WorldWideScience

Sample records for school-based asthma clinic

  1. Cost-benefit analysis of childhood asthma management through school-based clinic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Teresa; Bame, Sherry I

    2011-04-01

    Asthma is a leading chronic illness among American children. School-based health clinics (SBHCs) reduced expensive ER visits and hospitalizations through better healthcare access and monitoring in select case studies. The purpose of this study was to examine the cost-benefit of SBHC programs in managing childhood asthma nationwide for reduction in medical costs of ER, hospital and outpatient physician care and savings in opportunity social costs of lowing absenteeism and work loss and of future earnings due to premature deaths. Eight public data sources were used to compare costs of delivering primary and preventive care for childhood asthma in the US via SBHC programs, including direct medical and indirect opportunity costs for children and their parents. The costs of nurse staffing for a nationwide SBHC program were estimated at $4.55 billion compared to the estimated medical savings of $1.69 billion, including ER, hospital, and outpatient care. In contrast, estimated total savings for opportunity costs of work loss and premature death were $23.13 billion. Medical savings alone would not offset the expense of implementing a SBHC program for prevention and monitoring childhood asthma. However, even modest estimates of reducing opportunity costs of parents' work loss would be far greater than the expense of this program. Although SBHC programs would not be expected to affect the increasing prevalence of childhood asthma, these programs would be designed to reduce the severity of asthma condition with ongoing monitoring, disease prevention and patient compliance.

  2. Effect of the School-Based Telemedicine Enhanced Asthma Management (SB-TEAM) Program on Asthma Morbidity: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halterman, Jill S; Fagnano, Maria; Tajon, Reynaldo S; Tremblay, Paul; Wang, Hongyue; Butz, Arlene; Perry, Tamara T; McConnochie, Kenneth M

    2018-03-05

    Poor adherence to recommended preventive asthma medications is common, leading to preventable morbidity. We developed the School-Based Telemedicine Enhanced Asthma Management (SB-TEAM) program to build on school-based supervised therapy programs by incorporating telemedicine at school to overcome barriers to preventive asthma care. To evaluate the effect of the SB-TEAM program on asthma morbidity among urban children with persistent asthma. In this randomized clinical trial, children with persistent asthma aged 3 to 10 years in the Rochester City School District in Rochester, New York, were stratified by preventive medication use at baseline and randomly assigned to the SB-TEAM program or enhanced usual care for 1 school year. Participants were enrolled at the beginning of the school year (2012-2016), and outcomes were assessed through the end of the school year. Data were analyzed between May 2017 and November 2017 using multivariable modified intention-to-treat analyses. Supervised administration of preventive asthma medication at school as well as 3 school-based telemedicine visits to ensure appropriate assessment, preventive medication prescription, and follow-up care. The school site component of the telemedicine visit was completed by telemedicine assistants, who obtained history and examination data. These data were stored in a secure virtual waiting room and then viewed by the primary care clinician, who completed the assessment and communicated with caregivers via videoconference or telephone. Preventive medication prescriptions were sent to pharmacies that deliver to schools for supervised daily administration. The primary outcome was the mean number of symptom-free days per 2 weeks, assessed by bimonthly blinded interviews. Of the 400 enrolled children, 247 (61.8%) were male and 230 (57.5%) were African American, and the mean (SD) age was 7.8 (1.7) years. Demographic characteristics and asthma severity in the 2 groups were similar at baseline. Among

  3. Roles of the State Asthma Program in Implementing Multicomponent, School-Based Asthma Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Laura L.; Wilce, Maureen A.; Gill, Sarah A.; Disler, Sheri L.; Collins, Pamela; Crawford, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a leading chronic childhood disease in the United States and a major contributor to school absenteeism. Evidence suggests that multicomponent, school-based asthma interventions are a strategic way to address asthma among school-aged children. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages the 36 health…

  4. Parents' asthma information needs and preferences for school-based asthma support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Aloola, Noha Abdullah; Nissen, Lisa; Alewairdhi, Huda Abdullaziz; Al Faryan, Nawaf; Saini, Bandana

    2017-11-01

    This study sought to investigate parents' needs and preferences for school-based asthma support in Saudi Arabian primary schools. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in the period between November 2015 and February 2016, with a convenience sample that comprised Saudi parents and carers of children with asthma. Recruitment of participants was primarily driven through Saudi primary schools; passive snowballing and social networks were used to boost participation rates further. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, translated and data were thematically organised using a latent content analysis approach. Twenty interviews were conducted. Six themes emerged from the interviews and were grouped into three major categories: (1) general asthma management issues; (2) school-based asthma management issues; and (3) communication dissatisfaction. Participants expressed concern at schools' social and physical environments and a lack of confidence in the ability of schools to manage their child's asthma, especially when their child was ill. Most of the participants advocated for staff training and school community engagement to improve the management of asthma in Saudi primary schools. This research clearly describes a need for school-based asthma support, including asthma-related policies, procedures and education on asthma and first aid in Saudi primary schools.

  5. Kickin' Asthma: school-based asthma education in an urban community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Patel, Bina; Davis, Adam; Edelstein, Joan; Tager, Ira B

    2008-12-01

    In urban communities with high prevalence of childhood asthma, school-based educational programs may be the most appropriate approach to deliver interventions to improve asthma morbidity and asthma-related outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the implementation of Kickin' Asthma, a school-based asthma curriculum designed by health educators and local students, which teaches asthma physiology and asthma self-management techniques to middle and high school students in Oakland, CA. Eligible students were identified through an in-class asthma case identification survey. Approximately 10-15 students identified as asthmatic were recruited for each series of the Kickin' Asthma intervention. The curriculum was delivered by an asthma nurse in a series of four 50-minute sessions. Students completed a baseline and a 3-month follow-up survey that compared symptom frequency, health care utilization, activity limitations, and medication use. Of the 8488 students surveyed during the first 3 years of the intervention (2003-2006), 15.4% (n = 1309) were identified as asthmatic; approximately 76% of eligible students (n = 990) from 15 middle schools and 3 high schools participated in the program. Comparison of baseline to follow-up data indicated that students experienced significantly fewer days with activity limitations and significantly fewer nights of sleep disturbance after participation in the intervention. For health care utilization, students reported significantly less frequent emergency department visits or hospitalizations between the baseline and follow-up surveys. A school-based asthma curriculum designed specifically for urban students has been shown to reduce symptoms, activity limitations, and health care utilization for intervention participants.

  6. Effectiveness of school-based family asthma educational programs in quality of life and asthma exacerbations in asthmatic children aged five to 18: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Helen; Sadeque-Iqbal, Fatema; Ulysse, Rose; Castillo, Doreen; Fitzpatrick, Aileen; Singleton, Joanne

    2016-11-01

    Asthma is a common, chronic, non-communicable respiratory disease that affects millions of children worldwide. Asthma exacerbations can range from mild to severe and can have an unfavorable impact on the quality of life of children and their caregivers. Asthma exacerbations often result in absenteeism from school or work, activity intolerance and emergency hospital visits. One strategy to address this health issue in an attempt to improve health outcomes is school-based asthma educational programs. A review of the literature revealed that previous systematic reviews have examined similar topics on the effectiveness of school-based asthma educational programs that have included collaborative efforts between parents and schools. No systematic reviews were found that examined the effectiveness of school-based asthma educational programs that exclusively included children and their caregivers. Research has not been systematically reviewed to determine the effectiveness of a school-based asthma educational program within a familial context. To identify the best available evidence on the effectiveness of school-based family asthma educational programs that exclusively included both children and caregivers on the quality of life and number of asthma exacerbations of children aged five to 18 years with a clinical diagnosis of asthma. Children aged five to 18 years of any gender, race or ethnicity with a clinical diagnosis of asthma and their caregivers. School-based family asthma educational programs. Randomized controlled trials. Quality of life and the number of asthma exacerbations measured by either missed days from school or work, and/or physical activity intolerance, and/or emergency hospital visits. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies from inception of the database to August 21, 2015. Quantitative papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity before inclusion in the review

  7. Clinical phenotypes of asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bel, Elisabeth H.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Asthma is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder and, over the years, many different clinical subtypes of asthma have been described. A precise definition of asthma phenotypes is now becoming more and more important, not only for a better understanding of pathophysiologic

  8. Enhancing school-based asthma education efforts using computer-based education for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Laura A; Kockritz, Jennifer L; Ludke, Robert L; Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2012-03-01

    Schools are an important site for delivery of asthma education programs. Computer-based educational programs are a critical component of asthma education programs and may be a particularly important education method in busy school environments. The objective of this brief report is to review and critique computer-based education efforts in schools. The results of our literature review indicated that school-based computer education efforts are related to improved knowledge about asthma and its management. In some studies, improvements in clinical outcomes also occur. Data collection programs need to be built into games that improve knowledge. Many projects do not appear to last for periods greater than 1 year and little information is available about cultural relevance of these programs. Educational games and other programs are effective methods of delivering knowledge about asthma management and control. Research about the long-term effects of this increased knowledge, in regard to behavior change, is needed. Additionally, developing sustainable projects, which are culturally relevant, is a goal for future research.

  9. Sustaining School-Based Asthma Interventions through Policy and Practice Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Laurie M.; Lachance, Laurie; Wilkin, Margaret; Clark, Noreen M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Schools are an ideal setting for implementation of asthma interventions for children; however, sustaining school-based programs can be challenging. This study illustrates policy and practice changes brought about through the Childhood Asthma Linkages in Missouri (CALM) program to sustain such programs. Methods: Researchers analyzed…

  10. The effectiveness of school-based family asthma educational programs on the quality of life and number of asthma exacerbations of children aged five to 18 years diagnosed with asthma: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Helen; Sadeque-Iqbal, Fatema; Ulysse, Rose; Castillo, Doreen; Fitzpatrick, Aileen; Singleton, Joanne

    2015-10-01

    children and their parents examined the effects of comprehensive school-based asthma education programs on symptoms, grades and school absences, and parents' asthma management practices. The interventions consisted of six components for children, their parents, classmates and school personnel. One of the six components included "Open Airways for Schools" disease management training for children, which also included handouts and homework for the parents. One of the five interventions for the parents included school fairs with asthma care questions and answers sessions to discuss the frequency and type of asthma symptoms of their children. Results of this study demonstrated that 24 months post intervention, children from the intervention groups had better disease management, which included improved control of daytime and nighttime symptoms, and reduced absences from school and work related to asthma exacerbations, compared to the children from the control group.In another study, Bruzzese et al. conducted a pilot RCT that included 24 families. Each family consisted of an asthmatic child and a caregiver. The study examined the effects of a two-month, school-based asthma education program. The interventions consisted of six interactive 75-minute group sessions for students, held once a week for six weeks, and five 90-minute group sessions for caregivers, held once a week. The student sessions were led by a developmental psychologist, and one of the lesson topics included prevention and management of asthma. The group sessions for caregivers were led by a clinical psychologist, and one of the lesson topics included asthma self-management of their children. The interventions resulted in positive short term changes in family relations and an overall improved health status for the children. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  11. Asthma medication adherence among urban teens: a qualitative analysis of barriers, facilitators and experiences with school-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaakman, Susan W; Cohen, Alyssa; Fagnano, Maria; Halterman, Jill S

    2014-06-01

    Teens with persistent asthma do not always receive daily preventive medications or do not take them as prescribed, despite established clinical guidelines. The purpose of this study was to understand urban teens' experiences with asthma management, preventive medication adherence and participation in a school-based intervention. Teens (12-15 years) with persistent asthma, and prescribed preventive medication, participated in a pilot study that included daily observed medication therapy at school and motivational interviewing. Semi-structured interviews occurred at final survey. Qualitative content analysis enabled data coding to identify themes. Themes were classified as "general asthma management" or "program-specific." For general management, routines were important, while hurrying interfered with taking medications. Forgetfulness was most commonly linked to medication nonadherence. Competing demands related to school preparedness and social priorities were barriers to medication use. Independence with medications was associated with several benefits (e.g. avoiding parental nagging and feeling responsible/mature). Program-specific experiences varied. Half of teens reported positive rapport with their school nurse, while a few felt that their nurse was dismissive. Unexpected benefits and barriers within the school structure included perceptions about leaving the classroom, the distance to the nurse's office, the necessity of hall passes and morning school routines. Importantly, many teens connected daily medication use with fewer asthma symptoms, incenting continued adherence. Teens with asthma benefit from adherence to preventive medications but encounter numerous barriers to proper use. Interventions to improve adherence must accommodate school demands and unique teen priorities. The school nurse's role as an ally may support teens' transition to medication independence.

  12. Clinical Features of Fatal Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Zuei Chen

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the clinical features of fatal asthma, we retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients who died of an acute asthma attack in our hospital during a 15-year period from 1989 to 2003. Twelve patients had fatal asthma during this period, including eight who were dead on arrival in the emergency room (ER and three who died within 1 hour of admission to the ER. Patients were categorized into three groups according to the clinical presentations during the fatal attack: (1 rapid (< 3 hours decompensation in four patients; (2 gradual development of respiratory failure over several days in two patients; and (3 acute deterioration after unstable asthma lasting several days in six patients. All patients in groups 1 and 2 had reported previous near-fatal attacks. The proportion of young patients was highest in group 3, with half of them (3/6 younger than 35 years of age. Only one patient in group 3 had had a previous near-fatal attack. Five of the seven patients, with previous near-fatal attacks, had a pattern of decompensation during their fatal attack that was similar to their previous attacks. In conclusion, nearly all patients with fatal asthma in this study died outside of the hospital or within 1 hour after admission to the ER. Patients had patterns of decompensation during the fatal attack that were similar to those of their previous attacks. Early detection of warning signs, early admission to the ER, adequate treatment, and extremely close observation of patients, especially within 1 hour after ER arrival, may prevent or decrease the incidence of fatal asthmatic attack.

  13. Development of the siriraj clinical asthma score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichyanond, Pakit; Veskitkul, Jittima; Rienmanee, Nuanphong; Pacharn, Punchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai; Visitsunthorn, Nualanong

    2013-09-01

    Acute asthmatic attack in children commonly occurs despite the introduction of effective controllers such as inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene modifiers. Treatment of acute asthmatic attack requires proper evaluation of attack severity and appropriate selection of medical therapy. In children, measurement of lung function is difficult during acute attack and thus clinical asthma scoring may aid physician in making further decision regarding treatment and admission. We enrolled 70 children with acute asthmatic attack with age range from 1 to 12 years (mean ± SD = 51.5 ± 31.8 months) into the study. Twelve selected asthma severity items were assessed by 2 independent observers prior to administration of salbutamol nebulization (up to 3 doses at 20 minutes interval). Decision for further therapy and admission was made by emergency department physician. Three different scoring systems were constructed from items with best validity. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of these scores were assessed. Inter-rater reliability was assessed for each score. Review of previous scoring systems was also conducted and reported. Three severity items had poor validity, i.e., cyanosis, depressed cerebral function, and I:E ratio (p > 0.05). Three items had poor inter-rater reliability, i.e., breath sound quality, air entry, and I:E ratio. These items were omitted and three new clinical scores were constructed from the remaining items. Clinical scoring system comprised retractions, dyspnea, O2 saturation, respiratory rate and wheezing (rangeof score 0-10) gave the best accuracy and inter-rater variability and were chosen for clinical use-Siriraj Clinical Asthma Score (SCAS). A Clinical Asthma Score that is simple, relatively easy to administer and with good validity and variability is essential for treatment of acute asthma in children. Several good candidate scores have been introduced in the past. We described the development of the Siriraj Clinical Asthma Score (SCAS) in

  14. Viral asthma: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Menendez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Roger Menendez1, Michael D Goldman21Allergy and Asthma Center of El Paso, El Paso, TX, USA; 2Pulmonary Division, UCLA Gaffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: The natural history of asthma appears to be driven primarily by the timing and duration of viral respiratory infections. From the very high rate of infections in childhood, to the more sporadic pattern seen in adults, the cycle of acute injury followed by an inefficient repair process helps explain the clinical patterns of asthma severity currently recognized by asthma guidelines. Why the asthmatic host responds to viral injury in a particular way is largely a mystery and the subject of intense investigation. The role of viruses in asthma extends not just to intermittent but to persistent disease, and to both the atopic as well as nonatopic phenotypes. Future therapeutic strategies should include primary prevention via the development of antiviral innate immunity-enhancing vaccines, as well as secondary prevention via the use of antiviral agents, or immunomodulators designed to boost the antiviral response or interrupt the proinflammatory cascade.Keywords: asthma, rhinoviruses, exacerbations, epidemiology, phenotypes, clinical trials

  15. Quality assurance of asthma clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Kerstin; Peszek, Iza; Al Botto; Lu, Susan; Enright, Paul L; Reiss, Theodore F

    2002-04-01

    Accuracy and repeatability of spirometry measurements are essential to obtain reliable efficacy data in randomized asthma clinical trials. We report our experience with a centralized spirometry quality assurance program that we implemented in our phase III asthma trials. Six asthma trials of 4 to 21 weeks in duration were conducted at 232 clinical centers in 31 countries. Approximately 23,100 prebronchodilator and 13,700 postbronchodilator spirometry tests were collected from 2523 adult and 336 pediatric asthmatic patients. The program used a standard spirometer (the Renaissance spirometry system) with maneuver quality messages and automated quality grading of the spirometry tests. Each clinical center transmitted spirometry data weekly to a central database, where uniform monitoring of data quality was performed and feedback was provided in weekly quality reports. Seventy-nine percent of all patients performed spirometry sessions with quality that either met or exceeded American Thoracic Society standards and improved over time. Good-quality spirometry was associated with (1) less severe asthma; (2) active treatment; (3) infrequent nocturnal awakenings; (4) age above 15 years; and (5) low body weight. Maneuver-induced bronchospasm was rare. Good-quality spirometry was observed in multicenter asthma clinical trials that employed a standard spirometer and continuous monitoring. Both within- and between-patient variability decreased. Spirometry quality improved with time as study participants and technicians gained experience.

  16. Can a school-based hand hygiene program reduce asthma exacerbations among elementary school children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Joe K.; Zhang, Bin; McClure, Leslie A.; Bailey, William C.; Harrington, Kathy F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Viral upper respiratory infections have been implicated as a major cause of asthma exacerbations among school age children. Regular hand washing is the most effective method to prevent the spread of viral respiratory infections but, effective hand washing practices are difficult to establish in schools. Objectives This randomized controlled trial evaluated whether a standardized regimen of hand washing plus alcohol-based hand sanitizer could reduce asthma exacerbations more than schools’ usual hand hygiene practices. Methods This was a two year, community-based, randomized controlled crossover trial. Schools were randomized to usual care then intervention (Sequence 1) or intervention then usual care (Sequence 2). Intervention schools were provided with alcohol-based hand sanitizer, hand soap, and hand hygiene education. The primary outcome was the proportion of students experiencing an asthma exacerbation each month. Generalized estimating equations were used to model the difference in the marginal rate of exacerbations between sequences while controlling for individual demographic factors and the correlation within each student and between students within each school. Results 527 students with asthma were enrolled among 31 schools. The hand hygiene intervention did not reduce the number of asthma exacerbations as compared to the schools’ usual hand hygiene practices (p=0.132). There was a strong temporal trend as both sequences experienced fewer exacerbations during Year 2 as compared to Year 1 (phand hygiene behaviors and resources in usual care schools. Therefore, these results should be viewed cautiously. PMID:23069487

  17. Relaxation and Guided Imagery: A School-Based Intervention for Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Heather L.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    This investigation analyzed the effect of relaxation and guided imagery on lung function and anxiety by employing a multiple baseline design across four middle school students with asthma. With the introduction of the intervention, it was found that lung function improved and anxiety decreased in all students. (Contains 63 references, 1 table, and…

  18. Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Asthma Asthma: NIH-Sponsored Research and Clinical Trials Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents NIH-Sponsored Research Asthma in the Inner City: Recognizing that asthma severity ...

  19. Comparison of clinically diagnosed asthma with parental assessment of children's asthma in a questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hederos, C.A.; Hasselgren, M.; Hedlin, G.

    2007-01-01

    with the corresponding medical records in the same region. An International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC)-based WQ was answered by 75% of the parents of 6295 children aged 1-6 yr. Clinically diagnosed asthma, recorded in connection with admissions to the hospital or a visit to any of the outpatient......Epidemiological evaluations of the prevalence of asthma are usually based on written questionnaires (WQs) in combination with validation by clinical investigation. In the present investigation, we compared parental assessment of asthma among their preschool children in response to a WQ...... clinics in the same region, were analysed in parallel. Finally, a complementary WQ was sent to the parents of children identified as asthmatic by either or both of this approaches. In response to the WQ 5.9% were claimed to suffer from asthma diagnosed by a doctor. According to the medical records...

  20. The Varied Circumstances Prompting Requests for Emergency Contraception at School-Based Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebottom, Abbey; Harrison, Patricia A.; Amidon, Donna; Finnegan, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the circumstances that prompt teenagers to request emergency contraception (EC). This evaluation was designed to refine the EC clinical protocol and improve pregnancy prevention efforts in high school-based clinics by analyzing information on EC use and subsequent contraception use of EC patients. Methods: Sites…

  1. Pharmacists' interventions on clinical asthma outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Cardenas, Victoria; Armour, Carol; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Martinez-Martinez, Fernando; Rotta, Inajara; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the impact of pharmacists' interventions on clinical asthma outcomes on adult patients and to identify the outcome indicators used.PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Scielo were searched. Studies addressing pharmacists' interventions on adult asthma patients reporting clinical asthma outcomes were incorporated.11 clinical outcomes were identified in 21 studies. 10 studies measured the impact of the intervention on asthma control. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and non-RCTs found positive results in percentages of controlled patients and Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) scores. Discordant results were found for Asthma Control Test results. Asthma severity was assessed in four studies. One RCT found a significant decrease in the percentage of severe patients; two non-RCTs found significant improvements in severity scores. 11 studies reported pulmonary function indicators, showing inconsistent results. Eight studies measured asthma symptoms; three RCTs and four non-RCTs showed significant improvements.RCTs and non-RCTs generated similar results for most outcomes. Based on the evidence generated by RCTs, pharmacists' have a positive impact on the percentage of controlled patients, ACQ scores, severity and symptoms. Future research should report using the core outcome set of indicators established for asthma (PROSPERO CRD42014007019). Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  2. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions:  Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  3. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim: Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... half the daily dose with no increased risk of systemic effects. Clinical studies of adults with asthma have shown a greater effect of ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, on quality of life, small airway patency, and markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation, but no difference...... with regard to conventional clinical indices of lung function and asthma control. Conclusions: Asthma patients treated with ultrafine ICS, compared with non-ultrafine ICS, have at least similar chance of achieving asthma control at a lower daily dose. Further clinical studies are needed to explore whether...

  4. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 55. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  5. Clinical and inflammatory markers in asthma and COPD phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Nijs, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the studies described in this thesis, we conclude that adult-onset respiratory diseases (asthma and COPD) are heterogeneous conditions characterized by different clinical features and inflammatory characteristics. The first part of the thesis focused on phenotypes of adult-onset asthma. We

  6. The Asthma Control Questionnaire as a clinical trial endpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnes, P J; Casale, T B; Dahl, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    these component endpoints; however, there is no consensus on the optimal instrument for use in clinical trials. The Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) has been shown to be a valid, reliable instrument that allows accurate and reproducible assessment of asthma control that compares favourably with other commonly...

  7. Adaptation of an asthma management program to a small clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Kenny Yat-Choi; Redjal, Nasser; Scott, Lyne; Li, Marilyn; Thobani, Salima; Yang, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Asthma management programs, such as the Breathmobile program, have been extremely effective in reducing asthma morbidity and increasing disease control; however, their high start-up costs may preclude their implementation in smaller health systems. In this study, we extended validated asthma disease management principles from the Breathmobile program to a smaller clinic system utilizing existing resources and compared clinical outcomes. Cox-regression analyses were conducted to determine the cumulative probability that a new patient entering the program would achieve improved clinical control of asthma with each subsequent visit to the program. A weekly asthma disease management clinic was initiated in an existing multi-specialty pediatric clinic in collaboration with the Breathmobile program. Existing nursing staff was utilized in conjunction with an asthma specialist provider. Patients were referred from a regional healthcare maintenance organization and patients were evaluated and treated every 2 months. Reduction in emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations, and improvements in asthma control were assessed at the end of 1 year. A total of 116 patients were enrolled over a period of 1 year. Mean patient age was 6.4 years at the time of their first visit. Patient ethnicity was self-described predominantly as Hispanic or African American. Initial asthma severity for most patients, classified in accordance with national guidelines, was "moderate persistent." After 1 year of enrollment, there was a 69% and 92% reduction in ED/urgent care visits and hospitalizations, respectively, compared with the year before enrollment. Up to 70% of patients achieved asthma control by the third visit. Thirty-six different patients were seen during 1 year for a total of $15,938.70 in contracted reimbursements. A large-scale successful asthma management program can be adapted to a stationary clinic system and achieve comparable results.

  8. School-Based Health Clinics: An Analysis of the Johns Hopkins Study. Research Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demsko, Tobin W.

    School-based health clinics, adolescent pregnancy prevention programs offering comprehensive health services, represent the latest initiative to reduce the incidence of teenage pregnancy. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University designed and administered a pregnancy prevention program which offered sexuality education and family planning services…

  9. Learning from Successful School-based Vaccination Clinics during 2009 pH1N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar; O'Connell, Katherine; Stoto, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The 2009 H1N1 vaccination campaign was the largest in US history. State health departments received vaccines from the federal government and sent them to local health departments (LHDs) who were responsible for getting vaccines to the public. Many LHD's used school-based clinics to ensure children were the first to receive limited…

  10. Support for Offering Sexual Health Services through School-Based Health Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michele Johnson; Barr, Elissa; Wilson, Kristina; Griner, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies document support for sexuality education in the schools. However, there is a dearth of research assessing support for sexual health services offered through school-based health clinics (SBHCs). The purpose of this study was to assess voter support for offering 3 sexual health services (STI/HIV testing, STI/HIV…

  11. Association of School-Based Influenza Vaccination Clinics and School Absenteeism--Arkansas, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquelais, Rachel E.; Safi, Haytham; Butler, Sandra; Smith, Nathaniel; Haselow, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of seasonal viral respiratory illness among school-aged children. Accordingly, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) coordinates >800 school-based influenza immunization clinics before each influenza season. We quantified the relationship between student influenza vaccination in Arkansas public schools…

  12. Dental Services Satisfaction and Perceived Quality in a School-Based Clinic in Cartagena, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Lora-Salgado, Irene Margarita; Tirado-Amador, Lesbia Rosa; Montoya-Mendoza, Jorge Luis; Simancas-Pallares, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to describe the level of quality and perception of satisfaction in attended users from a school-based dental clinic in Cartagena, Colombia. Methods: we performed a cross-sectional study in 277 patients. For data collection we applied a structured and self-administered survey asking for demographic, clinic attention topics and specific questions regarding quality and services satisfaction. Data analysis was performed through descriptive statistics with frequencies, proportions and 9...

  13. Evaluation of a pharmacist-managed asthma clinic in an Indian Health Service clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Ryan G; Nye, Shane

    2016-01-01

    To observe whether American Indian and Alaskan Native (AI/AN) patients at the Yakama Indian Health Service seen at the pharmacist-managed asthma clinic improved asthma outcomes. Retrospective chart review, single group, preintervention and postintervention. Pharmacist-managed asthma clinic at an Indian Health Service ambulatory care clinic. Sixty-one AI/AN patients who were seen at least once in the asthma clinic from 2010 to 2014. Pharmacist-provided asthma education and medication management. Asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department or urgent care (ED) visits. The total number of asthma-related hospitalizations and ED visits between the 12-month periods preceding and following the initial asthma clinic visit were 11 versus 2 hospitalizations (P = 0.02) and 43 versus 25 ED visits (P = 0.02), respectively. Over the same period, asthma-related oral corticosteroid use showed a nonsignificant decrease in the number of prescriptions filled (n = 59, P = 0.08). In contrast, inhaled corticosteroid prescription fills significantly increased (n = 42, P = 0.01). A reduction of asthma-related hospitalizations and ED visits were observed during the course of the intervention. Increased access to formal asthma education and appropriate asthma care benefit the Yakama AI/AN people. A controlled trial is needed to confirm that the intervention causes the intended effect. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. [Clinical pathway for management of patients with acute asthma attack].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Naoto; Katada, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Kojima, Makiko; Nakajima, Yumi; Shibano, Miyo; Tomita, Hitomi; Yamanaka, Takao; Harada, Yoshinori; Ishii, Taeko; Saeki, Yukihiko

    2008-11-01

    There have been few reports of clinical pathway (CP) for treatment of asthma attack, because patients with asthma always admit emergently and the severity varies. We introduced CP so that standard asthma treatment can be widely used, and investigated its clinical usefulness. We designed a new CP for treating asthma attack according to the guideline (Japanese guideline (JGL) and Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA)). 136 patients who admitted to our hospital due to asthma attack from January 1999 to November 2006, were enrolled our study. Excluding cases complicated with pneumonia, COPD or cardiac failure, we evaluated 46 cases treated with the CP comparing with 19 cases treated without the CP. The clinical evaluations include systemic and inhaled steroid use, FEV1.0%, history of asthma, and the duration of asthma attack. Furthermore, we investigated difference between cases with and without prolonged admission. While the rates of systemic and inhaled steroid use in cases without the CP were 57.9% and 52.6% respectively, those in cases with the CP were approximately 100%. Employing the CP, FEV 1.0% at discharge time was elevated from 71.7% to 76.3% and the duration of hospitalization was shortened from 14.2 days to 11.5 days. Mean age of the cases with prolonged admission was higher than the rest. The asthma CP is an effective way for the standard treatment according to the guideline to be used widely even by doctors who are not familiar with asthma treatment. It improves the efficacy of in-hospital treatment.

  15. [Asthma and metabolic syndrome: Clinical and pathogenetic relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnevsky, A V; Malysh, E Yu; Ovsyannikov, E S; Drobysheva, E S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and metabolic syndrome (MS) are common and social diseases. External and internal factors influencing the development and manifestations of asthma are identified; among which there is obesity that is a major risk factor for MS. Accordingly, the concurrence of asthma and MS and to study their clinical and pathogenetic relationships are a topical problem. There is a tendency to identify a particular asthma phenotype that is characterized by later-onset disease in the presence of obesity; the low prevalence of atopy, low serum level of IgE, and a poorly-controlled course with a trend of standard therapy resistance. It is necessary to understand the essence of asthma cause-effect relationships in the presence of obesity for defining management tactics for this group of patients.

  16. Adolescent postabortion groups: risk reduction in a school-based health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Joan Ziegler; Ziegler, Robert; Goldstein, Donna J

    2004-10-01

    A short-term postabortion group for adolescents was developed. Three groups were conducted in an adolescent mental health clinic within an urban high school-based health clinic. The clinical group experiences offered the adolescents an opportunity to integrate the experience of pregnancy and the abortion decision into their lives. At follow up, adolescents who participated in th postabortion counseling group indicated that they chose and used a method of birth control, did not repeat an unplanned pregnancy, and remained in high school.

  17. Omalizumab: Clinical Use for the Management of Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil C. Thomson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Omalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds circulating IgE antibody, is a treatment option for patients with moderate to severe allergic asthma whose asthma is poorly controlled with inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled long-acting β 2 agonist bronchodilators. This review considers the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety and place in management of omalizumab in asthma and focuses particularly on key articles published over the last three years. Omalizumab reduces IgE mediated airway inflammation and its effect on airway remodeling is under investigation. Recent long-term clinical trials confirm the benefits of omalizumab in reducing exacerbations and symptoms in adults and in children with moderate to severe allergic asthma. No clinical or immunological factor consistently predicts a good therapeutic response to omalizumab in allergic asthma. In responders, the duration of treatment is unclear. The main adverse effect of omalizumab is anaphylaxis, although this occurs infrequently. Preliminary data from a five-year safety study has raised concerns about increased cardiovascular events and a final report is awaited. Clinical trials are in progress to determine whether omalizumab has efficacy in the treatment of non-allergic asthma.

  18. Biomarkers in the clinical development of asthma therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Tracy L; Choy, David F; Arron, Joseph R

    2016-01-01

    Here we review how biomarkers have been used in the design, execution and interpretation of recent clinical studies of therapeutic candidates targeting cytokine-mediated inflammatory pathways in asthma. This review focuses on type 2 inflammation, as there are multiple therapeutics and/or clinical studies that can be compared within that specific pathway. Comparative analyses of data from these clinical studies illustrate the utility of biomarkers to quantify pharmacodynamic effects, clarify mechanism of action and stratify patients, which may facilitate the interpretation of outcomes in the development of molecularly targeted therapies. These case examples provide a basis for biomarker considerations in the design of future studies in the asthma setting.

  19. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical manifestations of acute asthma in children at the Department of Child Health Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Kadek Ayu Lestari; Imam Budiman; Sudigdo Sastroasmoro

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute asthma is an asthma attack or worsening of asthma manifestation and pulmonary function. Severe asthma at- tack might be prevented by early recognition of the attack and ap- propriate therapy. Clinical manifestations of asthma in children vary widely, so does the assessment of the attack that is often not accu- rately defined by doctors. This leads to delayed and inadequate treatment of the attack. Objective This study aimed to know the clinical manifestat...

  1. FENO and AHR mannitol in patients referred to an out-of-hospital asthma clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Sverrild, Asger; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    between FENO and AHR to mannitol in unselected individuals with possible asthma. METHODS: A real-life study on patients with possible asthma referred to a specialized asthma clinic. Data on asthma history, FEV(1), FENO, atopy, smoking, treatment and AHR to mannitol were collected. RESULTS: In 217...

  2. Clinical utility of asthma biomarkers: from bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijverberg SJH

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Susanne JH Vijverberg,1,2,* Bart Hilvering,2,* Jan AM Raaijmakers,1 Jan-Willem J Lammers,2 Anke-Hilse Maitland-van der Zee,1,* Leo Koenderman2,* 1Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Clinical Pharmacology, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Asthma is a chronic disease characterized by airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and recurrent episodes of reversible airway obstruction. The disease is very heterogeneous in onset, course, and response to treatment, and seems to encompass a broad collection of heterogeneous disease subtypes with different underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. There is a strong need for easily interpreted clinical biomarkers to assess the nature and severity of the disease. Currently available biomarkers for clinical practice – for example markers in bronchial lavage, bronchial biopsies, sputum, or fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO – are limited due to invasiveness or lack of specificity. The assessment of markers in peripheral blood might be a good alternative to study airway inflammation more specifically, compared to FeNO, and in a less invasive manner, compared to bronchoalveolar lavage, biopsies, or sputum induction. In addition, promising novel biomarkers are discovered in the field of breath metabolomics (eg, volatile organic compounds and (pharmacogenomics. Biomarker research in asthma is increasingly shifting from the assessment of the value of single biomarkers to multidimensional approaches in which the clinical value of a combination of various markers is studied. This could eventually lead to the development of a clinically applicable algorithm composed of various markers and clinical features to phenotype asthma and improve diagnosis and asthma management

  3. The impact of gender on asthma in the daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Gallo, Fabio

    2018-03-01

    It is up-to-date to consider the potential gender impact on a disease. There are few data about gender difference in asthma. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study tested this hypothesis in a real-life setting to investigate possible difference between genders. This study was cross-sectional, considering 554 consecutive outpatients suspected of asthma, who were referred for a first specialist visit. Clinical and functional parameters were evaluated. Females with asthma could have a worse perception of asthma control, assessed by asthma control test (ACT), and more anxiety than asthmatic males. However, there was no difference regarding asthma control grading, asthma severity, and asthma medication use between genders; the differences in lung function were without clinical relevance. In the daily clinical practice, it is relevant to consider gender in the management of asthma.

  4. Clinical and functional criteria for predicting asthma in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. L. Mizemitskiy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine clinical and functional criteria for predicting asthma in children who have sustained acute obstructive bronchitis in infancy. Subjects and methods. A total of 125 infants aged 2 to 36 months who had experienced 1 -2 episodes of acute obstructive bronchitis and treated at hospital were examined when bronchial obstruction syndrome was being relieved. In addition to physical examination, functional studies (computerized bronchophonography and heart rate variability assessment were used. Immunological examination included determination of the serum levels of immunoglobulin E and interleuMn-17A. The infants who had sustained acute obstructive bronchitis were followed up for 12-36 months. Results. The infants who had sustained acute obstructive bronchitis in the presence of mild perinatal CNS damage caused by hypoxia were typified by high respiratory morbidity; early-onset bronchial obstruction; long-term bronchial obstruction relief; high incidence of grade 2 respiratory failure in acute obstructive bronchitis. These patients developed asthma more often than twice and repeated episodes of bronchial obstruction. ROC analysis was used to elaborate clinical and functional criteria for predicting the development of asthma in infants. Conclusion. The proposed additional clinical and functional criteria characterizing external respiratory dysfunction and autonomic homeostatic changes contribute to the early diagnosis of asthma and substantially increase the validity of prediction of its development in children younger than 3 years, which is of great importance for goal-oriented preventive measures.

  5. Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Harold

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Asthma is the most common respiratory disorder in Canada. Despite significant improvement in the diagnosis and management of this disorder, the majority of Canadians with asthma remain poorly controlled. In most patients, however, control can be achieved through the use of avoidance measures and appropriate pharmacological interventions. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs represent the standard of care for the majority of patients. Combination ICS/long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA inhalers are preferred for most adults who fail to achieve control with ICS therapy. Allergen-specific immunotherapy represents a potentially disease-modifying therapy for many patients with asthma, but should only be prescribed by physicians with appropriate training in allergy. Regular monitoring of asthma control, adherence to therapy and inhaler technique are also essential components of asthma management. This article provides a review of current literature and guidelines for the appropriate diagnosis and management of asthma.

  6. Asthma education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-01-01

    ). Allergy and Asthma Clinic, Red Cross War Memorial Hospital. Mike Levin runs a secondary level asthma/ allergy clinic and does a tertiary allergy session once a week, focusing on difficult asthma and food allergies. He has ...

  7. Handgrip strength test as a complementary tool in monitoring asthma in daily clinical practice in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel; Navarro-Martínez, Ana Vanesa; Mañas-Bastidas, Alfonso; García-Pinillos, Felipe

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that handgrip strength test can discriminate the presence/absence of asthma and between intermittent and moderate persistent asthma in children. 140 children (70 healthy and 70 with asthma) completed the Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) and performed the handgrip strength test. Forty-eight hours later, subjects performed spirometry. The results showed Handgrip strength was significantly lower (pstrength test was a predictive factor for asthma (cut-off at 16.84 kg) and for severity of pathology (cut-off at 15.06 kg). Handgrip strength was reduced in children with asthma. Handgrip strength was positively associated with lung capacity and quality of life. The fact that the handgrip strength test was able to discriminate between presence/absence of asthma and between intermittent and moderate persistent asthma in children suggested that this test could be used as a complementary tool in the monitoring of asthma in daily clinical practice.

  8. Postpartum Teenagers' Views on Providing Contraception in School-Based Health Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pooja R; Huynh, Michaela T; Alvarez, Crystal A; Jones, DaJonitta; Jennings, Kristofer; Snyder, Russell R

    2016-01-01

    To determine characteristics of teen pregnancies in southeast Texas and the opinions of postpartum teenagers with regard to having contraceptive services available in high school clinics. A cross-sectional study of postpartum teenagers interviewed during their hospital stay. Of 404 postpartum teenagers interviewed, 86% had unplanned pregnancies. Approximately 53% of respondents first had intercourse at less than 16 years of age. Of the 130 teenagers who had used contraception prior to pregnancy, 85% became pregnant because they were unable to visit the clinic to obtain a contraceptive refill or replacement. In multivariate modeling, factors associated with using contraceptives prior to pregnancy included black race (p teenagers surveyed, 223 (82%) were in favor of having contraceptive services offered in high school clinics. Contraceptive education is not sufficient to prevent teenage pregnancy. Increase in access is critical as teenagers with previous pregnancies were more likely to use contraception, likely due to their interaction with the medical community during the antecedent pregnancy. One possible solution is to bring contraceptive services to the teenagers, by offering them at school based health systems. A majority of teenagers surveyed in this study supported this proposal.

  9. Clinical and functional criteria for predicting asthma in infants

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. L. Mizemitskiy; V. A. Pavlenko; I. M. Melnikova

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to determine clinical and functional criteria for predicting asthma in children who have sustained acute obstructive bronchitis in infancy. Subjects and methods. A total of 125 infants aged 2 to 36 months who had experienced 1 -2 episodes of acute obstructive bronchitis and treated at hospital were examined when bronchial obstruction syndrome was being relieved. In addition to physical examination, functional studies (computerized bronchophonography and heart rate variability asses...

  10. Content and outcomes of Dutch nurse clinics for children with asthma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, D.; Francke, A.L.; Hutten, J.B.F.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Zee, J. van der; Huyer Abu-Saad, H.

    2001-01-01

    Dutch specialist asthma nurses run extramural and transmural nurse clinics for children with asthma. Extramural clinics are run under responsibility and in the premises of a home care organisation. Transmural clinics are run in an outpatient clinic in close collaboration and joint responsibility

  11. Clinically remitted childhood asthma is associated with airflow obstruction in middle-aged adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Keitaro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Yamane, Takashi; Nakashima, Taku; Haruta, Yoshinori; Hattori, Noboru; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2017-01-01

    While adult asthma has been shown to be a risk factor for COPD, the effect of remitted childhood asthma on adult lung function has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to examine whether remitted childhood asthma is a risk factor for airflow obstruction in a middle-aged general population. A total of 9896 participants (range: 35-60 years) from five healthcare centres were included in the study. The participants were classified into four categories based on the presence or absence of physician-diagnosed childhood/adulthood asthma and asthma symptoms as follows: healthy controls (n = 9154), remitted childhood asthma (n = 287), adulthood-onset asthma (n = 354) and childhood-adulthood asthma (n = 101). The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was similar in both the participants with remitted childhood asthma and healthy controls. The prevalence of airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 )/forced vital capacity (FVC) childhood asthma, those with adult-onset asthma and those with childhood-adulthood asthma (5.2%, 14.4% and 16.8%, respectively) compared with healthy controls (2.2%). Multivariate logistic regression showed that remitted childhood asthma was independently associated with airflow obstruction. Among the participants with remitted childhood asthma, ever-smokers had significantly lower FEV 1 /FVC than never-smokers. Clinically remitted childhood asthma is associated with airflow obstruction in middle-aged adults. Smoking and remitted childhood asthma may be additive factors for the development of airflow obstruction. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  12. Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma worse. If so, try to limit time outdoors when the levels of these substances in the outdoor air are high. If animal fur triggers your ... have side effects. Most doctors agree that the benefits of taking inhaled ... have. Also, work with your health care team if you have any questions about ...

  13. The clinical significance of lung hypoexpansion in acute childhood asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E.; Allison, Kelley Z.; Narla, Lakshmana D.; Lowry, Patricia A.; Lopatina, Olga A.; Sethi, Narinder N.; Nettleman, Mary D.

    2004-01-01

    Many children experiencing acute asthmatic episodes have chest radiographs, which may show lung hyperinflation, hypoinflation, or normal inflation. Lung hypoinflation may be a sign of respiratory fatigue and poor prognosis. To compare the clinical course in children with asthma according to the degree of lung inflation on chest radiographs. We conducted a retrospective study during a 24-month period (from July 1999 to July 2001) of children aged 0-17 years, who presented to a pediatric emergency department or outpatient clinic with an asthma exacerbation. Chest radiographs obtained at presentation were reviewed independently by three pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the admission status of the patient. The correlation between hypoinflation and hospital admission was assessed in three age groups: 0-2 years, 3-5 years, and 6-17 years. Hypoinflation on chest radiographs was significantly correlated with hospital admission for children aged 6-17 years (odds ratio 16.00, 95% confidence interval 1.89-135.43). The inter-reader agreement for interpretation of these radiographs was strong, with a kappa score of 0.76. Hypoinflation was not correlated with admission in younger children. Lung hypoinflation is associated with a greater likelihood of hospital admission in children aged 6 years or older. Therefore, hypoinflation was a poor prognostic sign and may warrant more aggressive therapy. (orig.)

  14. The clinical significance of lung hypoexpansion in acute childhood asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spottswood, Stephanie E. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 980615, 23298-0615, Richmond, VA (United States); Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of the King' s Daughters, 601 Children' s Lane, Norfolk, VA 23507 (United States); Allison, Kelley Z.; Narla, Lakshmana D.; Lowry, Patricia A. [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Box 980615, 23298-0615, Richmond, VA (United States); Lopatina, Olga A.; Sethi, Narinder N. [School of Medicine, Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, VA (United States); Nettleman, Mary D. [Department of Internal Medicine, B-427 Clinical Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Many children experiencing acute asthmatic episodes have chest radiographs, which may show lung hyperinflation, hypoinflation, or normal inflation. Lung hypoinflation may be a sign of respiratory fatigue and poor prognosis. To compare the clinical course in children with asthma according to the degree of lung inflation on chest radiographs. We conducted a retrospective study during a 24-month period (from July 1999 to July 2001) of children aged 0-17 years, who presented to a pediatric emergency department or outpatient clinic with an asthma exacerbation. Chest radiographs obtained at presentation were reviewed independently by three pediatric radiologists who were blinded to the admission status of the patient. The correlation between hypoinflation and hospital admission was assessed in three age groups: 0-2 years, 3-5 years, and 6-17 years. Hypoinflation on chest radiographs was significantly correlated with hospital admission for children aged 6-17 years (odds ratio 16.00, 95% confidence interval 1.89-135.43). The inter-reader agreement for interpretation of these radiographs was strong, with a kappa score of 0.76. Hypoinflation was not correlated with admission in younger children. Lung hypoinflation is associated with a greater likelihood of hospital admission in children aged 6 years or older. Therefore, hypoinflation was a poor prognostic sign and may warrant more aggressive therapy. (orig.)

  15. Clinical and Diagnostic Features of Bronchial Asthma in Children on the Background of Latent Food Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Levytskyi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on clinical and paraclinical examination of 112 children with bronchial asthma, there were studied the features of its course against the background of food allergy. It was found that only a set of clinical and paraclinical signs is the most important for the diagnosis of bronchial asthma in children on the background of latent food allergy.

  16. Clinical experience with Omalizumab in a Portuguese severe asthma unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alfarroba

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely recognized that asthma control is not always possible in patients with very severe asthma despite available treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Omalizumab on asthma control as an add‐on therapy in patients from the “Severe Asthma Outpatient Service” of Pulido Valente Hospital in Lisbon, Portugal. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to assess asthma control by the ACT score and by GINA classification, frequency and severity of exacerbations, medication use and pulmonary function in patients treated with Omalizumab. Clinical information was collected from medical records from the start of treatment and at 6‐, 12‐ and 24‐month follow‐ups. Results: 26 patients started the treatment with Omalizumab, and all (100% were classified by GINA with uncontrolled asthma prior to treatment. Mean ACT score was 11.5. All the patients had treatment with fixed‐dose ICS and LABA and 34.6% also had an anti‐cholinergic inhaler. 42.3% of patients were also treated with oral glucocorticosteroids for control. Patients reported an average of 1.8 moderate and 3.1 severe exacerbations/year. Statistical differences were found at 6‐month follow‐up in most end‐points: GINA score improved: 60.9% of patients with partially controlled asthma and only 39.1% with uncontrolled asthma (Wilcoxon 0.00; ACT score improved to 19.52 (Wilcoxon 0.00; mean FEV1 improved to 76.7% (Wilcoxon 0.025; the proportion of patients requiring oral glucocorticosteroid therapy reduced to 17.4% (Wilcoxon 0.014; and the number of moderate and severe exacerbations also decreased to 1.04 and 1.83 respectively (Wilcoxon 0.007; Wilcoxon 0.002 respectively. Conclusions: The current analysis shows evidence that omalizumab is successful in improving asthma control as an add‐on therapy GINA step 5 treatment. Resumo: Introdução: Está bem documentado que o controlo de asma nem

  17. Severe bronchial asthma in children: the role of clinical and anamnestic indices in diagnosis verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolyubakina L.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents comparative analysis of results of clinical and anamnestic examination of children depending on the asthma severity. Severe asthma in schoolchildren relative to moderate phenotype characterized by birth overweight, more burdened individual allergic history, highly infectious index, drug or combined (medication, food and household allergies, seasonal exacerbations (mainly from November to March, what associated with the trigger role of ARVI and meteorological factors, inadequate asthma control during standard basic therapy.

  18. Redesigning a large school-based clinical trial in response to changes in community practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald, Lynn B; Gerald, Joe K; McClure, Leslie A; Harrington, Kathy; Erwin, Sue; Bailey, William C

    2011-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are seasonal with the greatest risk in elementary-age students occurring shortly after returning to school following summer break. Recent research suggests that this seasonality in children is primarily related to viral respiratory tract infections. Regular hand washing is the most effective method to prevent the spread of viral respiratory infections; unfortunately, achieving hand washing recommendations in schools is difficult. Therefore, we designed a study ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Know How to Use Your ... 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health File Formats Help: How do ...

  20. Performance of a novel clinical score, the Pediatric Asthma Severity Score (PASS), in the evaluation of acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelick, Marc H; Stevens, Molly W; Schultz, Theresa R; Scribano, Philip V

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of a new clinical asthma score, the Pediatric Asthma Severity Score (PASS), in children aged 1 through 18 years in an acute clinical setting. This was a prospective cohort study of children treated for acute asthma at two urban pediatric emergency departments (EDs). A total of 852 patients were enrolled at one site and 369 at the second site. Clinical findings were assessed at the start of the ED visit, after one hour of treatment, and at the time of disposition. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) (for patients aged 6 years and older) and pulse oximetry were also measured. Composite scores including three, four, or five clinical findings were evaluated, and the three-item score (wheezing, prolonged expiration, and work of breathing) was selected as the PASS. Interobserver reliability for the PASS was good to excellent (kappa = 0.72 to 0.83). There was a significant correlation between PASS and PEFR (r = 0.27 to 0.37) and pulse oximetry (r = 0.29 to 0.41) at various time points. The PASS was able to discriminate between those patients who did and did not require hospitalization, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.82. Finally, the PASS was shown to be responsive, with a 48% relative increase in score from start to end of treatment and an overall effect size of 0.62, indicating a moderate to large effect. This clinical score, the PASS, based on three clinical findings, is a reliable and valid measure of asthma severity in children and shows both discriminative and responsive properties. The PASS may be a useful tool to assess acute asthma severity for clinical and research purposes.

  1. Small airway function changes and its clinical significance of asthma patients in different clinical phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Hui Zhou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the small airways function changes of asthmatic patients in different clinical phases and to discuss its clinical significance. Methods: A total of 127 patients diagnosed as asthma were selected randomly and pulmonary function (PF of them was determined by conventional method. Then they were divided into A, B and C group based on PF results. All 34 patients in A group suffered from acute asthma attack for the first time. All 93 patients in B group had been diagnosed as asthma but in remission phase. C Group was regarded as Control group with 20 healthy volunteers. Then FEV1, FEF50%, FEF75% levels of patients in each group were analyzed, and ΔFEV1, ΔFEF75% and ΔFEF50% levels of patients in each group were compared after bronchial dilation test. Results: It was found that most patients in group A and B had abnormal small airways function, and their small airways function was significantly different compared with that of group C (P<0.01. In addition, except for group C, ΔFEF75%,ΔFEF50% levels in A and B group were improved more significantly than ΔFEV1 levels (P<0.01. Conclusions: Asthma patients in acute phase all have abnormal small airways function. Most asthma patients in remission phase also have abnormal small airways function. After bronchial dilation test, whether patients in acute phase or in remission phase, major and small airways function of them are improved, but improvement of small airways function is weaker than that of major airways. This indicates that asthma respiratory tract symptoms in different phases exists all the time and so therapeutic process is needed to perform step by step.

  2. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Kate S; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay; Emmerton, Lynne; Burton, Deborah L; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service (interventions) they choose to deliver. To explore the scope and frequency of asthma-related clinical interventions provided by pharmacists to patients in an evidence-based complex asthma service. Pharmacists from 4 states/territories of Australia were trained in asthma management. People with asthma had 3 or 4 visits to the pharmacy. Guided by a structured patient file, the pharmacist assessed the patient's asthma and management and provided interventions where and when considered appropriate, based on their clinical decision making skills. The interventions were recorded in a checklist in the patient file. They were then analysed descriptively and thematically. Pharmacists provided 22,909 clinical pharmacy interventions over the service to 570 patients (398 of whom completed the service). The most frequently delivered interventions were in the themes 'Education on asthma', 'Addressing trigger factors', 'Medications - safe and effective use' and 'Explore patient perspectives'. The patients had a high and ongoing need for interventions. Pharmacists selected interventions based on their assessment of perceived need then revisited and reinforced these interventions. Pharmacists identified a number of areas in which patients required interventions to assist with their asthma management. Many of these were perceived to require continuing reinforcement over the duration of the service. Pharmacists were able to use their clinical judgement to assess patients and provide clinical pharmacy

  3. Omalizumab: Clinical Use for the Management of Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Neil C.; Chaudhuri, Rekha

    2012-01-01

    Omalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds circulating IgE antibody, is a treatment option for patients with moderate to severe allergic asthma whose asthma is poorly controlled with inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled long-acting β 2 agonist bronchodilators. This review considers the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety and place in management of omalizumab in asthma and focuses particularly on key articles published over the last three years. Omalizumab reduce...

