.

  9. Physical literacy in the field of physical education – A challenge and a possibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lundvall

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Publications of articles with physical literacy as a topic have increased dramatically since the beginning of 2000s. The aim of this paper is to, through an explorative literature overview with an inductive approach, analyze frequent, and significant themes in published peer reviewed articles, with a focus on physical literacy. The database EBSCO has been used with the identifiers “physical literacy” and “physical literacy and evidence”. Furthermore ICSSPE Bulletin's special issue on physical literacy has been included in the overview. The findings have resulted in three key themes: assumptions of the concept physical literacy and its educative role, sports development and physical literacy, and assessment and physical literacy. Future studies are needed to examine if the advocated pedagogical strategies based on the concept physical literacy have led to a re-organized and revitalized school subject. There is also an existing critique towards making physical literacy an idealistic neutral concept or synonym with fundamental movement skills or sports talent identification. The role of higher education emerges as crucial for the next step of the development of the scientific framework as this involves how physical literacy will be socially configured, nurtured, and embodied in practice.

  10. A Program for Introducing Information Literacy to Commercial Art and Design Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Walczak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of developing and implementing a comprehensive, school-wide, and sustainable information literacy program at a commercial art and design school. The program requires that information literacy student learning outcomes be included in specific General Education and art and design courses across the curriculum. The results of this multi-year effort indicate that while the program is sound, teaching information literacy is an on-going effort requiring much more training of faculty and students. Best practices in information literacy in library science and art and design literature are reviewed

  11. Professional Development on a Budget: Facilitating Learning Opportunities for Information Literacy Instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Shamchuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available How do you stay on top of evolving trends and changes to information literacy delivery, especially while coping with shrinking professional development allocations? This article details various in-house, professional development opportunities created for MacEwan University’s library staff. Low-cost, practical ideas are given to help jump-start a library's information literacy professional development offerings. Included are details about organizing an Information Literacy Community, internal Library Professional Development Days and an information literacy event open to local library professionals.

  12. Literacy and Development for the Orang Asli in Malaysia: What Matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renganathan, Sumathi

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the literacy practices of the indigenous Semai Orang Asli community in Malaysia. Literacy for the Orang Asli often centres on formal education and schooling and is hardly explored from a social and cultural perspective. In fact, researchers have paid barely any attention to Orang Asli oral and literate traditions nor their…

  13. Credit Card Usage among Older Adults: Assessing Financial Literacy and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Pierre, Eileen; Shreffler, Karina

    2013-01-01

    The research reported here assessed the financial literacy of older adults living in rural communities, current use of and attitudes towards debt, and debt pressures. Those surveyed exhibit low credit card usage and responsible payment practices. Most never use credit to pay medical expenses. Respondents display a financial literacy level similar…

  14. Telling Tales out of School: Women and Literacy in "New Times."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Lesley; Kamler, Barbara; Threadgold, Terry

    2000-01-01

    Three personal stories illustrate how dominant narratives deny women's voices: (1) women silenced the literacies of the changing workplace; (2) writing workshops in which older women describe age stereotypes; and (3) a courtroom in which a rape victim is silenced. Ways to intervene in prevailing literacy practices must stem from policy as well as…

  15. The Journey towards Technological Literacy for All in the United States--Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Philip A.

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to examine if technology education is getting close to the destination of technological literacy for all in the United States. People now live at a point where all those interested in technological literacy must take a critical, unrelenting look at the profession's history, research base, and contemporary practice. Here, the…

  16. Parenting Styles and Home Literacy Opportunities: Associations with Children's Oral Language Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Gary E.; Jeon, Hyun-Joo; Kwon, Kyong-Ah; Lim, Chaehyun

    2017-01-01

    This study examined associations among parenting style, home literacy practices, and children's language skills. A total of 181 ethnically diverse parents, primarily African American, and their preschool-aged child participated. Results suggest that an authoritative parenting style was positively associated with informal home literacy (book…

