WorldWideScience

Sample records for school-based humanistic counselling

  1. Randomised controlled trial of school-based humanistic counselling for emotional distress in young people: Feasibility study and preliminary indications of efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial comparing six weeks of humanistic school-based counselling versus waiting list in the reduction of emotional distress in young people, and to obtain initial indications of efficacy. Methods Following a screening procedure, young people (13 - 15 years old) who experienced emotional distress were randomised to either humanistic counselling or waiting list in this multi-site study. Outcomes were assessed using a range of self-report mental health measures, with the emotional symptoms subscale of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) acting as the primary outcome indicator. Results Recruitment procedures were successful, with 32 young people consenting to participate in the trial and 27 completing endpoint measures. Trial procedures were acceptable to all involved in the research. No significant differences were found between the counselling and waiting list groups in reductions in levels of emotional symptoms (Hedges' g = 0.03), but clients allocated to counselling showed significantly greater improvement in prosocial behaviour (g = 0.89) with an average effect size (g) across the nine outcome measures of 0.25. Participants with higher levels of depressive symptoms showed significantly greater change. Conclusion This study suggested that a randomised controlled trial of counselling in schools is acceptable and feasible, although initial indications of efficacy are mixed. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN68290510. PMID:20412578

  2. A Humanistic Existential Perspective on Career Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloland, Paul A.; Walker, Betty A.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an approach to career counseling based on humanistic existentialism (HE). The philosophical and psychological background of HE is reviewed with implications for various counseling dimensions including diagnosis, process, outcomes, interview techniques, test interpretation, and occupational information. (RC)

  3. Response to Hansen: Economic Pressures, Not Science, Undermine Humanistic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibert, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    The author contends that it was economic interests, not reductionist scientific methods, that displaced the humanities as the basis for counseling profession. Attacking scientific methods may inadvertently marginalize humanistic counselors. Instead, science in counseling should be viewed more broadly and thereby support the humanities as a basis…

  4. The INSPIRE Project: Using the "Unknown" to Co-Construct a Training Course on Humanistic Counselling in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Grieve, Sandra; Kaveh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    This article details a collaborative project between the University of Strathclyde (UK) and the University of Herat (Afghanistan). The aim was to co-construct a model of training, based on humanistic approaches, in order to enhance counselling services in Afghanistan and to establish counselling training at the University of Herat. Two groups of…

  5. School-Based Group Counseling for Children of Divorce: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauman, Beth E.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews literature on school-based group counseling for children of divorce, focusing on support for school-based group intervention, consideration of developmental factors, involvement of parents and teachers, attending to positive aspects, and specific approaches and techniques. Looks at bibliotherapy, media use, board games, and other…

  6. The Impact of School-Based Counselling on Young People's Capacity to Study and Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupani, Pooja; Haughey, Nuala; Cooper, Mick

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how school-based counselling might impact young people's capacity to study and learn. Previous research has indicated that counselling in schools has an indirect positive impact on academic achievement. A mixed methods approach, using a semi-structured qualitative interview and a brief rating scale, was employed with 21 young…

  7. School-based counseling using systematic feedback: a cohort study evaluating outcomes and predictors of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mick; Stewart, Dave; Sparks, Jacqueline; Bunting, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of school-based counseling incorporating the Partners for Change Outcome Monitoring System (PCOMS) were evaluated using a cohort design, with multilevel modeling to identify predictors of change. Participants were 288 7-11 year olds experiencing social, emotional or behavioral difficulties. The intervention was associated with significant reductions in psychological distress, with a pre-post effect size (d) of 1.49 on the primary outcome measure and 88.7% clinical improvement. Greater improvements were found for disabled children, older children, and where CBT methods were used. The findings provide support for the use of systematic feedback in therapy with children.

  8. The Impact of Education and School-Based Counseling on Children's and Adolescents' Views of Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Shawanda W.; Moore, Paula A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if a school-based education and counseling program (Life Skills Training Program) would have an impact on school-aged children/adolescents' views of substance abuse. The study also investigated the degree and direction of change. Participants were 338 elementary or middle-school students in the metro…

  9. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a School-Based Counselling Service in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Claire L.; Butler, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Despite the growth of school counselling in the UK, very few studies have examined its effectiveness. As part of a wider evaluation of the work of the NSPCC Schools Counselling Project, 219 pupils aged 11-17 years completed the TEEN CORE questionnaire before receiving counselling; 104 of these pupils also completed a questionnaire after…

  10. A Holistic Approach to School-Based Counselling and Guidance Services in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sew Kim; Kok, Jin Kuan; Lee, Mah Ngee

    2013-01-01

    Counselling services in Malaysian schools were first established in 1963. Several local research studies investigated the provision of school counselling services and revealed that they were unpopular among students and could be further improved. School-aged children are still under the care of their family, mostly their parents, and many authors…

  11. Needs assessment in terminal patients through in-depth interviews and their follow-up with humanistic and thanatological counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliana Jiménez Zaraín

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent investigation of qualitative type had as a target to detect the psychological and physics necessities of the patients with some kind of terminal sickness. This took place in the I.S.S.S.T.E hospital, where through the application of an instrument proportionate by the hospital and the technical of a deep interview it was recollected some information, each interview had duration between 1 and 2 hours. There were 6 interviews with each one of the 3 patients, already interviewed and it was searched that this one was found on an isolated room to establish a confidential environment, those interviews were not realized in a continuous appropriated way to the patients disposition that in some occasions it was obstructed by their sickness or by their courage. To each patient, it was offered psychotherapy with humanistic and thanatological focus for their necessities.

  12. Humanistic HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardzell, Jeffrey; Bardzell, Shaowen

    2015-01-01

    Although it has influenced the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) since its origins, humanistic HCI has come into its own since the early 2000s. In that time, it has made substantial contributions to HCI theory and methodologies and also had major influence in user experience (UX) design...... as research products, while offering some practical advice for peer review; and focuses on two major topics where humanistic HCI has had particular influence in the field—user experience and aesthetics and emancipatory approaches to computing. This book argues for a more inclusive and broad reach......, aesthetic interaction, and emancipatory/social change-oriented approaches to HCI. This book reintroduces the humanities to a general HCI readership; characterizes its major epistemological and methodological commitments as well as forms of rigor; compares the scientific report vs. the humanistic essay...

  13. Humanistic HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardzell, Jeffrey; Bardzell, Shaowen

    2015-01-01

    as research products, while offering some practical advice for peer review; and focuses on two major topics where humanistic HCI has had particular influence in the field—user experience and aesthetics and emancipatory approaches to computing. This book argues for a more inclusive and broad reach......Although it has influenced the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) since its origins, humanistic HCI has come into its own since the early 2000s. In that time, it has made substantial contributions to HCI theory and methodologies and also had major influence in user experience (UX) design...

  14. Beyond Both Traditional Scientist/Humanists and Humanist/Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspy, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This article compares traditional science and the "new science of possibilities" for counseling based on humanistic principles. The information age impels counselors to shift to the new paradigm because the exponential increase of cultural change is generating a climate in which control-oriented procedures are inconsistent with events and…

  15. Humanistic HCI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardzell, Jeffrey; Bardzell, Shaowen

    2015-01-01

    Although it has influenced the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) since its origins, humanistic HCI has come into its own since the early 2000s. In that time, it has made substantial contributions to HCI theory and methodologies and also had major influence in user experience (UX) design...

  16. Effects of School-Based Point-of-Testing Counselling on Health Status Variables among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murimi, Mary W.; Chrisman, Matthew S.; Hughes, Kelly; Taylor, Chris; Kim, Yeonsoo; McAllister, Tiffany L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Rural areas may suffer from a lack of access to health care and programmes to promote behaviours such as healthy eating and physical activity. Point-of-testing counselling is a method of promoting a healthy lifestyle during an individual's most "teachable moment". Design/Setting: This longitudinal study examined the effects of…

  17. The Identification of Factors Affecting the Development and Practice of School-Based Counseling in Different National Contexts: A Grounded Theory Study Using a Worldwide Sample of Descriptive Journal Articles and Book Chapters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ian; Lauterbach, Alexandra; Carey, John

    2015-01-01

    A grounded theory methodology was used to analyze articles and book chapters describing the development and practice of school-based counseling in 25 different countries in order to identify the factors that affect development and practice. An 11-factor analytic framework was developed. Factors include: Cultural Factors, National Needs, Larger…

  18. Abraham Maslow's Legacy for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the life of Abraham Maslow, a key founder of the humanistic approach to counseling, and his contributions to the counseling field. Maintains that Maslow's innovative work was often misinterpreted by both his admirers and his critics, yet remains highly relevant to current concerns in counseling. (Author/PVV)

  19. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  20. What Makes Psychotherapy Humanistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, John R.

    Based on an earlier list of characteristics, ten assertions were derived about the nature of psychotherapy upon which it was believed that humanistic therapists would agree. These assertions were then submitted to three groups of therapists (111 returns) listed in the "National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology":…

  1. Gilson as Christian Humanist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Redpath

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The author suggests that the intellectual life of Étienne Gilson constituted a new humanism, that Gilson’s scholarly work was part of a new renaissance, that a new humanism that Gilson thought is demanded by the precarious civilizational crisis of the modern West after World Wars I and II. He also argues that, more than anything else, Gilson was a renaissance humanist scholar who consciously worked in the tradition of renaissance humanists before him, but did so to expand our understanding of the notion of “renaissance” scholarship and to create his own brand of Christian humanism to deal with problems distinctive to his age. The author shows the specificity of the Christian humanism that Gilson developed as part of his distinctive style of doing historical research and of philosophizing.

  2. Ibadan Journal of Humanistic Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ibadan Journal of Humanistic Studies is an interdisciplinary forum focusing on issues of broad humanistic relevance, with preference for the results of African and Africanist studies. However, there is also room for issues of the larger international order or human culture from which the African world may derive valuable ...

  3. International Journal of Humanistic Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Humanistic Studies is an annual peer-reviewed Journal. It focuses on every aspect of Humanistic Studies and has a strong interdisciplinary thrust. Contributions are accepted from the fields of Philosophy, English Language, Literature, History, Theatre Arts, Music, Communication Arts, Anthropology, ...

  4. Sigmund Koch as critical humanist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M B

    2001-05-01

    Just as Sigmund Koch was a good scientist without succumbing to scientism, he was a good humanist without succumbing to the popular distortions trading on the name of humanism. When humanistic psychology was seduced by the touchy-feely encounter group movement, Koch derided its technology of authenticity as shamelessly meretricious. Later, when postmodern humanists of deconstruction and textual analysis began to be heard in psychology, Koch wryly expressed his preference for the old-fashioned kind of humanism. Koch's interests and his conception of the domain of psychology thus transcended scientific and humanistic labels and boundaries. To be good science, human psychological studies have to start with and be guided by openness to all aspects of being human. No less in the present and future than during his lifetime, the implications of Koch's vision of psychological inquiry warrant discerning and disciplined attention.

  5. Integrating Motivational Interviewing into a Basic Counseling Skills Course to Enhance Counseling Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarussi, Melanie H.; Tyler, Jessica M.; Littlebear, Sarah; Hinkle, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI), a humanistic counseling style used to help activate clients' motivation to change, was integrated into a basic counseling skills course. Nineteen graduate-level counseling students completed the Counselor Estimate of Self-Efficacy at the start and conclusion of the course. Significant differences were found between…

  6. Humanists for 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Campàs

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available From certain critical considerations with respect to which, faced with the new challenges and transformations brought on by the information society which affect areas of culture, knowledge and learning, only fears and concerns arise, and, likewise, from a positive assessment of the Humanist manifesto for the 21st century, this paper reflects on three aspects that serve to reconfigure a new digital humanism: the complexity paradigm, the digital revolution and globalisation, leading to an invitation to form a political commitment and praxis to not convert humanists into a cultural illusion and mere ornamental whim of the system.

  7. School-Based Counseling of Abused Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Marla R.; Rivelis, Erin; Diaz, Vielka

    2009-01-01

    Abused children experience high rates of behavior, emotional, and learning problems but infrequently receive treatment. Most services provided to abused children and their families are not based on any clear evidence that they work. A number of evidence-based treatments (EBTs), demonstrated to be safe and effective in treating a range of…

  8. Library Administration: A Humanistic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Lillian

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the tasks of library administration in relation to autocratic, participatory, and contingency approaches to management problems. The psychological and organizational side-effects of the three management styles are considered and a humanistic combination of approaches is suggested. A bibliography is included. (JL)

  9. Humanistic Studies and Mass Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggart, Richard

    1970-01-01

    Two problems are examined in this essay: the relation of the mass media to humanistic studies, and how the sociology of literature and art might bear on such studies. The focus is less on theory wihtin the humanisties than on what might be learned from the theoretical work of the social sciences. (SE)

  10. A Return to the Human in Humanism: A Response to Hansen's Humanistic Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberger, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    In his extension of the humanistic vision, Hansen (2012) recommends that counseling practitioners and scholars adopt operations that are consistent with his definition of a multiple-perspective philosophy. Alternatively, the author of this article believes that Hansen has reduced the capacity of the human to interpret meaning through quantitative…

  11. Humanities and Science: A Necessary Unity for the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterman, Jeffrey T.; Martin, Clayton V.; Kopp, David M.

    2012-01-01

    This article is a reply to Hansen's (2012) call for the counseling profession to embrace a purely humanistic ideology for counseling. The authors suggest the relationship between humanities and science set forth by Hansen does not emphasize the both-and aspects of these ideologies. An integrative framework is considered for counseling.

  12. Further reflections on the humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Alan S

    2014-01-01

    Replies to comments by Morley (see record 2014-01475-010), Serlin (see record 2014-01475-011), Friedman (see record 2014-01475-012), Churchill and Mruk (see record 2014-01475-013), and Schneider (see record 2014-01475-014) on the current author's original article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" (see record 2013-12501-001). The article contrasting humanistic psychology and positive psychology with respect to their ontological, epistemological, and practical philosophical foundations has generated commentaries from leading proponents of varying perspectives within humanistic psychology. There is a great deal of material within those commentaries with which the current author is in full accord. It is worth noting at the outset that no one appears to be challenging the observations (a) that published exchanges between proponents of humanistic and positive psychology have been marked by tension and ambivalence, albeit with occasional efforts at reconciliation and rapprochement; (b) that proponents of the two perspectives differ with respect to the philosophers they most frequently cite in their writings; or (c) that such citations reflect the philosophical assumptions serving as foundations for the theoretical, research, and counseling/therapeutic endeavors of psychologists in both groups. The principal points of concurrence in the critiques published here are that the current underestimates the extent to which mutually supportive, collaborative work can be accomplished across the philosophical divide and that the recommendations the current author has made has advanced serious potential negative consequences for the field. The current author will address these points here in the reply, although space does not permit him to address other substantive points raised by individual commentators. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Critical Contributions of Piaget to Humanistic Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassel, Russell N.

    Humanistic psychologists now embrace many of the same principles which served as the basis for Piaget's theory. These same theories were described earlier by John Locke and Immanuel Kant, and were the basis of the new "Humanism" movement in Germany in the 18th century. If one considers humanistic psychology as a kind of culmination of…

  14. Toward Effective Advocacy for Humanistic Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

    1998-01-01

    There is a vigorous, national values debate in America today because of the general sense that the nation's moral standards are in decline. Historically, humanistically oriented counselors such as Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers have contributed to the values discussions. This article provides a conceptual framework for humanistic counselors of…

  15. Humanistic Speech Education to Create Leadership Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Beverley Jeanne

    A theoretical framework based primarily on the humanistic psychology of Abraham Maslow is used in developing a humanistic approach to speech education. The holistic view of human learning and behavior, inherent in this approach, is seen to be compatible with a model of effective leadership. Specific applications of this approach to speech…

  16. The humanist emergentism of Javier Monserrat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carlos Beorlegui

    2016-01-01

    ... paradigm in our cultural context. He defends a humanist emergentism, which he has deepened from the level of neuronal engrams to later agree with the postulates on quantum neurology by Penrose and Hameroff...

  17. International Journal of Humanistic Studies: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reviewed Journal. It focuses on every aspect of Humanistic Studies and has a strong interdisciplinary thrust. Contributions are accepted from the fields of Philosophy, English Language, Literature, History, Theatre Arts, Music, Communication ...

  18. The Humanistic Imperative in African Politics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-04-19

    , the blame for its lost generation falls squarely on the shoulders of its people's leaders- corrupt military dictators and their civilian accomplices who over the past quarter of a century. The Humanistic Imperative in African ...

  19. Treatment failure in humanistic and experiential psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeanne C

    2011-11-01

    In this article, treatment failure in humanistic experiential psychotherapy is defined and explored. I outline several markers that indicate when treatment is not going well. Factors that contribute to failure include client factors, for example, emotional processing capacities, shame, and impoverished narratives, as well as therapist factors including lack of empathic attunement and inflexibility. Treatment failure is illuminated with a case example drawn from humanistic/experiential psychotherapy, and clinical strategies for dealing with failures are recommended. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Discourse on humanistic clinical care and nurse healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Pei-Fan

    2011-10-01

    The Humanistic Clinical Care and Nurse Healing series of graduate studies courses at National Yang-Ming University reflects the mission and goals of the master's and doctoral programs to cultivate the core competence of students. The humanistic nursing curriculum is designed to engender nurse subjectivity by integrating multidisciplinary knowledge. Courses focus on humanistic ideals and ontological, epistemological and methodological nurse fitness while cultivating nurses' humanistic caring competence and humanistic knowledge development. The Humanistic Clinical Care and Nursing Healing curriculum addresses core subject areas including psychoanalysis and humanistic caring, humanistic clinical knowledge exploration, western philosophy and humanistic caring, imaging art and humanistic caring, and the humanistic caring aspect of helping others as well as discusses creative and evidence-based ideas in health promotion and humanistic nursing. The curriculum begins with identifying and understanding concepts, then advances toward applying concepts in practice, reflection, and healing. This paper introduces curriculum structure and content, evaluates student learning through focus groups and assignment content analysis, and discusses the future development potential of humanistic clinical care and nurse healing.

  1. School-Based Support Groups for Traumatized Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Linda Leek

    2011-01-01

    After students experience a traumatic event, group counseling is an effective tool to offset the effects of grief and distress. Following a school crisis, successful school-based intervention requires interdisciplinary coordination between school psychologists, counselors, school social workers, teachers, and administrative staff. Within a short…

  2. Experimental analysis of humanistic systems in decision making ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental analysis of humanistic systems in decision making. ... Journal of Applied Science and Technology ... Computational techniques for generating intuitionistic fuzzy random numbers (IFRNs) for the formulation of test problems in the management of humanistic systems have been developed and implemented.

  3. The Humanistic Movement in Psychology and Education: Some Reservations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Lloyd G.

    1971-01-01

    Compares the holistic humanist view of education with the analytic scientific viewpoint, considers their implications for guiding research and instruction, and concludes that the humanist makes some assumptions that are patently invalid." (AL)

  4. The humanist emergentism of Javier Monserrat

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Beorlegui

    2016-01-01

    J. Monserrat is the most significant and consistent representative of the emergentist paradigm in our cultural context. He defends a humanist emergentism, which he has deepened from the level of neuronal engrams to later agree with the postulates on quantum neurology by Penrose and Hameroff. This article will present the main arguments supported by J. Monserrat, within the context of the ample paradigm of systemic emergentism. It will show how this paradigm allows him to defend a humanist and...

  5. Medical humanities - arts and humanistic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlzén, Rolf

    2007-12-01

    The nature and scope of medical humanities are under debate. Some regard this field as consisting of those parts of the humanistic sciences that enhance our understanding of clinical practice and of medicine as historical phenomenon. In this article it is argued that aesthetic experience is as crucial to this project as are humanistic studies. To rightly understand what medicine is about we need to acknowledge the equal importance of two modes of understanding, intertwined and mutually reinforcing: the mode of aesthetic imagination and the mode of analytical reflection.

  6. The humanist emergentism of Javier Monserrat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Beorlegui

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available J. Monserrat is the most significant and consistent representative of the emergentist paradigm in our cultural context. He defends a humanist emergentism, which he has deepened from the level of neuronal engrams to later agree with the postulates on quantum neurology by Penrose and Hameroff. This article will present the main arguments supported by J. Monserrat, within the context of the ample paradigm of systemic emergentism. It will show how this paradigm allows him to defend a humanist and believing anthropological model in a more adequate way.

  7. Psychological influence on American humanist education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu, L.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is meant to outline the modalities in which psychology has influenced humanist education in the USA, starting with a historical background and presenting its major trends: positive psychology, transcendentalism, the trend based on new discoveries in genetics and neurology with special focus on the third force psychology. It encourages self-actualization, enabling students to express themselves, to act, to experiment, to make mistakes, to discover and to self-discover. The major objectives of humanist education work together for free manifestation of human individuality and the elimination of any coercion and oppression which may suppress the individual.

  8. Are humanistic and positive psychology really incommensurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Harris

    2014-01-01

    Comments on the article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" by Waterman (see record 2013-12501-001). Waterman has provided some broad-brush generalizations about differences between humanistic psychology and positive psychology, many of which do not hold in all cases, and he has pointed out some difficulties that would be involved in reconciling them. However, he has not presented any convincing argument that the two are irreconcilable. Essentially, Waterman has confounded difficulties with impossibilities by concluding these are incommensurate. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. A humanistic approach to South African Accounting education | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humanistic psychologist Carl Rogers made a distinction between traditional approaches and humanistic `learner-centred\\' approaches to education. The traditional approach holds that educators impart their knowledge to willing and able recipients; whereas the humanistic approach holds that educators act as facilitators ...

  10. Janusz Korczak: The Extraordinary Educator-Humanist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawiec, Edwin P.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the objectives and accomplishments of a Polish educator, Janusz Korczak, who was director of two orphanages in Warsaw from 1911-1942. Information is presented on Korczak's humanistic values, educational objectives, insistence that the individuality of children be recognized, and selfless devotion to the children in his orphanages.…

  11. Pursuing Humanistic Medicine in a Technological Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertman, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    The humanistic practice of medicine requires that the practitioner have sufficient time and appropriate focus. Both elements, however, are under assault by the high-speed, distraction-filled environment within which primary care is delivered today. Despite or perhaps because of modern medicine's technological advances, the potentially healing bond between doctor and patient is being frayed and the quality of care consequently degraded.

  12. "Humanistic Bildung": Regulative Idea or Empty Concept?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on the notion and humanistic ideal of self-cultivation and self-transformation, for which the term "Bildung" is/was traditionally used in German educational thought. It is argued that the idea of "Bildung", understood as human development and end-in-itself, is not a German exclusivity. However, to understand…

  13. Some Historical Antecedents of Humanistic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Paul

    1975-01-01

    Antecedents of humanistic education appear to be economic affluence and technological advancement. Historically, this phenomena occurred in classical Greece; the Renaissance; the agricultural and industrial revolutions in England; the Romantic period; the revolutions in the consciousness created by Marx, Freud, and the existentialists; and the…

  14. Humanistic Functions of the Arts Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatchadourian, Haig

    1980-01-01

    From philosophic literature, the author details six humanistic functions art can perform in modern Western society. He considers the ways that art can keep the imagination alive, preserve our capacity to form human relationships, bring order to the world, promote communality and continuity, and give a meaning to life. (SJL)

  15. Humanistic epistemology* | Ijiomah | Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Humanistic epistemology*.

  16. Humanistic Education and Self-Actualization Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Rod

    1984-01-01

    Stresses the need for theoretical justification for the development of humanistic education programs in today's schools. Explores Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs and theory of self-actualization. Argues that Maslow's theory may be the best available for educators concerned with educating the whole child. (JHZ)

  17. Career Counseling and Occupational Preferences Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We found that career counseling, teaching and field trips by students significantly influenced their occupational choice in secondary schools. Based on this finding we recommended that schools should from time to time arrange vocational counseling for their students, where schools don't have residents' counselors, they ...

  18. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... been added to your dashboard . KEY POINTS Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes, birth defects and medical ... in your area. What is genetic counseling? Genetic counseling helps you understand how genes , birth defects and other ...

  19. Relevance of counselling to human resource management in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Counselling is regarded as a programme that is only school based by many Nigerians due to inadequate information. However, literature has shown that counselling is universal and useful in all fields of human endeavours. This paper therefore brings into focus the relevance of counselling to human resource management ...

  20. Young Clients' Narratives of the Purpose and Outcome of Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kerry; Cartwright, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how adolescent clients construct the purpose and outcome of counselling. A narrative analysis was performed on interviews with 22 clients (aged 16--18) who had used a school-based counselling service. The aim was to identify the purpose and outcomes that participants attributed to their counselling experience. The analysis…

  1. Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe Emil; Fisker, Anna Marie; Poulsen, Søren Bolvig

    2013-01-01

    With the construction of new hospitals, the design principle healing architecture is introduced, representing the humanistic vision of improving hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by stimulating architecture. In this regard, we address focus on the potential influence of the design....... Associated with the methodology of evidence-based design (EBD), we in this regard question, if these challenges derive from conflicting paradigms of some of the stakeholders involved in the design process? Relating to the Danish scene of hospital design, we introduce the research project “Smart Textiles...... in Future Hospitals”, stating the overall hypothesis that textiles in hospital interiors possess an unexploited architectural potential in relation to the humanistic visions of healing architecture. Concerned with the operational challenge of unfolding the visionary design principle, we suggest to re...

  2. Pedagogic process modeling: Humanistic-integrative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Boritko Nikolaj M.

    2007-01-01

    The paper deals with some current problems of modeling the dynamics of the subject-features development of the individual. The term "process" is considered in the context of the humanistic-integrative approach, in which the principles of self education are regarded as criteria for efficient pedagogic activity. Four basic characteristics of the pedagogic process are pointed out: intentionality reflects logicality and regularity of the development of the process; discreteness (stageability) in ...

  3. [The humanistic partnership model in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan; Lefebvre, Hélène; Néron, André; Van Cutsem, Chantal; Bustillo, Aurélia; Laloux, Martine

    2017-06-01

    The humanistic partnership model in health care has been jointly developed by nursing professionals and partner patients. In line with the evolution of our society and nursing thinking, it provides a new implementation of the discipline's core concepts and invites professionals and partner patients to "move together towards" a co-constructed future which is recorded in the patient's life project. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychological influence on American humanist education

    OpenAIRE

    Radu, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is meant to outline the modalities in which psychology has influenced humanist education in the USA, starting with a historical background and presenting its major trends: positive psychology, transcendentalism, the trend based on new discoveries in genetics and neurology with special focus on the third force psychology. It encourages self-actualization, enabling students to express themselves, to act, to experiment, to make mistakes, to discover and to self-discover. The major ob...

  5. HUMANISTIC STRATEGIES IN THE EFL SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa J. Mardijono

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the humanistic strategies woven into the EFL speaking class activities. The speaking class, which the writer used for her study, is the highest level of speaking course offered in the curriculum of the English Department of Petra Christian University, to develop students' English speaking skills, particularly in public speaking. The humanistic strategies are based on the assumption that a "supportive and co-operative group atmosphere" ((Hadfield, 1995, p.15 will enhance learning to bring out the best of the students. The primary aims are to help the students, through active participation, to develop more positive feelings about themselves and their classmates, to co-operate and support each other to grow and excel at their speech performance. Based on the students' evaluation and the teacher's observation of the students' public speech performance and their academic achievement, it can be concluded that the humanistic strategies have created a co-operative and supportive group atmosphere and has given positive effects on the students' speech performance. This is also a rewarding experience for the teacher.

  6. The Rediscovery of Gratitude: Implications for Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark E.; Hutchinson, Tracy S.

    2012-01-01

    Although gratitude has been rediscovered by the field of positive psychology, strength-based wellness-oriented interventions have historically been a part of the humanistic tradition in counseling. The article is a review of emerging gratitude research including characteristics of gratitude, theoretical explanations, specific interventions, and…

  7. Reflection and Critical Thinking of Humanistic Care in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Shiau, Shu-Jen; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance and learning issues of humanistic care in medical education. This article will elaborate on the following issues: (1) introduction; (2) reflection and critical thinking; (3) humanistic care; (4) core values and teaching strategies in medical education; and (5) learning of life cultivation. Focusing on a specific approach used in humanistic care, it does so for the purpose of allowing the health professional to understand and apply the conc...

  8. Reflection and critical thinking of humanistic care in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Shu-Jen; Chen, Chung-Hey

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance and learning issues of humanistic care in medical education. This article will elaborate on the following issues: (1) introduction; (2) reflection and critical thinking; (3) humanistic care; (4) core values and teaching strategies in medical education; and (5) learning of life cultivation. Focusing on a specific approach used in humanistic care, it does so for the purpose of allowing the health professional to understand and apply the concepts of humanistic value in their services.

  9. Humanistic therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Davies, Philippa; Caldwell, Deborah; Moore, Theresa HM; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different humanistic therapy models (person-centred, gestalt, process-experiential, transactional analysis, existential and non-directive therapies) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression. PMID:25278809

  10. Reflection and Critical Thinking of Humanistic Care in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Jen Shiau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to stress the importance and learning issues of humanistic care in medical education. This article will elaborate on the following issues: (1 introduction; (2 reflection and critical thinking; (3 humanistic care; (4 core values and teaching strategies in medical education; and (5 learning of life cultivation. Focusing on a specific approach used in humanistic care, it does so for the purpose of allowing the health professional to understand and apply the concepts of humanistic value in their services.

  11. Humanistic Traditions, East and West: Convergence and Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Morimichi

    2016-01-01

    The term "humanism" is Western in origin. It denotes the tradition that places special emphasis on cultivation of letters for education. In the West, this tradition was originated with sophists and Isocrates, established by Cicero, and was developed by Renaissance humanists. East Asia, however, also has its own humanistic traditions with…

  12. Humanistic Model in Adult Education and Science and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    That humankind overcomes the terrible threats of boredom, meaninglessness and dehumanizing state of contemporary world is the result of the scientific and technological advancement, this paper considers humanistic model in adult education as liberal education appropriate for adult age. Using the humanistic model, we ...

  13. Touching the Challenge: Embodied Solutions Enabling Humanistic Moral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz-Franco, Orit

    2016-01-01

    One of the main educational challenges we still face today--more than ever--is the humanistic challenge, namely how to promote humanistic moral values, how to strengthen in students the motivation to be morally active, and especially how to help them recognize the other as a human subject. I adopt Nel Noddings' approach of relational ethics of…

  14. Constructing the Discipline of Humanistic Medicine on Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Baisheng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Humanistic medicine, as an interdisciplinary science, synthesizes knowledge concerning medical philosophy, medical ethics, medical law, medical history, medical sociology, medical logic, and doctor-patient communication. On Mainland China, increasing attention is being paid to humanistic medicine, as evidenced by doctoral education programs being…

  15. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  16. [Tranfusion counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbil, R; Fabrigli, P; Garraud, O

    2009-05-01

    In this article, we present transfusion counseling; its organization, actors, their formations and we deal with factual positions. Transfusion counseling needs better identification, tending to a homogeneous organization between every bloodbank centre.

  17. Humanistic Patient Care Training: Content and Methodology. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Kathleen A.; Wilson, Dottie C.

    This monograph, the fifth in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to provide a skilled group trainer with the hospice-specific insights necessary to conduct training in humanistic patient care. Chapter 1 covers training program…

  18. Pedagogic process modeling: Humanistic-integrative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boritko Nikolaj M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with some current problems of modeling the dynamics of the subject-features development of the individual. The term "process" is considered in the context of the humanistic-integrative approach, in which the principles of self education are regarded as criteria for efficient pedagogic activity. Four basic characteristics of the pedagogic process are pointed out: intentionality reflects logicality and regularity of the development of the process; discreteness (stageability in dicates qualitative stages through which the pedagogic phenomenon passes; nonlinearity explains the crisis character of pedagogic processes and reveals inner factors of self-development; situationality requires a selection of pedagogic conditions in accordance with the inner factors, which would enable steering the pedagogic process. Offered are two steps for singling out a particular stage and the algorithm for developing an integrative model for it. The suggested conclusions might be of use for further theoretic research, analyses of educational practices and for realistic predicting of pedagogical phenomena. .

  19. Recent Changes in Humanistic Research Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Lasse Gøhler; Vikman, Jutta Maria; Liljenstrøm, Andreas Jan

    2016-01-01

    The present paper analyzes changes in research practices in the humanities around the turn of the millennium. The analysis is based on a reading of all humanistic PhD dissertations in Denmark between 1992 and 2012 (N=1,958). For every dissertation we recorded not only language, format, co......-authors and supervisors but also the theoretical sources, data types and analytical methods/techniques used. We show that, while the share of article-based dissertations (as opposed to monographs) is relatively stable, the share of English dissertations grows from around 18 percent in the beginning of the period...... to around 48 percent at the end of the period. English language is especially common among the article-based dissertations (71 percent for the entire period). We also identify a growing convergence with the social sciences, which is reflected in an increased use of more “social scientific” data types...

