WorldWideScience

Sample records for school psychology programs

  1. Psychology Students' Interest in Graduate Training: A Need for Partnership among Undergraduate Psychology and Graduate School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinnett, Terry A.; Solomon, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    An initial point of contact for recruitment of qualified persons into school psychology is undergraduate psychology degree programs. Unfortunately, the discipline of school psychology appears to receive at best only cursory coverage in undergraduate psychology texts, curriculum, and discussion by psychology department faculty even though school…

  2. School Psychological Services and Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Mary Jo, Ed.

    1972-01-01

    A variety of court decisions and laws relevant to malpractice and liability of school psychologists are presented. Terms are defined and examples of faulty psychological testing, defamation, withholding information, and inferred imcompetence are provided. Suggestions regarding litigation and legal defenses are made and issues related to…

  3. Play Therapy Training among School Psychology, Social Work, and School Counseling Graduate Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Christina Bechle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined play therapy training across the nation among school psychology, social work, and school counseling graduate training programs. It also compared current training to previous training among school psychology and school counseling programs. A random sample of trainers was selected from lists of graduate programs provided by…

  4. Promoting Diversity through Program Websites: A Multicultural Content Analysis of School Psychology Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leann V.; Blake, Jamilia J.; Graves, Scott L.; Vaughan-Jensen, Jessica; Pulido, Ryne; Banks, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of culturally and linguistically diverse students to graduate programs is critical to the overall growth and development of school psychology as a field. Program websites serve as an effective recruitment tool for attracting prospective students, yet there is limited research on how school psychology programs use their websites to…

  5. Scholarly Productivity of School Psychology Faculty Members in Specialist-Level Programs: 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Jeff; Runia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The scholarly productivity of school psychology faculty members in specialist-level only programs was examined. Information was gathered from the School Psychology Program Information portion of the website for the National Association of School Psychologists. A total of 137 specialist-level only school psychology programs were identified.…

  6. Demographic Changes in School Psychology Training Programs between 1997 and 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study seeks to add to the body of knowledge regarding school psychology training programs by analyzing the data of the 2005 National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Graduate Training in School Psychology Database, a national survey of psychology training programs. Program directors of all known existing school…

  7. Social Networking in School Psychology Training Programs: A Survey of Faculty and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.; Goforth, Anisa N.; Segool, Natasha; Burt, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of social networking sites has become an emerging focus in school psychology training, policy, and research. The purpose of the current study is to present data from a survey on social networking among faculty and graduate students in school psychology training programs. A total of 110 faculty and 112 graduate students in school…

  8. Psychology of the scientist: LXXXI. Professional school and traditional program graduates: comparison on measures of achievement in clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, D I; Tomeo, M E; Pointkowski, S R; Mitroff, D; Niederhauser, R N; Siscoe, K

    2000-06-01

    Clinical psychologists who graduated from traditional programs and those who graduated from professional schools were compared on both scientifically and professionally oriented criteria of achievement and recognition. Upon controlling for year of graduation from a doctoral program, the professional school graduates were less likely to be APA fellows, less likely to be on the editorial board of specified research oriented journals in clinical psychology, less likely to have diplomate status in the American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP), less likely to have been president of state psychological associations, and less likely to have been APPIC internship directors.

  9. Canadian Innovation: A Brief History of Canada's First Online School Psychology Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drefs, Michelle A.; Schroeder, Meadow; Hiebert, Bryan; Panayotidis, E. Lisa; Winters, Katherine; Kerr, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a brief historical review and survey of the current landscape of online graduate psychology programs within the Canadian context. Specific focus is given to outlining the establishment and evolution of the first Canadian online professional specialization program in school psychology. The article argues that given the virtual…

  10. Meeting the Needs of Children and Families: Opportunities and Challenges for School Psychology Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael J.; Batsche, George M.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that graduate training programs face challenges, as well as opportunities, in fulfillment of their responsibilities to prepare school psychologists for entry into professional practice. Examines nature and origins of potential changes facing school psychology and discusses adequacy of current training programs. Discusses future implications…

  11. A High School Depression and Suicide Prevention Program: A Collaboration between Health Education and Psychological Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Donna L.; Bradbury, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined a collaboration between health education and psychological services in generating a high school depression and suicide prevention program. The five-component program raised awareness of teen depression and suicide, increased communication about these issues within the school and community, and provided information about available…

  12. Scholarly Productivity and Impact of School Psychology Faculty in APA-Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapin, Sally L.; Kranzler, John H.; Daley, Matt L.

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to conduct a normative assessment of the research productivity and scholarly impact of tenured and tenure-track faculty in school psychology programs accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA). Using the PsycINFO database, productivity and impact were examined for the field as a whole and by…

  13. Navigating Social Networking and Social Media in School Psychology: Ethical and Professional Considerations in Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.

    2014-01-01

    Social networking and social media have undoubtedly proliferated within the past decade, allowing widespread communication and dissemination of user-generated content and information. Some psychology graduate programs, including school psychology, have started to embrace social networking and media for instructional and training purposes; however,…

  14. Article Publications, Journal Outlets, and Article Themes for Current Faculty in APA-Accredited School Psychology Programs: 1995?1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carper, Robin M.; Williams, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    The study addressed three major questions regarding the 1995?1999 journal publications of faculty at school psychology programs accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) as of Sept. 1, 2000: (a) Which program faculties had the strongest records of article publications for 1995?1999? (b) What were the major school psychology and…

  15. Research Productivity and Scholarly Impact of APA-Accredited School Psychology Programs: 2005-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, John H.; Grapin, Sally L.; Daley, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the research productivity and scholarly impact of faculty in APA-accredited school psychology programs using data in the PsycINFO database from 2005 to 2009. We ranked doctoral programs on the basis of authorship credit, number of publications, and number of citations. In addition, we examined the primary publication outlets of…

  16. Internship Attainment and Program Policies: Trends in APA-Accredited School Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Thompson, Miriam E.; Mahoney, Emery

    2015-01-01

    Completion of an internship that is accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) is considered to be to the "gold standard" for health service psychology training programs. The Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) facilitates a Match process between participating applicants and internship…

  17. Professional Preparation in School Psychology: A Summary of Information from Programs in Seven Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Thomas; Hatzichristou, Chryse

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes prominent themes found in descriptions of school psychology programs in Estonia (Kikas, 2014), Greece (Hatzichristou & Polychroni, 2014), Hong Kong (Lam, 2014), Romania (Negovan & Dinca, 2014), Sweden (Schad, 2014), United Kingdom (Wood, 2014), and United States (Joyce & Rossen, 2014). This paper summarizes…

  18. Social Justice Training in School Psychology: Applying Principles of Organizational Consultation to Facilitate Change in Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapin, Sally L.

    2017-01-01

    Scholars and professional organizations have called for an increased emphasis on social justice training in applied psychology graduate programs, including school psychology programs (SPPs). During the past decade, emerging research has identified some features of high-quality social justice education, including a clear program mission statement…

  19. Recruitment of Diverse Students in School Psychology Programs: Direction for Future Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Sherrie L.; Simpson, Chamane M.; Levin, Jacqueline; Hackimer, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Lack of racially, ethnically, and linguistically (REL) diverse school psychologists has been a concern for decades. Recent and rapid increases in student diversity within America's public schools require that school psychology address the longstanding lack of diversity within the field. This article details the demographics of school…

  20. The Practice-oriented Model of «School Psychology» Master's Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andruschenko T.Y.,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We presented the experience in the development and testing the module “Psychological diagnosis of students” of the “School psychology” master program in “Psychological and pedagogical education” training direction. We discussed contemporary contexts of design educational modules that are defined by ideas of cultural-historical approach of the scientific school of L.S. Vygotsky, educational theories and activities of developing education by D.B. Elkonin, V.V. Davydov, collectively distributed educational activity of V.V. Rubtsov. We analyzed the issue of professional competence training in educational psychologists at higher education. We presented the connection between the content of masters training and the requirements of the Professional standard “Teacher-psychologist (the psychologist in education”. Within the context of the network of educational organizations we paid special attention to the content and organization of distributed practice as the basic condition of master’s professional competences formation and their readiness for the implementation of the working activities.

  1. Psychological changes among Muslim students participating in a faith-based school physical activity program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, Virginie; Kahan, David

    2013-12-01

    Some religions espouse doctrines that (in)directly impact physical activity (PA) behavior. Yet limited PA interventions have been tailored to religious minorities. Thus, a formative study was conducted to examine the effect of a faith-based pedometer program (Virtual Umra) on psychological correlates of PA behavior and their contribution to school-time changes in PA among Muslim adolescents. Forty-three (27 girls, 16 boys; M(age) = 12.3 +/- 1.0 years) students at 1 Islamic middle school participated. Prebaseline and postprogram enjoyment and motivation were measured using the shortened PA Enjoyment Scale and the Situational Motivation Scale, respectively. Pedometer step counts were measured daily during a 2-week baseline and 8 weeks of Virtual Umra. The Reliable Change Index and Cohen's d were used to analyze individual- and group-level changes in enjoyment and motivation, respectively. Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance (RM-MANOVA) was used to analyze program and gender effects over time. Partial correlations examined the relationships between psychological correlates and PA change. One third of the sample expressed greater enjoyment postprogram (p motivation was unaffected (p > .05; range, d = - 0.02 to 0.32). RM-MANOVA revealed that boys increased their steps, whereas girls reduced their step number through the program. Enjoyment increased and extrinsic motivation and amotivation decreased. Partial correlations revealed that enjoyment and more self-determined behavioral regulations were positively associated with non-physical education (PE)-day PA change; only intrinsic motivation was positively associated with PE-day PA change. Virtual Umra was associated with increased enjoyment of PA but needs further modification to more positively impact girls' PA.

  2. Measuring School Psychology Trainee Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Adam B.; Mcclure, John; Sealander, Karen; Baker, Courtney N.

    2017-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing need for school psychology training programs to demonstrate their ability to produce competent practitioners. One method of addressing this need is through the assessment of self-efficacy. However, little research on self-efficacy in school psychology exists likely due to the lack of a psychometrically sound measure of…

  3. Manitoba's School Psychology, Circa 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Barry; Bednarczyk, George; Hanson, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    While the geographic landscape of Manitoba has changed very little since the last review of school psychology in Manitoba was published 15 years ago, the school psychology landscape here has changed considerably, and we continue to be alive, well, and flourishing. Two previous articles in the "Canadian Journal of School Psychology"…

  4. Psychology of programming

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    Hoc, J-M

    1991-01-01

    Psychology provides a backdrop for most of the study of human*b1computer interaction. In this volume the psychological issues that pertain to programming, rather than systems design, are examined in four sections: Theoretical and Methodological Issues; Language Design and Skill Acquisition; Expert Programming; and the Future.****The book was inspired by working groups in France and the United Kingdom but also includes work by major North American figures (such as Curtis and Soloway). It is the first comprehensive work on this topic since the early 1980s.

  5. International School Psychology: Psychology's Worldwide Portal to Children and Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    International school psychology is discussed in reference to scholarly and professional development within psychology, the emergence of an international association of school psychology, its efforts to promote school psychology, prevailing characteristics of school psychologists, and additional efforts needed to further enhance its development.…

  6. Intervention Research Productivity from 2005 to 2014: Faculty and University Representation in School Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Umaña, Ileana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify authors and training programs making the most frequent contributions to intervention research published in six school psychology journals ("School Psychology Review," "School Psychology Quarterly," "Journal of School Psychology," "Psychology in the Schools,"…

  7. Credentialing high school psychology teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kenneth A

    2014-09-01

    The National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula (American Psychological Association, 2013b) require a teacher with considerable psychology content knowledge to teach high school psychology courses effectively. In this study, I examined the initial teaching credential requirements for high school psychology teachers in the 50 states plus the District of Columbia. Thirty-four states (the District of Columbia is included as a state) require the social studies credential to teach high school psychology. An analysis of the items on standardized tests used by states to validate the content knowledge required to teach social studies indicates little or no presence of psychology, a reflection of psychology's meager presence in the social studies teacher preparation curricula. Thus, new teachers with the social studies teaching credential are not prepared to teach high school psychology according to the National Standards. Approval of The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards: Guidance for Enhancing the Rigor of K-12 Civics, Economics, Geography, and History (National Council for the Social Studies, 2013) presents an opportunity to advocate for establishing a psychology credential in the 34 states. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Qualitative analysis on the field training program for clinical school counselling―Interview survey on psychology department of the universities having post graduate field training program―

    OpenAIRE

    岡本, 淳子; 佐藤, 秀行; 金, 亜美; 水﨑, 光保

    2016-01-01

     In this study, we have interviewed 20 universities with psychology departments that have the postgraduate field training programs of clinical school counselling for more than a year to find out the currentsituation. The results of the study revealed that the field training programs are implementedthrough various channels, largely categorized into the following types: 1)counselling support to thelocal schools through the board of education; 2)counselling support to the individual students thr...

  9. Undergraduate Psychology Students' Knowledge and Exposure to School Psychology: Suggestions for Diversifying the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Joel O.; Gubi, Aaron A.; Fan, Chung-Hau; Hansmann, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Trainers within school psychology have struggled to recruit racial/ethnic minority graduate students, with a recent demographic survey suggesting that racial/ethnic minorities comprise 9.3% of school-based practitioners (Curtis, Castillo, & Gelley, 2012). Furthermore, research has suggested that school psychology training programs have also…

  10. School Psychology in Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sara; McGonnell, Melissa; Noyes, Amira

    2016-01-01

    Registration as a psychologist in Nova Scotia can be at the master's or doctoral level; however, the Nova Scotia Board of Examiners in Psychology has announced a move to the doctoral degree as the entry-level to practice. Many school psychologists in Nova Scotia practice at the master's level; therefore, this change could affect school psychology…

  11. A Program to Reduce Disruptive Behavior in a School Based Upon a Practical Application of the Adlerian Theory of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Carl G.

    This practicum report describes a program to aid in reducing the incidence of disruptive behavior of students through the use of the Adlerian Theory of Psychology. The report contains a general definition of the problem, which was the reduction of the disruptive student behavior, and the objectives to be achieved from the program. There is a…

  12. A preliminary evaluation of the training effects of a didactic and simulation-based psychological first aid program in students and school counselors in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Sun; You, Sungeun; Choi, Yun-Kyeung; Youn, Hyae-Young; Shin, Hye Sook

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the training effects of a didactic and simulation-based psychological first aid (PFA) program. Based on the competency-based model, the study sought to examine whether the PFA training would enhance knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Study 1 examined the training effects of the PFA program in a sample of undergraduate and graduate students in psychology. Study 2 was conducted with school counselors. In both studies, all participants completed a one-day PFA workshop with a 3-hour didactic lecture and a 3-hour simulation-based practice. Assessments were conducted prior to the didactic lecture and upon completion of the simulation-based practice. In study 1, an examination of pre- and posttest comparisons indicated that the training significantly improved students' PFA knowledge and perceived competence in PFA skill. In study 2, the same PFA training significantly improved school counselors' PFA knowledge, perceived competence in PFA skill, perceived preparedness and confidence to provide psychological assistance for future disasters, but their perceived willingness to participate in psychological assistance did not significantly change after the training. This study provides preliminary evidence supporting the effectiveness of the PFA training program using a combined method of didactic and simulation-based practice for disaster mental health providers in Korea.

  13. A preliminary evaluation of the training effects of a didactic and simulation-based psychological first aid program in students and school counselors in South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Sun Lee

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the training effects of a didactic and simulation-based psychological first aid (PFA program. Based on the competency-based model, the study sought to examine whether the PFA training would enhance knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Study 1 examined the training effects of the PFA program in a sample of undergraduate and graduate students in psychology. Study 2 was conducted with school counselors. In both studies, all participants completed a one-day PFA workshop with a 3-hour didactic lecture and a 3-hour simulation-based practice. Assessments were conducted prior to the didactic lecture and upon completion of the simulation-based practice. In study 1, an examination of pre- and posttest comparisons indicated that the training significantly improved students' PFA knowledge and perceived competence in PFA skill. In study 2, the same PFA training significantly improved school counselors' PFA knowledge, perceived competence in PFA skill, perceived preparedness and confidence to provide psychological assistance for future disasters, but their perceived willingness to participate in psychological assistance did not significantly change after the training. This study provides preliminary evidence supporting the effectiveness of the PFA training program using a combined method of didactic and simulation-based practice for disaster mental health providers in Korea.