  4. Designing clinical trials to address the needs of childhood and adult asthma: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's AsthmaNet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, E Rand; Busse, William W

    2014-01-01

    In 2008, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute announced its intent to support a new asthma network known as AsthmaNet. This clinical trials consortium, now in its fifth year, has been charged with developing and executing clinical trials to address the most important asthma management questions and identify new treatment approaches in pediatric and adult patients. This review will discuss the organization of AsthmaNet and the scientific context in which the network was developed and began its work, report the results of an internal priority-setting exercise designed to guide the network's scientific strategy, and highlight the portfolio of clinical trials, proof-of-concept studies, and mechanistic studies planned for the 7-year period of the network to update the global asthma community regarding the progress and processes of the network. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Omalizumab for severe asthma: toward personalized treatment based on biomarker profile and clinical history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaian F

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Farnaz Tabatabaian, Dennis K Ledford Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Asthma is a heterogeneous syndrome with numerous underlining molecular and inflammatory mechanisms contributing to the wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Multiple therapies targeting severe asthma with type 2 (T2 high inflammation are or soon will be available. T2 high inflammation is defined as inflammation associated with atopy or eosinophilia or an increase in cytokines associated with T-helper 2 lymphocytes. Omalizumab is a humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibody and the first biologic therapy approved for moderate–severe allergic asthma. Despite the specificity of biologic therapies like omalizumab, clinical response is variable, with approximately 50% of treated patients achieving the primary outcome. A prior identification of the ideal candidate for therapy would improve patient outcomes and optimize the use of health care resources. As the number of biologic therapies for asthma increases, the goal is identification of biomarkers or clinical phenotypes likely to respond to a specific therapy. This review focuses on potential biomarkers and clinical history that may identify responders to omalizumab therapy for asthma. Keywords: severe persistent asthma, asthma phenotype and endotype, T2 high inflammation, omalizumab, asthma biomarkers, eosinophils, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, IgE

  6. Redesigning a large school-based clinical trial in response to changes in community practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Lynn B; Gerald, Joe K; McClure, Leslie A; Harrington, Kathy; Erwin, Sue; Bailey, William C

    2011-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are seasonal with the greatest risk in elementary-age students occurring shortly after returning to school following summer break. Recent research suggests that this seasonality in children is primarily related to viral respiratory tract infections. Regular hand washing is the most effective method to prevent the spread of viral respiratory infections; unfortunately, achieving hand washing recommendations in schools is difficult. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate the effect of hand sanitizer use in elementary schools on exacerbations among children with asthma. Purpose To describe the process of redesigning the trial in response to changes in the safety profile of the hand sanitizer as well as changes in hand hygiene practice in the schools. Methods The original trial was a randomized, longitudinal, subject-blinded, placebo-controlled, community-based crossover trial. The primary aim was to evaluate the incremental effectiveness of hand sanitizer use in addition to usual hand hygiene practices to decrease asthma exacerbations in elementary-age children. Three events occurred that required major modifications to the original study protocol: (1) safety concerns arose regarding the hand sanitizer’s active ingredient; (2) no substitute placebo hand sanitizer was available; and (3) community preferences changed regarding hand hygiene practices in the schools. Results The revised protocol is a randomized, longitudinal, community-based crossover trial. The primary aim is to evaluate the incremental effectiveness of a two-step hand hygiene process (hand hygiene education plus institutionally provided alcohol-based hand sanitizer) versus usual care to decrease asthma exacerbations. Enrollment was completed in May 2009 with 527 students from 30 schools. The intervention began in August 2009 and will continue through May 2011. Study results should be available at the end of 2011. Limitations The changed design does not allow us to

  7. Redesigning a large school-based clinical trial in response to changes in community practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Lynn B; Gerald, Joe K; McClure, Leslie A; Harrington, Kathy; Erwin, Sue; Bailey, William C

    2011-06-01

    Asthma exacerbations are seasonal with the greatest risk in elementary-age students occurring shortly after returning to school following summer break. Recent research suggests that this seasonality in children is primarily related to viral respiratory tract infections. Regular hand washing is the most effective method to prevent the spread of viral respiratory infections; unfortunately, achieving hand washing recommendations in schools is difficult. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate the effect of hand sanitizer use in elementary schools on exacerbations among children with asthma. To describe the process of redesigning the trial in response to changes in the safety profile of the hand sanitizer as well as changes in hand hygiene practice in the schools. The original trial was a randomized, longitudinal, subject-blinded, placebo-controlled, community-based crossover trial. The primary aim was to evaluate the incremental effectiveness of hand sanitizer use in addition to usual hand hygiene practices to decrease asthma exacerbations in elementary-age children. Three events occurred that required major modifications to the original study protocol: (1) safety concerns arose regarding the hand sanitizer's active ingredient; (2) no substitute placebo hand sanitizer was available; and (3) community preferences changed regarding hand hygiene practices in the schools. The revised protocol is a randomized, longitudinal, community-based crossover trial. The primary aim is to evaluate the incremental effectiveness of a two-step hand hygiene process (hand hygiene education plus institutionally provided alcohol-based hand sanitizer) versus usual care to decrease asthma exacerbations. Enrollment was completed in May 2009 with 527 students from 30 schools. The intervention began in August 2009 and will continue through May 2011. Study results should be available at the end of 2011. The changed design does not allow us to directly measure the effectiveness of hand

  8. Asthma in Children: Risk Factors, Clinical Features and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Balci

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. It is known that asthma prevalence has increased significantly especially in children in last 20 years. To stop this increase in asthma, causes and prevention measures should be known better. For the management of the illness, control of environmental and trigger factors causing asthma attack are extremely important. Asthmatic children and family should be informed by health staff about changes in their life and measures to prevent the attacks. Through this information asthmatic children and their families can be supported for a better quality of life. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(1.000: 79-86

  9. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reasons to celebrate its journals. Learn More about the American Academy Of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Life Spectrum of Asthma Meeting School-based Asthma Management Program – (SAMPRO TM ) This central resource focuses on ...

  10. Sustainable Benefits of a Community Hospital-Based Paediatric Asthma Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzik, Brian A; Chen, Chee P; Hansen, Miriam J; Montgomery, Paula L

    2017-01-01

    In 2011, we reported that our paediatric asthma clinic (PAC) appeared to significantly reduce the burden of paediatric asthma in our community. Supported by these results, the PAC underwent a gradual threefold expansion while maintaining the same model of care. We now report on the outcome of that expansion and demonstrate that our PAC continues to significantly reduce the burden of paediatric asthma in our community. As previously, newly enrolled PAC patients continue to show a 12-month reduction in asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits and admissions exceeding 60% and 80%, respectively. This consistent short-term benefit, coupled with clinic expansion, has contributed to a significant improvement in our rate of paediatric asthma-related ED visits or hospitalizations when compared to other Ontario hospitals.

  11. Childhood Asthma: A Clinical Study in Southern Nigeria | Okoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common recognized trigger factor for exacerbation of asthmatic symptoms was extreme cold seen in 29 (72.5%) patients, while the most common identified early childhood risk factor for development of asthma was a positive family history of asthma in 21 (52.5%) patients. Thirty five of the subjects (87.5%) had mild ...

  12. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Kate S.; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay; Emmerton, Lynne; Burton, Deborah L.; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service (interventions) they choose to deliver. Objective: To explore the scope and frequency of asthma-related clinical interventions provided by pharmacists to patients in an evidence-based complex asthma service. Methods: Pharmacists from 4 states/territories of Australia were trained in asthma management. People with asthma had 3 or 4 visits to the pharmacy. Guided by a structured patient file, the pharmacist assessed the patient’s asthma and management and provided interventions where and when considered appropriate, based on their clinical decision making skills. The interventions were recorded in a checklist in the patient file. They were then analysed descriptively and thematically. Results: Pharmacists provided 22,909 clinical pharmacy interventions over the service to 570 patients (398 of whom completed the service). The most frequently delivered interventions were in the themes ’Education on asthma’, ’Addressing trigger factors’, ’Medications - safe and effective use’ and ’Explore patient perspectives’. The patients had a high and ongoing need for interventions. Pharmacists selected interventions based on their assessment of perceived need then revisited and reinforced these interventions. Conclusion: Pharmacists identified a number of areas in which patients required interventions to assist with their asthma management. Many of these were perceived to require continuing reinforcement over the duration of the service. Pharmacists were able to use their

  13. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeMay KS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service (interventions they choose to deliver. Objective: To explore the scope and frequency of asthma-related clinical interventions provided by pharmacists to patients in an evidence-based complex asthma service. Methods: Pharmacists from 4 states/territories of Australia were trained in asthma management. People with asthma had 3 or 4 visits to the pharmacy. Guided by a structured patient file, the pharmacist assessed the patient’s asthma and management and provided interventions where and when considered appropriate, based on their clinical decision making skills. The interventions were recorded in a checklist in the patient file. They were then analysed descriptively and thematically. Results: Pharmacists provided 22,909 clinical pharmacy interventions over the service to 570 patients (398 of whom completed the service. The most frequently delivered interventions were in the themes ‘Education on asthma’, ‘Addressing trigger factors’, ‘Medications – safe and effective use’ and ‘Explore patient perspectives’. The patients had a high and ongoing need for interventions. Pharmacists selected interventions based on their assessment of perceived need then revisited and reinforced these interventions. Conclusion: Pharmacists identified a number of areas in which patients required interventions to assist with their asthma management. Many of these were perceived to require continuing reinforcement over the duration of the service. Pharmacists were

  14. Management of children and young people (CYP) with asthma: a clinical audit report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark L; Ward, Angela; Nelson, Sara

    2018-05-21

    An asthma attack or exacerbation signals treatment failure. Most attacks are preventable and failure to recognize risk of asthma attacks are well recognized as risk factors for future attacks and even death. Of the 19 recommendations made by the United Kingdom National Review of Asthma Deaths (NRAD) (1) only one has been partially implemented-a National Asthma Audit; however, this hasn't reported yet. The Harrow Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) in London implemented a clinical asthma audit on 291 children and young people aged under 19 years (CYP) who had been treated for asthma attacks in 2016. This was funded as a Local Incentive Scheme (LIS) aimed at improving quality health care delivery. Two years after the publication of the NRAD report it is surprising that risks for future attacks were not recognized, that few patients were assessed objectively during attacks and only 10% of attacks were followed up within 2 days. However, it is encouraging that CYP hospital admissions following the audit were reduced by 16%, with clear benefit for patients, their families and the local health economy. This audit has provided an example of how clinicians can focus learning on patients who have had asthma attacks and utilize these events as a catalyst for active reflection in particular on modifiable risk factors. Through identification of these risks and active optimization of management, preventable asthma attacks could become 'never events'.

  15. Evaluation of clinical data in childhood asthma. Application of a computer file system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, D.; Twarog, F.J.; Geha, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    A computer file system was used in our pediatric allergy clinic to assess the value of chest roentgenograms and hemoglobin determinations used in the examination of patients and to correlate exposure to pets and forced hot air with the severity of asthma. Among 889 children with asthma, 20.7% had abnormal chest roentgenographic findings, excluding hyperinflation and peribronchial thickening, and 0.7% had abnormal hemoglobin values. Environmental exposure to pets or forced hot air was not associated with increased severity of asthma, as assessed by five measures of outcome: number of medications administered, requirement for corticosteroids, frequency of clinic visits, frequency of emergency room visits, and frequency of hospitalizations

  16. An exploration of clinical interventions provided by pharmacists within a complex asthma service

    OpenAIRE

    Lemay, Kate S.; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine; Stewart, Kay; Emmerton, Lynne; Burton, Deborah L.; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pharmacists in Australia are accessible health care professionals, and their provision of clinical pharmacy interventions in a range of areas has been proven to improve patient outcomes. Individual clinical pharmacy interventions in the area of asthma management have been very successful. An understanding of the nature of these interventions will inform future pharmacy services. What we do not know is when pharmacists provide a complex asthma service, what elements of that service...

  17. Validation of asthma recording in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Francis; Morales, Daniel R; Mullerova, Hana; Smeeth, Liam; Douglas, Ian J; Quint, Jennifer K

    2017-08-11

    The optimal method of identifying people with asthma from electronic health records in primary care is not known. The aim of this study is to determine the positive predictive value (PPV) of different algorithms using clinical codes and prescription data to identify people with asthma in the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). 684 participants registered with a general practitioner (GP) practice contributing to CPRD between 1 December 2013 and 30 November 2015 were selected according to one of eight predefined potential asthma identification algorithms. A questionnaire was sent to the GPs to confirm asthma status and provide additional information to support an asthma diagnosis. Two study physicians independently reviewed and adjudicated the questionnaires and additional information to form a gold standard for asthma diagnosis. The PPV was calculated for each algorithm. 684 questionnaires were sent, of which 494 (72%) were returned and 475 (69%) were complete and analysed. All five algorithms including a specific Read code indicating asthma or non-specific Read code accompanied by additional conditions performed well. The PPV for asthma diagnosis using only a specific asthma code was 86.4% (95% CI 77.4% to 95.4%). Extra information on asthma medication prescription (PPV 83.3%), evidence of reversibility testing (PPV 86.0%) or a combination of all three selection criteria (PPV 86.4%) did not result in a higher PPV. The algorithm using non-specific asthma codes, information on reversibility testing and respiratory medication use scored highest (PPV 90.7%, 95% CI (82.8% to 98.7%), but had a much lower identifiable population. Algorithms based on asthma symptom codes had low PPVs (43.1% to 57.8%)%). People with asthma can be accurately identified from UK primary care records using specific Read codes. The inclusion of spirometry or asthma medications in the algorithm did not clearly improve accuracy. The protocol for this research was approved

  18. A virtual asthma clinic for children: fewer routine outpatient visits, same asthma control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaart, L.S. van den; Roukema, J.; Boehmer, A.L.M.; Brouwer, M.L.; Hugen, C.A.C.; Niers, L.E.M.; Sprij, A.J.; Rikkers-Mutsaerts, E.; Rottier, B.L.; Donders, A.R.T.; Verhaak, C.M.; Pijnenburg, M.W.; Merkus, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    eHealth is an appealing medium to improve healthcare and its value (in addition to standard care) has been assessed in previous studies. We aimed to assess whether an eHealth intervention could improve asthma control while reducing 50% of routine outpatient visits.In a multicentre, randomised

  19. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Patrick

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137 and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75, differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p 2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar.

  20. Clinical application of inert gas Multiple Breath Washout in children and adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitserloot, Annelies; Fuchs, Susanne I; Müller, Christina; Bisdorf, Kornelia; Gappa, Monika

    2014-09-01

    Children with asthma often have normal spirometry despite significant disease. The pathology of the small airways in asthma may be assessed using Multiple Breath Washout (MBW) and calculating the Lung Clearance Index (LCI). There are only few studies using MBW in children with asthma and existing data regarding bronchodilator effect are contradictory. The aim of the present pilot study was to compare LCI in asthma and controls and assess the effect of salbutamol in children with asthma on the LCI. Unselected patients with a diagnosis of asthma visiting the outpatient department of our hospital between 04-2010 and 03-2011 were recruited and compared to a healthy control group. MBW was performed as inert gas MBW using sulfurhexafluorid (SF6) as the tracer gas. Clinical data were documented and spirometry and MBW (EasyOne Pro, MBW module, NDD Switzerland) were performed before and after the use of salbutamol (200-400 μg). Healthy controls performed baseline MBW only. 32 children diagnosed with asthma (4.7-17.4 years) and 42 controls (5.3-20.8) were included in the analysis. LCI differed between patients and controls, with a mean LCI (SD) of 6.48 (0.48) and 6.21 (0.38) (P = 0.008). Use of salbutamol had no significant effect on LCI for the group. These pilot data show that clinically stable asthma patients and controls both have a LCI in the normal range. However, in patients the LCI is significantly higher indicating that MBW may have a role in assessing small airways disease in asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Anxiety and depression among Nigerian patients with asthma; Association with sociodemographic, clinical, and personality factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewuya, Abiodun O; Adeyeye, Olufunke O

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the rate of anxiety and depression in adult asthma patients and examine the possible association with sociodemographic, clinical and other significant variables. Adult asthmatics (n = 203) were recruited from the asthma outpatient clinic and assessed for sociodemographic and clinical profiles, their levels of disability, social support, asthma treatment stigma and personality traits. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I) was used to assess for the diagnosis of Anxiety and Depression in comparison with matched healthy controls (n = 205). Seventy (34.5%) of the patients with asthma have a diagnosis of Anxiety or Depression compared with 15 (7.3%) of matched healthy controls and the difference was significant (OR 6.67, 95% CI 3.58-13.04). Although older age, lower income, use of oral corticosteroid, patients perceived severity of asthma, disability, social support and personality traits were initially significant in univariate analysis, a subsequent logistic regression analysis revealed that only disability scores above the group mean (OR 4.50, 95% CI 2.28-8.87) and not having a strong social support (OR 2.88, 95% CI 1.443-5.78) were the only variables independently associated with diagnosis of Anxiety and Depression in the group of patients with asthma. Anxiety and depression are significantly more common in adult outpatients with asthma when compared with healthy control in Nigeria and was significantly associated with levels of disability and social support. These factors should be considered while formulating predictive models for management of psychosocial problems in asthma in this environment.

  2. Multidimensional Analyses of Long-Term Clinical Courses of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Oga

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are chronic respiratory disorders involving obstructive airway defects. There have been many discussions on their similarities and differences. Although airflow limitation expressed as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 has been considered to be the main diagnostic assessment in both diseases, it does not reflect the functional impairment imparted to the patients by these diseases. Therefore, multidimensional approaches using multiple measurements in assessing disease control or severity have been recommended, and multiple endpoints in addition to FEV1 have been set recently in clinical trials so as not to miss the overall effects. In particular, as improving symptoms and health status as well as pulmonary function are important goals in the management of asthma and COPD, some patient-reported measurements such as health-related quality of life or dyspnea should be included. Nonetheless, there have been few reviews on the long-term clinical course comparing asthma and COPD as predicted by measurements other than airflow limitation. Here, we therefore analyzed and compared longitudinal changes in both physiological measurements and patient-reported measurements in asthma and COPD. Although both diseases showed similar long-term progressive airflow limitation similarly despite guideline-based therapies, disease progression was different in asthma and COPD. In asthma, patient-reported assessments of health status, disability and psychological status remained clinically stable over time, in contrast to the significant deterioration of these parameters in COPD. Thus, because a single measurement of airflow limitation is insufficient to monitor these diseases, multidimensional analyses are important not only for disease control but also for understanding disease progression in asthma and COPD. KEY WORDS: asthma, COPD, longitudinal survey, multidimensional analysis, patient

  3. Teen Pregnancy and School-Based Health Clinics. A Family Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbacker, Barrett

    To combat the problem of teenage pregnancy, public health clinics have made birth control counseling and free contraceptives available to minors and many public schools have implemented sex education programs. Despite the development and implementation of these programs, teenage sexual activity and pregnancy have increased. The increase in…

  4. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction : clinical studies in childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. Hofstra (Winfried)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAt present, astluna is regarded as a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, In susceptible individuals, asthma causes symptoms, that are usually associated with variable, but often reversible airflow obstmction. Astlulla is the most conunon lung disease in childhood, with

  5. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelim L F D Gomes

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma.A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20 or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16. Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO, maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol and lung function.No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05. Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG.The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

  6. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  7. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Evelim L F D; Carvalho, Celso R F; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvement in their exercise capacity and a reduction in pulmonary inflammation. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294.

  8. Randomized Clinical Trial of Lansoprazole for Poorly Controlled Asthma in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Janet T.; Wise, Robert A.; Gold, Benjamin D.; Blake, Kathryn; Brown, Ellen D.; Castro, Mario; Dozor, Allen J.; Lima, John; Mastronarde, John G.; Sockrider, Marianna; Teague, W. Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Context Asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is prevalent in children with asthma. It is not known whether treatment of GER with a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) improves asthma control. Objective To determine whether lansoprazole is effective in reducing asthma symptoms in children without overt GER. Design, Setting, and Patients A multicenter, randomized, masked, placebo controlled, parallel clinical trial comparing lansoprazole to placebo in children with poor asthma control on inhaled corticosteroid treatment conducted at 18 academic clinical centers. Participants were followed for 24 weeks. A subgroup had an esophageal pH study before randomization. Intervention Children received either lansoprazole (15 mg daily lansoprazole and placebo groups, respectively (P=0.12). There were no detectable treatment differences in secondary outcomes (mean (95% CI) for FEV1(0.00 (−0.08, 0.08)), asthma quality of life (−0.1 (−0.4, 0.1) or episodes of poor asthma control, hazard ratio of 1.18 (95% CI 0.91, 1.53). Among the 115 children with esophageal pH studies, the prevalence of GER was 43%. In the subgroup with a positive pH study, no treatment effect for lansoprazole versus placebo was observed for any asthma outcome. Children treated with lansoprazole reported more upper respiratory infections (63% vs 49%, P=0.02), sore throats (52% vs 39%, P=0.02), and bronchitis (7% vs 2%, P=0.05). Conclusion Among children with poorly controlled asthma without symptoms of GER who were using inhaled corticosteroids, the addition of lansoprazole, as compared to placebo, did not improve symptoms nor lung function but was associated with increased adverse events. PMID:22274684

  9. Clinical and Individual Variables in Children's Dental Fear: A School-Based Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Ethieli Rodrigues da; Goettems, Marília Leão; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Azevedo, Marina Sousa

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of dental fear and associated factors in schoolchildren aged 8 to 12 years old, in Pelotas, southern Brazil. Schoolchildren enrolled in 20 public and private schools were selected using a multi-stage sample design. Sociodemographic characteristics, children's dental visit and oral hygiene habits were assessed by questionnaires. The Dental Anxiety Question was used to measure dental fear prevalence. Children's clinical examination evaluated presence of dental caries (DMFT/dmft index) and gingival bleeding. Data were analyzed using Poisson regression with robust variance (prevalence ratio; 95% confidence interval). One thousand two hundred and two children were included. Dental fear prevalence was 24.6%. After the adjustment, girls [PR=1.71 (CI 95%: 1.31-2.22)], children from poorer families [PR=1.96 (CI 95%: 1.36-2.83)], those who had decayed teeth (D/d index>0)[PR=1.32 (CI 95%: 1.01-1.72), and who had never been at the dentist [PR=1.85 (CI 95%: 1.42-2.41) remained significantly associated with dental fear. The prevalence of dental fear indicates that it is a common problem among schoolchildren. Early dental care and dental caries prevention are important factors to prevent dental fear.

  10. The effectiveness of xylitol in a school-based cluster-randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonik; Spiekerman, Charles; Heima, Masahiro; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn; Ferretti, Gerald; Milgrom, Peter; Nelson, Suchitra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this double-blind, cluster-randomized clinical trial was to examine the effects of xylitol gummy bear snacks on dental caries progression in primary and permanent teeth of inner-city school children. A total of 562 children aged 5-6 years were recruited from five elementary schools in East Cleveland, Ohio. Children were randomized by classroom to receive xylitol (7.8 g/day) or placebo (inulin fiber 20 g/day) gummy bears. Gummy bears were given three times per day for the 9-month kindergarten year within a supervised school environment. Children in both groups also received oral health education, toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste, topical fluoride varnish treatment and dental sealants. The numbers of new decayed, missing, and filled surfaces for primary teeth (dmfs) and permanent teeth (DMFS) from baseline to the middle of 2nd grade (exit exam) were compared between the treatment (xylitol/placebo) groups using an optimally-weighted permutation test for cluster-randomized data. The mean new d(3-6)mfs at the exit exam was 5.0 ± 7.6 and 4.0 ± 6.5 for the xylitol and placebo group, respectively. Similarly, the mean new D(3-6)MFS was 0.38 ± 0.88 and 0.48 ± 1.39 for the xylitol and placebo group, respectively. The adjusted mean difference between the two groups was not statistically significant: new d(3-6)mfs: mean 0.4, 95% CI -0.25, 0.8), and new D(3-6)MFS: mean 0.16, 95% CI -0.16, 0.43. Xylitol consumption did not have additional benefit beyond other preventive measures. Caries progression in the permanent teeth of both groups was minimal, suggesting that other simultaneous prevention modalities may have masked the possible beneficial effects of xylitol in this trial. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Xylitol gummy bear snacks: a school-based randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Marilyn C

    2008-07-01

    containing xylitol at 11.7 or 15.6 g/day or maltitol at 44.7 g/day divided in three exposures. Lactobacillus spp. levels were essentially unchanged in all groups. These results suggest that a xylitol gummy bear snack may be an alternative to xylitol chewing gum for dental caries prevention. Positive results with high dose maltitol limit the validity of xylitol findings. A larger clinical trial is needed to confirm the xylitol results. Trial registration [ISRCTN63160504

  12. Linking clinical quality indicators to research evidence - a case study in asthma management for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Miew Keen; Tsafnat, Guy; Hibbert, Peter; Runciman, William B; Coiera, Enrico

    2017-07-21

    Clinical quality indicators are used to monitor the performance of healthcare services and should wherever possible be based on research evidence. Little is known however about the extent to which indicators in common use are based on research. The objective of this study is to measure the extent to which clinical quality indicators used in asthma management in children with outcome measurements can be linked to results in randomised controlled clinical trial (RCT) reports. This work is part of a broader research program to trial methods that improve the efficiency and accuracy of indicator development. National-level indicators for asthma management in children were extracted from the National Quality Measures Clearinghouse database and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standards by two independent appraisers. Outcome measures were extracted from all published English language RCT reports for asthma management in children below the age of 12 published between 2005 and 2014. The two sets were then linked by manually mapping both to a common set of Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts. The analysis identified 39 indicators and 562 full text RCTs dealing with asthma management in children. About 95% (37/39) of the indicators could be linked to RCT outcome measures. It is possible to identify relevant RCT reports for the majority of indicators used to assess the quality of asthma management in childhood. The methods reported here could be automated to more generally support assessment of candidate indicators against the research evidence.

  13. Assessing the Effectiveness of a School-Based Dental Clinic on the Oral Health of Children Who Lack Access to Dental Care: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Rachel; Walker, Mary P.; Liu, Ying; Simmer-Beck, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    This program evaluation examines the effectiveness of a school-based dental clinic. A repeated-measures design was used to longitudinally examine secondary data from participants (N = 293). Encounter intensity was developed to normalize data. Multivariate analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to investigate the effect of encounter…

  14. Clinical potential for imaging in patients with asthma and other lung disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoer, Emily M; Spielberg, David R; Brody, Alan S

    2017-01-01

    The ability of lung imaging to phenotype patients, determine prognosis, and predict response to treatment is expanding in clinical and translational research. The purpose of this perspective is to describe current imaging modalities that might be useful clinical tools in patients with asthma and other lung disorders and to explore some of the new developments in imaging modalities of the lung. These imaging modalities include chest radiography, computed tomography, lung magnetic resonance imaging, electrical impedance tomography, bronchoscopy, and others. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical characteristics of the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mia; Bårnes, Camilla Boslev; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: In recent years, the so-called asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) has received much attention, not least because elderly individuals may present characteristics suggesting a diagnosis of both asthma and COPD. At present, ACOS...... is described clinically as persistent airflow limitation combined with features of both asthma and COPD. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to review the currently available literature focusing on symptoms and clinical characteristics of patients regarded as having ACOS. METHODS: Based on the preferred......% predicted and FEV1/FVC ratio in spite of lower mean life-time tobacco exposure. Furthermore, studies have revealed that ACOS patients seem to have not only more frequent but also more severe exacerbations. Comorbidity, not least diabetes, has also been reported in a few studies, with a higher prevalence...

  16. Optimizing community-level surveillance data for pediatric asthma management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wande O. Benka-Coker

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-level approaches for pediatric asthma management rely on locally collected information derived primarily from two sources: claims records and school-based surveys. We combined claims and school-based surveillance data, and examined the asthma-related risk patterns among adolescent students.Symptom data collected from school-based asthma surveys conducted in Oakland, CA were used for case identification and determination of severity levels for students (high and low. Survey data were matched to Medicaid claims data for all asthma-related health care encounters for the year prior to the survey. We then employed recursive partitioning to develop classification trees that identified patterns of demographics and healthcare utilization associated with severity.A total of 561 students had complete matched data; 86.1% were classified as high-severity, and 13.9% as low-severity asthma. The classification tree consisted of eight subsets: three indicating high severity and five indicating low severity. The risk subsets highlighted varying combinations of non-specific demographic and socioeconomic predictors of asthma prevalence, morbidity and severity. For example, the subset with the highest class-prior probability (92.1% predicted high-severity asthma and consisted of students without prescribed rescue medication, but with at least one in-clinic nebulizer treatment. The predictive accuracy of the tree-based model was approximately 66.7%, with an estimated 91.1% of high-severity cases and 42.3% of low-severity cases correctly predicted.Our analysis draws on the strengths of two complementary datasets to provide community-level information on children with asthma, and demonstrates the utility of recursive partitioning methods to explore a combination of features that convey asthma severity. Keywords: Asthma, Classification, Risk stratification, Statistical data analysis, Disease management

  17. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical efficacy of omalizumab for the treatment of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Maxime; Bardou, Marc; Bonniaud, Philippe; Goirand, Françoise

    2016-12-01

    Omalizumab is a subcutaneously administrated monoclonal anti-IgE antibody indicated in adults, adolescents and children 6 years of age and older with moderate to severe allergic asthma uncontrolled by conventional pharmacological treatments and sensitization to at least one perennial allergen. Area covered: This drug evaluation summarizes published data on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of omalizumab, on clinical efficacy and safety, including real-world evidence, and provides a medico-economic evaluation of the drug. Expert opinion: Omalizumab represents an efficient therapeutic option for the management of patients with uncontrolled moderate/severe allergic asthma. It provides a significant reduction in the asthma exacerbation rate with a steroid-sparing effect, an improvement in quality of life in adults and adolescents, despite a lack of evidence about its efficacy specifically in severe allergic asthma. Clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the pediatric population but further real-life evidence is expected to better characterize long-term effects in this population. There is still some debate about the optimal treatment duration but, to date, it is recommended not to stop the treatment as cessation has resulted in symptom recurrence. Omalizumab is an expensive treatment, but a key therapeutic option when used for uncontrolled severe allergic asthma.

  18. The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Clinical Manifestations of Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic, Aleksandra; Francuski, Djordje; Nikolic, Aleksandra; Milosevic, Katarina; Jovicic, Snezana; Markovic, Bojan; Djukic, Mirjana; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2017-08-01

    The significance of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of childhood asthma was recognized, but its role in the clinical manifestations of disease is still unclear. The study was conducted in 96 asthmatic children. The urinary biomarker of oxidative stress, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG/creatinine) was determined by using HPLC-MS/MS. ELISA was performed to measure myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Cu,Zn- superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD) in serum. Logistic regression analysis revealed that female gender, tobacco smoke exposure, and increased 8-oxodG/creatinine were associated with risk for intermittent asthma, while the positive allergy test and increased Cu,Zn-SOD were associated with eczema in asthmatic children. Higher MPO (p = 0.033), and percent of granulocytes (p = 0.030) were found in severe persistent asthma in comparison to intermittent or mild persistent asthma. The main findings that TSE-induced oxidative stress is a risk for intermittent asthma and eczema may be clinically significant for the disease prevention and therapeutic improvements.

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Developing from Asthma, Allergy, and Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how consciousness-based holistic medicine can be used in the case of asthma, allergy, and eczema. We have many fine drugs to relieve patients from the worst of these symptoms, where many children and adults suffer health problems related to hyper-reactivity of the immune system. Many symptoms remain throughout life because the drugs do not cure the allergy and allergy today is the sixth leading cause of chronic illness. The etiology of the immune disturbances is mostly unknown from a biomedical perspective. Consciousness-based holistic medicine could therefore be used to treat these diseases if the patient is willing to confront hidden existential pain, is motivated to work hard, and is dedicated to improve quality of life, quality of working life, and personal relationships. Improving quality of life is not always an easy job for the patient, but it can be done with coaching from the physician. An increased physical health is often observed after only a few sessions with a physician skilled in using holistic medical tools and able to coach the patient successfully through a few weeks of dedicated homework. Children with allergy and asthma can also be helped if their parents are able to do work on personal development, to improve the general quality of life in the family and their relationship with the child.

  20. Predicting occupational asthma and rhinitis in bakery workers referred for clinical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonaid, Badri Sadat; Rooyackers, Jos; Stigter, Erik; Portengen, Lützen; Krop, Esmeralda; Heederik, Dick

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational allergic diseases are a major problem in some workplaces like in the baking industry. Diagnostic rules have been used in surveillance but not yet in the occupational respiratory clinic. OBJECTIVE: To develop diagnostic models predicting baker's asthma and rhinitis among

  1. A Population-based Clinical Study of Allergic and Non-allergic Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, T.B.; Thomsen, S.F.; Nolte, H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to describe differences between allergic and non-allergic asthma in a large community-based sample of Danish adolescents and adults. Methods. A total of 1,186 subjects, 14 to 44 years of age, who in a screening questionnaire had reported a history of airway...... symptoms suggestive of asthma and/or allergy, or who were taking any medication for these conditions were clinically examined. All participants were interviewed about respiratory symptoms, and furthermore skin test reactivity, lung function, and airway responsiveness were measured. Results. A total of 489...

  2. Two cases of Schizophyllum asthma: is this a new clinical entity or a precursor of ABPM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Haruhiko; Fujimura, Masaki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Makimura, Koichi

    2011-10-01

    There is a close link between fungal sensitization and asthma severity. Although Schizophyllum commune (S. commune, "suehirotake" in Japanese), one of the basidiomycetous (BM) fungi, is a fungus that can cause allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) and allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS), whether the fungus causes or sensitizes subjects to asthma is unclear. The bronchial provocation test using S. commune antigen was performed in two asthmatics who had demonstrated positive skin reactions to the S. commune antigen, and low dose of itraconazole (50 mg/day) was prescribed as an adjunctive therapy for 2 weeks. The allergological features and clinical manifestations of these patients are herein evaluated and discussed. Case 1 was a 71-year-old female, and case 2 was a 69-year-old male. Both patients demonstrated positive reactions to the inhalation test. A diagnosis of AFS or ABPM was excluded in both patients because of the lack of a history of pulmonary infiltrates, central bronchiectasis, a history of expectoration of brown plugs or flecks, or sinusoidal findings. Although the efficacy of itraconazole in our cases was unclear, the elevated titer of the specific IgG-for S. commune in case 2 gradually decreased during the period of antifungal therapy. The two patients described herein were diagnosed to have bronchial asthma caused by S. commune; so-called Schizophyllum asthma. S. commune may also be a causative fungal antigen of bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of CPAP on clinical variables and autonomic modulation in children during an asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Dantas Gomes, Evelim Leal; Costa, Dirceu; Germano, Sandra Maria; Borges, Pâmela Vieira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá

    2013-08-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) causes changes in alveolar and intrathoracic pressure and the activation of pulmonary stretch receptors affects the balance of the autonomic nervous system. The acute effects of CPAP on autonomic modulation have been demonstrated in different diseases, but no studies have been carried out addressing CPAP in patients with asthma. The hypothesis tested in the present study is that CPAP can produce an autonomic effect beyond a mechanical effect of bronchial dilatation in children with asthma. The results demonstrated improvements in clinical variables and an increase in vagal tone with the administration of CPAP during an asthma attack, as demonstrated by a diminished respiratory rate and a reduction in signs of respiratory distress. Regarding autonomic modulation, an increase in parasympathetic variables was found, indicating non-cholinergic activation stemming from the persistent increase in peak flow. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparing clinical efficacy of Symbicort versus Pulmicort in reducing asthma symptom and improving its control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, higher efficacy of the combination of long-acting beta2-adrenoceptor agonist and inhaled corticosteroids on controlling asthma symptoms has been hypothesized. This study aimed to examine the clinical effects of the combination of Budesonide with formoterol (Symbicort and Budesonide (Pulmicort alone in persistent asthma. Materials and Methods: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial, 76 patients with definite diagnosis of moderate-to-severe asthma were randomized to receive Pulmicort 180 mcg/inhalation two puffs twice daily, or receive Symbicort 80/4.5 mg/inhalation two puffs twice daily, or receive Symbicort 160/4.5 mg/inhalation two puffs twice daily for 3 months. All participants were initially evaluated by spirometry for assessing respiratory parameters and also the level of asthma control was assessed by Asthma Control Test (ACT. Results: More significant improvement in spirometry parameters, including forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, as well as in peak expiratory flow (PEF in both groups of Symbicort with the regimens 80/4.5 mg/inhalation or 160/4.5 mg/inhalation 2 puffs twice daily compared with Pulmicort group, ACT score was significantly improved in Symbicort group with the regimens 160/4.5 mg/inhalation compared with both Symbicort groups with lower dosage and Pulmicort group . Response to treatment in PEF parameter and also in ACT level was significantly more in those who received Symbicort with the regimens 160/4.5 mg/inhalation compared with other two interventional groups adjusted for gender and age. Conclusion: Symbicort with the regimens 160/4.5 mg/inhalation has higher efficacy in reducing asthma symptom and improving its control compared with low doses of this drug and with Pulmicort.

  5. Environmental Air Pollutants as Risk Factors for Asthma Among Children Seen in Pediatric Clinics in UKMMC, Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Idayu Badilla; Ghazi, Hasanain Faisal; Zhie, Khor Hui; Khairuman, Khairul Aliff; Yahya, Siti Kasuma; Abd Zaim, Farah Azureen; Nam, Chok Wai; Abdul Rasid, Hazwan Zuhairi; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma is increasing, especially among children in Malaysia, with environmental factors as one of the main preventable contributors. The aim of this study was to determine the association between environmental air pollutants and the occurrence of asthma among children seen in pediatric clinics in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur. An unmatched case control study among children who attended the pediatric clinic was carried out from May to August 2015. A total of 223 children who were diagnosed with asthma (105 cases) and who did not have asthma (118 controls) were included in this study. Their parents or caregivers were interviewed using questionnaires modified from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. Data obtained were analyzed using SPSS software version 20. There was a higher risk of asthma in those who had carpet at home (OR = 2.15 CI [1.25-3.68]), those who lived within 200 m of heavy traffic (OR = 1.72 CI [1.01-2.93]), and those who were exposed to lorry fumes (OR = 2.61. CI [1.38-4.93]). Environmental air pollutants increased the risk of asthma among children in Malaysia. Exposure to congested roads, lorry fumes, and indoor carpet were associated with asthma among children in this study. Parents or caretakers of children with asthma should be given adequate education on the prevention of asthmatic attack among these children. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Summary of recommendations for the design of clinical trials and the registration of drugs used in the treatment of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgate, S T; Bousquet, J; Chung, K F

    2004-01-01

    With new drugs being introduced to treat asthma it is timely to review criteria that can be used to assess efficacy in clinical trials. Anti-asthma drugs are classified into symptoms-modifying, symptom preventers and disease modifying agents. Attention is drawn to the types of experimental eviden...

  7. The impact of sex and BMI on the clinical course of COPD and bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Wytrychowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bronchial asthma is a heterogeneous disease, and is one phenotype of asthma with obesity. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fourth most frequent cause of death in the world. Objectives. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of BMI and sex on the clinical course of uncontrolled asthma and COPD with moderate to severe airflow limitation. Material and methods . The study was performed on 2 groups. Group A: 72 adults suffering from asthma (38 F – females, 34 M – males with at least 1 exacerbation requiring treatment with systemic corticosteroids in the year before the study. Group B: 79 patients (34 F, 45 M with COPD Grades 2 and 3 according to GOLD. Data including age, gender, BMI, disease duration, treatment, concomitant diseases, pack-years, and number of exacerbations in the last year were collected. Asthma Control Questionnaire scores in group A and COPD Assessment Test scores in group B were collected. Pulmonary function tests were performed in both groups. Results . There were no differences between females and males in the analyzed variables in both groups. Obese patients (BMI > 30.0 kg/m2 were selected for analysis from group A (18 F, 10 M and from group B (13 F, 16 M. In group A, the number of exacerbations was significantly lower in males (M 1.3 vs. F 1.9; p = 0.01. In group B the age of obese patients was higher than in patients with BMI ≤ 30.0 (68.3 vs. 62.5; p = 0.002. Conclusion . Poorer control of asthma in obese patients was associated with the female gender. Age is a risk factor for obesity development in patients with COPD.

  8. Induced sputum nitrite levels correlate with clinical asthma parameters in children aged 7-18 years with mild to moderate persistent asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devki Nandan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this study is to measure levels of nitrites in induced sputum in children with asthma and correlate it with clinical asthma parameters. Method: This prospective observational study was done in PGIMER, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital, New Delhi, on 91 children aged 7-18 years with mild and moderate persistent asthma. Patients were specifically evaluated for five clinical parameters of asthma (i.e. Days of acute exacerbations, use of salbutamol as rescue medication, emergency visits, nights with cough, days of school absence and induced sputum nitrite levels was done at the time of enrollment and 3 months after treatment with inhaled budesonide. Results: The mean age of subjects was 10.79 ± 2.563yrs. Six (6.59% patients were not able to perform induced sputum, eighty five (93.41% patients were suitable for data analysis. There was significant reduction in sputum nitrite levels from 33.42 ± 22.04nmol/ml at enrollment to 11.72 ± 5.61 nmol/ml (P < 0.0005 after 3 months of inhaled budesonide therapy. Significant positive correlation was found between reduction in sputum nitrite level and control of asthma symptoms: Days of acute exacerbations(r value = 0.548, P value = 0.0001, Days of salbutamol use as rescue medication (r value = 0.431, P value =< 0.0001, Number of emergency visits(r value = 0.414, P value = 0.0001, Nights with cough (r value = 0.259, P value = 0.0169, Days of school absence(r value = 0.411, P value = 0.0001. Sputum nitrite levels were significantly higher in moderate persistent asthmatics as compared to mild at the time of enrollment (P < 0.0005, which shows that induced sputum nitrite levels correlate with asthma severity. Conclusions: This study confirms that nitrites in induced sputum correlate well with clinical asthma parameters and asthma severity in children and is a simple, non invasive, and cheap method which can be used as a parameter for monitoring of asthma.

  9. Effectiveness of asthma principles and practice course in increasing nurse practitioner knowledge and confidence in the use of asthma clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Fishwick, Judith C; Okafor, Maureen; Fletcher, Monica

    2015-04-01

    The Asthma Principle and Practice (APP) course, an evidence-based blended distance-learning educational encounter, was designed to aid in the dissemination of the 2007 asthma clinical guidelines (EPR-3) and priority messages, increase knowledge of content of the guidelines as well as create an environment to enable participants to apply knowledge and skills into clinical practice. Students received a self-study binder 6-week period prior to attendance at an interactive study day. The APP is grounded in adult education principle and practices. A questionnaire was completed before reading the study binder and post study day to measure demographic variables as well as awareness of and changes in knowledge and confidence in key attributes of the clinical guidelines including patient education. The results showed that by taking the APP course confidence levels related to knowledge of asthma and its management increased with specific reference to the asthma clinical guidelines. Confidence in the use of patient education/communication strategies improved as well as the use of pulmonary function tests and the interpretation of test results. Nurse practitioners are an important audience to target in the dissemination of clinical guidelines and benefit from educational materials based on adult education strategies. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  10. Clinical characteristics of the asthma-COPD overlap syndrome--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Mia; Bårnes, Camilla Boslev; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the so-called asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) has received much attention, not least because elderly individuals may present characteristics suggesting a diagnosis of both asthma and COPD. At present, ACOS is described clinically as persistent airflow limitation combined with features of both asthma and COPD. The aim of this paper is, therefore, to review the currently available literature focusing on symptoms and clinical characteristics of patients regarded as having ACOS. Based on the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a systematic literature review was performed. A total of 11 studies met the inclusion criteria for the present review. All studies dealing with dyspnea (self-reported or assessed by the Medical Research Council dyspnea scale) reported more dyspnea among patients classified as having ACOS compared to the COPD and asthma groups. In line with this, ACOS patients have more concomitant wheezing and seem to have more cough and sputum production. Compared to COPD-only patients, the ACOS patients were found to have lower FEV1% predicted and FEV1/FVC ratio in spite of lower mean life-time tobacco exposure. Furthermore, studies have revealed that ACOS patients seem to have not only more frequent but also more severe exacerbations. Comorbidity, not least diabetes, has also been reported in a few studies, with a higher prevalence among ACOS patients. However, it should be acknowledged that only a limited number of studies have addressed the various comorbidities in patients with ACOS. The available studies indicate that ACOS patients may have more symptoms and a higher exacerbation rate than patients with asthma and COPD only, and by that, probably a higher overall respiratory-related morbidity. Similar to patients with COPD, ACOS patients seem to have a high occurrence of comorbidity, including diabetes. Further research into the ACOS, not least

  11. Omalizumab in children with uncontrolled allergic asthma: Review of clinical trial and real-world experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Bradley E; Lanier, Bob; Milgrom, Henry; Deschildre, Antoine; Hedlin, Gunilla; Szefler, Stanley J; Kattan, Meyer; Kianifard, Farid; Ortiz, Benjamin; Haselkorn, Tmirah; Iqbal, Ahmar; Rosén, Karin; Trzaskoma, Benjamin; Busse, William W

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Allergen sensitization and high frequencies of comorbid allergic diseases are characteristic of severe asthma in children. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE mAb, is the first targeted biologic therapeutic approved for the treatment of moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma (AA) that remains uncontrolled despite high-dose inhaled corticosteroids plus other controller medications. Since its initial licensing for use in adults and adolescents 12 years of age and older, the clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of omalizumab have been demonstrated in several published clinical trials in children aged 6 to less than 12 years with moderate-to-severe AA. These studies supported the approval of the pediatric indication (use in children aged ≥6 years) by the European Medicines Agency in 2009 and the US Food and Drug Administration in 2016. After this most recent change in licensing, we review the outcomes from clinical trials in children with persistent AA receiving omalizumab therapy and observational studies from the past 7 years of clinical experience in Europe. Data sources were identified by using PubMed in 2016. Guidelines and management recommendations and materials from the recent US Food and Drug Administration's Pediatric Advisory Committee meeting are also reviewed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Developing Partnerships in the Provision of Youth Mental Health Services and Clinical Education: A School-Based Cognitive Behavioral Intervention Targeting Anxiety Symptoms in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Allison M; Groth, Trisha A; Sanders, Mary; O'Brien, Rosanne; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J

    2015-11-01

    Clinical scientists are calling for strong partnerships in the provision of evidence-based treatments for child mental health problems in real-world contexts. In the present study, we describe the implementation of a cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBI) to address grade 5 children's anxiety symptoms. The CBI arose from a long-standing partnership between University and Education Department stakeholders. The partnership integrates school-based, evidence-informed treatment delivery with clinical education, and also supports a school-based psychology clinic to provide assessment and treatment services to children attending schools within the catchment area and clinical training for university graduate students. Children in the active condition (N=74) completed the CBI during regular class time, while children in the control condition (N=77) received the standard classroom curriculum. Children's anxiety and depressive symptoms, threat interpretation biases (perceived danger and coping ability), and perceptions of their social skills were assessed before and after condition. Children in the active condition reported significant improvements in self-reported anxiety symptoms, and perceptions of their social skills and coping ability, whereas no significant differences were observed for children in the control condition from pre- to post-assessment. For a subset of children assessed 12 months after the CBI (n=76), symptom improvement remained stable over time and estimates of danger and coping ability showed even greater improvement. Results demonstrate the value of strong stakeholder partnerships in innovative youth mental health services, positive child outcomes, and clinical education. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Clinical characteristics of childhood asthma | Mercer | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective study was undertaken of 298 asthmatic children attending a paediatric allergy clinic in Bloemfontein. A detailed history was obtained, and skin tests were performed. Male predominance and an early age of onset were confirmed. Symptomatic allergic rhinitis was an extremely common finding. A family history ...

  14. Testing evidence routine practice: Using an implementation framework to embed a clinically proven asthma service in Australian community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joanne M; Saini, Bandana; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Garcia Cardenas, Victoria; Benrimoj, Shalom I; Armour, Carol

    Community pharmacists are well placed and evidence clearly demonstrates that they can be suitably trained to deliver professional services that improve the management of asthma patients in clinical, economic and humanistic terms. However the gap between this evidence and practice reality remains wide. In this study we measure the implementation process as well as the service benefits of an asthma service model. Using an effectiveness-implementation hybrid design, a defined implementation process (progression from Exploration through Preparation and Testing to Operation stages) supporting an asthma service (promoting asthma control and inhaler technique) was tested in 17 community pharmacies across metropolitan Sydney. Seven pharmacies reached the Operation stage of implementation. Eight pharmacies reached the Testing stage of implementation and two pharmacies did not progress beyond the Preparation stage of implementation. A total of 128 patients were enrolled in the asthma service with 110 patients remaining enrolled at the close of the study. Asthma control showed a positive trend throughout the service with the overall proportion of patients with 'poor' asthma control at baseline decreasing from 72% to 57% at study close. There was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of patients with correct inhaler technique from 12% at Baseline (Visit 1) to 33% at Visit 2 and 57% at study close. Implementation of the asthma service varied across pharmacies. Different strategies specific to practice sites at different stages of the implementation model may result in greater uptake of professional services. The asthma service led to improved patient outcomes overall with a positive trend in asthma control and significant change in inhaler technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patient profiles and clinical utility of mepolizumab in severe eosinophilic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haldar P

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pranabashis Haldar Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Glenfield Hospital, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK Abstract: Mepolizumab (Nucala® is an effective and specific anti-eosinophil molecular therapy that has recently been approved as add-on therapy for the management of severe eosinophilic asthma by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA, European Medicines Agency (EMA; European Union and more recently National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE; UK. It is one of several molecular therapies in development for this indication and is illustrative of the strategic trajectory for pharmaceutical drug development taken over the past decade in several disease areas. Molecular therapies offer the prospect of improved specificity and effectiveness of biological effect. However, this necessitates a clear understanding of the underlying mechanistic pathways underpinning pathological processes, to inform drug development that yields novel more efficacious treatment options with a better clinical profile than existing agents. For the first time, utilization of molecular therapies in clinical trials is providing a novel in vivo model to characterize the association between specific pathways and clinical disease expression. It is increasingly recognized that asthma exhibits both clinical and pathological heterogeneity. It follows that a one-size-fits-all approach will not be appropriate and cost-effectiveness may only be achieved by identifying responder subgroups. This so-called personalized approach to therapy is being supported by the parallel development of companion biomarkers for clinical application. In this review, the author summarizes the clinical studies, their interpretation and the lessons learnt with mepolizumab that have informed our understanding of the approach to personalized molecular therapy in asthma. Keywords: IL-5, Nucala, exacerbations 

  16. Clinical and atopic parameters and airway inflammatory markers in childhood asthma: a factor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, T; Wong, G; Ko, F; Lam, C; Fok, T

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have repeatedly shown weak correlations among lung function parameters, atopy, exhaled nitric oxide level (FeNO), and airway inflammatory markers, suggesting that they are non-overlapping characteristics of asthma in adults. A study was undertaken to determine, using factor analysis, whether the above features represent separate dimensions of childhood asthma. Methods: Clinically stable asthmatic patients aged 7–18 years underwent spirometric testing, methacholine bronchial challenge, blood sampling for atopy markers and chemokine levels (macrophage derived chemokine (MDC), thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC), and eotaxin), FeNO, and chemokines (MDC and eotaxin) and leukotriene B4 measurements in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Results: The mean (SD) forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FeNO of 92 patients were 92.1 (15.9)% predicted and 87.3 (65.7) ppb, respectively. 59% of patients received inhaled corticosteroids. Factor analysis selected four different factors, explaining 55.5% of total variance. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy was 0.587. Plasma total and specific IgE levels, peripheral blood eosinophil percentage, and FeNO loaded on factor 1; plasma TARC and MDC concentrations on factor 2; MDC, eotaxin and leukotriene B4 concentrations in EBC on factor 3; and plasma eotaxin concentration together with clinical indices including body mass index and disease severity score loaded on factor 4. Post hoc factor analyses revealed similar results when outliers were excluded. Conclusions: The results suggest that atopy related indices and airway inflammation are separate dimensions in the assessment of childhood asthma, and inflammatory markers in peripheral blood and EBC are non-overlapping factors of asthma. PMID:16055623

  17. Clinical significance of changes of serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in elderly patients with chronic bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in elderly patients with chronic bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels were determined with RIA in 55 elderly patients with chronic bronchial asthma and 35 controls. Results: Serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels were important pathophysiologic features in chronic bronchial asthma. (authors)

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Know How ... Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Asthma & Community Health File Formats ...

  19. Clinical significance of determination of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donglin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma and 30 controls. Results: Serum levels of TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF were very significantly higher in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma than those in controls (P<0.01). After one week treatment, the levels dropped considerably but still remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Monitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  20. Defining moderate asthma exacerbations in clinical trials based on ATS/ERS joint statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virchow, J Christian; Backer, Vibeke; de Blay, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    from baseline on at least 2 consecutive mornings/evenings or ≥20% decrease in FEV1 from baseline and/or d) visit to the emergency room/trial site for asthma treatment not requiring systemic corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: A clinically and patient-relevant, operational definition of moderate exacerbations......BACKGROUND: Exacerbations are a key outcome in clinical research, providing patient-relevant information about symptomatic control, health state and disease progression. Generally considered as an episode of (sub)acute deterioration of respiratory symptoms, a precise, clinically useful definition...... is needed for use in clinical trials. AIM AND METHODS: Focussing on moderate exacerbations, this opinion piece reviews landmark trials and current guidelines to provide a practical definition of a moderate exacerbation. Specifically, we adapt the ATS/ERS consensus statement of terminology Reddel et al...