  20. Neuroscience and humanistic psychiatry: a residency curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, James L

    2014-04-01

    Psychiatry residencies with a commitment to humanism commonly prioritize training in psychotherapy, cultural psychiatry, mental health policy, promotion of human rights, and similar areas reliant upon dialogue and collaborative therapeutic relationships. The advent of neuroscience as a defining paradigm for psychiatry has challenged residencies with a humanistic focus due to common perceptions that it would entail constriction of psychiatric practice to diagnostic and psychopharmacology roles. The author describes a neuroscience curriculum that has taught psychopharmacology effectively, while also advancing effectiveness of language-based and relationship-based therapeutics. In 2000, the George Washington University psychiatry residency initiated a neuroscience curriculum consisting of (1) a foundational postgraduate year 2 seminar teaching cognitive and social neuroscience and its integration into clinical psychopharmacology, (2) advanced seminars that utilized a neuroscience perspective in teaching specific psychotherapeutic skill sets, and (3) case-based teaching in outpatient clinical supervisions that incorporated a neuroscience perspective into traditional psychotherapy supervisions. Curricular assessment was conducted by (1) RRC reaccreditation site visit feedback, (2) examining career trajectories of residency graduates, (3) comparing PRITE exam Somatic Treatments subscale scores for 2010-2012 residents with pre-implementation residents, and (4) postresidency survey assessment by 2010-2012 graduates. The 2011 RRC site visit report recommended a "notable practice" citation for "innovative neurosciences curriculum." Three of twenty 2010-2012 graduates entered neuroscience research fellowships, as compared to none before the new curriculum. PRITE Somatic Treatments subscale scores improved from the 23rd percentile to the 62nd percentile in pre- to post-implementation of curriculum (p neuroscience curriculum for a residency committed to humanistic psychiatry

  1. Turkish School Counselors and Counselor Educators' Perceptions about Multicultural Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatunoglu, Askim

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the topic of multicultural counseling in Turkey, where school-based multicultural counseling services remain comparatively limited in scope and application. Participants consisted of twenty-three counselors working in secondary or high schools and fourteen counselor educators from several state universities. While the…

  2. Digital Storytelling: Bringing Humanistic Inquiry to Management Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesteruk, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This essay recounts how a teaching experiment with digital storytelling unexpectedly revealed how this humanistic genre enabled by contemporary technology might contribute to a more creative integration of business study with the liberal arts.

  3. The Humanist Bias in Western Philosophy and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues that the bias in Western philosophy is tied to its humanist ideology that pictures itself as central to the natural history of humanity and is historically linked to the emergence of humanism as pedagogy.

  4. A Powerful Motivator: Humanistic Techniques in Second Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Gertrude

    1980-01-01

    Research recommends focusing on the positive aspects of low-risk humanistic concerns for classroom language teaching activities. Through sharing personal experiences and feelings students' ethnic identity will be strengthened and intergroup awareness and appreciation promoted. (PMJ)

  5. The Implementation of Smart Textiles in Humanistic Hospital Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Jeppe; Fisker, Anna Marie

    2012-01-01

    With the construction of new modern hospitals, the humanistic design principle of healing architecture is introduced to create health promoting synergies representing the vision of improving hospitalised patients’ healing process, supported by enriching design solutions...

  6. Humanistic Nursing Theory: application to hospice and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hung-Lan; Volker, Deborah L

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a discussion of the relevance of Humanistic Nursing Theory to hospice and palliative care nursing. The World Health Organization has characterized the need for expert, palliative and end-of-life care as a top priority for global health care. The specialty of hospice and palliative care nursing embraces a humanistic caring and holistic approach to patient care. As this resonates with Paterson and Zderad's Humanistic Nursing Theory, an understanding of hospice nurses' experiences can be investigated by application of relevant constructs in the theory. This article is based on Paterson and Zderad's publications and other theoretical and research articles and books focused on Humanistic Nursing Theory (1976-2009), and data from a phenomenological study of the lived experience of Taiwanese hospice nurses conducted in 2007. Theoretical concepts relevant to hospice and palliative nursing included moreness-choice, call-and-response, intersubjective transaction, uniqueness-otherness, being and doing and community. The philosophical perspectives of Humanistic Nursing Theory are relevant to the practice of hospice and palliative care nursing. By 'being with and doing with', hospice and palliative nurses can work with patients to achieve their final goals in the last phase of life. Use of core concepts from Humanistic Nursing Theory can provide a unifying language for planning care and describing interventions. Future research efforts in hospice and palliative nursing should define and evaluate these concepts for efficacy in practice settings. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. SUPPLEMENT TO HUMANISTIC CONCEPT OF YOUTHS’ SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duško Bjelica

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Sport of the children and youths represents an ideal educative medium able to contribute to optimal personal and social development of the youths. However, positive influence of sports on their psycho-physical development does not have to be always expressed, especially when the victory on competitions is over-stressed. In such circumstances, a sportive environment can become to the children and youths a source of high pressure and stress, which can be the reason why they leave the sport, failing to realise their potential sport talents and predispositions. Whether the youths’ sport will become a mean for improvement of their psycho-physical development or the source of negative experiences mostly depends on the way it is organised and coached by adults, as well as on the aims they find primary. If we accept the humanistic concept of the youths’ sport, in which the victory is not the only aim, we will teach the children how to enjoy the sports, how to develop their inner motivation and how to become successful if they do their best. In this way, we will increase the chance to use a great educative potential and to put it in the service of health and proper development of the youths.

  8. Giftedness Counseling in Germany: Consultation Reasons and Issues and Their Relations to Gender, Age, and Aptitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Nele; Koop, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, parents can request counseling and assessment of school-related learning and behavioral issues from either independent counseling centers or school-based ones. Focusing on giftedness consultations at independent counseling centers, the goal of this study is to provide a detailed description of the reasons for and the issues discussed…

  9. A School-Based Program for Overweight and Obese Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pbert, Lori; Druker, Susan; Barton, Bruce; Schneider, Kristin L.; Olendzki, Barbara; Gapinski, Mary A.; Kurtz, Stephen; Osganian, Stavroula

    2016-01-01

    Background: Given the dramatic increase in adolescent overweight and obesity, models are needed for implementing weight management treatment through readily accessible venues. We evaluated the acceptability and efficacy of a school-based intervention consisting of school nurse-delivered counseling and an afterschool exercise program in improving…

  10. The Human Factor: Student Reactions to the Integration of Personal Dispositions into a Counseling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Melinda M.; Cochran, Jeff L.; Spurgeon, Shawn; Diambra, Joel F.

    2013-01-01

    The authors explored student reactions to the integration of personal dispositions, or characteristic attitudes, into a counseling program. Results suggested participants liked focusing on personal dispositions and were able to identify areas of personal growth related to these characteristics. Integrating humanistic principles by using…

  11. The Role of Guidance and Counseling in Enhancing Student Discipline in Secondary Schools in Koibatek District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgong, Victor Kipkemboi; Ngumi, Owen; Chege, Kimani

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the role of guidance and counseling in enhancing student discipline in secondary schools in Koibatek district. The study was guided by Alfred Adler (1998) theory of personality, and humanistic theory of Albert Bandura (1995) social learning model. The study adopted a descriptive survey research design.…

  12. Toward a humanistic model in health communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werder, Olaf

    2017-03-01

    Since the key to effective health communication lies in its ability to communicate well, some of its core problems are those that relate to the sharing of meaning between communicators. In elaborating on these problems, this paper offers two key propositions: one, health communication has to pass through the filter of a particular world view that creates a discrepancy between expected and actual message reception and response. Two, the assumption of a rational human actor made implicitly by most health psychological models is a contestable issue, as many times message recipients do not follow a cognitive judgment process. The phenomenon of resisting health messages by reasonable people asks the question whether we ought to rethink our adherence to a particular vision of human health as many times the adverse reaction to behaviour modification occurs as the result of a particular dialogical or discursive situation. At the same time, most motivational decisions in people's daily routines are automatic and use a concept known as self-identity to give stability to their behaviour patterns. Finally, health communication as part of organised government practices adheres to predominant value perspectives within health promotion practice that affect the manner in which health issues become problematised. This paper proposes a humanistic model that aims to pay attention to the intricacies of human communication by addressing all of the above problems in turn. It interprets the sharing of meaning element in human communication and addresses the question of how the idea of health is created through discourse. As such, it offers a complementary and constructive paradigm and set of approaches to understand health, its meanings and communication.

  13. Marriage Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to improve a troubled relationship. You can use marriage counseling to help with many specific issues, including: Communication problems Sexual difficulties Conflicts about child rearing or blended families Substance abuse Anger Infidelity ...

  14. Aconselhamento pós-teste anti-HIV: análise à luz de uma teoria humanística de Enfermagem Consejería pós test Anti-HIV: análisis a luz de una teoría humanistica de enfermería Anti-HIV after-test counselling: analysis at a light of a Nursing humanistic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alix Leite Araújo

    2006-12-01

    -objeto. Las consultas eran rápidas y puramente mecánicas, llevando a esos profesionales en ciertos momentos a no brindar de una ayuda humanizada.This work analyzes the counselling after anti-HIV test in Basic Units of Health. It is a qualitative study developed in Family's Basic Units of Health in the city of Fortaleza (UBASF. The field work happened by the observation of the 12 male nurses attendance in consultations of prenatal. The theoretical referencial of analysis was the Paterson & Zderad's Humanistic Theory of Nursing, seen that in Nursing, according to the theory, implicates in a special type of encounter among human beings. The analysis was based on the concept of dialogue, having as variables its structural elements: the encounter, the relationship, the presence and the call and the answer. It was observed that the assistance to the pregnant didn't reach the relationship I-YOU, in other words, the relationship subject-subject, with the presence of the authentic dialogue. The relationship that prevailed was the I-THAT, subject-object. The consultations were fast and purely mechanics, leading those professionals in certain moments to escape from a humanized assistance.

  15. Practicing what we preach in humanistic and positive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Scott D; Mruk, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Comments on the article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" by Waterman (see record 2013-12501-001). With a largely backward glance cast toward humanistic psychology's early successes, Waterman's article concluded by turning toward positive psychology's "vibrant" future and pointed to irreconcilable differences that would limit further dialogue between the two fields. From the current authors' perspective, such an assessment results in premature closure on the relationship between the two subdisciplines, as we in the humanistic tradition continue to appreciate and place our trust in the power of dialogue. Psychologists on both sides of this epistemological boundary might therefore benefit from focusing on the possibilities offered by an interface between the two approaches rather than on a divide that is far more likely to push us apart. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Forms and effects of the humanists' grammatical metadiscourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horster, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Taking clauses with quia as an example, this article addresses the relationship between grammatical metadiscourse on how one should compose in Latin and actual practice among humanist writers in order to shed light on the workings of grammatical metadiscourse. The investigation compares quantitat......Taking clauses with quia as an example, this article addresses the relationship between grammatical metadiscourse on how one should compose in Latin and actual practice among humanist writers in order to shed light on the workings of grammatical metadiscourse. The investigation compares...

  17. Comparison of recent graduates of clinical versus counseling psychology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brems, C; Johnson, M E

    1997-01-01

    Recent graduates from clinical (N = 65) and counseling (N = 64) psychology programs were surveyed to assess similarities and differences of aspects of their programs and job-related activity. Results revealed only minor differences. Counseling psychologists were more likely to provide group therapy, career counseling and assessment, public lectures and workshops, to have more knowledge of the Strong Interest Inventory, to be more likely to work in university counseling centers, and to endorse humanistic theoretical orientations. Clinical psychologists were more likely to work in medical school settings, to ascribe human behavior to internal states rather than to social causes, and to have greater knowledge of the Rorschach. However, the similarities between the two specialities relative to work setting, theoretical orientation, service, research, and teaching activities, far outweighed these minor differences. Implications of these findings are placed in the context of previous research that has suggested the possible merger of the two specialities.

  18. Recentering Leadership around the Human Person : Introducing a Framework for Humanistic Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Sharin; Sörgel, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Despite the advances of humanistic concepts in business research and practice, and the paradigmatic shift from economicism to humanism, existing leadership theory is insufficiently suited to provide solutions for a new humanistic economy as it adheres to an evidently non-humanistic logic. Therefore, this study first provides an overview of humanistic advances in business, as it aims at building a comprehensive leadership theory that is grounded in humanism. Our notion and definition of humani...

  19. Analysis of the Status Quo of Humanistic Quality-Oriented Education in Medical Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shulei; Li, Yamin

    2012-01-01

    With transformation of contemporary modern medical educational modes and improvement of requirement upon doctors' humanistic quality, it seems quite important to strengthen humanistic quality-oriented education in medical colleges and universities. Medical humanistic quality-oriented education in China started late, which determines that there are…

  20. Scientific Literacy: A Freirean Perspective as a Radical View of Humanistic Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Wildson L. P.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, a rationale for advancing a new idea in humanistic science education is developed from a Paulo Freire perspective. Paulo Freire developed a well-known approach to adult literacy based on his humanistic ideas through the dialogical process. From Freirean educational principles, the idea unfolds that a Freirean humanistic science…

  1. Denis Goldberg: Freedom Fighter and Humanist | Kenvyn | New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Denis Goldberg: Freedom Fighter and Humanist. David Kenvyn, Pat Turnbull. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER RESOURCES.

  2. Mapping Place and Identity in Academic Development: A Humanistic Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Trevor; Dea, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a humanistic dialogue between the authors that focuses on mapping place and identity in academic development. The authors chose this format in order to capture some of the important work that conversation among intellectual peers can do--work that forms the basis of much learning at conferences and in the corridors and…

  3. A Humanistic-Educative Approach to Evaluation in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Dolly; Dietrich, Pamela

    2002-01-01

    A humanistic-educative evaluation method for nursing education emphasizes collaboration, caring, creativity, critical thinking, and self-assessment. A teacher-student shared home visit in family nursing illustrates the use of the approach for developing self-directed and competent nurses. (Contains 34 references.) (SK)

  4. Is Gestalt Therapy a Humanistic Form of Psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantino, Len

    1977-01-01

    Believes the therapeutic situation that offers the greatest awareness with the least amount of dehumanization is a synthesis of the gestalt and the existential humanistic (EH) orientations. Considers the relationship and possible synthesis of the existential and gestalt positions. (Author/RK)

  5. The Humanistic Psychology Movement and the Teaching of Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin

    1983-01-01

    Describes how several areas of humanistic psychology can be applied to college level chemistry in particular and teaching in general, focusing on confluent education in chemistry and neurolinguistic programing (including representational systems, anchoring, and neurolinguistic programing strategies). Comments on the author's participation in the…

  6. The Humanistic Approach: A Model For Dental Health Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Sue; Hurley, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A special dental health curriculum, called the Tattletooth Curriculum, demonstrates the use of the humanistic model in health education and its concern for the learner as a total person. The main concept in the development of this curriculum is that the prospect for changing behavior is unlikely unless the health information is personally…

  7. An Annotated Bibliography of Resources for Humanistic and Psychological Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Gerald J.

    1979-01-01

    Compiled for New England Teacher Corps Conference on Interpersonal Relations (March 1978), this annotated bibliography offers suggestions and examples of how humanistic and psychological education theories have been and can be put into practice. Sections include (1) classroom exercises; (2) resource directories; (3) films; and (4) humanistic…

  8. Humanistic and economic burden of fibromyalgia in Japan [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee LK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lee LK, Ebata N, Hlavacek P, DiBonaventura M, Cappelleri JC, Sadosky A. Humanistic and economic burden of fibromyalgia in Japan. Journal of Pain Research. 2016;9:967–978.Figures 3, 4, 5, and 6 contain errors in the key. Fibromyalgia should be dark gray and matched controls should be light gray.Read the original article.

  9. Humane Education and Humanistic Philosophy: Toward a New Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sydney Carroll; Beirne, Piers

    2002-01-01

    The authors argue that humane education should be an integral part of humanistic philosophy. They outline 2 key components of a humane education: (a) an understanding of the sociological and psychological dimensions of animal abuse and (b) the cultivation of empathy for nonhuman animals. (Contains 41 references.) (Author)

  10. Humanistic Education for Teaching in a Globalizing World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suransky, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on humanistic education in a globalizing world by exploring experiences of teaching and learning in the annual international summer school on Pluralism, Development and Social Change. The summer school creates a rich microcosm of pedagogic practice in the context of

  11. COUNSELING MULTIKULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUZLIAH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multicutural is a term used to describe one's view of the variety of life in the world, or cultural policy emphasizing their acceptance of diversity, and a wide range of cultures (multicultural that exist in society regarding values, system, culture, customs and politics that they profess. The effectiveness of counseling depends on many factors the most important is the relation to each other, and mutual understanding between counselor and client. Cultural differences that exist in this country requires the counselor needs to understand the different cultures that exist. Importance of multicultural for counselors as a form of consciousness that the counselor and client have cultural differences. Multicultural counseling a counseling relationship with the concept that there is a counselor with a client who has a cultural background, values and different lifestyles. Building a good relationship when the counseling process takes place so that the counselor can understand the culture of its clients one of the key attitudes that exist within konsleor is empathy. Counselors who have empathy will be able to understand the way the world through the perspective of the client.

  12. Outplacement Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowdell, Richard L.; And Others

    This monographs discusses outplacement counseling (the process of helping a terminated employee secure new employment) in business and industry and in higher education. The first section, outplacement in business and industry, describes the emergence of outplacement services and discusses benefits and problems associated with the service. The…

  13. Outplacement Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony S.; Dai, Sheila

    Rapid changes in technology and the economy have led to major staff reductions in the workplace, and have increased the need to assist displaced employees with outplacement counseling that is responsive, cost-effective, humane, and on-going. College counselors have the basic skills to effectively expand their role in this field in ways that…

  14. Nurturing the Relationships of All Couples: Integrating Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Concerns into Premarital Education and Counseling Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquarelli, Elaine J.; Fallon, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that premarital counseling programs help engaged couples develop interpersonal and problem-solving skills that enhance their marital relationships. Yet, there are limited services for same-sex couples. This article assumes an integrated humanistic and social justice advocacy stance to explore the needs of lesbian, gay, and bisexual…

  15. The Efficacy of School-Based Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Jonathan

    This presentation reviews the concept of school-based consultation (Lambert, 1974) and contrasts it with other consultation models. The validity of this model for the professional talking relationships of school psychologists (school-based consultation) is assessed first by examining: (1) the likelihood that interprofessional interchange will take…

  16. Communication Technologies Preferred by School Based Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the communication technologies preferred by school based administrators. This study surveyed and interviewed 96 school based administrators in a mid-sized suburban school system. The data show that individual emails, email lists, and cell phone technologies had the highest percentage effectiveness ratings…

  17. Application of humanistic theory concepts at a burn unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Kelve Castro Damasceno; Lorita Marlena Freitag Pagliuca; Maria Grasiela Teixeira Barroso

    2011-01-01

    By using a Theory Analysis model in care for burn patients, this study aimed to analyze the concepts and sub-concepts of the Humanistic Theory. An exploratory-descriptive research was carried out between February and July 2004 at a Burn Treatment Centre in Fortaleza, Brazil. The sample consisted of two nurses and two burn victims. Health, human being and nursing were selected as concepts, while dialogue, encounter, presence, call, response and communion as sub-concepts. The application of the...

  18. Innovation Through Tradition: Rediscovering the "Humanist" in the Medical Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutac, Julie; Osipov, Rimma; Childress, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    Throughout its fifty-year history, the role of the medical humanist and even the name "medical humanities" has remained raw, dynamic and contested. What do we mean when we call ourselves "humanists" and our practice "medical humanities?" To address these questions, we turn to the concept of origin narratives. After explaining the value of these stories, we focus on one particularly rich origin narrative of the medical humanities by telling the story of how a group of educators, ethicists, and scholars struggling to define their relatively new field rediscovered the studia humanitatis, a Renaissance curriculum for learning and teaching. Our origin narrative is composed of two intertwined stories-the history of the studia humanitatis itself and the story of the scholars who rediscovered it. We argue that as an origin narrative the studia humanitatis grounds the medical humanities as both an engaged moral practice and pedagogical project. In the latter part of the paper, we use this origin narrative to show how medical humanists working in translational science can use their understanding of their historical roots to do meaningful work in the world.

  19. School-Based Management: Power to the Parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    PTA Today, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Discusses school-based management, explaining what PTAs need to be prepared for discussions about restructuring through school-based management. The article discusses origin of governance, school-based management councils, decision making, and parent-community involvement. (SM)

  20. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  1. The Humanistic and Economic Burden of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Durgin

    Full Text Available RLSOBJECTIVES: To evaluate the humanistic and economic burden of a restless legs syndrome (RLS diagnosis with regard to health-related quality of life, work productivity loss, healthcare resource use, and direct and indirect costs.Self-reported data came from the 2012 National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS, a large, annual, nationally representative cross-sectional general health survey of US adults.RLS patients (n = 2,392 were matched on demographic and health characteristics to Non-RLS respondents via propensity score matching differences between groups were tested with Bivariate and multivariable analyses.RLS patients had significantly lower health-related quality of life scores: Mental Component Summary (44.60 vs. 48.92, p<.001, Physical Component Summary (40.57 vs. 46.78, p<.001, Health Utilities (.63 vs. .71, p<.001 and higher levels of work productivity loss in the past seven days including absenteeism (8.1% vs. 3.9%, p<.001, presenteeism (26.5% vs. 15.8%, p<.001, and overall productivity loss (30.1% vs. 18.1%, p<.001 as well as general activity impairment (46.1% vs. 29.7%, p<.001 [corrected]. RLS patients had significantly higher healthcare resource use in the past 6 months than non-RLS patients: healthcare provider visits (7.46 vs. 4.42%, p<.001, ER visits (0.45 vs. 0.24, p<.001, and hospitalizations (0.24 vs. 0.15, p<.001. RLS patients also had higher estimated direct and indirect costs than non-RLS patients. Finally, it was found that across outcomes increasing severity is associated with increased economic and humanistic burden for RLS patients.RLS patients suffer a greater humanistic and economic burden than those without RLS. Moreover as severity increases so does the burden of RLS.

  2. George Kelly: cognitive psychologist, humanistic psychologist, or something else entirely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjafield, John G

    2008-11-01

    George Kelly was regarded by some of his contemporaries as a cognitive psychologist and by others as a humanistic psychologist. Kelly himself resisted being rubricized. He did, however, name several people who had been influential in his life and work, one of whom was J.F. Herbart. A comparison of Herbart and Kelly reveals several similarities. Both shared a belief that psychology was fundamentally a mathematical discipline. Both eliminated distinctions usually taken for granted in psychology, such as emotion versus cognition. Reconstructing Kelly's relation to Herbart allows one to see more clearly why Kelly was such a unique figure in 20th century psychology.

  3. Focus on Humanistic Values in Rural Livable Residential System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiuli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the development of farmers as a goal of residential system using value rationality instead of farmer’s requirements which can be satisfied. Based upon the position and function of humanistic values in residential system, a rural housing system is built as a subjectivity and objectivity unity consisting of artifacts system, behavior system and concept system. Moreover, we introduce three coupling design strategies to rural livable residential system aiming to guide the current reconstruction of shabby buildings in rural areas.

  4. CONTRADICTION BETWEEN TECHNOCRATIC AND HUMANISTIC SYSTEMS OF VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Kazakevich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the paper is determination of difference between technocratic and humanistic value systems. The authors also suggest to outline the range of issues specific to modern technological civilization, reflect its controdictory nature, as well as to focus on the university activity fields concerning formation and/or restoration of technocratic and humanitarian balance. Methodology. The most important methodological principle of the work is a systematic approach. It has determined logic of description and conclusion. During the study authors analyzed separate aspects of social development of the late 20th – early 21st centuries, as well as content analysis of the global information flow (documentary and non-documentary on this topic and their own observations, obtained during the implementation of long-term educational and scientific practices at the university. It is, for example, drawing up a comparative table of technocratic and humanistic value systems. The authors have conducted a comparative analysis of 2 Sociological Research data (2009 and 2013 years among university youth of Dnipropetrovsk "Modern Library by Students′ Eyes" and trending concerning the issues about the role of reading in the students lives. Findings. The difference between the technocratic and humanistic value systems was determined. Contemporary problems of the personal intellectual development in the process of education and training in technical universities during the dominance of technocratic value systems were outlined. Attention is focused on the university directions on formation and / or restoration of technocratic and humanitarian balance. Originality. The authors have analyzed and outlined a range of issues specific to contemporary industrial civilization, its controversial nature was reflected. Rebalancing of the technocratic and humanitarian is one of the major tasks in our time. The directions of universities activities were determined

  5. A humanistic-educative approach to evaluation in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Dolly; Dietrich, Pamela

    2002-05-01

    A continuing challenge for nurse educators is to create a learning environment in which students receive fair and timely evaluations. Traditional or behavioural evaluation methods have been criticized as being too limited. A humanistic-educative evaluation method is offered with its emancipation of faculty and students and emphasis on collaboration, caring, creativity, critical thinking and self-assessment. A teacher-student shared home visit for a Family Nursing clinical assignment is provided to illustrate this approach. The potential benefit of the method for developing self-directed and competent professional nurses is proposed. Copyright 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  6. Teaching residents humanistic skills in a colposcopy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Constance

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this project is to add formal training and evaluation of humanistic skills for residents in a colposcopy clinic. Medical education of residents in office procedures has generally focused on proficiency in a particular technical skill and acquisition of clinical knowledge regarding management options. The literature supports assessing pattern recognition with visual images and observing a specific number of procedures to achieve proficiency. Little attention has been given to training residents to demonstrate sensitivity during procedures. However, we believe this is a key element, as the procedure involves anxious patients who are fearful of cancer and fearful of pain in their most private body parts. Further, women who have painful or unpleasant colposcopy procedures are less likely to follow up for further evaluation of treatment and may be at higher risk to develop cervical cancer. Colposcopy training for gynecology residents, family medicine residents, medical students, and emergency room sexual assault nurses is provided at a colposcopy clinic that performs more than 400 procedures per year. The majority of women are referred for colposcopy from outside clinics, and more than one third are non-English-speaking. We have added to our traditional didactics and case instruction curriculum a session dedicated to training residents in humanistic skills related to performing colposcopy. Topics of discussion include (1) how to ask sensitive questions regarding risk factors for cervical dysplasia, (2) how to explain the procedure and obtain consent, especially with non-English-speaking women, (3) how to educate patients about human papilloma virus (HPV) and prevention of cervical cancer, (4) how to speak to the patient and the attending physician during the procedure to reduce rather than increase anxiety, (5) how to provide comfort measures during colposcopy (e.g., using a warm speculum, using local anesthesia, hiding instruments from patient view), and (6

  7. Use of Treatment and Counseling Services and Mind-Body Techniques by Students with Emotional and Behavioral Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardene, Wasantha; Erbe, Ryan; Lohrmann, David; Torabi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background: School-based treatment and counseling services (TCSs) can integrate mind-body techniques (MBTs) to improve children's health, wellness, and academic performance. We aimed to describe the effect of school-based TCS on MBT-use among students experiencing difficulties with concentration, emotions, behaviors, and getting along (DCEBG).…

  8. Genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina-Neto, João Monteiro de

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this review of genetic counseling (GC) is to describe the current concepts and philosophical and ethical principles accepted by the great majority of countries and recommended by the World Health Organization, the stages of the process, its results and the psychological impact that a genetic disease has on a family. The concepts presented are based on an historical synthesis of the literature on GC since the 1930s until today, and the articles cited represent the most important research published which today provides the foundation for the theory and practice of GC. The modern definition of GC is a process of communication that deals with the human problems related with the occurrence of a genetic disease in a family. It is of fundamental importance that health professionals are aware of the psychological aspects triggered by genetic diseases and the ways in which these can be managed. In the field of human and medical genetics we are still living in a phase in which technical and scientific aspects predominate, with little emphasis on the study of emotional reactions and people's processes of adaptation to these diseases, which leads to clients having a low level of understanding of the events that have taken place, with negative consequences for family life and for society. The review concludes by discussing the need to refer families with genetic diseases for GC and the need for professionals working in this area to invest more in humanizing care and developing non-directive psychological GC techniques.

  9. Humanistic Content in the Chinese Language Textbooks for Nine Year Compulsory Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Sargent, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employ quantitative and qualitative content analysis to investigate the nature of humanistic value content in the Chinese language arts curriculum and whether or not this varies across old and new versions of the textbooks. Our findings illustrate the various dimensions of humanistic value content in the Chinese language arts…

  10. A Call for Sobriety: Sixteenth-Century Educationalists and Humanist Conviviality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Demmy

    2013-01-01

    Michel Jeanneret's "A Feast of Words. Banquets and Table Talk in the Renaissance" (1987; English translation published in 1991) highlighted the celebration by Renaissance humanists of food and drink as catalysts of intellectual exchange. The author convincingly argued that Renaissance banquets served as a paradigm for the humanist body…

  11. The Humanist Conception of the University: A Framework for Post-Modern Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviram, Aharon

    1992-01-01

    Five models of the university are examined: traditional (medieval); liberal (English); positivist (French); relativist (utilitarian); and humanist (German). The models exist on three conceptual continuums, focusing on the goal of the university and nature and function of science. It is argued that, despite erosion, the humanist model is most…

  12. Kazimierz Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration and the American Humanistic Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckowicz, T. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the differences and similarities between Dabrowski's theory of positive disintegration and the theories of the American humanistic psychologists. Stresses the suffering associated with attaining higher levels of spiritual development. Suggests that Dabrowski and humanists followed different theodicies. (Author/ABL)

  13. An anatomy memorial tribute: fostering a humanistic practice of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, A

    1998-01-01

    Medical students' first "patients" are the individuals who donate their bodies for laboratory dissection, and these first lessons of medicine serve as a model for the doctor-patient relationship. An Anatomy Memorial Tribute was initiated by students at Mount Sinai School of Medicine to honor these donors. Students and faculty shared music, art, and readings of original poetry and prose. The event facilitated dialogue about attitudes and feelings with regards to death and dying. Controversial issues included anonymity versus identification of donors and the appropriateness of professionals showing emotion in public. The feedback from both students and faculty participants in the event was overwhelmingly positive. Students wrote that the tribute provided a sense of closure for their dissection experience and reinvolved them in shaping their education; faculty indicated that it was appropriate. Memorial tributes are a first step toward fostering the personal growth and emotional preparation required for competent and compassionate patient care. To encourage a humanistic approach to medical education, faculty have the opportunity to participate in such tributes, facilitate sensitive use of language in the anatomy laboratory, and expand the broader medical school curriculum in relation to death and dying. Medical students may expand the concept of memorial tributes and enhance their professional growth in this area by sharing information, ideas, and experiences through national organizations such as the Humanistic Medicine Group of the American Medical Students Association. The capacity of physicians to effectively serve patients facing the end of life is particularly relevant in the setting of palliative medicine.

  14. School-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Marla R.; Fiorvanti, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse is a leading cause of emotional, behavioral, and health problems across the lifespan. It is also preventable. School-based abuse prevention programs for early childhood and elementary school children have been found to be effective in increasing student knowledge and protective behaviors. The purpose of this article is to help school…

  15. What Is School-Based Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Bank Publications, 2007

    2007-01-01

    School-based management (SBM) is the decentralization of authority from the central government to the school level. SBM has become a very popular movement over the past decade. The World Bank's work program emerged out of a need to define the concept more clearly, review the evidence, support impact assessments in various countries, and provide…

  16. Information and Communication Technology and School Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communication Technology and School Based Assessment: Challenges for Sustainable Development. ... The result showed among others that ICT is very useful in SBA and all primary schools be provided with ICT facilities and that teachers should be computer literate for sustainable development.

  17. School-based social work interventions: a cross-national systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Meares, Paula; Montgomery, Katherine L; Kim, Johnny S

    2013-07-01

    Across the globe, social workers serve schools in a variety of capacities, providing services such as skills training; individual, group, and family counseling; crisis intervention; home visits; parent support and education; and advocacy for students, families, and school systems. To date, no synthesis of the literature exists examining tier 1 and tier 2 cross-national school-based social work interventions. Therefore, the purpose of this systematic review was twofold: (1) to identify tier 1 and tier 2 school-based interventions that involve social workers and (2) to examine the extent to which the interventions are efficacious with school-based youths. A computerized search with inclusion and exclusion criteria was conducted using several databases. Eighteen studies were included for the final sample in this review. Effect sizes were calculated for all outcomes to determine magnitude of treatment effect. Results indicated that most of the studies were conducted in the United States (n = 14) and half (n = 9) of the included interventions were tier 1. Many positive effect sizes were found. Interventions aimed to treat a variety of outcomes such as sexual health, aggression, self-esteem, school attendance, identity, and depression. More research is needed to determine the effectiveness of school-based social work worldwide.

  18. Developing teachers' social and emotional competence: a humanistic psychology perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Palomero Fernández

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The social and emotional competences of teachers have a notable influence on the type of teaching that is carried out and on the type of relationships that are built in the classroom. Training teachers in personal aspects is a current urging need. Since the end of the last century there have a great deal of enriching research, courses and publications on teachers' emotional and social intelligence. From the point of view of training, this article presents some limitations of certain emerging proposals. Next, an alternative is proposed, based on the principles of humanistic psychology and promoting the development of five attitudes directly related to the teacher's emotional and social competence: phenomenological disposition, autonomy, responsibility, criteria independence and cooperative disposition. Finally, some the possible shortcomings and negative aspects of the proposed model are discussed, highlighting the need to further investigate the efficiency and relevance of training proposals such as the one presented here in order to increase their social impact.