  17. Literacy, Education, and Inequality: Assimilation and Resistance Narratives from Families Residing at a Homeless Shelter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I draw on data from my qualitative dissertation study of the literacy practices of five families who resided in a homeless shelter to complicate the relationship between literacy, education, and inequality. Homelessness is examined through the lens of sponsorship to understand the differential access the families have to powerful…

  18. Defining, Designing for, and Measuring "Social Constructivist Digital Literacy" Development in Learners: A Proposed Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a newly conceptualized modular framework for digital literacy that defines this concept as a task-driven "social constructivist digital literacy," comprising 6 practice domains grounded in Constructionism and social constructivism: Create, Manage, Publish, Socialize, Research, Surf. The framework articulates possible…

  19. Literacy Course Priorities and Signature Aspects of Nine Elementary Initial Licensure Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Susan; Ganske, Kathy; Chambers, Sandy; Wold, Linda; Dobler, Elizabeth; Grisham, Dana L.; Scales, Roya; Smetana, Linda; Wolsey, Thomas Devere; Yoder, Karen K.; Young, Janet

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the first part of a three-phase study to learn what makes an effective elementary literacy initial licensure program. The first step was to identify how nine programs prioritized research-based literacy practices and to identify each program's unique features, which we called "signature aspects." Findings…

  20. "Grand Theft South Africa": Games, Literacy and Inequality in Consumer Childhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Marion; Pallitt, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of "game literacy" focus on the informal learning and literacies associated with games but seldom address the diversity in young people's gaming practices, and the highly differentiated technologies of digital gaming in use. We use available survey data to show how, in South Africa, income inequalities influence consumption…

  1. The App Map: A Tool for Systematic Evaluation of Apps for Early Literacy Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelson, Madeleine Heins

    2015-01-01

    As portable devices become increasingly available in elementary classrooms teachers are expected to use these new technologies to engage students in both traditional print-based literacy learning and digital literacies practices, such as multimodal composing. Teachers face the daunting task of integrating apps into their current research-based…

  2. The Importance of "Praxis" in Financial Literacy Education: An Indigenous Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon; Grootenboer, Peter; Brimble, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We argue the importance of "praxis" in financial literacy education teaching practices that is, the moral and ethical nature of teaching and learning. Post the global financial crisis of 2008, the teaching of financial literacy has become a priority for many countries. Indigenous communities are often the target of broad FLE strategies…

  3. Elementary School Principals' Knowledge of Literacy Development and Instruction and Students' Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to determine if the knowledge of literacy development and reading instruction practices an elementary school principal possesses impacts the level of reading achievement of his/her students. Principals' scores on an assessment of knowledge of literacy development and instruction were compared to students'…

  4. Ask, Don't Tell: Pedagogy for Media Literacy Education in the Next Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogow, Faith

    2011-01-01

    NAMLE was founded (as the Alliance for a Media Literate America) 10 years ago with a mission "to expand and improve the practice of media literacy education in the United States." There have been many successes since then, and some disappointments. The expansion of media literacy education into schools has fallen into the latter…

  5. Project RAILS: Lessons Learned about Rubric Assessment of Information Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Jackie; Zou, Ning; Mills, Jenny Rushing; Holmes, Claire; Oakleaf, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Rubric assessment of information literacy is an important tool for librarians seeking to show evidence of student learning. The authors, who collaborated on the Rubric Assessment of Informational Literacy Skills (RAILS) research project, draw from their shared experience to present practical recommendations for implementing rubric assessment in a…

  6. Information Literacy in Mathematics Undergraduate Education: Where Does It Stand Today?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Jeffra Diane; Bond, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    The published literature on information literacy in mathematics is relatively sparse. This article explores the current state of information literacy initiatives in undergraduate mathematics. The authors survey academic librarians (n = 118) who liaise with mathematics departments in order to gain an understanding of their practices and attitudes…

  7. More than Words: Comics as a Means of Teaching Multiple Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Dale

    2007-01-01

    Historically, comics have been viewed as a "debased or simplified word-based literacy," explains Dale Jacobs, who considers comics to be complex, multimodal texts. Examining Ted Naifeh's "Polly and the Pirates," Jacobs shows how comics can engage students in multiple literacies, furthering meaning-making practices in the classroom and beyond.