  14. Developing the Profession of School Psychology in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terjesen, Mark D.; Kassay, Kimberly S.; Bolger, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Building upon a successful prior initial trip to Vietnam in January 2008, students and faculty from St. John's University (STJ) School Psychology program returned to work with the faculty from Hanoi National University of Education (HNUE) in developing the profession of school psychology in that country. The purpose of this trip was twofold: (1)…

  15. Ensuring the Availability and Quality of School Psychology Doctoral Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Abigail M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, only a small percentage of internships accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) are filled by school psychology interns and only a few of the available APA internship positions are in schools. Program data submitted online to APA indicate that many interns are in sites that meet the guidelines adopted by the Council of…

  16. Including Fathers in School Psychology Literature: A Review of Four School Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greif, Jennifer L.; Greif, Geoffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well documented that fathers have a significant influence on their children's success in school. To examine the ways in which fathers have been represented in school psychology literature, the authors searched over 1,000 recent articles published in four leading U.S. school psychology journals ("Psychology in the Schools," "School Psychology…

  17. Psychology or Psychological Science?: A Survey of Graduate Psychology Faculty Regarding Program Names

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collisson, Brian; Rusbasan, David

    2018-01-01

    The question of renaming graduate psychology programs to psychological science is a timely and contentious issue. To better understand why some programs, but not others, are changing names, we surveyed chairpersons (Study 1) and faculty (Study 2) within graduate psychology and psychological science programs. Within psychology programs, a name…

  18. Compulsory Schooling, Child Study, Clinical Psychology, and Special Education: Origins of School Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the history of school psychology, emphasizing the work of L. Witmer (1897, 1907, 1910, 1922) and G. S. Hall (1911, 1923). Providing psychological services in the schools is among the earliest instances of applied psychology. School psychology was one of many child-saving services originating from 1890 to 1920. (SLD)

  19. National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The "National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula" attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best…

  20. Online School Psychology: Blueprint to Higher Education Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    The author is convinced that the school psychology profession needs to develop innovative programs to address the shortages of school psychologists across the nation, specifically, online programs that can reach the rural and underserved districts of each state. Current educators seeking to expand their skill set can be the untapped answer to…

  1. The Organizational Origins of Public School Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Traces public school psychology from 1899 to the 1970s with emphasis on the identity of the first public school psychologists, how and why they came to be associated with the schools, and how they viewed education in its relation to psychology. (Author/DB)

  2. The psychology of computer programming

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    Weinberg, Gerald Marvin

    1998-01-01

    This landmark 1971 classic is reprinted with a new preface, chapter-by-chapter commentary, and straight-from-the-heart observations on topics that affect the professional life of programmers. Long regarded as one of the first books to pioneer a people-oriented approach to computing, The Psychology of Computer Programming endures as a penetrating analysis of the intelligence, skill, teamwork, and problem-solving power of the computer programmer. Finding the chapters strikingly relevant to today's issues in programming, Gerald M. Weinberg adds new insights and highlights the similarities and differences between now and then. Using a conversational style that invites the reader to join him, Weinberg reunites with some of his most insightful writings on the human side of software engineering. Topics include egoless programming, intelligence, psychological measurement, personality factors, motivation, training, social problems on large projects, problem-solving ability, programming language design, team formati...

  3. The Misrepresentation of School Psychology in Introduction to Psychology Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Paula Sachs

    1981-01-01

    This study indicates that introductory psychology textbooks ignore the role of the psychologist in the schools. Out of 84 textbooks, only 26 described the school psychologist. When 12 students analyzed these available descriptions for five skill types, no coherent images of school psychologists emerged. (AM)

  4. Promoting the psychological well-being of Italian youth: a pilot study of a high school mental health program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltro, Franco; Ialenti, Valentina; Iannone, Claudia; Bonanni, Emiliana; Morales García, Manuel Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    School is potentially one of the most important and effective agencies for the promotion of mental health. For this reason, in Italy, the Mental Health Department of The National Health Institute has developed an intervention based on a structured handbook. The aim of this intervention is to promote the psychological well-being of the students. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of this intervention through a quasi-experimental study design of four classes (two were control) of secondary education, including 79 students aged 14 to 16 years (15.35 ± 0.68). Assessments were administered before and after the intervention. The results showed improvement in perceived self-efficacy (p ≤ .001), emotional coping (p = .003), and overall well-being (p usefulness was also increased (p skills, problem solving, and goal definition training is recommended with the use of a revised handbook. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  5. National standards for high school psychology curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The National Standards for High School Psychology Curricula attempts to represent current knowledge in the field of psychology in developmentally appropriate ways. Psychology is a popular high school course, one that can introduce students to scientific ideas and engage students in the learning process. However, it is difficult for even the best of teachers to present all of psychology in a single course for students who begin with virtually no formal knowledge of psychology. The standards presented here constitute the first of two reports in this issue of the American Psychologist (January 2013) representing recent American Psychological Association (APA) policies that support high-quality instruction in the teaching of high school psychology. These standards provide curricular benchmarks for student learning in the high school course.

  6. [Status of health psychology teaching in Chilean schools of medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Jaime T; Pinedo, José P; Repetto, Paula L

    2012-07-01

    Physicians should be exposed, during their training to basic concepts in psychology. To describe the current status of the formal teaching of health psychology or medical psychology in Chilean medical schools. We reviewed the programs of the courses including topics of Medical Psychology, Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine at 18 medical schools in Chile, using a focused coding method. The contents and the time spent on these courses were considered and analyzed. Eighty three percent of medical schools have a Medical Psychology or related program, 56.3% are carried out during the first year of medical School teaching and the weekly load has an average of 4 hours. The contents are mixed and predominantly concerning general and developmental psychology, but also address specific issues of Medical Psychology in most cases. There is little clarity about the training issues to be addressed in medical psychology for medical students in Chile. It is necessary to define the minimum content that all medical graduates should learn.

  7. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Journal Article Citation Classics in School Psychology: Analysis of the Most Cited Articles in Five School Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Katherine W.; Floyd, Randy G.; Fagan, Thomas K.; Smithson, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and examine the top 100 most highly cited articles of all time as well as the 25 most highly cited articles of the last decade from within 5 school psychology journals: "Journal of School Psychology," "Psychology in the Schools," "School Psychology International," "School Psychology Quarterly," and "School…

  9. Institutions Offering Graduate Training in School Psychology: 1973-1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardon, Jack I.; Wenger, Ralph D.

    1974-01-01

    This compilation of graduate programs in school psychology from 180 institutions in U.S. and Canada includes: (1) names and address of institution; (2) responsible administrative unit; (3) degree(s) conferred; (4) type and quantity of financial assistance; and (5) program emphasis. (HMV)

  10. Where in the World Is School Psychology?: Examining Evidence of School Psychology around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Skokut, Mary; Cardenas, Santiago; Malone, Heather; Stewart, Kaitlyn

    2008-01-01

    This study examined each of the 192 Member States of the United Nations to address three important questions: (1) how many countries have professionals who provide school psychology services; (2) which countries do and do not have school psychologists; (3) what evidence of school psychology is available in each country. Of the 192 Member States of…

  11. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  12. National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 101,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 30.5 million children each school day in 2008. In 1998, Congress expanded the National School Lunch…

  13. School Psychology in New Brunswick in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureika, Juanita

    2016-01-01

    School psychology in New Brunswick experienced a surge of growth and development in the early part of the 21st century; however, dwindling numbers and recent government initiatives are presenting serious challenges to our ability to continue to provide the quality tiered services that we want to offer to the school community.

  14. Racial/Ethnic Minority Undergraduate Psychology Majors' Perceptions about School Psychology: Implications for Minority Recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Joel O.; Newell, Markeda L.; Gubi, Aaron A.

    2016-01-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities are underrepresented within school psychology. Increased racial/ethnic diversity within university training programs has been shown to reduce prejudices and anxiety within students while increasing empathy for other racial/ethnic groups. The reduction of prejudices and anxiety and increased empathy for racial/ethnic…

  15. A Modified Content Analysis of Existing School Psychology Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Barry; Schellenberg, Miriam E.; Smith, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Discrepancies between our university's training program's report-writing guidelines and common practice in Manitoba could not be resolved by reference to the literature. To inform the discussion, we collected a sample of local real world school psychology reports and undertook a modified content analysis to operationally define and measure…

  16. Training of Teachers and Teaching Services Specialists for the Design and Implementation of the "School Psychology Master Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimova L.A.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of organizing the training courses for teachers and teaching services specialists for design and implementation of the basic professional educational pedagogical master program in a psycho-pedagogical training direction (educational psychologist with enhanced internship for students in a context of networking. The authors submit a modular design of training program. The first module includes methodological bases of the design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program. The second module includes legal coverage of the design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program. The third module consists of design and implementation of the basic professional educational master program in a psycho-pedagogical training direction (educational psychologist. The program involves a variety of active and interactive educational technology, providing the development of professional activities: remote technology, expert seminars, design stations, panels and plenary discussions, business games, round-table discussions.

  17. Full Human Development And School Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaiklin, Seth

    The aim of this keynote address is to show how theoretical ideas from the cultural-historical tradition have been used to address issues that fall within the scope of interest for Brazilian school psychologists. The first part of the conference discusses the idea of radical-local teaching...... which explains how this perspective was used with lower secondary school boys in Denmark who had been expelled from several schools. These two parts will be used to illustrate a perspective about full human development, expressed through cultural-historical theoretical concepts, as an orientation...... for all professional approaches to school psychology....

  18. School Psychology and Childhood – a public school experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Maria Cintra da Silva

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This work reports an activity performed as part of coursework in Psychology class during a school semester which aimed to provide students an effective experience of what public school psychologists do, based on the critical presumptions about Psychology and also aimed to present reflections on the performance of this professional together with children. The proposal involved encounters with teachers and children and the undergraduates were responsible for the preparation and execution of activities under the supervision of professors. The Psychology students highlighted the importance of this practice for their professional training, which provided discussions on key questions such as childhood, education and the impact of School Psychology in the Brazilian educational scope.

  19. Understanding Immigrants, Schooling, and School Psychology: Contemporary Science and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L.; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2016-01-01

    Immigration into the United States is a particularly salient topic of current contemporary educational, social, and political discussions. The school-related needs of immigrant children and youth can be well served by rigorous research and effective school psychology preservice training and preparation. This overview highlights key definitions,…

  20. Counseling Health Psychology: Assessing Health Psychology Training within Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Lewis, Brian L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Training directors of American Psychological Association-approved counseling psychology doctoral programs completed a questionnaire assessing (a) student and faculty involvement in health-related research, practice, and teaching; (b) health-related research conducted by students and faculty; and (c) programs' expectations and ability to…

  1. ZAPs: Using Interactive Programs for Learning Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Casper D.; Eysink, Tessa H. S.; Loyens, Sofie; de Jong, Ton

    2005-01-01

    ZAPs are short, self-contained computer programs that encourage students to experience psychological phenomena in a vivid, self-explanatory way, and that are meant to evoke enthusiasm about psychological topics. ZAPs were designed according to principles that originate from experiential and discovery learning theories. The interactive approach…

  2. High School Psychology: A Coming of Age Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Kenneth D.; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost; Blair-Broeker, Charles T.; Ernst, Randal M.

    2013-01-01

    Although institutional recognition of high school psychology is fairly recent, psychology and psychological subject matters have a history dating to at least the 1830s. By the middle of the twentieth century, high school psychology courses existed in nearly all U.S. states, and enrollments grew throughout the second half of the century. However,…

  3. School Psychology Research: Combining Ecological Theory and Prevention Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    The current article comments on the importance of theoretical implications within school psychological research, and proposes that ecological theory and prevention science could provide the conceptual framework for school psychology research and practice. Articles published in "School Psychology Review" should at least discuss potential…

  4. Of Course: Prerequisite Courses for Admission into APA-Accredited Clinical and Counseling Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.; Stratigis, Katerina Y.; Zimmerman, Barrett E.

    2014-01-01

    Students often inquire about which psychology courses to complete in preparation for graduate school. This study provides data that enable students and their advisors to make research-informed decisions. We surveyed the directors of the 304 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology (97%…

  5. The 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference: Accomplishments and next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamruz-Smith, Susan; Harrison, Patti L.; Cummings, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    The major national and international school psychology organizations hosted the 2012 School Psychology Futures Conference during the fall of 2012. The conference was designed to provide an opportunity for school psychologists to plan their future roles in better supporting children, families, and schools. The 2012 conference, titled "School…

  6. An Overview of Psychological Research on School-Family Partnership

    OpenAIRE

    小倉, 正義; OGURA, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    These days, the importance of school-family partnership has much understanding. It is valuable forschool-family partnership to promote children's growth, their school progress, and their development.So school-family partnership is one of notable topics in psychological research. The purpose of thisstudy was to overview psychological research on school-family partnership and to discuss the determinantsof school-family relationship and the methods of promoting school-family partnership. In thef...

  7. The Practice of School Psychology in Quebec English Schools: Current Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Cindy A.

    2016-01-01

    In Quebec, school psychology is alive and well. This article outlines current challenges and opportunities related to the practice of psychology in Quebec English schools. Changes to the practice of psychology in Quebec over the last decade have had an impact on the delivery of psychological services in schools. Modifications of the admission…

  8. Mindfulness in School Psychology: Applications for Intervention and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felver, Joshua C.; Doerner, Erin; Jones, Jeremy; Kaye, Nicole C.; Merrell, Kenneth W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of mindfulness is increasing in other areas of applied psychology, school psychology has yet to embrace it in practice. This article introduces school psychologists to the burgeoning field of mindfulness psychology and to the possibilities that it offers to their discipline. A background on the Western scientific study and…

  9. Understanding the Development of School Psychology in Mainland China

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, Rik Carl; van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.; Zhao, B. Yang; Hu, Juan

    2013-01-01

    School psychology is an important area within psychology, which has a short developmental history in Mainland China. Nonetheless, along with economic advances and social changes in Mainland China, school psychology is developing and becoming more important. Currently, people need to work harder and longer. This places many under pressure that may…

  10. An Analysis of Social Justice Research in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily; Baker, Courtney N.; Cloth, Allison H.; Fisher, Sycarah; Nastasi, Bonnie K.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the current content analysis was to build upon previous empirical research both within school psychology and in other subdisciplines of psychology to refine the operationalized definition of social justice within school psychology research. Operationalizing the definition and substantiating it within the empirical literature is a…

  11. Internships in School Psychology: Selection and Accreditation Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilin, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students in school psychology often report unique issues and challenges when seeking a doctoral internship. The number and range of accredited internship positions available to School Psychology (SP) students in the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) Match is quite limited, and they often obtain…

  12. Physical Activity and Psychological Correlates during an After-School Running Club

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2018-01-01

    Background: After-school programs (ASPs) have the potential to contribute to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), but there is limited empirical evidence to guide their development and implementation. Purpose: This study assessed the replication of an elementary school running program and identified psychological correlates of children's…

  13. Personality and Graduate Academic Performance among Counselor Education and School Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Laux, John; Salyers, Kathleen; Kozelka, Susan

    2017-01-01

    General personality was assessed of 104 graduate students in school counseling, mental health counseling, and school psychology programs in the United States using the Big Five model of personality domains. The students in three programs reported similarities and differences in their preference and performance in domain knowledge, with more…

  14. Rogerian Psychology and "Non-Directive" Counselling in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quicke, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the prevalence of the nondirective approach in the school counseling movement and analyzes its psychological rationale and practical implications, centering on the psychological concepts of Carl R. Rogers. (MF)

  15. School Psychology in the Federal Republic of Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietzel, Gerd; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Reviews origins and evaluation of the present status of school psychology in the Federal Republic of Germany, emphasizing strict separation of school tracks. Notes that system has been evolving into more flexible organizational structure in recent years. Discusses roles and functions of school psychology, administration, training, relationships…

  16. Teaching the History of Psychology: A Content Analysis of Course Syllabi from Doctor of Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merced, Matthew; Stutman, Zachariah E.; Mann, Sandra T.