  19. Creativity and health: an anti-humanist reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nick J

    2013-09-01

    Many studies suggest that health benefits from engaging with the creative arts, but explanations of the association remain tenuous. This article explores both creativity and health from an anti-humanist perspective and develops a Deleuze-inspired analysis to supply the theoretical framework for creativity and health. In this view, creativity is an active, experimenting flow within a network or assemblage of bodies, things, ideas and institutions, while health is understood as the capacity of a body to affect and be affected by this assemblage. It is consequently unsurprising that there is a relationship between creative activity and health. This analysis is used to explore how creative production and reception can affect health, and to assess the implications for sociology and for arts in health-care practice.

  20. The humanistic approach in the Public Accountant Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Dextre Flores

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to show the importance of the humanistic approach of the accounting student considering the social orientation of accounting knowledge whose main objectives are the preparation, interpretation and assessing of the financial information of the different economical events. These reflections results from three years work devoted to the preparation and implementation of a new career program based on competences for the Facultad de Administración y Contabilidad of the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP and the result of a research about the needs and interests of the academic, social and business agents related to the accounting field. The career program adopted take the graduated of the career to prepare moral positive judgments and to understand that the occupation training is just a part of the human approach.

  1. Humanist trends preschool education in Japan: theoretical and methodological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Tarabasova

    2014-08-01

    The main focus of the educational strategy in Japan is on the intrinsic value of every child, regardless of the AI characteristics and abilities. Respect for human subjectivity permeates its entire livelihoods Japanese, from pre­school age, and is the fundamental principle of education. Humanistic principles of education in Japan declares: «untalented children there!». The purpose of education in the Japanese education more educational than education is implemented in the idea of «kokoro», which translated from Japanese means: heart, soul, mind, humanity. Contents concept of « kokoro « include: respect for people and animals, sympathy and generous attitude towards others, the search for truth, the ability to feel a great and high, have self­control, protect nature, to contribute to society. This principle permeates the content of all programs, objects, and daily life. The main objectives of pre­school Japanese teachers determine: training as a benefit for the child.

  2. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF HUMANISTIC LEARNING AT DARUL AMAN ISLAMIC HIGH SCHOOL IN ACEH BESAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Sulaiman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article focuses on humanistic learning at an Islamic private school in Aceh. It uses qualitative descriptive method and takes seven subjects as the sample of the data. It shows that the humanistic learning in Darul Aman Private Madrasah Aliyah of Aceh Besar was implemented through three mechanisms. First, creating a humanist class situation, both physical and non-physical environment (socio-emotional, through a democratic approach. Second, employing a cooperative learning model as the basis of humanistic learning. Third, adopting an effective communication model in creating humanistic learning interactions. This involves cycle-models of communication and interaction of learning: one direction interaction (teacher-student, teacher-learners-learners (their feedback for teachers; students learn from each other and multi-interaction of the teacher-learner, learner-teacher, learners-learners (interaction in many directions. The implementation of humanistic learning at Darul Aman Private Madrasah Aliyah of Aceh Besar had a problem in the form of limited instructional media resources. Nevertheless, the overall learning process was humanist.

  3. The Implementation of Humanistic Learning at Darul Aman Islamic High School in Aceh Besar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Sulaiman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on humanistic learning at an Islamic private school in Aceh. It uses qualitative descriptive method and takes seven subjects as the sample of the data. It shows that the humanistic learning in Darul Aman Private Madrasah Aliyah of Aceh Besar was implemented through three mechanisms. First, creating a humanist class situation, both physical and non-physical environment (socio-emotional, through a democratic approach. Second, employing a cooperative learning model as the basis of humanistic learning. Third, adopting an effective communication model in creating humanistic learning interactions. This involves cycle-models of communication and interaction of learning: one direction interaction (teacher-student, teacher-learners-learners (their feedback for teachers; students learn from each other and multi-interaction of the teacher-learner, learner-teacher, learners-learners (interaction in many directions. The implementation of humanistic learning at Darul Aman Private Madrasah Aliyah of Aceh Besar had a problem in the form of limited instructional media resources. Nevertheless, the overall learning process was humanist. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.20414/ujis.v21i1.1161

  4. Benefits of Required Counseling for Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Holm, Jessica M.; Daly, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students experience mental health distress. The authors investigated the benefits of required counseling services at a training clinic for students enrolled in counseling courses. Results indicated that after receiving services, students ("N" = 55) reported decreases in overall problems, depressive symptoms, and anxiety…

  5. Prenatal Genetic Counseling (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Prenatal Genetic Counseling KidsHealth / For Parents / Prenatal Genetic Counseling What's ... how can they help your family? What Is Genetic Counseling? Genetic counseling is the process of: evaluating ...

  6. Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edo Journal of Counselling, the official publication of Edo Chapter of Counselling Association of Nigeria publishes original well researched and well articulated papers/articles on all issues relating to counselling and psychology that use a variety of appropriate approaches to the conduct of theoretical, empirical and ...

  7. Outplacement as Transition Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Richard J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes outplacement counseling as a process that enables management to deal with the problem of the employee who must be released or the staff that must be reduced. Discusses the process of outplacement counseling, the stages of transition counseling, and techniques to be implemented. (BH)

  8. A Course on Humanistic Creativity in Later Life: Literature Review, Case Histories, and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuessel, Frank; Van Stewart, Arthur; Cedeno, Aristofanes

    2001-01-01

    Presents case histories of late-life creativity in literature (May Sarton), painting (Marcel Duchamp), music (Leos Janacek), dance (Martha Graham), and theatre (Jessica Tandy). Offers suggestions for a course on humanistic creativity in later life. (Contains 74 references.) (SK)

  9. Effects of Humanistic Techniques on Attitude, Cohesiveness, and Self-Concept of Foreign Language Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Gertrude

    1981-01-01

    Describes and gives results of two studies conducted to determine what effects humanistic activities in teaching a foreign language have on attitudes, cohesiveness, and self-concept of foreign language students. (BK)

  10. Holistic Health and Humanistic Education: The Physical Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses physical exercise as an intervention strategy for counselors and teachers to meet many traditional teaching/counseling goals. In five articles explores the effects of running and jogging on health and well being, offers guidelines for exercise regimens and health education for children, and discusses an active life-style. (JAC)

  11. Epistemology of the Ecuadorian university humanist formation with a gender perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Vizcaíno-Cárdenas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the dynamics of the university humanistic formation focusedongender, the aimistoprovide the process university students formation with the epistemology to guide it. There searched analysis method was suitableto examine the Ecuadorian legislation context. There sults of this research may contribute to the integral formation of the study subject providing at the same time evidence of the social relevance in the face of the humanistic and gender formation.

  12. Bernardo de Aldrete, humanist and laminario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolard, Kathryn A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The humanist scholar and philologist Bernardo de Aldrete had a contradictory relationship to the Sacromonte affair. His first book in 1606 was a pathbreaking history of the Spanish language. Notable for its rigorous methods of linguistic inquiry, that work demonstrated the Latin origins of Spanish and rejected its existence before the time of the Visigoths. Aldrete's thesis was attacked for impugning the authenticity of the Turpiana parchment. In a second book Aldrete defended both his earlier work and the Sacromonte discoveries. He assisted Archbishop de Castro in the defense of the lead books, but that role has received little attention from historians. This article draws together Aldrete's published work and his correspondence with the Archbishop's house- hold to bring his role in the Sacromonte case into focus. It attempts to identify the continuities as well as the more often noted contradictions between Aldrete's roles as laminario and humanist scholar.

    La relación de Bernardo de Aldrete, humanista y filólogo, con el caso del Sacromonte fue ambigua. Su primer libro, publicado en 1606, fue una historia innovadora de la lengua española. Notable por sus métodos rigurosos de investigación lingüística, la obra mostró los orígenes latinos del español y rechazó su existencia antes de la época de los godos. La tesis de Aldrete fue atacada por impugnar la autenticidad del pergamino de la Torre Turpiana. En otro libro, Aldrete defendió su obra anterior y también los hallazgos del Sacromonte. Aldrete ayudó al Arzobispo de Castro en la defensa de los libros plúmbeos, un papel que ha llamado poco la atención de historiadores del Sacromonte. Este artículo compagina la obra publicada de Aldrete y su correspondencia con la casa del Arzobispo, para enfocar su papel en el caso del Sacromonte. Pretende identificar tanto las continuidades como las contradicciones entre el trabajo de Aldrete como laminario y como humanista.

  13. Receptions of Human Dimension in the Context of Anthropological Discourse of Humanistic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Voronkova 

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of research is the perception of human dimension as the anthropological aspect of humanistic management, based on the interrelations between man, government, society. The paper describes the evolution of views on man in the context of anthropological foundations of humanistic management;it is noted that the development trends of the philosophical and anthropological knowledge of humanistic management are based on human perception in the projection of anthropological dimensions of man, which is fundamental in European philosophy. The paper analyzes the essence of human dimension as anthropological paradigm of humanistic management, in which man is not only economic, or political, but also the spiritual and cultural member of society; gives the analysis of human dimension as anthropological paradigm of European philosophy that investigates the anthropological foundations of economic, political and social spheres, interprets conditions of creating a humane society, in which the imperatives of a just society should be implemented. Characteristics and features, as well as the conditions for achieving human dimension as the anthropological foundation of European humanistic management are disclosed. The acquired knowledge can be useful for solving anthropological problems of humanistic management.

  14. A HUMANISTIC PHYLOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS ON WOMEN EXISTENCE IN THE FIQH OF SYAFII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffatin Nur

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the fiqh of Shāfi‘ī, a humanistic philosophical analysis on women existence is given serious attention, particularly in his investigation on the matters of women. It is very vivid in his magnum opuses entitled al-Umm (The Mother, al-Risālah fi Us\\ūl al-Fiqh and his periodicals qawl qadīm (old view and qawl jadīd (new view. This article seeks to provide thorough analysis on the women empowerment through humanistic values from methodological and legal products aspects generated by Shāfi‘ī. In the aspect of methodology (us\\ūl fiqh, the use of qiyās (analogy is an indication of the humanistic value in the development of the mas\\lah\\ah\\ (beneficial principles. The legal products aspect can be explored through the following three classifications. Firstly, humanistic values of women in the law regarding the properties. Secondly, the humanistic values of women in the state law on economic issues related to religious conversion and social relations in political settings. Thirdly, the humanistic values of women in the marriage laws.

  15. LEARNING MODEL OF SCHOOL-BASED ANTI BULLYING INTERVENTION IN EAP (ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES SETTINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ririn Ambarini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilingual learning can be integrated in any subjects in school. One of the subject is Guidance and Couseling subject that provides opportunities for students to develop their social skills and communication. Today, the phenomenon of bullying often occurs in every aspect of life, and one of them is in educational institutions such as schools. School should be a place to establish a positive attitude and character, but the fact the school becomes the scene of bullying practices. The research question is how the bilingual learning of school-based anti bullying intervension integrated with Guidance and Counseling materials by using English for Academic Purposes settings is. This qualitative study used descriptive qualitative method that aims to understand the process and the outcome of bilingual learning process from the viewpoint or perspective of the participants. This research takes the view that since people are instruments, the objects of the research together with the researcher herself, their active involvement in the process is the key to any sustainable efforts. This research is aslo supposed to identify the students‘ understanding of the school-based anti bullying materials that are implemented in EAP settings. The impact of thus program implementation is certainly expected as the strategies to minimize the impacts that will occur in bullying behavior by the integration of anti-bullying bilingual learning model through guidance and counseling materials.

  16. Counseling in teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Dorthe Busk

    Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant-orientated pilotp......Counseling is about supporting and challenging students in making decisions, being adaptive, seeing opportunities and acquiring self-knowledge. Literaturesearch of articles about counseling research in nordic teacher education 2008-2013 shows no results. We started a participant......-orientated pilotproject about counseling in teacher education. The aim was to acquire knowledge about how students perceive counseling. This knowledge could help uncover potential areas of development for counselingpractice. In the pilotproject it is tested if the chosen method is suitable for bigger qualitative study...

  17. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  18. The 'reformation' of counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Lotter

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the Reformation took place some four hundred years ago, one area in which reformation is really needed today is the counselling of people. Since Wilhelm Wundt started the “study of the mind” in 1879, William James and Sigmund Freud followed and secular psychology gradually has developed to take the “front seat”; hence moving Biblical counselling, which has been practised since the times of the New Testament, to the “back burner”. This development had been going on for the greater part of the 20th century, up to the publication of Competent to Counsel by Jay E. Adams in 1970. In the model for counselling suggested by Adams, the principles of the Reformation of the sixteenth century, Soli Deo Gloria, Soli Scriptura, Soli Fidei, Sola Gratia, etc. were again implemented in assisting and counselling people with personal and interpersonal problems. The epistomological and anthropological approach of secular psychology differs radically from that of Biblical principles, thus necessitating a new “reformation” of counselling. Within this new form counselling, inter alia, implies the following: the Word of God has its rightful place, sin has to be taken seriously and the work of the Holy Spirit should be recognised. In this article it is proposed that the “reformation” of counselling was started by scholars with a Biblical Reformational approach and that this method of counselling followed the parameters of the Reformation of the sixteenth century. This “reformation” developed into a new direction in counselling and still continues today with fascinating new frontiers opening up for Biblical counselling.

  19. Narrative Intervention: A School-Based Counseling Strategy for Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Khosrow; Yoosefi Looyeh, Majid

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a group narrative intervention for improving the behavior of 8- to 11-year-old children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder at home and school. (Contains 2 tables and 1 note.)

  20. Beyond spaces of counselling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bank, Mads; Nissen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    The article articulates experiments with spatial constructions in two Danish social work agencies, basing on (a) a sketchy genealogical reconstruction of conceptualisations and uses of space in social work and counselling, (b) a search for theoretical resources to articulate new spaces, and (c...... spaces are forms of spatialisations which might be taken as prototypical in attempts to develop social work and counselling...

  1. Narrative Dietary Counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard Jakobsen, Nina; Kaufmann, Lisbeth; Hennesser, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Using cases and empirical data from a research and development project at a Danish prevention center, this study explores whether and how the use of narrative dietary counseling can strengthen dietitians' relationships and collaboration with clients who are chronically ill. The results of the study...... dietary counseling empowered clients and improved relationship building and collaboration between client and dietitian....

  2. Models of Counselling Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calgary Univ. (Alberta).

    University counseling centers usually follow one of a variety of themes or "models," although not in pure form. Perhaps the oldest is the vocational counseling model, which concentrates on helping students find suitable careers. In the psychotherapy model, most student concerns are seen for their personal content. Another model, student affairs…

  3. Marketing Counseling: Caveat Emptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Holly A.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by questioning whether marketing is a justifiable means to a worthwhile end. Examines language of marketing, juxtaposes marketing and counseling metaphors to highlight conflicting philosophies, and concludes that counselors should not abandon philosophical traditions of their…

  4. Malpractice in Counseling Neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert Henley

    1992-01-01

    Responds to earlier four articles on integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology by noting that neuropsychology occurs in settings with high risk of legal complaints. Contends that aspiration to press counseling psychology toward clinical neuropsychology should be filtered through consideration for legal risk. Explores legal…

  5. Counseling Gay Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gerald P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a brief historical context for today's changing popular and professional attitudes. Some current counseling procedures used with adolescent homosexuals are discussed. The legal aspects of counseling gay adolescents conclude the article, followed by an annotated bibliography of suggested reading. (Author)

  6. Publishing International Counseling Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenshil, Thomas H.; Amundson, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a rationale for including international articles in the "Journal of Counseling & Development." Then, 2 general categories of international articles are described. First are articles that provide a general overview of counseling in a particular country. The 2nd category is more general and might involve international…

  7. Islamic approach in counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin Hamjah, Salasiah; Mat Akhir, Noor Shakirah

    2014-02-01

    A religious approach is one of the matters emphasized in counseling today. Many researchers find that there is a need to apply the religious element in counseling because religion is important in a client's life. The purpose of this research is to identify aspects of the Islamic approach applied in counseling clients by counselors at Pusat Kaunseling Majlis Agama Islam Negeri Sembilan (PKMAINS). In addition, this research also analyses the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS with reference to al-Quran and al-Sunnah. This is a qualitative research in the form of case study at PKMAINS. The main method used in this research is interview. The research instrument used is interview protocol. The respondents in this study include 9 counselors who serve in one of the counseling centers in Malaysia. This study also uses questionnaire as an additional instrument, distributed to 36 clients who receive counseling service at the center. The findings of the study show that the Islamic approach applied in counseling at PKMAINS may be categorized into three main aspects: aqidah (faith), ibadah (worship/ultimate devotion and love for God) and akhlaq (moral conduct). Findings also show that the counseling in these aspects is in line with Islamic teachings as contained in al-Quran and al-Sunnah.

  8. Therapist Ethnicity and Treatment Orientation Differences in Multicultural Counseling Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Lauren K; Zane, Nolan; Hwang, Wei-Chin

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between therapist characteristics, therapeutic orientations, person-level and agency-level practices with cultural competency among 221 Los Angeles County community mental health clinicians. Results from an online survey indicated that compared to White therapists, ethnic minority therapists were more personally involved in communities of color, more likely to use a cultural framework in clinical practice, and perceived their agencies to be more culturally sensitive. Ethnic minority therapists also reported greater multicultural (MC) awareness and better MC counseling relationships with their clients than White therapists. Personal involvement in communities of color accounted for ethnic differences in MC awareness and MC counseling relationships. Compared to therapists with a strictly non-behavioral (psychodynamic or humanistic) orientation, therapists with an eclectic (or integrative) therapy orientation reported having a higher level of community knowledge. Therapists with an eclectic orientation reported greater MC awareness than therapists with a non-behavioral orientation, while both eclectic and behavioral (cognitive behavioral or behavior modification) therapists recounted better MC counseling relationships with their clients than therapists with a non-behavioral orientation. Community knowledge mediated eclectic vs. non-behavioral therapeutic orientation differences in MC awareness. Agency resources/linkages and outreach both moderated the relationship between therapeutic orientation and MC skills. Results suggest that if therapists become more personally involved with diverse populations, they will feel more culturally aware and feel like they have a better relationship with ethnic minority clients.

  9. The importance of communication in pediatric oncology palliative care: focus on Humanistic Nursing Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Jael Rúbia Figueiredo de Sá; da Costa, Solange Fátima Geraldo; Lopes, Maria Emilia Limeira; da Nóbrega, Maria Miriam Lima; de França, Inacia Sátiro Xavier

    2013-01-01

    to investigate and analyze communication in palliative care contexts from the perspective of nurses, based on Humanistic Nursing Theory. this is a field study with a qualitative approach, in which ten nurses working in the pediatric oncology unit of a Brazilian public hospital participated. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. The testimonies were qualitatively analyzed using Humanistic Nursing Theory and based on the five phases of Nursing Phenomenology. two thematic categories emerged from the analysis of the study's empirical material: "strategy to humanize nursing care, with an emphasis on relieving the child's suffering" and "strategy to strengthen ties of trust established between nurse and child." communication is an efficacious element in the care provided to the child with cancer and is extremely important to promoting palliative care when it is based on Humanistic Nursing Theory.

  10. Secular Weddings in Canada: An Examination of a Humanist Response to the Evolution of Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lloyd Hawkeye Robertson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing societal secularization, little research has been undertaken on the needs of non-religious people to engage in marriage ceremony or the means by which such needs are met. Using a jurisdictional scan, focus groups, and an on-line survey, this exploratory survey examines the provision for and use of secular legal marriage in Canada’s regions from a humanist perspective. It is postulated that marriage ceremonies have persisted among the non-religious due to needs to authenticate or recognize transitional changes to the self, but these needs have been met through ad hoc strategies as opposed to a uniform demand for humanist services. Implications for humanist organizations are discussed along with recommendations for further research.

  11. Attitudes Towards Spirituality and Other Worldly Experiences: An Online Survey of British Humanists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Dein

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined attitudes towards and understandings of the term “spirituality” among members of the British Humanist Association (N = 318. Thirty-five percent agreed strongly and twenty-one percent moderately agreed that it was possible to be spiritual without being religious. Some respondents asserted that the term spiritual was so vague as to be almost useless. They preferred terms such as emotional connectedness, awe, or beauty, which are commonly included in definitions of spirituality. For a few individuals, spirituality referred to the existence of spirits. A minority in the study (12% had what might be defined as ‘other worldly experiences,’ although these were explained in purely naturalistic terms (e.g., lack of sleep, drugs/alcohol, and brain dysfunction. The primary conclusion from the survey is that many British Humanists see no contradiction between being a humanist and having experiences that are often defined as “spiritual.”

  12. Humanistic and positive psychology need each other, and to advance, our field needs both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kirk J

    2014-01-01

    Comments on the article "The humanistic psychology-positive psychology divide: Contrasts in philosophical foundations" by Waterman (see record 2013-12501-001). Alan Waterman's article is an illuminating contribution that will be reviewed and debated for years to come. The current author is appreciative of Waterman for raising key questions about the respective worldviews of humanistic and positive psychology and their potential for rapprochement. That said, the current author thinks Waterman's conclusion that both perspectives are better off pursuing their own independent agendas is a short-sighted one that is likely to have debilitating, if not dire, effects on the future of our profession. The current author believes that there are many ways for existential-humanistic and positive psychology researchers to collaborate. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Humanistic and economic burden of fibromyalgia in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lulu K; Ebata, Nozomi; Hlavacek, Patrick; DiBonaventura, Marco; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Sadosky, Alesia

    2016-01-01

    those without fibromyalgia, resulting in significantly higher costs. Improving the rates of diagnosis and treatment for this chronic pain condition may be helpful in addressing this considerable humanistic and economic burden. PMID:27853390

  14. Indigenous counseling: A needed area in school counseling in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous counselling has not been given attention in Nigeria's school counselling programme. This counselling gap was created by European colonialism, which succeeded in developing in the minds of the African that anything indigenous is local, unscientific and unorthodox. Indigenous counselling is one of the ...

  15. Politics of School-Based Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M. Walker

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1970s the problem of urban education has been cast as partially a problem of governance and authority structures. This focus mirrors a larger preoccupation by educational reformers with democratizing the decision-making process in public schools, a preoccupation that is evident not only in this country but also many nations throughout the world. Borrowing from the private sector, the underlying assumption behind decentralization is that educational improvement is only possible if those closest to the point at which decision are enacted become the architects of these decisions. Thus, school-based management or participatory decision-making is viewed as a means to formally incorporate the voices of parents, teachers and the community in the management of their schools. This paper discusses the findings of a recently conducted study on school-based management in thirty of New Jersey's poorest districts (referred to as the Abbott Districts. These districts have begun a process of complex reform after the State's Supreme Court ruled that the state had failed to constitutionally provide a thorough and efficient education for its poorest students by the absence of parity funding. Populated by primarily black and Hispanic students, and representing most of the larger urban communities in the state, students in these districts exhibit performance levels significantly below that of the state average. The results of the study indicate that (1 genuine autonomy has been usurped by an intensification in state power and authority, (ii state elites have provided little opportunity for districts and SBM teams to build capacity; (iii the level of democratization or opening-up of decision making to local community members has been minimal as the teams become teacher dominated; and (iv in the absence of clear guidelines from the State, conflict over the appropriate role of SBM members, principals, central office staff and local school boards has

  16. Humanistic Antidotes to Social Media/Cell Phone Addiction in the College Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Elliot Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes “humanistic antidotes” to offset the widespread social media/cell phone addiction prevalent in current US college classrooms. The inappropriate use of cell phones to engage in social media in college classrooms is a pervasive problem that many college instructors have complained about.  The dominant focus of this article is in humanistic education, in which the author's efforts at getting psychology college students to put away their cell phones, “talk with each other,”...

  17. The humanistic burden of Pompe disease: are there still unmet needs? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoser, Benedikt; Bilder, Deborah A; Dimmock, David; Gupta, Digant; James, Emma S; Prasad, Suyash

    2017-11-22

    Humanistic burden considers the impact of an illness on a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQoL), activities of daily living (ADL), caregiver health, and caregiver QoL. Humanistic burden also considers treatment satisfaction and adherence to treatment regimens. Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive, progressive, multisystemic neuromuscular disease. Approval of enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) markedly improved prognosis for patients, but considerable morbidity and a substantial humanistic burden remain. This article characterizes the humanistic burden of Pompe disease through a systematic literature review. A systematic search of MEDLINE® and Embase® with back-referencing and supplementary literature searches was performed to retrieve data from interventional and non-interventional studies on the humanistic burden of Pompe disease. Publications were screened according to predefined criteria, extracted, and assessed for quality. Extracted data were narratively synthesized. No publications on the humanistic burden of infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) were identified. As such, of 17 publications included here, all are in patients with late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD). Thirteen publications were initiated after approval of ERT, two were initiated before, and two overlapped the approval of ERT. The review shows that LOPD patients have a significantly lower HRQoL than the general population, even if treated with ERT. On transitioning to ERT, treatment was associated with improvement in the physical component score of the SF-36 and fatigue, although the SF-36 mental component score remained stable. Physical HRQoL remained below population norms after 4 years of ERT. Significantly more ERT-treated patients reported pain than controls, and bodily pain worsened in later years following ERT initiation. Treatment-naïve LOPD patients had significantly poorer ADL functioning compared with the general population, although ERT stabilized deteriorating functioning

  18. School-based asthma disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkelman, David; Schwartz, Abby

    2004-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic childhood illness and the leading cause of missed school days. School is a potential location for establishing an asthma education program for children and their parents/caregivers designed to improve disease management. To determine whether a comprehensive, school-based asthma management program, in addition to a conventional disease management program, can reduce measures of asthma control, student absenteeism, and caregiver lost workdays. School nurses recruited parents/caregivers of students with asthma from three urban elementary and middle schools. Children were identified as having asthma by a previous diagnosis from their personal physician. Parents were invited to attend educational sessions about the program. Students received peak flow meters and training in their use and had access to an interactive asthma diary to record symptoms, peak flow, and medicine usage. They received monthly asthma education at school and had access to an online asthma education program and additional handouts. Parents received several educational calls regarding asthma and had a 24-hour, 7-days-a-week emergency number to call if problems arose. At 6 months, missed school days and unscheduled doctor visits were reduced by two thirds (n = 41; pschool-based asthma management program can successfully improve asthma control and reduce absenteeism in elementary and middle school students and caregiver lost workdays.

  19. Building Rural Communities through School-Based Agriculture Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.; Henry, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory for community development by school-based agriculture programs through grounded theory methodology. Data for the study included in-depth interviews and field observations from three school-based agriculture programs in three non-metropolitan counties across a Midwestern state. The…

  20. Job Stress of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephanie Ferney; Prater, Mary Anne; Dyches, Tina Taylor; Heath, Melissa Allen

    2009-01-01

    Stress and burnout contribute significantly to the shortages of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs). At the request of the Utah State Office of Education, the researchers measured the stress levels of 97 school-based SLPs using the "Speech-Language Pathologist Stress Inventory." Results indicated that participants' emotional-fatigue…

  1. Incorporating Trauma-Informed Care into School-Based Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L.; Ashley, Olivia Silber; White, LeBretia; Axelson, Sarah; Clark, Marc; Burrus, Barri

    2017-01-01

    Background: This article provides an overview of the rationale and process for incorporating trauma-informed approaches into US school-based programs, using school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs as an example. Methods: Research literature is reviewed on the prevalence and outcomes of childhood trauma, including the links between…

  2. Strategies for Fostering the Efficacy of School-Based Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined community participation in the School-Based Management Committees (SBMC), the challenges hindering participation, and strategies for fostering efficacy of the School Based Management Committee. The number 340 schools were selected from the population of 2543 public primary schools in ...

  3. School-Based Management and Effectiveness of Public Secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the extent to which some of the functions of the State Secondary Education Board (SSEB) have been delegated to Principals of Secondary Schools in Cross River State, in line with school-based management. Four research questions guided the study. A questionnaire [School-based Management and ...

  4. School-Based Crisis Intervention. A Center Quick Training Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Center for Mental Health in Schools.

    As used here, the term school-based crisis intervention refers to a range of responses schools can plan and implement in response to crisis events and reactions. All school-based and school-linked staff can play an important role in crisis intervention. This quick training aid presents a brief set of resources to guide those providing an…

  5. School-Based Health Care State Policy Survey. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) surveys state public health and Medicaid offices every three years to assess state-level public policies and activities that promote the growth and sustainability of school-based health services. The FY2011 survey found 18 states (see map below) reporting investments explicitly dedicated…

  6. Nurse-Led School-Based Child Obesity Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sharon; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine M.

    2015-01-01

    School-based childhood obesity prevention programs have grown in response to reductions in child physical activity (PA), increased sedentariness, poor diet, and soaring child obesity rates. Multiple systematic reviews indicate school-based obesity prevention/treatment interventions are effective, yet few studies have examined the school nurse role…

  7. A Profile of Latino School-Based Extracurricular Activity Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    Participation in school-based extracurricular activities influences educational success. Thus, it is important to depict a profile of school-based extracurricular activity involvement for a Latino student population that is marginalized in schools. This research uses the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 and logistic regression analyses to…

  8. Therapy and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... system of rewards and reinforcement of positive behavior.Psychoanalysis. This type of treatment encourages you to think ... work, marriage and family therapy, rehabilitation counseling, and psychoanalysis. Your family doctor can help you choose the ...

  9. Controlling Depersonalized Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, Tom

    1982-01-01

    Outlines Gestalt therapy techniques to increase active listening and counselor/client involvement in career counseling. Discusses awareness through dialog, role playing or "presentizing," and experiential "presentizing." Presents a sample dialog as illustration. (RC)

  10. Counseling the Coronary Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, Caryl; Semmler, Maynard

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses counseling sessions designed to a) help the coronary patient adjust to cardiovascular disease, b) diminish patient anxieties and fears, and c) educate the patient and family members on controlling risk factors to deter another coronary attack. (JS)

  11. Whom are we counselling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, J

    1985-12-01

    Non-directional counseling of patients is introduced experientially in a 5-day residential course at the College of Ripon and New York St. John in England. Groups of 3 work on real problems presented by a doctor, with some sessions videotaped for later analysis. Over the past 5 years, 200 doctors, primarily trainees, have participated in the course. The doctors ranged in age from 25-60 years, and participated for a variety of reasons. Increasing frustration with traditional medicine, doubts about career or specialty choice, and doubts about their ability to help others were among the reasons cited for participation. The course is emotionally intense for both students and tutors, but a feeling of camaraderie develops, particularly between the trio members. Although the course was not intended to provide psychotherapy for doctors, the exploration of a patient's problem can lead to a process of self-discovery. Tutors felt keenly the inability to offer proper personal counseling for some of the participants, which highlighted the current lack of organized counseling services for doctors. The rate of suicide, drug abuse, and marital problems in the medical profession is indicative of the need for such counseling. But, because of self and public perceptions about the omnipotence of doctors, it is questionable that doctors would avail themselves of counseling services. This course might provide a realistic option, in that its overt aim is teaching a skill while covertly offering a limited amount of personal counseling.

  12. Humanistic and economic burden of fibromyalgia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee LK

    2016-11-01

    those without fibromyalgia experienced significantly more loss in work productivity and health care resource use, resulting in those with fibromyalgia incurring indirect costs that were more than twice as high (adjusted means =¥2,826,395 vs ¥1,201,547 and direct costs that were nearly six times as high (¥1,941,118 vs ¥335,140, both with P<0.001.Conclusion: Japanese adults with fibromyalgia experienced significantly poorer health-related quality of life and greater loss in work productivity and health care use than those without fibromyalgia, resulting in significantly higher costs. Improving the rates of diagnosis and treatment for this chronic pain condition may be helpful in addressing this considerable humanistic and economic burden. Keywords: direct costs, health care resource use, health-related quality of life, indirect costs, sleep quality, work productivity loss

  13. School-Based Influenza Vaccination: Parents’ Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Candace; Russell, Margaret L.; MacDonald, Judy; Collins, Ramona; Frank, Christine J.; Davis, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. Purpose We explored parents’ perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. Participants Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. Findings Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV), Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support), families (e.g. convenience), the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities), the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness) and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles). Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized), families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions) and the education sector (loss of instructional time). Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. Conclusions Parents perceived advantages and

  14. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Candace; Russell, Margaret L; MacDonald, Judy; Collins, Ramona; Frank, Christine J; Davis, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV), Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support), families (e.g. convenience), the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities), the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness) and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles). Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized), families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions) and the education sector (loss of instructional time). Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. Parents perceived advantages and disadvantages to delivering annual seasonal influenza

  15. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Lind

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. PURPOSE: We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. FINDINGS: Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV, Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support, families (e.g. convenience, the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities, the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles. Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized, families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions and the education sector (loss of instructional time. Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. CONCLUSIONS: Parents perceived

  16. Pre-Service Teachers' Humanistic vs. Custodial Beliefs: Before and After the Student Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm-Possinger, Megan

    2016-01-01

    The student teaching experience is cited as one of the most critical facets of teachers' professional development. However, teachers' beliefs about pedagogical practices and disciplinary procedures, as well as their perceptions of students, also influence the approaches they use in the classroom. This study uses a humanistic and custodial…

  17. Reflected Places of Childhood: Applying the Ideas of Humanistic and Cultural Geographies to Environmental Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Sirpa

    2017-01-01

    The article investigates people-environment relationships from the viewpoint of humanistic and cultural geographies and highlights the importance of subjective experiences and emotional place attachment in the construction of environmental attitudes. Some core concepts of these research fields (e.g. "place,"…

  18. KU & Dansk Erhverv: Humanister og erhvervsliv i fælles front

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Riisgaard, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Humanister besidder relevant viden, som ofte først bliver anvendt i slutningen af virksomhedernes udviklingsproces, men den tilbøjelighed skal et nyt samarbejde gøre op med, skriver Julie Sommerlund, prodekan på Københavns Universitet, og Louise Riisgaard, chefkonsulent i Dansk Erhverv....