  8. Digital Worlds as Sites of Belonging for Third Culture Kids: A New Literacies Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaford, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Literacies developed in digital worlds are part of the out-of-school experiences that students bring into their classrooms every day. This article, which draws from a multiple case study undertaken in an international school, calls on a sociocultural--new literacies approach to explore identity, discourse and space within the online practices of…

  9. Pokémon GO: Implications for Literacy in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Emily

    2017-01-01

    This teaching tip gives teachers practical applications of the game Pokémon GO for literacy teaching and learning. The author discusses applications of the game for teaching multimodality in upper elementary-school classrooms. The author situates these applications in relevant theoretical perspectives as well as current literacy research.

  10. Combining Traditional and New Literacies in a 21st-Century Writing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Jennifer M.; McMackin, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how third graders combine traditional literacy practices, including writer's notebooks and graphic organizers, with new literacies, such as video editing software, to create digital personal narratives. The authors emphasize the role of planning in the recursive writing process and describe how technology-based audio…

  11. The effectiveness and feasibility of an online educational program for improving evidence-based practice literacy: an exploratory randomized study of US chiropractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael; Evans, Roni; Haas, Mitchell; Leach, Matthew; Delagran, Louise; Hawk, Cheryl; Long, Cynthia; Cramer, Gregory D; Walters, Oakland; Vihstadt, Corrie; Terhorst, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Online education programs are becoming a popular means to disseminate knowledge about evidence-based practice (EBP) among healthcare practitioners. This mode of delivery also offers a viable and potentially sustainable solution for teaching consistent EBP content to learners over time and across multiple geographical locations. We conducted a study with 3 main aims: 1) develop an online distance-learning program about the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) for chiropractic providers; 2) test the effectiveness of the online program on the attitudes, skills, and use of EBP in a sample of chiropractors; and 3) determine the feasibility of expanding the program for broader-scale implementation. This study was conducted from January 2013 to September 2014. This was an exploratory randomized trial in which 293 chiropractors were allocated to either an online EBP education intervention or a waitlist control. The online EBP program consisted of 3 courses and 4 booster lessons, and was developed using educational resources created in previous EBP educational programs at 4 chiropractic institutions. Participants were surveyed using a validated EBP instrument (EBASE) with 3 rescaled (0 to 100) subscores: Attitudes, Skills, and Use of EBP. Multiple regression was used to compare groups, adjusting for personal and practice characteristics. Satisfaction and compliance with the program was evaluated to assess feasibility. The Training Group showed modest improvement compared to the Waitlist Group in attitudes (Δ =6.2, p < .001) and skills (Δ =10.0, p < .001) subscores, but not the use subscore (Δ = -2.3, p = .470). The majority of participants agreed that the educational program was 'relevant to their profession' (84 %) and 'was worthwhile' (82 %). Overall, engagement in the online program was less than optimal, with 48 % of the Training Group, and 42 % of the Waitlist Group completing all 3 of the program courses. Online EBP training leads to

  12. Literacy research methodologies

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Nell K

    2012-01-01

    The definitive reference on literacy research methods, this book serves as a key resource for researchers and as a text in graduate-level courses. Distinguished scholars clearly describe established and emerging methodologies, discuss the types of questions and claims for which each is best suited, identify standards of quality, and present exemplary studies that illustrate the approaches at their best. The book demonstrates how each mode of inquiry can yield unique insights into literacy learning and teaching and how the methods can work together to move the field forward.   New to This Editi

  13. In amongst the Glitter and the Squashed Blueberries: Crafting a Collaborative Lens for Children's Literacy Pedagogy in a Community Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Abigail; Pahl, Kate; Pool, Steve