    2018-01-01

    Psychology graduate students in the United States are expected to demonstrate competency in the history of psychology. Despite the topic's importance, there are limited guidelines. The present study examined history and systems of psychology (HSP) course syllabi from American Psychological Association accredited Doctor of Psychology programs. Of…

  17. Solar for Schools program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egles, D.; Lee, A. [Carmanah Technologies Corp., Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Carmanah Technologies proposed a nation wide program to bring photovoltaic (PV) power to secondary schools across Canada in 2004.The objectives of the Solar 4 Schools program were to improve awareness of energy issues within schools and to increase the acceptance of PV power through visibility in the community. The British Columbia Ministry of Energy and Mines provided a $300,000 grant to install the first 2 systems; one in Fort Nelson and one in Vernon, British Columbia. This paper described the 2 installed and fully functional 10 KW PV power systems and their expected electrical contributions to the schools. It also described the Internet based production monitoring software developed as part of the program. The incentives for renewable energy technologies stem from the increased demand for energy at a time when conventional energy supplies are declining. Another incentive is to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the combustion of fossil fuel. It is expected that PV technology will be competitive with fossil fuel generated electricity in Canada within the next decade. Currently, PV is cost effective in Canada at about 25 cents per kilowatt-hour. Cost projections and the cost of future electrical energy in Canada were presented. The Solar 4 Schools program raises awareness that there are viable alternatives to fossil fuel for producing electricity. At completion, the program anticipates to see PV power used by 1000 schools across Canada with an addition of 10 MW of solar capacity to Canada's current 7 MW. The program would deliver GHG offsets of about 12,000 tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year if fossil fuel was the primary energy source. In addition to the energy savings that schools will gain from this program, other benefits will be gained by students, the community, industry and Canada, which currently lags behind most industrialized nations in the installation of renewable energy. 2 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  18. Assessing Effectiveness and Efficiency of Academic Interventions in School Psychology Journals: 1995-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlett, Ron; Cates, Gary L.; Savina, Elena; Lauinger, Brittni

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews research in the four major school psychology journals: "Journal of School Psychology," "Psychology in the Schools," "School Psychology Quarterly," and "School Psychology Review." The function of the review was to provide school psychologists with a summary of academic interventions published through years 1995-2005, synthesize…

  19. Acknowledging and Appreciating the Full Spectrum of the Human Condition: School Psychology's (Limited) Focus on Positive Psychological Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froh, Jeffrey J.; Huebner, E. Scott; Youssef, Al-Jameela; Conte, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    This study is a content analysis of a random selection of 20% (N = 1,168) of articles from "School Psychology Quarterly", "Psychology in the Schools", the "Journal of School Psychology", and "School Psychology Review". Across the four journals, 27% of the articles had a positive focus, and the percentage of articles focused on the positive has…

  20. What Do Schools Need? School Professionals' Perceptions of School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtola, Annarilla; Kiiski-Mäki, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Indirect work of school psychologists has not actualized itself widely in everyday practices. To understand this contradiction, the working environment of school psychologists, that is, the school, is worthy of closer examination. In the present study, we wanted to find out which factors affect school professionals' perceptions of school…

  1. Enhancing the Educational Subject: Cognitive Capitalism, Positive Psychology and Well-Being Training in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, James

    2013-01-01

    Positive psychology is influencing educational policy and practice in Britain and North America. This article reveals how this psychological discourse and its offshoot school-based training programs, which stress happiness, self-improvement and well-being, align with an emergent socio-economic formation: cognitive capitalism. Three key points are…

  2. The school evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, E.; Harrison, J.; Turner, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot program to provide classroom and field training to school facility operators that was implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation Programs in 1989. This program consisted of two phases. The first phase developed and delivered a three-day workshop in Nashville, Tennessee. As a result of the workshop a second phase was initiated. The second phase investigated several school buildings with elevated indoor radon levels in the Western United States. Radon entry mechanisms were identified. Measurements to evaluate soil depressurization as a radon control method were made and HVAC systems were characterized. Measurements were made to evaluate HVAC modification as a radon control method. Building shell tightness measurements were made and information was collected to judge the suitability of potential sites for additional EPA sponsored 'hands on' school training. Physical and institutional problem areas were identified

  3. The Lvov-Warsaw School: The forgotten tradition of historical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citlak, Amadeusz

    2016-05-01

    This article is an attempt to reconstruct the psychological achievements of the representatives of the Lvov-Warsaw School of historical psychology, virtually forgotten and unknown in the world's psychological literature. Kazimierz Twardowski (1866-1938), founder of the school, developed a philosophical and psychological program on the basis of (among other things) the theory of actions and products, including the research program that is now included in the thread of historical psychology. His student, Wladyslaw Witwicki (1878-1948), developed the cratism theory (the theory of power) on the basis Twardowski's assumptions, providing an alternative to Alfred Adler's theory of striving for superiority while also declaring it a few years before Adler. The consequence of Witwicki's theory and the methodological assumptions was the creation of psychobiography: the first nonpsychoanalytical psychobiography of Socrates (Witwicki, 1909, 1922) and the psychobiography of Jesus Christ (Witwicki, 1958). The school's activities weakened for political reasons, particularly the outbreak of the First World War. The members of the school dispersed after 1918, and they lost international connections with the world of science. Their significant achievements in the field of psychology remained unknown to psychologists for nearly a century. In this article, I would like to present the school's unique but unfinished program of reconstructing mental life through the psychological interpretation of cultural products (literature, arts, diaries), and its value for the practice of research in historical psychology. This program required additional development, but because of the war this never happened. Some of the school's theoretical findings and the first attempts to apply them have still significant value and show us the originality of Lvov-Warsaw School psychology. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. An Updated Analysis of Author Affiliation across Four School Psychology Journals: Is Practitioner Research Increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspiranti, Kathleen B.; McCleary, Daniel F.; Ratliff, Stephen R.

    2018-01-01

    This study analyzed articles published in four school psychology journals ("Journal of School Psychology," "Psychology in the Schools," "School Psychology Quarterly," and "School Psychology Review") between the years 2009 and 2015. Articles were classified based on whether they were narrative or empirical,…

  5. School Breakfast Program and School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Alan; And Others

    Children who participate in the School Breakfast Program show significant improvement in academic performance and tardiness rates, and a trend toward improvement in absenteeism. The School Breakfast Program was created by Congress in 1966 to provide a breakfast on school days for low income children who would otherwise have none. Children…

  6. Standards for the High School Psychology Course. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganett, L. Lee

    The latest contribution to the content standards boom that began in the 1990s comes from the American Psychological Association (APA), which recently published "National Standards for the Teaching of High School Psychology." This Digest discusses: (1) the origin and purposes of the project to develop standards for high school psychology…

  7. Publication Outlets for School Psychology Faculty: 2010 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulac, David; Johnson, Natalie D.; Ushijima, Shiho C.; Schneider, Maryia M.

    2016-01-01

    Many school psychology faculty are required to publish for purposes of retention and promotion. It is useful to have an understanding of the different outlets for scholarly publications. In the present study, we investigated the peer-reviewed journals in which school psychology faculty were published between 2010 and 2015, the number of articles…

  8. Men in Academic School Psychology: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Steven G.; Akin-Little, Angeleque; Palomares, Ronald S.; Eckert, Tanya L.

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of research examining the experiences and perceptions of men employed as school psychology academicians. The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain male school psychology academicians' perceptions of their respective academic climates, levels of support, incidences of harassment, and levels of stress, and to compare…

  9. The Status of School Psychology in Ontario School Boards: 2016 Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, Debra

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the status of school psychology in Ontario. School psychology practice in Ontario has continued to evolve since the previous report was published in 2001. School psychologists have varied roles, and although the most prominent one remains as assessing students for entry into certain special education services, school-based…

  10. International Perspectives on Academic and Professional Preparation of School and Educational Psychologists: Introduction to a Special Issue of the "International Journal of School & Educational Psychology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Thomas; Hatzichristou, Chryse

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the "International Journal of School & Educational Psychology" is devoted to promoting an understanding of some current features of school psychology programs and to suggest ways to further strengthen preparation. Information summarized in these 12 articles is intended to assist us in determining the relevance…

  11. A School Reentry Program for Chronically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worchel-Prevatt, Frances F.; Heffer, Robert W.; Prevatt, Bruce C.; Miner, Jennifer; Young-Saleme, Tammi; Horgan, Daniel; Lopez, Molly A.; Frankel, Lawrence; Rae, William A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a school reintegration program aimed at overcoming the numerous psychological, physical, environmental, and family-based deterrents to school reentry for chronically ill children. The program uses a systems approach to children's mental health with an emphasis on multiple aspects of the child's environment (i.e., family, medical…

  12. Programa de Atención Psicológica para los alumnos de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Barcelona Psychological Care Program for the students of the Medical School of the University of Barcelona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Sender Romeo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El Programa d´Atenció Psicològica de la Facultad de Medicina de Barcelona se desarrolló entre los años 1999 y 2003. Se razonan los motivos de su creación así como los aspectos específicos de pertenencia a una facultad de medicina. Se da cuenta de los trabajos de tipo asistencial realizados en el transcurso de ese periodo, así como de los trabajos de investigación correspondientes a la misma etapa o derivados de las líneas generales que se prolongaron con posterioridad al cierre del programa y que tienen su origen en la línea de trabajo del propio programa. Se analiza la conveniencia y el interés que puede atribuirse a este tipo de colaboraciones que pretenden valorar la etapa universitaria de los sujetos como la antesala de la vida laboral.Between 1999 and 2003 the program of the Barcelona UB Medical School Psychological Service was offered to the students. In this paper the reasons of its birth and specific linkage to the medical school are explained. An account is offered about the psychiatric and psychological are activity developed during this period, as well as the research projects which began during this time and were followed after the interruption of the care program. Finally the interest and convenience of these kind of programs are discussed, emphasizing the utility of considering the time spended at the university as the prelude of working life.

  13. Promoting Effective Program Leadership in Psychology: A Benchmarking Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Although scholars have scrutinized many aspects of academic life in psychology, the topic of leadership for psychology programs has remained elusive. This article describes the importance of high-quality leadership in the development of thriving psychology programs. The author offers a strategy for evaluating leaders to help provide developmental…

  14. Evolving Nature of School Psychology in Alberta: Politics and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Coranne; Zwiers, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the practice of school psychology in the province of Alberta reflects the entrenchment of assessment with the emerging possibility of a broader service provider role. This article articulates the influence that politics and government has had on the role of school psychologists in Alberta schools as special education…

  15. The Legal Content of School Psychology Journals: A Systematic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Imad; Zirkel, Perry A.

    2014-01-01

    The many challenges that school psychologists face inevitably include legal issues. In light of the agreement between the two primary professional organizations for school psychologists that understanding of law is a critical competency, this study analyzed the extent of law-based articles in leading school psychology journal articles published…

  16. Psychology departments in medical schools: there's one in Canada, eh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwraith, Robert D

    2014-12-01

    Comments on the original article by Robiner et al. (see record 2014-07939-001) regarding psychologists in medical schools and academic medical center settings. Robiner et al. reported that their extensive review "revealed no independent departments of psychology in U.S. medical schools." The current authors note north of the border in Canada there is one department of psychology in a medical school. The Department of Clinical Health Psychology has been a department within the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Manitoba since 1995. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Statistical Reform in School Psychology Research: A Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Hariharan; Rogers, H. Jane

    2007-01-01

    Statistical reform in school psychology research is discussed in terms of research designs, measurement issues, statistical modeling and analysis procedures, interpretation and reporting of statistical results, and finally statistics education.

  18. Employment, Leaving School, and Psychological Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winefield, Tony

    1985-01-01

    The author sums up the findings of research on the psychological effects of unemployment and of a variety of work experience schemes in which unemployed people participate. The article focuses on school leavers in Australia. (CT)

  19. Clinical Reasoning in School Psychology: From Assessment to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jac J. W.; Syeda, Maisha M.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists typically conduct psychological and psychoeducational assessments, provide prevention and intervention services, and consult and collaborate with allied professionals (e.g., teachers, physicians, psychiatrists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers, and nurses) and parents toward better understanding and…

  20. Sexual orientation and gender identity in schools: A call for more research in school psychology-No more excuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espelage, Dorothy L

    2016-02-01

    Research focused on sexual orientation and gender identity among youth is scarce in school psychology journals. Graybill and Proctor (2016; this issue) found that across a sample of eight school support personnel journals only .3 to 3.0% of the articles since 2000 included lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT)-related research. It appears that special issues are a mechanism for publishing LGBT-related scholarship. This commentary includes a call for more research in school psychology and other related disciplines that intentionally addresses experiences of LGBT youth and their families. Two articles in this special section are summarized and critiqued with clear directions for future scholarship. Researchers and practitioners are ethically responsible for engaging in social justice oriented research and that includes assessing gender identity and sexual orientation in their studies and prevention program evaluations. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. School Breakfast Program and school performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, A F; Sampson, A E; Weitzman, M; Rogers, B L; Kayne, H

    1989-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that participation in the School Breakfast Program by low-income children is associated with improvements in standardized achievement test scores and in rates of absence and tardiness, children in grades 3 through 6 were studied in the Lawrence, Mass, public schools, where the School Breakfast Program was begun at the start of the second semester 1986-1987 school year. The changes in scores on a standardized achievement test and in rates of absence and tardiness before and after the implementation of the School Breakfast Program for children participating in the program were compared with those of children who also qualified but did not participate. Controlling for other factors, participation in the School Breakfast Program contributed positively to the 1987 Comprehensive Tests of Basic Skills battery total scale score and negatively to 1987 tardiness and absence rates. These findings suggest that participation in the School Breakfast Program is associated with significant improvements in academic functioning among low-income elementary school children.

  2. Teachers' Perceptions of Disruptive Behaviour in Schools: A Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Poppy; Schlösser, Annette; Scarr, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into school teachers' perceptions of disruptive behaviour from a psychological perspective. The inter-disciplinary nature of this research bridges the understanding between educational and psychological perspectives on disruptive behaviour. This article discusses evidence that for the most troubled pupils,…

  3. Characteristics of Programs That Maximize Psychology Major Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoloff, Michael L.; Good, Megan Rodgers; Smith, Kristen L.; Brewster, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a national survey of psychology department chairs, and, based on their responses, we concluded that psychology programs differ in the number of students enrolled in various types of classes; the degree of focus on each of the goals recommended by the "American Psychological Association (APA) Guidelines for an Undergraduate…

  4. POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, EMOTIONAL EDUCATION AND THE HAPPY CLASSROOMS PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bisquerra Alzina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive psychology has multiple applications. This article is focused on formal education, from the ages of 3 to 18 years. The development of well-being should be one of the aims of education, which would affect teachers, students, families and by extension society at large. This has been a clear aim for emotional education (Bisquerra, 2000, 2009, from the outset. With the emergence of positive psychology, there was a renewed effort in this direction, as a means of providing a better foundation. GROP (Grup de Recerca en Orientación Psicopedagógica [Research in Psychopedagogical Education Group] at the University of Barcelona is conducting research on this subject. The Happy Classrooms (“Aulas felices” program developed by the SATI team is the first program in Spanish aimed at working on positive education. It is designed for children and youths in pre-school, primary and secondary education. The program focuses its applications on character strengths and mindfulness. It is freely available for access and distribution. This article argues for the importance of enhancing well-being in education. Practical activities and intervention strategies are presented, with special reference to the importance of teacher training.

  5. School Breakfast Program and School Performance

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1989-01-01

    The effects of participation in the school breakfast program by low income children on academic achievement and rates of absence and tardiness are reported from the Department of Pediatrics, Boston City Hospital, Boston, MA.

  6. School Psychology in Greece: A System of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Lea A.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Dioguardi, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses origin of school psychology in Greece which emerged with services for mentally disabled in 1937. Explains how laws were instituted with the growing demand for educational services for students with social and emotional needs. Includes discussions on diverse roles of school psychologists, present status of special education, and influence…

  7. School Psychology: Learning Lessons from History and Moving Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Peter

    2010-01-01

    At a time when, in most countries, the profession of school psychology is experiencing a period of growth and expansion, many problems still remain. The origins of these problems are linked to the historical development of the profession which has provided school psychologists with a unique and distinctive role in administering IQ tests and using…

  8. Recurrent Respiratory Infections and Psychological Problems in Junior School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmanson, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent respiratory infections (RRI) are among most common diseases in school-aged children. Little is known about possible associations between RRI and children psychological well-being. Aim: To study possible associations between RRI in junior school pupils and their emotional/behavioural characteristics. Methods: The RRI group…

  9. Identifying Critical Cross-Cultural School Psychology Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Margaret R.; Lopez, Emilia C.

    2002-01-01

    Study sought to identify critical cross-cultural competencies for school psychologists. To identify the competencies, an extensive literature search about cross-cultural school psychology competencies was conducted, as well as a questionnaire to ask expert panelists. The 102 competencies identified cover 14 major domains of professional activities…

  10. Integrating Neuropsychology and School Psychology: Potential and Pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Paul B.; Plotts, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    The neurological basis of learning disabilities (LD), and other handicapping conditions commonly found in school-age children, makes the integration of neuropsychology and school psychology plausible. However, there has been longstanding debate over the required level of education, training, supervision, and credentialing needed for the practice…

  11. Evaluation of School Psychological Services: A Case Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Thomas N.; Seeley, Tracey J.