  19. Humanistic Health Care Components in a Course on the Geriatric Patient: A Rationale and a Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Edward D.; Kaylor, C. Edward, Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Components of instruction and exercises in humanistic health care added to an interdisciplinary pharmacy course on the geriatric patient are described. Included in the coursework are values and attitudes concerning elderly people, interpersonal communication skills, and special psychological and social complexities of old age. (MSE)

  20. Novels, Thought Experiments, and Humanist Sociology in the Classroom: Mari Sandoz and CAPITAL CITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Based upon the teaching of Mari Sandoz' allegorical novel, CAPITAL CITY, this article identifies the characteristics of novels which provide a sociologically useful humanist perspective. A key characteristic is the extent to which the novel conducts thought experiments, defined as cerebral exercises which explore alternative social futures based…

  1. Understanding Curriculum Better: Rise and Fall Progressive Curriculum and a Humanist Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Gary R.

    This paper places the rise and decline of the progressive movement in education in the context of shifts in determinist-humanist philosophies, popular conceptions of social needs and demands of education, and genetic-cognitive trends in psychology. The following six theses are advanced to explain the rise and decline of the progressive curriculum…

  2. The Humanistic Psychology-Positive Psychology Divide: Contrasts in Philosophical Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the fields of humanistic and positive psychology has been marked by continued tension and ambivalence. This tension can be traced to extensive differences in the philosophical grounding characterizing the two perspectives within psychology. These differences exist with respect to (a) ontology, including the ways in which…

  3. Guide for Hospices. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, David J.; Mortenson, Lee E.

    This monograph, the first in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to assist hospice directors, educators, and other administrative staff members to understand the focus of the proposed training and its applicability to their…

  4. Training Program Design. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, David J.; Mortenson, Lee E.

    This monograph, the third in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to describe the steps in designing a training program for a particular hospice and the activities undertaken between the selection of the trainers and the…

  5. Guide for Trainers. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dottie C.; Grady, Kathleen A.

    This monograph, the second in a series of five, provides information for trainers on interdisciplinary team training and humanistic patient care in hospices. Designed to help outside trainers who may be invited by a hospice to conduct its training, the materials help instructors to understand the nature of hospices, to determine whether or not the…

  6. 38 CFR 21.3100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.3100.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3100 Counseling. (a) Purpose of counseling. The purpose of counseling is to...)) (b) Availability of counseling. Counseling assistance is available for— (1) Identifying and removing...

  7. A meta-analysis of the effect of school-based anti-bullying programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunhee; Kim, Chun-Ja; Kim, Dong Hee

    2015-06-01

    Bullying is a serious public health problem, and many studies have examined the effect of school-based anti-bullying programs. However, these programs and those outcomes are complex, broad, and diverse. Research is needed into the optimal strategies for these comprehensive programs, which consider both the effectiveness and cost of programs. We performed a meta-analysis of 13 studies using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software package to calculate effect size (ES) and the Q statistic. We conducted subgroup analyses to examine the differences based on student grade level, program duration, and program strategy. The pooled ES calculation indicated that school-based anti-bullying programs have a small to moderate effect on victimization. The results of the Q test indicated significant heterogeneity across studies of victimization (Q = 39.625; I (2) = 69.7%; p bullying (p bullying programs should include training in emotional control, peer counseling, and the establishment of a school policy on bullying. © The Author(s) 2013.

  8. Semar puppet counseling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhrudin All Habsy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Puppet as the original local wisdom has a great role in the character building and giving a good example of how to behave, puppet is also the source or guidance of how to behave well. One of the figures in puppet that has strong characteristic as the leader, protector, patron, and also the guide for ksatria in taking the decision is Semar. Semar has the perfection ethic of Javanese person and raise as the core of the soul of Javanese people. Semar’s wisdom can be applied in the development of multi culture Counseling for Counselor and multi culture Counseling characteristic. The characteristic of multi cultural based Counselor are: (1 Prudent, (2 Helper, (3 Motivator, (4 Democratic, (5 Fair, (6Associating, (7 Sustains on the objectives, (8 Responsible, (9 Teaching, (10 Wholeheartedly, (11 Well mannered, (12 Sincere, (13 Honest, (14 Faithful, (15 Unpretentious (16 Not an anti critical, (17 Able to keep secret, and (18 Positive thinking. The application of Counseling based on the Semar’s characters is offered to develop the practice of multi cultural Counseling for the Counselors, it called puppet semar counseling model.

  9. A mobile school-based HCT service - is it youth friendly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Estelle; Struthers, Patricia; Van Hove, Geert

    2016-12-01

    Despite an increase in HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT), few young people have been tested. It has been suggested that they do not test because formal health services (where HCT is provided) are often not youth friendly. The World Health Organisation describes a youth-friendly health service (YFHS) as one which is accessible, equitable, acceptable, appropriate, and effective. A mobile school-based model has been implemented by a non-governmental organisation in Cape Town in an attempt to make HCT more youth friendly and accessible to young people. The objective of this study was to explore whether this mobile school-based HCT service is youth friendly. The study was descriptive, using three qualitative data collection methods: observation of the HCT site at two secondary schools; interviews with six service providers; and direct observation of 21 HCT counselling sessions. The mobile school-based HCT service fulfilled some of the criteria for being a YFHS. The service was equitable in that all students, irrespective of race, gender, age, or socio-economic status, were free to use the service. It was accessible in terms of location and cost, but students were not well informed to make decisions about using the service. The service was acceptable in that confidentiality was guaranteed and the service providers were friendly and non-judgemental, but it was not considered acceptable in that there was limited privacy. The service was appropriate in that HCT is recommended as an intervention for decreasing the transmission of HIV, based on evidence and expert opinion; however, in this case, HCT was provided as a stand-alone service rather than part of a full package of services. Moreover, studies have suggested that young people want to know their HIV status. The service was ineffective in that it identified students who are HIV positive; however, these students were not assisted to access care. Providing HCT in the school setting may make HCT more accessible for

  10. A mobile school-based HCT service – is it youth friendly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite an increase in HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT, few young people have been tested. It has been suggested that they do not test because formal health services (where HCT is provided are often not youth friendly. The World Health Organisation describes a youth-friendly health service (YFHS as one which is accessible, equitable, acceptable, appropriate, and effective. A mobile school-based model has been implemented by a non-governmental organisation in Cape Town in an attempt to make HCT more youth friendly and accessible to young people. The objective of this study was to explore whether this mobile school-based HCT service is youth friendly. Methods: The study was descriptive, using three qualitative data collection methods: observation of the HCT site at two secondary schools; interviews with six service providers; and direct observation of 21 HCT counselling sessions. Key Results: The mobile school-based HCT service fulfilled some of the criteria for being a YFHS. The service was equitable in that all students, irrespective of race, gender, age, or socio-economic status, were free to use the service. It was accessible in terms of location and cost, but students were not well informed to make decisions about using the service. The service was acceptable in that confidentiality was guaranteed and the service providers were friendly and non-judgemental, but it was not considered acceptable in that there was limited privacy. The service was appropriate in that HCT is recommended as an intervention for decreasing the transmission of HIV, based on evidence and expert opinion; however, in this case, HCT was provided as a stand-alone service rather than part of a full package of services. Moreover, studies have suggested that young people want to know their HIV status. The service was ineffective in that it identified students who are HIV positive; however, these students were not assisted to access care. Conclusion: Providing HCT

  11. Giving Counsel: Donald Capps' Contributions to Pastoral Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMothe, Ryan

    2017-10-23

    This article explores some of Donald Capps' contributions to the ministry of pastoral counseling. In particular, several key attributes of pastoral counseling as a ministry of the church are identified and discussed. This is followed by identifying six features necessary for good enough pastoral counseling. A final brief section offers some musings that I wish Capps could respond to.

  12. Existentialism in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Leona E.

    1971-01-01

    The counselor, in working with students, can make each choice a means through which the person clarifies his purposes and designs his own future. Every commitment of time is a serious undertaking. This, the author sees, is the fundamental message of existentialism for counseling. (Author)

  13. Stress and stress counselling.

    OpenAIRE

    Matheson, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report by the 1989 National Association of Clinical Tutors Wyeth Travelling Fellow to the United States of America. The stresses of postgraduate training and attempts to modify these are described, including stress counselling. The significance of stress and the relevance of the findings for postgraduate training in the United Kingdom are considered.

  14. "Counseling" in Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, J.

    1976-01-01

    The need to counsel patients with genetic ophthalmological problems is stressed in the article. Assessment of autosomal dominance or autosomal recessitivity in an individual is explained and sex-linked heredity is traced. Practical examples of genetic abnormalities, such as pigmentary retinopathy and chorodineremia, are discussed. (PHR)

  15. Feminist Counseling: A Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Alison

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to show that feminist counseling is part of the larger feminist perspective. The author maintains that to be a non-sexist counselor is not enough. Counselors need to encourage a feminist viewpoint in clients. The article describes how this might be done. (EJT)

  16. Counseling in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remley, Theodore P.; Bacchini, Eugenio; Krieg, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The counseling profession in Italy is in an early stage of development. No university preparation programs exist, and counselors are not employed in schools. Counselors maintain private practices, work in agencies, and are employed by the government. Counselors receive their preparation in Italy from professional associations in programs that…

  17. First Cycle Counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darska, Anna

    1981-01-01

    Investigations are described that were carried out by the Centre d'Information de Documentation et d'Orientation of the Rene Descartes University to find an answer to the counseling problems arising from student admission, through coursework, and upon leaving the university to start a career. (Author/MLW)

  18. The Role of Organizational Humanistic Social Support in Decreasing the Interference of Work Problems on Employees’ Family Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increased interest in humanistic touch in global organizational support, the nature of helping processes rendered by supervisor and coworkers is still vague. The study was performed to examine the relationship between organizational humanistic social support and work interference with family conflict using 100 usable questionnaires gathered from academic staff in a Malaysian public institution of higher learning in Borneo. The findings of SmartPLS path model indicated that humanistic touch in term of supervisory support significantly correlated with work interference with family conflict. Similarly, humanistic touch of coworker support significantly correlated with work interference with family conflict. This result shows that the readiness of supervisors and coworkers to amply offer material and moral support in performing task have reduced the intrusion of work problems in employees’ family affairs and enriched their skills to decrease family conflicts. In addition, discussion, implications and conclusion are elaborated.

  19. Do Counseling and Marketing Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Wittman's previous article on counseling and marketing by discussing concerns about two of Wittman's purposes for use of marketing: improved services in consumers and economic survival of counseling profession. Agrees that counseling profession needs to understand basic marketing principles used by business and health care industry;…

  20. 38 CFR 21.5100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.5100.... Chapter 32 Counseling § 21.5100 Counseling. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is: (1) To assist in... of counseling. Counseling assistance in available for— (1) Identifying and removing reasons for...

  1. Humanistic Approach to Nursing Education: Lived Experiences of Iranian Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Yekta, Zohreh Parsa

    2015-01-01

    The nurse teachers tried to have a complete understanding of the educational contents, to transfer knowledge to nursing students better, and to facilitate the process of education. The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of Iranian nursing students regarding the characteristics of academic nurse teachers. In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, data were collected via in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 12 Iranian nursing students and the audio-taped and transcribed interviews analyzed according to Van Manen´s method. The main theme emerged during data analysis, was “humanistic approach to nursing education”. The theme was extracted from 2 sub-themes including ‘ethical necessities’ and ‘effective interaction’. The findings present greater understanding of humanistic approach to nursing education. PMID:25716394

  2. Qi Gong exercises and Feldenkrais method from the perspective of Gestalt concept and humanistic psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Stöckl, Andrea; Mucha, Dariusz

    2010-07-01

    This study describes two similar approaches to human movement: Qi Gong exercises and the Feldenkrais method. These systems are investigated in terms of Gestalt concepts and humanistic psychology. Moshe Feldenkrais created the concept known as Awareness Through Movement. This concept assumes that by becoming more aware of one's movements, one functions at a higher level. In similar ways to those using the Feldenkrais method, individuals may become more aware of their own movements by performing Qi Gong exercises: A therapeutic modality that facilitates mind-body integration. Qi Gong exercises commonly lead to increased personal awareness accompained by enhanced quality, fluency and smoothness of movement. These two methods of movement therapies are explored in terms of their relations with Gestalt concept and humanistic psychology. (c) 2008. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. DIGITAL HUMANISTIC PEDAGOGY: RELEVANT PROBLEMS OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF USING ICT IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Yu. Bykov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the article theoretical and methodological principles of digital humanistic pedagogy – the science about the laws of creating a positive integrated educational reality as a result of the convergence of physical and virtual (created using ICT training spaces (environments are determined. Based on the use of modern ICT learning activity (formal, nonformal and informal is at the intersection of two worlds: the real and the virtual. Methodology and research methods of classical pedagogy require review and improvement in the context of current realities of the educational process, needs and interests of all its subjects. The development of digital humanities in the international educational space is analyzed; the content of the new field of pedagogical knowledge as part of digital humanistic is outlined; research methods and directions of current scientific research are defined.

  4. Inciting the Metric Oriented Humanist: Teaching Bibliometrics in a Faculty of Humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuccala, Alesia Ann

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades the core of bibliometrics has predominantly been ‘scientometric’ in nature, due to the first commercial citation index having been created for scientific journals and articles. The production of citation indexes for books implies that proper education related to their use ...... the humanities, the work of humanists who have sought to explain the development of new knowledge through objective pattern-seeking, and the complementary value of alternative versus traditional indicators of scholarly research performance....

  5. DIGITAL HUMANISTIC PEDAGOGY: RELEVANT PROBLEMS OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF USING ICT IN EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Valeriy Yu. Bykov; Mariya P. Leshchenko

    2016-01-01

    In the article theoretical and methodological principles of digital humanistic pedagogy – the science about the laws of creating a positive integrated educational reality as a result of the convergence of physical and virtual (created using ICT) training spaces (environments) are determined. Based on the use of modern ICT learning activity (formal, nonformal and informal) is at the intersection of two worlds: the real and the virtual. Methodology and research methods of classical pedagogy req...

  6. Humanistic Antidotes to Social Media/Cell Phone Addiction in the College Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliot Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes “humanistic antidotes” to offset the widespread social media/cell phone addiction prevalent in current US college classrooms. The inappropriate use of cell phones to engage in social media in college classrooms is a pervasive problem that many college instructors have complained about.  The dominant focus of this article is in humanistic education, in which the author's efforts at getting psychology college students to put away their cell phones, “talk with each other,” and gain awareness of the detrimental effects of social media addiction and narcissism is illustrated.  The methodology utilized in this article is based upon autoethnographic research, where relevant experiences of the researcher are considered to be an informative and fundamental part of the research. The author describes in narrative form his relevant experiences in formulating humanistic antidotes to the excessive and inappropriate use of cell phones to engage in social media, that he encountered in his college psychology teaching. These humanistic antidotes are described as a three-step process: 1 take necessary actions to eliminate as much as possible the inappropriate use of cell phones in the classroom; 2 engage students in required personal/academic small group discussions every class period; 3 include small discussions about the excessive and inappropriate use of cell phones and social media, and require them to write and present project papers of their own choosing, which will likely include some papers on the topic of cell phone/social media addiction, demonstrating their awareness of the detrimental aspects of this pervasive problem.

  7. Emphasizing humanities in medical education: Promoting the integration of medical scientific spirit and medical humanistic spirit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Peipei; Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    In the era of the biological-psychological-social medicine model, an ideal of modern medicine is to enhance the humanities in medical education, to foster medical talents with humanistic spirit, and to promote the integration of scientific spirit and humanistic spirit in medicine. Throughout the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), other Western countries, and some Asian countries like Japan, many medical universities have already integrated the learning of medical humanities in their curricula and recognized their value. While in China, although medical education reform over the past decade has emphasized the topic of medical humanities to increase the professionalism of future physicians, the integration of medical humanity courses in medical universities has lagged behind the pace in Western countries. In addition, current courses in medical humanities were arbitrarily established due to a lack of organizational independence. For various reasons like a shortage of instructors, medical universities have failed to pay sufficient attention to medical humanities education given the urgent needs of society. The medical problems in contemporary Chinese society are not solely the purview of biomedical technology; what matters more is enhancing the humanities in medical education and fostering medical talents with humanistic spirit. Emphasizing the humanities in medical education and promoting the integration of medical scientific spirit and medical humanistic spirit have become one of the most pressing issues China must address. Greater attention should be paid to reasonable integration of humanities into the medical curriculum, creation of medical courses related to humanities and optimization of the curriculum, and actively allocating abundant teaching resources and exploring better methods of instruction.

  8. SARTRE’S CONCEPTION OF ART GROUNDED ON HUMANIST EXISTENTIALISM AND PHENOMENOLOGICAL ONTOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    BAL, Metin; Sökmen, Sema

    2012-01-01

    This presentation would be considered as an attempt to introduce a new bridge between philosophy and art. The main problem of this presentation is “how can a conception of art grounded on humanist existentialism and phenomenological ontology be possible?” For the answer, this presentation concentrates on Jean-Paul Sartre’s philosophy. Existentialism and phenomenology are the two influential concepts of contemporary philosophy. Sartre brings these two concepts together and develops a new type ...

  9. A grounded theory of humanistic nursing in acute care work environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Mojgan; Mohammadi, Eesa; Vanaki, Zohreh

    2017-12-01

    Humanistic nursing practice which is dominated by technological advancement, outcome measurement, reduced resources, and staff shortages is challenging in the present work environment. To examine the main concern in humanistic nursing area and how the way it is solved and resolved by Iranian nurses in acute care setting. Data were collected from interviews and observations in 2009-2011 and analyzed using classic grounded theory. Memos were written during the analysis, and they were sorted once theoretical saturation occurred. Participants and research context: In total, 22 nurses, 18 patients, and 12 families from two teaching hospitals in Tehran were selected by purposeful and theoretical sampling. Ethical considerations: The research was approved by the Ethics Committee of the university and hospitals. The main concern for the nurses is the violation of their rights. They overcome this concern when there is a synergy of situation-education/learning, that is, a positive interaction between education and learning of values and sensitivity of the situation or existence of care promotion elements. They turn to professional values and seeking and meeting others' needs, resulting in "success and accomplishment" of nurse/nursing manager and patient/family. This theory shows that professional values, elements of care promotion, and sensitivity of the situation have a key role in activation of humanistic approach in nursing. Violation of the nurses' professional rights often leads to a decrease in care, but these factors make the nurses practice in an unsparing response approach. It is necessary to focus on development of professional values and provide essential elements of care promotion as changeable factors for realization of humanistic nursing although there is a context in which the nurses' rights are violated.

  10. Andrés Laguna: a great medical humanist (1499-1559).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulis, Antonis A; Karamanou, Marianna; Androutsos, George

    2011-01-01

    Andrés Laguna, a Spanish humanist physician of the 16th century, occupies an important position in the history of medicine. An illustrious and brilliant mind, pioneer of anatomy and urology, Laguna proved to be a true pacifist and humanitarian with his knowledge standards and his political eloquence. He deserves to be remembered today as the perfect example of the Renaissance men, a true Homo Universalis.

  11. Nurse drug diversion and nursing leader's responsibilities: legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanga, Hazel Y

    2011-01-01

    Nurses who divert drugs pose significant threats to patient safety, but also become a liability to healthcare organizations and the nursing department where the diversion occurred. Healthcare and nursing leaders have a responsibility to ensure that security systems are in place to prevent diversion and protect patients if nursing impairment is suspected as a result of drug diversion. Nursing leaders must consider legal, regulatory, ethical, humanistic, and practical considerations in resolving this issue.

  12. Humanistic and economic burden of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Europe: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Cathelijne J M; Westerhout, Kirsten Y; Hensen, Marja; Chambers, Colette; Stoker, Malcolm; Long, Stephen; van Nooten, Floortje E

    2015-08-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. A systematic literature review was conducted to provide an overview of published literature in the last 10-years on the epidemiology, humanistic burden and economic burden of PDPN in Europe. A search was performed according to pre-defined strategy and review criteria in Embase, Pubmed, and conference proceedings databases from 2003 till December 2012. In total, 30 publications written in English covering the relevant patient population and topics of interest. European prevalence ranges from 6% to 34% in diabetes mellitus patients. PDPN has a significant humanistic and economic impact. Patients are limited in their general functioning and their ability to sleep and often experience anxiety and depression. Not surprisingly, PDPN is associated with reduced Health-Related-Quality-of-Life (HRQoL). PDPN patients incur high health care costs due to hospitalizations and outpatient visits. In addition, the painful symptoms cause impaired work productivity. Studies suggest both humanistic and economic burden increase with higher pain severity. The burden from PDPN appears to be higher with increasing pain severity. More severe pain leads to a higher impairment in daily functioning, sleep and HRQoL. Higher pain intensity also leads to increasing healthcare costs and work productivity losses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. A Qualitative Study of Factors That Influence Contraceptive Choice among Adolescent School-Based Health Center Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Andrea J.; Gilmore, Kelly; Cady, Janet; Akers, Aletha Y.; Ahrens, Kym R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods can prevent teen pregnancy yet remain underutilized by adolescents in the United States. Pediatric providers are well positioned to discuss LARCs with adolescents, but little is known about how counseling should occur in pediatric primary care settings. We explored adolescent womens’ attitudes and experiences with LARCs to inform the development of adolescent-centered LARC counseling strategies. Design Qualitative analysis of one-on-one interviews. Setting Participants were recruited from 2 urban school-based, primary care centers. Participants Thirty adolescent women aged 14–18 years, diverse in race/ethnicity, and sexual experience. Interventions Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using inductive and deductive coding. Main Outcome Measure Major themes were identified to integrate LARC-specific adolescent preferences into existing counseling approaches. Results Participants (mean age, 16.2 years; range, 14–18 years) represented a diverse range of racial and/or ethnic identities. Half (15/30) were sexually active and 17% (5/30) reported current or past LARC use. Five themes emerged regarding key factors that influence LARC choice, including: (1) strong preferences about device-specific characteristics; (2) previous exposure to information about LARCs from peers, family members, or health counseling sessions; (3) knowledge gaps about LARC methods that affect informed decision-making; (4) personal circumstances or experiences that motivate a desire for effective and/or long-acting contraception; and (5) environmental constraints and supports that might influence adolescent access to LARCs. Conclusion We identified 5 factors that influence LARC choice among adolescent women and propose a framework for incorporating these factors into contraceptive counseling services in pediatric primary care settings. PMID:26477942

  14. [Dietary counseling in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nathalie; Haslebacher, Yvonne; Teuscher-Sick, Patricia; Fischer, Beatrice

    2013-02-01

    Information on weight management and a healthy eating is accessible to anyone. However, recommendations are inconsistent. This often leads to confusion rather than to real changes in eating behavior. The principle of a long-term weight reduction is based on the idea of achieving negative energy balance with a healthy, balanced and slightly hypocaloric diet. The regimen is neither supposed to be rigid nor should it ban any food products or food products. Changes in eating patterns come about step by step and the counseling approach should be based on the patient's habits and capabilities. The basic requirement to successfully treat obese patients is their own motivation Therefore, the timing of launching the therapy needs to be well chosen. Apart from goals directly concerning weight loss, goals related to well-being, general health and exercise should be set and pursued. However, the main focus should be on changes of dietary behavior. Dietary counseling is preferably embedded in a multidisciplinary treatment concept.

  15. Medication counseling for thyroxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This communication from the National Indian Patient-centered Thyroid Management group provides a useful tool to help in medication counseling during hypothyroidism management. The authors classify and list aspects of thyroxine use which must be discussed with patients on thyroxine supplementation or replacement. Issues related to concomitant food and medications intake, preconception and pregnancy management, as well as sick day care, are also discussed.

  16. The Impact of Community Violence on School-Based Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Richards, Maryse; Militello, Lisa K; Dean, Kyle C; Scott, Darrick; Gross, Israel M; Romeo, Edna

    2015-12-01

    Research conducted on youth exposure to violence has generally focused on documenting the prevalence of community violence and its emotional and behavioral implications. However, there is a dearth of information related to the impact of violence on the implementation and evaluation of community and school-based programs. This commentary examines the impact of community violence on a school-based research program. It is also a brief summary of the detrimental effects of exposure to community violence on psychological and academic functioning and health outcomes. An example of the impact of community violence on the implementation of a school-based asthma program will be addressed. Implications for school nurses will be discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. The provision of nurse-led school based health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sarah; Dickinson, Annette

    2017-07-12

    Internationally, nurses have been in the forefront of delivering health care services in the school environment and whilst health care delivery in secondary and high schools is evaluated, this is not the case for services delivered in primary/elementary schools. In countries such as New Zealand there is no significant inter-service collaboration between health and education; therefore, the delivery of health services remains fragmented and underdeveloped. This discussion paper reviews the history and development of nurse-led school-based health services internationally and provides an insight into the current provision of primary school-based health services in New Zealand. The initial approach to this paper was to gain an understanding of the history of school-based health services internationally and to explore the relationship between health and education in relation to this. This assisted in providing some context and comparison with the current provision of school-based health services in New Zealand. Discussion outcome: Internationally, it is acknowledged that schools provide not only a location to deliver health services to children but also the opportunity to reach entire families and communities yet surprisingly, the development of school-based health services within the primary/elementary school sector has received minimal attention in New Zealand and worldwide. This paper supports the need for further research concerning the feasibility, provision and effectiveness of school-based health services in primary/elementary schools. In order to be effective, this should incorporate the shared needs and values of all stakeholders. The authors argue the need to develop an inter-service, collaborative, national framework for the delivery of school nursing services within the primary school sector in New Zealand. Impact statement: A collaborative framework for health service delivery into primary schools can enable early establishment of supportive health

  18. School-Based Anxiety Treatments for Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig-Anderson, Kathleen; Colognori, Daniela; Fox, Jeremy K.; Stewart, Catherine E.; Warner, Carrie Masia

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY School-based empirically supported treatments for anxiety disorders are a promising avenue for providing necessary intervention to distressed youth who would otherwise never receive treatment. Sustaining such programs in school settings should be viewed as a multiple-stage process, from integration of the program into the institution and maintenance of the intervention to responding to institutional change and ownership of the program by the school.51 Given the scarce resources available to schools, additional research on embedding programs into the school culture and maximizing existing resources is essential to enhancing the sustainability of school-based interventions for anxiety disorders and reaching youth in need. PMID:22801000

  19. Consultation: Creating School-Based Interventions. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkmeyer, Don, Jr.; Carlson, Jon

    Decades after consultation has become a mandated function of school counselors, consultants still seek effective ways to deliver this essential role. This book, geared towards mental health professionals, provides a set of skills for working with the school-based population. The ideas, based on Adlerian psychology, present a theory of consultation…

  20. School-Based First Aid Training Programs: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveruzzi, Bianca; Buckley, Lisa; Sheehan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background: This review examines the breadth of first aid training delivered to school students and the components that are age appropriate to adolescents. Method: Eligible studies included school-based first aid interventions targeting students aged between 10 and 18 years. Online databases were searched, for peer-reviewed publications available…

  1. School-Based Sexuality Education in Portugal: Strengths and Weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Ana Cristina; Leal, Cláudia; Duarte, Cidália

    2016-01-01

    Portugal, like many other countries, faces obstacles regarding school-based sexuality education. This paper explores Portuguese schools' approaches to implementing sexuality education at a local level, and provides a critical analysis of potential strengths and weaknesses. Documents related to sexuality education in a convenience sample of 89…

  2. The Impact of Community Violence on School-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Richards, Maryse; Militello, Lisa K.; Dean, Kyle C.; Scott, Darrick; Gross, Israel M.; Romeo, Edna

    2015-01-01

    Research conducted on youth exposure to violence has generally focused on documenting the prevalence of community violence and its emotional and behavioral implications. However, there is a dearth of information related to the impact of violence on the implementation and evaluation of community and school-based programs. This commentary examines…

  3. Teacher Training by Means of a School-Based Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore how a school-based training model (SBTM) could help to address the shortage of teachers. This model also allows, among other aspects, for poor and disadvantaged students to study while they gain experience. This article reports on the results of the SBTM implemented by a South African university, whereby…

  4. Emotional Regulation: Considerations for School-Based Group Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Kristine M.; Brooks, Morgan; Rinaldo, Vincent J.; Bogner, Roselind; Hodges, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    School-based professionals have entered the 21st century with a heightened call to address the emotional and behavioral concerns of youth. While cognitive-behavioral therapies and psychoeducational groups have demonstrated moderate effects with children and adolescents, there is little available research to assist clinicians in refining treatments…

  5. The Current Practices and Problems of School Based Supervision in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All teacher respondents were used in the analysis. On the other hand 65 school based supervisors, 13 principals and 10 cluster supervisors were selected using comprehensive sampling techniques as they are highly responsible for supervisory practices and their number was also manageable. The main instruments used ...

  6. Research on School-Based Management in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, David T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a 1992-93 research project involving 66 state schools that attempted to ascertain the overall effectiveness of school-based management in Victoria, Australia. Findings of the Likert-style survey revealed substantial participant satisfaction with school councils' current composition, information provision, and overall functioning. (20…

  7. School-Based Home Instruction and Learning: A Quantitative Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, M. Elizabeth; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Research on elementary school-based programs for increasing the educationally stimulating qualities of the home environment was statistically synthesized in a qualitative analysis of 29 controlled studies. Of 121 comparisons made in the analysis, 91.1 percent favored treatment over control groups, thus pointing to the effectiveness of these…

  8. Comprehensive School-Based Physical Activity Promotion: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Heather; Beighle, Aaron; Carson, Russell L.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) participation levels among youth remain well below national recommendations. Thus, a variety of strategies to promote youth PA have been advocated, including multifaceted, school-based approaches. One identified as having great potential is a comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP). The goal of a CSPAP is to…

  9. A School-Based Suicide Risk Assessment Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide remains the third leading cause of death among young people in the United States. Considering that youth who contemplate suicide generally exhibit warning signs before engaging in lethal self-harm, school-based mental health professionals can play a vital role in identifying students who are at risk for suicidal behavior. Nevertheless, the…

  10. Family Involvement in School-Based Dysphagia Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Nicholson, Joanna K.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a practitioner-friendly synthesis of existing literature on family involvement in the management of dysphagia for school-age. Research reviewed includes family perspectives on programs, therapists, and characteristics that comprise effective family involvement in school-based dysphagia management programs. Also included are…

  11. A history of adolescent school based vaccination in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kirsten; Quinn, Helen; Menzies, Robert; McIntyre, Peter

    2013-06-30

    As adolescents have become an increasingly prominent target group for vaccination, school-based vaccination has emerged as an efficient and effective method of delivering nationally recommended vaccines to this often hard to reach group. School-based delivery of vaccines has occurred in Australia for over 80 years and has demonstrated advantages over primary care delivery for this part of the population. In the last decade school-based vaccination programs have become routine practice across all Australian states and territories. Using existing records and the recollection of experts we have compiled a history of school-based vaccination in Australia, primarily focusing on adolescents. This work is copyright. Apart from any use as permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without prior written permission from the Commonwealth. Requests and inquiries concerning reproduction and rights should be addressed to the Commonwealth Copyright Administration, Attorney General's Department, Robert Garran Offices, National Circuit, Barton ACT 2600 or posted at http://www.ag.gov.au/cca.