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we bring together relational arts practice (Kester, 2004) with collaborative ethnography (Campbell and Lassiter, 2015) in order to propose art not as a way of teaching children literacy, but as a lens to enable researchers and practitioners to view children's literacies differently. Both relational arts practice and collaborative…

  14. The effect of health literacy on knowledge and receipt of colorectal cancer screening: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pignone Michael P

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An estimated one-half of Americans have limited health literacy skills. Low literacy has been associated with less receipt of preventive services, but its impact on colorectal cancer (CRC screening is unclear. We sought to determine whether low literacy affects patients' knowledge or receipt of CRC screening. Methods Pilot survey study of patients aged 50 years and older at a large, university-affiliated internal medicine practice. We assessed patients' knowledge and receipt of CRC screening, basic sociodemographic information, and health literacy level. We defined limited literacy as reading below the ninth grade level as determined by the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. Bivariate analyses and exact logistic regression were used to determine the association of limited health literacy with knowledge and receipt of CRC screening. Results We approached 105 patients to yield our target sample of 50 completing the survey (recruitment rate 48%. Most subjects were female (72%, African-American (58%, and had household incomes less than $25,000 (87%. Overall, 48% of patients had limited literacy skills (95% CI 35% to 61%. Limited literacy patients were less likely than adequate literacy patients to be able to name or describe any CRC screening test (50% vs. 96%, p Conclusion Patients with limited literacy skills are less likely to be knowledgeable of CRC screening compared to adequate literacy patients. Primary care providers should ensure patients' understanding of CRC screening when discussing screening options. Further research is needed to determine if educating low literacy patients about CRC screening can increase screening rates.

  15. New Literacies, Multiple Literacies, Unlimited Literacies: What Now, What Next, Where to? A Response to "Blue Listerine, Parochialism and ASL Literacy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter V.

    2006-01-01

    This article is a response to "Blue Listerine, Parochialism, and ASL Literacy" (Czubek, 2006). The author presents his views on the concepts of literacy and the new and multiple literacies. In addition, the merits of print literacy and other types of literacies are discussed. Although the author agrees that there is an American Sign…

  16. Five Fabulous Literacy-Oriented Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlychek, Ken

    1997-01-01

    Profiles six noteworthy web sites on literacy-related information, including sites that deal with issues addressing literacy and deafness, literacy development, family literacy program development, evaluation of family literacy programs, and encouraging young children with deafness to read. Online addresses of the web sites are provided. (CR)

  17. Health literacy and chronic disease management: drawing from expert knowledge to set an agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poureslami, Iraj; Nimmon, Laura; Rootman, Irving; Fitzgerald, Mark J

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the nature and impact of health literacy is a priority in health promotion and chronic disease prevention and treatment. Health literacy comprises the application of a broad set of skills to access, comprehend, evaluate, communicate and act on health information for improved health and well-being. A complex concept, it involves multiple participants and is enacted across a wide variety of contexts. Health literacy's complexity has given rise to challenges achieving a standard definition and developing means to measure all its dimensions. In May 2013, a group of health literacy experts, clinicians and policymakers convened at an Expert Roundtable to review the current state of health literacy research and practice, and make recommendations about refining its definition, expanding its measurement and integrating best practices into chronic disease management. The four-day knowledge exchange concluded that the successful integration of health literacy into policy and practice depends on the development of a more substantial evidence base. A review of the successes and gaps in health literacy research, education and interventions culminated in the identification of key priorities to further the health literacy agenda. The workshop was funded by the UBC Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, Vancouver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  19. Adolescent Literacy. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The nation's workforce is demanding ever more literate workers and citizens. As technology advances and the American economy grows increasingly knowledge based, individuals must be able to read, write, and communicate at higher levels in order to remain economic and social contributors. A student's level of literacy is a critical determinant of…

  20. Stewards of Digital Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheingold, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Participatory culture, in which citizens feel and exercise the agency of being cocreators of their culture and not just passive consumers of culture created by others, depends on widespread literacies of participation. One can't participate without knowing how. And cultural participation depends on a social component that is not easily learned…