  1. Anti-IgE: lessons from clinical trials in patients with severe allergic asthma symptomatic despite optimised therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Buhl

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of omalizumab has been extensively investigated in clinical trials in patients with severe persistent allergic (pre-treatment total immunoglobulin E 30–700 IU·mL–1 asthma including the Investigation of Omalizumab in Severe Asthma Treatment (INNOVATE study, which enrolled patients with inadequately controlled severe persistent allergic asthma despite receiving high-dose inhaled corticosteroid in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist, and also additional controller medication if required. In the INNOVATE study, add-on omalizumab significantly reduced clinically significant exacerbation rates by 26% (0.68 versus 0.91, severe exacerbation rates by 50% (0.24 versus 0.48 and emergency visit rates by 44% (0.24 versus 0.43 and significantly improved asthma-related quality of life (QoL compared with placebo. In a pooled analysis of data from seven studies, add-on omalizumab significantly reduced asthma exacerbation rates by 38% (0.91 versus 1.47 and total emergency visits by 47% (0.332 versus 0.623. In addition, omalizumab significantly improved QoL versus current asthma therapy in a pooled analysis of data from six studies. Omalizumab has demonstrated a good safety and tolerability profile in completed phase-I, -II and -III studies involving >7,500 patients with asthma, rhinitis or related conditions. Omalizumab represents a major advance for the treatment of severe persistent allergic asthma that is inadequately controlled despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids and a long-acting beta2-agonist.

  2. Social vs. Clinical Perspectives on the Use of Information: Implications for School-based Information Systems. Systemic Evaluation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotnik, Kenneth A.; And Others

    This paper presents a study of the contrast of social and clinical perspectives on the selection and use of information by school staff, including: (1) an outline of the context and activities of the study; (2) a definition and discussion of the basic distinction between social and clinical perspectives; (3) an examination of case material…

  3. A systematic review of serious games in asthma education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, David; Monnier, Delphine; Tesnière, Antoine; Hadchouel, Alice

    2017-05-01

    Serious games may be useful tools for asthma education. The objectives of this systematic review were to identify the available articles on serious games designed to educate patients and the general public about asthma and to assess their impact on patient's knowledge, behavior, and clinical outcomes related to asthma. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PsychInfo, and Web of Science were systematically searched from January 1980 to December 2015 for studies investigating serious games in asthma education. Two investigators independently assessed studies against inclusion criteria and rated those included on indicators of quality. Investigators extracted data on serious games' content and learning objectives, and on outcomes following Kirkpatrick classification. A total of 12 articles were found to be relevant, describing a total of 10 serious games. All serious games were directed toward children, with eight games for children with asthma and two for school-based intervention. The average Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument score was 13.9 of 18, which is high. Most of the serious games were associated with high rates of satisfaction and improvement in children's knowledge. Seven studies evaluated the impact of serious games on clinical outcomes and found no significant difference relative to control groups. Although serious games designed for asthma education have evolved with advances in technology, results of their evaluation remained similar across studies, with clear improvements in knowledge but little or no change in behaviors and clinical outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. [Occupational asthma: Clinical and professional profile of the Tunisian asthmatic worker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toujani, S; Hedhli, A; Mjid, M; Ben Salah, N; Ouahchy, Y; Louzir, B; Daghfous, J; Mhiri, N; Cherif, J; Beji, M

    2016-08-01

    Asthma takes up a great importance in occupational diseases but remains underestimated as it is insufficiently diagnosed. We aimed to access the clinical and professional profile of the Tunisian asthmatic worker. It was a retrospective descriptive study in a professional pathology unit in a university hospital. All patients referred by their doctor for symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma, during a period from 2000 to 2008, were included. Forty-eight patients were selected from 172. The mean age was 40 years, with a male predominance (56 %). In 2/3 of the cases, it was the textile workers, food and chemical industry. The etiological agents incriminated were textile dust in 18.8 % of cases followed by isocyanates and flour. Typical episodes of wheezing dyspnea were present in 52 % and atopy in 54.2 % of workers. In 2 % of cases, symptoms disappeared and worsened in 18.8 %. The prognosis of OA depends on early end accurate diagnosis. The physician's role is to initiate the appropriate diagnostic approach, which must comply with the Tunisian conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Elevation of antioxidant enzymes in the clinical effects of radon and thermal therapy for bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsunobu, Fumihiro; Hosaki, Yasuhiro; Ashida, Kozo; Tanizaki, Yoshiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Sugita, Katsuhiro; Kojima, Shuji

    2003-01-01

    An increased systemic production of oxygen-free radicals by activated inflammatory cells is thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effects of radon and thermal therapy on asthma in relation to antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxide. Radon and thermal therapy were performed once a week. All subjects went to a hot bathroom with a high concentration of radon, and nasal inhalation of vapor from a hot spring was performed for 40 min once a day under conditions of high humidity. The room temperature was 48 deg C; the room radon concentration was 2,080 Bq/m 3 . Blood samples were collected at 2 h, 14, and 28 days after the first therapy. A blood sample also was collected before the first therapy (at body temperature and background radon level) to be used as the control. The forced expiratory volume in one second (%FEV 1 ) was significantly increased 28 days after the first therapy. On day 28, the catalase (CAT) activity was significantly increased in comparison with the control. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was significantly increased compared to the control after first inhalation. On days 14 and 28, the lipid peroxide level was significantly decreased in comparison with the control. In conclusion, the present pilot study has shown that radon and thermal therapy improved the pulmonary function of asthmatics by increasing the reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes. (author)

  6. Point-of-care blood eosinophil count in a severe asthma clinic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, Enrico; Terranova, Giovanni; Chessari, Carlo; Frazzetto, Valentina; Crimi, Claudia; Fichera, Silvia; Picardi, Giuseppe; Nicolosi, Giuliana; Porto, Morena; Intravaia, Rossella; Crimi, Nunzio

    2017-07-01

    One of the main severe asthma phenotypes is severe eosinophilic or eosinophilic refractory asthma for which novel biologic agents are emerging as therapeutic options. In this context, blood eosinophil counts are one of the most reliable biomarkers. To evaluate the performance of a point-of-care peripheral blood counter in a patients with severe asthma. The blood eosinophil counts of 76 patients with severe asthma were evaluated by point-of-care and standard analyzers. A significant correlation between blood eosinophils assessed by the 2 devices was found (R 2  = 0.854, P asthma and the ELEN index, a composite score useful to predict sputum eosinophilia. The results of our study contribute to the validation of a point-of-care device to assess blood eosinophils and open the possibility of using this device for the management of severe asthma management. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mendonça Rodrigues

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: To describe the clinical characteristics, lung function, radiological findings, and the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum in children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA treated at a referral center in southern Brazil.Methods: We retrospectively analyzed children and adolescents (3-18 years of age with uncontrolled STRA treated with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2 agonists. We prospectively collected data on disease control, lung function, skin test reactivity to allergens, the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum, chest CT findings, and esophageal pH monitoring results.Results: We analyzed 21 patients (mean age, 9.2 ± 2.98 years. Of those, 18 (86% were atopic. Most had uncontrolled asthma and near-normal baseline lung function. In 4 and 7, induced sputum was found to be eosinophilic and neutrophilic, respectively; the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum having changed in 67% of those in whom induced sputum analysis was repeated. Of the 8 patients receiving treatment with omalizumab (an anti-IgE antibody, 7 (87.5% showed significant improvement in quality of life, as well as significant reductions in the numbers of exacerbations and hospitalizations.Conclusions: Children with STRA present with near-normal lung function and a variable airway inflammatory pattern during clinical follow-up, showing a significant clinical response to omalizumab. In children, STRA differs from that seen in adults, further studies being required in order to gain a better understanding of the disease mechanisms.

  8. The effects of additional care by a pulmonary nurse for asthma and COPD patients at a respiratory outpatient clinic: results from a double blind, randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rootmensen, Geert N.; van Keimpema, Anton R. J.; Looysen, Elske E.; van der Schaaf, Letty; de Haan, Rob J.; Jansen, Henk M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of additional information based nursing care program in the treatment of asthma and COPD patients at a pulmonary outpatient clinic. METHODS: In a double blind, randomized clinical trial, 191 patients were allocated to an additional care group or control group.

  9. Paediatric acute asthma management in Australia and New Zealand : practice patterns in the context of clinical practice guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babl, F. E.; Sheriff, N.; Borland, M.; Acworth, J.; Neutze, J.; Krieser, D.; Ngo, P.; Schutz, J.; Thomson, F.; Cotterell, E.; Jamison, S.; Francis, P.

    Objectives: To compare clinical practice guideline (CPG) recommendations and reported physician management of acute paediatric asthma in the 11 largest paediatric emergency departments, all of which have CPGs, in Australia (n= 9) and New Zealand (n= 2). All 11 sites participate in the Paediatric

  10. The patient-physician partnership in asthma: real-world observations associated with clinical and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, M; Vickers, A; Anderson, P; Kay, S

    2010-09-01

    It is hypothesized that a good partnership between asthma patients and their physicians has a direct and positive influence on the patients' clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Conversely, poor partnership has a detrimental effect on clinical and patient-reported outcomes. This paper uses data from a real-world observational study to define partnership through matched physician and patient data and correlate the quality of partnership with observed clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Data were drawn from Adelphi's Respiratory Disease Specific Programme, a cross-sectional study of consulting patients in five European countries undertaken between June and September 2009. A range of clinical and patient-reported outcomes were observed allowing analysis of the partnership between 2251 asthma patients and their physicians. Analysis demonstrates that the better the partnership between patient and physician, the more likely the patient is to have their asthma condition controlled (PPartnership is also associated with lower impact on lifestyle (Ppartnership is a contributory factor in the improvement of asthma treatment, and patient education may lead to improvement in a patient's ability to contribute to this. Device satisfaction is one of the markers of good partnership.

  11. Effect of Sameera Pannaga Rasa (arsenomercurial formulation) in the management of Tamaka Shwasa (bronchial asthma) - Randomized double blind clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashru, Mayur; Galib, R; Shukla, Vinay J; Ravishankar, B; Prajapati, Pradeep Kumar

    2013-10-01

    Asthma represents a profound world-wide public health problem. The most effective anti-asthmatic drugs currently available include β2-agonists and glucocorticoids which can controls asthma in about 90-95% of patients. In Ayurveda, this miserable condition is comparable with Tamaka Shwasa type of Shwasa Roga. In the present study, 52 patients were treated with Sameera Pannaga Rasa at a dose of 30 mg twice a day for 4 weeks along with Nagavallidala (leaf of Piper betel Linn.) The results were assessed in terms of clinical recovery, symptomatic relief, pulmonary function improvement and on subjective and objective parameters. A significant improvement in subjective parameters, control on asthma, recurrence of asthma, increase in peak expiratory flow rate, considerable decrease in total and absolute, acute eosinophil count and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were observed. Overall marked improvement was found in 33.33%, moderate improvement in 44.44% and mild improvement in 20.00% was observed. The study reveals that Sameera Pannaga Rasa can be used as an effective drug in bronchial asthma.

  12. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Diamant, Zuzana; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant impact on asthma incidence and manifestations. The purpose of the review is to discuss recent observations regarding the association between obesity and asthma focusing on underlying mechanisms, clinical presentation, response to therapy and effect...... of weight reduction. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical and epidemiological studies indicate that obese patients with asthma may represent a unique phenotype, which is more difficult to control, less responsive to asthma medications and by that may have higher healthcare utilization. A number of common comorbidities...... have been linked to both obesity and asthma, and may, therefore, contribute to the obese-asthma phenotype. Furthermore, recently published studies indicate that even a modest weight reduction can improve clinical manifestations and outcome of asthma. SUMMARY: Compared with normal-weight patients, obese...

  13. Effectiveness of computerized clinical decision support systems for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathima, Mariam; Peiris, David; Naik-Panvelkar, Pradnya; Saini, Bandana; Armour, Carol Lyn

    2014-12-02

    The use of computerized clinical decision support systems may improve the diagnosis and ongoing management of chronic diseases, which requires recurrent visits to multiple health professionals, disease and medication monitoring and modification of patient behavior. The aim of this review was to systematically review randomized controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of computerized clinical decision systems (CCDSS) in the care of people with asthma and COPD. Randomized controlled trials published between 2003 and 2013 were searched using multiple electronic databases Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, IPA, Informit, PsychINFO, Compendex, and Cochrane Clinical Controlled Trials Register databases. To be included, RCTs had to evaluate the role of the CCDSSs for asthma and/or COPD in primary care. Nineteen studies representing 16 RCTs met our inclusion criteria. The majority of the trials were conducted in patients with asthma. Study quality was generally high. Meta-analysis was not conducted because of methodological and clinical heterogeneity. The use of CCDSS improved asthma and COPD care in 14 of the 19 studies reviewed (74%). Nine of the nineteen studies showed statistically significant (p < 0.05) improvement in the primary outcomes measured. The majority of the studies evaluated health care process measures as their primary outcomes (10/19). Evidence supports the effectiveness of CCDSS in the care of people with asthma. However there is very little information of its use in COPD care. Although there is considerable improvement in the health care process measures and clinical outcomes through the use of CCDSSs, its effects on user workload and efficiency, safety, costs of care, provider and patient satisfaction remain understudied.

  14. Prevalence, determinants and clinical correlates of vitamin D deficiency in adults with inhaled corticosteroid-treated asthma in London, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliffe, David A; Kilpin, Kate; MacLaughlin, Beverley D; Greiller, Claire L; Hooper, Richard L; Barnes, Neil C; Timms, Peter M; Rajakulasingam, Raj K; Bhowmik, Angshu; Choudhury, Aklak B; Simcock, David E; Hyppönen, Elina; Corrigan, Christopher J; Walton, Robert T; Griffiths, Christopher J; Martineau, Adrian R

    2018-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common in children with asthma, and it associates with poor asthma control, reduced forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) and increased requirement for inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Cross-sectional studies investigating the prevalence, determinants and clinical correlates of vitamin D deficiency in adults with asthma are lacking. We conducted a multi-centre cross-sectional study in 297 adults with a medical record diagnosis of ICS-treated asthma living in London, UK. Details of potential environmental determinants of vitamin D status, asthma control and medication use were collected by questionnaire; blood samples were taken for analysis of serum 25(OH)D concentration and DNA extraction, and participants underwent measurement of weight, height and fractional exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FeNO), spirometry and sputum induction for determination of lower airway eosinophil counts (n=35 sub-group). Thirty-five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 11 vitamin D pathway genes (DBP, DHCR7, RXRA, CYP2R1, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP3A4 CYP27A1, LRP2, CUBN, VDR) were typed using Taqman allelic discrimination assays. Linear regression was used to identify environmental and genetic factors independently associated with serum 25(OH)D concentration, and to determine whether vitamin D status was independently associated with Asthma Control Test (ACT) score, ICS dose, FeNO, forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV 1 or lower airway eosinophilia. Mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 50.6nmol/L (SD 24.9); 162/297 (54.5%) participants were vitamin D deficient (serum 25(OH)D concentration asthma control investigated. Vitamin D deficiency is common among UK adults with ICS-treated asthma, and classical environmental determinants of serum 25(OH)D operate in this population. However, in contrast to studies conducted in children, we found no association between vitamin D status and markers of asthma severity or control. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by

  15. Feline asthma syndrome: a retrospective study of the clinical presentation in 29 cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, B.M.; Foster, D.J.; Fuentes, V.L.

    1995-01-01

    Feline asthma syndrome (FAS) is a clinical condition characterised by recurrent bouts of coughing, wheezing and, or, dyspnoea. While the aetiology is unproven, the condition is believed to involve a type I immediate hypersensitivity reaction to inhaled allergens. In this paper the clinical data from 29 cats, where a diagnosis of FAS was made, are assessed retrospectively. The most common clinical presentation was recurrent bouts of coughing (n = 26) and dyspnoea (n = 21). Radiographic changes were noted in 24 cats, which included increased bronchial (n = 5), interstitial (n = 7) and mixed (n = 12) (bronchial and interstitial) patterns. Right middle lung lobe collapse was noted in two cats. Abnormal bronchial cytology was present in 16 cats. A predominant eosinophilic sample was collected in only three cats. There were minimal changes in differential white cell counts, and mild eosinophilia was found in only five cats. Prednisolone alone was the most effective therapy, although avoidance of putative aeroallergens and antibacterial therapy was effective in some. On the basis of the data from these cases it would appear that the diagnosis of FAS depends largely on the clinical presentation and radiographic findings. The value of ancillary tests in the diagnosis of FAS appears to be limited

  16. The clinical significance of the substance P in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Bangping; Jiang Changbin

    2003-01-01

    Using radioimmunoassay to measure the substance P (SP) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in thirty patients with bronchial asthma and thirty healthy persons. Compered with healthy group (33.4±24.5 pmol/L), the SP in bronchial asthma group (240.2±18.7 pmol/L) increased significantly (p < 0.01). SP may play a role in the development of bronchial asthma

  17. Clinical and inflammatory characteristics of the European U-BIOPRED adult severe asthma cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Dominick E; Sousa, Ana R; Fowler, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    U-BIOPRED is a European Union consortium of 20 academic institutions, 11 pharmaceutical companies and six patient organisations with the objective of improving the understanding of asthma disease mechanisms using a systems biology approach.This cross-sectional assessment of adults with severe...... asthma, mild/moderate asthma and healthy controls from 11 European countries consisted of analyses of patient-reported outcomes, lung function, blood and airway inflammatory measurements.Patients with severe asthma (nonsmokers, n=311; smokers/ex-smokers, n=110) had more symptoms and exacerbations...

  18. Core Components for a Clinically Integrated mHealth App for Asthma Symptom Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Robert S; Fanta, Christopher H; Predmore, Zachary; Kron, Kevin; Edelen, Maria O; Landman, Adam B; Zimlichman, Eyal; Bates, David W

    2017-10-01

    Background mHealth apps may be useful tools for supporting chronic disease management. Objective Our aim was to apply user-centered design principles to efficiently identify core components for an mHealth-based asthma symptom–monitoring intervention using patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Methods We iteratively combined principles of qualitative research, user-centered design, and “gamification” to understand patients' and providers' needs, develop and refine intervention components, develop prototypes, and create a usable mobile app to integrate with clinical workflows. We identified anticipated benefits and burdens for stakeholders. Results We conducted 19 individual design sessions with nine adult patients and seven clinicians from an academic medical center (some were included multiple times). We identified four core intervention components: (1) Invitation—patients are invited by their physicians. (2) Symptom checks—patients receive weekly five-item questionnaires via the app with 48 hours to respond. Depending on symptoms, patients may be given the option to request a call from a nurse or receive one automatically. (3) Patient review—in the app, patients can view their self-reported data graphically. (4) In-person visit—physicians have access to patient-reported symptoms in the electronic health record (EHR) where they can review them before in-person visits. As there is currently no location in the EHR where physicians would consistently notice these data, recording a recent note was the best option. Benefits to patients may include helping decide when to call their provider and facilitating shared decision making. Benefits to providers may include saving time discussing symptoms. Provider organizations may need to pay nurses extra, but those costs may be offset by reduced visits and hospitalizations. Conclusion Recent systematic reviews show inconsistent outcomes and little insight into functionalities required for mHealth asthma

  19. Dosha phenotype specific Ayurveda intervention ameliorates asthma symptoms through cytokine modulations: Results of whole system clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kalpana S; Nesari, Tanuja M; Dedge, Amrish P; Dhumal, Vikram R; Shengule, Sushant A; Gadgil, Maithili S; Salvi, Sundeep; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran

    2017-02-02

    Over the past few decades, there have been significant scientific advances leading to improved understanding of asthma as a disease and treatment providing immediate relief. However, prevention of recurrent attacks, exacerbations and disease cure remains a challenge. Ayurveda refers to bronchial asthma as Tamaka Swasa and it is well explained in Charaka Samhita. Management of asthma in Ayurveda includes removal of vitiated Kapha through Shodhana, Shamana procedures, herbal and herbomineral formulations in addition to advising a healthy lifestyle and diet. Several clinical trials on Ayurvedic formulations for treatment of asthma are reported, however, whole system management of asthma has rarely been studied in the manner in which it is actually being practiced. Ayurveda therapeutics provides Dosha specific approaches, which needs biological investigation. The objective of our study was to investigate lung functions and cytokine changes in Asthmatic individuals in response to Ayurvedic intervention. The study design was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee of Tilak Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya (TAMV) & Sheth Tarachand Ramnath Charitable Ayurveda Hospital and followed guidelines of the Declaration of Helsinki and Tokyo for humans. It was conducted as a whole system individualized pragmatic clinical trial and written consent of patients was collected before enrollment. One hundred and fifteen patients with mild-to-moderate asthma were divided into 2 sub-groups depending on their disease subsets and administered phenotype specific ayurvedic interventions. Seventy six asthma patients completed the treatment. Serum IgE levels, blood eosinophil counts, spirometry and blood cytokine levels were measured before the start of treatment and six months at the end of treatment. Age and sex matched healthy participants (n=69) were recruited in the study for comparison of cytokines levels. Significant improvements in FEV1(% predicted) (p<0.0001) and FVC (% predicted) (p=0

  20. Asthma - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 53. Lugogo N, Que LG, Gilstrap DL, Kraft M. Asthma: clinical diagnosis and management. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et ...

  1. Inhaled budesonide for adults with mild-to-moderate asthma: a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa Godoy Fernandes

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Budesonide is an inhaled corticosteroid with high topical potency and low systemic activity recommended in the treatment of chronic asthma. OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of inhaled budesonide via a breath-activated, multi-dose, dry-powder inhaler. TYPE OF STUDY: Multicenter randomized parallel-group, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial. SETTING: Multicenter study in the university units. PARTICIPANTS: Adult patients with mild-to-moderate asthma that was not controlled using bronchodilator therapy alone. PROCEDURES: Comparison of budesonide 400 µg administered twice daily via a breath-activated, multi-dose, dry-powder inhaler with placebo, in 43 adult patients (aged 15 to 78 years with mild-to-moderate asthma (FEV1 71% of predicted normal that was not controlled using bronchodilator therapy alone. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Efficacy was assessed by pulmonary function tests and asthma symptom control (as perceived by the patients and the use of rescue medication. RESULTS: Budesonide 400 µg (bid was significantly more effective than placebo in improving morning peak expiratory flow (mean difference: 67.9 l/min; P < 0.005 and FEV1 (mean difference: 0.60 l; P < 0.005 over the 8-week treatment period. Onset of action, assessed by morning peak expiratory flow, occurred within the first two weeks of treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Budesonide via a breath-activated, multi-dose, dry-powder inhaler results in a rapid onset of asthma control, which is maintained over time and is well tolerated in adults with mild-to-moderate asthma.

  2. Clinical and immunologic findings of methylene diphenyl diisocyanate-induced occupational asthma in a car upholstery factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, G-Y; Koh, D-H; Choi, G-S; Park, H-J; Choi, S-J; Ye, Y-M; Kim, K-S; Park, H-S

    2008-04-01

    Although methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) is widely used in many industries, there have been few immunological studies of MDI-induced occupational asthma. We investigated the effects of MDI exposure on the clinical and immunologic condition of workers in a single car upholstery factory. Fifty-eight MDI-exposed workers were studied. Work-related lower-respiratory symptoms (WRRS) were identified using a questionnaire. Serum-specific IgE and IgG antibodies to MDI-human serum albumin conjugate were detected by ELISA. Atopy was evaluated using a skin prick test. MDI-induced occupational asthma was confirmed in the symptomatic workers with a positive result on an MDI-specific inhalation test. Thirteen (22.4%) of the subjects complained of WRRS. MDI-induced occupational asthma was confirmed in five (8.6%) of the workers, and occupational eosinophilic bronchitis was confirmed in two (3.5%). The prevalence of specific IgG antibodies (20.7%) was higher than that of specific IgE antibodies (8.6%). The prevalence of MDI-induced occupational asthma/eosinophilic bronchitis was strongly associated with the presence of both WRRS and serum-specific IgG antibodies to an MDI-human serum albumin conjugate (Pworkers. The prevalence of MDI-induced occupational asthma was 8.6%, and MDI-induced eosinophilic bronchitis was confirmed in two workers. The presence of work-related lower-respiratory symptoms and serum-specific IgG antibodies to an MDI-human serum albumin conjugate may be used to predict MDI-induced occupational asthma/eosinophilic bronchitis in MDI-exposed workers.

  3. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  4. Personalizing the Approach to Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Childhood Asthma Share | Personalizing the approach to childhood asthma Published Online: March 24, 2104 Clinicians treating asthmatic ... classifying 1,041 asthmatics who participated in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) clinical trial that assessed long- ...

  5. Comparative clinical study testing the effectiveness of school based oral health education using experiential learning or traditional lecturing in 10 year-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulou, Matina V; Kavvadia, Katerina; Taoufik, Konstantina; Oulis, Constantine J

    2015-04-28

    School based oral health education through traditional lecturing has been found successful only in improving oral health knowledge, while has low effectiveness in oral hygiene and gingival health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of experiential learning (EL) oral health education to traditional lecturing (TL), on enhancing oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior as well as oral hygiene, gingival health and caries of 10-year-old children. Eighty-four children were recruited for the EL and 100 for the TL group from 3 locations in Greece. Data regarding oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior were collected via questionnaires. Data regarding dental plaque, gingivitis and caries were collected by clinical examination. The evaluation using questionnaires and clinical examination was assessed at baseline and 6 and 18 months afterwards. Two calibrated pediatric dentists examined the students using a periodontal probe and artificial light. Modified hygiene index (HI) was used for dental plaque recording, the simplified gingival index (GI-S) was used for gingivitis and DMFT, based on BASCD criteria, for dental caries. Based on a dedicated manual, the teacher applied in the classroom the oral health educational program using EL. EL group had statistically significant better hygiene than the TL at 6 months (p 0.05) and attitude (p > 0.05) at 6 months in comparison to baseline. EL program was found more successful than TL in oral hygiene improvement. Both oral health education programs improved the oral health knowledge, attitude and behavior of children. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02320162).

  6. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL EFFICACY OF INOSINE PRANOBEX FOR ACUTE RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ATOPIC ASTHMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Bulgakova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of atopic asthma in children remains high. One of the reasons for lack of control over asthma symptoms is repeated infection. The article describes results from the study of immunomodulating medication inosine pranobex used in treatment of acute respiratory infections in children with atopic asthma. The results obtained prove the efficacy and safety of this medication. The use of this immunomodifier with antiviral activity during the period of acute respiratory infection in children with atopic asthma contributes to shortening of intoxication and catarrhal signs duration, elimination of viral agents. Key words: asthma, acute respiratory infections, immunomodifiers, inosine pranobex, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:98-105

  7. Bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardi, Gennaro; Salzillo, Antonello; Sofia, Matteo; D'Amato, Maria; D'Amato, Gennaro

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this review is to underline the need for an adequate clinical and functional evaluation of respiratory function and asthma control in patients undergoing surgical procedures requiring general anesthesia to obtain useful information for an adequate preoperative pharmacological approach. It has been shown that baseline uncontrolled clinical/functional conditions of airways represent the most important risk factors for perioperative bronchospasm. In nonemergency conditions, asthma patients should undergo clinical/functional assessment at least 1 week before the surgery intervention to obtain, the better feasible control of asthma symptoms in the single patient. Some simple preoperative information given by the patient in preoperative consultation may be sufficient to identify individuals with uncontrolled or poor controlled asthmatic conditions. Spirometric evaluation is essential in individuals with poor control of symptoms, as well as in those patients with uncertain anamnestic data or limited perception of respiratory symptoms, and in those requiring lung resection. A better control of asthma must be considered the 'gold standard' for a patient at 'a reasonable low risk' to develop perioperative/postoperative bronchospasm. International consensus promoted by pulmonologists, anesthesiologists, and allergists might be useful to define a better diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  8. Fenótipos clínicos de asma grave Clinical phenotypes of severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseliane de Souza Araújo Alves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer os fenótipos clínicos em portadores de asma grave. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados, retrospectivamente, 111 pacientes em um ambulatório especializado. Os pacientes foram avaliados e acompanhados de maneira sistemática, estabelecendo-se ao final do acompanhamento a adesão e o controle ou não da doença por dados clínicos e funcionais. A resistência ao tratamento foi definida como o não preenchimento, ao final do acompanhamento, por pelo menos seis meses, dos critérios de controle de asma, apesar do uso correto e adesão à medicação. Os fenótipos foram determinados por análise fatorial e comparados por testes diversos. RESULTADOS: Ao final, 88 pacientes foram considerados aderentes e 23 não aderentes. Por análise fatorial do grupo aderente, quatro fenótipos foram determinados: o fenótipo 1 (28 pacientes, formado pelos pacientes resistentes ao tratamento, com maior freqüência de sintomas noturnos, maior número de exacerbações e uso mais freqüente de broncodilatador de resgate; o fenótipo 2 (48 pacientes, formado pelos pacientes com obstrução persistente, com menores valores de relação volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo/capacidade vital forçada na avaliação inicial, idade mais avançada e maior tempo de doença; o fenótipo 3 (42 pacientes, representa os pacientes com rinossinusite alérgica, sendo constituído de não fumantes com obstrução predominantemente reversível; e o fenótipo 4 (15 pacientes, formado por casos com história de intolerância à aspirina associado à asma quase fatal. CONCLUSÕES: Um número significativo de portadores de ama grave não adere ao tratamento. Muitos pacientes com asma grave têm obstrução irreversível, mas o fenótipo clínico mais relevante é constituído pelos pacientes resistentes ao tratamento habitual.OBJECTIVE: To characterize clinical phenotypes of severe asthma. METHODS: A total of 111 patients were retrospectively evaluated at a

  9. Comparison of an expert system with other clinical scores for the evaluation of severity of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, V; Rédier, H; Pujol, J L; Bousquet, J; Proudhon, H; Michel, C; Daurès, J P; Michel, F B; Godard, P

    1996-01-01

    "Asthmaexpert" was produced at the special request of several clinicians in order to obtain a better understanding of the medical decisions taken by clinical experts in the management of asthmatic patients. In order to assess the severity of asthma, a new score called Artificial Intelligence score (AI score), produced by Asthmaexpert, was compared with three other scores (Aas, Hargreave and Brooks). One hundred patients were enrolled prospectively in the study during their first consultation in the out-patient clinic. Distribution of severity level according to the different scores was studied, and the reliability between AI and other scores was evaluated by Kappa and MacNemar tests. Correlations with functional parameters were performed. The AI score assessed higher levels of severity than the other scores (Kappa = 18, 28 and 10% for Aas, Hargreave and Brooks, respectively) with significant MacNemar test in all cases. There was a significant correlation between AI score and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (r = 0.73). These data indicate that the AI score is a severity score which defines higher levels of severity than the chosen scores. Correlations for functional parameters are good. This score appears easy to use for the first consultation of an asthmatic patient.

  10. Mortality among subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma at two respiratory disease clinics in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Murray M; Chapman, Kenneth R; McIvor, R Andrew; Sears, Malcolm R

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma are common; however, mortality rates among individuals with these diseases are not well studied in North America. OBJECTIVE: To investigate mortality rates and risk factors for premature death among subjects with COPD. METHODS: Subjects were identified from the lung function testing databases of two academic respiratory disease clinics in Hamilton and Toronto, Ontario. Mortality was ascertained by linkage to the Ontario mortality registry between 1992 and 2002, inclusive. Standardized mortality ratios were computed. Poisson regression of standardized mortality ratios and proportional hazards regression were performed to examine the multivariate effect of risk factors on the standardized mortality ratios and mortality hazards. RESULTS: Compared with the Ontario population, all-cause mortality was approximately doubled among subjects with COPD, but was lower than expected among subjects with asthma. The risk of mortality in patients with COPD was related to cigarette smoking, to the presence of comorbid conditons of ischemic heart disease and diabetes, and to Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease severity scores. Individuals living closer to traffic sources showed an elevated risk of death compared with those who lived further away from traffic sources. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality rates among subjects diagnosed with COPD were substantially elevated. There were several deaths attributed to asthma among subjects in the present study; however, overall, patients with asthma demonstrated lower mortality rates than the general population. Subjects with COPD need to be managed with attention devoted to both their respiratory disorders and related comorbidities. PMID:22187688

  11. A randomised clinical trial of feedback on inhaler adherence and technique in patients with severe uncontrolled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Imran; Greene, Garrett; MacHale, Elaine; Seheult, Jansen; Mokoka, Matshediso; D'Arcy, Shona; Taylor, Terence; Murphy, Desmond M; Hunt, Eoin; Lane, Stephen J; Diette, Gregory B; FitzGerald, J Mark; Boland, Fiona; Sartini Bhreathnach, Aoife; Cushen, Breda; Reilly, Richard B; Doyle, Frank; Costello, Richard W

    2018-01-01

    In severe asthma, poor control could reflect issues of medication adherence or inhaler technique, or that the condition is refractory. This study aimed to determine if an intervention with (bio)feedback on the features of inhaler use would identify refractory asthma and enhance inhaler technique and adherence.Patients with severe uncontrolled asthma were subjected to a stratified-by-site random block design. The intensive education group received repeated training in inhaler use, adherence and disease management. The intervention group received the same intervention, enhanced by (bio)feedback-guided training. The primary outcome was rate of actual inhaler adherence. Secondary outcomes included a pre-defined assessment of clinical outcome. Outcome assessors were blinded to group allocation. Data were analysed on an intention-to-treat and per-protocol basis.The mean rate of adherence during the third month in the (bio)feedback group (n=111) was higher than that in the enhanced education group (intention-to-treat, n=107; 73% versus 63%; 95% CI 2.8%-17.6%; p=0.02). By the end of the study, asthma was either stable or improved in 54 patients (38%); uncontrolled, but poorly adherent in 52 (35%); and uncontrolled, but adherent in 40 (27%).Repeated feedback significantly improved inhaler adherence. After a programme of adherence and inhaler technique assessment, only 40 patients (27%) were refractory and adherent, and might therefore need add-on therapy. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  12. School Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  13. Elevated Plasma Level of Leukotrienes in Bronchial Asthma Patients: A Possible Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Mansour

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma from bronchial asthma patients and healthy controls was investigated for the content of lipoxygenase products. After lipid extraction using SEP-PAK C18 Cartridges, the lipoxygenase products were measured by Enzyme-Immunoassay. Elevated chemotactic B4 was found in plasma from asthmatic patients with mean value (483±75 pmoUL, while the mean value in normal healthy donors was (140± 12.1 pmol/L (M±SE. The levels of spasmogenic cysteinyl containing leukotrienes were also very high in the bronchial asthma patients. Elevations of leukotriene B4 and cysteinyl containing leukotrienes were detected during attacks of bronchial asthma. These results suggest that leukotriene B4 may be important in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma and confirmed that peptidoleukotrienes playa role as chemical mediators during the asthmatic attack.

  14. Clinical Manifestations and Treatment of Adult-Onset Asthma and Periocular Xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cavallazzi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adult-onset asthma and periocular xanthogranuloma is an uncommon and recently described disease. Little is known about the condition because only a few case reports and series are available.

  15. Stratifying a Risk for an Increased Variation of Airway Caliber among the Clinically Stable Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Hayata

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: These results indicate that ACQ, %FEV1 and FENO can stratify the risk for increased variation in airway caliber among patients with stable asthma. This may help identify subjects in whom further monitoring of lung function fluctuations is indicated.

  16. Comparative effectiveness of asthma interventions within a practice based research network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Lisa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a chronic lung disease that affects more than 23 million people in the United States, including 7 million children. Asthma is a difficult to manage chronic condition associated with disparities in health outcomes, poor medical compliance, and high healthcare costs. The research network coordinating this project includes hospitals, urgent care centers, and outpatient clinics within Carolinas Healthcare System that share a common electronic medical record and billing system allowing for rapid collection of clinical and demographic data. This study investigates the impact of three interventions on clinical outcomes for patients with asthma. Interventions are: an integrated approach to care that incorporates asthma management based on the chronic care model; a shared decision making intervention for asthma patients in underserved or disadvantaged populations; and a school based care approach that examines the efficacy of school-based programs to impact asthma outcomes including effectiveness of linkages between schools and the healthcare providers. Methods/Design This study will include 95 Practices, 171 schools, and over 30,000 asthmatic patients. Five groups (A-E will be evaluated to determine the effectiveness of three interventions. Group A is the usual care control group without electronic medical record (EMR. Group B practices are a second control group that has an EMR with decision support, asthma action plans, and population reports at baseline. A time delay design during year one converts practices in Group B to group C after receiving the integrated approach to care intervention. Four practices within Group C will receive the shared decision making intervention (and become group D. Group E will receive a school based care intervention through case management within the schools. A centralized database will be created with the goal of facilitating comparative effectiveness research on asthma outcomes

  17. Comparison of Costs and Clinical Outcomes Between Hospital and Outpatient Administration of Omalizumab in Patients With Severe Uncontrolled Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiner, Eusebi; Fernández-Fabrellas, Estrella; Landete, Pedro; Novella, Laura; Ramón, Mercedes; Sancho-Chust, José Norberto; Senent, Cristina; Berraondo, Javier

    2016-04-01

    To compare clinical outcomes and costs between two administration strategies of omalizumab treatment. We evaluated two cohorts of patients with uncontrolled severe asthma over a 1-year period. Patients received the treatment in the primary care center in Hospital A and conventional hospital administration in Hospital B. We studied 130 patients, 86 in Hospital A and 44 in Hospital B, 30 men (24%) and 100 women (76%), age 50 ± 15 years, FEV1% 67 ± 22%, body mass index (BMI) 28 ± 6 kg/m(2), 639 ± 747 UI IgE/mL, followed for 24 ± 11 months (12-45), Asthma Control Test (ACT) score 12 ± 4 and Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) 3 ± 2. There were no significant pretreatment differences between the groups in hospital admissions and emergency room visits in the previous year, nor in proportion of patients receiving oral steroids. Evaluations were performed at baseline and after 12 months of treatment, revealing significant differences in ACT (Ptravel costs were 35% lower in the ambulatory strategy adopted in Hospital A. The administration of omalizumab in ambulatory health centers achieved the same clinical results as a hospital administration strategy, but with lower costs. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. A Pharmaco-Economic Analyzis of Treating Severe Uncontrolled Child Asthma with Omalizumab — Actual Russian Clinical Practice Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kolbin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Omalizumab is the first and yet the only biopreparation for asthma which combines high efficiency and high cost. The clinical-economic expediency of using omalizumab in asthmatic children has not been previously studied in Russia.Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and economic expediency of using omalizumab as additive treatment (to basic or supporting therapy in children with severe uncontrolled atopic asthma under the Russian economic conditions.Methods: We conducted a mathematical simulation of asthma treatment in children with an increased frequency of hospitalization (9 times per year with an average monthly omalizumab requirement of 558 mg. The model is based on the Markov chain. The model includes direct and non-direct costs. The planning horizons were 2 and 5 years. We analyzed the efficiency and utility of the costs and their influence on the budget. The stability of received data is proven by sensitivity analyzis.Results: Over a 5-year planning horizon the cost of an additional year of quality life (due to using omalizumab was 1,259,185 roubles, while the “society’s solvency” is 1 341 308 roubles (cost utility analizis. It takes 39,820 rubles to prevent one hospitalization with omalizumab over a 5-year planning horizon (cost efficiency analizis, which is comparable to the cost of hospitalization (43,141 rubles. Total costs for treating 100 children with asthma, 7 of which would be treated with omalizumab, were equal to the amount of money which is enough to treat 105 children without omalizumab (analysis of budgetary influence.Conclusion: The analyses of cost efficiency and utility have shown that the strategy of using omalizumab together with standard treatment is economically expedient. Budgetary influence analysis has not detected a significant burden on the budget.

  19. Quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in South Western Nigeria: A report of clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalu, Olufemi Olumuyiwa; Adeoti, Adekunle Olatayo; Ogunmola, Olarinde Jeffrey; Fadare, Joseph Olusesan; Kolawole, Tolutope Fasanmi

    2016-01-01

    To audit the quality of acute asthma care in two tertiary hospitals in a state in the southwestern region of Nigeria and to compare the clinical practice against the recommendations of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guideline. We carried out a retrospective analysis of 101 patients who presented with acute exacerbation of asthma to the hospital between November 2010 and October 2015. Majority of the cases were females (66.3%), audit has implicated the need to address the non-performing areas and organizational issues to improve the quality of care.

  20. Efficacy of Using the Japanese Version of the Asthma Control Test for Determing the Level of Asthma Control in Clinical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hasegawa

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study, the first large-scale investigation of the efficacy of the J-ACT, determined that this evaluation tool is highly efficacious in establishing the level of asthma control. However, the determination of accurate cutpoints for the J-ACT will require more clear definitions of asthma control in future prospective studies.

  1. Regulatory cells, cytokine pattern and clinical risk factors for asthma in infants and young children with recurrent wheeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, L M; Arroz, M J; Videira, P; Martins, C; Guimarães, H; Nunes, G; Papoila, A L; Trindade, H

    2009-08-01

    Several risk factors for asthma have been identified in infants and young children with recurrent wheeze. However, published literature has reported contradictory findings regarding the underlying immunological mechanisms. This study was designed to assess and compare the immunological status during the first 2 years in steroid-naive young children with >or= three episodes of physician-confirmed wheeze (n=50), with and without clinical risk factors for developing subsequent asthma (i.e. parental asthma or a personal history of eczema and/or two of the following: wheezing without colds, a personal history of allergic rhinitis and peripheral blood eosinophilia >4%), with age-matched healthy controls (n=30). Peripheral blood CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells and their cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), GITR and Foxp3 expression were analysed by flow cytometry. Cytokine (IFN-gamma, TGF-beta and IL-10), CTLA-4 and Foxp3 mRNA expression were evaluated (real-time PCR) after peripheral blood mononuclear cell stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (24 h) and house dust mite (HDM) extracts (7th day). Flow cytometry results showed a significant reduction in the absolute number of CD4(+)CD25(high) and the absolute and percentage numbers of CD4(+)CD25(+)CTLA-4(+) in wheezy children compared with healthy controls. Wheezy children at a high risk of developing asthma had a significantly lower absolute number of CD4(+)CD25(+) (P=0.01) and CD4(+)CD25(high) (P=0.04), compared with those at a low risk. After PMA stimulation, CTLA-4 (P=0.03) and Foxp3 (P=0.02) expression was diminished in wheezy children compared with the healthy children. After HDM stimulation, CTLA-4 (P=0.03) and IFN-gamma (P=0.04) expression was diminished in wheezy children compared with healthy children. High-risk children had lower expression of IFN-gamma (P=0.03) compared with low-risk and healthy children and lower expression of CTLA-4 (P=0.01) compared with healthy

  2. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obesity has significant negative impact on asthma control and risk of exacerbations. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies evaluating the effects of weight reduction on asthma control in obese adults. RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical studies have shown that weight...... reduction in obese patients is associated with improvements in symptoms, use of controller medication, and asthma-related quality of life together with a reduction in the risk for severe exacerbations. Furthermore, several studies have also revealed improvements in lung function and airway responsiveness...... reduction in obese adults with asthma leads to an overall improvement in asthma control, including airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Weight reduction should be a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with asthma....

  3. Occupational Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  4. Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  5. High frequency chest wall oscillation for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations: a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Stephanie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO is used for airway mucus clearance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFCWO early in the treatment of adults hospitalized for acute asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods Randomized, multi-center, double-masked phase II clinical trial of active or sham treatment initiated within 24 hours of hospital admission for acute asthma or COPD at four academic medical centers. Patients received active or sham treatment for 15 minutes three times a day for four treatments. Medical management was standardized across groups. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to therapy after four treatments (minutes used/60 minutes prescribed and satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included change in Borg dyspnea score (≥ 1 unit indicates a clinically significant change, spontaneously expectorated sputum volume, and forced expired volume in 1 second. Results Fifty-two participants were randomized to active (n = 25 or sham (n = 27 treatment. Patient adherence was similarly high in both groups (91% vs. 93%; p = 0.70. Patient satisfaction was also similarly high in both groups. After four treatments, a higher proportion of patients in the active treatment group had a clinically significant improvement in dyspnea (70.8% vs. 42.3%, p = 0.04. There were no significant differences in other secondary outcomes. Conclusions HFCWO is well tolerated in adults hospitalized for acute asthma or COPD and significantly improves dyspnea. The high levels of patient satisfaction in both treatment groups justify the need for sham controls when evaluating the use of HFCWO on patient-reported outcomes. Additional studies are needed to more fully evaluate the role of HFCWO in improving in-hospital and post-discharge outcomes in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00181285

  6. Perceived parent financial burden and asthma outcomes in low-income, urban children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Minal R; Brown, Randall W; Clark, Noreen M

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic characteristics of low-income parents who perceive financial burden in managing their child's asthma and related associations with their children's asthma outcomes and clinical characteristics. We hypothesized that (1) identifiable differences between parents who do and do not report burden; (2) regardless of access to care, asthma outcomes would be worse for children whose parents perceive financial burden in obtaining care for their child's condition. Baseline data from a randomized trial evaluating the effect of a school-based asthma intervention were analyzed for this research. Eight hundred thirty-five parents were interviewed by telephone regarding their child's asthma management. Associations between demographic and clinical factors and perception of financial burden were examined using bivariate analysis. Multivariate regression analyses were used to examine associations between perceptions of financial burden and asthma outcomes, including emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and missed school days. Perceived financial burden was evident in 10% (n = 79) of parents. Female heads of household (χ2 (3) = 7.41; p financial burden. In models controlling for level of asthma control, income, and having a usual source of asthma care, parents who perceived financial burden were more likely to have children who had at least one emergency department visit (OR = 1.95; 95% CI = 1.15 to 3.29), hospitalization (OR = 3.99; 95% CI = 2.03 to 7.82), or missed school days due to asthma (OR = 3.26; 95% CI = 1.60 to 6.67) in the previous year. Our results supported our hypotheses. Among low-income parents of children with asthma, the majority do not perceive financial burden to obtaining care. However, among parents that do perceive burden, urgent care use and missed school days due to asthma for their child were significantly higher, regardless of family income and having a

  7. Temporal relationship of allergic rhinitis with asthma and other co-morbidities in a Mediterranean country: a retrospective study in a tertiary reference allergy clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, M; Koulouris, S; Koti, I; Aggelides, X; Sideri, K; Chliva, C; Vassilatou, E; Kalogeromitros, D

    2010-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a global health problem which causes major illness and represents a risk factor for asthma. The primary aim of the study was to record the clinical pattern of allergic rhinitis and its temporal relation with asthma in a Greek population. Three-hundred and sixteen subjects with documented diagnosis of allergic rhinitis in a two-year period were included in this study. All participants completed a standardised questionnaire with full retrospective epidemiological data for rhinitis; in addition, serum IgE measurement and skin prick tests with 22 common inhalant allergens were carried out, while spirometry was performed in subjects with self-reported or doctor-diagnosed asthma. All subjects with at least one positive skin test were included in study analysis. One-hundred and sixty five out of 316 patients (49.1%) stated self reported-asthma while in 63/316 (19.9%) asthma was documented with spirometry. One hundred out of 165 (60.6%) had rhinitis as first clinical manifestation while in 24/165 (14.5%) asthma symptoms appeared first; the remaining 31/165 (24.9%) reported simultaneous onset of upper and lower airways' symptoms. About 68.5% were sensitised to seasonal allergens exclusively, while 50% were sensitised to ≥ 1 of Parietaria, grasses sp., Olea eur. The duration of rhinitis in the subpopulation of patients with self-reported asthma (n=165) was significantly higher compared with non-asthmatics (mean=3.22 years, p<0.001). Survival analysis for the estimation of asthma onset showed that the mean time interval with rhinitis only is 16.6 years (median 12 years, incidence 0.0596). The unique environmental conditions and the aerobiology of each area clearly affect the clinical features of respiratory allergy. Copyright © 2009 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Asthma essentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Greene

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic, reversible obstructive disease that when in exacerbation can present to the emergency department in a spectrum of severity. Prompt recognition of the potentially severely ill asthmatic requires a careful history and physical exam while considering alternative diagnoses for the presenting symptoms. Early administration of salbutamol and corticosteroids is indicated in almost all patients with other medications such as ipratropium and magnesium and supportive modalities like BiPAP reserved for sicker patients. The global impact of asthma is increasing, especially amongst children. While the benign clinical presentation is most common and mortality has decreased in recent decades due to improved recognition and care, the ubiquity of the condition and frequent lack of regular outpatient management contribute to the disease claiming 250,000 lives worldwide annually. The emergency physician must be prepared to assess and appropriately manage both the young child with a mild wheeze and the adult in respiratory failure.

  9. Significant rise of the prevalence and clinical features of childhood asthma in Qingdao China: cluster sampling investigation of 10,082 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rongjun; Guan, Renzheng; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhao, Baochun; Guan, Jie; Lu, Ling

    2014-09-26

    Recent investigations suggested that the trend of childhood asthma has been stabilizing or even reversing in some countries. The observation provides contrast to our experience. Thus, the study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical features of asthma in children aged 0-14 years in Qingdao China, determine the changes of childhood asthma in China, and discover evidence that can allow better diagnosis and treatment of childhood asthma. A cluster sampling method was used. We randomly extracted the investigation clusters from schools, kindergartens, and communities in Qingdao. Subsequently, we interviewed the members of the clusters using a questionnaire from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) to find children with asthmatic symptoms. After determination by the doctors, more details on the asthmatic children were obtained by asking questions from the National Epidemiology Study of Asthma and Allergies in China questionnaire to obtain more details. We intended to survey 10,800 children. However, the actual number of children was 10,082. The prevalence of asthma in Qingdao children aged 0-14 years was 3.69%. The prevalence among male children was higher than in female (χ2 = 24.53,P China increased significantly based on data obtained ten years ago (2000). Respiratory tract infections were the most important precursors of asthma attack. The attack was most commonly manifested as cough. The treatment, especially the use of ICS, was more rational. However, a certain difference was found, which has yet to be contrasted with the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) project.

  10. Homoeopathy for the management of Asthma - A review of Council′s Clinical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The positive outcome in controlling acute episodes of asthma, reducing the frequency and intensity of subsequent episodes and weaning of bronchodilators and other allopathic drugs have been reported. As only observational studies have been conducted, further pragmatic trials including randomized control studies are desirable.

  11. Longterm clinical outcomes of omalizumab therapy in severe allergic asthma: Study of efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Adel H; Srivastava, Sapna; Mitchell, Verity; Sullivan, Julie; Kasujee, Ismail

    2017-03-01

    Omalizumab has been shown to be an effective add-on therapy for patients with uncontrolled severe persistent allergic asthma. There has been a steady accumulation of evidence on the long-term effectiveness of omalizumab; however, data on real-life outcomes beyond one year of treatment is limited. In this study, we report on long-term outcomes of omalizumab treatment. We collected data from our severe asthma registry on hospitalisations, exacerbations, corticosteroid sparing, asthma control, lung function, biomarkers and side effects, to determine if the benefit was sustained and treatment was safe on the long term. Forty-five patients [mean age 44.9 years (range 19-69), females 37/45 (82%), mean duration of omalizumab treatment = 60.7 ± 30.9 months (range 23-121) were included in the analysis. We observed a reduction in the annual acute asthma related hospital admissions for the total population from 207 at baseline to 40 on treatment (80.7% reduction), whilst the per patient annual hospitalisations were reduced from a mean of 4.8 to 0.89 post-omalizumab treatment (p omalizumab therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical and inflammatory characteristics of the European U-BIOPRED adult severe asthma cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaw, Dominick E.; Sousa, Ana R.; Fowler, Stephen J.; Fleming, Louise J.; Roberts, Graham; Corfield, Julie; Pandis, Ioannis; Bansal, Aruna T.; Bel, Elisabeth H.; Auffray, Charles; Compton, Chris H.; Bisgaard, Hans; Bucchioni, Enrica; Caruso, Massimo; Chanez, Pascal; Dahlén, Barbro; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Dyson, Kerry; Frey, Urs; Geiser, Thomas; Gerhardsson de Verdier, Maria; Gibeon, David; Guo, Yi-Ke; Hashimoto, Simone; Hedlin, Gunilla; Jeyasingham, Elizabeth; Hekking, Pieter-Paul W.; Higenbottam, Tim; Horváth, Ildikó; Knox, Alan J.; Krug, Norbert; Erpenbeck, Veit J.; Larsson, Lars X.; Lazarinis, Nikos; Matthews, John G.; Middelveld, Roelinde; Montuschi, Paolo; Musial, Jacek; Myles, David; Pahus, Laurie; Sandström, Thomas; Seibold, Wolfgang; Singer, Florian; Strandberg, Karin; Sterk, Peter J.; van Aalderen, Wim; Lutter, Rene; van Drunen, Kees; Brinkman, Paul; Zwinderman, Koos

    2015-01-01

    U-BIOPRED is a European Union consortium of 20 academic institutions, 11 pharmaceutical companies and six patient organisations with the objective of improving the understanding of asthma disease mechanisms using a systems biology approach.This cross-sectional assessment of adults with severe

  13. Using a knowledge translation framework to implement asthma clinical practice guidelines in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licskai, Christopher; Sands, Todd; Ong, Michael; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Quality problem International guidelines establish evidence-based standards for asthma care; however, recommendations are often not implemented and many patients do not meet control targets. Initial assessment Regional pilot data demonstrated a knowledge-to-practice gap. Choice of solutions We engineered health system change in a multi-step approach described by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework. Implementation Knowledge translation occurred at multiple levels: patient, practice and local health system. A regional administrative infrastructure and inter-disciplinary care teams were developed. The key project deliverable was a guideline-based interdisciplinary asthma management program. Six community organizations, 33 primary care physicians and 519 patients participated. The program operating cost was $290/patient. Evaluation Six guideline-based care elements were implemented, including spirometry measurement, asthma controller therapy, a written self-management action plan and general asthma education, including the inhaler device technique, role of medications and environmental control strategies in 93, 95, 86, 100, 97 and 87% of patients, respectively. Of the total patients 66% were adults, 61% were female, the mean age was 35.7 (SD = ± 24.2) years. At baseline 42% had two or more symptoms beyond acceptable limits vs. 17% (P< 0.001) post-intervention; 71% reported urgent/emergent healthcare visits at baseline (2.94 visits/year) vs. 45% (1.45 visits/year) (P< 0.001); 39% reported absenteeism (5.0 days/year) vs. 19% (3.0 days/year) (P< 0.001). The mean follow-up interval was 22 (SD = ± 7) months. Lessons learned A knowledge-translation framework can guide multi-level organizational change, facilitate asthma guideline implementation, and improve health outcomes in community primary care practices. Program costs are similar to those of diabetes programs. Program savings offset costs in a ratio of 2.1:1.