  12. School-Based Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Brandon K.; Storer, Jennifer; Watabe, Yuko; Sadler, Joanna; Evans, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    The authors review the research literature regarding school-based treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Students with ADHD often do not receive access to special services, even though the impairments associated with the disorder often compromise learning and cause concerns for classroom teachers, school administrators, and…

  13. Building an Effective School-Based Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy Ann; Stormont, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth are at risk for failure in school due to various school, family, and community characteristics. To provide more support for youth at risk, school-based mentoring programs have become increasingly popular. However, this seemingly simple intervention is actually quite complex and must be implemented with integrity and fidelity. Although…

  14. Addressing Pediatric Health Concerns through School-Based Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Stephen D.; Albritton, Kizzy

    2011-01-01

    In schools, the term "consultation" has multiple meanings. Often it is used to describe a quick, informal process of advice giving between teachers and/or school specialists. As a formal discipline, School-Based Consultation (SBC) is an indirect service delivery model that involves two or more parties working together to benefit students. Most…

  15. Youth Voice in Nigerian School-Based Management Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Bashiru Bako; Krauss, Steven Eric; Samah, Asnarulkhadi Abu; Hamid, Jamaliah Abdul

    2017-01-01

    In Nigeria, School-Based Management Committees (SBMCs) aim to provide an opportunity for all stakeholders, particularly the vulnerable groups in the school's host communities such as young people and women to partake in school governance. Research on the experiences of youth voice in the committees is scant, however, as much of the existing…

  16. The Democratic Deficit and School-Based Management in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Megan; Ehrich, Lisa Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to apply the theory of the democratic deficit to school-based management with an emphasis on Australia. This theory was developed to examine managerial restructuring of the Australian Public Service in the 1990s. Given similarities between the use of managerial practices in the public service and government schools, the…

  17. Decentralisation And School-Based Management In Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, David T.; Sooksomchitra, Pacharapimon

    2004-01-01

    School-based management (SBM) in Thailand began in 1997 in the course of a reform aimed at overcoming a profound crisis in the education system. The present contribution reports on the introduction and institutionalisation of decentralisation and SBM with community participation in Thailand. The data reported here are based on an empirical survey…

  18. What Do We Know about School-Based Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, Harry Anthony; Fasih, Tazeen; Barrera, Felipe; Garcia-Moreno, Vicente A.; Bentaouet-Kattan, Raja; Baksh, Shaista; Wickramasekera, Inosha

    2007-01-01

    Impact evaluations of school-based management (SBM) programs, or any other kind of program, are important because they can demonstrate whether or not the program has accomplished its objectives. Furthermore, these evaluations can identify ways to improve the design of the program. These evaluations can also make successful interventions…

  19. Physical Therapists' Perceptions of School-Based Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Sheryl L; Kuperstein, Janice; Effgen, Susan K

    2015-01-01

    Surveys have reported that most school-based physical therapists perceive ideal practices are not commonly implemented in their settings. Our aim was to obtain a more in-depth understanding of these perceptions through open-ended inquiry. Qualitative data were derived from voluntary open-ended responses provided upon completion of a survey regarding school-based physical therapy practice. Of the survey's 561 participants, 250 provided open-ended commentaries that were analyzed using interpretive phenomenology. Six qualitative themes emerged from the open-ended responses, including: In quest: Meeting students' school-based needs via physical therapy; Seeking relatedness: Finding working teams in the school system; Building understanding: Developing a voice/identity in the school context; Stretched beyond limits: Managing workloads; Networking: Coordinating services outside school to meet student needs; Defying definition: What does working in an educational model mean? School-based physical therapists seek to meet educationally relevant physical therapy needs of students, ages 3 to 21 years. Successes appear woven of a multitude of factors such as therapist expertise, team dynamics, and district supports.

  20. Teamwork in Israeli Arab-Bedouin School-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizel, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the western world a leading example of the educational reforms that have been implemented in the late twentieth and twenty-first century is School-Based Management (SBM), a system designed to improve educational outcome through staff teamwork and self-governance. This research set out to examine the efficacy of teamwork in ten…

  1. School-Based Management: Arab Education System in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid; Abu-Romi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the issue of school-based management (SBM) in elementary schools in the Arab education system in Israel, comparing schools experienced in SBM, schools beginning to use SBM and schools that do not use SBM. Design/methodology/approach: A quantitative research used a structured questionnaire to…

  2. School-Based Management and Arts Education: Lessons from Chicago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kate R.

    2012-01-01

    School-based management, or local school control, is an organizational school reform effort aimed at decentralizing school decision-making that has become prevalent in districts throughout the United States. Using the groundbreaking Chicago system of local school control as an exemplar, this article outlines the implications of such reform efforts…

  3. Key Elements of a Successful School-Based Management Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Kerri L.; Wohlstetter, Priscilla

    2003-01-01

    Syntheses of research findings from major studies of school-based management (SBM) generate eight elements of schooling associated with successful SBM: An active vision, meaningful decision-making authority, distribution of power, development and use of knowledge and skills, collecting and communicating information, rewards for progress, shared…

  4. The Equity Consequences of School-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Adam E.; Miran, Meir

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which the introduction of school-based management (SBM) affects schools' incomes and educational equity? Design/methodology/approach: An analysis of financial reports coming from 31 SBM schools during a period of four sequential years reveals that the overall inequity among schools has…

  5. Who Benefits from School-Based Management in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Fernando; Cardenas, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    In this article the authors examine evidence pertaining to the implementation of a national programme of school-based decentralization, the Quality Schools Programme ("Programa de Escuelas de Calidad"). The main argument of this article is that high levels of inequality in the institutional capacity of different schools and in the…

  6. School-Based Management Developments and Partnership: Evidence from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandur, Agustinus

    2012-01-01

    School-based management (SBM) with devolution of authority and responsibility to school level decision-makers has become the most prominent feature of public school management systems in most countries around the world. This article provides the global trends and current developments in SBM in Indonesia with an emphasis on how SBM has created…

  7. School-Based Management Developments: Challenges and Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandur, Agustinus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the current school-based management (SBM) policy reform in Indonesia, with an emphasis on the impacts of shifting authority and responsibility to school level, as well as challenges confronted by the school council members, followed by remedial measures to minimize the problems.…

  8. The Art of Successful School-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelehear, Zach

    2006-01-01

    In this monograph the author offers the reader a new perspective on an important, dynamic, and sometimes daunting issue: managing successful school-based leadership. Organized around the seven elements of art criticism, the author uses an arts-based approach to weave together notions of research-based leadership skills for successful school-based…

  9. Outcomes for a Comprehensive School-Based Asthma Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Lynn B.; Redden, David; Wittich, Angelina R.; Hains, Coralie; Turner-Henson, Anne; Hemstreet, Mary P.; Feinstein, Ronald; Erwin, Sue; Bailey, William C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of a comprehensive school-based asthma management program in an inner-city, largely African-American school system. All 54 elementary schools (combined enrollment 13,247 students) from a single urban school system participated in this study. Schools were randomly divided between immediate and delayed…

  10. Implementation of School-Based Management in Indonesia. Monograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernez, Georges; Karam, Rita; Marshall, Jeffery H.

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a quantitative and qualitative status report on the implementation of school-based management (SBM) in Indonesia, identifies factors associated with the successful practices of SBM, and assesses SBM effects on student achievement eight years after its inception. The authors' findings are based on face-to-face surveys of…

  11. School-Based Management in Hong Kong: Centralizing or Decentralizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, I-Wah

    2008-01-01

    This paper examined the debate on a reform of school-based management in Hong Kong, which was to set up the Incorporated Management Committee (IMC) to manage the subsidized school. The nature of the debate during legislation and the characteristics of the reform were examined. The advantages, disadvantages and the implications of the reform were…

  12. Local Responses to School-Based Management In Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yvonne Y. K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper adopts a qualitative approach to study the perceptions of six secondary teachers from two schools with a similar background and history of school-based management (SBM). The study aims to explore the views of the teachers in the following areas: changes in school administration and the structure of the school under SBM; changes in the…

  13. An Innovative School-Based Intervention to Promote Healthy Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piana, Natalia; Ranucci, Claudia; Buratta, Livia; Foglia, Elena; Fabi, Marta; Novelli, Francesca; Casucci, Simone; Reginato, Elisa; Pippi, Roberto; Aiello, Cristina; Leonardi, Alessia; Romani, Giannermete; De Feo, Pierpaolo; Mazzeschi, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe an innovative school-based intervention to promote healthy lifestyles. To evaluate its effects on children's food habits and to highlight the key components which contribute most to the beneficial effects obtained from children's, teachers' and parents' perspectives. Design: An educational tool to improve personal awareness,…

  14. Transition from School-Based Training in VET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daehlen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper assesses the drop-out rate among disadvantaged students within vocational education and training. The purpose of this paper is to examine the probability of dropping out after school-based training for child welfare clients--a particularly disadvantaged group of youth. Child welfare clients' drop-out rate is compared with…

  15. School-Based Health Centers + School Nurses = Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) and school nurses know that healthy students learn better. They share an important mission: providing preventive care for all students they serve, with the goal of keeping students in class learning. They both: (1) Educate students and families about healthy behaviors and nutrition; (2) Enroll students and…

  16. Effect of School-based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Technology for Health (PATH) to evaluate different HPV vaccine delivery strategies. A school-based HPV vaccine delivery strategy was adopted in Ibanda targeting girls enrolled in primary grade five (P5). In Nakasongola, the HPV vaccine was delivered during the routine Child. Days Plus (CDP) program, targeting girls of at.

  17. Models for Delivering School-Based Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, David A.; McManus, Joseph M.; Mitchell, Dennis A.

    2005-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) often are located in high-need schools and communities. Dental service is frequently an addition to existing comprehensive services, functioning in a variety of models, configurations, and locations. SBHCs are indicated when parents have limited financial resources or inadequate health insurance, limiting…

  18. Incorporating Trauma-Informed Care Into School-Based Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L; Ashley, Olivia Silber; White, LeBretia; Axelson, Sarah; Clark, Marc; Burrus, Barri

    2017-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the rationale and process for incorporating trauma-informed approaches into US school-based programs, using school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs as an example. Research literature is reviewed on the prevalence and outcomes of childhood trauma, including the links between trauma and pregnancy. Information is then presented concerning the implementation of trauma-informed approaches in school settings, describing activities undertaken, barriers encountered, and outcomes achieved. Next, we describe the implications of this literature for school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs, outlining the reasons for including trauma-informed approaches in these programs, the prerequisites for doing so, and some examples of successful implementation. Many children in our country experience trauma, placing them at increased risk of multiple health concerns including adolescent pregnancy. In response to this situation, some schools have successfully incorporated trauma-informed approaches into adolescent pregnancy prevention programs, as well as other programming. Incorporating trauma-informed approaches into school settings, including school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs, is a viable and important way to address the multiple needs of traumatized children. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  19. Implementation of school based physical activity interventions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Patti-Jean; Nettlefold, Lindsay; Race, Douglas; Hoy, Christa; Ashe, Maureen C; Wharf Higgins, Joan; McKay, Heather A

    2015-03-01

    Implementation science is an emerging area in physical activity (PA) research. We sought to establish the current state of the evidence related to implementation of school-based PA models to explore 1) the relationship between implementation and health outcomes, and 2) factors that influence implementation. We searched 7 electronic databases (1995-2014) and included controlled studies of school-based PA programmes for healthy youth (6-18 y) measuring at least one physical health-related outcome. For objective 1, studies linked implementation level to student-level health outcome(s). For objective 2, studies reported factors associated with implementation. There was substantial variability in how health outcomes and implementation were assessed. Few studies linked implementation and health outcomes (n=15 interventions). Most (11/15) reported a positive relationship between implementation and at least one health outcome. Implementation factors were reported in 29 interventions. Of 22 unique categories, time was the most prevalent influencing factor followed by resource availability/quality and supportive school climate. Implementation evaluation supports scale-up of effective school-based PA interventions and thus population-level change. Our review serves as a call to action to 1) address the link between implementation and outcome within the school-based PA literature and 2) improve and standardize definitions and measurement of implementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Child Sexual Abuse: Offenders, Disclosure, and School-Based Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldman, Jonathan P.; Crespi, Tony D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper explores the characteristics of the child sexual offender and the devastating impact of sexual abuse on children. It discusses the importance of a child's disclosure of victimization and its significance in the treatment process. Recommendations are presented on ways to improve school-based sexual abuse programs since they are in a…

  1. Assessing the Outcomes of School-Based Partnership Resilience Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampane, Ruth; Huddle, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on the outcomes of educational psychology school-based intervention. The aim was to determine whether the intervention served as an educational pathway to resilience. Through a concurrent mixed-methods research design interpreted through a pragmatic lens, academic school performance of students in a rural school was used as an…

  2. Assessing the outcomes of school-based partnership resilience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on the outcomes of educational psychology school-based intervention. The aim was to determine whether the intervention served as an educational pathway to resilience. Through a concurrent mixed-methods research design interpreted through a pragmatic lens, academic school performance of ...

  3. Attitude of teachers to school based adolescent reproductive health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-11-11

    Nov 11, 2003 ... adolescent sexual behaviour, including contraceptive use is important. The attitude of teachers to school-based adolescent reproductive health services was assessed among two hundred and twenty three teachers in Sagamu. Forty seven percent of them were trained family life educators while 52.9% had ...

  4. Community's willingness to pay for a school-based chemotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a random sample of 523 households having at least one child attending primary school in 3 villages in Buchosa Division, Sengerema District, Tanzania. The aim was to determine the community's willingness to pay (WTP) for a school-based chemotherapy ...

  5. The challenges of school-based teacher development initiatives in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It illustrates this by reporting on some research findings on the potential and limitations of school-based teacher development through a cluster case study, which could be described as a South African version of a Professional Learning Community. Keywords: teacher development, cluster teaching, professional learning ...

  6. Implementing School-Based Teacher Development in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, Frank; Hardman, Jan; Dachi, Hillary; Elliott, Louise; Ihebuzor, Noel; Ntekim, Maniza; Tibuhinda, Audax

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of a pilot school-based professional development programme for Tanzanian primary school teachers launched in February 2011 and evaluated in December 2012 by the Ministry of Education and Vocational Training with the support of UNICEF. The study set out to investigate the effectiveness and efficiency of the pilot…

  7. Process evaluation of school-based peer education for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 2005, a survey was conducted among all the 27 high schools of Aden, which revealed low levels of knowledge on major prevention measures, and a high level of stigma and discrimination towards people living with HIV (PLWH). The results served as a baseline for implementing a school-based peer education ...

  8. Resources available for school based mental health services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Childhood mental illnesses most times are detected earlier in schools than at homes as the schools provide enabling environment for early identification of children with problems. Objectives: To evaluate the resources available for school-based mental health services in Enugu urban and to determine the head ...

  9. Teacher Motivation and School-Based Performance Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Heneman, Herbert, III; Milanowski, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes findings from series of research studies on the motivational effects of school-based performance award (SBPA) programs in Kentucky and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg (North Carolina) School District. Finds that teachers associate various positive and negative outcomes with the programs. Draws several implications for design and…

  10. School-Based Performance Awards: Research Findings and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Heneman, Herbert, III; Milanowski, Anthony

    This paper synthesizes research on how motivation influenced teachers at two school-based performance award (SBPA) programs in Kentucky and in North Carolina. The research was conducted between 1995 and 1998 by the Consortium for Policy Research in Education. SBPA programs provide teachers and other school staff with pay bonuses for the…

  11. Advancing School-Based Interventions through Economic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Tina M.; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Eninger, Lilianne

    2014-01-01

    Commentators interested in school-based prevention programs point to the importance of economic issues for the future of prevention efforts. Many of the processes and aims of prevention science are dependent upon prevention resources. Although economic analysis is an essential tool for assessing resource use, the attention given economic analysis…

  12. A Synthesis of International School-Based Bullying Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jennifer; Medaris, Jessica; Verity, Kimberley; Hott, Brittany

    2013-01-01

    Bullying is a prevalent problem in school systems in the United States and abroad. This literature review focuses on elementary school-based bullying interventions for students published between 2005-2012. Ten studies reviewed included students from the first grade through the eighth grade from five countries. There were many common themes among…

  13. Immigrant Youth Involvement in School-Based Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, Anthony A.

    2011-01-01

    Extracurricular activity involvement is generally beneficial toward student progress and success. Little is known, however, about immigrant youth involvement in school-based extracurricular activities. The author examined the patterns of Latino and Asian American youth extracurricular involvement by focusing on the pertinent role of immigrant…

  14. The Charismatic Clergyman and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    This article is an introduction to charismatic counseling. Charismatic clergy are seeing transformations of lives unlike anything experienced in their ministries before the charismatic renewal. (Author)

  15. 38 CFR 21.7100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7100... Bill-Active Duty) Counseling § 21.7100 Counseling. A veteran or servicemember may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. (a) Purpose. The purpose of counseling is (1) To...

  16. 38 CFR 21.3102 - Required counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Required counseling. 21.... Chapter 35 Counseling § 21.3102 Required counseling. (a) Child. The VA counseling psychologist will provide counseling and assist in preparing the educational plan only if the eligible child or his or her...

  17. SOCIAL COMPETENCE FORMATION AMONG TEENAGERS FROM HUMANIST TREND MULTIPLE-AGED GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa A. Krapivina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the problems of social development of adolescents in multiple-aged groups (MAG.Methods. The methods involve socio-personal approach, consideration of the subject in a certain ideological humanistic orientation, comparative analysis, and comparison of historical facts, the study of social phenomena of different ages, long-term scientific observations, reflections, a retrospective analysis of personal experience.Results. The author describes objective conditions for the uprise of extremist, subcultural youth of multiple-aged groups, and the reasons whence they begin to perform distinctive functions that are specific for teenagers. Options for models of MAG humanistic educational systems formed in Russian and foreign social and pedagogical practice are listed. A complex of pedagogical conditions provided for the formation of social competence of adolescents in multiple-aged associations of humanistic orientation is considered. It has been found that this type of system is characterized by the following features: the principle of voluntary association of people, independence of subjects, rapid adaptation to changing socio-cultural situation, a variety of activities by interests, alternating change of activities, conflict resolution within the team, a high level of team spirit, selfmanagement, the creative nature of educational process, upbringing, socialization and self-realization. A brief description of conditions for development of fundamental human values among adolescents and formation of new specific complicated humanistic human and personal relations in global world is given.Scientific novelty. The author studies the following concepts: educational system of multiple-aged associations, teenager social competence, ambivalent behavior, emotional and moral compass of personality, invisible assets of the team, emergent effect of multiple-aged groups, inter-age communication. It was found that the specificity of MAG educational

  18. On Displaced Humanists: Counselor Education and the Meaning-Reduction Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Counseling, as have other mental health professions, has undergone regular historical alternations between meaning-based and reductive ideologies of helping. Contemporarily, counseling is participating in a protracted reductionistic phase. This situation has resulted in the marginalization of those in the profession who have humanistic…

  19. The Sociology of Humanist, Spiritual, and Religious Practice in Prison: Supporting Responsivity and Desistance from Crime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff B. Duncan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents evidence for why Corrections should take the humanist, spiritual, and religious self-identities of people in prison seriously, and do all it can to foster and support those self-identities, or ways of establishing meaning in life. Humanist, spiritual, and religious (H/S/R pathways to meaning can be an essential part of the evidence-based responsivity principle of effective correctional programming, and the desistance process for men and women involved in crime. This paper describes the sociology of the H/S/R involvement of 349 women and 3,009 men during the first year of their incarceration in the Oregon prison system. Ninety-five percent of the women and 71% of the men voluntarily attended at least one H/S/R event during their first year of prison. H/S/R events were mostly led by diverse religious and spiritual traditions, such as Native American, Protestant, Islamic, Wiccan, Jewish, Jehovah Witness, Latter-day Saints/Mormon, Seventh Day Adventist, Buddhist, and Catholic, but, increasingly, events are secular or humanist in context, such as education, yoga, life-skills development, non-violent communication, and transcendental meditation groups. The men and women in prison had much higher rates of H/S/R involvement than the general population in Oregon. Mirroring gender-specific patterns of H/S/R involvement found in the community, women in prison were much more likely to attend H/S/R events than men.

  20. Examining Multicultural Counseling Competencies of Rehabilitation Counseling Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Chandra M.

    2008-01-01

    There has been little examination of multicultural counseling competencies of rehabilitation counselor trainees. The current study examined competency development (knowledge, skills and awareness) of 68 rehabilitation counseling master's degree students across six universities. Results indicate that students did not demonstrate competence in…

  1. Addiction Counseling Accreditation: CACREP's Role in Solidifying the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Culbreth, Jack R.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs' (CACREP) role in furthering the specialty of addiction counseling. After sharing a brief history and the role of counselor certification and licensure, the authors share the process whereby CACREP developed the first set of…

  2. The solidarization potencies of Buddhist axiological system and humanistic grounding of its priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaniv Maryana Ivanivna

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of the value system of the Buddhist religion in the context of current globalization trends. The author considers the stereotypes about the confrontation in the parameters “West – East” and offers the alternative view on the model of Buddhist values and its solidarization potencies. The author extrapolates her ideas on the intellectual and practical sense of a famous Buddhist philosopher Daisaku Ikeda. The author emphasizes the importance of a practical way of aesthetic and ethical projects initiated by Ikeda and justifies their humanistic social significance.

  3. The Cultural Implications of Negotiation with Italian Enterprises: A Humanistic Education of Elites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis BEGIONI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a reflection on the fundamental differences in the behavior ofFrench and Italian entrepreneurs. The paper focuses on the typically humanistic education ofItalian elites who go through a conventional school where the teaching of Latin, Greek, philosophyand art history usually is crucial. On the contrary, in France, the best students are the ones who gothrough a mainly scientific education in highschool. It has to be observed that school educationbased on classical studies has intercultural consequences on the economic behavior and, inparticular, in the field of trade negotiations.

  4. Carbon humanism: Freeman Dyson and the looming battle between environmentalists and humanists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    2014-07-01

    Freeman Dyson has had a distinguished career as a scientist, but perhaps this notable body of work might be eclipsed in importance by his many writings about society, especially those dealing with the dilemma of how improved living standards can be brought about without despoiling the land. Dyson is one of the few prominent commentators who directly addresses what might shape up as a culture war between two viewpoints — environmentalism and humanism — that otherwise have many aims in common. The first part of this essay looks at the broad outline of Dyson's career while the second part looks more particularly at his contributions to the humanist debate.

  5. World Englishes and English Language Teaching: A pragmatic and humanistic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Kumar Bhowmik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seidlhofer (2005 describes the current status of English as an “unstable equilibrium.” In many ways this analogy regarding the current state of affairs with English language teaching (ELT is appropriate. Taking World Englishes (WE perspectives, this paper presents various mismatches between teaching goals and objectives vis-à-vis the teaching and learning outcomes in ELT. The paper then makes the argument that in order for more successful English language teaching and learning to take place a pragmatic and humanistic approach needs to be adopted. An outline of such an approach is discussed.

  6. 34 CFR 106.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 106.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  7. 32 CFR 196.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 196.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or...

  8. 45 CFR 618.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 618.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  9. 45 CFR 2555.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Activities Prohibited § 2555.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the counseling or guidance of...

  10. Responsibility, Authority, and Accountability in School-Based and Non-School-Based Management: Principals' Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshtain, Yael; Gibton, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how primary school principals in Israel cope with the gaps between authority and responsibility in their work, deriving from partially implemented decentralization processes, and how this relates to school-based management (SBM) and accountability principles. Design/methodology/approach: Using…

  11. Breastfeeding counsel against cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prameela Kannan Kutty

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer potential by breastfeeding is not fully tapped in the light of the present knowledge of the subject. Literature indicates that breastmilk has anticancer action but may underestimate its full capacity. The protective spectrum within breastmilk hints on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of it as an anticancer tool. Exclusive breastfeeding could confer protection from carcinogenesis with a greater impact than realised. A literature review was conducted using four electronic databases. Selected areas were extracted after thorough perusal of the articles. The uninitiated would take exclusive breastfeeding seriously if actively counselled as an anticancer tool. Advice on details of the breastfeeding process and holistic information on breastfeeding may endow a greater impact among the skeptics. Counselling the breastfeeding mother on information sometimes not imparted, such as on maternal nutrition, details of the process of breastfeeding, benefits of direct breastfeeding versus milk expression and her psychosocial well being may make a difference in optimising anticancer action that exists in breastmilk. Additionally, its anticancer potential provides a platform to universally improve physical and psychosocial well being of women who breastfeed. Statistics of protection by breastfeeding in some maternal and childhood cancers are evident. “Bio-geno-immuno-nutrition” of breastmilk may shield the mother and infant from carcinogenesis in more ways than appreciated. The molecular basis of mother-to-infant signals and their “energies” need to be researched. Breastfeeding as a modifiable behaviour provides cost effective nutrition with potential for both cancer immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy.

  12. Counseling in Turkey: An Evolving Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Rex; Guneri, Oya Yerin

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a brief history of counseling and addresses the current issues and future trends of counseling in Turkey. Special emphasis is placed on the factors that impede the development of school counseling as a discipline.

  13. Client Motivation and Multicultural Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bryan S. K.

    2011-01-01

    This reaction article comments on the major contribution titled "Motivation and Autonomy in Counseling, Psychotherapy, and Behavior Change: A Look at Theory and Practice." It first points out the article's strengths, the primary of which was to move the construct of motivation to the center of focus in the discussion of counseling. In addition,…

  14. Cultural Accommodation Model of Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T. L.

    2011-01-01

    The current article provides an overview to the cultural accommodation model (CAM) of counseling (Leong & Lee, 2006) that may help guide employment counselors' work. The integrative multidimensional model of cross-cultural counseling (Leong, 1996), a precursor to the CAM, is also reviewed.

  15. Vocational Counselling and First Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darou, Wes G.

    Some First Nations communities in northern Ontario have requested vocational counseling services to help youth select careers and reduce student attrition. However, Euro-American counseling practices may not be appropriate for Native clients. This paper describes the approach of the Anishanabek Educational Institute (AEI), which was established to…

  16. Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 6 of 6 ... Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Journal Home > Archives: Edo Journal of Counselling. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 6 of 6 Items. 2011 ...

  17. Adlerian Counseling for Parent Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Fred P.

    The helping professions must aid parents in understanding their children and in providing parents with methods to improve family relationships. Adlerian counseling is presented as one potentially useful method of reaching this goal. The basic principles and democratic philosophy of Adlerian counseling are outlined, and emphasis is placed on the…

  18. Counseling Women: Overview and Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Joy Anne; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The papers in this section are a review of the literature related to counseling women. They review documents on the history of sexist helping practices. Together, they reveal the need for a systematic intervention by the helping professions to rectify potentially inadequate, inappropriate, or damaging treatment of women in counseling. (Author)

  19. Nonlinear Analysis in Counseling Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkin, Richard S.; Richey Gosnell, Katelyn M.; Holmgren, Andrew; Osborne, Jason W.

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear effects are both underreported and underrepresented in counseling research. We provide a rationale for evaluating nonlinear effects and steps to evaluate nonlinear relationships in counseling research. Two heuristic examples are provided along with discussion of the results and advantages to evaluating nonlinear effects.

  20. School Counseling in China Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Timothy C.; Qiong, Xiao

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the development of psychological thinking in China and social influences on the practice of school counseling today. Common problems of students are described, including anxiety due to pressure to perform well on exams, loneliness and social discomfort, and video game addiction. Counseling approaches used…

  1. Rómulo de Carvalho's Humanistic Chemistry Syllabus in the 1948 Portuguese Liceal Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, Arthur

    2013-06-01

    This paper scrutinizes the contribution of Rómulo de Carvalho to the development of the Portuguese science curriculum, arguing that it was critically informed by his lifetime inclination to the humanities. It focuses on a particular historical event: the 1948 chemistry programme for the secondary school `Liceus'. The paper briefly reviews the educational situation during Salazarism, and how Carvalho and others worked against Salazar's anti-liberal idealism. The concept of humanistic science education is also reviewed. The article provides a general overview of Carvalho's activities in poetry, the history of science, and in education, and argues that the work of this multifaceted man was geared towards the need for context and meaningfulness in ordinary human life. In 1948, a shift in chemistry teaching is identified, from one that is less meaningful to students' everyday lives to one that is more humanistic in nature. This shift, introduced by Carvalho, brought about radical measures such as the controversial suppression of chemical equations and concepts. The article also provides an account of Carvalho's rationale for such changes and concludes with a discussion of the significance of the reform for Carvalho and for Portuguese science education.

  2. The fusion of humanistic management and organizational learning vreate sustainable and high quality organizations une

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Largacha Martínez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rev.esc.adm.neg Looking for the best results that support company sustainability, diverse methodologies focusing on productivity and efficiency have been developed. Under this perspective, the trends of Human Talent Management look for high productive workers and to have low rates of personnel rotation (Bruce, 2006; Wu y Lee, 2001; Fisher, 2000; Lyons, 2006. However, most of these trends do not surpass the reductionist version of the market which only consider a company as a producer of goods or services (Schumacher, 1975, or the managerial paradigms that create structures opposing human resource management (Maslow, 1968; Berger y Luckmann, 1967; Senge et.al., 1994. The Humanistic Management is an exception as it offers another managerial option based on the existing people in the company, not seen as resources but what they really are: human beings. Its principles focus on alteration, non- ideologies and organizational social obligations (Largacha-Martínez, 2010b. In this paper, the outcomes of a qualitative study in seven companies coordinated by the Humanistic Management Network are presented (Von Kimakowitz, et. al, 2011, analyzing them from the perspective of excellence and organizational learning

  3. The univocal vocation of Zaira Rodríguez Ugidos’s humanist thought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lic. Kirenia Chaveco-Asin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article itself is an approach  to philosophical thinking Zaira Rodriguez Ugidos with intent to disclose the particular dimension which clearly shows to study philosophical reflections present in  theoretical and  scientific  production in which offers significant intellectual creation  cuban contributions and latin; as well as the  marked humanist thought that identify  her  work, is result of the influences received from marxist  formation which are expressed in the  approach  that gives  her  texts,  conferences, interventions  and  all  the professional work, making  an  stamp  that distingue.  Likewise emphasizes  recognition  doing the  role of  culture and science as process agents catalysts traffic towards social progress.Keywords: humanist thought, social progress, science, culture.

  4. The Humanist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Tom

    2004-01-01

    A high school teacher's everlasting influence on his students is recounted. Mr. Batelli, a football-coach, health and spelling teacher, cared about all his students regardless of their academic ability or athletic prowess, regardless of their race or family prominence.

  5. School-based In-service Teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans Jørgen; Hadzibegovic-Bubanja, Elvira; Nielsen, Søren P.

    and learning methodologies and to produce guidelines for organisation of such competence development of teachers. The ambition is to inspire and enable policymakers and practitioners to organise a school-based approach to continuing professional development of teachers in VET schools (and teachers in other...... upper–secondary education). The philosophy of the Handbook is that teacher competence development becomes both more efficient and much cheaper if closely related to the actual job requirements of teachers, organised at school level and for teams of teachers with strong support from school leadership...... and to produce guidelines for organisation of such competence development of teachers. The ambition is to inspire and enable policymakers and practitioners to organise a school-based approach to continuing professional development of teachers in VET schools (and teachers in other upper–secondary education...

  6. Adolescent smoking cessation services of school-based health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H; Yingling, Faith; Dake, Joseph A; Telljohann, Susan K

    2003-04-01

    A national sample of 390 junior and senior high school-based centers were mailed an 18-item survey to assess their institutional stages of change regarding smoking cessation education, referral, and prescription nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) services and their perceived barriers and benefits regarding the provision of these services. Nearly half were in the maintenance stage for cessation education programs, one-third were in maintenance stage for referral services, and 12% were in the maintenance stage for NRT. The most frequently cited perceived benefits included an increased awareness of short- and long-term effects of smoking (education programs and referral services) and increasing student access to cessation methods (NRT). The greatest barriers cited were a lack of financial resources (education programs), problems with student transportation (referral services), and staff not having the authority to provide prescription services (NRT). School-based centers can do more to help stop adolescents from using tobacco.

  7. Global school-based childhood obesity interventions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Melinda J; McMullen, Jennifer; Haider, Taj; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-08-28

    The issue of childhood overweight and obesity has become a global public health crisis. School-based interventions have been developed and implemented to combat this growing concern. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast U.S. and international school-based obesity prevention interventions and highlight efficacious strategies. A systematic literature review was conducted utilizing five relevant databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1) primary research; (2) overweight or obesity prevention interventions; (3) school-based; (4) studies published between 1 January 2002 through 31 December 2013; (5) published in the English language; (6) child-based interventions, which could include parents; and (7) studies that reported outcome data. A total of 20 interventions met the inclusion criteria. Ten interventions each were implemented in the U.S. and internationally. International interventions only targeted elementary-aged students, were less likely to target low-income populations, and were less likely to be implemented for two or more years in duration. However, they were more likely to integrate an environmental component when compared to U.S. interventions. Interventions implemented in the U.S. and internationally resulted in successful outcomes, including positive changes in student BMI. Yet, varying approaches were used to achieve success, reinforcing the fact that a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary to impact childhood obesity. However, building on successful interventions, future school-based obesity prevention interventions should integrate culturally specific intervention strategies, aim to incorporate an environmental component, and include parents whenever possible. Consideration should be given to the potential impact of long-term, frequent dosage interventions, and subsequent follow-up should be given attention to determine long-term efficacy.

  8. Global School-Based Childhood Obesity Interventions: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda J. Ickes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The issue of childhood overweight and obesity has become a global public health crisis. School-based interventions have been developed and implemented to combat this growing concern. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast U.S. and international school-based obesity prevention interventions and highlight efficacious strategies. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted utilizing five relevant databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1 primary research; (2 overweight or obesity prevention interventions; (3 school-based; (4 studies published between 1 January 2002 through 31 December 2013; (5 published in the English language; (6 child-based interventions, which could include parents; and (7 studies that reported outcome data. Results: A total of 20 interventions met the inclusion criteria. Ten interventions each were implemented in the U.S. and internationally. International interventions only targeted elementary-aged students, were less likely to target low-income populations, and were less likely to be implemented for two or more years in duration. However, they were more likely to integrate an environmental component when compared to U.S. interventions. Discussion: Interventions implemented in the U.S. and internationally resulted in successful outcomes, including positive changes in student BMI. Yet, varying approaches were used to achieve success, reinforcing the fact that a one-size-fits-all approach is not necessary to impact childhood obesity. However, building on successful interventions, future school-based obesity prevention interventions should integrate culturally specific intervention strategies, aim to incorporate an environmental component, and include parents whenever possible. Consideration should be given to the potential impact of long-term, frequent dosage interventions, and subsequent follow-up should be given attention to determine long-term efficacy.