    1996-01-01

    Illustrates how school psychological services were evaluated in two elementary schools. Questionnaires were used to solicit input from students regarding individual counseling and classroom guidance activities. Rating scales were used to solicit input from parents regarding the assessment service and from building staff regarding their perception…

  12. School Psychology in Rural Contexts: Ethical, Professional, and Legal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lynn M.; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Delivering psychological services in rural communities presents a number of unique challenges for practitioners relative to their peers in urban and suburban communities. In this article, the authors describe the current context of rural schools and examine the ethical and legal issues school psychologists may face when practicing in rural…

  13. Treatment Acceptability of Interventions Published in Six School Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Ponce, Christopher; Gutierrez, Heveli

    2015-01-01

    Treatment acceptability (TA) is critical when selecting and implementing an intervention, as TA is associated with treatment outcomes. The significance of TA is reflected in school psychology models for services that state that school psychologists should address TA during development, implementation, and evaluation of interventions. However, the…

  14. Assessment of military population-based psychological resilience programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brenda J; Bibb, Sandra C Garmon

    2011-09-01

    Active duty service members' (ADSMs) seemingly poor adaptability to traumatic stressors is a risk to force health. Enhancing the psychological resilience of ADSMs has become a key focus of Department of Defense (DoD) leaders and the numbers of military programs for enhancing psychological resilience have increased. The purpose of this article is to describe the results of an assessment conducted to determine comprehensiveness of current psychological resilience building programs that target ADSMs. A modified six-step, population-based needs assessment was used to evaluate resilience programs designed to meet the psychological needs of the ADSM population. The assessment results revealed a gap in published literature regarding program outcomes. DoD leaders may benefit from targeted predictive research that assesses program effectiveness outcomes. The necessity of including preventive, evidence-based interventions in new programs, such as positive emotion interventions shown to enhance psychological resilience in civilian samples, is also recommended.

  15. Applying "What Works" in Psychology to Enhancing Examination Success in Schools: The Potential Contribution of NLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudliskis, Voldis; Burden, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The strengths and weaknesses of Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) are described with reference to its origins, previous research and comments from critics and supporters. A case is made for this allegedly theoretical approach to provide the kind of outcomes focused intervention that psychology and psychologists can offer to schools. In…

  16. Dissertation Research in School Psychology: Changes in Topics and Methodology over the Past 25 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekwa, Adam; Ysseldyke, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Eighty school psychology programs offering training at the doctoral level were contacted with a request for lists of authors, titles, and abstracts of dissertations completed between the years 2000 and 2007. Titles and abstracts from 1119 dissertations were reviewed to assess the interests and experiences of new researchers and practitioners in…

  17. 75 FR 39697 - Indians Into Psychology Program; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indians Into Psychology Program; Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice correction. SUMMARY: The Indian Health Service...-IHS-2010-INPSY-0001, for the Indians Into Psychology Program. The document contained an incorrect...

  18. Comprehensive School Alienation Program, Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    This document presents guidelines developed by the Hawaii State Department of Education's Comprehensive School Alienation Program to consolidate and strengthen the delivery of services to alienated students. It is intended to assist district staff, school administrators, and project personnel in planning and implementing program activities and…

  19. School Violence, Social Support and Psychological Health among Taiwanese Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Wei, Hsi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper examines how peer social support mediates the association between school victimization and student psychological health among junior-high students in an Asian context (Taiwan), and further examines how gender and ethnicity differ in the interrelationships of school violence, peer social support and psychological health.…

  20. National Association of School Psychologists Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Psychology Review, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) is to represent school psychology and support school psychologists to enhance the learning and mental health of all children and youth. "School psychologists" provide effective services to help children and youth succeed academically, socially, behaviorally, and emotionally.…

  1. Beyond the schools of psychology 2: a digital analysis of psychological review, 1904-1923.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher D; Feinerer, Ingo; Burman, Jeremy T

    2014-01-01

    In order to better understand the broader trends and points of contention in early American psychology, it is conventional to organize the relevant material in terms of "schools" of psychology-structuralism, functionalism, etc. Although not without value, this scheme marginalizes many otherwise significant figures, and tends to exclude a large number of secondary, but interesting, individuals. In an effort to address these problems, we grouped all the articles that appeared in the second and third decades of Psychological Review into five-year blocks, and then cluster analyzed each block by the articles' verbal similarity to each other. This resulted in a number of significant intellectual "genres" of psychology that are ignored by the usual "schools" taxonomy. It also made "visible" a number of figures who are typically downplayed or ignored in conventional histories of the discipline, and it provide us with an intellectual context in which to understand their contributions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Analysis of Author Affiliation across Four School Psychology Journals from 2000 to 2008: Where Is the Practitioner Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Erin E.; Skinner, Christopher H.; McCleary, Daniel F.; von Mizener, Briana Hautau; Bliss, Stacy L.

    2009-01-01

    Articles published between 2000 and 2008 in four major school psychology journals--"School Psychology Review," "Journal of School Psychology," "Psychology in the Schools," and "School Psychology Quarterly"--were classified based on type (empirical or narrative) and on the primary and secondary authors' affiliations. Results showed that more than…

  3. Theory-Driven Evaluation in School Psychology Intervention Research: 2007-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Sterett H.; Idler, Alyssa M.; Bartfai, Jamie M.

    2014-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the extent to which school psychology intervention research is guided by theory and addresses theoretical implications of findings. Intervention studies published during 2007-2012 in four journals, "Journal of School Psychology," "Psychology in the Schools," "School Psychology…

  4. Application to graduate psychology programs by undergraduate students of color: the impact of a research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Gordon C Nagayama; Allard, Carolyn B

    2009-07-01

    The top 86 students were selected from a pool of approximately 400 applicants to a summer clinical psychology research training program for undergraduate students of color. Forty-three of the students were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 clinical psychology research training programs, and 43 were randomly assigned to a control condition without training. The multicultural version of the training program emphasized the cultural context of psychology in all areas of training, whereas cultural context was de-emphasized in the monocultural version of the program. Although the cultural content of the 2 training programs was effectively manipulated as indicated by a fidelity check by an outside expert, there were no significant differences between the effects of the 2 programs on the outcomes measured in this study. The primary differences in this study were between students who did versus those who did not participate in a training program. Sixty-five percent of the students who completed the multicultural training program applied to graduate schools in psychology, compared with 47% of those who completed the monocultural training program, and 31% of those in the control group. Participation in summer research training programs also increased self-perceptions of multicultural competence.

  5. The Experiences of Latina Graduate Students in Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celaya, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the experience of Latinas in doctoral programs in psychology using a qualitative phenomenological methodology. Eleven women who self-identified as Latina and were in the process of working towards a doctoral degree in psychology participated in in-person interviews that were audio-recorded. Participants described experiences…

  6. Beyond the schools of psychology 1: a digital analysis of Psychological Review, 1894-1903.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher D; Feinerer, Ingo; Burman, Jeremy T

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, American psychology at the turn of the twentieth century has been framed as a competition among a number of "schools": structuralism, functionalism, behaviorism, etc. But this is only one way in which the "structure" of the discipline can be conceived. Most psychologists did not belong to a particular school, but they still worked within loose intellectual communities, and so their work was part of an implicit psychological "genre," if not a formalized "school." In this study, we began the process of discovering the underlying genres of American psychology at the turn of the twentieth century by taking the complete corpus of articles from the journal Psychological Review during the first decade of its publication and conducting a statistical analysis of the vocabularies they employed to see what clusters of articles naturally emerged. Although the traditional functionalist school was among the clusters we found, we also found distinct research traditions around the topics of color vision, spatial vision, philosophy/metatheory, and emotion. In addition, momentary clusters corresponding to important debates (e.g., the variability hypothesis) appeared during certain years, but not others. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." Supreme Court Case: Implications for School Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Shauna G.; Eusebio, Eleazar C.; Turton, William J.; Wright, Peter W. D.; Hale, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." United States Supreme Court case could have significant implications for school psychology practice. The Court ruled that the parents of a student with a disability were entitled to private school tuition reimbursement even though T.A. had not been identified with a disability or previously…

  8. Psychological Impact of Cyber-Bullying: Implications for School Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordahl, Jennifer; Beran, Tanya; Dittrick, Crystal J.

    2013-01-01

    Cyber-bullying is a significant problem for children today. This study provides evidence of the psychological impact of cyber-bullying among victimized children ages 10 to 17 years (M = 12.48, SD = 1.79) from 23 urban schools in a western province of Canada (N = 239). Students who were cyber-bullied reported high levels of anxious,…

  9. Toward a Framework for Translational Research in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Oliver W.

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses a translational research framework for school psychology. Translational research uses outcomes of basic and applied science to enhance the overall well-being of persons. This transdisciplinary framework connects disciplines and uses their resources, capacities, systems, and procedures to advance prevention, intervention, and…

  10. Rasch Analysis: A Primer for School Psychology Researchers and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, William J.; Noltemeyer, Amity

    2017-01-01

    In order to progress as a field, school psychology research must be informed by effective measurement techniques. One approach to address the need for careful measurement is Rasch analysis. This technique can (a) facilitate the development of instruments that provide useful data, (b) provide data that can be used confidently for both descriptive…

  11. Advancing science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this editorial to inform both readers and potential authors, the editor provides a few details relevant to the School Psychology Quarterly (SPQ) including: the mission, contemporary context, the new emphases of SPQ, the editorial board, and advice for authors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. School Principals' Authentic Leadership and Teachers' Psychological Capital: Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng-I

    2016-01-01

    This study examined teachers' perceptions of principals' authentic leadership and the relationship of authentic leadership to teachers' psychological capital in Taiwan. A total of 1,429 elementary and secondary school teachers were surveyed. The results showed that teachers perceived their principals' authentic leadership as moderate and that the…

  13. Promoting Psychological Well-Being in an Urban School Using the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Patrick B.; Summerville, Meredith A.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Patterson, Julie; Earnshaw, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    School psychology has recently reconceptualized its service provision model to include multitiered systems of academic and psychosocial promotion, prevention, and intervention. The availability of evidence-based programs and advances in school consultation theory accompany the paradigm shift of the field. Despite these advances, implementing…

  14. Prince Edward Island's School Psychology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matters, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    The Prince Edward Island (PEI) school system has been struggling with issues of recruitment and particularly retention for psychologists. Reasons include concerns about professional autonomy; having more limited roles, which are heavily assessment focused; reduced job satisfaction; and restrictions on additional private practice work. The waiting…

  15. Children's Sleep and School Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckhalt, Joseph A.; Wolfson, Amy R.; El-Sheikh, Mona

    2009-01-01

    Much contemporary research has demonstrated the multiple ways that sleep is important for child and adolescent development. This article reviews that research with an emphasis on how sleep parameters are related to school adjustment and achievement. Five areas of sleep research are reviewed to discern implications for practice with children using…

  16. School Health: Findings from Evaluated Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHHS), Rockville, MD. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

    This publication presents findings from evaluations of many school health programs from across the United States. Each program includes at least one of the following eight components of a comprehensive school health program: health education, clinical services, counseling and mental health services, school environment, school food programs,…

  17. Mixed Methods Research in School Psychology: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Trends in the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Heather; Mihalas, Stephanie; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Suldo, Shannon; Daley, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    This article illustrates the utility of mixed methods research (i.e., combining quantitative and qualitative techniques) to the field of school psychology. First, the use of mixed methods approaches in school psychology practice is discussed. Second, the mixed methods research process is described in terms of school psychology research. Third, the…

  18. Childhood psychological problems in school settings in rural Southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Cortina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many children can be exposed to multiple adversities in low and middle-income countries (LMICs placing them at potential risk of psychological problems. However, there is a paucity of research using large representative cohorts examining the psychological adjustment of children in school settings in these countries. Children's psychological adjustment has been shown to affect educational progress which is critical for their future. This study, based in a rural, socio-economically disadvantaged area of South Africa, aimed to examine the prevalence of children's psychological problems as well as possible risk and protective factors. METHODS: Rates of psychological problems in 10-12 year olds were examined using teacher- and child-report questionnaires. Data on children from 10 rural primary schools, selected by stratified random sampling, were linked to individual and household data from the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance system collected from households over 15 years. RESULTS: A total of 1,025 children were assessed. Teachers identified high levels of behavioural and emotional problems (41%. Children reported lower, but substantial rates of anxiety/depression (14%, and significant post-traumatic stress symptoms (24%; almost a quarter felt unsafe in school. Risk factors included being a second-generation former refugee and being from a large household. Protective factors highlight the importance of maternal factors, such as being more educated and in a stable partnership. CONCLUSION: The high levels of psychological problems identified by teachers are a serious public health concern, as they are likely to impact negatively on children's education, particularly given the large class sizes and limited resources in rural LMIC settings. Despite the high levels of risk, a proportion of children were managing well and research to understand resilience could inform interventions.

  19. A psicologia e o Programa "Ler e Escrever": a formação de professores na escola Psychology and the "Reading and Writing" Program: teaching training in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Sawaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O artigo traz dados de uma investigação cujo objetivo foi contribuir para a compreensão das formas por meio das quais a Psicologia vem sendo apropriada pelos projetos de formação de professores em serviço. Mediante o exame do projeto de formação do município de São Paulo, o "Programa Ler e Escrever, Prioridade na escola. Projeto Toda Força ao 1º Ano", analisam-se as concepções psicológicas em suas formas de conceber as crianças, a aprendizagem e o projeto de sua iniciação na cultura escrita. A partir das reconceitualizações sobre a aprendizagem, em que esta é considerada uma decorrência da natureza construtiva da mente infantil, é pertinente perguntar em que medida essas ideias rompem com aquelas anteriores, pertencentes ao assim chamado "ensino tradicional". Para responder a essas perguntas, recorreu-se a algumas das contribuições da história da leitura.The article presents data from an investigation, having as its objective, a deepening of our comprehension of how psychology is being applied in educating teachers, who are already in service. By examining the São Paulo training program "The Reading and Writing Project, Priority in school" and "The Project, All Power to the First Year", the way children are conceived of, based upon psychological concepts, is analyzed, alongside their learning achievements and initiation into our writing culture in response to projects designed to facilitate this. Because of new ways we have of conceptualizing the learning process, where learning is now considered a consequence of the constructive nature of the young mind, it is pertinent to ask, to what extent these ideas break with previous ones, those belonging to so-called "traditional teaching". To answer this question, some contributions from the history of reading, were reviewed.

  20. Recruitment and retention of Native American graduate students in school psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Anisa N; Brown, Jacqueline A; Machek, Greg R; Swaney, Gyda

    2016-09-01

    There is a clear underrepresentation of Native Americans in the field of school psychology. There are a number of factors that have led to this underrepresentation, including cultural and historical variables, barriers to accessing higher educational opportunities, and lack of financial support. Given the importance of having diverse perspectives in the field, as well as the need for mental health services and academic supports for Native American children and their families, school psychology trainers should consider actively recruiting and retaining Native American graduate students to doctoral and specialist programs. This article provides specific research-based recommendations for recruiting Native American students and strategies for supporting their success and matriculation in the program. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology: science and scientific thinking as safeguards against human error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-02-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for school psychologists. Specifically, we (a) outline basic principles of scientific thinking, (b) delineate widespread cognitive errors that can contribute to belief in pseudoscientific practices within school psychology and allied professions, (c) provide a list of 10 key warning signs of pseudoscience, illustrated by contemporary examples from school psychology and allied disciplines, and (d) offer 10 user-friendly prescriptions designed to encourage scientific thinking among school psychology practitioners and researchers. We argue that scientific thinking, although fallible, is ultimately school psychologists' best safeguard against a host of errors in thinking. Copyright © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Positive psychological strengths and school engagement in primary school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Wilkins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A sizeable body of research has investigated the impact of specific character strengths or traits on significant outcomes. Some recent research is beginning to consider the effects of groups of strengths, combined as a higher order variable and termed covitality. This study investigated the combined influence of four positive character traits, gratitude, optimism, zest and persistence, upon school engagement, within a sample of 112 Australian primary school students. The combined effect of these four traits, in defining covitality as a higher or second-order factor within a path analysis, was found to predict relatively higher levels of school engagement and pro-social behaviour.