  14. Using a knowledge translation framework to implement asthma clinical practice guidelines in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licskai, Christopher; Sands, Todd; Ong, Michael; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Quality problem International guidelines establish evidence-based standards for asthma care; however, recommendations are often not implemented and many patients do not meet control targets. Initial assessment Regional pilot data demonstrated a knowledge-to-practice gap. Choice of solutions We engineered health system change in a multi-step approach described by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework. Implementation Knowledge translation occurred at multiple levels: patient, practice and local health system. A regional administrative infrastructure and inter-disciplinary care teams were developed. The key project deliverable was a guideline-based interdisciplinary asthma management program. Six community organizations, 33 primary care physicians and 519 patients participated. The program operating cost was $290/patient. Evaluation Six guideline-based care elements were implemented, including spirometry measurement, asthma controller therapy, a written self-management action plan and general asthma education, including the inhaler device technique, role of medications and environmental control strategies in 93, 95, 86, 100, 97 and 87% of patients, respectively. Of the total patients 66% were adults, 61% were female, the mean age was 35.7 (SD = ±24.2) years. At baseline 42% had two or more symptoms beyond acceptable limits vs. 17% (Pabsenteeism (5.0 days/year) vs. 19% (3.0 days/year) (P< 0.001). The mean follow-up interval was 22 (SD = ±7) months. Lessons learned A knowledge-translation framework can guide multi-level organizational change, facilitate asthma guideline implementation, and improve health outcomes in community primary care practices. Program costs are similar to those of diabetes programs. Program savings offset costs in a ratio of 2.1:1 PMID:22893665

  15. Validation of the Asthma Illness Representation Scale-Spanish (AIRS-S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidora-Arcoleo, Kimberly Joan; Feldman, Jonathan; Serebrisky, Denise; Spray, Amanda

    2010-05-01

    To expand knowledge surrounding parental illness representations (IRs) of their children's asthma, it is imperative that culturally appropriate survey instruments are developed and validated for use in clinical and research settings. The Asthma Illness Representation Scale (AIRS) provides a structured assessment of the key components of asthma IRs, allowing the health care provider (HCP) to quickly identify areas of discordance with the professional model of asthma management. The English AIRS was developed and validated among a geographically and ethnically diverse sample. The authors present the validation results of the AIRS-S (Spanish) from a sample of Mexican and Puerto Rican parents. The AIRS was translated and back translated per approved methodologies. Factor analysis, internal reliability, external validity, and 2-week test-retest reliability (on a subsample) were carried out and results compared with the validated English version. Data were obtained from 80 Spanish-speaking Mexican and Puerto Rican parents of children with asthma. The sample was recruited from two school-based health centers and a free medical clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, and a hospital-based asthma clinic in Bronx, New York. The original Nature of Asthma Symptoms, Facts About Asthma, and Attitudes Towards Medication Use subscales emerged. Remaining factors were a mixture of items with no coherent or theoretical distinction between them. Interpretation of results is limited due to not meeting the minimum requirement of 5 observations/item. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the total score (alpha = .77) and majority of subscales (alpha range = .53-.77) were acceptable and consistent with the English version. Parental reports of a positive relationship with the HCP significantly predicted AIRS scores congruent with the professional model; longer asthma duration was associated with beliefs aligned with the lay model; and AIRS scores congruent with the professional model were related to lower

  16. Detection of levels of serum interleukin-10 and plasma endothelin in children with or without atopic asthma and their clinical significances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuehua; Liu Li; Qiao Hongmei; Li Ya'nan; Lu Qinghua; Cheng Huanji

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the changes of the levels of serum interleukin-10 (Il-10), plasma endothelin (Et-1) and immunoglobulin E (IgE) in children with or without a topic asthma and to discuss their clinical significances. Methods: 60 asthma children conducted the Allergen skin prick tests and serum IgE measurement to determine a topic status at the same time, and they were divided into a topic asthma group (n=32) and non-a topic asthma group (n=28) according to the results. 30 normal healthy children were selected as control group. The expressions of Et-1 and IgE in the asthma children during attack period and remission phase and the children in control group were detected by radioimmunoassay and the levels of serum Il-10 were detected by the double antibody sandwich ELISA. Results: The level of serum Il-10 in the asthma children in the acute attack period was lower than those in control group (P<0.01), and the level of Et-1 was higher obviously than that in control group (P<0.05); the levels of IgE in the asthma children in the acute attack period and remission phase in asthma groups were obviously higher than that in control group (P<0.01). The levels of Et-1 and IgE of the a topic asthma children in acute attack period were higher than those of the atopic asthma children in remission phase, and the level of IL-10 was lower (P<0.01). The levels of serum IL-10 in atopic of the acute attack period was lower than that in non-atopic group (P<0.05), and the levels of the ET-1 and IgE of the patients in the acute attack period and remission phase in atopic group were higher than those in non-atopic group (P<0.05). The relationship between IL-10 level and ET-1 and IgE showed obviously negative correlations (r=-0.592, r=-0.894, P<0.05), and the relationship between ET-1 and IgE showed obviously positive correlation (r=-0.623, P<0.05). Conclusion: The levels of serum IL-10 and ET-1 perhaps take part in the pathologic and physiological process of the children's asthma

  17. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Biologic Therapy and Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Ravi K; Busse, William W

    2018-02-01

    Although airway inflammation is an intrinsic and key feature of asthma, this response varies in its intensity and translation to clinical characteristics and responsiveness to treatment. The observations that clinical heterogeneity is an important aspect of asthma and a feature that likely dictates and determines responses to treatment in severe asthma, patient responsiveness to medication is incomplete, and risks for exacerbation are increased. The development of biologics, which target selected and specific components of inflammation, has been a promising advance to achieve asthma control in patients with severe disease. This article reviews the current biologics available and under development and how their use has affected asthma and which subpopulations appear to benefit the greatest. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Asthma Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Asthma KidsHealth / For Parents / Asthma What's in this article? ... I Know? Print en español Asma What Is Asthma? Asthma is a condition that causes breathing problems. ...

  20. The Use of Telemedicine Access to Schools to Facilitate Expert Assessment of Children with Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Bergman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that access to an asthma specialist improves asthma outcomes. We hypothesized that we could improve access to expert asthma care through a telemedicine link between an asthma specialist and a school-based asthma program. We conducted a prospective cohort study in 3 urban schools to ascertain the feasibility of using an asthma-focused telemedicine solution. Each subject was seen by an asthma expert at 0, 8, and 32 weeks. The assessment and recommendations for care were sent to the primary care physician (PCP and parents were told to contact their physician for follow-up care. Eighty three subjects participated in the study. Subjects experienced improvement (P<.05 in family social activities and the number of asthma attacks. Ninety four percent of subjects rated the program as good or excellent. This study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptance of a school-based asthma program using a telemedicine link to an asthma specialist.

  1. Improvement in pulmonary functions and clinical parameters due to addition of breathing exercises in asthma patients receiving optimal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti Agarwal

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Breathing exercises provided significant improvements in spirometric parameters and significant reduction in breathlessness, wheezing, and nocturnal symptoms as well as requirements of rescue medicines in asthma patients who were receiving optimal asthma treatment.

  2. Integrating Demographic, Clinical,and Environmental Exposure Information to Identify Genomic Biomarkers Associated With Subtypes of Childhood Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood asthma is a multifactorial disease with a disturbingly high incidence in urbanized areas. The pathogenesis of asthma is poorly understood due to the complex relationship between genetic susceptibility and modulating environmental factors. The Mechanistic Indicators of C...

  3. The Adolescent "Expanded Medical Home": School-Based Health Centers Partner with a Primary Care Clinic to Improve Population Health and Mitigate Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Laurie, Anna R; Plegue, Melissa A; Richarson, Caroline R

    2016-01-01

    Access to high-quality health care is a crucial social determinant of health. We describe the implementation of an "expanded medical home" partnering a primary care practice (the Ypsilanti Health Center [YHC]) with local school-based health centers (the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools [RAHS]), and to assess whether this model improves access to and quality of care for shared patients. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, we define the steps in, barriers to, and facilitating factors in implementing the expanded medical home model. Visits and quality measures were assessed for patients seen by YHC only versus YHC/RAHS at baseline and during the intervention. At baseline, patients seen at YHC/RAHS had higher compliance with most quality metrics compared with those seen at YHC only. The proportion of shared patients significantly increased because of the intervention (P partnership between primary care physicians and school-based health centers increases the number of shared high-risk adolescent patients. Shared patients have improved compliance with quality measures, which may lead to long-term improved health equity. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in Preventing Common Cold-like Symptoms in Bronchial Asthma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Horiguchi

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions: Adult asthma patients undergoing treatment with LTRAs exhibit lower incidence rates of common cold-like symptoms than those not receiving LTRAs. LTRAs play an important role in reducing the incidence of common cold-like symptoms among asthma patients and in suppressing exacerbation of asthma symptoms possibly associated with these symptoms.

  5. Evaluation of acute bacterial rhino sinusitis in asthma patients based on clinical parameters and imaging studies, together with ear, nose and throat examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Alecsandra Calil Moises; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Dept. of Internal Medicine]. E-mail: analgf@terra.com.br; analuisa@pneumo.epm.br; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Otorhinolaryngology; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging

    2008-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate paranasal sinuses in patients with stable or acute asthma in order to determine the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 30 patients with acute asthma (73% females) treated in the emergency room and 30 patients with stable asthma (80% females) regularly monitored as outpatients. All patients completed a questionnaire on respiratory signs and symptoms and were submitted to ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, as well as to X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the sinuses. Results: Based on the clinical diagnosis, the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis was 40% in the patients with acute asthma and 3% in those with stable asthma. The ENT examination findings and the imaging findings in isolation were not useful to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusions: In themselves, ENT examination findings, X-ray findings and CT findings were not useful for the diagnosis of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Our results provide further evidence that a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis should be made with caution. (author)

  6. Evaluation of acute bacterial rhino sinusitis in asthma patients based on clinical parameters and imaging studies, together with ear, nose and throat examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, Alecsandra Calil Moises; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate paranasal sinuses in patients with stable or acute asthma in order to determine the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 30 patients with acute asthma (73% females) treated in the emergency room and 30 patients with stable asthma (80% females) regularly monitored as outpatients. All patients completed a questionnaire on respiratory signs and symptoms and were submitted to ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, as well as to X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the sinuses. Results: Based on the clinical diagnosis, the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis was 40% in the patients with acute asthma and 3% in those with stable asthma. The ENT examination findings and the imaging findings in isolation were not useful to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusions: In themselves, ENT examination findings, X-ray findings and CT findings were not useful for the diagnosis of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Our results provide further evidence that a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis should be made with caution. (author)

  7. WeChat Public Account Use Improves Clinical Control of Cough-Variant Asthma: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Lin, Shi-Hua; Zhu, Ding; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Shen, Hua-Hao; Li, Wen

    2018-03-14

    BACKGROUND WeChat is a convenient and popular social medium, and it seems to be an appropriate platform for education and management of patients. This study sought to identify usefulness in clinical control of cough-variant asthma (CVA). MATERIAL AND METHODS A randomized controlled trial was conducted among 80 CVA patients. After being assigned to either the traditional group (TG) or the WeChat group (WG), they received the same inhalation therapy, but patients in WG received additional education and instruction via our public account on the WeChat application. Questionnaires on asthma and chronic cough, data on pulmonary function, blood-related items, follow-up adherence, and Emergency Department (ED) visits were collected at the initial visit and at 3 months. RESULTS A total of 67 participants completed the trial for analysis. FEV1/predicted and FEV1/FVC were significantly increased in WG (pWeChat as part of treatment and management of CVA can help patients learn about their disease and medications, as well as improve disease control and therapy outcomes.

  8. Not Always Asthma: Clinical and Legal Consequences of Delayed Diagnosis of Laryngotracheal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Nunn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS is a rare condition that occurs most commonly as a result of instrumentation of the airway but may also occur as a result of inflammatory conditions or idiopathically. Here, we present the case of a patient who developed LTS as a complication of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, which was misdiagnosed as asthma for 6 years. After an admission with respiratory symptoms that worsened to the extent that she required intubation, a previously well 14-year-old girl was diagnosed with GPA. Following immunosuppressive therapy, she made a good recovery and was discharged after 22 days. Over subsequent years, she developed dyspnoea and “wheeze” and a diagnosis of asthma was made. When she became pregnant, she was admitted to hospital with worsening respiratory symptoms, whereupon her “wheeze” was correctly identified as “stridor,” and subsequent investigations revealed a significant subglottic stenosis. The delay in diagnosis precluded the use of minimally invasive therapies, with the result that intermittent laser resection and open laryngotracheal reconstructive surgery were the only available treatment options. There were numerous points at which the correct diagnosis might have been made, either by proper interpretation of flow-volume loops or by calculation of the Empey or Expiratory Disproportion Indices from spirometry data.

  9. Occupational asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the airways of the lungs. When an asthma attack occurs, the lining of the air passages swells ... small amount of the substance can trigger an asthma attack. Using a respiratory device to protect or reduce ...

  10. Asthma Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is working to explore the role of common air pollutants in the development and exacerbation of asthma at different life stages as well as other environmental and genetic factors that might make a person more sensitive to developing asthma.

  11. Understanding mild persistent asthma in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Szefler, Stanley J

    2005-01-01

    Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States...... and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems...... to be unrelated to the symptom severity. Clinical studies restricted to pediatric patients with mild asthma are limited, but available data do suggest substantial morbidity of mild persistent asthma in this population and support inhaled corticosteroid intervention. There is a need for further investigation...

  12. Asthma in pregnancy: association between the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and comparisons with spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Georgia Véras; Leite, Débora F B; Rizzo, José A; Sarinho, Emanuel S C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a possible association between the assessment of clinical asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) classification and to perform comparisons with values of spirometry. Through this cross-sectional study, 103 pregnant women with asthma were assessed in the period from October 2010 to October 2013 in the asthma pregnancy clinic at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Questionnaires concerning the level of asthma control were administered using the Global Initiative for Asthma classification, the Asthma Control Test validated for asthmatic expectant mothers and spirometry; all three methods of assessing asthma control were performed during the same visit between the twenty-first and twenty-seventh weeks of pregnancy. There was a significant association between clinical asthma control assessment using the Asthma Control Test and the Global Initiative for Asthma classification (pspirometry. This study shows that both the Global Initiative for Asthma classification and the Asthma Control Test can be used for asthmatic expectant mothers to assess the clinical control of asthma, especially at the end of the second trimester, which is assumed to be the period of worsening asthma exacerbations during pregnancy. We highlight the importance of the Asthma Control Test as a subjective instrument with easy application, easy interpretation and good reproducibility that does not require spirometry to assess the level of asthma control and can be used in the primary care of asthmatic expectant mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Public Health Nurse-Delivered Asthma Program to Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicutto, Lisa; To, Teresa; Murphy, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Childhood asthma is a serious and common chronic disease that requires the attention of nurses and other school personnel. Schools are often the first setting that children take the lead in managing their asthma. Often, children are ill prepared for this role. Our study evaluated a school-based, multifaceted asthma program that…

  14. Clinical utility and development of the fluticasone/formoterol combination formulation (Flutiform® for the treatment of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan RA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo Antonio Tan,1 Jonathan Corren2 1California Allergy and Asthma Medical Group, 2David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Pharmacologic treatment of asthma should be done with a stepwise approach recommended in treatment guidelines. If inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs alone are not adequate, ICSs in combination with long-acting β-agonists (LABAs are now established and widely used as the next step in effective controller therapy. Fixed-dose ICS/LABA combinations in a single device are the preferred form of delivery and improve compliance by enabling patients to get symptom relief from the LABA while receiving the anti-inflammatory benefits of ICSs. Fluticasone propionate/formoterol fumarate is one of the newest fixed-dose combinations. It has been in use in Europe in 2012, but is still under regulatory review in the US. Fluticasone is a synthetic ICS with potent anti-inflammatory effects, while formoterol is a selective β2-adrenergic receptor agonist with a rapid onset of bronchodilation within 5–10 minutes and a 12-hour duration of action. Fluticasone/formoterol has shown superior efficacy when compared to fluticasone or formoterol alone in multiple well-designed studies. The combination has shown comparable or “noninferior” benefits in lung function, clinical symptoms, and asthma control when compared with fluticasone and formoterol administered concurrently in separate inhalers. Fluticasone/formoterol provides similar efficacy with fluticasone/salmeterol, but with more rapid symptom relief. It has been compared directly with budesonide/formoterol with comparable results. Fluticasone/formoterol is well tolerated, with no unusual or increased safety concerns versus each individual component or other available ICS/LABA combinations. Fluticasone/formoterol is the latest entry into a relatively crowded market of branded fixed-dose preparations. Upcoming generic fixed-dose combinations and once-daily agents

  15. Clinical significance of measurement of changes in serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels after treatment in children with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Heng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of the changes of levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) after treatment in children with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 32 patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment the serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels in patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05 ). Conclusion: Changes of serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels contents after treatment might be of prognostic importance in children with bronchial asthma. (authors)

  16. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were useful for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and were of important clinical values in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. (authors)

  17. Clinical significance of determination of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuo; Sun Jin; Yao Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF were measured with RIA in 36 pediatric patients with bronchiol asthma and 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum levels of IL-6, GM-CSF were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P 0.05), Serum IL-2 levels were negatively correlated with the IL-6 and GM-CSF levels (r=-0.5846, -0.6018, P<0.01). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in pediatric patients. Mornitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  18. Exploring the perspectives of clinical professionals and support staff on implementing supported self-management for asthma in UK general practice: an IMP2ART qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Susan; Daines, Luke; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Steed, Liz; McKee, Lorna; Caress, Ann-Louise; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Pinnock, Hilary

    2017-07-18

    Despite an overwhelming evidence base, supported self-management of asthma is poorly implemented into routine practice. Strategies for implementation must address organisational routines, as well as provide resources for patients and training to improve professionals' skills. We aimed to explore the priority that primary care practices attach to asthma self-management, to describe their existing asthma management routines, and to generate innovative implementation strategies. We recruited 33 participants (23 general practitioners; seven nurses; three administrative staff) from 14 general practices. The 12 interviews and three focus groups were transcribed, coded and analysed thematically. Supported self-management was largely a nurse-led task within clinic-based annual reviews. Barriers included poor attendance at asthma clinics, lack of time, demarcation of roles, limited access to a range of tailored resources, and competing agendas in consultation, often due to multimorbidity. Suggestions for initiatives to improve the provision of supported self-management included emphasising the evidence for benefit (to influence prioritisation), improving teamwork (including team-based education), organisational strategies (including remote consulting) which need to fit within existing practice routines. Technology offers some potential solutions (e.g., improved templates, 'app'-based plans), but must be integrated with the practice information technology systems. Building on these insights, we will now develop a theoretically-based implementation strategy that will address patient, professional, and organisational buy-in, provide team-based education and offer a range of practical options and tools, which can be adapted and integrated within existing routines of individual practices.OVERCOMING THE ORGANISATIONAL BARRIERS TO IMPLEMENTING ASTHMA SELF-MANAGEMENT: Understanding the routines of primary care practices can suggest strategies to implement supported self

  19. Peak flow meter with a questionnaire and mini-spirometer to help detect asthma and COPD in real-life clinical practice: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorat, Yogesh T; Salvi, Sundeep S; Kodgule, Rahul R

    2017-05-09

    Peak flow meter with questionnaire and mini-spirometer are considered as alternative tools to spirometry for screening of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the accuracy of these tools together, in clinical settings for disease diagnosis, has not been studied. Two hundred consecutive patients with respiratory complaints answered a short symptom questionnaire and performed peak expiratory flow measurements, standard spirometry with Koko spirometer and mini-spirometry (COPD-6). Spirometry was repeated after bronchodilation. Physician made a final diagnosis of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and others. One eighty nine patients (78 females) with age 51 ± 17 years with asthma (115), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (33) and others (41) completed the study. "Breathlessness > 6months" and "cough > 6months" were important symptoms to detect obstructive airways disease. "Asymptomatic period > 2 weeks" had the best sensitivity (Sn) and specificity (Sp) to differentiate asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A peak expiratory flow of meter with few symptom questions can be effectively used in clinical practice for objective detection of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in the absence of good quality spirometry. Mini-spirometers are useful in detection of obstructive airways diseases but FEV 1 measured is inaccurate. DIFFERENTIATING CONDITIONS IN POORLY-EQUIPPED SETTINGS: A simple questionnaire and peak flow meter measurements can help doctors differentiate between asthma and chronic lung disease. In clinical settings where access to specialist equipment and knowledge is limited, it can be challenging for doctors to tell the difference between asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To determine a viable alternative method for differentiating between these diseases, Rahul Kodgule and colleagues at the Chest Research Foundation in Pune, India, trialed a simplified version

  20. Effect of Orem’s Self-Care Model on Self-Esteem of Adolescents with Asthma Referred to an Asthma and Allergy Clinic in Isfahan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosaviasl, Fatemeh Sadat; Abasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquisition of chronic diseases such as asthma leads to psychological, mental and physical complications in adolescents, and hence their self-esteem may be compromised. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma. Materials and Methods: This semi-experimental study enrolled 64 asthmatic adolescents referred to Shariati Hospital, Isfahan. Subjects were assigned to two groups of control and intervention consecutively. Then, the self-care training program was conducted according to Orem’s self-care model in eight two-hour sessions based on self-care needs, and self-esteem was measured in the two groups prior to and two months after the last training session. The data were collected by a questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventories (CSEI) and analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem between the intervention and control groups after the training (Pself-esteem before and after the training in the intervention group (P0.05). Conclusion: Regarding the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma, we recommend the use of this model as a care intervention in healthcare centers to promote adolescents’ health. PMID:27114724

  1. Effect of Orem's Self-Care Model on Self-Esteem of Adolescents with Asthma Referred to an Asthma and Allergy Clinic in Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosaviasl, Fatemeh Sadat; Abasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre; Kiani, Davood

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of chronic diseases such as asthma leads to psychological, mental and physical complications in adolescents, and hence their self-esteem may be compromised. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of Orem's self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma. This semi-experimental study enrolled 64 asthmatic adolescents referred to Shariati Hospital, Isfahan. Subjects were assigned to two groups of control and intervention consecutively. Then, the self-care training program was conducted according to Orem's self-care model in eight two-hour sessions based on self-care needs, and self-esteem was measured in the two groups prior to and two months after the last training session. The data were collected by a questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventories (CSEI) and analyzed by SPSS version 20. Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem between the intervention and control groups after the training (Pself-esteem before and after the training in the intervention group (P0.05). Regarding the effect of Orem's self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma, we recommend the use of this model as a care intervention in healthcare centers to promote adolescents' health.

  2. Asthma and Therapeutics: Recombinant Therapies in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockcroft Donald W

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous recombinant therapies are being investigated for the treatment of asthma. This report reviews the current status of several of these novel agents. Anti-immunoglobulin (IgE (omalizumab, Xolair markedly inhibits all aspects of the allergen challenge in subjects who have reduction of free serum IgE to undetectable levels. Several clinical studies in atopic asthma have demonstrated benefit by improved symptoms and lung function and a reduction in corticosteroid requirements. Early use in atopic asthmatics may be even more effective. Several approaches target interleukin (IL-4. Soluble IL-4 receptor has been shown to effectively replace inhaled corticosteroid; further studies are under way. Recombinant anti-IL-5 and recombinant IL-12 inhibit blood and sputum eosinophils and allergen-induced eosinophilia without any effect on airway responsiveness, allergen-induced airway responses, or allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness. Efalizumab, a recombinant antibody that inhibits lymphocyte trafficking, is effective in psoriasis. A bronchoprovocation study showed a reduction in allergen-induced late asthmatic response and allergen-induced eosinophilia, which suggests that it should be effective in clinical asthma. These exciting novel therapies provide not only promise of new therapies for asthma but also valuable tools for investigation of asthma mechanisms.

  3. Severe asthma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciznar, P.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma are clinically, physiologically and biologically a heterogeneous group. About half of children referred for medical examination for severe asthma have true severe, therapy resistant asthma. The rest of referred patients have difficult to treat asthma. Symptoms persist mostly due to drug non-compliance, inappropriate inhalation technique, persistent environmental exposures or co-morbid conditions. Compared with adults have children more frequently atopic form of severe asthma. This is associated with eosinophilia in peripheral blood and sensitization to inhaled allergens. The IgE levels are high. Therapy of co-morbidities and improvement of treatment compliance lead in most cases to full asthma control. Proportion of children will benefit from biologics like anti-IgE monoclonal antibody, administered by subcutaneous injections in 2 to 4 week intervals. By this therapy it is not only possible to suppress symptoms, but also decrease the total steroid dose and the risk of adverse effects associated with its long-term administration. By achieving a full asthma control we lower future risk of exacerbations and probably improve long-term prognosis of disease, frequently persisting for the rest of life. (author)

  4. Mortality among Subjects with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease or Asthma at Two Respiratory Disease Clinics in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray M Finkelstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and asthma are common; however, mortality rates among individuals with these diseases are not well studied in North America.

  5. Evolving Concepts of Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions. PMID:26161792

  6. Reflexology and bronchial asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, T; Heinig, J H; Collins, P

    2001-01-01

    Many asthma patients seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology, whereby finger pressure is applied to certain parts of the body. The aim of the study was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. Ten weeks of active...... or simulated (placebo) reflexology given by an experienced reflexologist, were compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 20+20 outpatients with asthma. Objective lung function tests (peak flow morning and evening, and weekly spirometry at the clinic) did not change. Subjective scores (describing...... diaries was carried out. It was accompanied by a significant pattern compatible with subconscious unblinding, in that patients tended to guess which treatment they had been receiving. No evidence was found that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond placebo influence....

  7. Diagnosis of asthma: diagnostic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Emily P; West, Natalie E

    2015-09-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease, encompassing both atopic and non-atopic phenotypes. Diagnosis of asthma is based on the combined presence of typical symptoms and objective tests of lung function. Objective diagnostic testing consists of 2 components: (1) demonstration of airway obstruction, and (2) documentation of variability in degree of obstruction. A review of current guidelines and literature was performed regarding diagnostic testing for asthma. Spirometry with bronchodilator reversibility testing remains the mainstay of asthma diagnostic testing for children and adults. Repetition of the test over several time points may be necessary to confirm airway obstruction and variability thereof. Repeated peak flow measurement is relatively simple to implement in a clinical and home setting. Bronchial challenge testing is reserved for patients in whom the aforementioned testing has been unrevealing but clinical suspicion remains, though is associated with low specificity. Demonstration of eosinophilic inflammation, via fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement, or atopy, may be supportive of atopic asthma, though diagnostic utility is limited particularly in nonatopic asthma. All efforts should be made to confirm the diagnosis of asthma in those who are being presumptively treated but have not had objective measurements of variability in the degree of obstruction. Multiple testing modalities are available for objective confirmation of airway obstruction and variability thereof, consistent with a diagnosis of asthma in the appropriate clinical context. Providers should be aware that both these characteristics may be present in other disease states, and may not be specific to a diagnosis of asthma. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  8. The need for precision medicine clinical trials in childhood asthma : rationale and design of the PUFFIN trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, Susanne J. H.; Pijnenburg, Marielle W.; Hovels, Anke M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    A `one-size fits all'-approach does not fit all pediatric asthma patients. Current evidence suggests that in children with persistent asthma, ADRB2 genotype-guided treatment can improve treatment outcomes, yet this evidence is mainly derived from observational and genotype-stratified studies.

  9. The need for precision medicine clinical trials in childhood asthma: rationale and design of the PUFFIN trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, Susanne Jh; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W.; Hövels, Anke M.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse

    2017-01-01

    A 'one-size fits all'-approach does not fit all pediatric asthma patients. Current evidence suggests that in children with persistent asthma, ADRB2 genotype-guided treatment can improve treatment outcomes, yet this evidence is mainly derived from observational and genotype-stratified studies.

  10. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma Associated Conditions Asthma & Pregnancy Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Asthma & Pregnancy: Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  11. The Breathmobile Program: structure, implementation, and evolution of a large-scale, urban, pediatric asthma disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Craig A; Clement, Loran T; Hanley-Lopez, Jean; Morphew, Tricia; Kwong, Kenny Yat Choi; Lifson, Francene; Opas, Lawrence; Guterman, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    Despite more than a decade of education and research-oriented intervention programs, inner city children with asthma continue to engage in episodic "rescue" patterns of healthcare and experience a disproportionate level of morbidity. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a sustainable community-wide pediatric asthma disease management program designed to shift inner city children in Los Angeles from acute episodic care to regular preventive care in accordance with national standards. In 1995 the Southern California Chapter of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS), and the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) established an agreement to initiate and sustain the Breathmobile Program. This program includes automated case identification, mobile school-based clinics, and highly structured clinical encounters supported by an advanced information technology solution. Interdisciplinary teams of asthma care specialists provide regular and ongoing care to children at school and county clinic sites over a wide geographic area of urban Los Angeles. Each team operates in a specially equipped mobile clinic (Breathmobile), efficiently moving a structured healthcare process to school and county clinic sites with large numbers of children. Demographic, clinical, and participation data is tracked carefully in an electronic medical record system. Program operations, clinical oversight, and patient tracking are centralized at a care coordination center. Clinical operations and methods have been replicated in fixed specialty clinic sites at the Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center. Clinical and process measures are regularly evaluated to assure quality, plan iterative improvement, and support evidence-based care. Four Breathmobiles deliver ongoing care at more than 90 school sites. The program has engaged over five thousand patients and their families in a

  12. Clinical research of acupoint application for "treatment of winter disease in summer" used to prevent and treat bronchial asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bi-Ling; Liu, Bao-Yan; Jin, Peng; Wang, Xue-Feng; Xiang, Xi-Xiong; Liu, Xiao-Fan; Hu, Jing-Qing; Lu, Fang; He, Li-Yun; Zhu, Wen-Zeng; Fang, Yi-Gong; Wang, Yu

    2012-03-01

    To preliminarily analyze key factors influencing curative effect through clinical observations of acupoint application for "treatment of winter disease in summer" used to prevent and treat bronchial asthma in children. In an observational study and prospective cohort study, we observed children in remission of asthma at three class III grade A TCM hospitals in Liaoning, Hubei, and Chengdu. A total of 609 children conformed to diagnostic and inclusive standards for remission of bronchial asthma. Through follow-up visits, we observed their skin reactions and the time and chance of treatment with different therapies in the three hospitals; we also compared and analyzed different drugs, acupoints, and preparations. We found that the key Chinese drugs were Bai Jie Zi (Semen Sinapis Albae) and Yian Hu Suo (Rhizoma Corydalis); the key acupoints were Feishu (BL 13), Gaohuang (BL 43), Dingchuan (EX-B1), Tiantu (CV 22), and Shanzhong (CV 17); and the best preparation was a mixture of drugs, ginger juice, and musk. Acupoint application was practiced on the hottest days of summer and the coldest days of winter for 0.5 to 2 h with the lowest rate of asthma relapse. The present data analysis shows that the curative effect of acupoint application for "treatment of winter disease in summer" may be influenced by recipes of Chinese drugs, preparations, prescriptions of acupoints, chance, time, and skin reactions. A curative effect is the result of the comprehensive action of these factors.

  13. Was it easy to use an Asthma Control Test (ACT) in different clinical practice settings in a tertiary hospital in Singapore?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Lathy; Earnest, Arul; Abisheganaden, John; Chee, Jane

    2009-12-01

    The Asthma Control Test (ACT) is a 5-item self-administered tool designed to assess asthma control. It is said to be simple, easy and can be administered quickly by patients in the clinical practice setting. This stated benefit has yet to be demonstrated in our local clinical practice setting. The aim was to identify factors associated with difficulty in the administration of the ACT in different clinical practice settings in a tertiary hospital in Singapore. This is a prospective study performed from April to June 2008. All patients diagnosed with asthma and referred to an asthma nurse from the in-patient and out-patient clinical practice setting in Tan Tock Seng Hospital were enrolled. Four hundred and thirty-four patients were asked to complete the ACT tool. In the univariate model, we found that age, clinical setting and medical history to be significantly associated with the completion of the ACT. The odds of completion decreased by a factor of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.89 to 0.94) for every year's increase in age, and this was statistically significant (P <0.001). Similarly, the odds ratio of completion for those with more than 3 medical conditions by history were 0.59 (95% CI, 0.48 to 0.71) as compared to those with less than 3 medical conditions by history, and this was also significant (P <0.001). In the multivariate model, we only found age to be an independent and significant factor. After adjusting for age, none of the other variables initially significant in the univariate model remained significant. The results show that the ACT was simple and easy to be administered in younger-aged patients.

  14. Diagnostic challenges of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakirtas, Arzu

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of asthma in childhood is challenging. Both underdiagnosis and overdiagnosis of asthma are important issues. The present review gives information about challenging factors for an accurate diagnosis of childhood asthma. Although underdiagnosis of asthma in childhood has always been the most important diagnostic problem, overdiagnosis of asthma has also been increasingly recognized. This is probably due to diagnosis of asthma based on symptoms and signs alone. Demonstration of variable airflow obstruction by lung function tests is the most common asthma diagnostic tests used in practice and is therefore strongly recommended in children who can cooperate. Recently, an asthma guideline combining the clinical and economic evidences with sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic procedures was developed to improve accuracy of diagnosis and to avoid overdiagnosis. This guideline provided an algorithmic clinical and cost-effective approach and included fractional exhaled nitric oxide measurement as one of the diagnostic tests in addition to lung function. Diagnosis of asthma in children should be made by combining relevant history with at least two confirmatory diagnostic tests whenever possible. Diagnosis based on short-period treatment trials should be limited to young children who are unable to cooperate with these tests.

  15. Current concepts of severe asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B.; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2016-01-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development. PMID:27367183

  16. A Biobehavioral Approach to Managing Childhood Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Daniel P.

    1987-01-01

    Describes childhood asthma and a program which teaches relaxation and mental imagery (RMI) exercises to children and adolescents as an adjunct in the management of asthma. Clinical experience indicates children who learn RMI rate their asthma as significantly reduced in severity, miss fewer days of school, and make fewer visits to emergency rooms.…

  17. Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been recognized that asthma is not a single disease, but comprises several clinical syndromes, which all share respiratory symptoms and lung function abnormalities, associated with different types of airway inflammation. These syndromes are now known as different asthma

  18. Mismatch between asthma symptoms and spirometry: implications for managing asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifano, Elizabeth D; Hollenbach, Jessica P; Cloutier, Michelle M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in assessing asthma severity and beginning therapy by the general pediatrician. Between 2008 and 2012, spirometry testing was satisfactorily performed in 894 children (ages 5-19 years) whose asthma severity had been determined by their pediatrician using asthma guideline-based clinical criteria. Spirometry-determined asthma severity using national asthma guidelines and clinician-determined asthma severity were compared for concordance using weighted Kappa coefficients. Thirty percent of participants had clinically determined intermittent asthma; 32%, 33%, and 5% had mild, moderate, and severe, persistent asthma, respectively. Increasing disease severity was associated with decreases in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio (P spirometry-determined severity. Concordance was 0.16 (95% CI 0.10, 0.23), and when adjusted for bias and prevalence, was 0.20 (95% CI 0.17, 0.23). When accounting for age, sex, exposure to smoke, and insurance type, only spirometry-determined asthma severity was a significant predictor of agreement (P spirometry-determined severity increased. Concordance between spirometry and asthma symptoms in determining asthma severity is low even when guideline-based clinical assessment tools are used. Because appropriate therapy reduces asthma morbidity and is guided by disease severity, results from spirometry testing could better guide pediatricians in determining appropriate therapy for their patients with asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The public health implications of asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Bousquet, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe J.; Godard, Philippe; Daures, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Asthma is a very common chronic disease that occurs in all age groups and is the focus of various clinical and public health interventions. Both morbidity and mortality from asthma are significant. The number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost due to asthma worldwide is similar to that for diabetes, liver cirrhosis and schizophrenia. Asthma management plans have, however, reduced mortality and severity in countries where they have been applied. Several barriers reduce the availabi...

  20. Svær asthma bronchiale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Backer, Vibeke; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma is defined by persistent symptoms and frequent exacerbations despite intensive asthma therapy. The prevalence is estimated to be 5-10% of all asthmatics. Severe asthma is responsible for a major burden of illness including low quality of life and a disproportionate use of health......-care resources. The clinical assessment of severe asthma must include verification of the correct diagnosis, adherence to medication, excluding differential diagnosis and identification and treatment of aggravating co-morbidities and trigger factors....

  1. A clinical study of infantile bronchial asthma by radioallergosorbent test (RAST), 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimuta, Toshiyuki

    1977-01-01

    RAST for house dust, RAST for egg white, and RAST for milk were performed in the serum of 91 cases of infantile bronchial asthma, 25 cases, and 29 cases of infantile allergic diseases picked up at random, respectively. 1) When using reference disc of three different lots, uptake counts of reference sera A, B, C and D showed the following scatters for added counts; A: 28.1-21.4%, B: 12.1-9.7%, C: 4.5-3.0%, and D: 2.8-2.2%. 2) When over 5% of added counts was defined as positive, a consistency of RAST for house dust with P-K test or induction test was 37/42 (88.1%) and 12/14 (85.7%), respectively. 3) When over 3% of added counts was defined as positive, a consistency of RAST for house dust with P-K test or induction test was 39/42 (92.8%) and 14/14 (100%), respectively. This consistency was better than that in positive case with over 5% of added counts. 4) When over 3% of RAST titer was defined as positive, the consistency with the diameter of flush area by intradermal test and in stretching of swelling by scratch test was 59/69 (85.5%) and 23/29 (79.3%), respectively. 5) When over 3% of RAST titer for house dust was defined as positive, cases which showed positive at lower concentration than 1:10,000 of intradermal test threshold was 56/61 (91.8%). 6) The positive in RAST for house dust was not recognized in infants of under 2 years old, but it was recognized in 50% of infants of 2 years old, and it was also recognized with high frequency in infants of over 3 years old. 7) The positive in RAST for egg white and milk was recognized in infants of under 2 years old, and not in infants of over 4 years old. (Tsunoda, M.)

  2. An Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme Polymorphism Is Associated with Clinical Phenotype When Using Differentiation-Syndrome to Categorize Korean Bronchial Asthma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-ki Jung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, genetic analysis was conducted to investigate the association of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE gene polymorphism with clinical phenotype based on differentiation-syndrome of bronchial asthma patients. Differentiation-syndrome is a traditional Korean medicine (TKM theory in which patients are classified into a Deficiency Syndrome Group (DSG and an Excess Syndrome Group (ESG according to their symptomatic classification. For this study, 110 participants were evaluated by pulmonary function test. Among them, 39 patients were excluded because they refused genotyping. Of the remaining patients, 52 with DSG of asthma (DSGA and 29 with ESG of asthma (ESGA, as determined by the differentiation-syndrome techniques were assessed by genetic analysis. ACE insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphism analysis was conducted using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Student's t, chi-square, Fisher and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium tests were used to compare groups. No significant differences in pulmonary function were observed between DSGA and ESGA. The genotypic frequency of ACE I/D polymorphism was found to differ slightly between DSGA and ESGA (P = .0495. However, there were no significant differences in allelic frequency observed between DSGA and ESGA (P = .7006, OR = 1.1223. Interestingly, the allelic (P = .0043, OR = 3.4545 and genotypic (P = .0126 frequencies of the ACE I/D polymorphism in female patients differed significantly between DSGA and ESGA. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that the symptomatic classification of DSGA and ESGA by differentiation-syndrome in Korean asthma patients could be useful in evaluation of the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma.

  3. REGULAR OBSERVATION OF CHILDREN WITH BRONCHIAL ASTHMA BY ALLERGOLOGIST AND ITS INFLUENCE ON CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PARAMETERS OF THE DISEASE AND CONSUMPTION OF HEALTHCARE RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Artyukhov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In real practice, treatment of patients with bronchial asthma (BA is accompanied by unreasonable increase of healthcare resources consumption because of unplanned visits to the doctor due to health worsening, hospital treatment of exacerbations and emergency calls. Objective: to evaluate an effectiveness of children’s with bronchial asthma observations by allergologist. Methods: the dynamics of clinical and functional signs and frequency of emergency claims was analyzed in 115 children with BA who were observed by allergologist once in 3 months during one year. Results: in 3 months of regular observation by allergologist the number of children with day and night symptoms of BA and patients with daily rescue use of short-acting 2-agonists decreased, there were fewer children with limitations of physical activity. The number of patients with normal FEV1 increased in 6 months. Regular observation with allergologist resulted in reduction of number of patients with exacerbations and hospitalizations, shortening of acute period of BA and hospital stay, decreasing of emergency claims rate compared to those who were observed by GPs. Conclusion: regular observation by allergologist once in 3 months results in stabilization of clinical and functional state in patients with BA and decreases the consumption of emergency care resources.Key words: children, bronchial asthma, allergologist, clinical and functional state, healthcare resources.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2011; 10 (3: 55–59

  4. Effect of Prenatal Supplementation With Vitamin D on Asthma or Recurrent Wheezing in Offspring by Age 3 Years: The VDAART Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litonjua, Augusto A; Carey, Vincent J; Laranjo, Nancy; Harshfield, Benjamin J; McElrath, Thomas F; O'Connor, George T; Sandel, Megan; Iverson, Ronald E; Lee-Paritz, Aviva; Strunk, Robert C; Bacharier, Leonard B; Macones, George A; Zeiger, Robert S; Schatz, Michael; Hollis, Bruce W; Hornsby, Eve; Hawrylowicz, Catherine; Wu, Ann Chen; Weiss, Scott T

    2016-01-26

    Asthma and wheezing begin early in life, and prenatal vitamin D deficiency has been variably associated with these disorders in offspring. To determine whether prenatal vitamin D (cholecalciferol) supplementation can prevent asthma or recurrent wheeze in early childhood. The Vitamin D Antenatal Asthma Reduction Trial was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 3 centers across the United States. Enrollment began in October 2009 and completed follow-up in January 2015. Eight hundred eighty-one pregnant women between the ages of 18 and 39 years at high risk of having children with asthma were randomized at 10 to 18 weeks' gestation. Five participants were deemed ineligible shortly after randomization and were discontinued. Four hundred forty women were randomized to receive daily 4000 IU vitamin D plus a prenatal vitamin containing 400 IU vitamin D, and 436 women were randomized to receive a placebo plus a prenatal vitamin containing 400 IU vitamin D. Coprimary outcomes of (1) parental report of physician-diagnosed asthma or recurrent wheezing through 3 years of age and (2) third trimester maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Eight hundred ten infants were born in the study, and 806 were included in the analyses for the 3-year outcomes. Two hundred eighteen children developed asthma or recurrent wheeze: 98 of 405 (24.3%; 95% CI, 18.7%-28.5%) in the 4400-IU group vs 120 of 401 (30.4%, 95% CI, 25.7%-73.1%) in the 400-IU group (hazard ratio, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.6-1.0; P = .051). Of the women in the 4400-IU group whose blood levels were checked, 289 (74.9%) had 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of 30 ng/mL or higher by the third trimester of pregnancy compared with 133 of 391 (34.0%) in the 400-IU group (difference, 40.9%; 95% CI, 34.2%-47.5%, P d of vitamin D compared with 400 IU/d significantly increased vitamin D levels in the women. The incidence of asthma and recurrent wheezing in their children at age 3 years was lower by 6.1%, but this did not

  5. Associations between selected allergens, phthalates, nicotine, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and bedroom ventilation and clinically confirmed asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis in preschool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, M.; Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    participating families. A single physician conducted clinical examinations of all 500 children. Children from the initially random control group with clinically confirmed allergic disease were subsequently excluded from the control group and admitted in the case group, leaving 242 in the healthy control group...... and clinically confirmed asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis. The study is a cross-sectional case-control study of 500 children aged 3-5years from Odense, Denmark. The 200 cases had at least two parentally reported allergic diseases, while the 300 controls were randomly selected from 2835...

  6. Integrating gene expression data with demographic, clinical, and environmental exposure information to reveal endotypes of childhood asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    RATIONALE. Childhood asthma is a multifactorial disease whose pathogenesis involves complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and modulating external factors. Therefore, effectively characterizing these multiple etiological pathways, or “endotypes”, requires an integrative...

  7. Characteristics associated with clinical severity and inflammatory phenotype of naturally occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Asger; Laing, Ingrid A; Poulsen, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In experimental studies viral infections have been shown to induce type 2 inflammation in asthmatics, but whether this is a feature of naturally occurring virus-induced asthma exacerbations is unknown. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) released from the airway epithelium in response...... occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma and whether TSLP is associated with this type 2 inflammation. METHODS: Patients presenting to hospital with acute asthma were examined during the exacerbation, and after 4 weeks recovery. The assessments included spirometry, FeNO and induced sputum...... in patients during virus-induced asthma exacerbations, to the same degree as non-viral exacerbations, and correlate negatively with FEV1. However, in virus-positive patients, high TSLP expression during exacerbation was associated with low sputum eosinophils, suggesting that the effect of TSLP in vivo...

  8. Diagnosis of asthma - new theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwhagen, Olle

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a remarkably high frequency of poorly controlled asthma. Several reasons for this treatment failure have been discussed, however, the basic question of whether the diagnosis is always correct has not been considered. Follow-up studies have shown that in many patients asthma cannot be verified despite ongoing symptoms. Mechanisms other than bronchial obstruction may therefore be responsible. The current definition of asthma may also include symptoms that are related to mechanisms other than bronchial obstruction, the clinical hallmark of asthma. Based on a review of the four cornerstones of asthma - inflammation, hyperresponsiveness, bronchial obstruction and symptoms - the aim was to present some new aspects and suggestions related to the diagnosis of adult non-allergic asthma. Recent studies have indicated that "classic" asthma may sometimes be confused with asthma-like disorders such as airway sensory hyperreactivity, small airways disease, dysfunctional breathing, non-obstructive dyspnea, hyperventilation and vocal cord dysfunction. This confusion may be one explanation for the high proportion of misdiagnosis and treatment failure. The current diagnosis, focusing on bronchial obstruction, may be too "narrow". As there may be common mechanisms a broadening to include also non-obstructive disorders, forming an asthma syndrome, is suggested. Such broadening requires additional diagnostic steps, such as qualitative studies with analysis of reported symptoms, non-effort demanding methods for determining lung function, capsaicin test for revealing airway sensory hyperreactivity, careful evaluation of the therapeutic as well as diagnostic effect of corticosteroids and testing of suggested theories.

  9. Determinants of persistent asthma in young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Lisbet Krogh; Halling, Anders; Bælum, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate determinants for the prognosis of asthma in a population-based cohort of young adults. Design: The study was a nine-year clinical follow up of 239 asthmatic subjects from an enriched population-based sample of 1,191 young adults, aged 20-44 years, who...... participated in an interviewer-administered questionnaire and clinical examination at baseline in 2003-2006. From the interview, an asthma score was generated as the simple sum of affirmative answers to five main asthma-like symptoms in order to analyse symptoms of asthma as a continuum. The clinical...... examination comprised spirometry, bronchial challenge or bronchodilation, and skin prick test. Results: Among the 239 individuals with asthma at baseline 164 (69%) had persistent asthma at follow up, while 68 (28%) achieved remission of asthma and seven (3%) were diagnosed with COPD solely. Determinants...

  10. Co-morbidities in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Patients with severe asthma represent a minority of the total asthma population, but carry a majority of the morbidity and healthcare costs. Achieving better asthma control in this group of patients is therefore of key importance. Systematic assessment of patients with possible severe asthma...... to identify treatment barriers and triggers of asthma symptoms, including co-morbidities, improves asthma control and reduces healthcare costs and is recommended by international guidelines on management of severe asthma. This review provides the clinician with an overview of the prevalence and clinical...... impact of the most common co-morbidities in severe asthma, including chronic rhinosinusitis, nasal polyposis, allergic rhinitis, dysfunctional breathing, vocal cord dysfunction, anxiety and depression, obesity, obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD...

  11. The Prevalence of Severe Asthma and Low Asthma Control Among Danish Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Bülow, Anna; Kriegbaum, Margit; Backer, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    asthma, the extent of asthma control, and contact with specialist care. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional register study was performed. By using a nationwide prescription database, we identified current patients with asthma (age, 18-44 years) in 2010. Severity was classified as severe versus mild......-moderate asthma according to the level of antiasthma treatment. We investigated prescription drug use, hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient clinic visits according to severity. RESULTS: Among a nationwide population, we identified 61,583 current patients with asthma. Based on the level...... asthma and low asthma control were not managed by specialist care. Patients with severe asthma with specialist contact more frequently had impaired asthma control compared with subjects not treated by a specialist (44.4% vs 33.1%, P

  12. Biomarkers for Monitoring Clinical Efficacy of Allergen Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Allergic Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamji, M H; Kappen, J H; Akdis, M

    2017-01-01

    be administered either subcutaneously (SCIT) or sublingually (SLIT) (3-12). Although AIT is effective, the degree of remission strongly varies depending on the complex interaction between patient, allergy, symptomatology and vaccines used for AIT (3-9). Clinical management of patients receiving AIT and efficacy...... medicine (18). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  13. Effect of Orem’s Self-Care Model on Perceived Stress in Adolescents with Asthma Referring the Asthma and Allergy Clinic, Isfahan, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Hemati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incidence of asthma in adolescents leads to variations in family status, roles and interaction with peers for them, which could be a source of stress and psychological tensions in them. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Orem’s self-care model on perceived stress in adolescents with asthma. Methods: In this semi-experimental study conducted from April 2013 to February 2014, 64 asthmatic adolescents referring Shariati Hospital, Isfahan were enrolled by simple random sampling and the patients were assigned to two groups of control and intervention. Then, Orem’s self-care model-based training was implemented throughout eight sessions of two hours each and the Cohen Perceived Stress Scale was administered to both groups prior to and two months after the completion of the training. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics consisting of paired t-test, independent t-test, Chi-square and Mann-Whitney using SPSS Version 20. Results: Mean age of the participants was 14.15±3.12 years in the intervention group and 15.21±3.09 years in the control groups. 68.8% and 59.4% of the participants were male in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Independent t-test indicated a significant difference in the mean scores of perceived stress in the intervention (25.46±5.31 and control groups (28.90±5.27 after the training. Also, the result of paired t-test indicated a significant difference in the mean score of perceived stress between before (29.18±5.27 and after (25.46±5.31 training. Conclusion: As the training based on Orem’s model had a positive effect on declining perceived stress in asthmatic adolescents, continuation of using these training interventions could contribute to ultimately achieving positive outcomes in health functions of these patients.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Omalizumab for the Treatment of Severe Persistent Asthma in Real Clinical Practice in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennera, María Del Carmen; Valero, Antonio; Uría, Estefany; Forné, Carles; Picado, César

    2016-07-01

    Omalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets circulating immunoglobulin E molecules to treat severe uncontrolled asthma. The aim of this study was to determine the cost effectiveness of omalizumab compared with standard treatment for the control of severe persistent asthma according to data from patients treated in a specialized asthma unit. This was an observational, retrospective, single-center study in the setting of the Pulmonology and Respiratory Allergy Service, Thorax Institute, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Data were collected by review of medical records of 86 uncontrolled severe persistent asthma patients treated with omalizumab from January 2005 to April 2014. Effectiveness was assessed by the reduction in asthma exacerbations and 3-point increases in the Asthma Control Test (ACT) score. The economic evaluation was performed from the societal perspective, including direct health costs (resource use and drug treatments) and indirect costs (disease impact on labor productivity) in 2016 Euros. The time horizon was 12 months before and after the initiation of treatment with omalizumab. Results were expressed using the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Taking into account only direct costs, the ICERs were €1487.46 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1241.21-1778.34) per exacerbation avoided and €5425.13 (95 % CI 4539.30-6551.03) per 3-point increase in the ACT. When indirect costs were included, the ICERs were €1130.93 (95 % CI 909.08-1392.86) per exacerbation avoided, and €4124.79 (95 % CI 3281.69-5186.73) per 3-point increase in the ACT. The results of this study confirm the effectiveness of the addition of omalizumab to standard therapy in patients with uncontrolled severe persistent asthma.

  15. Impact of omalizumab on treatment of severe allergic asthma in UK clinical practice: a UK multicentre observational study (the APEX II study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Robert M; Saralaya, Dinesh; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Masoli, Matthew; Clifton, Ian; Mansur, Adel H; Hacking, Victoria; McLain-Smith, Susan; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2016-08-09

    To describe the impact of omalizumab on asthma management in patients treated as part of normal clinical practice in the UK National Health Service (NHS). A non-interventional, mixed methodology study, combining retrospective and prospective data collection for 12 months pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab initiation, respectively. Data were collected in 22 UK NHS centres, including specialist centres and district general hospitals in the UK. 258 adult patients (aged ≥16 years; 65% women) with severe persistent allergic asthma treated with omalizumab were recruited, of whom 218 (84.5%) completed the study. The primary outcome measure was change in mean daily dose of oral corticosteroids (OCS) between the 12-month pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab initiation periods. A priori secondary outcome measures included response to treatment, changes in OCS dosing, asthma exacerbations, lung function, employment/education, patient-reported outcomes and hospital resource utilisation. The response rate to omalizumab at 16 weeks was 82.4%. Comparing pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab periods, the mean (95% CIs) daily dose of OCS decreased by 1.61 (-2.41 to -0.80) mg/patient/day (pomalizumab period. The mean number of A&E visits, inpatient hospitalisations, outpatient visits (excluding for omalizumab) and number of bed days/patient decreased significantly (pomalizumab period. These data support the beneficial effects of omalizumab on asthma-related outcomes, quality of life and resource utilisation in unselected patients treated in 'real-world' clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Atopy, but not obesity is associated with asthma severity among children with persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kim D; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Balcer-Whaley, Susan; Matsui, Elizabeth C

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of asthma in children. Atopic sensitization is a major risk factor for asthma including severe asthma in children. It is unclear if obesity is associated with worse asthma control or severity in children and how its effects compare to atopy. We sought to examine relationships of weight status and atopy to asthma control and severity among a population of predominantly low income, minority children and adolescents with persistent asthma. A cross-sectional analysis of 832 children and adolescents, age range 5-17 years, with persistent asthma was performed. Clinical assessments included asthma questionnaires of symptoms, asthma severity score, health care utilization and medication treatment step, lung function testing, and skin prick testing as well as measures of adiposity. Data were collected between December 2010 and August 2014 from Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD and Children's Hospital of Boston, MA. Obesity was not associated with worse asthma control or severity in this group of predominantly low income, minority children and adolescents with persistent asthma. However, a greater degree of atopy was associated with lower lung function, higher asthma severity score, and higher medication treatment step. Atopy may be a more important risk factor for asthma severity than obesity among low-income minority children and adolescents with persistent asthma living in Northeastern cities in the United States.