  9. School-Based Mental Health Services: Definitions and Models of Effective Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Beth; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Cornell, Laura; Song, Samuel Y.

    2017-01-01

    School-based mental health services are those delivered by school-employed and community-employed providers in school buildings. With the implementation of provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (2010) that funds school-based health centers, school-based mental health services could become more broadly available in…

  10. Approaching Participation in School-Based Mathematics as a Cross-Setting Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kara

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an ethnographic study of a 10-year-old's pursuit of school-based mathematics across school and home to suggest that participating in school-based mathematics is a cross-setting phenomenon in at least 2 ways. First, I illustrate how accomplishing school-based mathematics literally extends into the home and how individuals…

  11. An Exploration of the Role of Occupation in School-Based Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeryl DiSanti

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of occupation in school-based occupational therapy practice. The research questions were (1) How do school-based occupational therapists describe the role of occupation during intervention? (2) Which theories of occupation do school-based occupational therapists associate with their own practice?…

  12. 人文學者搜尋資訊行為的探究 Information-Seeking Behavior of the Humanists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-min Cheng

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available 無Information-seeking behavior is one of the important themes of users studies. The humanists information-seeking behavior is quite different from those of scientists of social scientists mainly because they work alone, are concerned with those human achievements which make up our cultural heritage and rarely do their research work under the pressure of time. Books are the material the humanists use most often. Whatever the published year or language. Therefore they are very much dependent on the collections of the library. The way they seek information is first searching the reference bibliographies listed in the books or journal articles. Or simply browsing in the library. Because the databases of the humanities are quite few and the years of coverage are not enough the humanists do not regard the information retrieval system as being useful. Realizing the information-seeking behavior of the humanists the librarians have to make some adjustments in acquisition allocation and user services. Librarians in Taiwan should do more extensive users studies so that they might provide more suitable services and collections to different users.

  13. A Practical and Reflexive Liberal-Humanist Approach to International Mindedness in International Schools: Case Studies from Malaysia and Brunei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamatea, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the response to cultural diversity and international mindedness at international schools in Malaysia and Brunei. It shows that the curriculum at these schools is set within a liberal-humanist framework, which some might suggest facilitates the project of "Westernization". It argues, however, that under the (local)…

  14. Interdisciplinary Team Training: Content and Methodology. Interdisciplinary Team Training and Humanistic Patient Care for Hospices. Monograph 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dottie C.; Grady, Kathleen A.

    This monograph, the fourth in a series of five, provides training information for hospice staff in improving interdisciplinary team functions and humanistic care provisions. Its purpose is to prepare a skilled team of trainers with information about hospices that is relevant to hospice interdisciplinary team training and to document experiences in…

  15. 38 CFR 21.9580 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.9580...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Counseling § 21.9580 Counseling. An individual may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during training. VA will apply the provisions of...

  16. 38 CFR 21.8100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.8100... Vietnam Veterans-Spina Bifida and Covered Birth Defects Counseling § 21.8100 Counseling. An eligible child requesting or receiving services and assistance under this subpart will receive professional counseling by VR...

  17. 28 CFR 550.43 - Drug counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug counseling. 550.43 Section 550.43... Drug Services (Urine Surveillance and Counseling for Sentenced Inmates in Contract CTCs) § 550.43 Drug counseling. (a) Drug counseling shall be provided to sentenced inmates in contract community treatment...

  18. 24 CFR 214.300 - Counseling services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling services. 214.300... HOUSING COUNSELING PROGRAM Program Administration § 214.300 Counseling services. (a) Basic requirements. (1) Agencies must provide counseling to current and potential homeowners and tenants to assist them...

  19. 38 CFR 21.6100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.6100... Recipients Counseling § 21.6100 Counseling. General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under this temporary program shall be provided professional counseling services by the Vocational...

  20. 38 CFR 21.7600 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.7600...) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the Selected Reserve Counseling § 21.7600 Counseling. A reservist may receive counseling from VA before beginning training and during...

  1. 34 CFR 686.32 - Counseling requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling requirements. 686.32 Section 686.32...) GRANT PROGRAM Administration of Grant Payments § 686.32 Counseling requirements. (a) Initial counseling. (1) An institution must ensure that initial counseling is conducted with each TEACH Grant recipient...

  2. 38 CFR 21.100 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 21.100... Counseling § 21.100 Counseling. (a) General. A veteran requesting or being furnished assistance under Chapter 31 shall be provided professional counseling services by Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (VR...

  3. The Help-Seeking in Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    This study examined help-seeking in career counseling by investigating factors that influence students' intention to consult a career counseling center. Nine hundred and eighteen participants were given the Attitudes toward Career Counseling Scale (ATCCS), an information brochure about the career counseling center; the Intention to Consult a…

  4. Companions: An Adjunct to Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Barry W.; Michaud, Patrick A.

    1971-01-01

    Undergraduates were trained to help the counseling staff by serving as models in demonstrating patterns of social behavior for clients, and as listeners to those having adjustment problems in college. (CJ)

  5. Between coaching and social counselling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Vrana

    2012-03-01

    The basic difference between coaching and social counselling lies in a different interpretation of the client' starting situation. Social counselling understands the client' starting situation as problematic and attempts to normalize it, while coaching understands it as normal and attempts to develop it. The key similarity of the two approaches is encour- agement of the clients' own initiative. Coaching needs to be investigated within the field of developmental conceptions, since its focus on results supports, unintentionally, the dominant developmental paradigm. Focusing on solutions in coaching is questionable also within an organization, where its interests may channel the course of clients' search for their own solutions. The counselling doctrine of coaching can gain valuable insights by a reassessment of the concepts of development and normality, a domain in which it is likely to encounter social counselling.

  6. Counselling Psychology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country's socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country's mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country's health care and education systems.

  7. Outplacement: The New Counseling Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branstead, Elizabeth; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes "Outplacement: The New Counseling Frontier" (Branstead); "Interview with Bob Ward"; "Ethics of Outplacement" (Axmith); "Outplacement--The View from Over Here" (Murray); "In-House Outplacement Programs for the 1990s and Beyond" (Benedict); "Government and Outplacement"…

  8. Preconception counseling for preventable risks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weerawadee Chandranipapongse; Gideon Koren

    2013-01-01

    .... She contracted chickenpox and endured unnecessary anxiety. This led me to think that it would be useful to have a summary of all the preconception counseling advice we should give to our patients to ensure the best pregnancy outcomes possible...

  9. Family Group Counseling for Alcoholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    kinsella, Samuel B.

    1970-01-01

    After personal involvement as a group leader with alcoholics under treatment and their families, the author stresses the need for this type of counseling to educate family on alcoholism and to help dispel their prejudices. (Author/CJ)

  10. Counselling Psychology in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country’s socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country’s mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country’s health care and education systems. PMID:27867261

  11. Genetic Counseling in Military Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    mother allegedly mistreated for preeclampsia at Tripler Army Medical Center could maintain an action for medical malpractice nothwithstanding Feres.1 2...perinatologists at most military hospitals perform genetic counseling. Due to their primary responsibilities fo management of high risk pregnancies

  12. HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD sponsors housing counseling agencies throughout the country that can provide advice on buying a home, renting, defaults, foreclosures, and credit issues. This...

  13. Counseling Services for Women in Marriage Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frischa Meivilona Yendi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marriage is a bond between the outer and inner man as a husband who has not aged 25 years and women 21 years old wife is not with the purpose of achieving happiness. Marriage and family counseling is a profession that will be developed in Indonesia. Counseling emphasizes on changes contained in the family system. Stages counseling, theory and dynamics as well as the use of counseling skills in marriage and family counseling has similarities with individual counseling and group counseling.

  14. 6 CFR 17.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  15. 10 CFR 5.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  16. 49 CFR 25.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  17. 29 CFR 36.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 36... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 36.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of...

  18. 22 CFR 146.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  19. 31 CFR 28.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 28.425 Section 28.425 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the....425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not...

  20. 38 CFR 23.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 23.425 Section 23.425 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Activities Prohibited § 23.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  1. 24 CFR 3.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 3.425 Section 3.425 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department... Activities Prohibited § 3.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  2. 7 CFR 15a.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Education Programs and Activities Prohibited § 15a.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of sex in the...

  3. 18 CFR 1317.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1317.425 Section 1317.425 Conservation of Power and Water Resources... Activities Prohibited § 1317.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  4. 14 CFR 1253.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1253.425 Section 1253.425 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... § 1253.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall...

  5. 22 CFR 229.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  6. 45 CFR 86.36 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.36 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  7. 13 CFR 113.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 113.425 Section 113.425 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS... Activities Prohibited § 113.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A...

  8. 10 CFR 1042.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials... on the Basis of Sex in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. (a) Counseling. A recipient shall not discriminate against any person on...

  9. Neuroanthropology: a humanistic science for the study of the culture-brain nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Duque, Juan F; Turner, Robert; Lewis, E Douglas; Egan, Gary

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we argue that a combined anthropology/neuroscience field of enquiry can make a significant and distinctive contribution to the study of the relationship between culture and the brain. This field, which can appropriately be termed as neuroanthropology, is conceived of as being complementary to and mutually informative with social and cultural neuroscience. We start by providing an introduction to the culture concept in anthropology. We then present a detailed characterization of neuroanthropology and its methods and how they relate to the anthropological understanding of culture. The field is described as a humanistic science, that is, a field of enquiry founded on the perceived epistemological and methodological interdependence of science and the humanities. We also provide examples that illustrate the proposed methodological model for neuroanthropology. We conclude with a discussion about specific contributions the field can make to the study of the culture-brain nexus.

  10. Between the West and Asia: "Humanistic" Japanese Family Planning in the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homei, Aya

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the formation of Japanese ventures in family planning deployed in various villages in Asia from the 1960s onward in the name of development aid. By critically examining how Asia became the priority area for Japan's international cooperation in family planning and by analyzing how the adjective "humanistic" was used to underscore the originality of Japan's family planning program overseas, the paper shows that visions of Japanese actors were directly informed by Japan's delicate position in Cold War geopolitics, between the imagined West represented by the United States and "underdeveloped" Asia, at a time when Japan was striving to (re-)establish its position in world politics and economics. Additionally, by highlighting subjectivities and intra-Asian networks centered on Japanese actors, the paper also aims to destabilize the current historiography on population control which has hitherto focused either on Western actors in the transnational population control movement or on non-Western "acceptors" subjected to the population control programs.

  11. Neuroanthropology: a humanistic science for the study of the culture–brain nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert; Lewis, E. Douglas; Egan, Gary

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we argue that a combined anthropology/neuroscience field of enquiry can make a significant and distinctive contribution to the study of the relationship between culture and the brain. This field, which can appropriately be termed as neuroanthropology, is conceived of as being complementary to and mutually informative with social and cultural neuroscience. We start by providing an introduction to the culture concept in anthropology. We then present a detailed characterization of neuroanthropology and its methods and how they relate to the anthropological understanding of culture. The field is described as a humanistic science, that is, a field of enquiry founded on the perceived epistemological and methodological interdependence of science and the humanities. We also provide examples that illustrate the proposed methodological model for neuroanthropology. We conclude with a discussion about specific contributions the field can make to the study of the culture–brain nexus. PMID:19654141

  12. Using the Benner intuitive-humanistic decision-making model in action: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Cynthia Ann

    2010-09-01

    Nurse educators make decisions that affect students in profound ways. This decision-making process may follow an intuitive-humanistic decision-making model. The author most connected with developing the intuitive model and the distinction between theoretical knowledge and experiential knowledge in the discipline of nursing is Patricia Benner (Thompson, 1999). Educators use intuition in forming judgments regarding educational planning. The educator may not be aware of subtleties that influence the decision but rely on a 'gut' instinct as they determine the appropriate action. Utilizing six key concepts identified by Dreyfus and Dreyfus (Benner and Tanner, 1987) this process utilizes what is known to the educator from previous situations to determine a course of action appropriate for the given situation. This paper describes a method one nursing educator used and identifies outcomes that could impact the career path for the student when determining if they were safe to continue in a practice based course. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. François Arago a 19th century French humanist and pioneer in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lequeux, James

    2016-01-01

    François Arago, the first to show in 1810 that the surface of the Sun and stars is made of incandescent gas and not solid or liquid, was a prominent physicist of the 19th century. He used his considerable influence to help Fresnel, Ampere and others develop their ideas and make themselves known. This book covers his personal contributions to physics, astronomy, geodesy and oceanography, which are far from negligible, but insufficiently known. Arago was also an important and influential political man who, for example, abolished slavery in the French colonies. One of the last humanists, he had a very broad culture and range of interests. In parallel to his biography, this title also covers the spectacular progresses of science at the time of Arago, especially in France: the birth of physical optics, electromagnetism and thermodynamics. Francois Arago’s life is a fascinating epic tale that reads as a novel.

  14. [The family living with Down syndrome patients in the perspective of Humanistic Theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Acaciane Frota; Caetano, Joselany Afio; Soares, Enedina; Rolim, Karla Maria Carneiro

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to socialize the process of coexistence of the family of the bearers of syndrome of Down based in the Humanistic Theory of Paterson and Zderad. The study was realized with a research of descriptive exploratory character, with a qualitative approach and participant observation. It was accomplished in APAE/ Sobral-CE, with the use of group dynamics and a guided interview for collection of data. The results showed us that the parents don't have difference between a normal son and a special one; the treatment is the same, with a lot of love, affection, understanding and respect, however a lot of times they find some difficulties in taking care, as the communication and the feeding. We also observed that the family is very important, necessary, so that the coexistence with the bearer becomes more and more natural in spite of a society that, a lot of times, still has prejudice.

  15. Postpartum adolescents' contraceptive counselling preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sober, Stephanie; Shea, Judy A; Shaber, Allison G; Whittaker, Paul G; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2017-04-01

    The optimal approach for provision and timing of postpartum contraceptive counselling for adolescents has not been established. To reduce repeat pregnancies from current USA levels of nearly 20%, a better understanding is needed of postpartum adolescent females' preferences regarding contraceptive counselling and delivery. Semi-structured interviews with 30 USA postpartum teens (97% Black) explored pregnancy prevention and contraceptive counselling. Transcripts were independently coded by two researchers and inter-rater reliability calculated using Kappa coefficients. With a standard content analysis approach, common themes were identified, coded and summarized. Findings indicated pregnancy prevention was important - two thirds of subjects reported becoming pregnant 'too soon', almost all did not desire another child for at least 6 years and most indicated that pregnancy prevention was either 'very' or 'extremely' important right now. The subjects described doctors and their prenatal clinic as their most accurate sources of contraception information, but stated that doctors and parents were the most helpful sources. All were comfortable discussing contraception with providers and had a desire for shared decision making. While many had received written materials, most preferred in-person contraceptive counselling. Optimally, participants suggested that contraceptive counselling would be provided by a physician, begin antepartum and almost all preferred to leave the hospital with their chosen method of contraception. Pregnancy prevention is important for postpartum adolescents as most desired to delay future childbearing. In-person contraceptive counselling should begin in the antepartum period and include provision of contraception prior to discharge.

  16. A school-based intervention for diabetes risk reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gary D; Linder, Barbara; Baranowski, Tom; Cooper, Dan M; Goldberg, Linn; Harrell, Joanne S; Kaufman, Francine; Marcus, Marsha D; Treviño, Roberto P; Hirst, Kathryn

    2010-07-29

    We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a multicomponent school-based intervention (21 schools) or assessment only (control, 21 schools). A total of 4603 students participated (mean [+/- SD] age, 11.3 [+/- 0.6 years; 54.2% Hispanic and 18.0% black; 52.7% girls). At the beginning of 6th grade and the end of 8th grade, students underwent measurements of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and fasting glucose and insulin levels. There was a decrease in the primary outcome--the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity--in both the intervention and control schools, with no significant difference between the school groups. The intervention schools had greater reductions in the secondary outcomes of BMI z score, percentage of students with waist circumference at or above the 90th percentile, fasting insulin levels (P=0.04 for all comparisons), and prevalence of obesity (P=0.05). Similar findings were observed among students who were at or above the 85th percentile for BMI at baseline. Less than 3% of the students who were screened had an adverse event; the proportions were nearly equivalent in the intervention and control schools. Our comprehensive school-based program did not result in greater decreases in the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity than those that occurred in control schools. However, the intervention did result in significantly greater reductions in various indexes of adiposity. These changes may reduce the risk of childhood-onset type 2 diabetes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00458029.)

  17. Counseling Young Children of Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Kathryn J.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a rationale for services to children of alcoholics and describes school-based interventions to help these children. Asserts that schools are the logical setting for providing knowledge, skills, and support to help children of alcoholics understand the dysfunctional effects of familial alcoholism. Offers suggestions for school counselors…

  18. Acupuncture, Counseling, and Usual care for Depression (ACUDep: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacPherson Hugh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence on the effect of acupuncture or counseling for depression is not conclusive yet is sufficient to warrant further research. Our aim is to conduct a full-scale RCT to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of acupuncture and counseling compared to usual care alone. We will explore the experiences and perspectives of patients and practitioners. Methods/Design Randomized controlled trial with three parallel arms: acupuncture plus usual care, counseling plus usual care, and usual care alone, in conjunction with a nested qualitative study using in-depth interviews with purposive samples of trial participants. Participants: Patients aged over 18 years diagnosed with depression or mood disorder by their GP and with a score of 20 or above on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. Randomization: Computer randomization by York Trials Unit to acupuncture, counseling, and usual care alone in proportions of 2:2:1, respectively, with secure allocation concealment. Interventions: Patients allocated to acupuncture and counseling groups receive the offer of up to 12 weekly sessions. Both interventions allow flexibility to address patient variation, yet are constrained within defined protocols. Acupuncture is based on traditional Chinese medicine and counseling is non-directive within the humanistic tradition. Outcome: The PHQ-9 is the primary outcome measure, collected at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Also measured is BDI-II, SF-36 Bodily pain subscale, and EQ-5D. Texted mood scores are collected weekly over the first 15 weeks. Health-related resource use is collected over 12 months. Analysis: The sample size target was for 640 participants, calculated for an effect size of 0.32 on the PHQ-9 when comparing acupuncture with counseling given 90% power, 5% significance, and 20% loss to follow-up. Analysis of covariance will be used on an intention-to-treat basis. Thematic analysis will be used for qualitative data. We will

  19. School-based violence prevention strategy: a pilot evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakore, Rachel V; Apfeld, Jordan C; Johnson, Ronald K; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Jahangir, A Alex; Sethi, Manish K

    2015-07-01

    Violence has recently been reported among a primarily young, minority population in Nashville, Tennessee. School-based programs have been proven as effective methods of reducing violent behavior, beliefs, and actions that lead to violence among adolescents. Investigators implemented a rigorous search for an appropriate school-based violence prevention program for Metropolitan Nashville middle school students utilizing a systematic review and discussion group with victims of violence. 27 programs nation-wide were reviewed and 2 discussion groups with African American males under the age of 25 admitted to a level 1 trauma center for assault-related injuries were conducted. Our findings led to a single, evidence-based conflict resolution program. In conjunction with educators, we evaluated the program's effectiveness in a pilot study in a Nashville middle school with high rates of violence. 122 students completed the conflict resolution program and described their behavior and experiences with violence in a pre-test/post-test self-rate questionnaire. Results showed a significant decrease in violent behavior and an increase in students' competencies to deal with violence (p less than 0.05). This study shows that a reduction in violent behavior and beliefs among middle school students can be achieved through the implementation of a targeted violence intervention program. A larger-scale intervention is needed to develop more conclusive evidence of effectiveness. © 2015 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  20. Standardized childhood fitness percentiles derived from school-based testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Aaron L; Bowser, John; White, Doug; Moberg, D Paul; Weaver, Brian; Hisgen, Jon; Eickhoff, Jens; Allen, David B

    2012-07-01

    To develop a statewide school-based program of measuring and reporting cardiovascular fitness levels in children, and to create age- and sex-specific cardiovascular fitness percentile-based distribution curves. A pilot study validated cardiovascular fitness assessment with Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER) testing as an accurate predictor of cardiovascular fitness measured by maximal oxygen consumption treadmill testing. Schools throughout the state were then recruited to perform PACER and body mass index (BMI) measurement and report de-identified data to a centralized database. Data on 20 631 individual students with a mean age 12.1 ± 2.0 years, BMI of 21.4 ± 5.1, and a cardiovascular fitness measured with PACER of 29.7 ± 18.2 laps (estimated maximal oxygen consumption of 36.5 mL/kg/min) were submitted for analysis. Standardized fitness percentiles were calculated for age and sex. This study demonstrates the feasibility of performing, reporting, and recording annual school-based assessments of cardiovascular fitness to develop standardized childhood fitness percentiles on the basis of age and sex. Such data can be useful in comparing populations and assessing initiatives that aim to improve childhood fitness. Because health consequences of obesity result from both adiposity and physical inactivity, supplementation of BMI measurement with tracking of cardiovascular fitness adds a valuable tool for large-scale health assessment. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  1. Practitioner Review: School-based interventions in child mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Frank W; Ohmann, Susanne; Popow, Christian

    2016-12-01

    School-based interventions (SBIs) are well-established and effective treatments for improving child mental health. Specific school-based topics include prevention (Tier I-III) and interventions (e.g. cognitive-behavioural programmes and daily report cards). We performed a systematic literature search in five commonly used online databases (ERIC, MEDLINE, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO and PSYNDEX) for English-language articles published between 1993 and 2015. Additional sources included reference lists of relevant articles and book chapters. We identified a number of successful behavioural or cognitive-behavioural programmes yielding moderate to strong effects for a range of emotional and behavioural problems. The implementation of these programmes and the collaboration of the involved settings (school and home) and persons are important factors for their effectiveness under real-life conditions. Effective SBIs are valuable tools for students with mental health problems if evidence-based cognitive-behavioural interventions are applied and rules of translational algorithms and implementation science are respected. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  2. School Based Vision Centers: striving to optimize learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Stacy Ayn; Johnson, Catherine; Majzoub, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    The successful delivery of comprehensive pediatric vision care after vision screening referral is a longstanding challenge that has significant implications for child wellness. In response to the many known obstacles that prevent the diagnosis and treatment of vision conditions, School-Based Vision Centers have been established in Framingham, MA and Boston, MA to provide easy access to comprehensive vision care following a failed vision screening. These on-site Vision Centers were developed to improve access to comprehensive vision care and treatment thereby correcting vision conditions that can adversely affect student academic achievement, athletic performance, and self-esteem. This paper highlights the collaboration between two public schools in Massachusetts and The New England Eye Institute and describes a multidisciplinary approach to comprehensive care delivery to high-risk pediatric populations in school-based settings. The ultimate goal of this model is to minimize visual barriers that may impede learning in order to maximize academic success and wellness. © 2011 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved

  3. A school-based post-Katrina therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Eliot E; Bauer, Daliah; Newman, Denise L; Kalka, Elaine; Lochman, John E; Silverman, Wendy K; Jensen, Peter S; Curry, John; Stark, Kevin; Wells, Karen C; Bannon, William M

    2015-05-01

    The current study presents the implementation of a set of school based interventions in a greater New Orleans school district one year following Hurricane Katrina. The interventions included adaptation and implementation of evidence based treatments in a crisis situation with at-risk youth which involved training and clinical challenges. 386 students found to have significant depressive and/or disruptive disorder symptoms received treatment from the School Therapeutic Enhancement Program (STEP). Further, a district-wide mental health needs assessment of middle and high school students (N = 11,861) screened for behavioral and emotional difficulties at the beginning and end of the school year provided a benchmark for community youth's emotional and behavioral distress. High-need intervention students demonstrated clinically significant lower levels of emotional and behavioral problems, depression and inattention in comparison to pre-treatment levels as indicated by multiple informants (i.e., self, parent, teacher). Self-reported distress levels were also lower than screening group students at post-test. These findings support the efficacy of a school-based intervention for youth struggling with the aftereffects of a highly disruptive natural disaster. Implications for utilizing a flexible adaptation of an evidence-based training model involving coaching and consultation are discussed.

  4. Effectiveness of School Based Recruitment Procedures and Modular Data Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Ahmed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The School Health Action, Planning and Evaluation System (SHAPES is a school-based data collection and knowledge exchange system designed to improve the health of youth. This paper outlines the design of the SHAPES study, examines the impact of different school recruitment models on participation rates, and examines the impact of using two different research modules during data collection on the prevalence of core behaviours being measured. Methods: In total, 76 schools were recruited from seven health regions and data were collected using the SHAPES Tobacco (TM and Physical Activity Modules (PAM. Results: It was found that school recruitment rates were higher when both the researchers and the health unit, worked together to recruit schools. Significant differences were found between students who completed the TM and students who completed the PAM with respect to body mass index, smoking susceptibility, the number of friends who smoke, and the number of active friends. Conclusions: This paper provides valuable real-world insight for future researchers interested in performing population-level school-based studies of youth risk behaviours. Our experience suggests that a modular approach to data collection is feasible and that recruitment rates are improved when researchers work in collaboration with health unit staff who have existing relationships with schools.

  5. A systematic review of school-based suicide prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Cara; Bolton, Shay-Lee; Katz, Laurence Y; Isaak, Corinne; Tilston-Jones, Toni; Sareen, Jitender

    2013-10-01

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among youth today. Schools are a cost-effective way to reach youth, yet there is no conclusive evidence regarding the most effective prevention strategy. We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on school-based suicide prevention programs. Studies were identified through MEDLINE and Scopus searches, using keywords such as "suicide, education, prevention and program evaluation." Additional studies were identified with a manual search of relevant reference lists. Individual studies were rated for level of evidence, and the programs were given a grade of recommendation. Five reviewers rated all studies independently and disagreements were resolved through discussion. Sixteen programs were identified. Few programs have been evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing suicide attempts. Most studies evaluated the programs' abilities to improve students' and school staffs' knowledge and attitudes toward suicide. Signs of Suicide and the Good Behavior Game were the only programs found to reduce suicide attempts. Several other programs were found to reduce suicidal ideation, improve general life skills, and change gatekeeper behaviors. There are few evidence-based, school-based suicide prevention programs, a combination of which may be effective. It would be useful to evaluate the effectiveness of general mental health promotion programs on the outcome of suicide. The grades assigned in this review are reflective of the available literature, demonstrating a lack of randomized controlled trials. Further evaluation of programs examining suicidal behavior outcomes in randomized controlled trials is warranted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. School-Based First Aid Training Programs: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveruzzi, Bianca; Buckley, Lisa; Sheehan, Mary

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the breadth of first aid training delivered to school students and the components that are age appropriate to adolescents. Eligible studies included school-based first aid interventions targeting students aged between 10 and 18 years. Online databases were searched, for peer-reviewed publications available as at August 2014. A total of 20 journal articles were relevant to the review. Research supported programs with longer durations (3 hours or more). Most programs taught resuscitation alone and few included content that was context-specific and relevant to the target group. The training experience of the facilitator did not appear to impact on student outcomes. Incorporating both practical and didactic components was found to be an important factor in delivering material and facilitating the retention of knowledge. Educational resources and facilitator training were found to be common features of effective programs. The review supports first aid in school curriculum and provides details of key components pertinent to design of school-based first aid programs. The findings suggest that first aid training may have benefits wider than the uptake and retention of knowledge and skills. There is a need for future research, particularly randomized controlled trials to aid in identifying best practice approaches. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  7. [Social counseling in outpatient cancer counseling centers : Offers and use by advice-seekers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jochen; Mehnert, Anja; Weis, Joachim; Faust, Tanja; Giesler, Jürgen M; Roick, Julia

    2016-11-01

    Outpatient psychosocial cancer care has gained importance in recent years and psychosocial counselling services (PCS) offer a broad spectrum of counselling interventions. Yet there is no published research on PCS legal counselling services. This study investigated the range of issues addressed by legal counselling and their relationship with characteristics of advice seekers and counsellors. We analyzed the records of 21 PCS funded by the German Cancer Aid (DKH) including 5203 advice seekers (80 % patients, 20 % others including friends and family; age ∅ 54 years; 24 % male) in 20,947 counselling sessions. We calculated descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression analyses (legal counselling: yes/no). Fifty-five percent of counselling seekers received legal counselling and 28 % approached the PCS exclusively for legal counselling. The proportion of people seeking legal advice ranged from 15 to 87 % between counselling centers. The most common topics during legal counselling were medical rehabilitation programs (57 %) and disability law (43 %). Counselling occurred in a single session in 68 % of cases and was mostly sought by older and unemployed persons with a recent diagnosis. Legal counselling made up 18 % of counselling time. Legal advice was mostly given by social workers (71 %). Legal counselling is a major part of psychosocial care services. Our results reveal large differences between counselling centers. Further research on quality of care and efficacy of legal counseling is needed.

  8. Teacher training by means of a school-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Richter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to explore how a school-based training model (SBTM could help to address the shortage of teachers. This model also allows, among other aspects, for poor and disadvantaged students to study while they gain experience. This article reports on the results of the SBTM implemented by a South African university, whereby student teachers are appointed at schools as assistant teachers. A mixed method study was preferred in order to explore the effectiveness of the model. The findings of the research indicate that the majority of teachers, lecturers, students and members of school managements involved were positive regarding the SBTM, and that the advantages of the model outweighed the challenges. It is therefore recommended that the model be implemented as an alternative teacher training programme for the special conditions prevailing in South Africa, as well as other countries that experience a teacher shortage.

  9. High impact of implementation on school-based smoking prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bast, Lotus Sofie; Due, Pernille; Bendtsen, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    prevention trial-the X:IT study. METHODS: A cluster-randomized trial testing is a multi-component intervention to prevent smoking among adolescents in 94 Danish elementary schools (51 intervention, 43 control schools). Participants were grade 7 pupils (mean age 12.5 years). Data was collected by electronic...... into account the complexity of the concept nor the intervention. The objective of the present study was to develop an overall quantitative measure of implementation fidelity, to examine the degree of implementation fidelity and the association of implementation and effect of a randomized school-based smoking...... questionnaires among pupils at baseline (n = 4161), the first follow-up (n = 3764), and the second follow-up (n = 3269) and among school coordinators at intervention schools at the first and second follow-up (50 and 39 coordinators). INTERVENTION: The intervention included three components: (1) smoke-free school...

  10. Adverse Childhood Experiences and School-Based Victimization and Perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Myriam; Gower, Amy L; McMorris, Barbara J; Borowsky, Iris W

    2017-01-01

    Retrospective studies using adult self-report data have demonstrated that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increase risk of violence perpetration and victimization. However, research examining the associations between adolescent reports of ACE and school violence involvement is sparse. The present study examines the relationship between adolescent reported ACE and multiple types of on-campus violence (bringing a weapon to campus, being threatened with a weapon, bullying, fighting, vandalism) for boys and girls as well as the risk of membership in victim, perpetrator, and victim-perpetrator groups. The analytic sample was comprised of ninth graders who participated in the 2013 Minnesota Student Survey ( n ~ 37,000). Multinomial logistic regression models calculated the risk of membership for victim only, perpetrator only, and victim-perpetrator subgroups, relative to no violence involvement, for students with ACE as compared with those with no ACE. Separate logistic regression models assessed the association between cumulative ACE and school-based violence, adjusting for age, ethnicity, family structure, poverty status, internalizing symptoms, and school district size. Nearly 30% of students were exposed to at least one ACE. Students with ACE represent 19% of no violence, 38% of victim only, 40% of perpetrator only, and 63% of victim-perpetrator groups. There was a strong, graded relationship between ACE and the probability of school-based victimization: physical bullying for boys but not girls, being threatened with a weapon, and theft or property destruction ( ps bullying and bringing a weapon to campus ( ps effects of cumulative ACE. We recommend that schools systematically screen for ACE, particularly among younger adolescents involved in victimization and perpetration, and develop the infrastructure to increase access to trauma-informed intervention services. Future research priorities and implications are discussed.