  3. Children's rights and school psychology: children's right to participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, Gerison; Jimerson, Shane R; Shahroozi, Reza

    2014-02-01

    The Convention on the Rights of the Child detailed an international imperative to fulfilling, protecting, and respecting the rights of every child. In particular, the Convention set out a clear mandate for guaranteeing opportunities for children to be heard on all matters of concern to them. The attainment of these goals involves respecting and valuing children as active participants in the educational process. If fully implemented, the right of children to express views and have them taken seriously, throughout the school environment, would represent one of the most profound transformations in moving towards a culture of respect for children's rights, for their dignity and citizenship, and for their capacities to contribute significantly towards their own well-being. These values and principles are consistent with those of the school psychology profession, thus, school psychologists are encouraged to be at the Center of the process advocating and actualizing the Convention in schools throughout the world. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Developments in clinical neuropsychology: implications for school psychological services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michael J; Scott, Albert J

    2011-01-01

    According to the 2000 Report of the Surgeon General's Conference on Children's Mental Health, a significant percentage of children and adolescents have emotional or behavioral problems serious enough to merit a mental health diagnosis. The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 reemphasized the schools' importance in supporting cognitive and behavioral development in students, particularly those identified with learning problems. In this article, we examine the growing specialty of clinical neuropsychology and provide suggestions for integrating this field into school-based psychological services. This article provides a review of the neuropsychological bases for many childhood learning disorders and addresses how school psychologists can work with clinical neuropsychologists to better address the needs of exceptional children through neuropsychological testing. There is substantial neurological evidence for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder as well as disorders of reading, language, and mathematics. Close collaborative partnerships between clinical neuropsychologists and school psychologists will help develop assessment protocols that are likely to result in more effective intervention services for students with neuropsychological conditions. Schools are being asked to support the physical, cognitive, and emotional development in students, particularly those identified with chronic physical and mental health challenges. Dissatisfaction with minimal screenings, the growing awareness of the neurology of learning disorders, and the passage of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 obliges all school-based mental health providers to consider how to fully integrate the tools of clinical neuropsychology into school-based psychological services. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  5. 78 FR 79567 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids... interim rule entitled National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for..., 2013 / Rules and Regulations [[Page 79567

  6. THE PROGRAM SUPPORT SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SAFETY OF CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Aleksandrovich Kislyakov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a description of the author’s program to support the social and psychological safety of children with intellectual disabilities enrolled in boarding school of VIII kind. The object of the study were children with intellectual disabilities. The subject of research – features of formation to children with intellectual disabilities the social and psychological safety. The methodological base are the special psychology (L.S. Vygotsky, S.L. Rubinstein, A. Speck. The results. Complex psychological and pedagogical support of social and psychological safety of children with intellectual disabilities reflects the content of psychological and pedagogical tasks (target function and technologies of their solution (instrumental function aimed at reducing internal and external risk factors. The target functions are: social and psychological adaptation, personal and developmental, the function of social support and psychological and pedagogical assistance, preventive and correctional function. Psycho-pedagogical objectives are the formation of skills of safe behavior and confront the dangers through the development of appropriate social skills, mental, physical and cognitive abilities, establishing a real and more comfortable with social contact (including municipal and educational environment, thereby ensuring individual protection and psychosocial well-being, support emotional balance, development of harmonious personality, to facilitate adaptation to the social environment, correction of risk factors of dysontogenesis. The program includes informative, technological and diagnostic modules. The basis for the construction of educational information in the field of security us based on the principle of integratively – interdisciplinary cooperation of academic subjects; a mix of mandatory core classes and extra-curricular and remedial work. Technological support included the following teaching methods: interactive (psychotechnical

  7. Evaluating School-Based Psychological and Counselling Services in Macao Using a Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.; Sit, Holly H. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the status of psychological services in schools in Macao, and the role of school counsellors providing these services. At present, school psychology is not a recognized profession within the territory and school counsellors appointed by the Direccao dos Servicos de Educacao e Juventude (DSEJ) through their…

  8. Effectiveness of School-Initiated Physical Activity Program on Secondary School Students' Physical Activity Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gråstén, Arto; Yli-Piipari, Sami; Watt, Anthony; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The promotion of physical activity and health has become a universal challenge. The Sotkamo Physical Activity as Civil Skill Program was implemented to increase students' physical activity by promoting supportive psychological and physical school environment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the…

  9. The Performance Enhancement Group Program: Integrating Sport Psychology and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Vincent J.; Hogan, Jeffery B.; Varnum, Lisa K.

    1995-01-01

    In an effort to improve the psychological health of the athlete who has sustained an injury, the Performance Enhancement Group program for injured athletes was created. This paper will offer a model for the Performance Enhancement Group program as a way to: 1) support the athlete, both mentally and physically; 2) deal with the demands of rehabilitation; and 3) facilitate the adjustments the athlete has to make while being out of the competitive arena. The program consists of responsibilities for professionals in sport psychology (ie, assessment/orientation, support, education, individual counseling, and evaluation) and athletic training (ie, organization/administration, recruitment and screening, support, application of techniques, and program compliance). The paper will emphasize that the success of the program is dependent on collaboration between professionals at all levels. PMID:16558357

  10. Building of Environmental Literacy among Middle School Students: The Role of In-School, Out of School, and Psychological Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn Tate

    Solving environmental challenges will require an environmentally literate citizenry, equipped with ecological knowledge, pro-environmental attitudes, problem-solving skills, and motivation toward environmentally responsible behaviors. This dissertation addresses three approaches to building environmental literacy (EL) among middle school students: through schools (Chapter 1), through activities outside of school (Chapter 2), and through understanding psychological factors that affect environmental perceptions (Chapter 3). Chapter 1. This study examined school-wide EE programs among middle schools in North Carolina, including the use of published EE curricula and time outdoors while controlling for teacher education level and experience, student demographics, and school attributes. Our sample included an EE group selected from schools with registered schoolwide EE programs, and a control group randomly selected from NC middle schools that were not registered as EE schools. Students were given an EL survey at the beginning and end of the spring 2012 semester. Use of published EE curricula, time outdoors, and having teachers with advanced degrees and mid-level teaching experience (between 3 and 5 years) were positively related with EL whereas minority status (Hispanic and black) was negatively related with EL. Results suggest that though school-wide EE programs may vary in effectiveness, the use of published EE curricula paired with time outdoors represents a promising strategy. Further, investments in both new and veteran teachers to build and maintain enthusiasm for EE may help to boost student EL levels. Middle school represents a pivotal time for influencing EL, as improvement was slower among older students. Differences in EL levels based on gender suggest boys and girls may possess complementary skills sets when approaching environmental issues. Our findings suggest ethnicity related disparities in EL levels may be mitigated by time spent in nature, especially

  11. Prevalence of Mindfulness Literature and Intervention in School Psychology Journals from 2006 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Stacy L.; Roth, Rachel; Zielenski, Alicia; Longo, Zachary; Chermak, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    Mindfulness has been gaining momentum in the field of school psychology, however compared to other applied psychology fields, less research on mindfulness interventions has been conducted. This study systematically reviewed mindfulness literature and empirical studies in nine school psychology journals from 2006-2016. The prevalence of mindfulness…

  12. Guidelines for Preparing High School Psychology Teachers: Course-Based and Standards-Based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is one of the most popular elective high school courses. The high school psychology course provides the foundation for students to benefit from psychological perspectives on personal and contemporary issues and learn the rules of evidence and theoretical frameworks of the discipline. The guidelines presented here constitute the second…

  13. School Psychology Goes to College: The Emerging Role of School Psychology in College Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; Joyce, Diana J.

    2012-01-01

    Many college students display academic and social-emotional needs that are not being addressed by extant university supports. School psychologists who work in postsecondary settings and have expertise in providing psychoeducational services may be uniquely positioned to help many of these students. However, few school psychologists currently work…

  14. The Psychology School Mental Health Initiative: An Innovative Approach to the Delivery of School-Based Intervention Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Golden M.; Lean, Debra; Sweet, Susan D.; Moraes, Sabrina C.; Nelson, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that schools have, by default, become the primary mental health system for students in Canada. The goal of the present study was to design, implement, and evaluate the Psychology School Mental Health Initiative (PSMHI). The PSMHI is an innovative attempt to increase the capacity of school-based psychology staff to deliver…

  15. [Psychological Effects of Forest Therapy Program on Workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikei, Harumi; Koizumi, Haruka; Song, Chorong; Kouzuki, Mitsunori; Teratani, Seiichiro; Sakuma, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    To examine the psychological effects of forest therapy program on workers. The subjective symptoms index, a shortened version of the profile of mood states (POMS), and a semantic differential (SD) method were used to measure the psychological effects. The evaluations were performed 3 days before, during, and 1, 3, and 5 days after the forest therapy. The following results were obtained: (1) the subjective symptoms improved before breakfast and continued for 5 days; (2) the mood evaluated using POMS improved before breakfast and continued for 3 days; and (3) “comfortable,” “relaxed,” and “natural” feelings evaluated using the SD method were enhanced before breakfast, lunch, and dinner during forest therapy. These results provided scientific evidence of the psychological effects of forest therapy program on workers.

  16. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  17. Standards for School Guidance Programs in Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Compensatory, Urban, and Supplementary Programs.

    This brochure is a checklist to rate school compliance with the standards for school guidance programs in Maryland, which were developed by the Maryland State Department of Education. The first set of standards addresses the philosophy and goals of school guidance programs in Maryland and the extent to which program goals and objectives are…

  18. Psychology, cognition and school success: validation of the learning strategies program / Psicologia, cognição e sucesso escolar: concepção e validação dum programa de estratégias de aprendizagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Maria Ferreira Diogo Dias Pocinho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a Learning Strategies Program developed to provide academic success as well as personal well-being. Each content of learning is based on a strategy with 8 stages: Pre-test and Contract, Description, Modeling, Verbal Practice, Practice and Feedback Control, Advanced Practice and Feedback, Post-test and Contracts, and Generalization. This is a quasi-experimental design, with pre and post-test, an experimental group (n=110 and a control group (n=99. Its application was assessed on (a reading and writing; (b school achievement; (c self-esteem and study methods; (c school achievement causal attributions and, (e opinion of the teachers. The EG improved significantly compared to the CG indicating that such Program can bring not only school performance benefits but also personal ones for Portuguese students.

  19. Investigation and Analysis on Psychological Health Situation for Middle and Primary School Students in Xianning City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is used to know about the psychological health situation for middle and primary school students in Xianning City and provide a certain empirical basis for meaningful development of psychological health education and psychological assistance. This paper uses the MHT scale prepared by Bucheng Zhou professor et al. to conduct a test for 1000 students in 7 middle and primary schools in Xianning City. The detection rate of psychological health problem accounts for 1.6% where the positive detection rate of study anxiety ranks first (43.2%. The psychological health situations have much difference in sex (t = -4. 624, P<0. 001, and it’s lower in male students than female ones. There is a significant difference between the psychological health situation for only and non-only children (t = -2. 519, P<0. 01.There is a significant difference on the psychological health situation for primary school, middle school and high school students (F = 11. 3, P<0. 001, and the psychological health situation of primary school students is better than that for middle school students. It can be concluded that the psychological health situation of middle and primary school students in Xianning City is fairly good, and the psychological health situation for male student, only children and primary school student is also fairly good.

  20. Effects of Social Psychological Phenomena on School Psychologists' Ethical Decision-Making: A Preliminary Empirical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Laurie McGarry; Lasser, Jon; Reardon, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    This preliminary, exploratory study examines the impact of select social psychological phenomena on school-based ethical decision-making of school psychologists. Responses to vignettes and hypothetical statements reflecting several social psychological phenomena were collected from 106 practicing school psychologists. Participants were asked to…

  1. Voices in International School Psychology: Interviews in Honor of Calvin D. Catterall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Frances M.

    Following a brief memorial message and a dedicatory tribute to Calvin D. Catterall, a leader in the field of school psychology, this volume provides a description of the origins of the International School Psychology Association and interviews with five school psychologists: Bram Norwich, University of London, England; Tony Cline, London, England;…

  2. Development and Initial Examination of the School Psychology Multicultural Competence Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Celeste M.; Briggs, Candyce; Ricks, Elizabeth; Middleton, Kyndra; Fisher, Sycarah; Connell, James

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the initial development and examination of the School Psychology Multicultural Competence Scale (SPMCS), a 45-item self-report measure for evaluating school psychologists' multicultural competence in the primary domains of school psychology practice (i.e., assessment, consultation, intervention). A sample of 312 school…

  3. Characteristics of Intervention Research in School Psychology Journals: 2010-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Castro, Maria J.; Umaña, Ileana; Sullivan, Jeremy R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an updated content analysis of articles published in major journals of school psychology spanning the years 2010-2014, with an emphasis on intervention research (including intervention and participant characteristics). Six journals--"School Psychology Review," "School Psychology…

  4. Contextual positive psychology: Policy recommendations for implementing positive psychology into schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ciarrochi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a rapid growth in positive psychology, a research and intervention approach that focuses on promoting optimal functioning and well-being. Positive psychology interventions are now making their way into classrooms all over the world. However, positive psychology has been criticized for being decontextualized and coercive, and for putting an excessive emphasis on positive states, whilst failing to adequately consider negative experiences. Given this, how should policy be used to regulate and evaluate these interventions? We review evidence that suggests these criticisms may be valid, but only for those interventions that focus almost exclusively on changing the content of people’s inner experience (e.g., make it more positive and personality (improving character strength, and overemphasize the idea that inner experience causes action. We describe a contextualized form of positive psychology that not only deals with the criticisms, but also has clear policy implications for how to best implement and evaluate positive education programs so that they do not do more harm than good.

  5. Cyberbullying, school bullying, and psychological distress: a regional census of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Shari Kessel; O'Donnell, Lydia; Stueve, Ann; Coulter, Robert W S

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a regional census of high school students, we have documented the prevalence of cyberbullying and school bullying victimization and their associations with psychological distress. In the fall of 2008, 20,406 ninth- through twelfth-grade students in MetroWest Massachusetts completed surveys assessing their bullying victimization and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms, self-injury, and suicidality. A total of 15.8% of students reported cyberbullying and 25.9% reported school bullying in the past 12 months. A majority (59.7%) of cyberbullying victims were also school bullying victims; 36.3% of school bullying victims were also cyberbullying victims. Victimization was higher among nonheterosexually identified youths. Victims report lower school performance and school attachment. Controlled analyses indicated that distress was highest among victims of both cyberbullying and school bullying (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] were from 4.38 for depressive symptoms to 5.35 for suicide attempts requiring medical treatment). Victims of either form of bullying alone also reported elevated levels of distress. Our findings confirm the need for prevention efforts that address both forms of bullying and their relation to school performance and mental health.

  6. Bringing Psychological Science to the Forefront of Educational Policy: Collaborative Efforts of the American Psychological Association's Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Stephen A.; Subotnik, Rena F.; Bassford, Maya; Smulson, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The following article details the work of the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Coalition for Psychology in the Schools and Education (CPSE). First, a brief history of the background and creation of the coalition is described. The article then details the projects, completed and ongoing, of the CPSE. Those projects include a Teacher…

  7. Investigation of social cognitive career theory for minority recruitment in school psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Joel O; Gubi, Aaron A; Cappaert, Kevin J

    2016-06-01

    School psychology trainers have historically struggled to adequately increase the number of professionals from diverse backgrounds. An increase in diverse providers is important in meeting the needs of a burgeoning racial/ethnic minority student population. Previous research suggests that minority undergraduate psychology students have less knowledge and exposure to school psychology than for counseling and clinical psychology, and that students with greater exposure or knowledge of school psychology reported significantly greater choice intentions for school psychology. The purpose of this study is to test the applicability of the Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT; Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) in explaining minority undergraduate psychology students' choice intentions for school psychology. This study is an analysis of existing data and is based on a national sample of 283 minority undergraduate psychology students. All instruments used in this study were found to have internal consistency ranging from .83 to .91. Students' learning experiences, self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and choice intentions for school psychology were evaluated by way of a mediator analysis. Results from a path analysis suggest that outcome expectations mediated the relationship between exposure and choice intentions for school psychology. Implications for minority recruitment practices are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Evaluating a Psychology Graduate Student Peer Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Christina; Mullins, Morell E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on mentoring outcomes and characteristics of various types of mentoring programs in different settings is limited. The present study sampled 39 graduate students at a small Midwestern university to evaluate peer mentoring in a graduate school setting. Mentoring function and outcome relationships as well as program characteristics were…

  9. The Home-School Psychological Contract: Implications for Parental Involvement in Middle Schooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renihan, Patrick J.; Renihan, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    Contends that social change has created a need for parents and teachers to develop strategies to improve communication, mutual understanding, and effective ways to nurture and educate young adolescents. Addresses the psychological contract between school and home, strategies and stances, and considerations and strategies for strengthening the…

  10. A history of the founding and early development of the Journal of School Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K; Jack, Sabrina L

    2012-12-01

    Historical aspects of the founding and early development of the Journal of School Psychology are discussed. Emphases are placed on the first decade of the journal, the factors in its founding and development, persons who have served as editors and members of the editorial boards and corporate leadership, and the journal's changing formats. The publication's relationships to the Journal of School Psychology, Inc. and later to the Society for the Study of School Psychology are briefly mentioned. Copyright © 2012 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enriching science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R

    2016-03-01

    This editorial provides a brief synthesis of the past, present, and future of School Psychology Quarterly, highlighting important contributions as an international resource to enrich, invigorate, enhance, and advance science, practice, and policy relevant to school psychology around the globe. Information herein highlights (a) the value of high quality and timely reviews, (b) publishing manuscripts that address a breadth of important topics relevant to school psychology, and (c) the structure and contributions of the special topic sections featured in School Psychology Quarterly. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Principles from history, community psychology and developmental psychology applied to community based programs for deinstitutionalized youth

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Murray

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This article analyses the issues of the deinstitutionalization of youth, and the development of community based services, using some historical data and some of the principles of community psychology. The basic premise is that there is no such thing as a social vacuum. All programs are implemented and function in an elaborate social context. RESUMO: Este artigo analisa as questões referentes à desinstitunalização dos jovens e ao desenvolvimento de serviços ...