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Control Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action ... – Hospital Emergency Departments Adults – Hospital Inpatients Adults – Medical clinics/ ...

  18. Bronchial asthma: correlation of high resolution computerized tomography findings with clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogami, Roberto; Marchiori, Edson; Kirk, Kennedy; Capone, Domenico; Daltro, Pedro

    1999-01-01

    In this work we did a sectional study of 31 asthmatic patients with several levels of disease severity, which were submitted to high resolution computed tomography of the thorax and spirometry, between the months of July, 1995 and August, 1997. The tomographic findings were correlated with the clinical classification of the patients and the most frequent tomographic findings were bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilatation, air trapping, centrilobular opacities, cicatricial linear shadows, mucoid impaction, emphysema and atelectasis. In asthmatic patients of long duration we observed small airway disease and irreversible lesions as the predominant findings. In smoking patients there was no high frequency of emphysema. (author)

  19. Carers' perception of childhood asthma and its management in a selected Pakistani community

    OpenAIRE

    Hazir, T; Das, C; Piracha, F; Waheed, B; Azam, M; Tam, A

    2002-01-01

    Methods: Subjects were children's parents/guardians visiting the asthma clinic, Children's Hospital, Islamabad. The questionnaire included items on general understanding of asthma, its triggers, and management.

  20. Advances in asthma, allergy and immunology series 2004: basic and clinical immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Javier; Shearer, William T

    2004-08-01

    This review highlights some of the most significant advances in basic and clinical immunology that were published from August 2002 to December 2003, focusing on manuscripts that appeared in the Journal. Articles selected were those considered most relevant to Journal readers. With regard to basic immunology, this report includes articles describing FcepsilonRI expression in mucosal Langerhans cells and type II dendritic cells, mechanisms of TH1 and TH2 regulation, the role of Foxp3 in the development of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, and the increasing importance of Toll receptors in immunity. Articles related to clinical immunology that were selected include the first report of lymphocyte subsets values from a large cohort of normal children; the description of new genetic defects in primary immunodeficiencies; a description of the complications of gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency; a report of 79 patients with hyper-IgM syndrome; a report of the mechanism of action and complications of intravenous immunoglobulin; a report of new approaches for immunotherapy; and an article on advances in HIV infection and management, including a report of defensins, small molecules with anti-HIV properties. Also summarized is an article that studied the immune system during a prolonged stay in the Antarctic, a model for human studies on the effect of environmental conditions similar to space expeditions.

  1. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... Can I Deal With My Asthma? Allergy Testing Definition: Allergy-Triggered Asthma Asthma Center Asthma View more ...

  2. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth / For Parents / Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print ... son la causa del asma? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who ...

  3. School and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español School and Asthma KidsHealth / For Kids / School and Asthma Print en ... Let's find out. Why Do I Need an Asthma Action Plan? When you're dealing with asthma, ...

  4. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every child (and ... of Pediatrics about asthma and exercise. What is asthma Asthma is the most common chronic medical problem ...

  5. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2015, 2.2 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  6. Predictive Biomarkers for Asthma Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrek, Sarah K; Parulekar, Amit D; Hanania, Nicola A

    2017-09-19

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease characterized by multiple phenotypes. Treatment of patients with severe disease can be challenging. Predictive biomarkers are measurable characteristics that reflect the underlying pathophysiology of asthma and can identify patients that are likely to respond to a given therapy. This review discusses current knowledge regarding predictive biomarkers in asthma. Recent trials evaluating biologic therapies targeting IgE, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-4 have utilized predictive biomarkers to identify patients who might benefit from treatment. Other work has suggested that using composite biomarkers may offer enhanced predictive capabilities in tailoring asthma therapy. Multiple biomarkers including sputum eosinophil count, blood eosinophil count, fractional concentration of nitric oxide in exhaled breath (FeNO), and serum periostin have been used to identify which patients will respond to targeted asthma medications. Further work is needed to integrate predictive biomarkers into clinical practice.

  7. Asthma, inhaled corticosteroid treatment, and growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Ninan, T K; Russell, G

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the effects on growth of inhaled corticosteroid treatment (ICT) and of the quality of control of asthma, height velocity was studied in 58 prepubertal children attending a specialist asthma clinic because of chronic asthma that was difficult to control. The height velocity standard deviation (SD) score was maximal when the asthma was well controlled both before (0.01) and after (-0.07) starting ICT. It was least when the asthma was poorly controlled both before (-1.50) and after (...

  8. Advances in asthma 2015: Across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Andrew H; Anderson, William C; Dutmer, Cullen M; Searing, Daniel A; Szefler, Stanley J

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, progress in understanding asthma ranged from insights to asthma inception, exacerbations, and severity to advancements that will improve disease management throughout the lifespan. 2015's insights to asthma inception included how the intestinal microbiome affects asthma expression with the identification of specific gastrointestinal bacterial taxa in early infancy associated with less asthma risk, possibly by promoting regulatory immune development at a critical early age. The relevance of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating asthma-related gene expression was strengthened. Predicting and preventing exacerbations throughout life might help to reduce progressive lung function decrease and disease severity in adulthood. Although allergy has long been linked to asthma exacerbations, a mechanism through which IgE impairs rhinovirus immunity and underlies asthma exacerbations was demonstrated and improved by anti-IgE therapy (omalizumab). Other key molecular pathways underlying asthma exacerbations, such as cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) and orosomucoid like 3 (ORMDL3), were elucidated. New anti-IL-5 therapeutics, mepolizumab and reslizumab, were US Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of patients with severe eosinophilic asthma. In a clinical trial the novel therapeutic inhaled GATA3 mRNA-specific DNAzyme attenuated early- and late-phase allergic responses to inhaled allergen. These current findings are significant steps toward addressing unmet needs in asthma prevention, severity modification, disparities, and lifespan outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Costs associated with workdays lost and utilization of health care resources because of asthma in daily clinical practice in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, P; Sanz de Burgoa, V

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is associated with high indirect costs due to lower work productivity and higher absenteeism and presenteeism. To study loss of productivity measured using the lost workday equivalent (LWDE) index and health care utilization in asthmatics depending on age, geographical location, time period, severity, and level of asthma control. In this cross-sectional, observational, epidemiological multicenter study, 120 allergists nationwide were asked to select asthmatic patients aged 18 to 65 years who were evenly distributed according to the 4 levels of asthma severity (Global Initiative on Asthma) during 3 different seasons. The participants collected sociodemographic data, spirometry values, Asthma Control Test (ACT) score, health care utilization data, perceived stress according to the Impact on Work Productivity Index (IMPALA, indice del Impacto de la Enfermedad en la Productividad Laboral), and score on the Sheehan disability scale. The LWDE index was used to measure the number of workdays lost and the number of workdays with asthma symptoms combined with the percentage for average performance at work. The study sample comprised 1098 patients (58.7% females; 48.5% aged 18-40 and 51.5% aged 41-65). According to the ACT score, disease was uncontrolled in 57.6% of patients, well controlled in 32.8%, and totally controlled in 9.6%. The mean cost due to workdays lost was Euro 285.81/patient/mo (95% CI, Euro 252.71-318.92). Indirect costs were significantly higher in older patients (41-65 years, Euro 405.08; 95% CI, 348.97-461.19), patients with more severe disease (Euro 698.95; 95% CI, 588.63-809.27), and patients with more poorly controlled asthma (Euro 466.86; 95% CI, Euro 414.39-519.33). The average cost of health care units per patient for each 3-month period was Euro1317.30 (95% CI, Euro 1151.34-Euro 1483.26). Indirect costs were significantly higher in older patients (Euro 2104.00 in patients aged 18-40 vs Euro 3301.55 in patients aged 41-65), in northern and

  10. The Saudi Initiative for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Moamary Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system.

  11. AsthmaVent – Effect of Ventilation on Asthma Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogaard, Nina Viskum; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Halken, Susanne

    sensitive towards. Reducing this exposure may improve the asthma control in these children. Previous studies give conflicting information on the effect of mechanical ventilation on asthma control in children. Objectives We aim at investigating whether mechanical ventilation is capable of improving indoor...... air quality in the home and health outcomes in the outpatient clinic every three months. Fig. 1 and 2. Primary outcome is reduction in minimal effective dose of inhalation steroid. Secondary endpoints….. Perspectives Asthma patients and their families rely on good evidence-based advice on behavior...

  12. Long-term adherence to daily controller medication in children with asthma : The role of outpatient clinic visits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keemink, Yvette S.; Klok, Ted; Brand, Paul L. P.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate changes in inhaled corticosteroids adherence, both before and after a scheduled follow-up visit, in young children in a comprehensive asthma management program. Study designOne-year prospective follow-up study in 104 asthmatic children (mean age 4.8 years). Adherence to

  13. Clinical evaluation of leukotriene receptor antagonists in preventing common cold-like symptoms in bronchial asthma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Takahiko; Ohira, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Kashin; Hirose, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Junichi; Kondo, Rieko; Tachikawa, Soichi

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the possibility of preventing common cold-like symptoms as a previously unknown benefit of leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs). A total of 279 adult patients with bronchial asthma referred to our hospital between June and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into LTRA treated and untreated groups. Frequency of acute exacerbations and number of visits to emergency rooms and of hospital admissions were analyzed as indicators of frequency of infections and asthma exacerbation over the previous 12 months. Irrespective of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use, frequency of infections was significantly lower in the LTRA treated group (0.3 +/- 0.7 times/year) than in the LTRA untreated group (1.6 +/- 4.2 times/year) (P cold-like symptoms. Frequency of acute exacerbations and number of hospital admissions were significantly lower in the LTRA treated versus LTRA untreated group (0.4 +/- 0.8 versus 2.7 +/- 4.3 times/year and 0.0 +/- 0.2 versus 0.4 +/- 0.7 times/year, respectively; both P cold-like symptoms than those not receiving LTRAs. LTRAs play an important role in reducing the incidence of common cold-like symptoms among asthma patients and in suppressing exacerbation of asthma symptoms possibly associated with these symptoms.

  14. Respiratory reviews in asthma 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2014-03-01

    From January 2012 up until March 2013, many articles with huge clinical importance in asthma were published based on large numbered clinical trials or meta-analysis. The main subjects of these studies were the new therapeutic plan based on the asthma phenotype or efficacy along with the safety issues regarding the current treatment guidelines. For efficacy and safety issues, inhaled corticosteroid tapering strategy or continued long-acting beta agonists use was the major concern. As new therapeutic trials, monoclonal antibodies or macrolide antibiotics based on inflammatory phenotypes have been under investigation, with promising preliminary results. There were other issues on the disease susceptibility or genetic background of asthma, particularly for the "severe asthma" phenotype. In the era of genome and pharmacogenetics, there have been extensive studies to identify susceptible candidate genes based on the results of genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, for severe asthma, which is where most of the mortality or medical costs develop, it is very unclear. Moreover, there have been some efforts to find important genetic information in order to predict the possible disease progression, but with few significant results up until now. In conclusion, there are new on-going aspects in the phenotypic classification of asthma and therapeutic strategy according to the phenotypic variations. With more pharmacogenomic information and clear identification of the "severe asthma" group even before disease progression from GWAS data, more adequate and individualized therapeutic strategy could be realized in the future.

  15. Diet and asthma: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yueh-Ying; Forno, Erick; Holguin, Fernando; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to provide an overview and discussion of recent experimental studies, epidemiologic studies, and clinical trials of diet and asthma. We focus on dietary sources and vitamins with antioxidant properties [vitamins (A, C, and E), folate, and omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 and n-6 PUFAs)]. Current evidence does not support the use of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, or PUFAs for the prevention or treatment of asthma or allergies. Current guidelines for prenatal use of folate to prevent neural tube defects should be followed, as there is no evidence of major effects of this practice on asthma or allergies. Consumption of a balanced diet that is rich in sources of antioxidants (e.g. fruits and vegetables) may be beneficial in the primary prevention of asthma. None of the vitamins or nutrients examined is consistently associated with asthma or allergies. In some cases, further studies of the effects of a vitamin or nutrient on specific asthma phenotypes (e.g. vitamin C to prevent viral-induced exacerbations) are warranted. Clinical trials of 'whole diet' interventions to prevent asthma are advisable on the basis of existing evidence.

  16. In patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, does knowledge of adherence and inhaler technique using electronic monitoring improve clinical decision making? A protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mokoka, Matshediso C

    2017-06-15

    Many patients with asthma remain poorly controlled despite the use of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting beta agonists. Poor control may arise from inadequate adherence, incorrect inhaler technique or because the condition is refractory. Without having an objective assessment of adherence, clinicians may inadvertently add extra medication instead of addressing adherence. This study aims to assess if incorporating objectively recorded adherence from the Inhaler Compliance Assessment (INCA) device and lung function into clinical decision making provides more cost-effective prescribing and improves outcomes.

  17. Signs of an asthma attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Asthma - children Patient Instructions Asthma and school Asthma - child - discharge Asthma - control drugs Asthma - quick-relief drugs Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child Exercise-induced asthma Exercising and asthma at school ...

  18. Flavonoids and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toshio; Takahashi, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease, characterized by airway inflammation, airflow limitation, hyper-reactivity and airway remodeling. It is believed that asthma is caused by the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence of allergic diseases, including asthma, has increased worldwide during the past two decades. Although the precise reasons that have caused this increase remain unknown, dietary change is thought to be one of the environmental factors. Flavonoids, which are polyphenolic plant secondary metabolites ubiquitously present in vegetables, fruits and beverages, possess antioxidant and anti-allergic traits, as well as immune-modulating activities. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and anti-allergic nutrients that inhibit the release of chemical mediators, synthesis of Th2 type cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13, and CD40 ligand expression by high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor-expressing cells, such as mast cells and basophils. They also inhibit IL-4-induced signal transduction and affect the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into effector T-cells through their inhibitory effect on the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Various studies of flavonoids in asthmatic animal models have demonstrated their beneficial effects. The results of several epidemiological studies suggest that an increase in flavonoid intake is beneficial for asthma. Moreover, clinical trials of flavonoids have shown their ameliorative effects on symptoms related to asthma. However, these human studies are currently limited; further validation is required to clarify whether an appropriate intake of flavonoids may constitute dietary treatment and for part of a preventive strategy for asthma. PMID:23752494

  19. Bronchial Thermoplasty in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Mitzner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss the potential of a new procedure, termed Bronchial Thermoplasty to prevent serious consequences resulting from excessive airway narrowing. The most important factor in minimizing an asthmatic attack is limiting the degree of smooth muscle shortening. The premise that airway smooth muscle can be either inactivated or obliterated without any long-term alteration of other lung tissues, and that airway function will remain normal, albeit with reduced bronchoconstriction, has now been demonstrated in dogs, a subset of normal subjects, and mild asthmatics. Bronchial Thermoplasty may thus develop into a useful clinical procedure to effectively impair the ability for airway smooth muscle to reach the levels of pathologic narrowing that characterizes an asthma attack. It may also enable more successful treatment of asthma patients who are unresponsive to more conventional therapies. Whether this will remain stable for the lifetime of the patient still remains to be determined, but at the present time, there are no indications that the smooth muscle contractility will return. This successful preliminary experience showing that Bronchial Thermoplasty could be safely performed in patients with asthma has led to an ongoing clinical trial at a number of sites in Europe and North America designed to examine the effectiveness of this procedure in subjects with moderately severe asthma.

  20. Overcoming Medicaid Reimbursement Barriers to Funding School Nursing Services for Low-Income Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcarney, Mary-Beth; Horton, Katherine; Seiler, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Background: School nurses can provide direct services for children with asthma, educate, and reinforce treatment recommendations to children and their families, and coordinate the school-wide response to students' asthma emergencies. Unfortunately, school-based health services today depend on an unreliable patchwork of funding. Limited state and…

  1. Long-term clinical effects of aspirin-desensitization therapy among patients with poorly controlled asthma and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Förster-Ruhrmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA, the levels of asthma symptom control can be divided into controlled, partially controlled and uncontrolled asthma. Optional therapy for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs-hypersensitive asthmatics uses aspirin desensitization, but until now, this therapy is not established in difficult to treat cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of aspirin desensitization in patients with poorly controlled asthma. Methods: Patients with poorly controlled asthma, NDAIDs hypersensitivity and aspirin desensitization were included in the retrospective study. The data were compared to those obtained from patients with controlled asthma and aspirin therapy. Lung function, levels of asthma symptom control, asthma medication, the size of nasal polyps (NP and smell function were evaluated over 18 months. Results: Thirty-two patients were included in the study (uncontrolled/partially controlled asthma n = 12; controlled asthma n = 20. After 18 months of follow-up, the patients with poorly controlled asthma had significantly increased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 values, as compared to the baseline (66–82%; p = 0.02, the levels of asthma control improved significantly (p  0.05 and the asthma medication was constant. In relation to nasal parameters the sense of smell improved significantly in both groups, NP-scores did not differ significantly. Conclusions: Patients with a poorly controlled asthma and NSAIDs hypersensitivity profit from an add-on aspirin therapy. Keywords: Asthma, Levels of asthma symptom control, GINA, Uncontrolled asthma, Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD, NSAIDs hypersensitivity, NSAIDs sensitive asthma, Nasal polyps

  2. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People with Asthma who Smoke Insurance coverage and barriers to care for people with asthma NACP Grantee ... clinics/physicians’ office Mixed Age Groups – Pharmacies Pregnant Women – Home Pregnant Women – Medical clinics/physicians’ office Health ...

  3. Exhaled nitric oxide and asthma in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.P. van der Valk (Ralf)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAsthma was first described in the medical literature of Greek antiquity. It is difficult to determine whether by referring to “asthma”, Hippocrates and his school (460-360 B.C.) meant an autonomous clinical entity or a symptom. The clinical presentation of asthma nowadays has probably

  4. Integration of gene expression, clinical, and demographic information in relation to asthma status to identify biomarkers associated with subtypes of childhood asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advances in biomarker development have improved our ability to detect early changes at the molecular, cellular, and pre-clinical level that are often predictive of adverse health outcomes. Biomarkers for monitoring the underlying molecular mechanisms of disease are of increasing...

  5. Assessment of quality of life among children with bronchial asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-02-23

    Feb 23, 2016 ... dren 5 years and younger, the clinical symptoms of asthma are variable and ... naires alone or composite scores of asthma control. Quality of life measures ... tory, examination finding, laboratory investigation and treatment ...

  6. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide has a good correlation with asthma control and lung function in latino children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Ramos, Mario; Castro-Rodríguez, Jose A; Hinojos-Gallardo, Luis Carlos; Hernández-Saldaña, Raul; Cisneros-Castolo, Martin; Carrillo-Rodríguez, Victor

    2013-08-01

    Although the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) has been recommended for observational studies and clinical trials of asthma, FE(NO) has not been examined in studies of childhood asthma in Latin America, To examine the relationship between FE(NO) and indicators of disease control or severity [asthma control test/childhood asthma control test (ACT/C-ACT), lung function, and exercise challenge test (ECT)] in Mexican children with persistent asthma, Children (6-18 years of age) with persistent asthma were consecutively recruited in a tertiary asthma clinic and divided into two groups, e.g. FE(NO) children, Children with FE(NO)children with FE(NO) ≥20 ppb, those with FE(NO) children with persistent asthma, low levels of FE(NO) ( asthma control, and higher lung function.

  7. Childhood asthma-predictive phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Mauger, David T; Lemanske, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Wheezing is a fairly common symptom in early childhood, but only some of these toddlers will experience continued wheezing symptoms in later childhood. The definition of the asthma-predictive phenotype is in children with frequent, recurrent wheezing in early life who have risk factors associated with the continuation of asthma symptoms in later life. Several asthma-predictive phenotypes were developed retrospectively based on large, longitudinal cohort studies; however, it can be difficult to differentiate these phenotypes clinically as the expression of symptoms, and risk factors can change with time. Genetic, environmental, developmental, and host factors and their interactions may contribute to the development, severity, and persistence of the asthma phenotype over time. Key characteristics that distinguish the childhood asthma-predictive phenotype include the following: male sex; a history of wheezing, with lower respiratory tract infections; history of parental asthma; history of atopic dermatitis; eosinophilia; early sensitization to food or aeroallergens; or lower lung function in early life. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical efficacy of implementing Bio Immune(G)ene MEDicine in the treatment of chronic asthma with the objective of reducing or removing effectively corticosteroid therapy: A novel approach and promising results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glady, Gilbert

    2018-06-01

    Asthma is one of the diseases that demonstrates a wide range of variation in its clinical expression, in addition to an important heterogeneity in the pathophysiological mechanisms present in each case. The ever-increasing knowledge of the molecular signalling routes and the development of the Bio Immune(G)ene Medicine [BI(G)MED] therapy in line with this knowledge has revealed a whole novel potential set of self-regulation biological molecules, that may be used to promote the physiological immunogenic self-regulation mechanisms and re-establish the homeostatic balance at a genomic, proteomic and cellular level. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate that the sublingual use of a therapeutic protocol based on BI(G)MED regulatory BIMUREGs in the treatment of chronic asthma may reduce or suppress corticosteroid therapy and avoid its harmful side effects which some patients suffer when using this treatment on a long-term basis. The clinical efficacy of BI(G)MED for chronic asthma was evaluated through a multi-centre study carried out in 2016 implementing a 6-month BI(G)MED treatment protocol for Bronchial Asthma. A total of 61 patients from private medical centres and of European countries including Germany, Austria, France, Belgium and Spain participated. The manuscript describes in detail the clinical efficacy of Bio Immune(G)ene regulatory BI(G)MED treatment protocol that allows the reduction or total removal of the corticosteroid dose in patients with chronic asthma. No adverse reactions were observed. The BI(G)MED regulatory therapy brings novel therapeutic possibilities as an effective and safe treatment of chronic asthma. BI(G)MED was demonstrated to significantly reduce asthma severity when parameter compositions were all analysed by categorical outcomes. Therefore, it is considered a good therapeutic alternative for patients who respond poorly to steroids.

  9. A blinded comparison of fluticasone propionate with budesonide via powder devices in adult patients with moderate-to-severe asthma: a clinical evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ringdal

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In Vitro and in vivo data have demonstrated that there are detectable differences between inhaled corticosteroids commonly used to treat asthma. However, controversy still remains as to whether these differences translate into clinical benefits. This 12-week, international, randomized, doubleblind, parallel-group study was undertaken to compare the efficacy and safety of fluticasone propionate (FP 800 μg daily, administered as a powder via the Diskhaler®, and budesonide (BUD 1600 μg daily, administered using the Turbuhaler®, in adult patients with moderate-tosevere asthma. A total of 518 patients participated in the study, 256 of whom received FP and 262 BUD. Assessment of mean morning peak expiratory flow (PEF over the 12-week treatment period revealed a statistically significant difference in efficacy between FP 800 μg daily and BUD 1600 μg daily in favour of FP (p = 0.003, with an overall improvement of 20.9 l/min with FP compared with 12.4 l/min on BUD. Statistically significant differences in favour of FP were seen over the 12 weeks for mean evening PEF (p = 0.04, diurnal PEF variation (p = 0.03 and percentage predicted PEF (p = 0.003, as well as forced expiratory volume (p = 0.008, forced vital capacity (p = 0.02 and PEF (p = 0.005 measured at clinic visits. The median percentage of symptom-free nights increased over the 12-week study period in both treatment groups, with similar changes seen for the median percentage of days with symptom score < 2, rescue medication use and exacerbations of asthma. The incidence of adverse events was found to be comparable in the two treatment groups. The geometric mean ratios of serum cortisol levels were found to be 1.03 for FP, indicating no mean hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression from baseline, and 0.93 for BUD (p = 0.0002 compared with FP. In summary, FP 800 μg daily showed a greater efficacy/safety ratio in the treatment of moderate-to-severe asthma than BUD 1600 μg daily.

  10. Stress and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoji Nagata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Three factors in recent medical research and treatment (advances in the field of psychoneuroimmunology, epidemiological evidence regarding important interaction between psychosocial factors and development of disease, and the recognition of the importance of patient education for self-management of asthma have led clinicians and researchers to reconsider the role of psychosocial stress in asthma. There are many reports suggesting that stressful life events, family problems and a behavior pattern that increases psychological conflict may influence the development or relapse of asthma and influence its clinical course. Depression is known as one of the risk factors of fatal asthmatic attack. In laboratory studies, about 20% of asthmatics were considered reactors who showed an airway change after exposure to emotional stress. Studies regarding the pathway of stress effect on allergy and asthma are reviewed and discussed from the standpoint of psychoneuroimmunology; for example, the enhancement of IgE production and increased susceptibility to respiratory infection by stress, conditioned anaphylaxis and nerve/mast cell interaction, the effect of stress on various bronchial responses and the inhibition of the immediate and late asthmatic response by anterior hypothalamic lesioning.

  11. Goals, beliefs, and concerns of urban caregivers of middle and older adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson-Scipio, Wanda; Krouse, Helene J

    2013-04-01

    Caregiver goals, an integral part of a partnership for asthma management, have been found to influence asthma outcomes in children. These goals are likely to change during the transitional period of adolescence to address the needs of teenagers as they mature and assume greater responsibilities for their own care. Little is known about the goals, beliefs, and concerns of caregivers as they begin to shift responsibilities for asthma management to teens. This study sought to identify the asthma management goals, beliefs, and concerns of primarily African American caregivers of urban middle and older adolescents. Fourteen caregivers of urban African American adolescents aged 14-18 years with asthma participated in a focus group session. An iterative process was used to identify themes from the session related to asthma management goals, concerns, and beliefs of caregivers. Caregivers identified goals that related to supporting their teens' progress toward independent asthma self-management. They described significant concerns related to the teens' ability to implement asthma self-management, especially in school settings. Caregivers also revealed beliefs that represented knowledge deficits related to asthma medications and factors that improved or worsened asthma. Most caregivers identified grave concerns about school policies regarding asthma medication administration and the lack of knowledge and support provided by teachers and staff for their teen. Caregivers are an invaluable resource in the care of adolescents with asthma. An opportunity exists to improve caregiver understanding of asthma medications and to provide support through improvements in asthma care for adolescents in school-based settings.

  12. A randomized controlled trial of a public health nurse-delivered asthma program to elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicutto, Lisa; To, Teresa; Murphy, Suzanne

    2013-12-01

    Childhood asthma is a serious and common chronic disease that requires the attention of nurses and other school personnel. Schools are often the first setting that children take the lead in managing their asthma. Often, children are ill prepared for this role. Our study evaluated a school-based, multifaceted asthma program that targeted students with asthma and the broader school community. A randomized trial involving 130 schools with grades 1-5 and 1316 children with asthma and their families was conducted. Outcomes of interest for the child, at 1 year, were urgent care use and school absenteeism for asthma, inhaler technique, and quality of life, and for the school, at 14 months, were indicators of a supportive school environment. Improvements were observed at the child and school level for the intervention group. Fewer children in the intervention group had a school absence (50% vs 60%; p Schools in the intervention group were more likely to have practices supporting an asthma-friendly environment. Implementation of a multifaceted school-based asthma program can lead to asthma-friendly schools that support children with asthma to be successful managers of their asthma and experience improved quality of life and decreased disease associated burden. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  13. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth / For Parents / Exercise-Induced Asthma What's in ... Exercise-Induced Asthma Print What Is Exercise-Induced Asthma? Most kids and teens with asthma have symptoms ...

  14. [Anesthesia in bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremerich, D H

    2000-09-01

    Asthma is defined as a chronic inflammatory airway disease in response to a wide variety of provoking stimuli. Characteristic clinical symptoms of asthma are bronchial hyperreactivity, reversible airway obstruction, wheezing and dyspnea. Asthma presents a major public health problem with increasing prevalence rates and severity worldwide. Despite major advances in our understanding of the clinical management of asthmatic patients, it remains a challenging population for anesthesiologists in clinical practice. The anesthesiologist's responsibility starts with the preoperative assessment and evaluation of the pulmonary function. For patients with asthma who currently have no symptoms, the risk of perioperative respiratory complications is extremely low. Therefore, pulmonary function should be optimized preoperatively and airway obstruction should be controlled by using steroids and bronchodilators. Preoperative spirometry is a simple means of assessing presence and severity of airway obstruction as well as the degree of reversibility in response to bronchodilator therapy. An increase of 15% in FEV1 is considered clinically significant. Most asymptomatic persons with asthma can safely undergo general anesthesia with and without endotracheal intubation. Volatile anesthetics are still recommended for general anesthetic techniques. As compared to barbiturates and even ketamine, propofol is considered to be the agent of choice for induction of anesthesia in asthmatics. The use of regional anesthesia does not reduce perioperative respiratory complications in asymptomatic asthmatics, whereas it is advantageous in symptomatic patients. Pregnant asthmatic and parturients undergoing anesthesia are at increased risk, especially if regional anesthetic techniques are not suitable and prostaglandin and its derivates are administered for abortion or operative delivery. Bronchial hyperreactivity associated with asthma is an important risk factor of perioperative bronchospasm. The

  15. [Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odler, Balázs; Müller, Veronika

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive lung diseases represent a major health problem worldwide due to their high prevalence associated with elevated socioeconomic costs. Bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are chronic obstructive ventilatory disorders with airway inflammation, however they are separate nosological entities based on thedifferent development, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, and prognostic features. However, these diseases may coexist and can be defined as the coexistence of increased variability of airflow in a patient with incompletely reversible airway obstruction. This phenotype is called asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. The syndrome is a clinical and scientific challenge as the majority of these patients have been excluded from the clinical and pharmacological trials, thus well-defined clinical characteristics and therapeutic approaches are lacking. The aim of this review is to summarize the currently available literature focusing on pathophysiological and clinical features, and discuss possible therapeutic approaches of patients with asthma - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(33), 1304-1313.

  16. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xian Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment. Data Sources: Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and "asthma" as the main keywords. Highly regarded older publications were also included. Study Selection: Information about the features of the two diseases in common, the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified, retrieved, and summarized. Results: Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions. The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years. Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea, and OSA often combines with asthma, as well. They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common. Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects, intermittent hypoxia, nerve reflex, inflammation, leptin, etc. Indirect mechanistic links include medication, nose diseases, smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma, some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome - "alternative overlap syndrome," and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure. Conclusions: OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis, symptoms, and therapies. With the growing awareness of the relationship between them, we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients. Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  17. Learn How to Control Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guidelines Asthma & Community Health Learn How to Control Asthma Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Arabic Chinese Français ... Is Asthma Treated? Select a Language What Is Asthma? Asthma is a disease that affects your lungs. ...

  18. Asthma and Food Allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Asthma and Food Allergies Page Content Article Body A family history of ... child may develop asthma . Children with asthma and food allergies are at increased risk for anaphylaxis, a severe ...

  19. Publications about Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA provides the general public, partners, media outlets and health care professionals with a wide variety of asthma resources at no-cost. EPA develops resources to share information about asthma, its triggers, and comprehensive asthma management.

  20. Asthma action plan

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2014-01-01

    This action plans allow each child (or parent/carer) to record his or her asthma treatment to help manage their asthma when they are well, when their symptoms get worse and when they are suffering an asthma attack.

  1. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  2. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  3. Traveling and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth / For Kids / Traveling and Asthma Print en ... pack it, too. How Can I Avoid My Asthma Triggers? Staying at a hotel Ask for a ...

  4. Omalizumab for severe allergic asthma in clinical trials and real-life studies: what we know and what we should address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminati, Marco; Senna, Gianenrico; Guerriero, Massimo; Dama, Anna Rita; Chieco-Bianchi, Fulvia; Stefanizzi, Giorgia; Montagni, Marcello; Ridolo, Erminia

    2015-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are the gold standard for the assessment of any therapeutic intervention. Real-life (R-L) studies are needed to verify the provided results beyond the experimental setting. This review aims at comparing RCTs and R-L studies on omalizumab in adult severe allergic asthma, in order to highlight the concurring results and the discordant/missing data. The results of a selective literature research, including "omalizumab, controlled studies, randomized trial, real-life studies" as key words are discussed. Though some similarities between RCTs and R-L studies strengthen omalizumab efficacy and safety outcomes, significant differences concerning study population features, follow-up duration, local adverse events and drop-out rate for treatment inefficacy emerge between the two study categories. Furthermore the comparative analysis between RCTs and R-L studies highlights the need for further research, concerning in particular long-term effects of omalizumab and its impact on asthma comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Asthma-Related School Absenteeism, Morbidity, and Modifiable Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Joy; Qin, Xiaoting; Beavers, Suzanne F; Mirabelli, Maria C

    2016-07-01

    Asthma is a leading cause of chronic disease-related school absenteeism. Few data exist on how information on absenteeism might be used to identify children for interventions to improve asthma control. This study investigated how asthma-related absenteeism was associated with asthma control, exacerbations, and associated modifiable risk factors using a sample of children from 35 states and the District of Columbia. The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Child Asthma Call-back Survey is a random-digit dial survey designed to assess the health and experiences of children aged 0-17 years with asthma. During 2014-2015, multivariate analyses were conducted using 2006-2010 data to compare children with and without asthma-related absenteeism with respect to clinical, environmental, and financial measures. These analyses controlled for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Compared with children without asthma-related absenteeism, children who missed any school because of asthma were more likely to have not well controlled or very poorly controlled asthma (prevalence ratio=1.50; 95% CI=1.34, 1.69) and visit an emergency department or urgent care center for asthma (prevalence ratio=3.27; 95% CI=2.44, 4.38). Mold in the home and cost as a barrier to asthma-related health care were also significantly associated with asthma-related absenteeism. Missing any school because of asthma is associated with suboptimal asthma control, urgent or emergent asthma-related healthcare utilization, mold in the home, and financial barriers to asthma-related health care. Further understanding of asthma-related absenteeism could establish how to most effectively use absenteeism information as a health status indicator. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Children's illness drawings and asthma symptom awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriels, R L; Wamboldt, M Z; McCormick, D R; Adams, T L; McTaggart, S R

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between children's abilities to perceive their symptoms of asthma via several previously researched subjective and objective procedures compared with their performance on a standardized children's drawing task and scale criteria. Results indicated that girls verbalized significantly more emotions about their drawings and were better able to detect airflow changes in their small airways than boys. The Gabriels Asthma Perception Drawing Scales (GAPDS) is a promising clinical tool for assessing children's perceptions and emotions about asthma via nonverbal methods. Varying methods of measuring asthma symptom awareness are not highly correlated; thus, more than one methodology is appropriate for use with children.

  7. Asthma affects time to pregnancy and fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth J; Thomsen, Simon F; Lindenberg, Svend

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of infertility and asthma has been observed clinically. Therefore, we investigated the association between asthma and delayed pregnancy in a nationwide population-based cohort of twins. A cohort of 15 250 twins living in Denmark (aged 12-41 years) participated in a questionnaire study...... including questions about the presence of asthma and fertility. Differences in time to pregnancy and pregnancy outcome were analysed in subjects with asthma, allergy and in healthy individuals using multiple regression analysis. Asthma was associated with an increased time to pregnancy, the percentage...... in those >30 years of age (32.2% versus 24.9%, OR (95% CI) 1.44 (1.1-1.9); p=0.04). Untreated asthmatics had a significant increased risk of prolonged time to pregnancy compared to healthy individuals (OR (95% CI) 1.79 (1.20-2.66); p=0.004), while asthmatics receiving any kind of treatment for asthma...

  8. Inhaled Asthma Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  9. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  10. Near-fatal asthma phenotype in the ENFUMOSA Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnoli, M.; Caramori, G.; Braccioni, F.; Ravenna, F.; Barreiro, E.; Siafakas, N. M.; Vignola, A. M.; Chanez, P.; Fabbri, L. M.; Papi, A.; Bel, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Near-fatal asthma (NFA) is characterized by severe asthma attacks usually requiring intensive care unit admission. This phenotype of asthma has been studied mainly in acute conditions. METHODS: The aim of our study was to compare the clinical, functional and inflammatory characteristics

  11. Novel Gentic Variations Contributing to Asthma Susceptability in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-13

    Collection of Clinical Data That Will be Used in This Study and Will Form a Data Bank for Asthma in Saudi Arabia; Identify Known and NOVEL Genetic Risk Factors Contributing to Asthma Susceptibility; Study the Mechanistic Roles of the Genetic Variants Within Major Asthma Susceptibility Genes

  12. The public health implications of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Jean; Bousquet, Philippe J; Godard, Philippe; Daures, Jean-Pierre

    2005-07-01

    Asthma is a very common chronic disease that occurs in all age groups and is the focus of various clinical and public health interventions. Both morbidity and mortality from asthma are significant. The number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost due to asthma worldwide is similar to that for diabetes, liver cirrhosis and schizophrenia. Asthma management plans have, however, reduced mortality and severity in countries where they have been applied. Several barriers reduce the availability, affordability, dissemination and efficacy of optimal asthma management plans in both developed and developing countries. The workplace environment contributes significantly to the general burden of asthma. Patients with occupational asthma have higher rates of hospitalization and mortality than healthy workers. The surveillance of asthma as part of a global WHO programme is essential. The economic cost of asthma is considerable both in terms of direct medical costs (such as hospital admissions and the cost of pharmaceuticals) and indirect medical costs (such as time lost from work and premature death). Direct costs are significant in most countries. In order to reduce costs and improve quality of care, employers and health plans are exploring more precisely targeted ways of controlling rapidly rising health costs. Poor control of asthma symptoms is a major issue that can result in adverse clinical and economic outcomes. A model of asthma costs is needed to aid attempts to reduce them while permitting optimal management of the disease. This paper presents a discussion of the burden of asthma and its socioeconomic implications and proposes a model to predict the costs incurred by the disease.

  13. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Egypt J Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2008; 6(2): 51-56. 51. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma. Review of Ain Shams Pediatric Hospital Chest Clinic Data. Cairo, Egypt 1995-2004. INTRODUCTION. Bronchial asthma is a major worldwide health problem, which has received increased attention in.

  14. Cleaning and asthma characteristics in women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dumas, O.; Siroux, V.; Luu, F.; Nadif, R.; Zock, J.P.; Kauffmann, F.; Moual, N. le

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to assess the associations between occupational exposure to cleaning products, a gender-related exposure, and asthma characteristics, considering clinical, mmunological and inflammatory aspects. Methods Analyses were conducted in 391 women (73 with adult-onset asthma) from the

  15. Improving Asthma Communication in High-Risk Children

    OpenAIRE

    Butz, Arlene M.; Walker, Jennifer; Land, Cassia Lewis; Vibbert, Carrie; Winkelstein, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    Few child asthma studies address the specific content and techniques needed to enhance child communication during asthma preventive care visits. This study examined the content of child and parent communications regarding their asthma management during a medical encounter with their primary care provider (PCP). The majority of parents and children required prompting to communicate symptom information to the PCP during the clinic visit. Some high-risk families may require an asthma advocate to...

  16. Precision medicine in patients with allergic diseases: Airway diseases and atopic dermatitis-PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Antonella; Lemanske, Robert F; Hellings, Peter W; Akdis, Cezmi A; Bieber, Thomas; Casale, Thomas B; Jutel, Marek; Ong, Peck Y; Poulsen, Lars K; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Seys, Sven F; Agache, Ioana

    2016-05-01

    In this consensus document we summarize the current knowledge on major asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis endotypes under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is an initiative of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology aiming to harmonize the European and American approaches to best allergy practice and science. Precision medicine is of broad relevance for the management of asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis in the context of a better selection of treatment responders, risk prediction, and design of disease-modifying strategies. Progress has been made in profiling the type 2 immune response-driven asthma. The endotype driven approach for non-type 2 immune response asthma, rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is lagging behind. Validation and qualification of biomarkers are needed to facilitate their translation into pathway-specific diagnostic tests. Wide consensus between academia, governmental regulators, and industry for further development and application of precision medicine in management of allergic diseases is of utmost importance. Improved knowledge of disease pathogenesis together with defining validated and qualified biomarkers are key approaches to precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Clinical characteristics and condition of the bronchial tree in patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in combination with hyperoxaluria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, G B; Petrova, M A; Shaĭlieva, L O; Kakliugin, A P; Zorina, M L; Sakharov, A N; Pavliukova, N O

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate peculiarities of a clinical course and changes in bronchial mucosa in bronchial asthma (BA) patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in combination with hyperoxaluria (HOU); informative value of some laboratory and device findings including oxalates assay in bronchial lavage fluid for specification of the diagnosis, role of oxalates in development of obstructive syndrome and choice of optimal therapy. Oxalates were examined in daily urine, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and exhaled air condensate of 104 patients with BA and COPD, 77 of which had HOU and an atypical course of bronchial obstruction syndrome. Conception of airways inflammation in patients with oxalate metabolism disturbances is proposed. It is shown that insoluble oxalates participate in pathogenesis of bronchial obstruction. Oxalate metabolism disturbances are an important factor in pathogenesis of airways inflammation and development of bronchial obstruction in predisposed patients. Therefore, administration of insoluble oxalates lowering therapy may effectively prevent formation and progression of obstructive pulmonary diseases in this group of patients.

  18. Clinical-Anamnestic Features and Evaluation of Control for Exercise-Induced Bronchial Asthma in Schoolchildren with Xenobiotics Biotransformation Genes Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.G. Grygola

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex clinical and spirographic investigation of schoolchildren suffering from exercise-induced bronchial asthma was carried out depending on the presence or the absence of genes polymorphism of the enzymes of glutation-S-transferase — GSTT1M1. The study showed that the course of the disease was more severe in the patients with the deletions of the named genes, the reactions of hypersensitivity were more often, but the desobstructive effect during the attack was reached quicker. The self-assessment of the control of the disease by different scales showed the controversial results, but the objectification by the spirographic investigation allowed to define the risk of achieving the controlled course of the disease in children with genotype GSTT1+M1+ (odds ratio — 3.33, relative risk — 1.8, absolute risk — 29 %.

  19. Características clínicas e prognóstico em pacientes com asma quase fatal em Salvador, Bahia Clinical characteristics and prognosis in near-fatal asthma patients in Salvador, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vieira Ponte

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a frequência de asma quase fatal em um grupo de pacientes com asma grave, assim como as características clínicas e o prognóstico desses pacientes em um ano de seguimento. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo envolvendo 731 pacientes de baixa renda com asma grave tratados em um ambulatório de referência para asma na cidade de Salvador (BA. Os pacientes realizaram espirometria na admissão do estudo, receberam medicações para asma e foram monitorizados quanto à frequência de exacerbações durante o seguimento. Uma subamostra de 511 pacientes também respondeu questionários de sintomas e de qualidade de vida relacionada a asma. RESULTADOS: Dos 731 pacientes estudados, 563 (77% eram do sexo feminino, com mediana de idade de 47 anos, e 12% não eram alfabetizados. A maioria dos pacientes apresentava rinite, e 70 (10% relataram asma quase fatal antes da admissão. Desses 70 pacientes, 41 (59% relataram terem sido intubados previamente. Os pacientes com asma quase fatal na admissão eram mais propensos a exacerbações de asma durante o acompanhamento e tiveram menor resposta ao tratamento do que aqueles sem asma quase fatal. Os resultados dos questionários no final do acompanhamento foram semelhantes nos dois grupos de pacientes. CONCLUSÕES: A frequência de asma quase fatal foi alta nesta população de pacientes com asma grave e de baixa renda. Os pacientes com histórico de asma quase fatal tiveram um pior prognóstico que aqueles sem esse histórico, embora tenham recebido o mesmo tratamento. Curiosamente, a intensidade dos sintomas e a qualidade de vida no final do estudo foram semelhantes entre os dois grupos de pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of near-fatal asthma in a group of severe asthma patients, as well as the clinical characteristics and prognosis of these patients within a one-year follow-up period. METHODS: A prospective study involving 731 low-income patients with severe asthma treated at a

  20. Researching asthma across the ages: insights from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Asthma Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabana, Michael D; Kunselman, Susan J; Nyenhuis, Sharmilee M; Wechsler, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Clinical asthma studies across different age groups (ie, cross-age studies) can potentially offer insight into the similarities, differences, and relationships between childhood and adult asthma. The National Institutes of Health's Asthma Research Network (AsthmaNet) is unique and innovative in that it has merged pediatric and adult asthma research into a single clinical research network. This combination enhances scientific exchange between pediatric and adult asthma investigators and encourages the application of cross-age studies that involve participants from multiple age groups who are generally not studied together. The experience from AsthmaNet in the development of cross-age protocols highlights some of the issues in the evaluation of cross-age research in asthma. The aim of this review is to summarize these challenges, including the selection of parallel cross-age clinical interventions, identification of appropriate controls, measurement of meaningful clinical outcomes, and various ethical and logistic issues. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Managing Asthma in Pregnancy (MAP) trial: FENO levels and childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morten, Matthew; Collison, Adam; Murphy, Vanessa E; Barker, Daniel; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Attia, John; Meredith, Joseph; Powell, Heather; Robinson, Paul D; Sly, Peter D; Gibson, Peter G; Mattes, Joerg

    2018-03-08

    The single-center double-blind, randomized controlled Managing Asthma in Pregnancy (MAP) trial in Newcastle, Australia, compared a treatment algorithm using the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) in combination with asthma symptoms (FENO group) against a treatment algorithm using clinical symptoms only (clinical group) in pregnant asthmatic women (Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, no. 12607000561482). The primary outcome was a 50% reduction in asthma exacerbations during pregnancy in the FENO group. However, the effect of FENO-guided management on the development of asthma in the offspring is unknown. We sought to investigate the effect of FENO-guided asthma management during pregnancy on asthma incidence in childhood. A total of 179 mothers consented to participate in the Growing into Asthma (GIA) double-blind follow-up study with the primary aim to determine the effect of FENO-guided asthma management on childhood asthma incidence. A total of 140 children (78%) were followed up at 4 to 6 years of age. FENO-guided as compared to symptoms-only approach significantly reduced doctor-diagnosed asthma (25.9% vs 43.2%; odds ratio [OR], 0.46, 95% CI, 0.22-0.96; P = .04). Furthermore, frequent wheeze (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.09-0.87; P = .03), use of short-acting β-agonists (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25-0.97; P = .04), and emergency department visits for asthma (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.04-0.76; P = .02) in the past 12 months were less common in children born to mothers from the FENO group. Doctor-diagnosed asthma was associated with common risk alleles for early onset asthma at gene locus 17q21 (P = .01 for rs8069176; P = .03 for rs8076131), and higher airways resistance (P = .02) and FENO levels (P = .03). A causal mediation analysis suggested natural indirect effects of FENO-guided asthma management on childhood asthma through "any use" and "time to first change in dose" of inhaled corticosteroids during the MAP trial (OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0

  2. Role of environmental exposure to spider mites in the sensitization and the clinical manifestation of asthma and rhinitis in children and adolescents living in rural and urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y-K; Chang, Y-S; Lee, M-H; Hong, S-C; Bae, J-M; Jee, Y-K; Chun, B-R; Cho, S-H; Min, K-U; Kim, Y-Y

    2002-09-01

    Spider mites such as the citrus red mite and the two-spotted spider mite have been demonstrated to be important allergens for fruit cultivating farmers. To evaluate the role of environmental exposure to spider mites in the sensitization and the clinical manifestations of asthma and rhinitis in children and adolescents living in urban and rural areas. A total of 16,624 subjects (aged 7 to 18 years) living in urban (metropolitan and non-metropolitan) and rural areas (apple orchards and citrus orchards) in Korea were evaluated by questionnaire and skin prick test for 11 common aeroallergens, including citrus red mite (CRM) and two-spotted spider mite (TSM). The positive skin response rates to TSM were 4.2% of 1,563 metropolitan subjects, 3.8% of 5,568 non-metropolitan subjects and 6.5% of 1,464 subjects living nearby apple farms, and that to CRM 15.6% of 8,029 living nearby citrus farms. The prevalence of current wheeze and rhinitis as reported on a questionnaire was higher among those with a history of visiting fruit farms once or more per year than among those without it (10% vs. 7.1%, 32.8% vs. 26.7%, for wheezing and rhinitis, respectively). Among those with wheezing or rhinitis, the positive skin responses to TSM or CRM were also higher among those with a history of visiting fruit farms than among those without one (11.2% vs. 6.6%, 13.0% vs. 6.6%, respectively), although the positive skin responses to house dust mites were similar in the both groups. Spider mites are common sensitizing allergens in children and adolescents exposed to them, and environmental exposure to these mites may represent an important risk factor in the sensitization and the clinical manifestations of asthma and rhinitis in children and adolescents living in rural and urban areas.

  3. Influence of Natural Lung Surfactant Inhalations on Clinical Symptoms and Pulmonary Function Parameters in Patients with Bronchial Asthma. Communication 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Stepanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Damage to lung surfactant (LS enabling the lung local immunity may contribute to the development of bronchial inflammation in patients with bronchial asthma. Methods and Results: A 40-day course of 16 LS (Surfactant-BL inhalations at the dose of 25mg was added to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and short/long-acting bronchodilators or combined inhalers in 14 patients with bronchial asthma. After 7 inhalations, patients demonstrated a significant decrease in shortness of breath and bronchospasm attacks, double reduction of ICS dose (p=0.01, and improvement of pulmonary function. Forced vital capacity (FVC increases during treatment in a linear fashion (y=62.9+5.60•x; p<0.05, reaching the normal level (80% after 9 inhalations (Day 15. Forced expiratory volume (FEV1 increases in a linear fashion (y=50.7+4.15•x; p<0.05 without reaching the normal level (80% after 16 inhalations (Day 41. The FEV1/FVC ratio does not change significantly in the time period between Day 1 to Day 15. By Day 41 the value decreases significantly to 67.4±4.66% (p<0.05. The peak expiratory flow (PEF parameter increases in a linear fashion (y=53.9+5.00•x; p<0.01 from 57.7±6.33% to 76.2±9.33% of the predicted value. Conclusion: LS inhalations improve the condition of patients with BA, allow ICS dose reduction by 2 times, and improve pulmonary function parameters.

  4. Therapeutic interventions in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Senna, Gianenrico; Mitchell, Patrick D; O'Byrne, Paul M; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Varricchi, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The present paper addresses severe asthma which is limited to 5-10% of the overall population of asthmatics. However, it accounts for 50% or more of socials costs of the disease, as it is responsible for hospitalizations and Emergency Department accesses as well as expensive treatments. The recent identification of different endotypes of asthma, based on the inflammatory pattern, has led to the development of tailored treatments that target different inflammatory mediators. These are major achievements in the perspective of Precision Medicine: a leading approach to the modern treatment strategy. Omalizumab, an anti-IgE antibody, has been the only biologic treatment available on the market for severe asthma during the last decade. It prevents the linkage of the IgE and the receptors, thereby inhibiting mast cell degranulation. In clinical practice omalizumab significantly reduced the asthma exacerbations as well as the concomitant use of oral glucocorticoids. In the "Th2-high asthma" phenotype, the hallmarks are increased levels of eosinophils and other markers (such as periostin). Because anti-IL-5 in this condition plays a crucial role in driving eosinophil inflammation, this cytokine or its receptors on the eosinophil surface has been studied as a potential target for therapy. Two different anti-IL-5 humanized monoclonal antibodies, mepolizumab and reslizumab, have been proven effective in this phenotype of asthma (recently they both came on the market in the United States), as well as an anti-IL-5 receptor alpha (IL5Rα), benralizumab. Other monoclonal antibodies, targeting different cytokines (IL-13, IL-4, IL-17 and TSLP) are still under evaluation, though the preliminary results are encouraging. Finally, AIT, Allergen Immunotherapy, a prototype of Precision Medicine, is considered, also in light of the recent evidences of Sublingual Immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet efficacy and safety in mite allergic asthma patients. Given the high costs of these therapies

  5. Japanese guidelines for childhood asthma 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hirokazu; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Kohno, Yoichi; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Kondo, Naomi; Nishima, Sankei; Nishimuta, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2017-04-01

    The Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Diseases 2017 (JAGL 2017) includes a minor revision of the Japanese Pediatric Guideline for the Treatment and Management of Asthma 2012 (JPGL 2012) by the Japanese Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology. The section on child asthma in JAGL 2017 provides information on how to diagnose asthma between infancy and adolescence (0-15 years of age). It makes recommendations for best practices in the management of childhood asthma, including management of acute exacerbations and non-pharmacological and pharmacological management. This guideline will be of interest to non-specialist physicians involved in the care of children with asthma. JAGL differs from the Global Initiative for Asthma Guideline in that JAGL emphasizes diagnosis and early intervention of children with asthma at asthma control levels, is easy to understand; thus, this guideline is suitable for the routine medical care of children with asthma. JAGL also recommends using a control test in children, so that the physician aims for complete control by avoiding exacerbating factors and appropriately using anti-inflammatory drugs (for example, inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene receptor antagonists). Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Asthma and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ali, Zarqa; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem, and obesity is associated with a high incidence of asthma and poor asthma control. The aim of the present paper is to systematically review the current knowledge of the effect on overall asthma control of weight reduction in overweight and obese adults with asthma....