  1. Extending Cultural Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecken, Ted J.; Court, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    Advocates defining cultural literacy to recognize the mass media's role in transmitting and maintaining cultural stereotypes and shaping values and beliefs. Distinguishes between ideational and material aspects of culture. Advocates teaching critical thinking and respect for persons in light of questionable moral perspectives in certain media…

  2. Nuclear literacy - Hungarian experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, E.; Marx, G.

    1996-01-01

    The operation of nuclear power plants and the related environmental sentiments make basic nuclear education to a precondition of modern democratic decision making. Nuclear chapters of the curriculum used to treat the topics in historical and descriptive, thus less convincing way. The question arises: how to offer nuclear literacy to the youth in general, to show its empirical aspects and relevance to citizens. (author)

  3. Writing for Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Shannon Marie

    Scientific literacy is the foundation on which both California's currently adopted science standards and the recommended new standards for science are based (CDE, 2000; NRC, 2011). The Writing for Science Literacy (WSL) curriculum focuses on a series of writing and discussion tasks aimed at increasing students' scientific literacy. These tasks are based on three teaching and learning constructs: thought and language, scaffolding, and meta-cognition. To this end, WSL is focused on incorporating several strategies from the Rhetorical Approach to Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking to engage students in activities designed to increase their scientific literacy; their ability to both identify an author's claim and evidence and to develop their own arguments based on a claim and evidence. Students participated in scaffolded activities designed to strengthen their written and oral discourse, hone their rhetorical skills and improve their meta-cognition. These activities required students to participate in both writing and discussion tasks to create meaning and build their science content knowledge. Students who participated in the WSL curriculum increased their written and oral fluency and were able to accurately write an evidence-based conclusion all while increasing their conceptual knowledge. This finding implies that a discourse rich curriculum can lead to an increase in scientific knowledge.

  4. Beyond the Computer Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Michael J.; Garhart, Casey

    1985-01-01

    Describes the approach taken in an education computing course for pre- and in-service teachers. Outlines the basic operational, analytical, and evaluation skills that are emphasized in the course, suggesting that these skills go beyond the attainment of computer literacy and can assist in the effective use of computers. (ML)

  5. Adolescents and media literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCannon, Robert

    2005-06-01

    In the face of media industry consolidation, fewer people control media content which makes it harder for parents and citizens to know the research about media-related issues, such as video game violence, nutrition, and sexual risk-taking. Media literacy offers a popular and potentially successful way to counter the misinformation that is spread by Big Media public relations.

  6. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  7. Learning Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehm, Rae-Anne; Lupton, Mandy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on university students' experiences of learning information literacy. Method: Phenomenography was selected as the research approach as it describes the experience from the perspective of the study participants, which in this case is a mixture of undergraduate and postgraduate students studying education at an…

  8. Linguistics and Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindell, Gloria

    1983-01-01

    Discusses four general areas of linguistics studies that are particularly relevant to literacy issues: (1) discourse analysis, including text analysis, spoken and written language, and home and school discourse; (2) relationships between speech and writing, the distance between dialects and written norms, and developmental writing; (3)…

  9. Youth engagement in eMental health literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene King

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition of the important role that eHealth Literacy strategies play in promoting mental health among youth populations. At the same time, youth engagement in mental health literacy initiatives is increasingly seen as a promising practice for improving health literacy and reducing stigma. The Health Literacy Team at BC Children’s Hospital uses a variety of strategies to engage youth in the development, implementation and dissemination of eMental Health Literacy resources. This paper reviews the evidence that supports the use of eHealth strategies for youth mental health promotion; describes the methods used by the Team to meaningfully engage youth in these processes; and evaluates them against three popular frameworks for youth participation and empowerment. The findings suggest that the Team is successfully offering opportunities for independent youth involvement, positively impacting project outcomes, and fostering youth empowerment. The Team could further contribute to the positive development of youth by creating more opportunities for youth-adult collaboration on eHealth Literacy initiatives.