  13. Guidelines for preparing high school psychology teachers: course-based and standards-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Psychology is one of the most popular elective high school courses. The high school psychology course provides the foundation for students to benefit from psychological perspectives on personal and contemporary issues and learn the rules of evidence and theoretical frameworks of the discipline. The guidelines presented here constitute the second of two reports in this issue of the American Psychologist (January 2013) representing recent American Psychological Association (APA) policies that support high-quality instruction in the teaching of high school psychology. These guidelines, aligned to the standards presented in the preceding report, describe models for the preparation of preservice psychology teachers. The two reports together demonstrate the rigor and competency that should be expected in psychology instruction at the high school level.

  14. Rx for a Healthy School Nutrition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Julie

    2009-01-01

    School nutrition directors face challenges on many fronts, from changing nutrition standards to addressing community interest in sustainability and local food sourcing. Programs are constantly changing to meet these new demands. How does a school business administrator know which changes will affect his/her school nutrition program positively? The…

  15. 77 FR 67572 - Magnet Schools Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 280 [Docket ID ED-2010-OII-0003] RIN 1855-AA07 Magnet Schools... amended the regulations governing the Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) to provide greater... creation of magnet schools that result in minority group enrollments in magnet and feeder schools exceeding...

  16. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  17. Experimental Research in School Psychology Internationally: An Assessment of Journal Publications and Implications for Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeny, John C.; Levy, Rebecca A.; Hida, Rahma; Norwalk, Kate

    2018-01-01

    Past studies have examined the contents of journal articles in school psychology, and more recently there has been increased interest in examining the frequency and characteristics of experimental studies appearing in school psychology journals. However, no prior studies have examined the international representation of experimental and…

  18. Educational and School Psychology in Newfoundland and Labrador: A 15-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Rhonda; Paul, Heather; Adey, Keith; Wilmott, Angela; Harris, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational psychology is an important profession in the Newfoundland and Labrador school system. Educational psychologists have core training in the areas of education and psychology and offer a variety of services to students, families, and teachers in the school system. This article builds on Martin's reflections by exploring the evolution of…

  19. The Perceptions of Academic Women in School Psychology: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin-Little, K. Angeleque; Bray, Melissa A.; Eckert, Tanya L.; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    There is a paucity of research examining the experiences and perceptions of women employed as school psychology academicians. The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain female school psychology academicians' perceptions of their respective academic climates, levels of support, incidences of harassment, and levels of stress. Comparisons…

  20. The Application of Social Justice Principles to Global School Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, David; Clinton, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In as much as school psychology practice is based on the goals of supporting the rights, access, and treatment of children as related to their education, social justice has the potential to be a moral framework for training, research, and practice in school psychology. Accordingly, this article seeks to achieve many objectives. First, a definition…

  1. Children's Rights and School Psychology: Historical Perspective and Implications for the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Stuart N.; Hart, Brannon W.

    2014-01-01

    School psychology and children's rights have great potential, well beyond what has been realized, for advancing the best interests of children, their communities, and societies. A child rights approach infused into school psychology can significantly contribute to the fulfillment of this potential. To respect and illuminate these factors and…

  2. Examining Diversity Research Literature in School Psychology from 2004 to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunewald, Stephanie; Shriberg, David; Wheeler, Anitra S.; Miranda, Antoinette Halsell; O'Bryon, Elisabeth C.; Rogers, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    One indicator of school psychology's capacity to provide culturally responsive practice is the percentage of articles in leading school psychology journals that have a "significant diversity focus." To date, there have been three published empirical studies (Brown, Shriberg, & Wang; Miranda & Gutte; Rogers Wiese) that have…

  3. The Legal Quality of Articles Published in School Psychology Journals: An Initial Report Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2014-01-01

    As a follow-up to a companion study (Zaheer & Zirkel, in press) that focused on the legal content in school psychology, this analysis examined legal quality. The companion study found that only 35 of the more than 7,000 articles in five leading journals of school psychology for the period 1970-2013 met rather relaxed standards for being law…

  4. The emergence and evolution of school psychology literature: A scientometric analysis from 1907 through 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyan; Oakland, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this current study is to identify the growth and development of scholarly literature that specifically references the term 'school psychology' in the Science Citation Index from 1907 through 2014. Documents from Web of Science were accessed and analyzed through the use of scientometric analyses, including HistCite and Pajek software, resulting in the identification of 4,806 scholars who contributed 3,260 articles in 311 journals. Whereas the database included journals from around the world, most articles were published by authors in the United States and in 20 journals, including the Journal of School Psychology, Psychology in the Schools, School Psychology Review, School Psychology International, and School Psychology Quarterly. Analyses of the database from the past century revealed that 20 of the most prolific scholars contributed 14% of all articles. Contributions from faculty and students at University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of South Carolina, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and University of Texas-Austin represented 10% of all articles including the term school psychology in the Science Citation Index. Relationships among some of the most highly cited articles are also described. Collectively, the series of analyses reported herein contribute to our understanding of scholarship in school psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. An International Partnership Promoting Psychological Well-Being in Sri Lankan Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Jayasena, Asoka N. S.

    2014-01-01

    This article illustrates the application of psychological and educational consultation in an international setting. With the goal of promoting psychological well-being of the school-age population, a partnership was formed between an American school psychologist and a Sri Lankan educational sociologist and teacher educator. The partners, or…

  6. The image of psychology programs: the value of the instrumental-symbolic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoye, Greet; Lievens, Filip; De Soete, Britt; Libbrecht, Nele; Schollaert, Eveline; Baligant, Dimphna

    2014-01-01

    As competition for funding and students intensifies, it becomes increasingly important for psychology programs to have an image that is attractive and makes them stand out from other programs. The current study uses the instrumental-symbolic framework from the marketing domain to determine the image of different master's programs in psychology and examines how these image dimensions relate to student attraction and competitor differentiation. The samples consist of both potential students (N = 114) and current students (N = 68) of three psychology programs at a Belgian university: industrial and organizational psychology, clinical psychology, and experimental psychology. The results demonstrate that both instrumental attributes (e.g., interpersonal activities) and symbolic trait inferences (e.g., sincerity) are key components of the image of psychology programs and predict attractiveness as well as differentiation. In addition, symbolic image dimensions seem more important for current students of psychology programs than for potential students.

  7. Influence of work-family-school role conflicts and social support on psychological wellbeing among registered nurses pursuing advanced degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lijuan; Song, Rhayun

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine how work-family-school role conflict and social support influence psychological well-being among registered nurses pursuing an advanced degree. A cross-sectional, correlational study design was used. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 320 registered nurses pursuing an advanced nursing degree at 13 hospitals in Korea, from June to October 2011. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling with the AMOS program. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to evaluate the measurement model prior to the testing of study hypotheses before and after controlling for extraneous variables. The fit parameters of the modified model (χ(2)/df=2.01, GFI=0.91, AGFI=0.89, CFI=0.92, SRMR=0.068, and RMSEA=0.065) indicated its suitability as the research model. This model explained 45% of the variance in work-related psychological well-being and 52% of the variance in general psychological well-being. Both social support and work-family-school role conflict exerted significant effects on work-related psychological well-being and general psychological well-being. The findings of the present study imply that work-family-school role conflict influences the psychological well-being of registered nurses pursuing an advanced degree. It is necessary for nursing administrators to develop strategies to help registered nurses to manage their multiple roles and improve both their work-related psychological well-being and their general psychological well-being. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Law Enforcement School Programs. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas Safe Schools Initiative Division, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The school shooting incidents during the decade of the 1990's prompted an increase of law enforcement presence in schools. The School Violence Resource Center (SVRC) at the Criminal Justice Institute (CJI) University of Arkansas System undertook a project to determine what programs law enforcement agencies currently provide in their local schools…

  9. Teaching Statistics in APA-Accredited Doctoral Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology: A Syllabi Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Anna S.; Ripley, Jennifer S.; Hook, Joshua; Erspamer, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Although statistical methods and research design are crucial areas of competency for psychologists, few studies explore how statistics are taught across doctoral programs in psychology in the United States. The present study examined 153 American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral programs in clinical and counseling psychology and aimed…

  10. How to Make School Lunch Programs Pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, Len

    Food waste, student rejection of Type A meals, and the difficulty of keeping school food service departments in the black have been the three major problems in the school lunch program. The Las Vegas Fast Food Combo Program provides an answer. By providing the foods students want to eat--foods of the type advertised everywhere--and making that…

  11. Developing Financial Resources for School Arts Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Alan C.; Ambler, Nancy Morison

    This document provides a sampling of financial resources for fine arts programs in the schools and lists methods for submitting proposals and dealing with sponsors of funds. Financial sources for arts programs include school districts, organizations and institutions, special events, direct mail, individuals, associations and clubs, businesses and…

  12. School Psychology Research and Practice in East Asia: Perspectives on the Past, Present, and Future Directions of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Dong Hun; McIntosh, Kent

    2016-01-01

    To engage in a comparison of school psychology research and practice in eastern and western countries, the current study sought to identify key themes that have influenced the field of school psychology in East Asian countries. Forty-six leading school psychology professionals in Japan, Hong Kong, South Korea, Thailand, and Taiwan provided their…

  13. Academic Leaderships Views of School Psychology and Black Students: The Case of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeks, Amirah; Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand academic leadership's views of the field of school psychology. This is the first study that has attempted to incorporate the views of historically Black college and university (HBCU) Psychology Department Chairs' regarding the field of school psychology and the potential development of school psychology…

  14. Racial Microaggressions and School Psychology Students: Who Gets Targeted and How Intern Supervisors Can Facilitate Racial Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Sherrie L.; Kyle, Jennifer; Lau, Cindy; Fefer, Keren; Fischetti, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate ethnically and racially diverse school psychology students' experiences with racial microaggressions in school psychology graduate training. Through a national survey of ethnically and racially diverse school psychology students (N = 228), the study examined if level of graduate training (i.e., interns…

  15. School Culture, Basic Psychological Needs, Intrinsic Motivation and Academic Achievement: Testing a Casual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Badri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Culture is s common system of believes, values and artifacts that the members of a society use it in their relations, and it transfers from one generation to another. The school culture is a system of norms, meanings and values between school members. One of STD (self-determination theory components is basic psychological needs that emphasizes on Relatedness, Competence and Autonomy to accomplish the motivation. Motivation involves the processes that energize, direct, and sustain behavior. It seems that school culture, basic psychological needs and motivation has immense effect on academic achievement. The purpose of the present research was to examine the relation between students' perceived school culture, basic psychological needs, intrinsic motivation and academic achievement in a causal model. 296 high school students (159 females and 137 males in Tabriz, north - west of Iran, participated in this research and completed the students' perceived school culture questionnaire based on Hofstede's cultural dimensions (femininity, uncertainty avoidance, collectivism and power distance, basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation. The results of the path analysis showed that fulfillment of basic psychological needs and intrinsic motivation has positive effect on academic achievement. Uncertainty avoidance and power distance have also negative effect on fulfillment of psychological needs, but the influence of femininity on this variable was positive. Also, collectivism has no significant effect on it. In general, the findings showed that if school culture supports students' autonomy, they will experience fulfillment of their basic psychological needs, and attain higher intrinsic motivation and academic achievement.

  16. Reducing School Violence: School-Based Curricular Programs and School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines two different, but interrelated approaches to reduce school violence: school-based curricular programs and efforts to change school climate. The state of the research for each is reviewed and the relationship between them is explored.

  17. The Preparation of School Psychologists and Specialists in Educational Psychology in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Elinor

    2014-01-01

    School psychologists have a new and stronger position in Sweden's educational system than earlier. For example, as of July 2011, all Swedish students ages 6 through 18 have guaranteed access to school psychology services. The school psychologists' roles are to be active participants and coworkers in the student health service team, working to…

  18. Culture and Identity in School Psychology Research and Practice: Fact versus Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews and critiques the article by Frisby (2015) in this special issue of "School Psychology Forum" as well as Frisby's book, "Meeting the Psychoeducational Needs of Minority Students: Evidence-Based Guidelines for School Psychologists and Other School Personnel" (Frisby, 2013). The concepts discussed are in the…

  19. Diversification of School Psychology: Developing an Evidence Base from Current Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Jamilia J.; Graves, Scott; Newell, Markeda; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2016-01-01

    Why is there a need to increase the racial/ethnic diversity of faculty in school psychology? Chiefly, school psychologists serve the most racially/ethnically diverse population: children in US schools. Therefore, developing a knowledge base that is inclusive of this wide range of perspective as well as growing a workforce that is reflective of…

  20. Internship Training Directors' Perceptions of School Psychology Internship Applicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Emery B.; Perfect, Michelle M.; Edwinson, Roxanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, an imbalance between the number of available American Psychological Association (APA)-accredited internships and applicants has existed. In 2014, 14% of predoctoral psychology students who applied for internships accredited by the APA or members of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) did…

  1. Off ramp : a secondary school TDM program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haq, F. [Better Environmentally Sound Transportation (BEST), Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The cities of Vancouver and Victoria in British Columbia have implemented a high school vehicle trip reduction program entitled Off-Ramp. The program, created by BEST, is about youth empowerment to help youths lead their peers to walk, cycle, skateboard, in-line skate, or carpool to school for a sustainable environment. Students raise awareness through media and drama to counter pop images of driving as being cool. Sponsorship is very important to the success of the program.

  2. The effect of teacher psychological, school organizational and leadership factors on teachers’ professional learning in Dutch schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijsel, F.P.; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Stoel, R.D.; Krüger, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined the relative importance of teachers' psychological states, school organizational conditions (teacher collaboration and participative decision making), and the leadership practices (vision, individual consideration, and intellectual stimulation) of principals at their

  3. Gratitude and Adolescents' Subjective Well-Being in School: The Multiple Mediating Roles of Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lili; Pi, Luyang; Huebner, E S; Du, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Based on the relation between gratitude and general subjective well-being (SWB), and Basic Psychological Needs Theory (Ryan and Deci, 2000), the present study's aim was to use structural equation modeling to test the multiple mediational roles of the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs at school in accounting for the association between gratitude and SWB in school (school satisfaction, school affect) in adolescents. A total of 881 Chinese adolescents (427 males; Mean age = 12.97) completed a multi-measure questionnaire that tapped the targeted variables. Findings revealed that gratitude related significantly, positively to adolescents' SWB in school. Moreover, a multiple-mediators analysis suggested that relatedness and competence needs satisfaction at school mediated the relation between gratitude and SWB in school. Lastly, a multiple-mediators analysis also indicated that autonomy needs satisfaction mediated the relation between relatedness and competence needs and SWB in school. Limitations and practical applications of the study were discussed.

  4. Gratitude and Adolescents’ Subjective Well-Being in School: The Multiple Mediating Roles of Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lili; Pi, Luyang; Huebner, E. S.; Du, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    Based on the relation between gratitude and general subjective well-being (SWB), and Basic Psychological Needs Theory (Ryan and Deci, 2000), the present study’s aim was to use structural equation modeling to test the multiple mediational roles of the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs at school in accounting for the association between gratitude and SWB in school (school satisfaction, school affect) in adolescents. A total of 881 Chinese adolescents (427 males; Mean age = 12.97) completed a multi-measure questionnaire that tapped the targeted variables. Findings revealed that gratitude related significantly, positively to adolescents’ SWB in school. Moreover, a multiple-mediators analysis suggested that relatedness and competence needs satisfaction at school mediated the relation between gratitude and SWB in school. Lastly, a multiple-mediators analysis also indicated that autonomy needs satisfaction mediated the relation between relatedness and competence needs and SWB in school. Limitations and practical applications of the study were discussed. PMID:27708601

  5. Psicologia, cognição e sucesso escolar: concepção e validação dum programa de estratégias de aprendizagem Psychology, cognition and school success: validation of the learning strategies program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Maria Ferreira Diogo Dias Pocinho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo apresentamos a concepção e validação dum programa de estratégias de aprendizagem promotor do sucesso académico, bem como do bem-estar pessoal e escolar. Cada conteúdo de aprendizagem utiliza uma estratégia com 8 estádios: Pré-teste e Contrato, Descrição, Modelação, Prática Verbal, Prática Controlada e Feedback, Prática Avançada e Feedback, Pós-teste e Contratos, e Generalização. Trata-se dum estudo quasi-experimental, com pré e pós-teste, grupo experimental e de controlo. Avaliou-se o efeito do programa na (a compreensão e expressão verbal; (b aproveitamento escolar; (c auto-estima, hábitos de estudo; (d atribuições causais do sucesso; e (e opiniões dos professores. O GE (n=110 melhorou significativamente comparativamente ao GC (n=99 indicando que o Programa traz benefícios escolares e pessoais aos estudantes portugueses.This article presents a Learning Strategies Program developed to provide academic success as well as personal well-being. Each content of learning is based on a strategy with 8 stages: Pre-test and Contract, Description, Modeling, Verbal Practice, Practice and Feedback Control, Advanced Practice and Feedback, Post-test and Contracts, and Generalization. This is a quasi-experimental design, with pre and post-test, an experimental group (n=110 and a control group (n=99. Its application was assessed on (a reading and writing; (b school achievement; (c self-esteem and study methods; (c school achievement causal attributions and, (e opinion of the teachers. The EG improved significantly compared to the CG indicating that such Program can bring not only school performance benefits but also personal ones for Portuguese students.