  7. Acute bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Ramuscello

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the main causes of morbidity worldwide. It affects some 300 million individuals and has risen over the past 20 years, especially in the paediatric population. Asthma is a chronic inflammation of the airways, subject to periodic exacerbations, characterised by coughing and progressive dyspnoea. Clinical conditions may vary greatly, ranging from moderate exacerbation with an increase in nocturnal awakening and a less than 20% reduction in the flow peak, through to severe respiratory insufficiency that requires immediate intubation of the airways. Pharmacological treatment envisages a step approach that aims to obtain and maintain control over the symptoms, taking into consideration the effectiveness of the treatment available, potential side effects and cost. β2-agonists and corticosteroids are the drugs of election for both maintenance therapy and for treating exacerbations. Other therapeutic devices may prove useful in particular cases. One fundamental key point in treatment over time is the cooperation between patient and attending doctor. The latest review of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA guidelines was published in 2006.

  8. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  9. Role of Obesity in Asthma: Mechanisms and Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hayley A; Wood, Lisa G; Gibson, Peter G

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is a commonly reported comorbidity in asthma, particularly in severe asthma. Obese asthmatics are highly symptomatic with a poor quality of life, despite using high-dose inhaled corticosteroids. While the clinical manifestations have been documented, the aetiologies of obese-asthma remain unclear. Several potential mechanisms have been proposed, including poor diet quality, physical inactivity and consequent accrual of excess adipose tissue. Each of these factors independently activates inflammatory pathways, potentially exerting effects in the airways. Because the origins of obesity are multifactorial, it is now believed there are multiple obese-asthma phenotypes, with varied aetiologies and clinical consequences. In this review, we will describe the clinical implications of obesity in people with asthma, our current understanding of the mechanisms driving this association and describe recently proposed obese-asthma phenotypes. We will then discuss how asthma management is complicated by obesity, and provide graded recommendations for the management of obesity in this population.

  10. Adolescent health care: improving access by school-based service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, C; Mulligan, D; Kaufman, A; Davis, S; Hunt, K; Kalishman, N; Wallerstein, N

    1985-10-01

    Participants in this discussion of the potential of school-based health care services for adolescents included family medicine physicians, school health coordinators, a school nurse, and a community worker. It was noted that health care for adolescents tends to be either inaccessible or underutilized, largely because of a lack of sensitivity to adolescent culture and values. An ideal service for adolescents would offer immediate services for crises, strict confidentiality, ready access to prescribed medications, a sliding-scale scheme, and a staff that is tolerant of divergent values and life-styles. School-based pilot adolescent clinics have been established by the University of New Mexico's Department of Family, Community, and Emergency Medicine to test the community-oriented health care model. On-site clinics provide urgent medical care, family planning, pregnancy testing, psychological counseling, alcohol and drug counseling, and classroom health education. Experience with these programs has demonstrated the necessity for an alliance among the health team and the school administration, parents, and students. Financial, ethical, and political factors can serve as constraints to school-based programs. In some cases, school administrators have been resistant to the provision of contraception to students on school grounds and parents have been unwilling to accept the adolescent's right to confidentiality. These problems in part stem from having 2 separate systems, each with its own values, orientation, and responsibilities, housed in 1 facility. In addition, there have been problems generating awareness of the school-based clinic among students. Health education theater groups, peer counseling, and student-run community services have been effective, however, in increasing student participation. It has been helpful to mold clinic services to meet the needs identified by teenagers themselves. There is an interest not only in curative services, but in services focused

  11. Association between asthma and dysphonia: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bumjung; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2016-09-01

    We investigated whether asthma predisposes patients to organic laryngeal lesions or increases dysphonia in those without organic laryngeal lesions. We performed a cross-sectional study with data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey; 19,330 subjects from 2008 through 2011 were included. The associations of asthma with organic laryngeal lesions and dysphonia were analyzed using a simple/multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling while adjusting for confounding factors (age, sex, smoking status, stress level, and body mass index) that could contribute to dysphonia. Compared with non-asthma participants, the asthma patients tended to be older and female and to have higher stress levels. These factors were associated with dysphonia (Age, AOR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.14 = 1.23, P dysphonia. Compared with non-asthma participants, asthma patients who had not taken asthma medication recently showed a higher AOR (1.62; 95% CI = 1.0-2.42) for dysphonia, and asthma patients who had taken asthma medication recently showed the highest adjusted odds ratio for dysphonia (AOR = 1.97; 95% confidence interval, CI = 1.28-3.02, P = 0.001). On multiple logistic regression analysis, vocal nodules, laryngeal polyps, and laryngitis were not associated with asthma (all P > 0.05). Asthma patients are predisposed to subjective dysphonia due to demographic and clinical characteristics (older age, female, and higher stress level) as well as to asthma itself. However, asthma was not associated with organic laryngeal lesions in this study.

  12. Can patients with asthma feel inhaler therapy working right away? Two clinical trials testing the effect of timing of assessment on patient perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidy, Nancy Kline; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Lampl, Kathy; Uryniak, Tom; O'Brien, Christopher D

    2009-12-01

    Feeling a maintenance therapy work right away may provide positive reinforcement and may offer one way to improve adherence in patients with asthma. Precise measurement is required to accurately compare the presence of this effect across clinical trial treatment groups. Two randomized, controlled studies tested whether timing of assessment (daily vs weekly, study 1; and predose vs postdose, study 2) influenced patients' reports of whether they can feel a medication working right away (perception), and their satisfaction with this perception (satisfaction). These 2-week US-based multicenter double-blind, parallel-group studies included patients > or = 18 years of age with mild to moderate persistent asthma. In each, patients were randomized to one of two drugs with different onset profiles: budesonide/formoterol pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) 80/4.5 microg x 2 inhalations (160/9 microg) twice daily or budesonide pMDI 80 microg x 2 inhalations (160 microg) twice daily. Patients were further randomized to complete previously validated perception and satisfaction questions in a cross-over fashion, either daily and weekly (N = 123) or predose and postdose (N = 134). Patient surveys also assessed perceptions of the onset of effect of medication and their value of these perceptions. No significant differences were observed in patients' reports of perception, either daily versus weekly or predose versus postdose. A statistically significant difference in satisfaction was found in study 1 only, favoring weekly recall (p away (136 of 157 patients) identified positive airway sensations. Most patients reported that feeling their medication work right away is reassuring and would help them manage their asthma. Assessment timing has no effect on patient response to the perception of feeling a medication working right away. Differences found in satisfaction levels reported with weekly versus daily recall were consistent across treatment groups, indicating that no bias

  13. The burden of severe asthma in childhood and adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, Louise; Murray, Clare; Bansal, Aruna T

    2015-01-01

    U-BIOPRED aims to characterise paediatric and adult severe asthma using conventional and innovative systems biology approaches. A total of 99 school-age children with severe asthma and 81 preschoolers with severe wheeze were compared with 49 school-age children with mild/moderate asthma and 53...... in the severe wheeze cohort. Almost all participants in each cohort were atopic and had a normal body mass index. Asthma-related quality of life, as assessed by the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) and the Paediatric Asthma Caregiver's Quality of Life Questionnaire (PACQLQ), was worse...... and mild/moderate cohorts were clinically very similar. Children with severe preschool wheeze or severe asthma are usually atopic and have impaired quality of life that is associated with poor control and airflow limitation: a very different phenotype from adult severe asthma. In-depth phenotyping...

  14. Cluster analysis of obesity and asthma phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rand Sutherland

    Full Text Available Asthma is a heterogeneous disease with variability among patients in characteristics such as lung function, symptoms and control, body weight, markers of inflammation, and responsiveness to glucocorticoids (GC. Cluster analysis of well-characterized cohorts can advance understanding of disease subgroups in asthma and point to unsuspected disease mechanisms. We utilized an hypothesis-free cluster analytical approach to define the contribution of obesity and related variables to asthma phenotype.In a cohort of clinical trial participants (n = 250, minimum-variance hierarchical clustering was used to identify clinical and inflammatory biomarkers important in determining disease cluster membership in mild and moderate persistent asthmatics. In a subset of participants, GC sensitivity was assessed via expression of GC receptor alpha (GCRα and induction of MAP kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 expression by dexamethasone. Four asthma clusters were identified, with body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2 and severity of asthma symptoms (AEQ score the most significant determinants of cluster membership (F = 57.1, p<0.0001 and F = 44.8, p<0.0001, respectively. Two clusters were composed of predominantly obese individuals; these two obese asthma clusters differed from one another with regard to age of asthma onset, measures of asthma symptoms (AEQ and control (ACQ, exhaled nitric oxide concentration (F(ENO and airway hyperresponsiveness (methacholine PC(20 but were similar with regard to measures of lung function (FEV(1 (% and FEV(1/FVC, airway eosinophilia, IgE, leptin, adiponectin and C-reactive protein (hsCRP. Members of obese clusters demonstrated evidence of reduced expression of GCRα, a finding which was correlated with a reduced induction of MKP-1 expression by dexamethasoneObesity is an important determinant of asthma phenotype in adults. There is heterogeneity in expression of clinical and inflammatory biomarkers of asthma across obese individuals

  15. CLINICAL AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE LONG-TERM MAINTENANCE THERAPY BY COMBINED DRUGS OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA IN SCHOOL CHILDREN, RESIDENTS OF THE RURAL REGIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Ermakova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: selection of the supporting anti-asthma therapy (SAAT of the moderate asthma in school children, residents of the village with the lowest ratio of price and efficiency. The maximum frequency of achieving control of asthma was 64%. The spectrum of asthma medicines (drugs used in outpatient phase is represented. For 7 years, the proportion of the inhaled corticosteroid (ICS therapy in children with asthma has increased moderately by 5.5 times and was 66%, of which 2/3 was the combination of inhaled glucocorticosteroids. When using the combined drug salmeterol/fluticasone propionate (50/100 mkg during 3 months, after that fluticasone proionat during next 3 months as a level-controlled asthma the SAAT controlling BA increased 2 times. The cost of drugs accounted for 86% of direct medical costs (DMC, the cost of hospitalization decreased from 80 to 56% (DMC savings — 24%. The results of the analysis of «cost–effectiveness» SAAT allow to review the financial resources for health in favor of providing children with mild asthma inhaled high-performance combination that will improve the quality of medical care for children, residents of the rural regions.Key words: asthma, children, inhaled glucocorticosteriods, combined therapies, pharmacoeconomic analysis.

  16. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Severe Weather Brochures Facts Guidance on Spirometry Parents Preventing and Controlling Tools for Control Triggers Indoors ... Medical clinics/physicians’ office Health care providers – Other Parents – Home Case Studies Open Airways for Schools Asthma ...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health care providers – Medical clinics/physicians’ office Health care providers – Other Parents – Home Case Studies Open Airways for Schools Asthma Care Training Wee Wheezers Adventures of Puff Inner City ...

  18. Origins of asthma in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savenije, Olga Elisabeth Maria

    2014-01-01

    Classifications and prediction rules that aim to identify preschool children that will develop asthma are not useful in clinical practice. Our research of longitudinal patterns of wheeze in childhood showed that these patterns (longitudinal wheezing phenotypes) are similar between English and Dutch

  19. The Potential for Emerging Microbiome-Mediated Therapeutics in Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Ayse Bilge; Turturice, Benjamin Arthur; Perkins, David L; Finn, Patricia W

    2017-08-10

    In terms of immune regulating functions, analysis of the microbiome has led the development of therapeutic strategies that may be applicable to asthma management. This review summarizes the current literature on the gut and lung microbiota in asthma pathogenesis with a focus on the roles of innate molecules and new microbiome-mediated therapeutics. Recent clinical and basic studies to date have identified several possible therapeutics that can target innate immunity and the microbiota in asthma. Some of these drugs have shown beneficial effects in the treatment of certain asthma phenotypes and for protection against asthma during early life. Current clinical evidence does not support the use of these therapies for effective treatment of asthma. The integration of the data regarding microbiota with technologic advances, such as next generation sequencing and omics offers promise. Combining comprehensive bioinformatics, new molecules and approaches may shape future asthma treatment.

  20. Obesity and Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Caroline Trunk-Black; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is more prevalent in obese compared with normal weight subjects. Our aim has been to review current knowledge of the impact of obesity on asthma severity, asthma control, and response to therapy.Several studies have shown that overweight and obesity is associated with more severe asthma...... and impaired quality of life compared with normal weight individuals. Furthermore, obesity is associated with poorer asthma control, as assessed by asthma control questionnaires, limitations in daily activities, breathlessness and wheezing, use of rescue medication, unscheduled doctor visits, emergency...... department visits, and hospitalizations for acute asthma. Studies of the impact of a high body mass index (BMI) on response to asthma therapy have, however, revealed conflicting results. Most studies show that overweight and obesity is associated with less favorable response to asthma therapy with regard...

  1. Asthma, inhaled corticosteroid treatment, and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, T K; Russell, G

    1992-06-01

    To evaluate the effects on growth of inhaled corticosteroid treatment (ICT) and of the quality of control of asthma, height velocity was studied in 58 prepubertal children attending a specialist asthma clinic because of chronic asthma that was difficult to control. The height velocity standard deviation (SD) score was maximal when the asthma was well controlled both before (0.01) and after (-0.07) starting ICT. It was least when the asthma was poorly controlled both before (-1.50) and after (-1.55) starting ICT. The effectiveness of control correlated significantly with the height velocity SD score, both before and after ICT was started. No evidence was found that the administration of ICT has an adverse effect on growth.

  2. Novel monoclonal treatments in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meteran, Howraman; Meteran, Hanieh; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2017-01-01

    articles published in English since 2000 were considered. The search identified 29 studies; 8 additional studies were found by hand search, generating 37 studies. RESULTS: Of the 37 studies investigating biological treatments of asthma, 5 were on the effects of anti-IgE (omalizumab); 12 on anti-IL-5; 8...... TSLP, IL-9, and TNF-α lacked convincing effectiveness. CONCLUSION: Research on the biological treatment of asthma shows promising results. While anti-IgE (omalizumab) has been used in the treatment of asthma for some years, anti-IL-5 has recently been approved for use. The efficacy of results of other...... large studies with a longer duration is needed to draw a firm conclusion. Such studies should not only focus on clinical outcomes, but also consider asthma-related quality of life. Knowledge on the asthma phenotypes and identification of biomarkers associated with these will be useful for physicians...

  3. Childhood asthma in low income countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Marianne Stubbe; Nantanda, Rebecca; Tumwine, James K

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia has hitherto been considered the key cause of the high respiratory morbidity and mortality in children under five years of age (under-5s) in low-income countries, while asthma has not been stated as a significant reason. This paper explores the definitions and concepts...... of pneumonia and asthma/wheezing/bronchiolitis and examines whether asthma in under-5s may be confused with pneumonia. Over-diagnosing of bacterial pneumonia can be suspected from the limited association between clinical pneumonia and confirmatory test results such as chest x-ray and microbiological findings...... and poor treatment results using antibiotics. Moreover, children diagnosed with recurrent pneumonia in infancy were often later diagnosed with asthma. Recent studies showed a 10-15% prevalence of preschool asthma in low-income countries, although under-5s with long-term cough and difficulty breathing...

  4. Distinguishing Asthma Phenotypes Using Machine Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca; Rattray, Magnus; Prosperi, Mattia; Custovic, Adnan

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is not a single disease, but an umbrella term for a number of distinct diseases, each of which are caused by a distinct underlying pathophysiological mechanism. These discrete disease entities are often labelled as 'asthma endotypes'. The discovery of different asthma subtypes has moved from subjective approaches in which putative phenotypes are assigned by experts to data-driven ones which incorporate machine learning. This review focuses on the methodological developments of one such machine learning technique-latent class analysis-and how it has contributed to distinguishing asthma and wheezing subtypes in childhood. It also gives a clinical perspective, presenting the findings of studies from the past 5 years that used this approach. The identification of true asthma endotypes may be a crucial step towards understanding their distinct pathophysiological mechanisms, which could ultimately lead to more precise prevention strategies, identification of novel therapeutic targets and the development of effective personalized therapies.

  5. Asthma Morbidity, Comorbidities, and Modifiable Factors Among Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Joy; Chen, Jessica; Mirabelli, Maria C

    Asthma morbidity is increased among older adults, especially older adult women. Interventions to improve asthma control in this population are not well described. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors (including modifiable factors) associated with asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department or urgent care center visits (ED/UCV) among older adults. A secondary objective was to investigate sex differences in variables relevant to asthma control. Data were obtained from 14,076 older adults ≥65 years with active asthma participating in the 2006-2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Asthma Call-back Survey (a random-digit dialed survey) in 40 US states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, representative of >2.6 million persons. Weighted, adjusted logistic regression was conducted. One or more asthma-related hospitalizations in the past year were reported by 5.7% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 5.0% to 6.4%) of participants; 10.6% (95% CI = 9.7% to 11.5%) reported ≥1 asthma-related ED/UCV. Compared with older adults without asthma-related hospitalizations, adjusted odds were higher among those with ≥1 asthma-related hospitalization for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary artery disease, depression, cockroaches or mold in the home, and cost barriers to asthma-related health care or medication. All these factors, except for cockroaches, were associated with asthma-related ED/UCV. Compared with males, adjusted odds were higher among females for COPD, depression, obesity, and cost barriers to asthma-related health care or medication. Among older adults, asthma-related hospitalizations and ED/UCV were associated with clinical comorbidities, mold in the home, and financial barriers to asthma-related health care. Interventions addressing modifiable factors could reduce asthma morbidity among older adults. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Asthma Outcomes: Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sandra R.; Rand, Cynthia S.; Cabana, Michael D.; Foggs, Michael B.; Halterman, Jill S.; Olson, Lynn; Vollmer, William M.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Taggart, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Background “Asthma-related quality of life” refers to the perceived impact that asthma has on the patient’s quality of life. Objective National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies convened an expert group to recommend standardized measures of the impact of asthma on quality of life for use in future asthma clinical research. Methods We reviewed published documentation regarding the development and psychometric evaluation; clinical research use since 2000; and extent to which the content of each existing quality of life instrument provides a unique, reliable, and valid assessment of the intended construct. We classified instruments as core (required in future studies), supplemental (used according to the study’s aims and standardized), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop convened in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results Eleven instruments for adults and 6 for children were identified for review. None qualified as core instruments because they predominantly measured indicators of asthma control (symptoms and/or functional status); failed to provide a distinct, reliable score measuring all key dimensions of the intended construct; and/or lacked adequate psychometric data. Conclusions In the absence of existing instruments that meet the stated criteria, currently available instruments are classified as either supplemental or emerging. Research is strongly recommended to develop and evaluate instruments that provide a distinct, reliable measure of the patient’s perception of the impact of asthma on all of the key dimensions of quality of life, an important outcome that is not captured in other outcome measures. PMID:22386511

  7. Contesting asthma medication: patients' view of alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopnina, Helen

    2010-08-01

    There are few studies pertaining to asthma patients' views on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The driving question behind the study is why some asthma patients choose noncompliance to conventional western medicine and resort to other modalities, often deemed as being 'alternative,' 'complementary,' or 'integrated.' Does the patients' emancipation movement lead to greater awareness of the benefits of alternative medicine? Does the patients' identity as asthma sufferers play a role in their decision? Case studies based on semistructured interviews were conducted between June 2009 and January 2010 with 19 asthma patients in The Netherlands who have chosen complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Patients were contacted through online forum of Dutch asthma patients' organization Astma Fonds. We have discovered that on the whole patients in the present study were well informed about risks and benefits of both prescribed and alternative medicines. We have argued that noncompliance to medical regime by some asthma patients can be explained by the rationality of their choice based on evidence of clinical trials of commonly assigned asthma medication as well as partial and anecdotal evidence of the benefits of CAM therapies. It is the patients themselves who, by invoking the same evidence-based dominant paradigm choose to address the conflict between protagonists of 'conventional,' western medicine and other modalities. The author argues that asthma patients' noncompliance with (Western) medical regime and choice for alternative medical treatment of asthma is a matter of rational choice informed by evidence-based awareness. This evidence-based rationality particularly refers here to the patients' awareness of the rather controversial results of clinical trials of commonly used asthma medicines, particularly those containing elements of budesonide (Pulmicort), an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid, and formoterol (Oxis, Foradil), a rapid-acting and long

  8. Fevipiprant in the treatment of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christobelle; Wright, Adam; Brightling, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Asthma is common and in many, particularly those with more severe disease, there remains a substantial unmet need. Success with biologics targeting eosinophilic inflammation underscore the value of treating inflammation in asthma beyond corticosteroids. Fevipiprant (QAW039) is an oral treatment for asthma. It competitively and reversibly antagonises the prostaglandin D2 receptor 2 (DP2) expressed on inflammatory and structural cells. Areas covered: We reviewed fevipiprant's mode of action and efficacy against other current and emerging pharmacological interventions for moderate-to-severe asthma. We undertook a literature review using the PubMed/Medline database, the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Clinical Trials website and from manufacturers' press releases with the search terms: 'QAW039', 'Fevipiprant', 'CRTH2 antagonists', 'DP2', 'DP1', 'monoclonal antibody', 'eosinophil' with 'asthma' plus the names of individual drugs. Three Phase 2 trials have been conducted and three Phase 3 trials (NCT02563067, NCT03052517, NCT02555683) are in progress. To date Fevipiprant's greatest success has been in targeting severe eosinophilic asthma. Expert opinion: Fevipiprant presents the possibility of a new orally active therapy for asthma. If successful in phase 3 trials it will have an enormous impact on the treatment paradigm for asthma and will potentially widen access for pre-biologic treatment to a larger population.

  9. Asthma and cystic fibrosis: a tangled web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Brian D; Lane, Stephen J; van Beek, Edwin J; Dodd, Jonathan D; Costello, Richard W; Tiddens, Harm A W M

    2014-03-01

    Successfully diagnosing concomitant asthma in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a challenging proposition, and the utility of conventional diagnostic criteria of asthma in CF populations remains uncertain. Nonetheless, the accurate identification of individuals with CF and asthma allows appropriate tailoring of therapy, and should reduce the unnecessary use of asthma medication in broader CF cohorts. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenge posed by asthma in CF, both in terms of clinical evaluation, and of interpretation of pulmonary function testing and non-invasive markers of airway inflammation. We also examine how the role of cross-sectional thoracic imaging in CF and asthma can assist in the diagnosis of asthma in these patients. Finally, we critically appraise the evidence base behind the use of asthma medications in CF populations, with a particular focus on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators. As shall be discussed, the gaps in the current literature make further high-quality research in this field imperative. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Asthma in childhood: a complex, heterogeneous disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Lee Chung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma in childhood is a heterogeneous disease with different phenotypes and variable clinical manifestations, which depend on the age, gender, genetic background, and environmental influences of the patients. Several longitudinal studies have been conducted to classify the phenotypes of childhood asthma, on the basis of the symptoms, triggers of wheezing illness, or pathophysiological features of the disease. These studies have provided us with important information about the different wheezing phenotypes in young children and about potential mechanisms and risk factors for the development of chronic asthma. The goal of these studies was to provide a better insight into the causes and natural course of childhood asthma. It is well-known that complicated interactions between genes and environmental factors contribute to the development of asthma. Because childhood is a period of rapid growth in both the lungs and the immune system, developmental factors should be considered in the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. The pulmonary system continues to grow and develop until linear growth is completed. Longitudinal studies have reported significant age-related immune development during postnatal early life. These observations suggest that the phenotypes of childhood asthma vary among children and also in an individual child over time. Improved classification of heterogeneous conditions of the disease will help determine novel strategies for primary and secondary prevention and for the development of individualized treatment for childhood asthma.

  11. Asthma and cystic fibrosis: A tangled web.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2014-03-01

    Successfully diagnosing concomitant asthma in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a challenging proposition, and the utility of conventional diagnostic criteria of asthma in CF populations remains uncertain. Nonetheless, the accurate identification of individuals with CF and asthma allows appropriate tailoring of therapy, and should reduce the unnecessary use of asthma medication in broader CF cohorts. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenge posed by asthma in CF, both in terms of clinical evaluation, and of interpretation of pulmonary function testing and non-invasive markers of airway inflammation. We also examine how the role of cross-sectional thoracic imaging in CF and asthma can assist in the diagnosis of asthma in these patients. Finally, we critically appraise the evidence base behind the use of asthma medications in CF populations, with a particular focus on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators. As shall be discussed, the gaps in the current literature make further high-quality research in this field imperative. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014; 49:205-213. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace Lind

    Full Text Available School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns.We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program.Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone.Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV, Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support, families (e.g. convenience, the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities, the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles. Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized, families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions and the education sector (loss of instructional time. Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process.Parents perceived advantages and disadvantages to delivering annual seasonal

  13. Asthma control assessment using asthma control test among patients attending 5 tertiary care hospitals in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jahdali, Hamdan H.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Alanezi, Mohamed O.; Zeitoni, Mohamed O.; Al-Tassan, Turki H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was the evaluation of asthma control using the Asthma Control Test (ACT). The ACT was used to assess asthma control among patients with bronchial asthma visiting pulmonary clinics in 5 major tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Each hospital had target of 300 patients to recruit over the period of the study from 1st September to 30th November 2006. The total number of patients studied was 1060 patients. Males constituted 442 (42%) and the females constituted 618 (58%), the median age was 38.56 years range 15-75. One-third of the patients had no formal education. The ACT score revealed uncontrolled asthma in 677 (64%), well controlled asthma in 328 (31%) and complete controlled in 55 (5%). There were no significant correlation between the age below 40 and above 40 years and level of asthma control p=0.12. However, the younger age group less than 20 had better control of asthma in comparison with older patients p=0.0001. There was significant correlation between level of asthma control and gender, males 44% had better asthma control than females (30%, p=0.0001). Control of bronchial asthma is still major concern in our population. Further studies are needed to explore the factors leading to poor asthma control. (author)

  14. Allergies and Asthma: They Often Occur Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma information. American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. http://acaai.org/asthma/about. Accessed Dec. 8, ... Asthma symptoms. American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. http://acaai.org/asthma/symptoms. Accessed Dec. 8, ...

  15. For Parents of Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma > Managing Asthma For Parents of Children with Asthma Watch On Demand Living with Asthma: Pathways to Better Management Register to watch a recording of our recent webcast on asthma treatment and management. Register Register While asthma affects ...

  16. Allergy in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, S R; Bakirtas, A; Bel, E; Custovic, A; Diamant, Z; Hamelmann, E; Heffler, E; Kalayci, Ö; Saglani, S; Sergejeva, S; Seys, S; Simpson, A; Bjermer, L

    2017-02-01

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps 4-5 of GINA guidelines to prevent their asthma from becoming 'uncontrolled', or whose disease remains 'uncontrolled' despite this therapy. Epidemiological studies on emergency room visits and hospital admissions for asthma suggest the important role of allergy in asthma exacerbations. In addition, allergic asthma in childhood is often associated with severe asthma in adulthood. A strong association exists between asthma exacerbations and respiratory viral infections, and interaction between viruses and allergy further increases the risk of asthma exacerbations. Furthermore, fungal allergy has been shown to play an important role in severe asthma. Other contributing factors include smoking, pollution and work-related exposures. The 'Allergy and Asthma Severity' EAACI Task Force examined the current evidence and produced this position document on the role of allergy in severe asthma. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Changes in asthma control, work productivity, and impairment with omalizumab: 5-year EXCELS study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazzali, James L; Raimundo, Karina P; Trzaskoma, Benjamin; Rosén, Karin E; Schatz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Asthma poses a significant disease burden worldwide. Current guidelines emphasize achieving and maintaining asthma control. To describe longitudinal changes of asthma control and asthma-related work, school, and activity impairment for patients with moderate-to-severe asthma treated with omalizumab and those who did not receive omalizumab in a real-world setting. This study used 5 years of data from patients ages ≥12 years old with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma who were enrolled in the Evaluating Clinical Effectiveness and Long-term Safety in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Asthma observational study. Asthma control was assessed with the Asthma Control Test for 5 years, and asthma-related work, school, and activity impairment was measured with the Work Productivity/Activity Impairment-Asthma questionnaire for the first 2 years. The percentage of patients treated with omalizumab (n = 4930) and with well-controlled asthma (Asthma Control Test score, >20) increased from 45% at baseline to 61% at month 60, and it was 49% (baseline) and 67% (month 60) for the non-omalizumab-treated cohort (n = 2779). For new starters to omalizumab (n = 576), the percentage with well-controlled asthma increased from 25% at baseline to 51% at month 6, and to 60% at month 60. Patients in the omalizumab-treated cohort and those in the non-omalizumab-treated cohort experienced a reduction in asthma-related work, school, and activity impairment. The amount of improvement in asthma control achieved and the reduction in asthma-related work, school, and activity impairment were similar, regardless of asthma severity. On average, patients in the Evaluating Clinical Effectiveness and Long-term Safety in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Asthma observational study who initiated omalizumab experienced clinically significant improvement in asthma control, which was observed within 6 months and persisted for 5 years.

  18. Pseudo-asthma: when cough, wheezing, and dyspnea are not asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Miles; Abu-Hasan, Mutasim

    2007-10-01

    Although asthma is the most common cause of cough, wheeze, and dyspnea in children and adults, asthma is often attributed inappropriately to symptoms from other causes. Cough that is misdiagnosed as asthma can occur with pertussis, cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia, airway abnormalities such as tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia, chronic purulent or suppurative bronchitis in young children, and habit-cough syndrome. The respiratory sounds that occur with the upper airway obstruction caused by the various manifestations of the vocal cord dysfunction syndrome or the less common exercise-induced laryngomalacia are often mischaracterized as wheezing and attributed to asthma. The perception of dyspnea is a prominent symptom of hyperventilation attacks. This can occur in those with or without asthma, and patients with asthma may not readily distinguish the perceived dyspnea of a hyperventilation attack from the acute airway obstruction of asthma. Dyspnea on exertion, in the absence of other symptoms of asthma or an unequivocal response to albuterol, is most likely a result of other causes. Most common is the dyspnea associated with normal exercise limitation, but causes of dyspnea on exertion can include other physiologic abnormalities including exercise-induced vocal cord dysfunction, exercise-induced laryngomalacia, exercise-induced hyperventilation, and exercise-induced supraventricular tachycardia. A careful history, attention to the nature of the respiratory sounds that are present, spirometry, exercise testing, and blood-gas measurement provide useful data to sort out the various causes and avoid inappropriate treatment of these pseudo-asthma clinical manifestations.

  19. Fatores de risco, aspectos clínicos e laboratoriais da asma em crianças Risk factors, clinical and laboratory aspects of asthma in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Líllian S.L. Moraes

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar os aspectos clínicos, laboratoriais, e os fatores de risco associados à asma em crianças atendidas no Ambulatório de Pediatria, do Hospital Universitário Júlio Müller. Método: estudo de caso-controle, incluindo 59 crianças asmáticas (casos e 104 não-asmáticas (controles. Os seguintes fatores foram considerados para análise de risco: escolaridade dos pais, exposição aos alérgenos domiciliares, tabagismo passivo, aleitamento materno, renda e antecedentes familiares alérgicos. Foram coletadas amostras de sangue para hemograma e dosagem de IgE total e específica para alérgenos. Realizou-se teste cutâneo de hipersensibilidade imediata pelo método de puntura para os seguintes alérgenos: ácaros, animais, fungos e baratas com controles positivo (histamina e negativo (solução fisiológica.Um modelo de regressão logística foi usado para calcular odds ratio (OR e intervalo de confiança (IC 95% ajustado para outros fatores de risco e confundidores. RESULTADOS: dentre os fatores de risco estudados, sexo, baixa escolaridade, baixa renda, tempo de aleitamento materno e tabagismo passivo não estiveram associados à ocorrência de asma. A exposição aos alérgenos foi semelhante nos dois grupos, a não ser pela maior freqüência de animais nos domicílios dos controles (c²=16,9; P OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the clinical and laboratory aspects and the risk factors associated with asthma in children treated at the Pediatric Outpatient Clinic of Hospital Universitário Júlio Müller. METHODS: A case-control study including 59 asthmatic children (cases and 104 nonasthmatic children (controls. The following factors were considered for risk analysis: parents' level of education, domestic exposure to allergens, passive smoking, breast feeding, low income, and family history of allergy. Samples of blood were collected for hemogram and to determine the total serum IgE as well as the one specific to allergens. Immediate

  20. The puzzle of immune phenotypes of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf-Rauf, Katja; Anselm, Bettina; Schaub, Bianca

    2016-12-01

    Asthma represents the most common chronic childhood disease worldwide. Whereas preschool children present with wheezing triggered by different factors (multitrigger and viral wheeze), clinical asthma manifestation in school children has previously been classified as allergic and non-allergic asthma. For both, the underlying immunological mechanisms are not yet understood in depth in children. Treatment is still prescribed regardless of underlying mechanisms, and children are not always treated successfully. This review summarizes recent key findings on the complex mechanisms of the development and manifestation of childhood asthma. Whereas traditional classification of childhood asthma is primarily based on clinical symptoms like wheezing and atopy, novel approaches to specify asthma phenotypes are under way and face challenges such as including the stability of phenotypes over time and transition into adulthood. Epidemiological studies enclose more information on the patient's disease history and environmental influences. Latest studies define endotypes based on molecular and cellular mechanisms, for example defining risk and protective single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and new immune phenotypes, showing promising results. Also, regulatory T cells and recently discovered T helper cell subtypes such as Th9 and Th17 cells were shown to be important for the development of asthma. Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) could play a critical role in asthma patients as they produce different cytokines associated with asthma. Epigenetic findings showed different acetylation and methylation patterns for children with allergic and non-allergic asthma. On a posttranscriptional level, miRNAs are regulating factors identified to differ between asthma patients and healthy controls and also indicate differences within asthma phenotypes. Metabolomics is another exciting chapter important for endotyping asthmatic children. Despite the development of new biomarkers and the discovery of

  1. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Hongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  2. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, CGRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lihua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF levels was significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM -CSF and low CGRP levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  3. Clinical significance of determination the changes of serum CGRP, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guijin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum CGRP, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum CGRP(with RIA), MMP-9, TIMP-1 (with ELISA) levels were measured in 32 patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum CGRP levels was significantly lower in patients than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal lower CGRP and high MMP-9, TIMP-1 levels might play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  4. Factors that influence quality of life in rural children with asthma and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennifer; Winkelstein, Marilyn; Land, Cassia; Lewis-Boyer, Lapricia; Quartey, Ruth; Pham, Luu; Butz, Arlene

    2008-01-01

    Among rural children with asthma and their parents, this study examined the relationship between parental and child reports of quality of life and described the relationship of several factors such as asthma severity, missed days of work, and asthma education on their quality of life. Two hundred one rural families with asthma were enrolled in a school-based educational program. Intervention parents and children participated in interactive asthma workshop(s) and received asthma devices and literature. Parent and child quality of life measurements were obtained before and after the intervention using Juniper's Paediatric Caregivers Quality of Life and Juniper's Paediatric Quality of Life Questionnaires. Asthma severity was measured using criteria from the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program guidelines. There was no association between parent and child total quality of life scores, and mean parental total quality of life scores were higher at baseline and follow-up than those of the children. All the parents' quality of life scores were correlated with parental reports of missed days of work. For all children, emotional quality of life (EQOL) was significantly associated with parental reports of school days missed (P = .03) and marginally associated with parental reports of hospitalizations due to asthma (P = .08). Parent's EQOL and activity quality of life (AQOL) were significantly associated with children's asthma severity (EQOL, P = .009; AQOL, P = .03), but not the asthma educational intervention. None of the child quality of life measurements was associated with asthma severity. Asthma interventions for rural families should help families focus on gaining and maintaining low asthma severity levels to enjoy an optimal quality of life. Health care providers should try to assess the child's quality of life at each asthma care visit independently of the parents.

  5. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is to avoid being around those allergens. The doctor also may prescribe medicine for your allergies if you can't completely avoid ... Allergy-Triggered Asthma Your House: How to Make It Asthma-Safe Air Pollution & ...

  6. Psychopathology in difficult asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, L.C.; van Son, M.J.M.; Keimpema, A.R.; van Ranst, D; Pommer, A; Meijer, J.W.; Pop, V.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Within the asthma population, difficult asthma (DA) is a severe condition in which patients present with frequent exacerbations, hospitalizations and emergency room visits. The identification and treatment of psychopathology is included in the management of DA. Psychopathology is supposed

  7. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  8. Smoking and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000504.htm Smoking and asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... enable JavaScript. Things that make your allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Smoking is a trigger ...

  9. Asthma - child - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  10. Asthma in the elderly: a different disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Battaglia

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease that affects all ages, but does this definition also include the elderly? Traditionally, asthma has been considered a disease of younger age, but epidemiological studies and clinical experience support the concept that asthma is as prevalent in older age as it is in the young. With the ever-increasing elderly population worldwide, the detection and proper management of the disease in old age may have a great impact from the public health perspective. Whether asthma in the elderly maintains the same characteristics as in young populations is an interesting matter. The diagnostic process in older individuals with suspected asthma follows the same steps, namely a detailed history supported by clinical examination and laboratory investigations; however, it should be recognised that elderly patients may partially lose reversibility of airway obstruction. The correct interpretation of spirometric curves in the elderly should take into account the physiological changes in the respiratory system. Several factors contribute to delaying the diagnosis of asthma in the elderly, including the age-related impairment in perception of breathlessness. The management of asthma in advanced age is complicated by the comorbidities and polypharmacotherapy, which advocate for a comprehensive approach with a multidimensional assessment. It should be emphasised that older age frequently represents an exclusion criterion for eligibility in clinical trials, and current asthma medications have rarely been tested in elderly asthmatics. Ageing is associated with pharmacokinetic changes of the medications. As a consequence, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of antiasthmatic medications can be variably affected. Similarly, drug-to-drug interactions may reduce the effectiveness of inhaled medications and increase the risk of side-effects. For this reason, we propose the term “geriatric asthma” be preferred to the more generic “asthma in the

  11. Method Development for Clinical Comprehensive Evaluation of Pediatric Drugs Based on Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis: Application to Inhaled Corticosteroids for Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuncui; Jia, Lulu; Meng, Yao; Hu, Lihua; Liu, Yiwei; Nie, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Xuan; Han, Sheng; Peng, Xiaoxia; Wang, Xiaoling

    2018-04-01

    Establishing a comprehensive clinical evaluation system is critical in enacting national drug policy and promoting rational drug use. In China, the 'Clinical Comprehensive Evaluation System for Pediatric Drugs' (CCES-P) project, which aims to compare drugs based on clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness to help decision makers, was recently proposed; therefore, a systematic and objective method is required to guide the process. An evidence-based multi-criteria decision analysis model that involved an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was developed, consisting of nine steps: (1) select the drugs to be reviewed; (2) establish the evaluation criterion system; (3) determine the criterion weight based on the AHP; (4) construct the evidence body for each drug under evaluation; (5) select comparative measures and calculate the original utility score; (6) place a common utility scale and calculate the standardized utility score; (7) calculate the comprehensive utility score; (8) rank the drugs; and (9) perform a sensitivity analysis. The model was applied to the evaluation of three different inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) used for asthma management in children (a total of 16 drugs with different dosage forms and strengths or different manufacturers). By applying the drug analysis model, the 16 ICSs under review were successfully scored and evaluated. Budesonide suspension for inhalation (drug ID number: 7) ranked the highest, with comprehensive utility score of 80.23, followed by fluticasone propionate inhaled aerosol (drug ID number: 16), with a score of 79.59, and budesonide inhalation powder (drug ID number: 6), with a score of 78.98. In the sensitivity analysis, the ranking of the top five and lowest five drugs remains unchanged, suggesting this model is generally robust. An evidence-based drug evaluation model based on AHP was successfully developed. The model incorporates sufficient utility and flexibility for aiding the decision-making process, and can be a useful

  12. Application of the asthma phenotype algorithm from the Severe Asthma Research Program to an urban population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paru Patrawalla

    Full Text Available Identification and characterization of asthma phenotypes are challenging due to disease complexity and heterogeneity. The Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP used unsupervised cluster analysis to define 5 phenotypically distinct asthma clusters that they replicated using 3 variables in a simplified algorithm. We evaluated whether this simplified SARP algorithm could be used in a separate and diverse urban asthma population to recreate these 5 phenotypic clusters.The SARP simplified algorithm was applied to adults with asthma recruited to the New York University/Bellevue Asthma Registry (NYUBAR to classify patients into five groups. The clinical phenotypes were summarized and compared.Asthma subjects in NYUBAR (n = 471 were predominantly women (70% and Hispanic (57%, which were demographically different from the SARP population. The clinical phenotypes of the five groups generated by the simplified SARP algorithm were distinct across groups and distributed similarly to those described for the SARP population. Groups 1 and 2 (6 and 63%, respectively had predominantly childhood onset atopic asthma. Groups 4 and 5 (20% were older, with the longest duration of asthma, increased symptoms and exacerbations. Group 4 subjects were the most atopic and had the highest peripheral eosinophils. Group 3 (10% had the least atopy, but included older obese women with adult-onset asthma, and increased exacerbations.Application of the simplified SARP algorithm to the NYUBAR yielded groups that were phenotypically distinct and useful to characterize disease heterogeneity. Differences across NYUBAR groups support phenotypic variation and support the use of the simplified SARP algorithm for classification of asthma phenotypes in future prospective studies to investigate treatment and outcome differences between these distinct groups.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00212537.

  13. Caffeine for asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, EJ; Bara, A; Barley, E; Cates, CJ

    2010-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud Caffeine has a variety of pharmacological effects; it is a weak bronchodilator and it also reduces respiratory muscle fatigue. It is chemically related to the drug theophylline which is used to treat asthma. It has been suggested that caffeine may reduce asthma symptoms and interest has been expressed in its potential role as an asthma treatment. A number of studies have explored the effects of caffeine in asthma, this is the first review to systematically examine and summar...

  14. Asthma in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Addo-Yobo, Emmanuel O. D; Woodcock, Ashley; Allotey, Adorkor; Baffoe-Bonnie, Benjamin; Strachan, David; Custovic, Adnan

    2007-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. The proportion of children with asthma is thought to be increasing worldwide, and particularly among children that live in more developed countries. However, it is not clear why this is, since many different aspects of lifestyle and the environment have been linked with the onset of asthma. In Africa, asthma has typically been thought of as being very uncommon, and indeed in many African dialects there is no word for asthma or the symptoms, such as wheezing, that ...

  15. FeNO as biomarker for asthma phenotyping and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardolo, Fabio L M; Sorbello, Valentina; Ciprandi, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The current review aims to revisit literature on exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in asthma phenotyping and management to clarify the utility of this test in clinical practice. It is increasingly evident that multiple profiles characterize asthma as a complex disease for which is necessary to find tools able to discriminate among these phenotypes to achieve the best therapeutic strategy for all asthmatic patients. Current findings indicate that FeNO, a noninvasive and easy-to-obtain biomarker, can be considered a useful tool in predicting asthma developing and exacerbation, in identifying specific asthma phenotypes, in improving asthma diagnosis and management in a selected population, and in monitoring efficacy of standard corticosteroid and biologic therapy. Based on this evidence, FeNO might become an appropriate tool for physicians to better define specific asthma phenotypes and to better deal with asthma worsening.

  16. Vitamin D and asthma-life after VIDA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, John M

    2014-09-01

    The vitamin D hypothesis postulates that lower vitamin D levels are causally associated with increased asthma risk and asthma severity. Multiple epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between circulating vitamin D levels (in the form of 25-hydroxy vitamin D) and asthma severity and control and lung function. However, in the recently published vitamin D and asthma (VIDA) study, vitamin D supplementation failed to show an improvement in asthma control in adults. This article reviews the current epidemiological and trial evidence for vitamin D and asthma and explores some of the possible alternative explanations for previous findings (including "reverse causation" and the importance of studying children and adults). We also address some of the unique challenges of conducting vitamin D trials and potential ways to address them. Finally, I will argue for further clinical trials of vitamin D in asthma, especially in children, using knowledge gained from the VIDA trial.

  17. Determinants of low risk of asthma exacerbation during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Z; Nilas, L; Ulrik, C S

    2018-01-01

    of Asthma during Pregnancy (MAP) programme at Hvidovre Hospital since 2007. Assessment of asthma control, adjustment of treatment, spirometry and measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) were performed, and baseline characteristics and exacerbation history were collected at enrolment. Determinants of low......: Clinically stable asthma at enrolment, together with no history of previous exacerbations and no prescribed controller medication, is a determinant of low risk of an asthma exacerbation during pregnancy, which may guide clinicians in individualizing surveillance of asthma during pregnancy.......BACKGROUND: Assessment of asthma control every 4-6 weeks during pregnancy is recommended to reduce risk of exacerbation, and by that improve outcome. OBJECTIVE: To identify determinants of pregnancies with low risk of asthma exacerbation. METHODS: All pregnant women enrolled into the Management...

  18. Asthma, guides for diagnostic and handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, Carlos E; Caballero A, Andres S; Garcia G, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    The paper defines the asthma, includes topics as diagnostic, handling of the asthma, special situations as asthma and pregnancy, handling of the asthmatic patient's perioperatory and occupational asthma

  19. Prenatal stress, prematurity and asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medsker, Brock; Forno, Erick; Simhan, Hyagriv; Celedón, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting millions of children in the U.S. and worldwide. Prematurity is a risk factor for asthma, and certain ethnic or racial minorities such as Puerto Ricans and non-Hispanic Blacks are disproportionately affected by both prematurity and asthma. In this review, we examine current evidence to support maternal psychosocial stress as a putative link between prematurity and asthma, while also focusing on disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and immune responses as potential underlying mechanisms for stress-induced “premature asthma”. Prenatal stress may not only cause abnormalities in the HPA axis but also epigenetic changes in the fetal glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1), leading to impaired glucocorticoid metabolism. Moreover, maternal stress can alter fetal cytokine balance, favoring Th2 (allergic) immune responses characteristic of atopic asthma: IL-6, which has been associated with premature labor, can promote Th2 responses by stimulating production of IL-4 and IL-13. Given a link among stress, prematurity, and asthma, future research should include birth cohorts aimed at confirming and better characterizing “premature asthma”. If confirmed, clinical trials of prenatal maternal stress reduction would be warranted to reduce the burden of these common co-morbidities. While awaiting the results of such studies, sound policies to prevent domestic and community violence (e.g. from firearms) are justified, not only by public safety but also by growing evidence of detrimental effects of violence-induced stress on psychiatric and somatic health. PMID:26676148

  20. Air pollution and asthma severity in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rage, Estelle; Siroux, Valérie; Künzli, Nino; Pin, Isabelle; Kauffmann, Francine

    2009-01-01

    Objectives There is evidence that exposure to air pollution affects asthma, but the effect of air pollution on asthma severity has not been addressed. The aim was to assess the relation between asthma severity during the past 12 months and home outdoor concentrations of air pollution. Methods Asthma severity over the last 12 months was assessed in two complementary ways among 328 adult asthmatics from the French Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA) examined between 1991 and 1995. The 4-class severity score integrated clinical events and type of treatment. The 5-level asthma score is based only on the occurrence of symptoms. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and ozone (O3) concentrations were assigned to each residence using two different methods. The first was based on the closest monitor data from 1991–1995. The second consisted in spatial models that used geostatistical interpolations and then assigned air pollutants to the geo-coded residences (1998). Results Higher asthma severity score was significantly related to the 8-hour average of ozone during April-September (O3-8hr) and the number of days (O3-days) with 8-hour ozone averages above 110 μg.m−3 (for a 36-day increase, equivalent to the inter quartile range, in O3-days, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 2.22 (1.61–3.07) for one class difference in score). Adjustment for age, sex, smoking habits, occupational exposure, and educational level did not alter results. Asthma severity was unrelated to NO2. Both exposure assessment methods and severity scores resulted in very similar findings. SO2 correlated with severity but reached statistical significance only for the model based assignment of exposure. Conclusions The observed associations between asthma severity and air pollution, in particular O3, support the hypothesis that air pollution at levels far below current standards increases asthma severity. PMID:19017701

  1. The relationship between migraine headache and asthma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Nigar; Demirci, Seden; Cakir, Munire

    2017-06-01

    Migraine and asthma are comorbid chronic disorders with episodic attacks thought to involve inflammatory and neurological mechanisms. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationship of asthma features between the asthma patients with migraine and those without migraine headache. A cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2015 to June 2016. Physician-diagnosed asthma patients aged 18 years and above were included. Demographic data, pulmonary function test and treatment of asthma were recorded. Asthma control was assessed using the asthma control test (ACT) and asthma control questionnaire (ACQ). The diagnosis of migraine was made by the neurologist with face-to face examinations based on the International Classification of Headache Disorders, third edition beta (ICHD-III-beta) criteria. Data about the age at onset, frequency of headache attacks, duration of headache attack, the presence of aura, and severity of headache were recorded. The severity of headache was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS). Overall 121 asthma patients were included in this study. Migraine was found to be present in 32 (26.4%) of patients. No statistically significant difference was found between asthma group and asthma with migraine groups in terms of pulmonary function test parameters. The mean ACT score in asthma with migraine patients group was significantly lower than the asthma groups. Morever, in the group asthma with migraine, a negative significant correlations were found between ACT scores with VAS scores. This study demonstrates that migraine headache may be associated with poor asthma control. On the other hand, it should not be forgotten that ACT is a subjective test and can be affected from by many clinical parameters.

  2. Asthma in goldminers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To detennine whether asthma in goldminers is caused by or contributed to by their working environment. Design. A case-control stUdy in which men with asthma working underground in goldmines were compared with underground goldminers without asthma in relation to their age, duration of exposure to the ...

  3. Obesity and asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Zarqa; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological data has established increasing adiposity as a risk factor for incident asthma. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and asthma are incompletely understood. In the present paper, we review current knowledge of possible mechanisms mediating the observed...... association between obesity and asthma....

  4. Allergy in severe asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Bakirtas, A.; Bel, E.; Custovic, A.; Diamant, Z.; Hamelmann, E.; Heffler, E.; Kalayci, O.; Saglani, S.; Sergejeva, S.; Seys, S.; Simpson, A.; Bjermer, Leif

    It is well recognized that atopic sensitization is an important risk factor for asthma, both in adults and in children. However, the role of allergy in severe asthma is still under debate. The term 'Severe Asthma' encompasses a highly heterogeneous group of patients who require treatment on steps

  5. Virus-induced exacerbations in asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eKurai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and/or airflow limitation due to pulmonary emphysema. Chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and bronchial asthma may all be associated with airflow limitation; therefore, exacerbation of asthma may be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the exacerbation of asthma, namely virus-induced asthma, may be associated with a wide variety of respiratory viruses.COPD and asthma have different underlying pathophysiological processes and thus require individual therapies. Exacerbation of both COPD and asthma, which are basically defined and diagnosed by clinical symptoms, is associated with a rapid decline in lung function and increased mortality. Similar pathogens, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and coronavirus, are also frequently detected during exacerbation of asthma and/or COPD. Immune response to respiratory viral infections, which may be related to the severity of exacerbation in each disease, varies in patients with both COPD and asthma. In this regard, it is crucial to recognize and understand both the similarities and differences of clinical features in patients with COPD and/or asthma associated with respiratory viral infections, especially in the exacerbative stage.In relation to definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology, this review aims to summarize current knowledge concerning exacerbation of both COPD and asthma by focusing on the clinical significance of associated respiratory virus infections.

  6. PREVALENCE OF ASTHMA-LIKE SYMPTOMS AND DIAGNOSED ASTHMA IN THE POPULATION OF ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Namazova-Baranova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent years, standardised epidemiological studies of asthma and asthma'like symptoms in the population of children have been conducted. ISAAC (International Study of Asthma and Allergy in Childhood questionnaire has been predominantly used as a tool to assess the prevalence of clinical implications and diagnosed conditions in children. However, this technique has limitations in terms of subject age (children aged 6–7 and 13–14. We have conducted a study on the prevalence of Asthma and allergy in adolescents (children aged 15–17 using the standardised GA2LEN (Global Allergy and Asthma European Network questionnaire in two Russian cities from central region and Siberia (Moscow and Tomsk. It has been found that the prevalence of asthma'like symptoms in adolescents was three times the level of clinically diagnosed asthma, which accounted for no more than 7%, with this indicator having no variance depending on the region of residence.Key words: asthma, GA2LEN, prevalence, epidemiology, adolescents.

  7. Student Voices in School-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Siu Yin Annie; Adamson, Bob

    2015-01-01

    The value of student voices in dialogues about learning improvement is acknowledged in the literature. This paper examines how the views of students regarding School-based Assessment (SBA), a significant shift in examination policy and practice in secondary schools in Hong Kong, have largely been ignored. The study captures student voices through…

  8. Understanding Ethics in School-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Hazel; Burstow, Bob

    2018-01-01

    The notion of the "teacher as researcher" has been in the education lexicon since the mid-1970s. School-based research, we suggest, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance, flourishing within the emerging, complex school landscape. This empirical research engages with 25 school leaders to explore the ways in which…

  9. Rational Thinking in School-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mary Kristen; Flynn, Perry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We reflect on Alan Kamhi's (2011) prologue on balancing certainty and uncertainty as it pertains to school-based practice. Method: In schools, rational thinking depends on effective team processes, much like professional learning communities. We consider the conditions that are required for rational thinking and how rational team dialogue…

  10. School-Based Management: Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Patricia, Ed.; Potter, Eugenia Cooper, Ed.

    School-based management (SBM), sometimes called site-based management, is fast becoming the hottest restructuring item in the arsenal of reformers, teachers' unions, governors, and legislators who want to change the traditional ways in which schools and school districts do business. This document comprises three main sections with contributions…

  11. Information and Communication Technology and School Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communication technology and school based assessment (SBA) is practice that broadens the form mode, means and scope of assessment in the school using modern technologies in order to facilitate and enhance learning. This study sought to ascertain the efficacy of Information and Communication ...