  10. Comparison of Brief Summary Formats Through a Health Literacy Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Michele L; Hall, Lori; Eleftherion, Anthony; Simpson, Katherine; Neuhauser, Linda

    2018-01-01

    Print pharmaceutical advertisements in the United States require inclusion of a brief summary of side effects, warnings, precautions, and contraindications from the labeling. The full package insert, which sponsors have traditionally used to fulfill the brief summary requirement, does not adhere to health literacy best practices, limiting its value to consumers. This study compared the understandability and usability of brief summaries in 3 formats designed to be more consumer friendly. Three brief summary formats were tested: (1) 2-column "Question and Answer"; (2) "Prescription Drug Facts Box," similar to current US over-the-counter drug facts labeling; and (3) "Health Literacy," based on clear communication principles. Researchers evaluated the formats using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) tool and conducted structured, scripted, one-on-one interviews (usability tests) with participants with estimated low to average education levels. This research was replicated across 2 therapeutic areas (type 2 diabetes and plaque psoriasis). SAM scores showed that the Health Literacy format outperformed the Question and Answer format and the Prescription Drug Facts Box format in both therapeutic areas, with both Health Literacy brief summaries rated on the SAM as "superior." Qualitative usability tests supported the SAM findings, with the Health Literacy format preferred consistently over the Question and Answer format, and more often than not over the Prescription Drug Facts Box format. Sponsors can employ a user-tested Health Literacy format to improve the understandability and usability of brief summaries with patients.

  11. The Geography of Financial Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bumcrot

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores how well equipped today’s households are to make complex financial decisions in the face of often high-cost and high-risk financial instruments. Specifically we focus on financial literacy. Most importantly, we describe the geography of financial literacy, i.e., how financial literacy is distributed across the fifty US states. We describe the correlation of financial literacy and some important aggregate variables, such as state-level poverty rates. Finally, we examine the extent to which differences in financial literacy can be explained by states’ demographic and economic characteristics. To assess financial literacy, five questions were added to the 2009 National Financial Capability Study, covering fundamental concepts of economics and finance encountered in everyday life: simple calculations about interest rates and inflation, the workings of risk diversification, the relationship between bond prices and interest rates, and the relationship between interest payments and maturity in mortgages. We constructed an index of financial literacy based on the number of correct answers provided by each respondent to the five financial literacy questions. The financial literacy index reveals wide variation in financial literacy across states. Much of the variation is attributable to differences in the demographic makeup of the states; however, a handful of states have either higher or lower levels of financial literacy than is explained by demographics alone. Also, there is a significant correlation between the financial literacy of a state and that state’s poverty level. The findings indicate directions for policy makers and practitioners interested in targeting areas where financial literacy is low.

  12. Innovative Approaches in Chronic Disease Management: Health Literacy Solutions and Opportunities for Research Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaire, Michael; Gonzalez, Diana Peña; Johnson, Kirby L

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses the need for innovative health literacy solutions to combat extensive chronic disease prevalence and costs. The authors explore the intersection of chronic disease management and health literacy. They provide specific examples of successful health literacy interventions for managing several highly prevalent chronic diseases. This is followed by suggestions on pairing research and practice to support effective disease management programs. In addition, the authors discuss strategies for collection and dissemination of knowledge gained from collaborations between researchers and practitioners. They identify current challenges specific to disseminating information from the health literacy field and offer potential solutions. The chapter concludes with a brief look at future directions and organizational opportunities to integrate health literacy practices to address the need for effective chronic disease management.

  13. Students’ Information Literacy: A Perspective from Mathematical Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Ariyadi Wijaya

    2016-01-01

    Information literacy is mostly seen from the perspective of library science or information and communication technology. Taking another point of view, this study was aimed to explore students’ information literacy from the perspective of mathematical literacy. For this purpose, a test addressing Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) mathematics tasks were administered to 381 eighth and ninth graders from nine junior high schools in the Province of Yogyakarta. PISA mathematics ...