  6. Mindfulness-oriented meditation for primary school children: Effects on attention and psychological well-being.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano eCrescentini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mindfulness-based interventions are increasingly being used as methods to promote psychological well-being of clinical and nonclinical adult populations. Much less is known, however, on the feasibility of these forms of mental training on healthy primary school students. Here, we tested the effects of a mindfulness-meditation training on a group of 16 healthy children within 7–8 years of age from an Italian primary school. An active control condition focused on emotion awareness was employed on a group of 15 age-matched healthy children from the same school. Both programs were delivered by the same instructors three times per week, for 8 total weeks. The same main teacher of the two classes did not participate in the trainings but she completed questionnaires aimed at giving comprehensive pre-post training evaluations of behavior, social, emotion, and attention regulation skills in the children. A children’s self-report measure of mood and depressive symptoms was also used. From the teacher’s reports we found a specific positive effect of the mindfulness-meditation training in reducing attention problems and also positive effects of both trainings in reducing children's internalizing problems. However, subjectively, no child in either group reported less depressive symptoms after the trainings. The findings were interpreted as suggestive of a positive effect of mindfulness-meditation on several children’s psychological well-being dimensions and were also discussed in light of the discrepancy between teacher and children’s reports. More generally, the results were held to speak in favor of the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions for healthy primary school children.

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HIGHER SCHOOL STUDENTS’ COMMUNICATIVE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Nechayev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The present-day higher education in Russia based on a two-level system is oriented as to high standards of education as to the labour market requirements. Among the competences meant for these requirements satisfaction there is a communicative competence providing a person’s social interaction in the given professional area by way of bilingual language means (Russian and a second language. However, the well-known facts of the students’ language proficiency falling down as related to both languages are to witness the insufficient care for communicative competence formation at higher school.The aim of the research is to highlight the psychological aspects of higher school students’ communicative training that is viewed as the process of their mastering a specialized language of a profession (using both Russian and the second language as the means of professionally-oriented bilingual verbal communication.Methodology and research methods. Considering the activity approach as the basis for higher education process study, the author outlines the stages of professional consciousness development (objective, theoretical and practical, treating them as the stages of the future professionals’ specific characters and psychological abilities development in the course of their mastering the professional activity objective content. The relationship of verbal communication and object-oriented activity as the central methodological problem of the paper is studied by way of analyzing a number of theoretical communication models.Results and scientific novelty. The author defines communicative preparation at the higher school as a process of development among students of the specialized language of profession (both native and foreign acting as means of the professional focused bilingual speech communication. It is emphasized that this preparation has to become a core of professional development of students and have complex and intersubject

  8. The direct cost of "Thriasio" school screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziotou Christina

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is great diversity in the policies for scoliosis screening worldwide. The initial enthusiasm was succeeded by skepticism and the worth of screening programs has been challenged. The criticisms of school screening programs cite mainly the negative psychological impact on children and their families and the increased financial cost of visits and follow-up radiographs. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the direct cost of performing the school screening in a district hospital. Methods A cost analysis was performed for the estimation of the direct cost of the "Thriasio" school-screening program between January 2000 and May 2006. The analysis involved all the 6470 pupils aged 6–18 years old who were screened at schools for spinal deformities during this period. The factors which were taken into consideration in order to calculate the direct cost of the screening program were a the number of the examiners b the working hours, c the examiners' salary, d the cost of transportation and finally e the cost of examination per child. Results During the examined period 20 examiners were involved in the program and worked for 1949 working hours. The hourly salary for the trainee doctors was 6.80 euro, for the Health Visitors 6.70 euro and for the Physiotherapists 5.50 euro in current prices. The cost of transportation was 32 euro per year. The direct cost for the examination of each child for the above studied period was calculated to be 2.04 euro. Conclusion The cost of our school-screening program is low. The present study provides a strong evidence for the continuation of the program when looking from a financial point of view.

  9. Comments on "Distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology:" Evidence-based interventions for grandiose bragging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwill, Thomas R

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide some perspectives on Lilienfeld, Ammirati, and David's (2012) paper on distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology. In many respects their work represents an intervention for "grandiose bragging," a problem that has occasionally occurred when various non-evidence-based or discredited interventions receive sensationalized positive endorsement for adoption in school psychology practice. In this paper, the implications of the Lilienfeld et al. work are discussed within the context of the scientist-practitioner gap, scientific thinking and evaluation of scientific thinking, and negative results research. The authors have advanced our thinking on evidence-based practices in school psychology and education. Copyright © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Counseling, Psychological, and Social Services Staffing: Policies in U.S. School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Nancy; Demissie, Zewditu

    2018-06-01

    Schools are in a unique position to meet the mental and behavioral health needs of children and adolescents because approximately 95% of young people aged 7-17 years attend school. Little is known, however, about policies related to counseling, psychological, and social services staffing in school districts. This study analyzed the prevalence of such policies in public school districts in the U.S. Data from four cycles (2000, 2006, 2012, and 2016) of the School Health Policies and Practices Study, a national survey periodically conducted to assess policies and practices for ten components of school health, were analyzed in 2017. The survey collected data related to counseling, psychological, and social services among nationally representative samples of school districts using online or mailed questionnaires. Sampled districts identified respondents responsible for or most knowledgeable about the content of each questionnaire. The percentage of districts with a district-level counseling, psychological, and social services coordinator increased significantly from 62.6% in 2000 to 79.5% in 2016. In 2016, 56.3% of districts required each school to have someone to coordinate counseling, psychological, and social services at the school. Fewer districts required schools at each level to have a specified ratio of counselors to students (16.2% for elementary schools, 16.8% for middle schools, and 19.8% for high schools), and the percentage of districts with these requirements has decreased significantly since 2012. Increases in the prevalence of district-level staffing policies could help increase the quantity and quality of counseling, psychological, and social services staff in schools nationwide, which in turn could improve mental and behavioral health outcomes for students. This article is part of a supplement entitled The Behavioral Health Workforce: Planning, Practice, and Preparation, which is sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

  11. PSYCHOLOGICAL GUIDING OF STUDENTS’ INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONAL TRAJECTORIES IN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evald F. Zeer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to prove the possibility and necessity of psychological support of students’ individual educational trajectories. The essence of individual educational trajectories is informed and responsible choices subject target orientation to realize their professional and educational potential in accordance with traditional values, attitudes and meanings of life. Methods. «Method of research of a locus of the control» by J. Rotter was used in pilot study of personal development features of students for studying of specificity of the person control and responsibility attribution for events occurring to personality; a questionnaire «Style of self-control of behaviour» by V. I. Morosanova for estimation of abilities to plan achievement of the vital purposes, abilities to self-organising; the method «Personal differential» by Ch. Osguda to find out representations of the individual about himself/herself, something own, level of aspiration, strong-willed selfcontrol, degree of communicativeness in interpersonal relations; the method of studying of requirement for achievements by Yu. M. Orlov was used to reveal features of displays of activity and behaviour. Results. It is shown that high dynamics of economic processes and the integration of manufacturing technologies have generated the need for its networking, and led to a new organizational form of education – individual learning paths. The choice of educational trajectory is determined by socio-professional orientation of students, their value-sense orientation, the availability of alternative educational programs, opportunities for educational organizations. The structurally functional model of psychological guiding of working out and realisation of individually-educational trajectories is proposed. The authors have described basic elements of the given model – the purpose, object, subject, subject matter, principles, means, conditions and results. In particular

  12. PSYCHOLOGICAL GUIDING OF STUDENTS’ INDIVIDUAL EDUCATIONAL TRAJECTORIES IN VOCATIONAL SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evald F. Zeer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to prove the possibility and necessity of psychological support of students’ individual educational trajectories. The essence of individual educational trajectories is informed and responsible choices subject target orientation to realize their professional and educational potential in accordance with traditional values, attitudes and meanings of life. Methods. «Method of research of a locus of the control» by J. Rotter was used in pilot study of personal development features of students for studying of specificity of the person control and responsibility attribution for events occurring to personality; a questionnaire «Style of self-control of behaviour» by V. I. Morosanova for estimation of abilities to plan achievement of the vital purposes, abilities to self-organising; the method «Personal differential» by Ch. Osguda to find out representations of the individual about himself/herself, something own, level of aspiration, strong-willed selfcontrol, degree of communicativeness in interpersonal relations; the method of studying of requirement for achievements by Yu. M. Orlov was used to reveal features of displays of activity and behaviour. Results. It is shown that high dynamics of economic processes and the integration of manufacturing technologies have generated the need for its networking, and led to a new organizational form of education – individual learning paths. The choice of educational trajectory is determined by socio-professional orientation of students, their value-sense orientation, the availability of alternative educational programs, opportunities for educational organizations. The structurally functional model of psychological guiding of working out and realisation of individually-educational trajectories is proposed. The authors have described basic elements of the given model – the purpose, object, subject, subject matter, principles, means, conditions and results. In particular

  13. Psychological and School Functioning of Latino Siblings of Children with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Debra; Kao, Barbara; Plante, Wendy; Seifer, Ronald; Grullon, Edicta; Cheas, Lydia; Canino, Glorisa

    2011-01-01

    Background: Siblings of children with disabilities are at risk for internalizing psychological disorders; however, little is known about how culture influences this effect. This study examined the psychological and school functioning of Latino siblings of children with intellectual disability (ID). Methods: Participants were 100 Latino (L) and…

  14. Exploring Neuropsychology: Seeking Evidence of Added Worth to School Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassu, Kari A.; Gelbar, Nicholas W.; Bray, Melissa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.; Patwa, Shamim

    2015-01-01

    Historically, school psychological assessment has included the core elements of cognitive, academic, and behavioral indices. Neuropsychological assessment has included these and the additional elements of attention, memory, language, visual-spatial, motor, sensory, and executive functioning (American Psychological Association, 2006). With the…

  15. Understanding the Development of School Psychology Services in the Republic of Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; D'Amato, Rik Carl

    2013-01-01

    School psychology is one of the most important fields within applied psychology, which is closely related to education and as a developing specialty it is important to be considered. Taiwan is an important Western ally and is highly developed in many ways. Taiwan is influenced by both Western and Eastern cultures, and this has inevitably impacted…

  16. Sport Psychology Teaching Approaches for High School Coaches and Their Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jenelle N.

    2017-01-01

    Coaches lacking a formal background in sport psychology may shy away from teaching these skills in favor of teaching physical skills with which they are more familiar. Other coaches may assume that athletes will learn sport psychology skills as a byproduct of their coaching pedagogy. Regardless, high school coaches are responsible for teaching…

  17. Investigation of Social Cognitive Career Theory for Minority Recruitment in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra, Joel O.; Gubi, Aaron A.; Cappaert, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    School psychology trainers have historically struggled to adequately increase the number of professionals from diverse backgrounds. An increase in diverse providers is important in meeting the needs of a burgeoning racial/ethnic minority student population. Previous research suggests that minority undergraduate psychology students have less…

  18. Positive Psychology in Jewish Education: Gratitude in the School and Synagogue Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Eliezer; Schnall, David

    2017-01-01

    Positive psychology is a rapidly growing area of study for research psychologists, and more recently for school psychologists and educators as well. Yet religious education researchers and practitioners have yet to embrace this exciting new field. The current article introduces positive psychology to clergy and educators in religious institutions.…

  19. Scientific research in school psychology: Leading researchers weigh in on its past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Kent; Martinez, Rebecca S; Ty, Sophie V; McClain, Maryellen B

    2013-06-01

    A survey of established researchers in school psychology was conducted to reflect on the state of the science of school psychology research. A total of 54 members of the Society for the Study of School Psychology shared their perceptions of (a) the most significant findings of the past 25years that have influenced research and practice in school psychology, (b) current, exciting research topics, and (c) topics that are likely to guide the future of research in school psychology. Qualitative analyses revealed 6 major categories and 17 minor categories within the major categories. Four major categories were present across each of the three time periods: (a) Data-Informed Practices and their Implementation, (b) Theory Development, (c) Changing Role and Function, and (d) Biological Bases of Behavior. Additional major categories included Advances in Research Methodology and Psychometrics (found across past and present time periods) and There is Not One Single Most Important Idea (found during only the past time period). Quotations are provided to illustrate these categories and share the respondents' ideas in their own words. Copyright © 2013 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Kamehameha Schools Program of Hawaiian Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Donald D.

    1975-01-01

    Article described the efforts of the Kamehameha Schools to teach a program of Hawaiian subjects to help the young citizens of Hawaii in their quest for knowledge and skills in this culture. (Author/RK)

  1. Assessment of elementary school safety restraint programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify elementary school (K-6) safety belt : education programs in use in the United States, to review their development, and : to make administrative and impact assessments of their use in selected States. : Six...

  2. Complex Situational Tasks in Assessment of Educational Outcomes in “Psychological Assessment of Students” Module of the Master’s Programme in School Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andruschenko T.Y.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the content of midterm performance evaluation of graduate students within the “Psychological Assessment” module of the master’s programme in School Psychology and focuses on the logic of the module’s design in relation to the professional standard in Educational Psychology. Complex situational tasks are considered in the modular program as the main means of assessing educational outcomes. The content of these tasks is determined by a range of diagnostic situations and closely corresponds with the real-life practice of educational psychologists. Setting complex situational tasks is related to a number of components of the educational psychologist’s professional activity in the field of psychological assessment, such as: planning the sequence of professional actions; ensuring the methodological background for assessment; taking into account deontological aspects of communication with assessed individuals; carrying out professional actions; reflecting on the process and outcomes of assessment. The paper analyses the place and role of graduate students’ self-assessment in finding solutions to complex situational tasks and offers a description of one such task that can be used in midterm performance evaluation of graduate students.

  3. Public School Finance Programs, 1978-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Esther O., Comp.

    This compendium describes the programs of state financial aid to school districts that were in effect in the 1978-79 school year. The introductory section of the report is an analysis of the situation and contains summary tables. The report for each state consists of two parts. The first part reports features of the state and local systems of…

  4. School Compost Programs: Pathways to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumpert, Kary; Dietz, Cyndra

    2012-01-01

    After the oft-repeated three Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle) comes the lesser-known but equally important fourth R: rot. In this case, rot means compost. Classrooms, schools, and school districts can use a number of methods to establish a compost program. The finished product is a valuable soil amendment that adds fertility to local farmland, school…

  5. School-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Marla R.; Fiorvanti, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse is a leading cause of emotional, behavioral, and health problems across the lifespan. It is also preventable. School-based abuse prevention programs for early childhood and elementary school children have been found to be effective in increasing student knowledge and protective behaviors. The purpose of this article is to help school…

  6. PSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF PATRIOTISM MANIFESTATIONS IN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G A Shurukhina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern society, patriotism is manifested in all spheres of human life and it is understood as a love for the motherland and its people, as a sense of duty and pride for the country, a sense of honor and personal dignity, personal responsibility for occurring events, devotion to the country and its people. Patriotism is a complex concept including patriotic feelings of an individual. In the article, the peculiarities of the manifestation of patriotic feelings in high school students are analyzed on the basis of the system-functional approach. The study involved a group of senior students of secondary comprehensive school, a group of the representatives of the Ministry of Emergency Situations and cadets of a Cadet Corps. Statistically significant differences in sixteen variables characterizing manifestation of patriotic feelings were obtained in the group of cadets, the differences were observed in degrees of manifestation of both harmonic and inharmonic variables. High values were obtained for the variables of the reflective-evaluative component. The personal difficulties have got higher values which indicates a serious and responsible approach of cadets to the manifestation of patriotic feelings. These results were used to formulate correction programs aimed at the harmonization and development of patriotism among representatives of different age groups

  7. The Effect of Teacher Psychological and School Organizational and Leadership Factors on Teachers' Professional Learning in Dutch Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijsel, Femke P.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Stoel, Reinoud D.; Kruger, Meta L.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined the relative importance of teachers' psychological states, school organizational conditions (teacher collaboration and participative decision making), and the leadership practices (vision, individual consideration, and intellectual stimulation) of principals at their schools in explaining variation in teachers'…

  8. Neuroscience and Positive Psychology: Implications for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, Sue A.; Callaway, Yvonne L.