  12. School-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Marla R.; Fiorvanti, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse is a leading cause of emotional, behavioral, and health problems across the lifespan. It is also preventable. School-based abuse prevention programs for early childhood and elementary school children have been found to be effective in increasing student knowledge and protective behaviors. The purpose of this article is to help school…

  13. Dietary pattern and lifestyle factors in asthma control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Noufal Poongadan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of asthma in adults varied from 0.96% to 11.03% while in children ranged from 2.3% to 11.9% in India. A number of factors including genetic predisposition, environment, and lifestyle factors including dietary habits influence the development and expression of asthma. The goal of asthma treatment is to achieve and maintain clinical control, which can be achieved in a majority of patients with pharmacologic intervention strategy. Objective: To assess the role of diet and lifestyle factors in asthma control in Indian population. Materials and Methods: Diagnosed asthma patients (aged 12-40 years were enrolled from the outpatient clinics. All patients were followed up and reassessed after 4 weeks with asthma control test (ACT and dietary and lifestyle questionnaire. The assessment of dietary pattern was performed by food frequency questionnaire (Nordic Nutrition Recommendations-Danish Physical Activity Questionnaire. The lifestyle factor included body mass index, smoking status, tobacco chewing, alcohol consumption, duration of travel (h/week, mental stress (visual analog scale: 0-10, sports activity - h/day, television (TV watching/video games - h/day, duration of sleep - h/day. Results: Seventy-five asthma patients (43 males and 32 females were divided into three groups according to ACT, 18 (24% patients in poorly-controlled asthma, 35 (46.7% in well-controlled asthma, and 22 (29.3% patients with totally-controlled asthma. Increased consumption of vegetables and cereals in patients with total-controlled asthma while increased consumption of sugar, nonvegetarian, fast food, salted and fried snacks in patients with poorly-controlled asthma. Poorly-controlled asthma had the highest duration of watching TV and sleep and least duration of travel and sports, though the results failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The dietary and lifestyle factors too contribute to degree of control of asthma in India.

  14. Asthma in inner city children: recent insights: United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutmer, Cullen M; Kim, Haejin; Searing, Daniel A; Zoratti, Edward M; Liu, Andrew H

    2018-04-01

    Children living in US inner cities experience disparate burdens of asthma, especially in severity, impairment, exacerbations, and morbidity. Investigations seeking to better understand the factors and mechanisms underlying asthma prevalence, severity, and exacerbation in children living in these communities can lead to interventions that can narrow asthma disparities and potentially benefit all children with asthma. This update will focus on recent (i.e. late 2016-2017) advances in the understanding of asthma in US inner city children. Studies published in the past year expand understanding of asthma prevalence, severity, exacerbation, and the outcomes of guidelines-based management of these at-risk children, including: asthma phenotypes in US inner city children that are severe and difficult-to-control; key environmental determinants and mechanisms underlying asthma severity and exacerbations (e.g. allergy-mediated exacerbation susceptibility to rhinovirus); the importance of schools as a place for provocative exposures (e.g. mouse allergen, nitrogen dioxide) as well as a place where asthma care and outcomes can be improved; and the development and validation of clinically useful indices for gauging asthma severity and predicting exacerbations. These recent studies provide a trove of actionable findings that can improve asthma care and outcomes for these at-risk children.

  15. Response to montelukast among subgroups of children aged 2 to 14 years with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Katie A; Arduino, Jean Marie; Santanello, Nancy C

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Determining who responds to asthma therapies, particularly leukotriene modifiers, continues to be explored. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify patient characteristics predictive of response to montelukast. METHODS: We used data from 2 clinical trials in which children with asthma receiv...

  16. Asthma characteristics and biomarkers from the Airways Disease Endotyping for Personalized Therapeutics (ADEPT) longitudinal profiling study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silkoff, P E; Strambu, I; Laviolette, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a heterogeneous disease and development of novel therapeutics requires an understanding of pathophysiologic phenotypes. The purpose of the ADEPT study was to correlate clinical features and biomarkers with molecular characteristics, by profiling asthma (NCT01274507). This re...

  17. Asthma and dualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, J

    2000-06-01

    The rejection of Cartesian dualism can be taken to imply that the mind is implicated in health and illness to a greater degree than conventional medicine would suggest. Surprisingly, however, there appears to be a train of thought in antidualist nursing theory which takes the opposite view. This paper looks closely at an interesting example of antidualist thinking - an article in which Benner and her colleagues comment on the ways in which people with asthma make sense of their condition - and concludes that it places unduly stringent and arbitrary limits on the mind's role. It then asks how antidualism can lead to such a dogmatic rejection of the idea that states of the body are clinically influenced by states of mind. The answer to this question is that Benner assimilates very different philosophical theories into the same 'tradition'. On this occasion, she has combined Descartes, Kant and the Platonist ascetics into a single package, misleadingly labelled 'Cartesianism', and this move accounts for her unexpected views on the relation between mind and body in asthma.

  18. The microbiome in allergic disease: Current understanding and future opportunities—2017 PRACTALL document of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Marsland, Benjamin J.; Bunyavanich, Supinda; O’Mahony, Liam; Leung, Donald Y. M.; Muraro, Antonella; Fleisher, Thomas A.

    2018-01-01

    PRACTALL is a joint initiative of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology to provide shared evidence-based recommendations on cutting-edge topics in the field of allergy and immunology. PRACTALL 2017 is focused on what has been established regarding the role of the microbiome in patients with asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy. This is complemented by outlining important knowledge gaps regarding its role in allergic disease and delineating strategies necessary to fill these gaps. In addition, a review of progress in approaches used to manipulate the microbiome will be addressed, identifying what has and has not worked to serve as a baseline for future directions to intervene in allergic disease development, progression, or both. PMID:28257972

  19. The microbiome in allergic disease: Current understanding and future opportunities-2017 PRACTALL document of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yvonne J; Marsland, Benjamin J; Bunyavanich, Supinda; O'Mahony, Liam; Leung, Donald Y M; Muraro, Antonella; Fleisher, Thomas A

    2017-04-01

    PRACTALL is a joint initiative of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology to provide shared evidence-based recommendations on cutting-edge topics in the field of allergy and immunology. PRACTALL 2017 is focused on what has been established regarding the role of the microbiome in patients with asthma, atopic dermatitis, and food allergy. This is complemented by outlining important knowledge gaps regarding its role in allergic disease and delineating strategies necessary to fill these gaps. In addition, a review of progress in approaches used to manipulate the microbiome will be addressed, identifying what has and has not worked to serve as a baseline for future directions to intervene in allergic disease development, progression, or both. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Allergic rhinitis is associated with poor asthma control in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Eric P; Nijkamp, Anke; Duiverman, Eric J; Brand, Paul L P

    2012-07-01

    Asthma and allergic rhinitis are the two most common chronic disorders in childhood and adolescence. To date, no study has examined the impact of comorbid allergic rhinitis on asthma control in children. To examine the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in children with asthma, and the impact of the disease and its treatment on asthma control. A cross-sectional survey in 203 children with asthma (5-18 years) using validated questionnaires on rhinitis symptoms (stuffy or runny nose outside a cold) and its treatment, and the paediatric Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ). Fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (FeNO) was measured with a Niox Mino analyser; total and specific IgE levels were assessed by the Immunocap system. 157 children (76.2%) had symptoms of allergic rhinitis but only 88 of these (56.1%) had been diagnosed with the condition by a physician. ACQ scores were worse in children with allergic rhinitis than in those without the condition (p=0.012). An ACQ score ≥ 1.0 (incomplete asthma control) was significantly more likely in children with allergic rhinitis than in those without (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.28 to 5.91, p=0.0081), also after adjustment for FeNO levels and total serum IgE. After adjustment for nasal corticosteroid therapy, allergic rhinitis was no longer associated with incomplete asthma control (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.47 to 1.12, p=0.150). Allergic rhinitis is common in children with asthma, and has a major impact on asthma control. The authors hypothesise that recognition and treatment of this condition with nasal corticosteroids may improve asthma control in children, but randomised clinical trials are needed to test this hypothesis.

  1. Thai pediatricians' current practice toward childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalaporn, Harutai; Chawalitdamrong, Pongpan; Preutthipan, Aroonwan

    2018-04-01

    Childhood asthma is a substantial health burden in Thailand. Due to a lack of pediatric respiratory specialists (pediatric pulmonologists and allergists; RS), most Thai children are cared for by general pediatricians (pediatric primary care providers (PCP)). We investigated whether current practices of Thai pediatricians complied with asthma guidelines and compared practices (diagnosis and treatments) provided by PCP and RS. A cross-sectional study was conducted using electronic surveys including four case scenarios of different asthma phenotypes distributed to Thai pediatricians. Asthma diagnosis and management were evaluated for compliance with standard guidelines. The practices of PCP and RS were compared. From 800 surveys distributed, there were 405 respondents (51%). Most respondents (81%) were PCP, who preferred to use clinical diagnosis rather than laboratory investigations to diagnose asthma. For acute asthmatic attacks, 58% of the pediatricians prescribed a systemic corticosteroid. For uncontrolled asthma, 89% of the pediatricians prescribed at least one controller. For exercise-induced bronchospasm, 55% of the pediatricians chose an inhaled bronchodilator, while 38% chose a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA). For virus-induced wheeze, 40% of the respondents chose an LTRA, while 15% chose inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators (31% vs. 18%, p = 0.02), antibiotics (20% vs. 6%, p attack. Most of the Thai pediatricians' practices toward diagnosis and treatment of acute asthmatic attack and uncontrolled asthma conform to the guidelines. PCP prescribed more oral bronchodilators, antibiotics, and antihistamines than RS.

  2. Phenotypes of asthma revisited upon the presence of atopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Ana; Magnan, Antoine; Boniface, Stéphanie; Proudhon, Hervé; Lanteaume, André; Romanet, Stéphanie; Vervloet, Daniel; Godard, Philippe

    2005-03-01

    Immunological studies claimed that atopic and non-atopic asthma share more similarities than differences. However, these two phenotypes of asthma are considered to be distinguishable upon distinct clinical patterns, which were not systematically assessed before in a large population. We studied characteristics discriminating atopic from non-atopic asthma among 751 asthmatic patients and 80 factors were analysed in univariate and multivariate analysis. Age, age of onset of asthma, female/male ratio were higher in non-atopic (n=200) than in atopic (n=551) asthmatics. Familial asthma, seasonal symptoms, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, allergen-triggered symptoms, improvement in altitude, exercise-induced asthma were associated with atopy. Non-atopic asthmatics displayed lower FEV(1) and FVC. Smoking was more frequent and asthma was more severe in these patients. Younger age, early onset, male sex, rhinitis and smoking were independent factors discriminating atopic from non-atopic asthma. This study establishes in a large population of asthmatics that although similarities exist between atopic and non-atopic asthma, two clinical phenotypes can still distinguish both kinds of asthma.

  3. Montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, for the treatment of persistent asthma in children aged 2 to 5 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knorr, B; Franchi, L M; Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    on a validated, asthma-specific diary card and, at specified times during the study, completed a validated asthma-specific quality-of-life questionnaire. Physicians and caregivers completed a global evaluation of asthma control at the end of the study. Efficacy end points included: daytime and overnight asthma...... symptoms, daily use of beta-agonist, days without asthma, frequency of asthma attacks, number of patients discontinued because of asthma, need for rescue medication, physician and caregiver global evaluations of change, asthma-specific caregiver quality of life, and peripheral blood eosinophil counts......, trouble breathing, and activity limitation); overnight asthma symptoms (cough); the percentage of days with asthma symptoms; the percentage of days without asthma; the need for beta-agonist or oral corticosteroids; physician global evaluations; and peripheral blood eosinophils. The clinical benefit...

  4. ERICA: prevalence of asthma in Brazilian adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Chigres Kuschnir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the prevalence of asthma and physician-diagnosed asthma in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS Cross-sectional, national, school-based study with adolescents from 12 to 17 years old, participants in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA. The study stratified the sample by region and grouped according to schools and classes with representativeness to the set of cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of the Country, macro-regions, capitals, and Federal District. A questionnaire collected data through a self-filled in method. We calculated the prevalences and their confidence intervals of 95% (95%CI according to sex, age group, type of school and skin color. RESULTS Between 2013 and 2014, 74,589 adolescents were evaluated, 55.3% of the female sex. The total prevalence of active asthma was of 13.1% (95%CI 12.1-13.9, being higher in girls (14.8%; 95%CI 13.7-16.0 when compared to boys (11.2%; 95%CI 10.3-12.2 in all geographical strata examined. It was also higher between students of private schools (15.9%; 95%CI 14.2-17.7 when compared to public ones (12.4%; 95%CI 11.4-13.4. It was higher in the Southeast region (14.5%; 95%CI 12.9-16.1, and in the city of Sao Paulo (16.7%; 95%CI 14.7-18.7. The lowest prevalence was observed in North region (9.7%; 95%CI 9.7-10.5, and in Teresina (6.3%; 95%CI 4.9-7.7. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was of 8.7% (95%CI 8.2-9.1; higher in the North region (13.5%; 95%CI 12.7-14.2, and in Porto Alegre (19.8%; 95%CI 17.5-22.3. It was lower in the Midwest (6.9%; 95%CI 6.0-7.8, and in Cuiaba (4.8%; 95%CI 3.8-5.9. We found no significant difference in the expression of this rate between the sexes, as well as in other variables evaluated by the study. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of asthma in Brazilian adolescents is high. Rates of active asthma and physician-diagnosed asthma vary widely in different regions and capitals evaluated by the ERICA. These results may assist in

  5. ERICA: prevalence of asthma in Brazilian adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschnir, Fábio Chigres; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Solé, Dirceu; Costa, Eduardo; Felix, Mara Morelo Rocha; de Oliveira, Cecília Lacroix; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the prevalence of asthma and physician-diagnosed asthma in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS Cross-sectional, national, school-based study with adolescents from 12 to 17 years old, participants in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA). The study stratified the sample by region and grouped according to schools and classes with representativeness to the set of cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of the Country, macro-regions, capitals, and Federal District. A questionnaire collected data through a self-filled in method. We calculated the prevalences and their confidence intervals of 95% (95%CI) according to sex, age group, type of school and skin color. RESULTS Between 2013 and 2014, 74,589 adolescents were evaluated, 55.3% of the female sex. The total prevalence of active asthma was of 13.1% (95%CI 12.1-13.9), being higher in girls (14.8%; 95%CI 13.7-16.0) when compared to boys (11.2%; 95%CI 10.3-12.2) in all geographical strata examined. It was also higher between students of private schools (15.9%; 95%CI 14.2-17.7) when compared to public ones (12.4%; 95%CI 11.4-13.4). It was higher in the Southeast region (14.5%; 95%CI 12.9-16.1), and in the city of Sao Paulo (16.7%; 95%CI 14.7-18.7). The lowest prevalence was observed in North region (9.7%; 95%CI 9.7-10.5), and in Teresina (6.3%; 95%CI 4.9-7.7). The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was of 8.7% (95%CI 8.2-9.1); higher in the North region (13.5%; 95%CI 12.7-14.2), and in Porto Alegre (19.8%; 95%CI 17.5-22.3). It was lower in the Midwest (6.9%; 95%CI 6.0-7.8), and in Cuiaba (4.8%; 95%CI 3.8-5.9). We found no significant difference in the expression of this rate between the sexes, as well as in other variables evaluated by the study. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of asthma in Brazilian adolescents is high. Rates of active asthma and physician-diagnosed asthma vary widely in different regions and capitals evaluated by the ERICA. These results may assist in the

  6. Working while unwell: Workplace impairment in people with severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiles, Sarah A; Harvey, Erin S; McDonald, Vanessa M; Peters, Matthew; Bardin, Philip; Reynolds, Paul N; Upham, John W; Baraket, Melissa; Bhikoo, Zaheerodin; Bowden, Jeffrey; Brockway, Ben; Chung, Li Ping; Cochrane, Belinda; Foxley, Gloria; Garrett, Jeffrey; Hew, Mark; Jayaram, Lata; Jenkins, Christine; Katelaris, Constance; Katsoulotos, Gregory; Koh, Mariko S; Kritikos, Vicky; Lambert, Marina; Langton, David; Rivero, Alexis Lara; Marks, Guy B; Middleton, Peter G; Nanguzgambo, Aldoph; Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Reddel, Helen; Rimmer, Janet; Southcott, Anne Marie; Sutherland, Michael; Thien, Francis; Wark, Peter Ab; Yang, Ian A; Yap, Elaine; Gibson, Peter G

    2018-04-20

    Severe asthma affects quality of life; however, its impact on workplace productivity is poorly understood. To compare workplace productivity - absenteeism and presenteeism - and impairment in daily activities in severe and non-severe asthma over time and identify characteristics associated with presenteeism in severe asthma. The Severe Asthma Web-based Database (SAWD) is an ongoing observational registry from Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. At April 2017, 434 patients with severe asthma and 102 with non-severe asthma were enrolled (18 to 88 years; 59% female). Participants provided comprehensive clinical and questionnaire data at baseline and were followed-up every 6 months for 24 months. Absenteeism (percentage of time not at work), presenteeism (self-reported impairment at work) and impairment in daily activities outside work due to health problems in the last week were calculated. At baseline, 61.4% of participants with severe asthma and 66.2% with non-severe asthma under 65 years were employed. At younger ages (30-50 years), fewer severe asthma participants were employed (69% vs 100%). Presenteeism and impairment in daily activity were more frequently reported in severe asthma and in participants with poorer asthma control, poorer lung function and more past-year exacerbations (pworkplace. Improving asthma control and mental health may be important targets for optimising workplace productivity in severe asthma. Presenteeism and absenteeism may represent key metrics for assessing intervention efficacy in people with severe asthma of working age. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. It's the adherence, stupid (that determines asthma control in preschool children)!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A; Duiverman, Eric J; Brand, Paul L

    2014-03-01

    Although guideline-based asthma care and adherence to inhaled corticosteroids are predictors of asthma control, the role of adherence in maintaining long-term asthma control is largely unknown. This study was designed to explore the relationship between adherence to inhaled corticosteroids and long-term asthma control in young children with asthma. In this observational study, 81 2-6-year-old asthmatic children, using inhaled corticosteroids, closely followed-up in a programme with extensive self-management training, were enrolled. Adherence was measured daily for 12 months using Smartinhaler (Nexus6 Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand) devices. Long-term asthma control was assessed by parents and physicians and included clinical assessment, an asthma control questionnaire and lung function measurement. We examined the association of adherence to asthma control, adjusting for seasonal influences and clinical characteristics. Median (interquartile range) adherence was 87% (70-94%), and 64 (79%) children had well-controlled asthma throughout follow-up. Adherence >80% was associated with better asthma control, and we found no important confounders of this association. Children with persistent mild symptoms had lower adherence rates (p=0.028). Guideline-based asthma care was associated with good asthma control in most children. Adherence to inhaled corticosteroids was an independent strong predictor of long-term asthma control, with highest levels of asthma control found in children with adherence >80% of doses prescribed.

  8. Politics and the success of school-based health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzo, B A; Button, J W; Wald, K D

    2000-10-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to health services by bringing providers to children (and sometimes parents) and furnishing low cost services in an atmosphere of trust. While the number of SBHCs has continued to grow and some clinics have continued to expand their services, others have barely survived and some have even closed. This study investigated factors, particularly political forces, that affected the success of SBHCs. Using a national survey of clinic directors, this study assessed clinic success in terms both of longevity and service delivery. Findings indicate the factors most consistently and significantly associated with success include not only measures of "need" (school size and percent African-American enrollment or population) but of "politics" (citizen political ideology and Southern conservatism). Thus, politics matters more than previous studies suggested.

  9. Children's perceptions of school-based violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumpel, T P; Meadan, H

    2000-09-01

    An important first step in understanding school-based violence is understanding children's subjective perceptions of the phenomena. Understanding these perceptions is likely to be a major factor in determining the integrity of both prevalence and intervention studies. We investigated how elementary and secondary aged children perceived school-based violence. A sample of 979 children from a nested random sample of elementary (grades 3-6) and middle school (grades 7-8) classrooms in Jerusalem participated in this study. To understand children's perception of school violence, we used an instrument composed of 19 dichotomous items, each presenting a one-line description of a behaviour, which the respondent would define as either 'intentionally harmful' or not. Eighth graders were significantly less likely to label the behaviours described as violent compared to all other grades; and seventh graders were less likely as compared to third, fourth and fifth graders; also, some between-gender differences were found. The respondents often view the behaviours described as intentional and aggressive; this finding should serve as an impetus to widen the scope of school-based violence interventions to include these behaviours, especially for younger children.

  10. Cost Benefit of Comprehensive Primary and Preventive School-Based Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Connor, Katherine A; Mueller, Josiah M; Hong, Jonathan C; Velazquez, Gabriela Calderon; Johnson, Sara B

    2018-01-01

    The Rales Health Center is a comprehensive school-based health center at an urban elementary/middle school. Rales Health Center provides a full range of pediatric services using an enriched staffing model consisting of pediatrician, nurse practitioner, registered nurses, and medical office assistant. This staffing model provides greater care but costs more than traditional school-based health centers staffed by part-time nurses. The objective was to analyze the cost benefit of Rales Health Center enhanced staffing model compared with a traditional school-based health center (standard care), focusing on asthma care, which is among the most prevalent chronic conditions of childhood. In 2016, cost-benefit analysis using a decision tree determined the net social benefit of Rales Health Center compared with standard care from the U.S. societal perspective based on the 2015-2016 academic year. It was assumed that Rales Health Center could handle greater patient throughput related to asthma, decreased prescription costs, reduced parental resources in terms of missed work time, and improved student attendance. Univariate and multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. The expected cost to operate Rales Health Center was $409,120, compared with standard care cost of $172,643. Total monetized incremental benefits of Rales Health Center were estimated to be $993,414. The expected net social benefit for Rales Health Center was $756,937, which demonstrated substantial societal benefit at a return of $4.20 for every dollar invested. This net social benefit estimate was robust to sensitivity analyses. Despite the greater cost associated with the Rales Health Center's enhanced staffing model, the results of this analysis highlight the cost benefit of providing comprehensive, high-quality pediatric care in schools, particularly schools with a large proportion of underserved students. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by

  11. Cannabis-Associated Asthma and Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatkin, J M; Zani-Silva, L; Ferreira, I; Zamel, N

    2017-09-18

    Inhalation of cannabis smoke is its most common use and the pulmonary complications of its use may be the single most common form of drug-induced pulmonary disease worldwide. However, the role of cannabis consumption in asthma patients and allergic clinical situations still remains controversial. To review the evidence of asthma and allergic diseases associated with the use of marijuana, we conducted a search of English, Spanish, and Portuguese medical using the search terms asthma, allergy, marijuana, marihuana, and cannabis. Entries made between January 1970 and March 2017 were retrieved. Several papers have shown the relationship between marijuana use and increase in asthma and other allergic diseases symptoms, as well as the increased frequency of medical visits. This narrative review emphasizes the importance to consider cannabis as a precipitating factor for acute asthma and allergic attacks in clinical practice. Although smoking of marijuana may cause respiratory symptoms, there is a need for more studies to elucidate many aspects in allergic asthma patients, especially considering the long-term use of the drug. These patients should avoid using marijuana and be oriented about individual health risks, possible dangers of second-hand smoke exposure, underage use, safe storage, and the over smoking of marijuana.

  12. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Comparison of clinical effects of beclomethasone dipropionate & budesonide in treatment of children with mild persistent asthma: A double-blind, randomized, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Various inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs are available to control the symptoms of asthma. Although beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP and budesonide (BUD are one of the oldest ICSs, their wide availability and low cost make them attractive options in developing countries. Due to lack of consensus on which of the two drugs is better for controlling mild persistent asthma, we undertook this study to compare the efficacy of these two drugs by measuring the change in percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 from baseline in children with mild persistent asthma. Methods: A double-blind, randomized, parallel group study was conducted in children 7-15 yr of age with newly diagnosed asthma. Of the 85 cases of mild persistent asthma, 42 received BUD while 43 received BDP at a dose of 400 µg/day using pressurized metered-dose inhaler with valved spacer for two months. The outcomes measured were change in FEV 1 , symptom scores and side effects. Results: There was a significant (P < 0.05 improvement in FEV 1 in BUD group (98.43 ± 4.63% than in BDP group (95.65 ± 5.66% at the end of two months of treatment. The mean symptom scores in BUD group (0.28 ± 1.22 and BDP group (0.43 ± 1.52 were comparable after two months. No side effects were seen in either group. Interpretation & conclusions: FEV 1 was significantly greater in BUD group than BDP group. Improvement in symptoms and incidence of side effects were similar. Our findings indicate that both BDP and BUD can be used effectively in the management of children with mild persistent asthma. [CTRI No: CTRI/2013/03/003495].

  14. Inflammation is a Continuous Trait in Children regardless of Asthma Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    asymptomatic children to children with intermittent asthmatic symptoms and children with persistent asthma. Methods: An unselected group of 196 six-year-old children were included from the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) birth cohort born of mothers with asthma. Bronchial...... for a dichotomized approach to asthma diagnosis. Childhood asthma remains a clinical diagnosis and surrogate markers may only be used cautiously as supportive evidence.......Rationale: Elevated fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and bronchial hyperresponsiveness are used as surrogate markers of asthma. Objective: To investigate the association between FeNO and bronchial responsiveness in a population of high risk children including the full spectrum from...

  15. School based assessment module for invasion games category in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School based assessment module for invasion games category in physical education. ... This study identify the level of basic skills of invasion games category when using School Based Assessment Module. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  16. Diagnóstico de asma alérgica en consultas de alergología y neumología Diagnosis of allergic asthma in allergy and pneumology outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Borderías

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estimar la prevalencia del diagnóstico de asma alérgica en pacientes con asma persistente que acuden a consultas de alergología y neumología y describir el tratamiento clínico de estos pacientes. Métodos: Se incluyó aleatoria y retrospectivamente a 382 pacientes (12-65 años de edad con diagnóstico de asma persistente (criterios GINA que acudieron a las consultas de neumología y alergología. Se definió asma alérgica como la presencia de sensibilización a alérgenos comunes en pruebas cutáneas y/o determinaciones de inmunoglobulina (Ig E específica. Se recogió también información sobre el tratamiento recibido para el asma. Resultados: Se realizaron estudios alergológicos en el 99,5 y el 76,5% de los pacientes que acudieron a las consultas de alergología y neumología, respectivamente. Se estableció el diagnóstico de asma alérgica en el 90,6 (intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%, 86,5-94,7 y el 46,1% (IC del 95%, 39,0-53,2 de los éstos, respectivamente. La prevalencia de diagnóstico de asma alérgica fue mayor entre los pacientes más jóvenes, los varones y los menos graves. El 14,1% de los pacientes de alergología y el 23,0% de neumología presentaban asma persistente grave. Un 24,0% de los pacientes de alergología y un 5,7% de los de neumología se trataban exclusivamente con broncodilatadores. Conclusiones: El diagnóstico de asma alérgica fue muy superior en las consultas de alergología que en las consultas de neumología. Parte de las diferencias pueden ser debidas a una mayor realización de estudios alérgicos en las consultas de alergología, aunque la mayor diferencia probablemente sea debida a los diferentes perfiles de los pacientes que llegan a cada una de estas consultas especializadas.Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of diagnosis of allergic asthma in patients with persistent asthma attending allergy or pneumology outpatient clinics and to describe the clinical management of asthma in

  17. Behavior problems and prevalence of asthma symptoms among Brazilian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Caroline A; Santos, Darci N; Barreto do Carmo, Maria B; Santos, Letícia M; Teles, Carlos A S; Rodrigues, Laura C; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2011-09-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood and has been designated a public health problem due to the increase in its prevalence in recent decades, the amount of health service expenditure it absorbs and an absence of consensus about its etiology. The relationships among psychosocial factors and the occurrence, symptomatology, and severity of asthma have recently been considered. There is still controversy about the association between asthma and a child's mental health, since the pathways through which this relationship is established are complex and not well researched. This study aims to investigate whether behavior problems are associated with the prevalence of asthma symptoms in a large urban center in Latin America. It is a cross-section study of 869 children between 6 and 12 years old, residents of Salvador, Brazil. The International Study of Allergy and Asthma in Childhood (ISAAC) instrument was used to evaluate prevalence of asthma symptoms. The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) was employed to evaluate behavioral problems. 19.26% (n=212) of the children presented symptoms of asthma. 35% were classified as having clinical behavioral problems. Poisson's robust regression model demonstrated a statistically significant association between the presence of behavioral problems and asthma symptoms occurrence (PR: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.10-1.85). These results suggest an association between behavioral problems and pediatric asthma, and support the inclusion of mental health care in the provision of services for asthma morbidity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Asthma morbidity in adult Chicago public housing residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertino, Anissa; Turyk, Mary E; Curtis, Luke; Persky, Victoria W

    2009-03-01

    Residents of public housing can experience socioeconomic disadvantages, inadequate access to health care, and particularly substandard indoor air quality due to inadequate building maintenance. This study investigates demographic, medical management, severity, and household factors associated with asthma-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations. A total of 103 adult participants with asthma from four Chicago housing developments completed surveys and underwent household inspections. Using stepwise multivariate logistic regression, we identified independent predictors of asthma-related emergency department visits: asthma controller medication use, not keeping an asthma-related doctor's appointment, and frequent nocturnal wheeze episodes. Using stepwise multivariate logistic regression, we identified independent predictors of asthma-related hospitalizations: peeling paint, plaster, or wallpaper, environmental tobacco smoke, written action plan for an asthma-related doctor or emergency department visit, and frequent nocturnal wheeze episodes. In multivariate models, factors related to clinical severity and asthma management were related to both emergency department visits and hospitalizations while household conditions were related only to hospitalizations. Interventions to address both asthma management and household environmental triggers may be needed to reduce asthma morbidity in low-income populations.

  19. Effects of regular exercise on asthma control in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Sirpa A M; Mäkikyrö, Elina M S; Hugg, Timo T; Jaakkola, Maritta S; Jaakkola, Jouni J K

    2017-08-28

    According to our systematic literature review, no previous study has assessed potential effects of regular exercise on asthma control among young adults. We hypothesized that regular exercise improves asthma control among young adults. We studied 162 subjects with current asthma recruited from a population-based cohort study of 1,623 young adults 20-27 years of age. Asthma control was assessed by the occurrence of asthma-related symptoms, including wheezing, shortness of breath, cough, and phlegm production, during the past 12 months. Asthma symptom score was calculated based on reported frequencies of these symptoms (range: 0-12). Exercise was assessed as hours/week. In Poisson regression, adjusting for gender, age, smoking, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, and education, the asthma symptom score reduced by 0.09 points per 1 hour of exercise/week (95% CI: 0.00 to 0.17). Applying the "Low exercise" quartile as the reference, "Medium exercise" reduced the asthma symptom score by 0.66 (-0.39 to 1.72), and "High exercise" reduced it significantly by 1.13 (0.03 to 2.22). The effect was strongest among overweight subjects. Our results provide new evidence that regular exercising among young adults improves their asthma control. Thus, advising about exercise should be included as an important part of asthma self-management in clinical practice.

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program America Breathing Easier Guide for State Programs Interventions Community ... over their asthma. Quick Links Asthma Action Plan America Breathing Easier [PDF – 1.1 MB] ASL Asthma ...

  1. Stay away from asthma triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... clothes. They should leave the coat outside or away from your child. Ask people who work at ...

  2. Flu and People with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swine Variant Pandemic Other Flu and People with Asthma Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Take Steps to Fight the Flu What is Asthma? Asthma is a lung disease that is caused ...

  3. Asthma phenotypes in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Monica B; Covar, Ronina A

    2016-04-01

    This review describes the literature over the past 18 months that evaluated childhood asthma phenotypes, highlighting the key aspects of these studies, and comparing these studies to previous ones in this area. Recent studies on asthma phenotypes have identified new phenotypes on the basis of statistical analyses (using cluster analysis and latent class analysis methodology) and have evaluated the outcomes and associated risk factors of previously established early childhood asthma phenotypes that are based on asthma onset and patterns of wheezing illness. There have also been investigations focusing on immunologic, physiologic, and genetic correlates of various phenotypes, as well as identification of subphenotypes of severe childhood asthma. Childhood asthma remains a heterogeneous condition, and investigations into these various presentations, risk factors, and outcomes are important since they can offer therapeutic and prognostic relevance. Further investigation into the immunopathology and genetic basis underlying childhood phenotypes is important so therapy can be tailored accordingly.

  4. Late-Onset Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    Late-onset asthma is common, associated with poor outcome, underdiagnosed and undertreated, possibly due to the modifying effect of ageing on disease expression. Although the diagnostic work-up in elderly individuals suspected of having asthma follows the same steps as in younger individuals (case......, to objectively confirm asthma. If necessary, a trial of oral or inhaled corticosteroid might be necessary. Asthma can be diagnosed when increased airflow variability is identified in a symptomatic patient, and if the patient does not have a history of exposure, primarily smoking, known to cause chronic...... obstructive pulmonary disease, the diagnosis is asthma even if the patient does not have fully reversible airflow obstruction. Pharmacological therapy in patients with late-onset asthma follows international guidelines, including treatment with the lowest effective dose of inhaled corticosteroid to minimize...

  5. Community-based asthma care: trial of a "credit card" asthma self-management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, W; Crane, J; Burgess, C; Te Karu, H; Fox, C; Harper, M; Robson, B; Howden-Chapman, P; Crossland, L; Woodman, K

    1994-07-01

    Although asthma self-management plans are widely recommended as essential in the long-term treatment of adult asthma, there have been few studies examining their use. Our objective was to assess the effect of a "credit card" adult asthma self-management plan in a community experiencing major health problems from asthma, by means of a before and after intervention trial of the efficacy of the "credit card" plan, when introduced through community-based asthma clinics. The participants were 69 Maori people with asthma. The "credit card" plan consisted of written guidelines for the self-management of asthma, based on self-assessment of asthma severity, printed on a plastic card. On one side, management guidelines were based on the interpretation of peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) recordings, whilst the reverse side was based on symptoms. The outcome measures used were before and after comparison of markers of asthma morbidity and requirement for acute medical treatment; and a structured questionnaire assessing the acceptability and use of the credit card plan. Following the introduction of the plan, the mean PEFR increased from 347 to 389 l.min-1, the percentage of nights woken fell from 30.4 to 16.9%, and the number of days "out of action" fell from 3.8 to 1.7%. The requirements for acute medical treatment also fell during the intervention period. Most participants commented favourably on the content and usefulness of the plan. In the situation of worsening asthma, 28% of subjects found the peak flow side of the card most helpful, 7% the symptoms side, and 48% found both sides equally helpful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Rural Asthma: Current Understanding of Prevalence, Patterns, and Interventions for Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Robin Dawson; Ownby, Dennis R

    2017-06-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness of children and adolescents in the USA. While asthma has been understood to disproportionately affect urban dwellers, recent investigations have revealed rural pediatric asthma prevalence to be very similar to urban and to be more closely correlated with socioeconomic and environmental factors than geographic location or population density. Rural children experience factors unique to location that impact asthma development and outcomes, including housing quality, cigarette smoke exposure, and small/large-scale farming. Additionally, there are challenging barriers to appropriate asthma care that frequently are more severe for those living in rural areas, including insurance status, lack of primary care providers and pulmonary specialists, knowledge deficits (both patient and provider), and a lack of culturally tailored asthma interventions. Interventions designed to address rural pediatric asthma disparities are more likely to be successful when targeted to specific challenges, such as the use of school-based services or telemedicine to mitigate asthma care access issues. Continued research on understanding the complex interaction of specific rural environmental factors with host factors can inform future interventions designed to mitigate asthma disparities.

  7. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based... Gadsden County. SUMMARY: HRSA will be transferring a School-Based Health Center Capital (SBHCC) Program... support the expansion of services at school-based health centers will continue. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  8. Inhaled Steroids: First Line Treatment of Adult Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cartier

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids are the most potent inhaled anti-inflammatory drugs for asthma treatment. This paper reviews the clinical evidence supporting the early use of inhaled steroids in asthma as a first line treatment. Inhaled steroids can probably alter the course of asthma, especially in mild asthmatics. Once they have been shown to improve control of asthma and even if the need for beta2-agonists is virtually nil, their use should be continued at low doses (ie, equivalent to 400 to 500 μg of budesonide or beclomethasone for at least one year before attempting to reduce the dosage.

  9. Sibship and self-esteem in children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Polizzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has explored the valence of sibship that may empower the self-esteem of children with asthma at the interpersonal, environmental control competence, emotionality management, and body-image levels. It has been assumed that the relationship between siblings may have a moderating effect on the negative impact that asthma has on child’s development. Seventy children suffering from chronic asthma have been involved: 40 children with siblings (experimental group and 30 sibling-free children (control group. The children with asthma have exhibited higher levels of self-esteem in comparison with the sibling-free children. The results of the study, at the clinical significance level, highlight how meaningful could be the involvement of healthy siblings to support the development, and to ease the compliance of children suffering from asthma. The outcomes have confirmed the supportive valence of sibship for the self-esteem of the children with asthma.

  10. Objective confirmation of asthma diagnosis improves medication adherence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, V; Stensen, L; Sverrild, A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The impact of diagnostic work-up in asthma management on medication redemption and probably also drug adherence is largely unknown, but we hypothesized that a confirmed diagnosis of asthma in a hospital-based out-patient clinic increases the willingness to subsequent medication...... redemption in a real life setting. METHODS: In a retrospective register-based study, 300 medical records of patients referred with possible asthma during one year were examined, of whom 171 had asthma (57%). One-year data on dispensed medicine was collected using the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product...... more frequently prescribed new therapy compared to those with unverified asthma (88.9% vs. 65.0%, respectively, p time redemption of prescriptions (72% vs. 64%, respectively, p = 0.3), whereas the second (52% vs. 27%, p = 0.001) and third or more asthma...

  11. Sibship and Self-esteem in Children with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Concetta; Fontana, Valentina; Carollo, Antonio; Bono, Alessandra; Burgio, Sofia; Perricone, Giovanna

    2016-06-15

    This study has explored the valence of sibship that may empower the self-esteem of children with asthma at the interpersonal, environmental control competence, emotionality management, and body-image levels. It has been assumed that the relationship between siblings may have a moderating effect on the negative impact that asthma has on child's development. Seventy children suffering from chronic asthma have been involved: 40 children with siblings (experimental group) and 30 sibling-free children (control group). The children with asthma have exhibited higher levels of self-esteem in comparison with the sibling-free children. The results of the study, at the clinical significance level, highlight how meaningful could be the involvement of healthy siblings to support the development, and to ease the compliance of children suffering from asthma. The outcomes have confirmed the supportive valence of sibship for the self-esteem of the children with asthma.

  12. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and immunology. © 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All Rights Reserved. Legal Notices | Site ... navigation Find an Allergist/Immunologist Search Your Symptoms Ask the Expert

  13. New drugs for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colice, Gene L

    2008-06-01

    The goal of asthma therapy is to reduce symptoms to the extent that patients can lead active, unlimited lives and to minimize concern about exacerbations. Unfortunately, despite advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and the existence of consensus asthma-management guidelines, patients with asthma still suffer considerable morbidity and, on rare occasions, death. Part of the reason for suboptimal asthma control is poor adherence, by both providers and patients, to the recommended asthma regimens and guidelines. However, even under the ideal circumstances of a motivated patient and a knowledgeable physician, the available asthma drugs are not effective in all patients at all times. The market for asthma drugs has been dynamic; numerous new products have recently been approved for marketing by the Food and Drug Administration. Unfortunately, the products recently approved and those likely to enter the market soon mostly are either reformulations or combinations of established molecules. Developing new drugs to treat asthma, particularly with novel anti-inflammatory properties, should be a priority.

  14. Asthma among mink workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Berit; Carstensen, Ole; Petersen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    We report two cases of asthma among mink workers. The first case is about a mink farmer who had asthma that was difficult to treat. In the medical history there was no clear relation to work, and no conclusive work relation with peak flow monitoring. He had a positive histamine release test to mink...... urine. The second case is about a mink farm worker, who had an asthma attack when handling mink furs. Peak flow monitoring showed a clear relation to this work, but there were no signs of allergy. We conclude that these two cases suggest an increased risk of asthma among mink workers....

  15. Teaching Your Child about Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  16. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (pimprovement in asthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effectiveness and Safety of Bronchial Thermoplasty in the Treatment of Severe Asthma A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Sham-Controlled Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, Mario; Rubin, Adalberto S.; Laviolette, Michel; Fiterman, Jussara; Lima, Marina De Andrade; Shah, Pallav L.; Fiss, Elie; Olivenstein, Ronald; Thomson, Neil C.; Niven, Robert M.; Pavord, Ian D.; Simoff, Michael; Duhamel, David R.; McEvoy, Charlene; Barbers, Richard; ten Hacken, Nicolaas H. T.; Wechsler, Michael E.; Holmes, Mark; Phillips, Martin J.; Erzurum, Serpil; Lunn, William; Israel, Elliot; Jariour, Nizar; Kraft, Monica; Shargill, Narinder S.; Quiring, John; Berry, Scott M.; Cox, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a bronchoscopic procedure in which controlled thermal energy is applied to the airway wall to decrease smooth muscle. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of BT versus a sham procedure in subjects with severe asthma who remain symptomatic

  18. Clinical control and histopathologic outcome of asthma when using airway hyperresponsiveness as an additional guide to long-term treatment. The AMPUL Study Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sont, J. K.; Willems, L. N.; Bel, E. H.; van Krieken, J. H.; Vandenbroucke, J. P.; Sterk, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    According to international guidelines, the level and adjustment of antiinflammatory treatment for asthma are based solely on symptoms and lung function. We investigated whether a treatment strategy aimed at reducing airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR strategy) in addition to the recommendations in the

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Controlling Tools for Control Triggers Indoors In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers ... clinics/physicians’ office Mixed Age Groups – Pharmacies Pregnant Women – Home Pregnant Women – Medical clinics/physicians’ office Health ...

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Profile Tables and Graphs Asthma Call-back Survey Technical Information Prevalence Tables BRFSS Prevalence Data NHIS Prevalence ... clinics/physicians’ office Mixed Age Groups – Pharmacies Pregnant Women – Home Pregnant Women – Medical clinics/physicians’ office Health ...

  1. Validation of parental reports of asthma trajectory, burden, and risk by using the pediatric asthma control and communication instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okelo, Sande O; Eakin, Michelle N; Riekert, Kristin A; Teodoro, Alvin P; Bilderback, Andrew L; Thompson, Darcy A; Loiaza-Martinez, Antonio; Rand, Cynthia S; Thyne, Shannon; Diette, Gregory B; Patino, Cecilia M

    2014-01-01

    Despite a growing interest, few pediatric asthma questionnaires assess multiple dimensions of asthma morbidity, as recommended by national asthma guidelines, or use patient-reported outcomes. To evaluate a questionnaire that measures multiple dimensions of parent-reported asthma morbidity (Direction, Bother, and Risk). We administered the Pediatric Asthma Control and Communication Instrument (PACCI) and assessed asthma control (PACCI Control), quality of life, and lung function among children who presented for routine asthma care. The PACCI was evaluated for discriminative validity. A total of 317 children participated (mean age, 8.2 years; 58% boys; 44% African American). As parent-reported PACCI Direction changed from "better" to "worse," we observed poorer asthma control (P < .001), mean Pediatric Asthma Caregiver Quality of Life Questionnaire (PACQLQ) scores (P < .001), and FEV1% (P = .025). Linear regression showed that, for each change in PACCI Direction, the mean PACQLQ score decreased by -0.6 (95% CI, -0.8 to -0.4). As parent-reported PACCI Bother changed from "not bothered" to "very bothered," we observed poorer asthma control (P < .001) and lower mean PACQLQ scores (P < .001). Linear regression showed that, for each change in PACCI Bother category, the mean PACQLQ score decreased by -1.1 (95% CI, -1.3 to -0.9). Any reported PACCI Risk event (emergency department visit, hospitalization, or use of an oral corticosteroid) was associated with poorer asthma control (P < .05) and PACQLQ scores (P < .01). PACCI Direction, Bother, and Risk are valid measures of parent-reported outcomes and show good discriminative validity. The PACCI is a simple clinical tool to assess multiple dimensions of parent-reported asthma morbidity, in addition to risk and control. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The usefulness of the mannitol challenge test for asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste; Sverrild, Asger; Backer, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    The mannitol test was developed as an easy-to-use, safe, standardized bronchial challenge test for diagnosing asthma in a wide range of clinical settings. The mannitol test has a moderate sensitivity and will only detect approximately 60% of asthma cases. Hence, a negative mannitol test cannot be......-inflammatory therapy. In this review, the current knowledge on the usefulness of the mannitol in a clinical setting as well as in clinical trials is presented and outstanding questions on the usefulness of the test are discussed.......The mannitol test was developed as an easy-to-use, safe, standardized bronchial challenge test for diagnosing asthma in a wide range of clinical settings. The mannitol test has a moderate sensitivity and will only detect approximately 60% of asthma cases. Hence, a negative mannitol test cannot...... be used to rule out asthma. The advantage of the mannitol test is a high specificity. In an individual with symptoms suggestive of asthma, a positive test indicates a high likelihood of asthma with ongoing airway inflammation and seems useful for detecting asthma requiring regular anti...

  3. Assessing Control of Asthma in Jush, Jimma, South West Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite international guidelines, asthma control is short of the goal in different parts of the world. The objective of this study was to assess control of asthma in patients older than 14 years at the Chest Clinic of Jimma University Specialized Hospital/JUSH, South West Ethiopia. Methods: A cross-sectional ...

  4. Examining Household Asthma Management Behavior through a Microeconomic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Brandt, Sylvia J.; Tager, Ira B.

    2014-01-01

    National guidelines on the effective management of pediatric asthma have been promoted for over 20 years, yet asthma-related morbidity among low-income children remains disproportionately high. To date, household and clinical interventions designed to remediate these differences have been informed largely by a health behavior framework. However,…

  5. Serious Asthma Events with Fluticasone plus Salmeterol versus Fluticasone Alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stempel, David A; Raphiou, Ibrahim H; Kral, Kenneth M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safe and appropriate use of long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) for the treatment of asthma has been widely debated. In two large clinical trials, investigators found a potential risk of serious asthma-related events associated with LABAs. This study was designed to evaluate the ris...

  6. Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of factors affecting adherence to asthma controller therapy in chest clinics in a sub-Saharan African setting: a cross-sectional study. ... Background: Adherence to controller therapy in asthma is a major concern during the management of the disease. Objective: To determine the adherence rate and identify the ...

  7. Risk factors precipitating exacerbations in adult asthma patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    one-third of the direct care costs of asthma are attributable to ED visits ... The setting for this study was the emergency unit, the primary health clinic and the asthma .... diisocyanate or when they were employed in the pharmaceutical, plastics or ...

  8. Emotionally triggered asthma and its relationship to panic disorder, ataques de nervios, and asthma-related death of a loved one in Latino adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Karinna; Sandler, Jonathan; Interian, Alejandro; Feldman, Jonathan M

    2017-02-01

    Research has demonstrated high comorbidity between asthma and panic disorder (PD). Less is known about the relationship between asthma and the Latino cultural idiom of distress of ataques de nervios, as well as the role that psychosocial stressors play. The current study tested the hypotheses that Latino asthma patients who experience PD, ataques de nervios, and/or asthma-related death of a loved one endorse greater psychological triggers of asthma, greater perceived impact of asthma triggers, and greater difficulty controlling such triggers than do those without these conditions. Data originated from an interview conducted prior to a randomized controlled trial in which 292 Latino adults with self-reported asthma were recruited from outpatient clinics in the Bronx, NY. The PRIME-MD Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) was used to screen for PD symptoms, while the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I) was used to confirm diagnosis of PD. Lifetime history of ataques de nervios and asthma-related death of a loved one were based upon self-report. Asthma triggers were examined using the Asthma Trigger Inventory (ATI). PD, ataques de nervios, and asthma-related death of a loved one each predicted a higher frequency of psychological asthma triggers, controlling for gender and comorbid medical conditions. Participants with PD also reported greater impact of asthma triggers than those without PD, while no significant differences in perceived control were observed. Providers should screen for PD, ataques de nervios, and asthma-related death of a loved one in Latino asthma patients, given their observed association with emotionally triggered asthma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Allergic asthma biomarkers using systems approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurab eSircar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is characterized by lung inflammation caused by complex interaction between the immune system and environmental factors such as allergens and inorganic pollutants. Recent research in this field is focused on discovering new biomarkers associated with asthma pathogenesis. This review illustrates updated research associating biomarkers of allergic asthma and their potential use in systems biology of the disease. We focus on biomolecules with altered expression, which may serve as inflammatory, diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers of asthma discovered in human or experimental asthma model using genomic, proteomic and epigenomic approaches for gene and protein expression profiling. These include high-throughput technologies such as state of the art microarray and proteomics Mass Spectrometry (MS platforms. Emerging concepts of molecular interactions and pathways may provide new insights in searching potential clinical biomarkers. We summarized certain pathways with significant linkage to asthma pathophysiology by analyzing the compiled biomarkers. Systems approaches with this data can identify the regulating networks, which will eventually identify the key biomarkers to be used for diagnostics and drug discovery.

  10. Asthma exacerbations: risk factors for hospital readmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Barcala, F-J; Calvo-Alvarez, U; Garcia-Sanz, M-T; Garcia-Couceiro, N; Martin-Lancharro, P; Pose, A; Carreira, J-M; Moure-Gonzalez, J-D; Valdes-Cuadrado, L; Muñoz, X

    2018-02-01

    The aim of our study is to analyse hospital readmissions due to asthma, as well as the factors associated with their increase. We carried out a retrospective study including all admissions of patients over 18 years old due to exacerbation of asthma occurring in our hospital between the years 2000 and 2010. The data were gathered by two members of the research team, by reviewing the clinical records. The first hospital admission of each patient was included for this study. An early readmission (ER) was defined as that which occurred in the following 15 days after hospital discharge and late readmission (LR) to that occurring from 16 days after discharge. This study included 2166 hospital admissions and 1316 patients, with a mean age of 62.6 years. Of the 1316 patients analysed, 36 (2.7%) had one ER and 313 (23.8%) one LR. The only factor independently associated with a higher probability of an ER was poor lung function. A higher probability of LR was associated with a greater severity of the asthma (OR: 17.8, for severe asthma versus intermittent asthma), to have had any hospital admission in the previous year (OR: 3.5) and the use of a combination of ICS-LABA as maintenance treatment. About 25% of the patients in our area admitted to hospital due to asthma exacerbation had repeat episodes of hospitalisation.

  11. Asthma transition from childhood into adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Oliver; Bahmer, Thomas; Rabe, Klaus F; von Mutius, Erika

    2017-03-01

    Asthma is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease both in children and adults and resembles a complex syndrome rather than a single disease. Different methods have been developed to better characterise distinct asthma phenotypes in childhood and adulthood. In studies of adults, most phenotyping relies on biomaterials from the lower airways; however, this information is missing in paediatric studies because of restricted accessibility. Few patients show symptoms throughout childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Risk factors for this might be genetics, family history of asthma and atopy, infections early in life, allergic diseases, and lung function deficits. In turn, a large proportion of children with asthma lose their symptoms during school age and adolescence. This improved prognosis, which might also reflect a better treatment response, is associated with being male and with milder and less allergic disease. Importantly, whether clinical remission of symptoms equals the disappearance of underlying pathology is unknown. In fact, airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation might remain despite the absence of overt symptoms. Additionally, a new-onset of asthma symptoms is apparent in adulthood, especially in women and in the case of impaired lung function. However, many patients do not remember childhood symptoms, which might reflect relapse rather than true initiation. Both relapse and adult-onset of asthma symptoms have been associated with allergic disease and sensitisation in addition to airway hyper-responsiveness. Thus, asthma symptoms beginning in adults might have originated in childhood. Equivocally, persistence into, relapse, and new-onset of symptoms in adulthood have all been related to active smoking. However, underlying mechanisms for the associations remain unclear, and future asthma research should therefore integrate standardised molecular approaches in identical ways in both paediatric and adult populations and in longitudinal

  12. Predictive factors for moderate or severe exacerbations in asthma patients receiving outpatient care

    OpenAIRE

    Guti?rrez, Francisco Javier ?lvarez; Galv?n, Marta Ferrer; Gallardo, Juan Francisco Medina; Mancera, Marta Barrera; Romero, Beatriz Romero; Falc?n, Auxiliadora Romero

    2017-01-01

    Background Asthma exacerbations are important events that affect disease control, but predictive factors for severe or moderate exacerbations are not known. The objective was to study the predictive factors for moderate (ME) and severe (SE) exacerbations in asthma patients receiving outpatient care. Methods Patients aged?>?12?years with asthma were included in the study and followed-up at 4-monthly intervals over a 12-month period. Clinical (severity, level of control, asthma control test [AC...

  13. Trial of a "credit card" asthma self-management plan in a high-risk group of patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, W; Burgess, C; Ayson, M; Crane, J; Pearce, N; Beasley, R

    1996-05-01

    The "credit card" asthma self-management plan provides the adult asthmatic patient with simple guidelines for the self-management of asthma, which are based on the self-assessment of peak expiratory flow rate recordings and symptoms. The study was a trial of the clinical efficacy of the credit card plan in a high-risk group of asthmatic patients. In this "before-and-after" trial, patients discharged from the emergency department of Wellington Hospital, after treatment for severe asthma were invited to attend a series of hospital outpatient clinics at which the credit card plan was introduced. Questionnaires were used to compare markers of asthma morbidity, requirement for emergency medical care, and medication use during the 6-month period before and after intervention with the credit card plan. Of the 30 patients with asthma who attended the first outpatient clinic, 26 (17 women and 9 men) completed the program. In these 26 participants, there was a reduction in both morbidity and requirement for acute medical services: specifically, the proportion waking with asthma more than once a week decreased from 65% to 23% (p = 0.005) and the proportion visiting the emergency department for treatment of severe asthma decreased from 58% to 15% (p = 0.004). The patients attending the clinics commented favorably on the plan, in particular on its usefulness as an educational tool for monitoring and treating their asthma. Although the interpretation of this study is limited by the lack of a randomized control group, the findings are consistent with other evidence that the credit card asthma self-management plan can be an effective and acceptable system for improving asthma care in a high-risk group of adult patients with asthma.