  11. [Effectiveness of a school-based program to prevent obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Solís, D; Díaz Martín, J J; Álvarez Caro, F; Suárez Tomás, I; Suárez Menéndez, E; Riaño Galán, I

    2015-07-01

    Intervention for childhood obesity is a public health priority. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an elementary school-based intervention against obesity in children. Non-randomised controlled trial was conducted on children from first to fifth grade from two public schools of Avilés (Spain). The intervention lasted for 2 school years comprising healthy diet workshops, educational chats, educational meetings, informative written material, and promotion of physical activities. Primary outcome measure was body mass index z-score. Secondary outcomes included: obesity and overweight prevalence, waist circumference, dietary habits, and physical activity. A total of 382 (177 girls, 205 boys) out of 526 pupils of both schools were included in the study. Complete anthropometric data were obtained in 340 of the 382 individuals. Compared to children in control group, those in intervention group decreased body mass index z-score from 1.14 to 1.02 (P=.017), and improved KIDMED score from 7.33 to 7.71 points (P=.045). The percentage of students who carried on an optimal diet increased from 42.6% to 52.3% (P=.021). There were no statistical differences in the prevalence of obesity and overweight, or in waist circumference between the intervention and control groups. This school-based program resulted in modest beneficial changes in body mass index and diet quality. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Ethics and medicine in Michel Foucault: the humanistic dimension of medicine derived from a genealogy of morality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Benjamim

    2005-01-01

    The article presents the results of a doctoral dissertation defended at the Universidad de Salamanca, based on Foucault's final decade of writings. If Foucault's goal in writing The History of Sexuality was to fashion a genealogy of ethics, my goal in analyzing this book, along with his other writings, is to demonstrate his last contribution to the history of medicine. He moves from a conception of power over others towards a conception of power over oneself, an exclusive terrain of ancient Greek morality. As a thinker who tries to understand today's problems by going to their roots, Foucault develops less a history than a philosophy of history. Considered an anti-humanist, he leaves us with a portrait of a wholly ethical-humanistic medicine.

  13. Counseling as an Art: The Creative Arts in Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladding, Samuel T.

    In this book counseling approaches with a variety of populations are examined using these creative arts: music; dance/movement; imagery; visual arts; literature; drama; and play and humor. It is noted that all of these arts are process-oriented, emotionally sensitive, socially directed, and awareness-focused. Chapter 1 discusses the history,…

  14. Getting the Most from Group Counseling in College Counseling Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcover, Jason A.; Dunton, Emily Carter; Gehlert, Kurt M.; Mitchell, Sharon L.

    2006-01-01

    Although group work is an often advocated treatment modality (Corey, 2000; Corey & Corey, 2002; Yalom, 1995), many college counseling centers are challenged with filling their groups each semester. Factors contributing to this difficulty include client resistance to participating in group treatment, staff reluctance to suggest group work as a…

  15. Continuum of Counseling Goals: A Framework for Differentiating Counseling Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Paul

    1984-01-01

    Presents counseling goals in a developmental continuum similar in concept to Maslow's hierarchy of needs. Discusses ego development goals, socialization goals, developmental goals, self-esteem goals, and self-realization goals and describes characteristics and implications of the continuum. (JAC)

  16. Counseling and Counseling Skills in the Industrial Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Anthony S.; Kaminski, William

    1981-01-01

    Describes new and challenging opportunities for counselors to apply their skills in an industrial setting, using the Smith Corona Laboratory as an example. Suggests the counselor role can include facilitative, developmental, crisis, and preventative counseling. Counselors can respond to the challenge for constructive cultivation of the work force.…

  17. Clinical, humanistic, and economic burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Canada: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang-Tan, Tam; Ismaila, Afisi; Zhang, Shiyuan; Zarotsky, Victoria; Bernauer, Mark

    2015-09-21

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic, irreversible disease and a leading cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. In Canada, COPD is the fourth leading cause of death. This systematic review was undertaken to update healthcare professionals and decision makers regarding the recent clinical, humanistic and economic burden evidence in Canada. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases to identify original research published January 2000 through December 2012 on the burden of COPD in Canada. Each search was conducted using controlled vocabulary and key words, with "COPD" as the main search concept and limited to Canadian studies, written in English and involving human subjects. Selected studies included randomized controlled trials, observational studies and systematic reviews/meta-analyses that reported healthcare resource utilization, quality of life and/or healthcare costs. Of the 972 articles identified through the literature searches, 70 studies were included in this review. These studies were determined to have an overall good quality based on the quality assessment. COPD patients were found to average 0-4 annual emergency department visits, 0.3-1.5 annual hospital visits, and 0.7-5 annual physician visits. Self-care management was found to lessen the overall risk of emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalization and unscheduled physician visits. Additionally, integrated care decreased the mean number of hospitalizations and telephone support reduced the number of annual physician visits. Overall, 60-68 % of COPD patients were found to be inactive and 60-72 % reported activity restriction. Pain was found to negatively correlate with physical activity while breathing difficulties resulted in an inability to leave home and reduced the ability to handle activities of daily living. Evidence indicated that treating COPD improved patients' overall quality of life. The average total cost per patient

  18. APPLICATION OF MODERN ICT TO SHAPE INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONAL REFLECTIVE AND HUMANISTIC TRAJECTORY OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE PUPIL OF SECONDARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mukiy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of ICT in everyday life gives opportunities for acquiring of quality integrated knowledge in different fields, remote data management, self-education that improves and simplifies the life of modern man on the one hand. And on the other it’s caused the appearance of new psychological problems of value-motivational, cognitive, psycho-physical areas of the child’s personality due to the lack of skills of large information flow filtering. The uncontrolled behavior and mind manipulation through reflexive inability to comprehend the meaning of information resources of inhumane nature exposes a child to danger. In some way it leads to a child’s dependence on the computer and the Internet. In solving of above mentioned problems crucial importance is gained by qualities of intellectual, reflective, spiritual and humanistic potential of pupil’s personality in particular – forming of reflexive-humanistic educational development trajectory of the child’s development. Urgent problem that becomes for teacher of Informatics is the humanization of the educational process through the implementation of educational, computer-based learning tools that will develop reflexivity and humanistic pupil’s potential. The article deals with the special aspects of formation of humanistic reflexive-educational trajectory of the pupil’s development during studying Informatics at secondary school, it presents the systematization of specified definitions’ components. Ways of using the modern information and communication technologies for comprehensive harmonious development of a child’s personality in the global informatization are substantiated and generalized

  19. Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Behavioral Counseling ...

  20. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Jan 19,2018 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  1. Ethical Decision Making in Counseling Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Karen S., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Elaborates issues surrounding ethical decision making in counseling and mental health professions. Articles covering implications for training, ethical counseling of adolescents and the elderly, and reviews of research on counselor ethics are included. (BH)

  2. Psychosocial counselling of identifiable sperm donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M.; Mochtar, M.H.; de Melker, A.A.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.; Gerrits, T.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What do identifiable sperm donors feel about psychosocial counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER: Identifiable sperm donors found it important that psychosocial counselling focused on emotional consequences and on rules and regulations and they expected to have access to psychosocial

  3. Knowledge and Acceptability of Long-Acting Reversible Contraception Among Adolescent Women Receiving School-Based Primary Care Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Andrea J; Ahrens, Kym R; Gilmore, Kelly; Cady, Janet; Haaland, Wren L; Amies Oelschlager, Anne-Marie; Prager, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    A key strategy to reduce unintended adolescent pregnancies is to expand access to long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods, including intrauterine devices and subdermal contraceptive implants. LARC services can be provided to adolescents in school-based health and other primary care settings, yet limited knowledge and negative attitudes about LARC methods may influence adolescents' utilization of these methods. This study aimed to evaluate correlates of knowledge and acceptability of LARC methods among adolescent women at a school-based health center (SBHC). In this cross-sectional study, female patients receiving care at 2 SBHCs in Seattle, Washington completed an electronic survey about sexual and reproductive health. Primary outcomes were (1) LARC knowledge as measured by percentage correct of 10 true-false questions and (2) LARC acceptability as measured by participants reporting either liking the idea of having an intrauterine device (IUD)/subdermal implant or currently using one. A total of 102 students diverse in race/ethnicity and socioeconomic backgrounds completed the survey (mean age 16.2 years, range 14.4-19.1 years). Approximately half reported a lifetime history of vaginal sex. Greater LARC knowledge was associated with white race (regression coefficient [coef] = 26.8; 95% CI 13.3-40.4; P Adolescent women in this SBHC setting had variable knowledge and acceptability of LARC. A history of vaginal intercourse was the strongest predictor of LARC acceptability. Our findings suggest a need for LARC counseling and education strategies, particularly for young women from diverse cultural backgrounds and those with less sexual experience. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. 36 CFR 1211.425 - Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling materials. 1211.425 Section 1211.425 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1211.425 Counseling and use of appraisal and counseling...

  5. Counseling Ethics Education Experience: An Interpretive Case Study of the First Year Master's Level Counseling Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Noor Syamilah

    2013-01-01

    Counseling ethics competency is an important part of counselor identity development as required by the counseling profession training standards, and counseling ethics education is one major component of knowledge acquisition in counseling profession. Counselor educators and counselor education training programs have a core responsibility to…

  6. Personal and Simulated Computer-Aided Counseling: Perceived versus Measured Counseling Outcomes for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Eileen; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined computer-aided counseling, using a simulated computer-aided model of cognitive counseling and clients' perceived outcomes. Results indicated a group that received counseling using computers viewed their experience as less effective than did a group counseled personally; however, no differences were found on outcome measures. (Author/BL)

  7. COUNSELING SERVICES BASED RESEARCH TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LEARNING THROUGH COUNSELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardimen Ardimen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of writing this article is to describe the subject of study and reason as well as research-based counseling service management. Counseling services based on research carried out to improve the quality of learning through counseling. The discussion of this article are (1 the background of the counseling service based research, (2 understanding the tasks and activities of counseling teacher or counselor, (3 reason for the existence of counseling in education, (4 the differences and similarities counseling services with research PTK-BK, (5 the motivations and goals of research-based counseling services, and (6 management of research-based counseling services. Among the benefits of this article is to (1 raise awareness counseling teacher or counselor about the importance of developing a counseling service that is integrated with the research, (2 develop a research culture for counseling teacher/ counselor, (3 encourage educational institutions both school/ madrasah/ pesantren for developing research-based counseling services, (4 encourage universities that provide education academic and professional counseling to develop research activities and community service through mentoring research-based counseling services.   Keywords: counseling services, research, quality of learning, PTK-BK.

  8. Neuropsychological Counseling in Hospital Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul C.

    1992-01-01

    Explores integration of counseling psychology and neuropsychology in hospital setting. Sees example of such interchange occurring in rehabilitation unit or hospital where psychologist has responsibilities for helping patients, families, and staff to understand implications of central nervous system dysfunction and to adapt to changes. Discusses…

  9. Counseling for Work and Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mary Sue

    2012-01-01

    Counseling for work and relationship is a social constructionist perspective, informed by feminist and social justice values, and responsive to radical changes in contemporary lives, that fosters a shift in vocational psychology from helping people develop careers to helping people construct lives through work and relationship. The first and major…

  10. Board Certification in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Susan L.; Lichtenberg, James W.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Although specialty board certification by the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) has been a valued standard for decades, the vast majority of counseling psychologists do not pursue board certification in the specialty. The present article provides a brief history of board certification in general and some historical information about…

  11. College Student Depression: Counseling Billy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, A. Keith

    2008-01-01

    A substantial portion of the college student population experiences affective disorders. This case study presents the conceptualization, course of treatment, and outcomes for a male college student presenting for counseling with depression. A review of Adlerian, cognitive-behavioral, and Gestalt techniques is provided. (Contains 1 figure.)

  12. Counseling Adolescents with Problem Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marecek, Jeanne

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the psychosocial context of unintended teenage pregnancies, including emotional and cognitive development during adolescence, family and peer relations, and norms for gender-appropriate sexual expression. The main goal in counseling is helping clients reach and implement an informed and fulled integrated decision about the pregnancy.…

  13. Using Meditation in Addiction Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark E.; DeLorenzi, Leigh de Armas; Cunningham, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Meditation has been studied as a way of reducing stress in counseling clients since the 1960s. Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and new wave behavior therapies incorporate meditation techniques in their programs. This article identifies meditation's curative factors and limitations when using meditation in addiction settings.

  14. Counseling According to don Juan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvino, Charles J.; Lee, James L.

    1975-01-01

    This article specifies a number of precepts put forth by don Juan, a Yaqui Indian sorcerer. It also outlines the consequences of each precept for counselors. The intent is to facilitate the emergence of a new reality for counseling and other helping professions. (Author/BW)

  15. Prenatal genetic counseling and consanguinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Angela; Springer, Stephanie; Langer, Martin; Blaicher, Wibke; Streubel, Berthold; Schmid, Maximilian

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of consanguineous patients at a Western European prenatal genetic counseling clinic and to describe demographic as well as health-related characteristics of this patient group. Retrospective analysis of 1964 primary consultations at the Prenatal Genetic Counseling Outpatient Clinic at the Medical University of Vienna General Hospital in Austria. Characteristics of consanguineous patients were compared with those of a control group of not-related unions. A total of 8.9% (174/1964) of all patients lived in a consanguineous union, meaning they were related as second cousin or closer [78.7% (137/174) first cousin, 14.4% (25/174) second cousin, 6.3% (11/174) first cousin once removed or 0.6% (1/174) uncle/niece]. Consanguineous patients were significantly younger (26.6 ± 5.4 vs 30.4 ± 6.5, p consanguinity (ICD Z84.3) in 31.6% (55/174) of cases. Estimations of the prevalence of consanguinity among the general population in Western Europe likely highly underestimate the evaluated prevalence among patients referred for prenatal genetic counseling. Counseling strategies need to take into consideration that consanguineous patients are more likely to be young and have an immigrant background. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Language Matters in Counselling Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Billy

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a personal view of some issues around therapeutic conversations involving difference and minority experience. Language, discourse and mother-tongue are explored from different theoretical standpoints and considered alongside concepts of difference, otherness and the unvoiced. Intercultural counselling offers a framework for…

  17. Brazilian adolescents' knowledge and beliefs about abortion methods: A school-based internet inquiry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Ellen; Heumann, Silke; Araujo, Ana; Adesse, Leila; Halpern, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    ...: We examined awareness of unwanted pregnancy, abortion behaviour, methods, and attitudes toward specific legal indications for abortion via a school-based internet survey among 378 adolescents aged...

  18. Lyman A. Brewer III (1907-1988): surgeon-scientist, inspirational teacher, and humanist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, R

    1998-12-01

    Dr. Lyman Augustus Brewer III, a distinguished, colorful thoracic surgeon and among the first to practice that specialty in the West, died on June 25, 1988, in Los Angeles, California, after a courageous battle with lymphoma. Dr. Brewer was a great humanist, innovative clinical surgeon, charismatic teacher, and surgical leader. In World War II, Lieutenant Colonel Brewer served in the Second Auxiliary Surgical Group in the Mediterranean and European theaters and helped define criteria that became the standard for the management of thoracic war injuries. Out of this experience he authored the classic paper, "The Wet Lung in War Casualties." Dr. Brewer's scientific contributions embraced the broad spectrum of thoracic surgical topics, including treatment of tuberculosis, classification of lung cancer, bronchial stump buttressing using the pericardial fat pad (Brewer fat pad), and management of esophageal perforation. Dr Brewer wrote seven books and more than 100 papers, and served as First Vice President of The American College of Surgeons and as President of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and The Pacific Coast Surgical Association.

  19. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, A.; Neri, L.; Aguglia, E.; Bellomo, A.; Bisogno, A.; Camerino, D.; Carpiniello, B.; Cassin, A.; Costa, G.; De Fazio, P.; Di Sciascio, G.; Favaretto, G.; Fraticelli, C.; Giannelli, R.; Leone, S.; Maniscalco, T.; Marchesi, C.; Mauri, M.; Mencacci, C.; Polselli, G.; Quartesan, R.; Risso, F.; Sciaretta, A.; Vaggi, M.; Vender, S.; Viora, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Methods. Participants (N = 1717) with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. Results. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP) 2010 US$ 4182–5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers' quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions. PMID:26557692

  20. Epidemiological, humanistic, and economic burden of illness of lower limb spasticity in adults: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alison Martin,1 Seye Abogunrin,1 Hannah Kurth,2 Jerome Dinet2 1Evidera, London, UK; 2Ipsen, Boulogne Billancourt Cedex, France Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological, humanistic, and economic burden of illness associated with adult lower limb spasticity (LLS and its complications. Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE identified 23 studies published between January 2002 and October 2012 that assessed the epidemiology, impact, and resource use associated with LLS. A hand-search of four neurology conferences identified abstracts published between 2010 and 2012. Results: LLS was found to occur in one third of adults after stroke, half to two thirds with multiple sclerosis, and three quarters with cerebral palsy. LLS limits mobility and reduces quality of life. No clear association was found between LLS and occurrence of pain, development of contractures, or risk of falls. Conclusion: The evidence on the burden of LLS and its complications is surprisingly limited given the condition's high prevalence among adults with common disorders, such as stroke. Further research is needed to clarify the impact of LLS, including the likelihood of thrombosis in spastic lower limbs. The dearth of high-quality evidence for LLS suggests a lack of awareness of, and interest in, the problem, and therefore, the unmet need among patients and their carers. Keywords: muscle spasticity, cost of illness, complications, quality of life

  1. Van bescheiden humanist tot vechtjas. Viglius van Aytta en de crisis van 1566-1567

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Postma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available From Modest Humanist to Argumentative Aggressor. Viglius van Aytta and the Crisis of 1566-1567In this essay I examine the dealings of the president of the Privy Council of the Netherlands, Viglius van Aytta (1507-1577 between the presentation of the Request of the Lower Nobility in April 1566 and the departure of Alva and his army from Italy a year later. Since Motley, Fruin and Bakhuizen van den Brink in the nineteenth century reinvented the Dutch Revolt, Viglius, in spite of his intellect and office, has not been held in high esteem. At best he was considered to be mediocre, and at worst a coward. The most recent verdict on Viglius was passed by H.G. Koenigsberger who referred to him in 2001 as ‘an intelligent if unimaginative lawyer from Friesland’. My essay is an attempt to refute this incorrect image. I do this by looking at the way Viglius handled the crisis of 1566-1567 in the first and the second town of the Netherlands, Brussels and Antwerp.

  2. Sardonic science? The resistance to more humanistic forms of science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, T. G. K.

    2010-09-01

    Resistance to more humanistic forms of science education is an endemic and persistent feature of university scientists as well as school science teachers. This article argues that science education researchers should pay more attention to its origins and to the subtleties of its stubborn influence. The paper explores some of the imperatives which dominate the continuing practices of teachers; the linkages between school and university science; and re-considers the relationships between learning science, learning to do science and learning about science. It draws on recent, prominent publications, as well as neglected and rather more contentious material, to underline the unhelpfully narrow view of science held by those who defend the traditional disciplinary influences of biology, chemistry and physics. Suggestions are made as to where those of a more radical and determined disposition should direct their attention in the interests of improved education, vital scientific progress as well as human survival. It is argued that university science must change in order to ensure that teachers better help their students to learn, do and appreciate science.

  3. Institutional Program of Training and Permanent Protagonism. Humanist Training from the Living-Sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Hernández Valderrama

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available At present, educational institutions of any academic level are immersed in a conglomeration of scientific-technological and socio-cultural phenomena, which surrounds them in an environment of doubts and dissatisfactions, for the effect the pedagogical work seems to have lost the compass that guides it to encounter with the interpersonal fullness. Therefore, from the Humanist Training area of the Universidad Politécnica of Puerto Cabello, the pedagogical reason of this program emerges. It involves the teaching experience and direct observation. It is framed in the qualitative paradigm under the novelty action-inquiry-reflection of a leading role type. This program serves the methodological process of investigating while training. The process of diagnosing, executing and evaluating constitutes an holistic dynamic of interpretation and triangulation of information, derived from participant observation and group discussion. By means of the exposition of thematic contents in days and sessions of joint work, it is tried among other aspects: the reflective-critical being of the teaching reality-pedagogy, to recover the readiness and teaching preparation to share with students, colleagues and other participants of the educational agenda, become aware of the human meaning of pedagogy and respect for the dignity that the student has, as a human being similar to the teacher himself.

  4. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fattori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Methods. Participants (N=1717 with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. Results. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p<0.01; SF-12 MCS: 59.4% versus 74.3%, p<0.01. The adjusted marginal overall productivity cost of workplace bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP 2010 US$ 4182–5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers’ quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions.

  5. A humanist's legacy in medical informatics: visions and accomplishments of Professor Jean-Raoul Scherrer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissbühler, A; Lovis, C; Spahni, S; Appel, R D; Ratib, O; Boyer, C; Hochstrasser, D F; Baud, R

    2002-01-01

    To report about the work of Prof. Jean-Raoul Scherrer, and show how his humanist vision, his medical skills and his scientific background have enabled and shaped the development of medical informatics over the last 30 years. Starting with the mainframe-based patient-centered hospital information system DIOGENE in the 70s, Prof. Scherrer developed, implemented and evolved innovative concepts of man-machine interfaces, distributed and federated environments, leading the way with information systems that obstinately focused on the support of care providers and patients. Through a rigorous design of terminologies and ontologies, the DIOGENE data would then serve as a basis for the development of clinical research, data mining, and lead to innovative natural language processing techniques. In parallel, Prof. Scherrer supported the development of medical image management, ranging from a distributed picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to molecular imaging of protein electrophoreses. Recognizing the need for improving the quality and trustworthiness of medical information on the Web, Prof. Scherrer created the Health-On-the-Net (HON) foundation. These achievements, made possible thanks to his visionary mind, deep humanism, creativity, generosity and determination, have made of Prof. Scherrer a true pioneer and leader of the human-centered, patient-oriented application of information technology for improving healthcare.

  6. Medical Teachers' Humanistic Perspective on Pedagogy: A New Starting Point for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jenny; Yates, Lyn; McColl, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the perspectives on pedagogy held by medical teachers in hospitals. The teachers were interviewed after they had been observed in both clinical and classroom settings. The study showed the teachers' reliance on the relational aspects of pedagogy more than on technical pedagogical knowledge. Teachers referred to their aims and approaches as "interactive," but this does not refer to any deliberate pedagogical design or acts. Asking questions was the technique used most commonly but not always skillfully, and they cited influences from the past rather than the present or the future. This research suggests the pedagogic approach of these medical teachers is "humanistic." It emphasizes personal and interpersonal factors, meaningful learning, and the affective, as well as cognitive aspects of clinical knowledge. It also captures a commitment to nonthreatening, nonhumiliating environments. Acknowledgment of this particular pedagogical perspective, it is argued, could better connect the health professional teachers with the education and development missions of universities, professional bodies, and governments. The teachers' expressed values and goals offer a new starting point for faculty development. Their reliance on the relational over the technical and on their own biographical experience, could be more respectfully valued and addressed to advance a more productive balance with the technical pedagogical elements that often concern educationalists, researchers, and administrators.

  7. Mathematics, commonness and integral pedagogy: offering trends from a humanist integral optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Elena Rodríguez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the educative institutions, numerous difficulties still are being perceived to teach Mathematics as it is circumscribed in a traditional pedagogy, th educative, cultural and social context is still being planned in an hegemonic way. Using a hermeneutical methodology in this qualitative research, offerer tendencies are given on the triad: Mathematics-daily life experiences-integral pedagogy, to provide a swerve to the teaching of science and to present it with an improved, active and liberating pedagogy; tending to change the perspective of the teaching of science. Among such tendencies we can find: the contribution to educate a honorable, supportive and humanist individual; the preparation on the intellectual, moral and spiritual levels; and authentic education, taking into account the scholar’s potentialities and an individual educated on mind, body and heart. To do so, the teacher must be skilled on history, philosophy, psychology, sociology, semiotics among other categories; and they must be ethical, critics on their own praxis, opened to the changes and innovations individuals.

  8. 24 CFR 206.41 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling. 206.41 Section 206.41... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.41 Counseling. (a) List... receive counseling. (b) Information to be provided. A counselor must discuss with the mortgagor: (1) The...

  9. Identifying Role Diffusion in School Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astramovich, Randall L.; Hoskins, Wendy J.; Gutierrez, Antonio P.; Bartlett, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    Role ambiguity in professional school counseling is an ongoing concern despite recent advances with comprehensive school counseling models. The study outlined in this article examined role diffusion as a possible factor contributing to ongoing role ambiguity in school counseling. Participants included 109 graduate students enrolled in a…

  10. 28 CFR 551.113 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counseling. 551.113 Section 551.113... Pretrial Inmates § 551.113 Counseling. (a) When consistent with institution security and good order, pretrial inmates may be allowed the opportunity to receive counseling services with convicted inmates. (b...

  11. Professional Counseling in Taiwan: Past to Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuh-Jen; Wang, Shu-Ching; Combs, Don C.; Lin, Yi-Chun; Johnson, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Because of the recent introduction of a licensure law, professional counseling has grown rapidly in Taiwan after decades of slow development. The authors provide a historical review of the development of professional counseling in Taiwan and discuss the current status and future trajectory of professional counseling in Taiwan.

  12. 20 CFR 638.517 - Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Counseling. 638.517 Section 638.517 Employees... THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Center Operations § 638.517 Counseling. The center operator shall establish and conduct an ongoing structured counseling program in accordance with procedures issued by the...

  13. Ethical Aspects of Spirituality in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Rheta LeAnne; Engels, Dennis; Thweatt, W. Tom, III

    2006-01-01

    The authors review the professional literature related to spirituality and ethics in counseling. The American Counseling Association's (1995, 2005) code of ethics was used as a basis for exploring the possibilities and limits/ boundaries appropriate for discussion of spirituality in counseling. Implications for practice and research are discussed.

  14. Counseling in Switzerland: Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roslyn; Henning, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    The authors review counseling in Switzerland and compare it with counseling in the United States. They evaluate the role of professional associations and programs and argue that the evolution of counseling is situated within the history and economic, social, and political systems of Switzerland. Findings suggest that Swiss counselors are ready to…

  15. Psychological counselling and indigenous African knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological counselling relates to basic humanity and universal values such as the regard for human dignity, healthy socialisation, and emotional health. Counselling individuals who experience emotional or relational problems is a function of the helping and health care professions. Effective counselling should provide ...

  16. Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Clinical and Counselling Psychology is concerned with the psychological, social, behavioural, medical, paediatric and ethical aspects of the applied field of clinical and counselling psychology. The journal publishes contributions of research, clinical, counselling and theoretical interest. Contributions ...

  17. Marriage Counselling in Multicultural Society, Nigerian Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses marriage counselling in Multicultural society: Nigerian experience. The researcher sees Multicultural Counselling as a helping relationship, which involves two or more persons with different culture, beliefs and environment. The paper discusses how multicultural counselling can be applied in marriage ...

  18. Globalization and Counseling: Professional Issues for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorelle, Sonya; Byrd, Rebekah; Crockett, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Scholars have examined globalization for many years in terms of its impact on individuals, but it remains a concept not often discussed in the counseling literature. As counseling transforms from a Western-based practice to a global phenomenon, it is important to understand professional counseling within an international and multicultural context.…

  19. Understanding Philosophical Counseling | Sivil | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    philosophical counseling by exploring its points of convergence to and deviation from its complimentary parts – philosophy and counseling. The practical and applied orientation of philosophical counseling seems worlds apart from what many consider to exemplify philosophy – theoretical, intellectual and abstract concern ...

  20. The Career Counseling with Underserved Populations Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Providing effective career counseling to culturally diverse individuals is not the same as helping those from majority cultures. The Career Counseling With Underserved Populations model aids career counselors in supporting underserved populations as they strive to address their important career counseling issues.

  1. Retain Valuable Employees with Career Adaptation Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Marcia P.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the goals of career adaptation counseling: to keep good people who may be dissatisfied; to make people who may have slipped more productive; and to save outplacement, recruitment, and training costs. Examines how counseling can help solve broad career issues, and how communication is crucial to the counseling process. (CT)

  2. Infusing Counseling Skills in Test Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Melanie E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Presents an instructional model based on Neurolinguistic Programming that links counseling student course work in measurement and test interpretation with counseling techniques and theory. A process incorporating Neurolinguistic Programming patterns is outlined for teaching graduate students the counseling skills helpful in test interpretation.…

  3. Values and Social Justice in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crethar, Hugh C.; Winterowd, Carrie L.

    2012-01-01

    The construct of social justice in counseling is defined and operationalized in this article. This is followed by a discussion about the intersection between social justice in counseling and philosophy, ethics, and spirituality. A call to action for counseling professionals is offered. (Contains 1 figure.)

  4. A Framework for Chaos Theory Career Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2010-01-01

    Theory in career development counselling provides a map that counsellors can use to understand and structure the career counselling process. It also provides a means to communicate this understanding and structuring to their clients as part of the counselling intervention. The chaos theory of careers draws attention to the complexity,…

  5. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Implications and Counseling Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David J.; Johnson, Norbert

    1983-01-01

    Presents special considerations in counseling fetal alcohol syndrome children and their mothers. Preventive counseling must begin before conception. Adequate education, counseling, testing, treatment, and followup of patients and their families is essential to reduce or eliminate problems associated with maternal alcohol abuse. (JAC)

  6. Counseling in a Mass-Mediated Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogle, Dale O.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some of the less visible media effects on counseling. Suggests the need for personal conversation in a mass-mediated culture, and examines the demand for professional counseling. Notes the effects of mass media on the counseling transaction. Discusses the relationships between media, loneliness, depression, and anxiety. (RC)

  7. Evolving Expectations for Personality Traits in Counselling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practising counselling psychologists are aware of the dynamics and stress that therapists experience; therefore, the effort expended on counselling psychologists in training that will succeed and be satisfied with their work is an important concern. Counselling professionals may increasingly recognize the role of personality ...

  8. Models of genetic counseling and their effects on multicultural genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Linwood J

    2002-06-01

    This theoretical paper examines challenges to multicultural genetic counseling, counseling between culturally different clients and counselors, in the context of Kessler's typology of models of genetic counseling (Kessler S (1997) J Genet Counsel 6:287-295). It is suggested that challenges such as resistance to multicultural genetic counseling education may be due to conceptions about genetic counseling as a biomedical field that transcends questions of culture as well as lack of multicultural training or prejudice. Directions for future research and recommendations for multicultural genetic counseling education are briefly explored.

  9. Biblical counselling regarding inner change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Campbell-Lane

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of inner change is not only the ultimate goal of counselling; it is also a central concept of the gospel. Biblical counselling entails a Scriptural understanding of the nature of change and aims at helping the counsellee change his/her inner life under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Change is the essence of the process of sanctification, entailing “putting off” (laying off sinful ways of life, renewing the mind, and ”putting on” (“clothing” oneself with godly ways of life (Eph. 4:22 ff.; Col. 3:8 ff.; Rom. 12:1-2. Although believers have a new identity in Christ, they still suffer from the effect of sin and have to grow in sanctification. Often the believer has not been instructed about changing previous irrational and unbiblical beliefs, behaviour, and habits, and he/she thus still integrates these negative results of sin into his/her new life. Unless old patterns are replaced with new ones, the counsellee can revert to sinful habits, unbiblical beliefs and behavioural patterns. A pastoral counsellor thus needs to teach the counsellee that God has made provision for him/her to change. A worldly anthropology-psychology is entirely opposed to the Biblical doctrines of sin and sanctification. Effective Biblical counselling depends on a Biblical anthropology and world view. A Biblical counsellor should promote holiness and a lifestyle in accordance with Biblical guidelines, thus shaping the counsellee to the likeness of Jesus Christ. When a Biblical counsellor ministers the Word of God in a life-transforming way, then God himself changes the counsellee from the inside out. A counsellor may not ignore sin and its effect as it will limit the effectiveness of counselling in facilitating lasting change in the life of a counsellee. It is important that a Biblical counseller understands the nature of change and is equipped with knowledge about, and the character of change.