  14. READING-WRITING AND LITERACY IN CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilene Bortolotti Boraschi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the role and learning of reading and wrinting to human development as a social practice, considering the necessary condition to reading and writing as an exercise in citizenship. Aims to reflect on the occurrence of reading-writing processes and literacy in children with intellectual disabilities. The study was conducted by means of literature, and are based on a qualitative research. The reflections made throughout the investigation brought some considerations on intellectual disability, charactering it. Allowed some notes on the processes of reading-writing and literacy. As the survey results, some thoughts were about the possible occurrence of the processes of reading-writing and literacy in intellectually disabled children, discussing how these processes can take place through pedagogical practices in classrooms common regular education, contributing to the appropriation of the world literate and active participation by such child in society.

  15. Justifying the design and selection of literacy and thinking tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Whitehead

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Criteria for the design and selection of literacy and thinking tools that allow educators to justify what they do are described within a wider framework of learning theory and research into best practice. Based on a meta-analysis of best practice, results from a three year project designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a secondary school literacy initiative in New Zealand, together with recent research from cognitive and neuro-psychologists, it is argued that the design and selection of literacy and thinking tools used in elementary schools should be consistent with (i teaching focused (ii learner focused, (iii thought linked (iv neurologically consistent, (v subject specific, (vi text linked, (vii developmentally appropriate, and (viii assessment linked criteria.

  16. Financial Literacy and Credit Card Behaviors: A Cross-Sectional Analysis by Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Allgood

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we use a measure of financial literacy that includes both a test score of actual financial literacy and a self-rating of perceived financial literacy to investigate how financial literacy affects five credit card behaviors: (1 always paying a credit card balance in full; (2 carrying over a credit card balance and being charged interest; (3 making only a minimum payment on a credit card balance; (4 being charged a fee for a late payment; and (5 being charged a fee for exceeding a credit limit. Probit analysis was used to assess each behavior with a large nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (N = 28,146 divided into groups to reflect the five major decades in the adult life cycle (18–29; 30–39; 40–49; 50–59; and 60–69 and older. Perceived financial literacy was found to be a stronger predictor of less costly practices in credit card use than actual financial literacy for the five credit card behaviors and across each of the five age groups. The study also shows that the combination of the subjective assessment with the objective assessment of financial literacy provides a more comprehensive analysis of how financial literacy affects each credit card behavior. This combined approach to assessment produced the largest estimates of the effects of financial literacy on credit card behavior. The findings hold across the five credit card behaviors and the five age groups.

  17. The Effect of STEM Learning through the Project of Designing Boat Model toward Student STEM Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tati, T.; Firman, H.; Riandi, R.

    2017-09-01

    STEM Learning focusses on development of STEM-literate society, the research about implementation of STEM learning to develope students’ STEM literacy is still limited. This study is aimed to examine the effect of implementation STEM learning through the project of designing boat model on students STEM literacy in energy topic. The method of this study was a quasi-experiment with non-randomized pretest-posttest control group design. There were two classes involved, the experiment class used Project Based Learning with STEM approach and control class used Project-Based Learning without STEM approach. A STEM Literacy test instrument was developed to measure students STEM literacy which consists of science literacy, mathematics literacy, and technology-engineering literacy. The analysis showed that there were significant differences on improvement science literacy, mathematics technology-engineering between experiment class and control class with effect size more than 0.8 (large effect). The difference of improvement of STEM literacy between experiment class and control class is caused by the existence of design engineering activity which required students to apply the knowledge from every field of STEM. The challenge that was faced in STEM learning through design engineering activity was how to give the students practice to integrate STEM field in solving the problems. In additional, most of the students gave positive response toward implementation of STEM learning through design boat model project.