  14. Differences between asthma-COPD overlap syndrome and adult-onset asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommola, Minna; Ilmarinen, Pinja; Tuomisto, Leena E; Lehtimäki, Lauri; Haanpää, Jussi; Niemelä, Onni; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2017-05-01

    Differences between asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) and adult-onset asthma are poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate these differences in a clinical cohort of patients with adult-onset asthma, as a part of the Seinäjoki Adult Asthma Study (SAAS).188 patients were diagnosed with adult-onset asthma and re-evaluated 12 years after diagnosis. They were divided into three groups based on smoking history and post bronchodilator spirometry values: 1) never- and ex-smokers with obstructive (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 )/forced vital capacity (FVC) ≥0.7) patients with ≥10 pack-years; and 3) ACOS patients with ≥10 pack-years and FEV 1 /FVC obstructive patients with ≥10 pack-years smoking history, respectively. ACOS patients also showed reduced lung function, higher remaining bronchial reversibility and a higher number of comorbidities.This study shows distinct differences in diffusing capacity, blood neutrophil and IL-6 levels, bronchial reversibility, lung function and comorbidities between ACOS and adult-onset asthma. The present findings should be considered in the comprehensive assessment of adult asthma patients. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  15. [Mechanical ventilation in acute asthma crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbas, Carmen Sílvia Valente; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Vianna, Arthur; Magaldi, Ricardo; Casati, Ana; José, Anderson; Okamoto, Valdelis Novis

    2007-06-01

    The II Brazilian Consensus Conference on Mechanical Ventilation was published in 2000. Knowledge on the field of mechanical ventilation evolved rapidly since then, with the publication of numerous clinical studies with potential impact on the ventilatory management of critically ill patients. Moreover, the evolving concept of evidence - based medicine determined the grading of clinical recommendations according to the methodological value of the studies on which they are based. This explicit approach has broadened the understanding and adoption of clinical recommendations. For these reasons, AMIB - Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira and SBPT - Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisiologia - decided to update the recommendations of the II Brazilian Consensus. Mechanical ventilation in the asthma attack has been one of the updated topics. Describe the most important topics on the mechanical ventilation during the asthma attack and suggest the main therapeutic approaches. Systematic review of the published literature and gradation of the studies in levels of evidence, using the key words "mechanical ventilation" and "asthma". We present recommendations on the ventilatory modes and settings to be adopted when ventilating a patient during an asthma attack, as well as the recommended monitoring. Alternative ventilation techniques are also presented. Protective ventilatory strategies are recommended when ventilating a patient during a severe asthma attack.

  16. Physicians' preferences for asthma guidelines implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Koo; Kim, Byung-Keun; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Park, Heung-Woo; Chang, Yoon-Seok; Kim, Sun-Sin; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2010-10-01

    Patient care based on asthma guidelines is cost-effective and leads to improved treatment outcomes. However, ineffective implementation strategies interfere with the use of these recommendations in clinical practice. This study investigated physicians' preferences for asthma guidelines, including content, supporting evidence, learning strategies, format, and placement in the clinical workplace. We obtained information through a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire was distributed to physicians attending continuing medical education courses and sent to other physicians by airmail, e-mail, and facsimile. A total of 183 physicians responded (male to female ratio, 2.3:1; mean age, 40.4±9.9 years); 89.9% of respondents were internists or pediatricians, and 51.7% were primary care physicians. Physicians preferred information that described asthma medications, classified the disease according to severity and level of control, and provided methods of evaluation/treatment/monitoring and management of acute exacerbation. The most effective strategies for encouraging the use of the guidelines were through continuing medical education and discussions with colleagues. Physicians required supporting evidence in the form of randomized controlled trials and expert consensus. They preferred that the guidelines be presented as algorithms or flow charts/flow diagrams on plastic sheets, pocket cards, or in electronic medical records. This study identified the items of the asthma guidelines preferred by physicians in Korea. Asthma guidelines with physicians' preferences would encourage their implementation in clinical practice.

  17. The influence of leptin on Th1/Th2 balance in obese children with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Mohammed Youssef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In individuals with asthma, obesity induces the production of leptin and is associated with disease severity. Our objective was to evaluate the levels of serum leptin and their effect on Th1/Th2 balance in obese and non-obese children with asthma, as well as to investigate the association between serum leptin levels and clinical outcomes. METHODS: We evaluated 50 atopic children with physician-diagnosed moderate-to-severe persistent asthma and 20 controls. The children with asthma were divided into two groups, by body mass index percentile: obese (n = 25 and non-obese (n = 25. From all subjects, we collected peripheral blood samples in order to determine the levels of leptin, IFN-γ, and IL-4. Asthma severity was assessed by an asthma symptom score, and the results were correlated with the parameters studied. RESULTS: Serum leptin levels were significantly higher in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group, as well as being significantly higher in the children with asthma than in the controls, whereas IFN-γ levels were significantly higher and IL-4 levels were significantly lower in the obese asthma group than in the non-obese asthma group. In addition, the obese asthma group showed higher asthma symptom scores and significantly lower FEV1 (% of predicted than did the non-obese asthma group. There was a significant positive correlation between leptin and IFN-γ levels only in the obese asthma group. CONCLUSIONS: Although leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of asthma in obese and non-obese children, its effect is more pronounced in the former. In the presence of high leptin levels, only obese children with asthma exhibited Th1 polarization, with higher IFN-γ levels and greater asthma severity.

  18. Stepwise management of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Ayesha N

    2015-09-01

    Stepwise management of asthma remains an area of evolving research. Asthma is one of the most expensive chronic diseases in the United States; stepwise management is an important area of focus, with several recent guidelines recommending management. This is a review of published English language literature, focusing on management guidelines for asthma in adult and pediatric patients. Asthma is a chronic disease whose assessment of severity allows for therapeutic goals to match the impairment noted. Good evidence exists to aid risk reduction, leading to decreased emergency room visits, preventing loss of lung function in adults and lung growth in children, and optimizing pharmacotherapy with reduced side effects profile. Recent asthma management guidelines incorporate 4 components of asthma care including: monitoring of severity, patient education, controlling external triggers, and medications, including recent attention to medication adherence. Asthma is an expensive chronic disease with preventive measures leading to reduced healthcare costs. Future targeted cytokine therapy to decrease serum and blood eosinophils may become an integral part of asthma management. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  19. Treating childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    asthma is under control for at least three months, consider reducing the therapy. Apply extra cautious when reducing therapy (even if good control is achieved) in children who have experienced previous life-threatening asthma, or who have concomitant severe food allergies /anaphylaxis due to the increased risks of severe ...

  20. Effect of asthma severity on symptom perception in childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.B. Cabral

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Individual ability to perceive airway obstruction varies substantially. The factors influencing the perception of asthma are probably numerous and not well established in children. The present study was designed to examine the influence of asthma severity, use of preventive medication, age and gender on the association between respiratory symptoms (RS and peak expiratory flow (PEF rates in asthmatic children. We followed 92 asthmatic children, aged 6 to 16 years, for five months. Symptom scores were recorded daily and PEF was measured twice a day. The correlations among variables at the within-person level over time were analyzed for each child and for the pooled data by multivariate analysis. After pooling the data, there was a significant (P<0.05 correlation between each symptom and PEF; 60% of the children were accurate perceivers (defined by a statistically significant correlation between symptoms and PEF across time for diurnal symptoms and 37% for nocturnal symptoms. The accuracy of perception was independent of asthma severity, age, gender or the use of preventive medication. Symptom perception is inaccurate in a substantial number of asthmatic children, independently of clinical severity, age, gender or use of preventive medication. It is not clear why some asthmatic patients are capable of accurately perceiving the severity of airway obstruction while others are not.

  1. Clinical characteristics of childhood asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-01-19

    Jan 19, 1991 ... in their mid-teens.! One of the major stumbling ... allergens (environmental, animal and food); and irritants such as paint, perfume and .... kaner stock with its own high incidence of inherited disorders.17. In the context of this ...

  2. FeNO and Bronchial Responsiveness are Associated and Continuous traits in Young Children Independent of Asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Ann-Marie Malby; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    adjustment for gender, allergic rhinitis, current asthma, inhaled corticosteroid treatment and upper respiratory tract infections prior to testing. Stratified analyses showed similar associations in children with and without asthma. CONCLUSION FeNO and bronchial responsiveness are associated traits...... and continuous traits in young children regardless of asthma symptoms. This suggests a continuous spectrum from sub-clinical to clinical of a process underlying asthma and cautions against the use of these surrogate markers for a dichotomized approach to asthma diagnosis.Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma...

  3. Indoor combustion and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W

    2008-08-01

    Indoor combustion produces both gases (eg, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide) and particulate matter that may affect the development or exacerbation of asthma. Sources in the home include both heating devices (eg, fireplaces, woodstoves, kerosene heaters, flued [ie, vented] or nonflued gas heaters) and gas stoves for cooking. This article highlights the recent literature examining associations between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma development and severity. Since asthma is a chronic condition affecting both children and adults, both age groups are included in this article. Overall, there is some evidence of an association between exposure to indoor combustion and asthma, particularly asthma symptoms in children. Some sources of combustion such as coal stoves have been more consistently associated with these outcomes than other sources such as woodstoves.

  4. Asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The goal of asthma management is to achieve disease control. Poorly controlled asthma is associated with an increased number of days lost from school, exacerbations and days in hospital. Furthermore, children with uncontrolled asthma have more frequent contacts with the health-care system. Recent...... studies have added new information about the effects of poorly controlled asthma on a range of important, but less studied outcomes, including risk of obesity, daily physical activity, cardiovascular fitness, stress, concentration and focused attention, learning disabilities and risk of depression. From...... these studies it seems that poor asthma control may have a greater impact on the child than previously thought. This may have important long-term consequences for the child such as an increased risk of life-style associated diseases and poorer school performance. The level of control seems to be the most...

  5. Fertility outcomes in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Elisabeth Juul; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Lindenberg, Svend

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is increasing of an association between asthma and aspects of female reproduction. However, current knowledge is limited and furthermore relies on questionnaire studies or small populations. In a prospective observational cohort study to investigate whether time to pregnancy, the number...... of fertility treatments, and the number of successful pregnancies differ significantly between women with unexplained infertility with and without asthma.245 women with unexplained infertility (aged 23-45 years) underwent questionnaires and asthma and allergy testing while undergoing fertility treatment. 96...... women entering the study had either a former doctor's diagnosis of asthma or were diagnosed with asthma when included. After inclusion they were followed for a minimum of 12 months in fertility treatment, until they had a successful pregnancy, stopped treatment, or the observation ended.The likelihood...

  6. Genetics of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Asthma runs in families, and children of asthmatic parents are at increased risk of asthma. Prediction of disease risk is pivotal for the clinician when counselling atopic families. However, this is not always an easy task bearing in mind the vast and ever-increasing knowledge about asthma genetics....... The advent of new genotyping technologies has made it possible to sequence in great detail the human genome for asthma-associated variants, and accordingly, recent decades have witnessed an explosion in the number of rare and common variants associated with disease risk. This review presents an overview...... of methods and advances in asthma genetics in an attempt to help the clinician keep track of the most important knowledge in the field....

  7. Reinventing School-Based Management: A School Board Guide to School-Based Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Darrel W.

    This report critiques the movement to decentralize decision making in public education. It provides an indepth examination of school-based management (SBM) with the aim of revealing why this type of reform seems to have had so little payoff for students. It addresses several key questions: What are the objectives of SBM, and are these objectives…

  8. Parental asthma education and risks for nonadherence to pediatric asthma treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Eva M; Cho, Christine S; Gildengorin, Ginny; Leibovich, Sara A; Morris, Claudia R

    2014-11-01

    Targeted parental education reduces acute visits for pediatric asthma. Whether the use of education sources readily available to parents relates to nonadherence to asthma treatments is uncertain. This study describes asthma education sources and assesses for a relationship to risks for nonadherence. Caregivers of children with asthma completed a cross-sectional survey at 2 sites: a pediatric emergency department (ED) and an asthma clinic (AC). Measured items included the use of 7 education sources (primary care, ED, AC, friends/family, TV, internet, and printed materials), scores of child asthma morbidity, parental asthma knowledge, and risks for nonadherence, the primary outcome. Recruitment site, preferred language (English/Spanish), and demographics were recorded. Descriptive statistics, bivariate analyses, and multivariate regressions were performed. A total of 260 participants, 158 from ED and 102 from AC, used a variety of education sources. They reported 4.1 (2.0) of 13 risk factors for nonadherence, with more risks in ED parents than AC parents (4.8 vs 3.9, P The ED parents worried more about medications and had worse access to primary care. The regression did not show a significant relationship between education sources and risks for nonadherence, but ED recruitment, Spanish language, and worse morbidity contributed to higher risks. The use of more asthma education sources was not associated with reduced risks for nonadherence. Of the education sources, a primary care provider may benefit ED parents, who also need refills and education about medications. Spanish-speaking parents report more risks for nonadherence, warranting further study of Spanish-language asthma education.

  9. Risk factors for death in patients with severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Guedes Oliva Fernandes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for death among patients with severe asthma. METHODS: This was a nested case-control study. Among the patients with severe asthma treated between December of 2002 and December of 2010 at the Central Referral Outpatient Clinic of the Bahia State Asthma Control Program, in the city of Salvador, Brazil, we selected all those who died, as well as selecting other patients with severe asthma to be used as controls (at a ratio of 1:4. Data were collected from the medical charts of the patients, home visit reports, and death certificates. RESULTS: We selected 58 cases of deaths and 232 control cases. Most of the deaths were attributed to respiratory causes and occurred within a health care facility. Advanced age, unemployment, rhinitis, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, long-standing asthma, and persistent airflow obstruction were common features in both groups. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender, FEV1 pre-bronchodilator < 60% of predicted, and the lack of control of asthma symptoms were significantly and independently associated with mortality in this sample of patients with severe asthma. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of outpatients with severe asthma, the deaths occurred predominantly due to respiratory causes and within a health care facility. Lack of asthma control and male gender were risk factors for mortality.

  10. Diet and Asthma: Is It Time to Adapt Our Message?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Guilleminault

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic respiratory disorder which is associated with airway inflammation. Environmental factors, in association with genetic susceptibility, play a critical role in asthma pathophysiology. Inhaled allergens, smoke exposure, indoor and outdoor air pollution are common triggers of asthma symptoms. Although the role of diet has clearly established mechanisms in diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, it is not commonly identified as a causal factor in asthma. However, some dietary patterns, such as the Western diet, which includes a high intake of refined grains, processed and red meats, and desserts, have pro-inflammatory effects. On the contrary, the Mediterranean diet, with high intake of fruits and vegetables has anti-inflammatory properties. The influence of food on asthma outcomes is of growing interest, but dietary habits of asthma patients are not commonly investigated in clinical practice. In this review, we focus on the impact of diet on asthma risk and asthma control. We also detail the influence of diet on obese patients with asthma.

  11. Asthma control during the year after bronchial thermoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Gerard; Thomson, Neil C.; Rubin, Adalberto S.

    2007-01-01

    scheduled 2-week periods of abstinence from LABA at 3, 6, and 12 months. Airflow, airway responsiveness, asthma symptoms, the number of symptom-free days, use of rescue medication, and scores on the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) were also assessed....... RESULTS: The mean rate of mild exacerbations, as compared with baseline, was reduced in the bronchial-thermoplasty group but was unchanged in the control group (change in frequency per subject per week, -0.16+/-0.37 vs. 0.04+/-0.29; P=0.005). At 12 months, there were significantly greater improvements......-thermoplasty group than in the control group but were similar during the period from 6 weeks to 12 months after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchial thermoplasty in subjects with moderate or severe asthma results in an improvement in asthma control. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00214526 [ClinicalTrials.gov].)....

  12. What's an Asthma Action Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español What's an Asthma Action Plan? KidsHealth / For Parents / What's an Asthma Action Plan? ... acción contra el asma? What's an Asthma Action Plan? An asthma action plan (or management plan) is ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Health Topic: Allergy Health Topic: Asthma Health Topic: Asthma in Children Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Educational Resources (12 links) American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: Allergies Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: What ...

  14. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth / For Teens / Smoking and Asthma Print en español Fumar y el asma Does Smoking Make Asthma Worse? Yes. If you have asthma, ...

  15. ASTHMA AND VIRAL INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sh. Macharadze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most common pathogens of acute respiratory diseases — most often causing mild symptoms of common cold: cough, runny nose, temperature increases. At the same time, 1/3 of children have the following symptoms of lower respiratory tract disorders: shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, respiratory failure. Virus-induced wheezing are risk factors for development of asthma in childhood. Recent clinical and scientific data suggest: the more difficult are viral respiratory infections in young children, the higher their risk of asthma later on. Another feature is that children with allergic diseases are much more likely to have viral respiratory infections(and with longer clinical course, compared with children without atopy. The use of ibuprofen is safe for children over 3 months, including suffering from bronchial asthma.

  16. Asthma Control and Its Relationship with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Teodorescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives. Asthma in older individuals is poorly understood. We aimed to characterize the older asthma phenotype and test its association with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Pulmonary and Asthma/Allergy clinics. Participants. 659 asthma subjects aged 18–59 years (younger and 154 aged 60–75 (older. Measurements. Sleep Apnea scale of Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SA-SDQ, asthma severity step (1–4, severe if step 3 or 4, established OSA diagnosis, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP use, and comorbidities. Results. Older versus younger had worse control, as assessed by asthma step, lung function, and inhaled corticosteroid use. Among older subjects, after controlling for known asthma aggravators, OSA diagnosis was the only factor robustly associated with severe asthma: on average, OSA was associated with nearly 7 times greater likelihood of severe asthma in an older individual (OR=6.67. This relationship was of greater magnitude than in younger subjects (OR=2.16. CPAP use attenuated the likelihood of severe asthma in older subjects by 91% (P=0.005, much more than in the younger asthmatics. Conclusion. Diagnosed OSA increases the risk for worse asthma control in older patients, while CPAP therapy may have greater impact on asthma outcomes. Unrecognized OSA may be a reason for poor asthma control, particularly among older patients.

  17. Clinical significance of changes of plasma motilin and serum gastrin levels in children with bronchial asthma complicated with gastro-esophageal reflux (GER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xixiu; Li Lusheng; Chi Liuying; Zhao Xin; Mao Hongyu; Zhu Weiwei; Wang Jun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between changes of blood levels of motilin gastrin and development of GER in children with bronchial asthma. Methods: Altogether 98 children with various forms of bronchial asthma were studied, in which 40 patients were complicated with symptomatic GER. Serum gastrin and plasma motilin levels were measured with RIA in all these 98 children and 30 controls. Barium swallow was performed in 76 children (including all the 40 with symptomatic GER) and anatomic GER was demonstrated in 31 patients (all with symptomatic GER except 4 in young infants who could not tell about symptom). No anatomic GER was shown in children without GER symptoms. Results: The blood levels of motilin and gastrin in all patients with symptomatic GER (barium swallow positive or not) were significantly lower than those in patients without GER symptoms and controls (P<0. 001). The hormone levels in asthmatic children without GER symptoms were still significantly lower than those in controls (P<0. 01). Conclusion: Plasma motilin and serum gastrin levels were markedly decreased in asthmatic children, especially in those with symptomatic and/or anatomic GER. Lowered motilin and gastrin levels might lead to development of GER and GER could further aggravate the attack of asthma. (authors)

  18. Tratamiento y seguimiento de adultos con asma bronquial en las clínicas de la capital de Namibia Treatment and follow-up of adults with bronchial asthma in the clinics from the capital of Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Oller Legrá

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se hizo un estudio descriptivo y transversal de 196 pacientes con asma bronquial, atendidos durante el 2007 en las clínicas de Katutura (Namibia, para determinar algunos aspectos biomédicos y sociales relacionados con esa afección en los integrantes de la casuística. En la serie predominaron el sexo femenino, los grupos etarios de 25 a 44 años, el esquema terapéutico basado en broncodilatadores y esteroides, así como la ausencia de una terapia higienoambiental y rehabilitadora. De igual manera, no hubo seguimiento clínico y tratamiento adecuados según el grado de asma bronquial existente y las acciones de promoción de salud resultaron escasas.A descriptive and cross-sectional study of 196 patients with bronchial asthma was carried out. They were assisted in the clinics of Katutura (Namibia, during 2007 in order to determine some social and biomedical aspects related to this disorder in the members of the case material. In the series prevailed the female sex, the age groups from 25 to 44 years old, the therapeutical outline based on bronchodilators and steroids, as well as the lack of a rehabilitation and hygiene-environmental therapy. Similarly, there was neither appropriate clinical follow-up nor treatment according to the degree of existing bronchial asthma and there were just a few health promotion actions.

  19. Precision medicine in allergic disease-food allergy, drug allergy, and anaphylaxis-PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, A; Lemanske, R F; Castells, M; Torres, M J; Khan, D; Simon, H-U; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Burks, W; Poulsen, L K; Sampson, H A; Worm, M; Nadeau, K C

    2017-07-01

    This consensus document summarizes the current knowledge on the potential for precision medicine in food allergy, drug allergy, and anaphylaxis under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is a joint effort of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, which aims to synchronize the European and American approaches to allergy care. Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment based on disease endotypes, which are phenotypic subclasses associated with specific mechanisms underlying the disease. Although significant progress has been made in defining endotypes for asthma, definitions of endotypes for food and drug allergy or for anaphylaxis lag behind. Progress has been made in discovery of biomarkers to guide a precision medicine approach to treatment of food and drug allergy, but further validation and quantification of these biomarkers are needed to allow their translation into practice in the clinical management of allergic disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Understanding what asthma plans mean: a linguistic analysis of terminology used in published texts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Nicola; Pinnock, Hilary; Wilson, Caroline; Hoskins, Gaylor; Jepson, Ruth; Wyke, Sally; Sheikh, Aziz

    2011-06-01

    To identify from the literature what terms are used for 'asthma plans', with what meaning, and in what context(s). Linguistic analysis of a selected body of asthma literature from 1989-2009. A wide range of asthma plan terminology was evident, with terms such as 'action plans', 'self-management plans' and 'treatment plans' being applied inconsistently and synonymously. For individual patients the term 'asthma plan' can describe a clinically-determined list of prescribed medication, an agreed plan to guide self-management of changing symptoms, or a more holistic 'living with asthma' plan. In some contexts the term 'asthma plan' was also used to describe an organisational system of care, which causes further ambiguity. Within the literature, a plethora of terms is used inconsistently and with varied meaning. This is a potential, but previously unrecognised, barrier to asthma plan implementation. A taxonomy of asthma plans and a standardised definitions of terms is required.

  1. Effects of exercise and diet in nonobese asthma patients - a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, Louise Lindhardt; Meteran, Howraman; Hostrup, Morten

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral interventions focusing on exercise and healthy diet improve asthma control in obese patients with asthma, but whether these interventions can lead to improvements in nonobese patients remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: In a randomized, controlled parallel-group design, we studied...... the effects of an 8-week intervention of either exercise (high-intensity interval training), diet (high protein/low glycemic index), or a combination of the 2, on asthma control and clinical outcomes in nonobese patients with asthma. METHODS: Nonobese adult patients with asthma (n = 149) were randomized to 1...... of 4 groups: an exercise group, a diet group, an exercise + diet group, or a control group. Outcomes included Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score, asthma-related quality-of-life (Asthma-Related Quality-of-Life Questionnaire [AQLQ]) score, inflammatory cell counts in induced sputum, FEV1...

  2. Usefulness of antioxidant drugs in bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawad, F.H.; Atabee, H.G.A.; Sahib, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a clinical syndrome with possible correlation to oxidative stress, therefore the effectiveness of some antioxidant drugs has been studied in management of chronic bronchial asthma. Methods: This study was carried out in the Al- Kadhimia Teaching Hospital between December 2008 to May 2009 on 56 patients of both sexes who were randomly allocated to 7 groups, plus 10 healthy volunteers as control group. Each group was given one of the following drugs: vitamin E, vitamin C, combination of vitamin E and C, selenium, zinc, allopurinol and garlic oil, in addition to their classical treatment of asthma and their pulmonary function tests were conducted as well as measuring the levels of serum zinc, calcium, and malondialdehyde (MDA) before and after treatment. Results: All asthmatic patients were suffering from oxidative stress and this was detected by measuring the level of serum MDA which was 2-3 folds more than the control group, and all antioxidants except allopurinol showed a beneficial effect of different degrees in the pulmonary function tests accompanied with clinical improvement of patients' condition and marked decrease in the number of daily attacks. Antioxidants can compensate the oxidative stress that correlates with asthma, can reduce the symptoms of asthma, and improve pulmonary functions. (author)

  3. Defining asthma and assessing asthma outcomes using electronic health record data: a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sallakh, Mohammad A; Vasileiou, Eleftheria; Rodgers, Sarah E; Lyons, Ronan A; Sheikh, Aziz; Davies, Gwyneth A

    2017-06-01

    There is currently no consensus on approaches to defining asthma or assessing asthma outcomes using electronic health record-derived data. We explored these approaches in the recent literature and examined the clarity of reporting.We systematically searched for asthma-related articles published between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015, extracted the algorithms used to identify asthma patients and assess severity, control and exacerbations, and examined how the validity of these outcomes was justified.From 113 eligible articles, we found significant heterogeneity in the algorithms used to define asthma (n=66 different algorithms), severity (n=18), control (n=9) and exacerbations (n=24). For the majority of algorithms (n=106), validity was not justified. In the remaining cases, approaches ranged from using algorithms validated in the same databases to using nonvalidated algorithms that were based on clinical judgement or clinical guidelines. The implementation of these algorithms was suboptimally described overall.Although electronic health record-derived data are now widely used to study asthma, the approaches being used are significantly varied and are often underdescribed, rendering it difficult to assess the validity of studies and compare their findings. Given the substantial growth in this body of literature, it is crucial that scientific consensus is reached on the underlying definitions and algorithms. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  4. Discovering Pediatric Asthma Phenotypes on the Basis of Response to Controller Medication Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mindy K; Yoon, Jinsung; van der Schaar, Auke; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Pediatric asthma has variable underlying inflammation and symptom control. Approaches to addressing this heterogeneity, such as clustering methods to find phenotypes and predict outcomes, have been investigated. However, clustering based on the relationship between treatment and clinical outcome has not been performed, and machine learning approaches for long-term outcome prediction in pediatric asthma have not been studied in depth. Our objectives were to use our novel machine learning algorithm, predictor pursuit (PP), to discover pediatric asthma phenotypes on the basis of asthma control in response to controller medications, to predict longitudinal asthma control among children with asthma, and to identify features associated with asthma control within each discovered pediatric phenotype. We applied PP to the Childhood Asthma Management Program study data (n = 1,019) to discover phenotypes on the basis of asthma control between assigned controller therapy groups (budesonide vs. nedocromil). We confirmed PP's ability to discover phenotypes using the Asthma Clinical Research Network/Childhood Asthma Research and Education network data. We next predicted children's asthma control over time and compared PP's performance with that of traditional prediction methods. Last, we identified clinical features most correlated with asthma control in the discovered phenotypes. Four phenotypes were discovered in both datasets: allergic not obese (A + /O - ), obese not allergic (A - /O + ), allergic and obese (A + /O + ), and not allergic not obese (A - /O - ). Of the children with well-controlled asthma in the Childhood Asthma Management Program dataset, we found more nonobese children treated with budesonide than with nedocromil (P = 0.015) and more obese children treated with nedocromil than with budesonide (P = 0.008). Within the obese group, more A + /O + children's asthma was well controlled with nedocromil than with budesonide (P = 0.022) or with placebo

  5. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Triggers Allergens and Allergic Asthma Tobacco Smoke Air Pollution Indoor Air Quality Respiratory Infections Pneumococcal Disease Flu (Influenza) Exercise Weather Asthma Symptoms Asthma Diagnosis ...

  6. Asthma and overweight/obese: double trouble for urban children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenthal, Elise N; Fagnano, Maria; Cook, Stephen; Halterman, Jill S

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of overweight/obese versus normal weight on symptoms, activity limitation and health care utilization among a group of urban children with persistent asthma. Data were obtained from the School Based Asthma Therapy trial. We enrolled 530 children ages 3-10 with persistent asthma from 2006 to 2009 (response rate: 74%). We conducted in-home interviews to assess symptoms and health care utilization. We measured height and weight in school nurse offices to determine BMI percentile, and compared normal weight children to overweight/obese (BMI >85th percentile) children. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used. We collected BMI data from 472 children (89%); 49% were overweight/obese. When controlling for child race, child ethnicity, intervention group, caregiver age and screen time, overweight/obese children had more days with asthma symptoms (4.25 versus 3.42/2 weeks, p = 0.035) and more activity limitation (3.43 versus 2.55/2 weeks, p = 0.013) compared to normal weight children. Overweight/obese children were more likely to have had an ED visit or hospitalization for any reason (47% versus 36%, OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.01, 2.19), and there was a trend for overweight/obese children to have more acute asthma visits in the past year (1.68 versus 1.31, p = 0.090). Overweight/obese children were not more likely to be taking a daily preventive inhaled corticosteroid (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.68, 1.56). Overweight/obese children with persistent asthma experience more asthma symptoms, activity limitation and health care utilization compared to normal weight children, with no increased use of inhaled corticosteroids. Further efforts are needed to improve the health of these children.

  7. Tobaksrygning og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients with ast......Cigarette smoking is a well-known health hazard, probably not least for patients suffering from asthma. This review gives a short overview of the effects of passive and active smoking on the inception and outcome with of longitudinal changes in the lung function and mortality of patients...... with asthma. Substantial evidence suggests that smoking affects asthma adversely. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, especially maternal smoking in children, may be a significant risk factor for asthma. Such exposure in patients with established asthma is not only associated with more severe symptoms......, but also with a poorer quality of life, reduced lung function, and increased utilisation of health care including hospital admissions. Active smoking does not appear to be a significant risk factor for asthma, but is associated with a worse outcome with regard to both longitudinal changes in lung function...

  8. Epidemiological Trends in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm R Sears

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Many markers of asthma morbidity have shown substantial increases over the past two decades, including family physician visits, use of anti-asthma medications, emergency room visits and hospital admissions. The reported prevalence of diagnosed asthma and of wheezing has increased, especially in children, with accompanying evidence of increased atopy and increased airway responsiveness. Allergen exposure and parental smoking are significant risk factors for childhood wheezing, whereas the influence of outdoor air pollution is uncertain. Increasing use of beta-agonist treatment, which appears to increase the severity of asthma by increasing early and late responses to allergen, may contribute to increased morbidity and mortality, especially if potent beta-agonists are used. Risk factors for asthma mortality include age, smoking, allergy and airway lability, as well as over-reliance on beta-agonists and poor compliance with other aspects of treatment. Following withdrawal of the potent beta-agonist fenoterol in New Zealand, both hospital admissions and mortality from asthma fell abruptly. Continued patient and physician education, with emphasis on avoidance of risk factors and use of appropriate treatment, should reduce morbidity and mortality from asthma in Canada.

  9. Serum progranulin as an indicator of neutrophilic airway inflammation and asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So Young; Hong, Gyong Hwa; Park, Sunjoo; Shin, Bomi; Yoon, Sun-Young; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom; Cho, You Sook

    2016-12-01

    Progranulin, a protein secreted from the airway epithelium, is known to attenuate the downstream cascade of neutrophilic inflammation in particular. We hypothesized that progranulin may have a role in inflammatory regulation in asthma. To investigate the association between serum progranulin levels and various clinical features in patients with asthma. Serum samples and clinical data of 475 patients with asthma and 35 healthy controls at a tertiary referral hospital and its affiliated health promotion center were collected. Serum progranulin levels were compared between patients with asthma and healthy controls and then were compared within the patients with asthma in terms of pulmonary function and measures of inflammatory status. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with severity of asthma. Serum progranulin levels were significantly lower in the asthma group than in healthy group and were positively correlated with prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted within patients with asthma. We found a negative correlation between serum progranulin levels and blood neutrophil counts. Multivariate analysis revealed that higher serum progranulin levels were associated with a lower risk of severe asthma (odds ratio, 0.888; 95% confidence interval, 0.846-0.932; P progranulin remains unknown, we suggest that serum progranulin may be an indicator of severe asthma with airflow limitation. Future studies with comprehensive airway sampling strategies are warranted to clarify its role, particularly in neutrophilic asthma. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Validated questionnaires heighten detection of difficult asthma comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Naghmeh; Tay, Tunn Ren; Hore-Lacy, Fiona; Stirling, Robert; Hoy, Ryan; Dabscheck, Eli; Hew, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Multiple extra-pulmonary comorbidities contribute to difficult asthma, but their diagnosis can be challenging and time consuming. Previous data on comorbidity detection have focused on clinical assessment, which may miss certain conditions. We aimed to locate relevant validated screening questionnaires to identify extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma, and evaluate their performance during a difficult asthma evaluation. MEDLINE was searched to identify key extra-pulmonary comorbidities that contribute to difficult asthma. Screening questionnaires were chosen based on ease of use, presence of a cut-off score, and adequate validation to help systematically identify comorbidities. In a consecutive series of 86 patients referred for systematic evaluation of difficult asthma, questionnaires were administered prior to clinical consultation. Six difficult asthma comorbidities and corresponding screening questionnaires were found: sinonasal disease (allergic rhinitis and chronic rhinosinusitis), vocal cord dysfunction, dysfunctional breathing, obstructive sleep apnea, anxiety and depression, and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. When the questionnaires were added to the referring clinician's impression, the detection of all six comorbidities was significantly enhanced. The average time for questionnaire administration was approximately 40 minutes. The use of validated screening questionnaires heightens detection of comorbidities in difficult asthma. The availability of data from a battery of questionnaires prior to consultation can save time and allow clinicians to systematically assess difficult asthma patients and to focus on areas of particular concern. Such an approach would ensure that all contributing comorbidities have been addressed before significant treatment escalation is considered.

  11. Mechanisms Mediating Pediatric Severe Asthma and Potential Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldara Martin Alonso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although a rare disease, severe therapy-resistant asthma in children is a cause of significant morbidity and results in utilization of approximately 50% of health-care resources for asthma. Improving control for children with severe asthma is, therefore, an urgent unmet clinical need. As a group, children with severe asthma have severe and multiple allergies, steroid resistant airway eosinophilia, and significant structural changes of the airway wall (airway remodeling. Omalizumab is currently the only add-on therapy that is licensed for use in children with severe asthma. However, limitations of its use include ineligibility for approximately one-third of patients because of serum IgE levels outside the recommended range and lack of clinical efficacy in a further one-third. Pediatric severe asthma is thus markedly heterogeneous, but our current understanding of the different mechanisms underpinning various phenotypes is very limited. We know that there are distinctions between the factors that drive pediatric and adult disease since pediatric disease develops in the context of a maturing immune system and during lung growth and development. This review summarizes the current data that give insight into the pathophysiology of pediatric severe asthma and will highlight potential targets for novel therapies. It is apparent that in order to identify novel treatments for pediatric severe asthma, the challenge of undertaking mechanistic studies using age appropriate experimental models and airway samples from children needs to be accepted to allow a targeted approach of personalized medicine to be achieved.

  12. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C. Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A.

    2018-01-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy—Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4–5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (pasthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. PMID:26296595

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key research tool for ... other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors and patients. The results ...

  14. Infant wheeze, comorbidities and school age asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Asa; Bergström, Anna; Gustafsson, Per; Thunqvist, Per; Andersson, Niklas; Nordvall, Lennart; Kull, Inger; Wickman, Magnus

    2014-06-01

    Factors associated with early onset of wheeze have been described, but there is limited knowledge on which of these infant wheezers who will have developed asthma in school age. The aim was to identify clinical risk factors for asthma in the 8-yr-old children that wheezed during infancy in a population-based setting. Three thousand two hundred and fifty-one children from a population-based birth cohort followed prospectively from infancy until age 8 yr were included in the study. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Parents reported any wheeze episode before age 2 yr in 823 subjects (25%). Infant wheezers had an almost fourfold risk of asthma at age 8 [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 3.68, 95% CI 2.74-4.96], equivalent to an asthma prevalence of 14% compared with 4% among non-wheezers (p < 0.001). After adjustments for sex, exposure to tobacco smoke and indoor dampness/mould, allergic heredity (aOR 1.53, 95% CI 1.02-2.30), increased frequency of wheeze (aOR 3.41, 95% CI 2.09-5.56 for children with ≥3 episodes compared with ≤2 episodes during the first 2 yr of life), infant eczema (aOR 2.31, 95% CI 1.52-3.49), and recurrent abdominal pain (aOR 2.33, 95% CI 1.30-4.16) remained risk factors for school age asthma in the infant wheezing group. Among infant wheezers, allergic heredity, increased severity of wheeze, infant eczema, and recurrent abdominal pain were independent risk factors for asthma at age 8 yr. Among children with three or four of these risk factors, 38% had asthma at school age. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Novel monoclonal treatments in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteran, Howraman; Meteran, Hanieh; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Backer, Vibeke

    2017-12-01

    To provide a general overview of the current biological treatments and discuss their potential anti-asthmatic effects. We reviewed articles in PubMed found using the search words "Asthma/therapy AND antibodies, monoclonal/therapeutic use AND cytokines." Only articles published in English since 2000 were considered. The search identified 29 studies; 8 additional studies were found by hand search, generating 37 studies. Of the 37 studies investigating biological treatments of asthma, 5 were on the effects of anti-IgE (omalizumab); 12 on anti-IL-5; 8 on anti-IL-13; 5 on anti-IL-4R-α; 3 on anti-IL-9; one on TNF-α; one on anti-IL-2R-α; one on TSLP (Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin); and one on OX40L. Sample sizes ranged from 3 to 943 participants. Studies of therapies targeting IgE, IL-2, IL4R-α, IL-5, and IL-13 showed some efficacy, whereas those targeting TSLP, IL-9, and TNF-α lacked convincing effectiveness. Research on the biological treatment of asthma shows promising results. While anti-IgE (omalizumab) has been used in the treatment of asthma for some years, anti-IL-5 has recently been approved for use. The efficacy of results of other large studies with a longer duration is needed to draw a firm conclusion. Such studies should not only focus on clinical outcomes, but also consider asthma-related quality of life. Knowledge on the asthma phenotypes and identification of biomarkers associated with these will be useful for physicians considering the right treatment for the asthma patient.

  16. Advances and Evolving Concepts in Allergic Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Hui-Ying; Li, Evan; Landers, Cameron; Nguyen, An; Kheradmand, Farrah; Knight, J Morgan; Corry, David B

    2018-02-01

    Allergic asthma is a heterogeneous disorder that defies a unanimously acceptable definition, but is generally recognized through its highly characteristic clinical expression of dyspnea and cough accompanied by clinical data that document reversible or exaggerated airway constriction and obstruction. The generally rising prevalence of asthma in highly industrialized societies despite significant therapeutic advances suggests that the fundamental cause(s) of asthma remain poorly understood. Detailed analyses of both the indoor (built) and outdoor environments continue to support the concept that not only inhaled particulates, especially carbon-based particulate pollution, pollens, and fungal elements, but also many noxious gases and chemicals, especially biologically derived byproducts such as proteinases, are essential to asthma pathogenesis. Phthalates, another common class of chemical pollutant found in the built environment, are emerging as potentially important mediators or attenuators of asthma. Other biological products such as endotoxin have also been confirmed to be protective in both the indoor and outdoor contexts. Proasthmatic factors are believed to activate, and in some instances initiate, pathologic inflammatory cascades through complex interactions with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expressed on many cell types, but especially airway epithelial cells. PRRs initiate the release of proallergic cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-33, IL-25, and others that coordinate activation of innate lymphoid cells type 2 (ILC2), T helper type 2 cells, and immunoglobulin E-secreting B cells that together promote additional inflammation and the major airway remodeling events (airway hyperresponsiveness, mucus hypersecretion) that promote airway obstruction. Proteinases, with airway fungi and viruses being potentially important sources, are emerging as critically important initiators of these inflammatory cascades in part through their effects on clotting

  17. Animal models of asthma: utility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aun MV

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Vivolo Aun,1,2 Rafael Bonamichi-Santos,1,2 Fernanda Magalhães Arantes-Costa,2 Jorge Kalil,1 Pedro Giavina-Bianchi1 1Clinical Immunology and Allergy Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil, 2Laboratory of Experimental Therapeutics (LIM20, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Clinical studies in asthma are not able to clear up all aspects of disease pathophysiology. Animal models have been developed to better understand these mechanisms and to evaluate both safety and efficacy of therapies before starting clinical trials. Several species of animals have been used in experimental models of asthma, such as Drosophila, rats, guinea pigs, cats, dogs, pigs, primates and equines. However, the most common species studied in the last two decades is mice, particularly BALB/c. Animal models of asthma try to mimic the pathophysiology of human disease. They classically include two phases: sensitization and challenge. Sensitization is traditionally performed by intraperitoneal and subcutaneous routes, but intranasal instillation of allergens has been increasingly used because human asthma is induced by inhalation of allergens. Challenges with allergens are performed through aerosol, intranasal or intratracheal instillation. However, few studies have compared different routes of sensitization and challenge. The causative allergen is another important issue in developing a good animal model. Despite being more traditional and leading to intense inflammation, ovalbumin has been replaced by aeroallergens, such as house dust mites, to use the allergens that cause human disease. Finally, researchers should define outcomes to be evaluated, such as serum-specific antibodies, airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodeling. The present review analyzes the animal models of asthma, assessing differences between species, allergens and routes

  18. Validation of the Spanish and English versions of the asthma portion of the Brief Pediatric Asthma Screen Plus among Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Carolyn A; Quinn, Kelly; Wolf, Raoul; Mosnaim, Giselle; Shalowitz, Madeleine

    2005-07-01

    The health and health care needs of non-English-speaking Hispanic families with children are poorly understood, in part because they are often excluded from research owing to language barriers. Instruments that are valid in English and Spanish are necessary to accurately evaluate the magnitude of asthma prevalence and morbidity among Hispanics. To establish the sensitivity and specificity of the English and Spanish versions of the asthma portion of the Brief Pediatric Asthma Screen Plus (BPAS+) in a low-income Hispanic population. The validation sample consisted of 145 children whose parents completed the BPAS+ in Spanish and 78 whose parents completed it in English. Bilingual clinicians conducted the examinations on which the clinical assessments were based. We compared the BPAS+ results with the clinical assessment findings to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the BPAS + among Hispanics in terms of identifying children who warrant further medical evaluation for asthma. The sensitivity and specificity of the asthma portion of the Spanish BPAS+ were 74% and 86%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the asthma portion of the English BPAS+ were 61% and 83%, respectively. The asthma portion of the BPAS+, a valid screen for identifying children who are in need of further evaluation for potentially undiagnosed asthma, is valid for low-income Hispanics in Spanish and English. As the Hispanic population continues to grow, it is imperative that researchers have English and Spanish instruments that are valid for this population.

  19. Precision medicine in allergic disease-food allergy, drug allergy, and anaphylaxis-PRACTALL document of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muraro, A; Lemanske, Robert F; Castells, M

    2017-01-01

    This consensus document summarizes the current knowledge on the potential for precision medicine in food allergy, drug allergy, and anaphylaxis under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is a joint effort of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the ......This consensus document summarizes the current knowledge on the potential for precision medicine in food allergy, drug allergy, and anaphylaxis under the auspices of the PRACTALL collaboration platform. PRACTALL is a joint effort of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology...... and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, which aims to synchronize the European and American approaches to allergy care. Precision medicine is an emerging approach for disease treatment based on disease endotypes, which are phenotypic subclasses associated with specific mechanisms underlying...

  20. Clinical and immunological profile of children aged 5-9 years with persistent egg allergy before oral immunotherapy with egg. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, L; Martin-Muñoz, M F; Martorell, C; Belver, M T; Alonso Lebrero, E; Zapatero, L; Fuentes, V; Piqué, M; Plaza, A; Muñoz, C; Martorell, A; Blasco, C; Villa, B; Gómez, C; Nevot, S; García, J M; Madero, R

    2018-05-24

    In children with egg protein allergy (EA), the probability of overcoming the allergy decreases with age, and the possibility of suffering severe adverse reactions as a consequence of dietetic transgressions results in worsened quality of life. One treatment option in such cases is oral immunotherapy (OIT) with foods. We present a cohort of children with EA scheduled for OIT with pasteurized raw egg white, describing their clinical and allergic characteristics before the start of OIT. The median age was six years, and 93% of the patients also suffered other allergies (58% asthma and 38.6% allergy to more than two food groups). In the last year, 14.8% had suffered a severe reaction due to dietetic transgression with egg. The median IgE specific of egg white titer was 38.5kU/l. A double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge with cooked egg white was performed, and if the test proved positive, it was repeated with pasteurized raw egg white. The mean symptoms-provoking dose was 1.26g and 0.55g for cooked egg white and raw egg white, respectively. An IgE specific of ovomucoid titer of <2.045kU/l differentiated those patients that tolerated cooked egg white. OIT with egg is regarded as an option in patients with persistent egg allergy. In the previous challenge test, an IgE specific of ovomucoid titer of <2.045kU/l differentiates those patients that tolerate cooked egg white. Copyright © 2018 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased ultrafine particles and carbon monoxide concentrations are associated with asthma exacerbation among urban children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kristin A.; Halterman, Jill S.; Hopke, Philip K.; Fagnano, Maria; Rich, David Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Increased air pollutant concentrations have been linked to several asthma-related outcomes in children, including respiratory symptoms, medication use, and hospital visits. However, few studies have examined effects of ultrafine particles in a pediatric population. Our primary objective was to examine the effects of ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles on asthma exacerbation among urban children and determine whether consistent treatment with inhaled corticosteroids could attenuate these effects. We also explored the relationship between asthma exacerbation and ambient concentrations of accumulation mode particles, fine particles (≤ 2.5 micrograms [μm]; PM2.5), carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone. We hypothesized that increased 1 to 7 day concentrations of ultrafine particles and other pollutants would be associated with increases in the relative odds of an asthma exacerbation, but that this increase in risk would be attenuated among children receiving school-based corticosteroid therapy. Methods We conducted a pilot study using data from 3–10 year-old children participating in the School-Based Asthma Therapy trial. Using a time-stratified case-crossover design and conditional logistic regression, we estimated the relative odds of a pediatric asthma visit treated with prednisone (n=96 visits among 74 children) associated with increased pollutant concentrations in the previous 7 days. We re-ran these analyses separately for children receiving medications through the school-based intervention and children in a usual care control group. Results Interquartile range increases in ultrafine particles and carbon monoxide concentrations in the previous 7 days were associated with increases in the relative odds of a pediatric asthma visit, with the largest increases observed for 4-day mean ultrafine particles (interquartile range=2088 p/cm3; OR=1.27; 95% CI=0.90–1.79) and 7-day mean carbon monoxide (interquartile range=0.17 ppm; OR=1.63; 95

  2. Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mechanistic Indicators of Childhood Asthma (MICA) Study has been designed to incorporate state-of-the-art technologies to examine the physiological and environmental factors that interact to increase the risk of asthmatic responses. MICA is primarily a clinically-bases obser...

  3. Short or Long End of the Lever? Associations between Provider Communication of the "Asthma-Action Plan" and Outpatient Revisits for Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Mehta, Renuka; Rethemeyer, R Karl; Ferrang, Carole; Dennis, Clifton; Redd, Vickie

    2015-10-01

    At the Children's Hospital of Georgia (CHOG), we found that outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma were significantly above national norms. According to the NIH, costly hospital revisits for asthma can be prevented through guidelines-based self-management of asthma, central to which, is the use of a written Asthma-Action Plan (AAP). The asthma services literature has emphasized the role of the healthcare provider in promoting asthma self-management using the AAP, to prevent hospital revisits. On the other hand, the asthma policy literature has emphasized the need for community-based interventions to promote asthma self-management. A gap remains in understanding the extent of leverage that healthcare providers may have in preventing hospital revisits for asthma, through effective communication of AAP in the outpatient setting. Our study sought to address this gap. We conducted a 6-month intervention to implement "patient-and-family-centered communication of the AAP" in CHOG outpatient clinics, based on the "change-management" theoretical framework. Provider communication of AAP was assessed through a survey of "Parent Understanding of the Child's AAP." A quasi-experimental approach was used to measure outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma, pre- and post-intervention. Survey results showed that provider communication of the AAP was unanimously perceived highly positively by parents of pediatric asthma patients, across various metrics of patient-centered care. However, there were no statistically significant differences in outpatient "revisit behavior" for pediatric asthma between pre- and post-intervention periods after controlling for several demographic variables. Additionally, revisits remained significantly above national norms. Results suggest limited potential of "effective provider communication of AAP," in reducing outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma; and indicate need for broader community-based interventions to address patient life variables

  4. Asthma disease management and the respiratory therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallstrom, Thomas J; Myers, Timothy R

    2008-06-01

    The role of the respiratory therapist (RT) is expanding with the growing acceptance and use of the disease-management paradigm for managing chronic diseases. RTs are key members of the asthma disease-management team, in acute-care settings, patients' homes, out-patient clinics, emergency departments, and in the community. Utilizing RTs as disease managers allows patients to be treated faster and more appropriately, discharged to home sooner, and decreases hospital admissions. RT are leaders in the emerging field of asthma disease management.

  5. Asthma - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed February 28, 2018. Durrani SR, Busse WW. Management of asthma in adolescents and adults. In: Adkinson NF Jr, Bochner BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  6. Asthma and school

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... teacher School nurse School office Gym teachers and coaches Alternative Names Asthma action plan - school; Wheezing - school; ... Children Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  7. Metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Jenny V; Moreno, Dolores; Garcia, Alexis H; De Sanctis, Juan B

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a syndrome that involves at least three disorders dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity and/or hypertension. MetS has been associated with several chronic diseases in the adulthood; however, in the recent years, the syndrome was redefined in children. Girls with early menarche and asthma, and children with MetS and asthma that reach adulthood appear to have higher risk to develop severe or difficult to control asthma and a higher probability to suffer cardiovascular diseases. It has been proposed that patients with MetS and endocrinological disorders should be considered a different entity in which pharmacologic treatment should be adjusted according to the individual. Recent patents on the field have addressed new issues on how endocrine control should be managed along with asthma therapeutics. In the near future, new approaches should decrease the high morbidity and mortality associated to these types of patients.

  8. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... warm, moist air helps keep asthma symptoms away. Football, baseball, and other sports with periods when you ... herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any ...

  9. Exercise and Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bursts of energy are also recommended. These include: • Hiking • Baseball • Golf • Walking • Leisure biking Because cold, dry ... plan. Exercise is important and provides many health benefits, especially for people with asthma. So don’t ...

  10. Obesity and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Baruwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic disorder affecting millions of people worldwide. The prevalence of asthma is around 300 million and is expected to increase another 100 million by 2025. Obesity, on the other hand, also affects a large number of individuals. Overweight in adults is defined when body mass index (BMI is between 25 to 30 kg/m 2 and obesity when the BMI >30 kg/m 2 . It has been a matter of interest for researchers to find a relation between these two conditions. This knowledge will provide a new insight into the management of both conditions. At present, obese asthma patients may be considered a special category and it is important to assess the impact of management of obesity on asthma symptoms.

  11. Work-related asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occupational exposure is 16% and for work-exacerbated asthma around 10%.3,4 ... Mohamed Jeebhay is a Professor of Occupational Medicine at the University of Cape Town. He convenes .... (obtain material safety data sheets. (MSDs) for ...

  12. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of ß2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of ß-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of ß2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  13. Zoneterapi og asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brygge, Thor; Heinig, John Hilligsøe; Collins, Philippa

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many patients with asthma seek alternative or adjunctive therapies. One such modality is reflexology. Our aim was to examine the popular claim that reflexology treatment benefits bronchial asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten weeks of either active or simulated (placebo) reflexology were...... compared in an otherwise blind, controlled trial of 40 patients with asthma. RESULTS: Objective lung function tests did not change. Subjective scores and bronchial sensitivity to histamine improved on both regimens, but no differences were found in the groups receiving active or placebo reflexology....... However, a trend in favour of reflexology became significant when a supplementary analysis of symptom diaries was carried out. At the same time a significant pattern compatible with subconscious un-blinding was found. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that reflexology has a specific effect on asthma beyond...

  14. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of β2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  15. Asthma Home Environment Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    This checklist guides home care visitors in identifying environmental asthma triggers most commonly found in homes. It includes sections on the building, home interior and room interior and provides low-cost action steps for remediation.

  16. What Is Asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma is a serious, sometimes life-threatening chronic respiratory disease that affects the quality of life for more ... the public of health risks from outdoor air pollution. The Partner website provides information to help children ...

  17. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Work-related Asthma NCHS Asthma FastStats Survey Questions Resources for Health Professionals and Schools Healthcare Professionals Public Health Professionals School and Childcare Providers CDC Publications on Asthma National Asthma Control Program ...

  18. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Underlying Cause of Death Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination among Children with ... Children aged 5–17 Years Asthma Severity among Adults with Current Asthma Asthma Severity among Children with ...

  19. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Current Asthma Overuse of quick-relief medication among persons with active asthma Use of long-term control medication among persons with active asthma Uncontrolled Asthma among Persons with ...

  20. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In the Workplace Outdoors Management Asthma Action Plan Flu Shots Inhalers Data, Statistics, and Surveillance Most Recent ... AsthmaStats Asthma as the Underlying Cause of Death Flu Vaccination among Adults with Current Asthma Flu Vaccination ...