  10. School-based secondary prevention programmes for preventing violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytton, J; DiGuiseppi, C; Gough, D; Taylor, R; Logan, S

    2006-07-19

    Early aggressive behaviour is a risk factor for later violence and criminal behaviour. Despite over 20 years of violence prevention interventions being delivered in the school setting, questions remain regarding the effectiveness of different interventions for children exhibiting aggressive behaviour. To examine the effect of school based violence prevention programmes for children identified as aggressive or at risk of being aggressive. We searched CENTRAL, Cochrane Injuries Group specialised register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, other specialised databases and reference lists of articles. We also contacted authors and organisations to identify any further studies. We included trials meeting the following criteria; 1) participants were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups; 2) outcome data were collected concurrently; 3) participants comprised children in mandatory education identified as exhibiting, or at risk of, aggressive behaviour; 4) interventions designed to reduce aggression, violence, bullying, conflict or anger; 5) school based interventions; 6) outcomes included aggressive behaviour, school and agency responses to acts of aggression, or violent injuries. Data were collected on design, participants, interventions, outcomes and indicators of study quality. Results of any intervention to no intervention were compared immediately post-intervention and at 12 months using meta-analysis where appropriate. Of 56 trials identified, none reported data on violent injuries. Aggressive behaviour was significantly reduced in intervention groups compared to no intervention groups immediately post intervention in 34 trials with data, (Standardised Mean Difference (SMD) = -0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.56 to -0.26). This effect was maintained in the seven studies reporting 12 month follow-up (SMD = -0.40, (95% CI -0.73 to -0.06)). School or agency disciplinary actions in response to aggressive behaviour were reduced in intervention groups for nine trials

  11. Storied experiences of school-based habitat restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Anne C.

    The purpose of this study has been to consider the eco-pedagogical promise of school-based habitat restoration. How does the practice of restoration foster a lived sense of being in a more-than-human world1 while inviting alternative approaches to teaching and learning? What opportunities does it offer to resist the societal forces and patterns, reinforced through the school system, which are eroding and effacing human relationships with other life? A literature review sets the broader context for an in-depth exploration of the experiences and understandings of participants (students, teachers, parents) involved in a case study. I proceeded with my research on the assumption that both the discursive and non-discursive dimensions of habitat restoration were key to appreciating its eco-pedagogical potential. Through participant observation over a ten month period, interviewing and a survey, I listened to some of the ways that habitat restoration challenged the typically disembodied, decontextualized organization of schooling by privileging hands-on involvement and encouraging attentive, caring relationships within the human and natural communities of which students were a part. I investigated particular storylines and metaphors which encoded and supported participants' endeavours, especially with regard to their potential to disrupt human-centered values and beliefs. This study suggests that the promise of habitat restoration lies in the openings created to attune to and interact with human and nonhuman others in fully embodied, locally situated and personally meaningful ways. Participants overwhelmingly attested to the importance of the experience of restoration which many deemed to be memorable and motivating and to provide fertile ground for future engagements in/for nature and society. As participants attended to the nuances and complexities of their interactions with a specific place and its inhabitants, their intimate involvement added a depth of feeling and

  12. Youth Voice in Nigerian School-based Management Committees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashiru Bako Umar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, School-Based Management Committees (SBMCs aim to provide an opportunity for all stakeholders, particularly the vulnerable groups in the school’s host communities such as young people and women to partake in school governance. Research on the experiences of youth voice in the committees is scant, however, as much of the existing literature on SBMCs focuses on program outcomes. Using qualitative research interviews, observations, and document analysis, this study addressed this gap by exploring how youth participate and express themselves in two SBMCs in Niger State, Nigeria. The findings, which were derived from 19 youth and adult participants, were drawn from SBMC members out of which 12 were youth between the ages 13 and 25, while 7 were adults aged 40 and above. The participants revealed that youth committee members expressed their voice in the committees through participating in a number of committee activities. Specifically, the youth participated in decision-making during meetings, aided in the construction of committee projects, undertook administrative/managerial functions and monitored the committee’s projects. They also participated in revenue generation, planning, school visits and supervision, advocacy, and sensitization campaigns.

  13. Data sharing to inform school-based asthma services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portwood, Sharon G; Nelson, Elissa B

    2013-12-01

    This article examines results and lessons learned from a collaborative project involving a large urban school district, its county health department, multiple community partners, and the local university to establish an effective system for data sharing to inform monitoring and evaluation of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) Asthma Education Program (AEP). Databases maintained by nurses, program staff, and school personnel were integrated into a single AEP Evaluation Database. There were a number of positive findings, including evidence that students with an elevated level of need received priority from AEP. A series of dependent group t tests analyzing changes across time in students' grade-point averages and absences, as well as their implications, also demonstrated some improvements. Additional outcome analyses for the 296 students who received case management services demonstrated further program benefits in the areas of attendance, academic performance, behavior, and quality of life. Enhancing the ability of school-based programs to merge data across project partners will facilitate efforts not only to evaluate services but also to demonstrate program impact on a wide variety of health and academic outcomes for students. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  14. Evaluating the Sustainability of School-Based Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Stephanie; Zirkle, Dorothy L; Barr, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    The United States is facing a surge in the number of school-based health centers (SBHCs) owing to their success in delivering positive health outcomes and increasing access to care. To preserve this success, experts have developed frameworks for creating sustainable SBHCs; however, little research has affirmed or added to these models. This research seeks to analyze elements of sustainability in a case study of three SBHCs in San Diego, California, with the purpose of creating a research-based framework of SBHC sustainability to supplement expertly derived models. Using a mixed methods study design, data were collected from interviews with SBHC stakeholders, observations in SBHCs, and SBHC budgets. A grounded theory qualitative analysis and a quantitative budget analysis were completed to develop a theoretical framework for the sustainability of SBHCs. Forty-one interviews were conducted, 6 hours of observations were completed, and 3 years of SBHC budgets were analyzed to identify care coordination, community buy-in, community awareness, and SBHC partner cooperation as key themes of sustainability promoting patient retention for sustainable billing and reimbursement levels. These findings highlight the unique ways in which SBHCs gain community buy-in and awareness by becoming trusted sources of comprehensive and coordinated care within communities and among vulnerable populations. Findings also support ideas from expert models of SBHC sustainability calling for well-defined and executed community partnerships and quality coordinated care in the procurement of sustainable SBHC funding.

  15. Telephone counselling for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Lindsay F; Hartmann-Boyce, Jamie; Perera, Rafael; Lancaster, Tim

    2013-08-12

    Telephone services can provide information and support for smokers. Counselling may be provided proactively or offered reactively to callers to smoking cessation helplines. To evaluate the effect of proactive and reactive telephone support via helplines and in other settings to help smokers quit. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register for studies of telephone counselling, using search terms including 'hotlines' or 'quitline' or 'helpline'. Date of the most recent search: May 2013. randomized or quasi-randomised controlled trials in which proactive or reactive telephone counselling to assist smoking cessation was offered to smokers or recent quitters. One author identified and data extracted trials, and a second author checked them. The main outcome measure was the risk ratio for abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up. We selected the strictest measure of abstinence, using biochemically validated rates where available. We considered participants lost to follow-up to be continuing smokers. Where trials had more than one arm with a less intensive intervention we used only the most similar intervention without the telephone component as the control group in the primary analysis. We assessed statistical heterogeneity amongst subgroups of clinically comparable studies using the I² statistic. We considered trials recruiting callers to quitlines separately from studies recruiting in other settings. Where appropriate, we pooled studies using a fixed-effect model. We used a meta-regression to investigate the effect of differences in planned number of calls, selection for motivation, and the nature of the control condition (self help only, minimal intervention, pharmacotherapy) in the group of studies recruiting in non-quitline settings. Seventy-seven trials met the inclusion criteria. Some trials were judged to be at risk of bias in some domains but overall we did not judge the results to be at high risk of bias. Among

  16. Systematic review of school-based interventions to prevent smoking for girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, M.J.J. de; Farmer, M.M.; Booth, M.; Motala, A.; Smith, A.; Sherman, S.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Shekelle, P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this review is to study the effect of school-based interventions on smoking prevention for girls. METHODS: We performed a systematic review of articles published since 1992 on school-based tobacco-control interventions in controlled trials for smoking prevention among

  17. School-Based Primary School Sexuality Education for Migrant Children in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenli; Su, Yufen

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, Beijing Normal University launched a programme of school-based sexuality education for migrant children in Xingzhi Primary School in Beijing. Over the past seven years, the project team has developed a school-based sexuality education curriculum using the "International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education" published by…

  18. Results of a Rural School-Based Peer-Led Intervention for Youth: Goals for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forneris, Tanya; Fries, Elizabeth; Meyer, Aleta; Buzzard, Marilyn; Uguy, Samy; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh; Lewis, Carol; Danish, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Background: School-based interventions are critical for enhancing the health of youth. The "Goals for Health (GFH)" school-based project was a goal-setting and life-skills intervention conducted in rural areas to increase self-efficacy, knowledge, and positive behaviors related to healthy eating. The intervention was peer-led with high…

  19. Comprehensive and Systematic School-Based Suicide Prevention Programs: A Checklist for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malley, Patrick B.; Kush, Francis

    1994-01-01

    Reviews literature germane to school-based suicide programs and identifies components that are descriptive of comprehensive and systematic school-based suicide programs. Uses literature review to devise checklist to enable school counselors to compare their programs with current views of prevention of teenage suicide. Checklist is appended and…

  20. Service Use by At-Risk Youths after School-Based Suicide Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Madelyn S.; Marrocco, Frank A.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Kleinman, Marjorie; Amakawa, Lia; Altschuler, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We sought to examine follow-up service use by students identified at risk for suicidal behavior in a school-based screening program and assess barriers to seeking services as perceived by youths and parents. Method: We conducted a longitudinal study of 317 at-risk youths identified by a school-based suicide screening in six high schools…

  1. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  2. A Concise History of School-Based Smoking Prevention Research: A Pendulum Effect Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Steve; Black, David S.; Rohrbach, Louise A.

    2010-01-01

    School-based cigarette smoking prevention was initiated shortly after the first Surgeon General's Report in 1964. This article highlights a sequence of events by which school-based tobacco use prevention research developed as a science, and illustrates a pendulum effect, with confidence in tobacco use prevention increasing and decreasing at…

  3. A mobile school-based HCT service – is it youth friendly?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-31

    Aug 31, 2016 ... to a health facility for further management. Testing at each school usually lasts a number of days, depending on the student numbers at the school, and the demand for HCT.1. Little has been published about this school-based model of HCT provision. A mobile school-based service in Uganda run by the.

  4. Voice Disorder Management Competencies: A Survey of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Amy F.; DeVeney, Shari L.; Friehe, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this survey was to determine the self-perceived competence levels in voice disorders of practicing school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and identify correlated variables. Method: Participants were 153 master's level, school-based SLPs with a Nebraska teaching certificate and/or licensure who completed a survey,…

  5. Improving The Quality of Education through School-Based Management: Learning from International Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grauwe, Anton

    2005-01-01

    School-based management is being increasingly advocated as a shortcut to more efficient management and quality improvement in education. Research, however, has been unable to prove conclusively such a linkage. Especially in developing countries, concerns remain about the possible detrimental impact of school-based management on school quality;…

  6. School Based Management: A Concept of Modest Entitivity with Modest Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Thomas D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of school-based management (SBM), often also called whole school reform. The paper is in four sections: (1) A description and discussion of what is meant by school-based management; (2) a review of the literature about its implementation; (3) a review of its effects on students; and (4) some general conclusions.…

  7. School-Based Management: Views from Public and Private Elementary School Principals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca-Tucker, Mary T.; Slate, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzed data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten to determine the extent to which school-based management was reported as having been implemented differently by public and private elementary school principals. Findings based on 866 principals show that public school principals have implemented school-based management to a…

  8. Integrating School-Based and Therapeutic Conflict Management Models at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Oosterlinck, Franky; Broekaert, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Explores the possibility of integrating school-based and therapeutic conflict management models, comparing two management models: a school-based conflict management program, "Teaching Students To Be Peacemakers"; and a therapeutic conflict management program, "Life Space Crisis Intervention." The paper concludes that integration might be possible…

  9. Leadership in School-Based Management: A Case Study in Selected Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Nico

    2006-01-01

    According to the literature on school-based management, there are two clear schools of thought on this issue. One school views school-based management as a positive and successful vehicle of school improvement. The other argues that it has been minimally successful in school improvement. The leadership role of the school principal is widely…

  10. Parent Interest in a School-Based, School Nurse-Led Weight Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lee, Jiwoo

    2014-01-01

    Because one in three children is already overweight or obese, school-based interventions targeting secondary obesity prevention merit consideration. This study assessed parent interest in participating in a school-based, school nurse-led weight management program for young school-aged children. A random sample of parents ("n" = 122) of…

  11. Integrated School-Based Teacher Education: From Apprenticeship to a Complex Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Steve; Ting, Hermia

    2017-01-01

    This article differentiates approaches to school-based teacher education. It contrasts the pervasive apprenticeship model, to a "naturally integrated" school-based teacher education program that we describe as a complex learning system. Rather than view teacher education as fragmented by separating educational theory (physically based on…

  12. Constructing the Ideal Muslim Sexual Subject: Problematics of School-Based Sex Education in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaie, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    School-based sex education is an underdeveloped and challenging issue to address in Iran. This paper provides insights into the main challenges in developing and implementing school-based sex education in Iran. Through an investigation of one Iranian boys' school that, in contrast to the majority of Iranian educational institutions, has an…

  13. School-based interventions on physical inactivity as a risk factor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School -based health education programmes are important in focussing on risk factors for chronic disease of lifestyle (CDL) among young people. The school as a setting can be used to assist learners to make informed decisions regarding health risk behaviours. In this article, research relating to school based interventions ...

  14. Discourses about School-Based Mathematics Teacher Education in Finland and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryve, Andreas; Hemmi, Kirsti; Borjesson, Mats

    2013-01-01

    In this cross-case study we focus on school-based teacher education in Sweden and Finland. Through the use of focus-group interviews with mathematics teacher educators in Finland and Sweden, the study shows that there are substantial differences in how school-based teacher education is introduced and portrayed in the discourse about teacher…

  15. Utilization of Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Ranbir M.; Cusson, Regina; White-Frese, Jesse; Walsh, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Background: We summarize utilization patterns for mental health services in school-based health centers. Methods: Administrative data on school-based health center visits in New Haven, Connecticut were examined for the 2007-2009 school years. Relative frequencies of mental health visits by age were calculated as a percentage of all visits and were…

  16. "Kickin' Asthma": School-Based Asthma Education in an Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of "Kickin' Asthma", a school-based asthma…

  17. An Initial Investigation of Sexual Minority Youth Involvement in School-Based Extracurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Russell B.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual minority youth are at risk for negative school-based experiences and poor academic outcomes. Yet, little is known about their experiences in positive school-based contexts. Using the "National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health" (1,214 sexual minority and 11,427 heterosexual participants), this study compared participation…

  18. [Communication skills for prenatal counselling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, J; Tschudin, S; Holzgreve, W; Tercanli, S

    2007-04-18

    Prenatal counselling is characterized by specific characteristics: A):The communication is about the values of the pregnant woman and her relationship with the child to be. B) The communication deals with patient's images and emotions. C) It is a communication about risks, numbers and statistics. D) Physician and patient deal with important ethical issues. In this specific setting of prenatal diagnosis and care physicians should therefore learn to apply basic principles of patient-centred communication with elements of non directive counselling, patient education and shared decision making. These elements are integrated into a process which comprises the following "steps": 1. Clarification of the patient's objectives and the obstetrician's mandate. 2. The providing of individualized information and education about prenatal tests and investigations. 3. Shared decision making regarding tests and investigations 4. Eventually Breaking (bad, ambivalent) news. 5. Caring for patients with an affected child.

  19. Preconception and prenatal genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Adonis S

    2017-07-01

    Identifying individuals at risk of having children affected by genetic conditions or congenital anomalies allows counselling that aims to inform reproductive decisions. This process takes place either at the preconception or early prenatal stage, although more options are available if risks are identified before the pregnancy. Preconception counselling covers issues that can affect the health of the mother and baby including folic acid supplementation. Carrier screening for autosomal recessive diseases, such as beta thalassaemia, has resulted in a significantly reduced incidence in many countries. National organisations, however, advocate more in-depth research before such screening recommendations apply to the general population. Recently, advances in genomic technologies have made it possible to greatly expand the scope of genetic screening, with the aim of providing more comprehensive information to prospective parents. This is a complex field, and research should focus on how the technology can be put to best use in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Using movies in pastoral counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelo, Florence

    2011-01-01

    This article uses a case study of a bereaved woman to illustrate the potential benefits of using movies as an adjunctive therapy in pastoral counseling. The article also references the literature on bibliotherapy and cinematherapy while summarizing relevant findings from studies for the use of movies in clinical practice. This article offers both suggestions and cautions for practitioners. At this time, research suggests that a considered therapeutic use of movies can be beneficial for personal growth.

  1. Subjectivity and professional vocational counselling

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Marina

    2004-01-01

    In this work, I shall deal with the psychodynamic approach to subjectivity in P.V.C. To this effect, I want to develop the concept of subject and subjectivity, its variation and historical-social construction and its approach in counselling, from a psychodynamic conceptual framework in P.V.C. with a short reference to the theoretical sources on which this approach is founded. Departamento de Psicología

  2. FEATURES OF STUDENT PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELLING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria Dorina Pasca

    2013-01-01

    ...), how (the problem can be solved). Some of the most important features that contribute to solving student problems are the counselor's deontology, trustworthiness and attitude that are to be relied on without impeding the client's personality traits. Thus, developing awareness of the features underlying student psychological counseling and acting accordingly is the real test for any professional in the field. Therefore, the real challenge is not being in the lion's den, but living with it.

  3. Cyber dating abuse among teens using school-based health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Rebecca N; McCauley, Heather L; Jones, Kelley A; Tancredi, Daniel J; Goldstein, Sandi; Blackburn, Samantha; Monasterio, Erica; James, Lisa; Silverman, Jay G; Miller, Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence of cyber dating abuse among youth aged 14 to 19 years seeking care at school-based health centers and associations with other forms of adolescent relationship abuse (ARA), sexual violence, and reproductive and sexual health indicators. A cross-sectional survey was conducted during the 2012-2013 school year (participant n = 1008). Associations between cyber dating abuse and study outcomes were assessed via logistic regression models for clustered survey data. Past 3-month cyber dating abuse was reported by 41.4% of this clinic-based sample. More female than male participants reported cyber dating abuse victimization (44.6% vs 31.0%). Compared with no exposure, low- ("a few times") and high-frequency ("once or twice a month" or more) cyber dating abuse were significantly associated with physical or sexual ARA (low: adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-4.4; high: aOR 5.4, 95% CI 4.0-7.5) and nonpartner sexual assault (low: aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.5; high: aOR 4.1, 95% CI 2.8-5.9). Analysis with female participants found an association between cyber dating abuse exposure and contraceptive nonuse (low: aOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7; high: aOR 4.1, 95% CI 2.0-8.4) and reproductive coercion (low: aOR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.2; high: aOR 5.7, 95% CI 2.8-11.6). Cyber dating abuse is common and associated with ARA and sexual assault in an adolescent clinic-based sample. The associations of cyber dating abuse with sexual behavior and pregnancy risk behaviors suggest a need to integrate ARA education and harm reduction counseling into sexual health assessments in clinical settings. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Characteristics of pediatric patients seen in medical school-based osteopathic manipulative medicine clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Gregg; Carreiro, Jane E

    2010-07-01

    Manual medicine--specifically osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT)--is commonly used in treating patients aged 18 years or younger. However, no published reports have described characteristics of this patient population or the conditions for which OMT is used with these patients. To better counsel parents, train physicians and other healthcare providers, and prioritize research, an improved understanding of the use of OMT in children is needed. To characterize pediatric patients and their conditions as seen in a medical school-based osteopathic manipulative medicine clinic. Retrospective analysis of administrative data on the use of OMT. Faculty osteopathic manipulative medicine specialty clinics associated with the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine. Data were analyzed from patients seen in the clinics from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2007, if they were younger than 19 years at their first visit during that period. Factors included in the data analysis were patient age at first visit, age at time of visit, number of visits during the study period, types of clinical diagnoses, and visits with nonmusculoskeletal diagnoses. A total of 407 patients generated 1500 clinic visits. Data showed a mean of 3.7 visits per patient (25th-75th percentiles = 2-5 visits) during the 1-year study period. The mean age at the first clinic visit was 7 years, 3 months, with the 25th-to-75th percentile being 1 year, 9 months, to 12 years, 3 months. Clinic visits by age group (ie, age at time of visit) as percentages of total visits were as follows: 0 to 11 months, 13.7%; 1 to 4 years, 33.3%; 5 to 12 years, 28.9%, older than 12 years, 24.2%. Diagnoses provided in visits covered a wide variety of common pediatric conditions. For the entire study population, 43.5% of visits included nonmusculoskeletal diagnoses. The percentages of visits with nonmusculoskeletal diagnoses for each age group were as follows: 0 to 11 months, 33.7%; 1 to 4 years, 64.0%; 5 to

  5. Teaching Genetic Counseling Skills: Incorporating a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum Model to Address Psychosocial Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugar, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Genetic counselors are trained health care professionals who effectively integrate both psychosocial counseling and information-giving into their practice. Preparing genetic counseling students for clinical practice is a challenging task, particularly when helping them develop effective and active counseling skills. Resistance to incorporating these skills may stem from decreased confidence, fear of causing harm or a lack of clarity of psycho-social goals. The author reflects on the personal challenges experienced in teaching genetic counselling students to work with psychological and social complexity, and proposes a Genetic Counseling Adaptation Continuum model and methodology to guide students in the use of advanced counseling skills.

  6. A school-based intervention to promote dietary change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prell, Hillevi C; Berg, M Christina; Jonsson, Lena M; Lissner, Lauren

    2005-06-01

    This study examined the effect of 2 school-based interventions on adolescents' consumption and knowledge of fish with the hypothesis that home economics education would enhance the effect of modifications in the school canteen. The school lunch intervention (SL) focused on changes in the school canteen, and the school lunch + home economics intervention (SL + HE) in addition consisted of changes in the home economics syllabus. Pupils in the 8th grade (n = 228) from 3 schools in Göteborg, Sweden, participated (control, n = 83; SL group, n = 58; SL + HE group, n = 87). A controlled design was used in which behavior and knowledge were assessed before and after the intervention. In contrast to much previous research of this type, measurement of behavior was based primarily on direct observation as opposed to self-reported intakes. Behavior (fish consumption) was measured individually by structured observations in the school canteen 5 times (once a week) when fish was served. Nutritional knowledge was measured by means of 10 items in a questionnaire. To analyze changes in behavior, a nonparametric statistical method assessing systematic change in paired ordered categoric variables was used. At follow-up evaluation, consumption had increased significantly in the SL + HE group, a change that also differed from the control group. In addition, significant positive changes in knowledge were observed in both intervention groups, but not in controls. The results suggest that dietary change was achieved by modifying conditions in the school canteen together with changing the home economics syllabus. This study shows the importance of the school in the promotion of dietary change among adolescents.

  7. Mobile healthcare services in school-based health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan

    2009-06-01

    In Taiwan, campus health problems are placing more and more pressure on school-based health centers (SBHCs). Moreover, SBHCs have insufficient resources to actively provide follow-up healthcare for students and faculty found to be overweight, chronically ill, or at high risk. In order to improve the quality of SBHC healthcare, a project was begun to enhance the efficiency of campus healthcare services by employing web-based and cell phone-based services. This project employed the Mobile Automated Medical Alert (MAMA) system, which was designed especially for campus health center use. Before implementing the MAMA system, a focus group of healthcare related staff identified areas in which SBHC healthcare services might be improved by the system and created a questionnaire to measure student and faculty response to the proposed services. Modifications to the MAMA design and service offerings were made based upon these questionnaire results. After the initial brainstorming session, the MAMA team created a survey instrument that was administered to students and faculty in order to understand their attitudes toward the proposed mobile healthcare services. Two hundred questionnaires were distributed to students and faculty at a private technical college in central Taiwan. Among the respondents, 100% had cellular phones and used short-text messages. Ninety-five percent of the student respondents and 85% of the faculty respondents agreed that mobile healthcare system would improve the quality of the health care their SBHC was currently providing. Based on these positive survey responses, the MAMA system was implemented. The current paper describes the process by which the MAMA team brainstormed proposed services and administered their survey. Survey results and the consequent changes to the MAMA system are discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for MAMA system use and a description is offered of the impact such systems might have on the future of college campus

  8. The Humanist Reception of St. Basil's Homily In Illud: Attende Tibi Ipsi In the XV–XVI cent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. ALIEVA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the humanist reception of St. Basil’s homily In illud: attende tibi ipsi up to 1532. In the XV cent., three new Latin translations were made in the circle of cardinal Bessarion: by Bessarion himself, by his protégé Athanasius Chalkeopulos, and by an anonymous author, probably Pietro Balbi. The translation of Franciscus Maturantius was published as a separate edition in 1522, and that of Rafaelle Maff ei appeared in the first Latin Opera of Basil in 1515. A review of these translations and of the dedicatory epistles shows that not only the humanistic program or theological views of Basil were of interest for the humanists. Attende tibi is valued as an example of biblical exegesis and because of its moral and ascetic content. Although, on the whole, reception centers in this period tend to distance from the Church, all our translators, except for one, are associated with the Roman Catholic Church. The comparison of the biblical «give heed to thyself» with the Delphic «know thyself», found in Maturantius’ dedicatory letter and in Maffei’s marginalia, aims at demonstrating the superiority of Christian wisdom, not at promoting the study of philosophy. Only two of the discussed translations were published, and a more or less large-scale dissemination of Basilius Latinus starts no earlier than in the 20s. of XVI cent., when the translation of Maff ei was reissued in Paris (1520 and 1523, Cologne (in 1523 and 1531 and Basel (1523.

  9. Nutritional counseling in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Benko, Borut

    2014-01-01

    I my thesis I present diabetes mellitus, nutritional counseling and the connection between the two. The teoretical part of my thesis describes the causes and types od diabetes, therapy and some possible complications of diabetes mellitus. I also present the importance of discipline and consistency in diabetes therapy; nutritional counseling and some of the practical theories used in nutritional counseling. I used case study method to describe and give meaning to the influence of healthy, b...

  10. OVERVIEW OF SCHOOL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELLING SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Donald A. Odeleye

    2017-01-01

    Education in the broadest sense is aimed at helping individuals become more productive members of the society. At the heart of the whole pedagogy is Guidance and Counselling, which has been positively correlated with effective learning outcomes. Primarily, School Guidance and Counselling services are geared towards helping students know themselves, the world around them and make optimal decisions for enhanced future for all. This paper presents guidance and counselling services provided in th...

  11. Criteria for standardising counselling for HIV testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Luzi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we outline basic health counselling skills, specifically, those for performing pre-test and post-test counselling for HIV infection. The ultimate goal is to propose that counselling be performed in facilities that carry out screening for anti-HIV antibodies, following standardised (and thus replicable criteria, with consistent focus on the quality of the relationship between the healthcare professional and the individual undergoing testing and on the individual's specific needs.

  12. Consumer credit counseling: credit card issuers' perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Furletti

    2003-01-01

    On Friday, May 23, 2003, the Payment Cards Center hosted a workshop led by collections managers from J.P. Morgan Chase and Juniper Bank. The managers provided the credit card issuers' perspective on the consumer credit counseling industry. The day's discussion complemented an earlier workshop at which representatives from local consumer credit counseling services (CCCS) discussed their business model. After describing the ways in which new market entrants have affected the counseling industry...

  13. Economic and Humanistic Burden of Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review of Large Sample Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Kovic, Bruno; Jin, Xuejing; He, Xiaoning; Wang, Mengxiao; Silvestre, Camila

    2016-11-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) consumes a significant amount of healthcare resources, and impairs the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients. Previous reviews have consistently found substantial variations in the costs of OA across studies and countries. The comparability between studies was poor and limited the detection of the true differences between these studies. To review large sample studies on measuring the economic and/or humanistic burden of OA published since May 2006. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE databases using comprehensive search strategies to identify studies reporting economic burden and HRQoL of OA. We included large sample studies if they had a sample size ≥1000 and measured the cost and/or HRQoL of OA. Reviewers worked independently and in duplicate, performing a cross-check between groups to verify agreement. Within- and between-group consolidation was performed to resolve discrepancies, with outstanding discrepancies being resolved by an arbitrator. The Kappa statistic was reported to assess the agreement between the reviewers. All costs were adjusted in their original currency to year 2015 using published inflation rates for the country where the study was conducted, and then converted to 2015 US dollars. A total of 651 articles were screened by title and abstract, 94 were reviewed in full text, and 28 were included in the final review. The Kappa value was 0.794. Twenty studies reported direct costs and nine reported indirect costs. The total annual average direct costs varied from US$1442 to US$21,335, both in USA. The annual average indirect costs ranged from US$238 to US$29,935. Twelve studies measured HRQoL using various instruments. The Short Form 12 version 2 scores ranged from 35.0 to 51.3 for the physical component, and from 43.5 to 55.0 for the mental component. Health utilities varied from 0.30 for severe OA to 0.77 for mild OA. Per-patient OA costs are considerable and a patient's quality of life remains poor. Variations in

  14. Water, soil and soccer: an experience of two years promoting humanistic competences and standardization of curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardello, Feliciana; Consoli, Simona; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Parraguirre, Sebastián; Pérez-Palazón, María J.; Pimentel, Rafael; Polo, María J.; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2015-04-01

    We present an experience of two years where a group of professors of University in Catania (Italy) and the University of Cordoba (Spain) created a practical case about hydrological planning in the context of similar subjects. The proposed work had to be solved and presented by teams of two students who competed following the philosophy of soccer leagues (national and champion). In the final match, the best teams of each country "played" and defended their work which was judged by an international committee of professors. The presentation and defense was carried out through videoconference so the fans in each country could support their teams. The winners in each country received a certificate of both Universities and the participation in the EGU Assembly 2014 and 2015 as coauthors of the present work. The objective of the practical case is the calculation of design peak flow for a rainfall quantile in a rural catchment following the Curve Number method developed by the Soil Conservation Service (1972.) This type of study implies different disciplines of Hydrology and Soil Sciences and the use of Geographic Information Systems and calculation and programming tools which is very useful to improve the students' technical skills. As for humanistic skills, an oral presentation in English allows improving their knowledge in foreign languages and to face a challenging experience which can be compared with an interview for a job. This teaching experience was very motivating for the students and the professors involved. The results of surveys done by the students indicated the improvement of the level of knowledge about hydrological engineering projects as well as the interest in managing water resources. This type of experience can be useful for other subjects or can integrate more teaching centres. REFERENCES: USDA Soil Conservation Service, 1972. National Engineering Handbook, Section 4, Hydrology. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 544. Acknowledment

  15. School-based sexual violence among female learners with mild intellectual disability in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phasha, Tlakale Nareadi; Nyokangi, Doris

    2012-03-01

    Following qualitative research methodology, this article presents school-based sexual violence experiences of female learners with mild intellectual disability. A total of 16 learners aged 16 to 24 years participated in the study. The findings revealed that learners with intellectual disability are not immune to school-based sexual violence. Modes of behavior that occurred frequently included touching, threats, and intimidation. School practices that reinforced school-based sexual violence are identified. The findings contradict common misconceptions that people with intellectual disability do not understand what is happening to them. The study recommends that school policies for sexual violence be intensified and learners receive developmentally appropriate sex education.

  16. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession.

  17. [Workplace Stress Counseling for Nurses: A Community Counseling Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Hsiang; Hsiao, Shiuan-Tzu

    2017-04-01

    Nurses play an integral role in providing medical services, with the quality of nursing care related closely to the level of success that these services achieve. Nursing is a high-stress occupation with a relatively high risk of work burnout, which has been associated with reduced workplace satisfaction, increased turnover, and reduced patient safety. In recent years, the high level of work-related stress in nursing has been an important issue for the government, academia, and industry. Although various plans and policies have been developed to improve the nursing environment in order to reduce stress, these have focused only on the general nursing-practice environment without substantive consideration of the impact of psychological, social, and cultural factors on nursing work stress. The present article introduces a community-counseling model and proposes a strategic plan that is designed to reduce the workplace stress of clinical nurses. We hope that the proposed model may substantially improve the problem of nursing stress and prevent work burnout. This model provides a reference for advanced nursing colleagues. Associated programs may be developed for other hospitals and organizations that use the community-counseling model.

  18. 15 CFR 0.735-38 - Availability for counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Availability for counseling. 0.735-38... AND CONDUCT Administration § 0.735-38 Availability for counseling. (a) The General Counsel of the... part; and (3) Coordinate the counseling services provided under this part and assure that counseling...

  19. General Counsel`s office FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, S.R.

    1994-09-01

    The General Counsel`s office provides legal counsel to all levels of WHC management; administers the intellectual property program; coordinates all WHC investigative activity and supports WHC activities to ensure compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, DOE directives, contractual provisions, and other requirements. In so doing, the Office of General Counsel supports the Hanford site mission of transforming the Hanford site into an environmentally attractive and economically sustainable community. This document briefs the FY95 site support plan.

  20. Primary school-based behavioural interventions for preventing caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anna M; O'Malley, Lucy A; Elison, Sarah N; Armstrong, Rosemary; Burnside, Girvan; Adair, Pauline; Dugdill, Lindsey; Pine, Cynthia

    2013-05-31

    Dental caries is one of the most common global childhood diseases and is, for the most part, entirely preventable. Good oral health is dependent on the establishment of the key behaviours of toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste and controlling sugar snacking. Primary schools provide a potential setting in which these behavioural interventions can support children to develop independent and habitual healthy behaviours. To assess the clinical effects of school-based interventions aimed at changing behaviour related to toothbrushing habits and the frequency of consumption of cariogenic food and drink in children (4 to 12 year olds) for caries prevention. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 18 October 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 4), MEDLINE via OVID (1948 to 18 October 2012), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 18 October 2012), CINAHL via EBSCO (1981 to 18 October 2012) and PsycINFO via OVID (1950 to 18 October 2012). Ongoing trials were searched for using Current Controlled Trials (to 18 October 2012) and ClinicalTrials.gov (to 18 October 2012). Conference proceedings were searched for using ZETOC (1993 to 18 October 2012) and Web of Science (1990 to 18 October 2012). We searched for thesis abstracts using the Proquest Dissertations and Theses database (1950 to 18 October 2012). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. Non-English language papers were included and translated in full by native speakers. Randomised controlled trials of behavioural interventions in primary schools (children aged 4 to 12 years at baseline) were selected. Included studies had to include behavioural interventions addressing both toothbrushing and consumption of cariogenic foods or drinks and have a primary school as a focus for delivery of the intervention. Two pairs of review authors independently extracted data related to methods