  18. Using Communication Technology to Facilitate Scientific Literacy: A Framework for Engaged Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBuskirk, Shireen Adele

    The purpose of this research project is to describe how existing communication technologies are used to foster scientific literacy for secondary students. This study develops a new framework as an analytic tool to categorize the activities of teachers and students involved in scientific literacy to describe what elements of scientific literacy are facilitated by such technologies. Four case studies are analyzed using the framework to describe the scientific literacy initiatives. Data collection at each site included interviews with the teacher, student focus groups, student surveys, and classroom observations. Qualitative analysis of the data provided insight into the learning activities and student experiences in the four cases. This study intentionally provides a platform for student voice. Very few previous empirical studies in the area of scientific literacy include the student experience. This represents a significant gap in the current literature on scientific literacy. An interpretation of scientific literacy that promotes student engagement, interaction, and initiative corresponds to a need to listen to students' perspectives on these experiences. Findings of the study indicated that the classroom activities depended on the teacher's philosophy regarding scientific literacy. Communication technology was ubiquitous; where the teacher did not initiate the use of social media in the classroom, the students did. The goal of supporting scientific literacy in students is an objective that extends beyond the boundaries of classroom walls, and it can be facilitated by technologies that seem both abundant and underutilized. Technology-enhanced pedagogy altered the classroom practices and resulted in more student participation and engagement.

  19. Organizational Health Literacy: Review of Theories, Frameworks, Guides, and Implementation Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Luc; Bouchard, Louise

    2018-01-01

    Organizational health literacy is described as an organization-wide effort to transform organization and delivery of care and services to make it easier for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health. Several health literacy guides have been developed to assist healthcare organizations with this effort, but their content has not been systematically reviewed to understand the scope and practical implications of this transformation. The objective of this study was to review (1) theories and frameworks that inform the concept of organizational health literacy, (2) the attributes of organizational health literacy as described in the guides, (3) the evidence for the effectiveness of the guides, and (4) the barriers and facilitators to implementing organizational health literacy. Drawing on a metanarrative review method, 48 publications were reviewed, of which 15 dealt with the theories and operational frameworks, 20 presented health literacy guides, and 13 addressed guided implementation of organizational health literacy. Seven theories and 9 operational frameworks have been identified. Six health literacy dimensions and 9 quality-improvement characteristics were reviewed for each health literacy guide. Evidence about the effectiveness of health literacy guides is limited at this time, but experiences with the guides were positive. Thirteen key barriers (conceived also as facilitators) were identified. Further development of organizational health literacy requires a strong and a clear connection between its vision and operationalization as an implementation strategy to patient-centered care. For many organizations, becoming health literate will require multiple, simultaneous, and radical changes. Organizational health literacy has to make sense from clinical and financial perspectives in order for organizations to embark on such transformative journey. PMID:29569968

  20. Organizational Health Literacy: Review of Theories, Frameworks, Guides, and Implementation Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmanova, Elina; Bonneville, Luc; Bouchard, Louise

    2018-01-01

    Organizational health literacy is described as an organization-wide effort to transform organization and delivery of care and services to make it easier for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health. Several health literacy guides have been developed to assist healthcare organizations with this effort, but their content has not been systematically reviewed to understand the scope and practical implications of this transformation. The objective of this study was to review (1) theories and frameworks that inform the concept of organizational health literacy, (2) the attributes of organizational health literacy as described in the guides, (3) the evidence for the effectiveness of the guides, and (4) the barriers and facilitators to implementing organizational health literacy. Drawing on a metanarrative review method, 48 publications were reviewed, of which 15 dealt with the theories and operational frameworks, 20 presented health literacy guides, and 13 addressed guided implementation of organizational health literacy. Seven theories and 9 operational frameworks have been identified. Six health literacy dimensions and 9 quality-improvement characteristics were reviewed for each health literacy guide. Evidence about the effectiveness of health literacy guides is limited at this time, but experiences with the guides were positive. Thirteen key barriers (conceived also as facilitators) were identified. Further development of organizational health literacy requires a strong and a clear connection between its vision and operationalization as an implementation strategy to patient-centered care. For many organizations, becoming health literate will require multiple, simultaneous, and radical changes. Organizational health literacy has to make sense from clinical and financial perspectives in order for organizations to embark on such transformative journey.