    2007-01-01

    Increasing research findings are pointing out that using positive psychology and wellness strategies in counseling and therapy are helpful in fostering healthy human development (Snyder & Lopez, 2001). Positive psychology is addressing the importance of positive emotions, character traits, and features of enabling institutions such as the 'good…

  9. Rethinking the early history of post-Vygotskian psychology: the case of the Kharkov school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasnitsky, Anton; Ferrari, Michel

    2008-05-01

    Between the death of Vygotsky in 1934 and the discovery of Vygotsky's work in the West in 1962, Vygotskian psychology was developed through research done by the first generation of Vygotsky's students and their followers, primarily associated with the Kharkov School. Surprisingly, these studies carried out in the 1930s, of great importance for the development of virtually all subsequent Vygotskian psychology, still remain largely unknown; this represents a significant gap in understanding the history of Vygotskian psychology as an empirical study of consciousness. This paper provides a systematic overview of the research agenda of the Kharkov group between 1931 and 1941 and provides new insights into the early development of Vygotskian psychology.

  10. The Adopt-a-School Service-Learning Program: Igniting Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs through School and University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, Jenny M.; Ford, Kristen M.; Knutson, Julie M.; Goplen, Hailey A.

    2018-01-01

    Physical educators have been identified as ideal school champions to lead comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) efforts within their schools. As such, they should be adequately prepared to take on this role. Faculty from three physical and health education teacher education programs have collaboratively developed the…

  11. Mental Health Awareness and Services in Armenian-American Schools: A Grant Proposal for a Teacher Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanielian, Aline Zarig

    2012-01-01

    School-based mental health programs in America provide students with psychological services that have been found to increase students' academic and social success and overall well-being. Furthermore, teacher involvement in students' psychological well-being via awareness, psychoeducation, and/or rendering help and resources has been found to be a…

  12. Positive psychology and ideas of cultural-historical school of L.S. Vygotsky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilev V.K.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article was carried out a comparative analysis between two distinctive psychology schools: the cultural-historical psychology of L.V. Vygotsky and the positive psychological school. Distinct are a number of significant similarities between their basic ideas that are valuable both for the development of human knowledge and for public practice. The authors have outlined and systematized the leading personal and intellectual qualities of the famous psychologists who have created the most promising theories in the psychological science. The category is highlighted as well as a small group of visionary psychologists who have identified the most important problems of man and psychology and have offered the best quality solutions to these problems. These are W. James, S. Freud, L. Vygotsky, E. Eriksson and A. Maslow; We’ve noticed that Vygotsky alone meets all the criteria, as if the concept of insightful psychologists was modeled over his creative work and his personality.

  13. Is there an emotional cost of completing high school? Ecological factors and psychological distress among LGBT homeless youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidell, Markus P

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the nexus of home and school climate on the psychological distress of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) homeless youth, as well as their experiences during high school. Of the LGBT homeless youth (N = 89) surveyed, 39.3% reported not completing high school. Most participants did not seek support from school staff nor did they report attending a school with a Gay-Straight Alliance. Significantly higher levels of psychological distress were found among high school graduates and those reporting LGBT harassment at home; however, harassment experienced at school was not statistically related to psychological distress. Findings are discussed.

  14. Impact of Physical, Psychological, and Sexual Violence on Social Adjustment of School Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sibnath; Walsh, Kerryann

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to understand the pervasiveness and impact of physical, psychological, and sexual violence on the social adjustment of Grade 8 and 9 school children in the state of Tripura, India. The study participants, 160 boys and 160 girls, were randomly selected from classes in eight English and Bengali medium schools in Agartala city,…

  15. School Psychology 2010: Demographics, Employment, and the Context for Professional Practice--Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael J.; Castillo, Jose M.; Gelley, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    The National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) established a policy in 1989 mandating a national study of the field every 5 years. The purpose of the studies was to generate a comprehensive description of the field of school psychology across the United States, as well as to allow for analyses of changes in the field over time. The first…

  16. The Changing Face of School Psychology: Trends in Data and Projections for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael J.; Grier, J. Elizabeth Chesno; Hunley, Sawyer A.

    2004-01-01

    Trends in data from the past to the present are described for demographic variables (gender, race and ethnicity, preparation levels, credentialing, age and experience) and ratio of students to school psychologists. School psychology in the United States will continue to be characterized as primarily Caucasian, specialist- level and female through…

  17. Diversity Research Literature on the Rise? A Review of School Psychology Journals from 2000 to 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephanie L.; Shriberg, David; Wang, Aimin

    2007-01-01

    School psychologists in the United States are not nearly as diverse demographically as the students they serve (T.K. Fagan & P.S. Wise, 2000). A.H. Miranda and P.B. Gutter (2002) investigated the number of diversity-related articles in four leading school psychology journals from 1990 to 1999 and found that there was an increase in the…

  18. Researching Pupil Well-Being in UK Secondary Schools: Community Psychology and the Politics of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckett, Paul; Sixsmith, Judith; Kagan, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the relationships between a school, its staff and its pupils and the impact of these relationships on school pupils' well-being. The authors adopted a community psychological perspective and applied critical, social constructionist epistemologies and participatory, multi-method research tools. The article discusses the…

  19. The Association between Bullying and Psychological Health among Senior High School Students in Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Andrew; Hart, Peter; Oliver, Brittney; Kang, Minsoo

    2011-01-01

    Background: School-based bullying, a global challenge, negatively impacts the health and development of both victims and perpetrators. This study examined the relationship between bullying victimization and selected psychological variables among senior high school (SHS) students in Ghana, West Africa. Methods: This study utilized data from the…

  20. Struggles for Order and Control of School Behaviour: A Sketch for a Social Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funnell, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Behaviour management is acknowledged as a leading psychological method to reduce classroom conflict by applying "rational choice" techniques. But it falls short in schools where poor academic results are reproduced, as is illustrated in an analysis of misbehaviour in an Australian rural school. It is argued that explanations of behaviour…

  1. Cultural Diversity Climate and Psychological Adjustment at School-Equality and Inclusion versus Cultural Pluralism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Maja K.; Noack, Peter; Van de Vijver, Fons J. R.; Eckstein, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The present study is concerned with cultural diversity climate at school and how it relates to acculturation orientations and psychological school adjustment of early adolescent immigrants. Specifically, the distinct role of two types of diversity policy is investigated, namely (a) fostering equality and inclusion and (b) acknowledging cultural…

  2. Adolescents' psychological well-being and self-esteem in the context of relationships at school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkova, Maria; Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Katreniakova, Zuzana; van den Heuvel, Wim; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The school environment has shown itself to be an important factor in explaining adolescent behaviour. The relationships and experiences that pupils have at school have been found to influence their development, psychological well-being, self-esteem and social adjustment. Purpose: The aim

  3. The 2002 Revision of the American Psychological Association's Ethics Code: Implications for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Rosemary; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Jacob, Susan

    2005-01-01

    The Ethical Principles for Psychologists and Code of Conduct has been recently revised. The organization of the code changed, and the language was made more specific. A number of points relevant to school psychology are explicitly stated in the code. A clear advantage of including these items in the code is the assistance to school psychologists…

  4. Home-school Relations--An Exploration from the Perspective of Social Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, I-wah

    2000-01-01

    Explores home-school relations by using three social psychology theories: (1) symbolic interactionism; (2) social exchange theory; and (3) reference group theory. States that these theories can contribute to the understanding and development of home-school relations in Hong Kong (China). (CMK)

  5. The Effect of Sports on the Psychological Well-Being Levels of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Özgür; Çaglayan, Hakan Salim; Akandere, Mehibe

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effect of sports education on psychological well-being levels of high school students in terms of individual, environmental and self-determination. This study group consists of totally 187 high school students, in other words 97 students (n[subscript male] = 48, n[subscript female] = 49) receive education in…

  6. Toward Understanding School Psychology around the Globe: Economical, Educational, and Professional Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacqueline A.; Jimerson, Shane R.

    2015-01-01

    Although the field of school psychology continues to develop rapidly, few recent studies have examined how it is directly affected by a country's economy and education. This study examined the effect of gross domestic product, public spending on education, and public support for education on the ratio of school psychologists to students, level of…

  7. Adolescents' Psychological Health and Experiences with Unwanted Sexual Behavior at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Greetje

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between experiences with unwanted sexual behavior at school and adolescents' health. Adolescent boys and girls (N = 2,808) participated in a 1998/1999 survey of secondary school students in two regions of The Netherlands. The psychological issues investigated included psychosomatic problems and self-esteem. It…

  8. Relationships between Teacher Organizational Commitment, Psychological Hardiness and Some Demographic Variables in Turkish Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Ferudun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between teachers' organizational commitment perceptions and both their psychological hardiness and some demographic variables in a sample of Turkish primary schools. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 405 randomly selected teachers working at primary schools in Ankara…

  9. Maternal Parenting and Social, School, and Psychological Adjustment of Migrant Children in Urban China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Siman; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relations of maternal warmth, behavioral control, and encouragement of sociability to social, school, and psychological adjustment in migrant children in China. The participants were 284 rural-to-urban migrant children (M age = 11 years, 149 boys) in migrant children's schools and their mothers. Data on parenting were…

  10. Adolescents' psychological health and experiences with unwanted sexual behavior at school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, G

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between experiences with unwanted sexual behavior at school and adolescents' health. Adolescent boys and girls (N = 2,808) participated in a 1998/1999 survey of secondary school students in two regions of The Netherlands. The psychological issues investigated

  11. Pediatric Psychology: Applications to the Schools Needs of Children with Health Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Joseph D.; Flanagan, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A review of pediatric psychology considers interventions by school personnel to promote the school adjustment of children with serious medical illness. Psychosocial and educational impacts of cancer, spina bifida, enuresis, and encopresis are discussed; and suggestions for managing children with chronic health disorders, serious illness, and…

  12. Adolescents' Psychological Well-Being and Self-Esteem in the Context of Relationships at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkova, Maria; Bacikova-Sleskova, Maria; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Katreniakova, Zuzana; van den Heuvel, Wim; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The school environment has shown itself to be an important factor in explaining adolescent behaviour. The relationships and experiences that pupils have at school have been found to influence their development, psychological well-being, self-esteem and social adjustment. Purpose: The aim of the study is to explore whether there is a…

  13. Business Schools' Programs Turn Felons into Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Mike Potts was halfway through a five-year prison sentence outside Houston when he heard about a program that would help him start a business when even buddies with clean records were struggling to find work. The Prison Entrepreneurship Program, run by a nonprofit group of the same name, works with Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business…

  14. Screening for psychological distress among High School Graduates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iman Hassan Diab

    2017-03-14

    Mar 14, 2017 ... Background: Mental and psychological health of adolescents in general ... depression was diagnosed among 14.3% of students whereas, ..... Breslau J. The impact of early behaviour disturbances on academic achievement.

  15. School Counselors and Psychological Aspects of Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, David A.

    1984-01-01

    Provides an overview of some of the more common psychological theories and behavioral variables associated with learning disabilities. Reviews Adlerian Rational Emotive and behavioral and hypnotherapy approaches as intervention strategies for the counselor confronted with learning disabled students. (LLL)

  16. What can an intern of psychology do at school? Discussing the practice and professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiana Dapieve Patias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available School psychology is dedicated to integrate actions that can facilitate the process of learning and development of scholar community. The psychologist has the function of reviewing his or her own professional concepts and practices constantly so that he or she can deal with the complexity of this reality, broadening the concept of school complaints in order to identify other factors associated with these complaints. This paper presents a report on the interventions done during an internship of school psychology at an Elementary School in the countryside of RS. It was noticed an initial necessity of awareness about the psychologist role and about a greateracceptance of a job that could not be just clinical. The practice of the psychologist and of the psychology intern in this context were discussed and related to education and health in a broad sense.

  17. Use of a Supplementary Internet Based Education Program Improves Sleep Literacy in College Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Stuart F.; Anderson, Janis L.; Hodge, Gordon K.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Knowledge regarding the importance of sleep in health and performance and good sleep hygiene practices is low, especially among adolescents and young adults. It is important to improve sleep literacy. Introductory psychology is one of the most highly enrolled courses at colleges and universities. This study tested the impact of an Internet-based learning module on improving sleep literacy in this venue. Methods: An Internet-based supplementary learning module containing sleep physiology and hygiene information was developed using content from the Harvard Medical School sleep educational website http://www.understandingsleep.org. Access to the module was provided as an extra credit activity for 2 of 4 sections (Supplemental Sleep, SS, N = 889) of an introductory college psychology course during their standard instruction on sleep and dreaming. The remaining 2 sections (Standard Instruction, SI, N = 878) only were encouraged to visit the website without further direction. Level of knowledge was assessed before and after availability to the module/website and at the end of the semester. Students were asked to complete a survey at the end of the semester inquiring whether they made any changes in their sleep behaviors. Results: Two hundred fifty students participated in the extra credit activity and had data available at all testing points. Students in the SS Group had a significant improvement in sleep knowledge test scores after interacting with the website in comparison to the SI group (19.41 ± 3.15 vs. 17.94 ± 3.08, p sleep habits after participation in the extra credit sleep activity (p sleep learning module has the potential to enhance sleep literacy and change behavior among students enrolled in an introductory college psychology course. Citation: Quan SF; Anderson JL; Hodge GK. Use of a supplementary internet based education program improves sleep literacy in college psychology students. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):155-160. PMID:23372469

  18. BCASP and the Evolution of School Psychology in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agar, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Since 1992, the British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) has been the professional body for school psychologists in British Columbia. In the intervening 24 years, BCASP has been very successful in performing the dual roles of a certifying body and a professional development organization for school psychologists in British…

  19. Psychological school climate: on the structure of the notion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedunina N.Y.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article regards the structure of the notion "school structure". The traditionally singled out components of school climate — structure and culture — are amended by the notion of an "individual", which becomes central for the concept of school security and in fact takes a domineering position in estimation and correction of school climate. The article discusses the need in elaboration of a balanced model of a school climate, able to take into account three main constituents: structural, cultural and individual.

  20. Effects of a 5-month football program on perceived psychological status and body composition of overweight boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabra, A C; Seabra, A F; Brito, J

    2014-01-01

    The effects of a 5-month intervention of football instruction and practice on the perceived psychological status and body composition of overweight boys were examined. Twelve boys (8-12 years; body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) participated in a structured 5-month football program, consisting...... of four weekly 60-90 min sessions with mean heart rate > 80%HRmax [football group (FG)]. A control group (CG) included eight boys of equivalent age from an obesity clinic located in the same area as the school. Both groups participated in two sessions of 45-90-min physical education per week at school....... Indicators of perceived psychological status included body image, self-esteem, attraction to participation in physical activity, and perceived physical competence measured with standardized questionnaires. Body composition was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. From baseline through 5 months...

  1. The school psychologist's role in implementing the principles of positive psychology in the development of the school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Slavica B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serbian school system is currently undergoing a transformation process, dealing with important issues of interest to society as a whole. One of the possible directions of this transformation is the development of a positive school as an institution in which value is placed not only on achievement but also on the wellbeing of all parties. This paper considers to what extent the professional potential of school psychologists could be utilized in this process. The analysis presented here aims to reassess the possibilities of applying the principles of positive psychology to defining and implementing the role of school psychologists, and to put forward along these lines certain suggestions for their practical work. For this purpose, we have reviewed the theoretical foundations of positive education and related research findings, analysed regulations and research findings regarding the work of school psychologists in Serbian schools, and discussed prospects for their further engagement from the standpoint of contemporary theories of organizational changes and development. The possibilities for creating a positive school have been corroborated through numerous studies. According to Serbian school regulations, the school psychologist is expected to be engaged in improving all aspects of work in a school, as well as relationships between all participants in that process. Research findings on building a positive school provide a stimulus, while the position of the school psychologist provides the basis for his or her engagement in the process of transforming Serbian schools into positive schools. The conclusion is that school psychologists could contribute to the development of the school as a positive institution provided their professional role is redefined in accordance with the principles of positive psychology.

  2. Criteria Based Case Review: The Parent Child Psychological Support Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Bujia-Couso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Parent Child Psychological Support Program (PCPS was established in an area of South West Dublin in 2001. Since then until May 2008 it has offered its services to over 700 children and their parents. This preventative, parenting support service is available to all parents of children aged 3 to 18 months within its catchment area. During periodical visits, the infant’s development and growth are measured and parents receive specific information about their child’s progress. Parents are empowered in their parenting practices, thus promoting consistency and synchrony in parent-child interaction. Between 2001 and 2006, 538 parents and their infants participated in the Program. Out of these cases, 130 (24.16% were considered to require additional support and were included in the Monthly Meeting Case Review (MM based on initial concerns The aims of this study were: 1. to review the first five years of MM cases and to explore the socio-demographic profile of the MM cases in comparison to those not in need of additional support (non-MM and 2. To illustrate an approach to refining the case review process which will inform practice and provides the service providers with better understanding of the early detection of parent-child relation difficulties. In pursuing this goal the cases screened over five years of practice were analyzed to explore the structure of the different factors by using statistical techniques of data reduction, i.e. factor analysis. The results showed that the MM group differed on several socio-demographic dimensions from the non-MM group and there was a four factor structure underlying the case review decision process. Implications of this research are discussed.

  3. Research Productivity in Top-Ranked Schools in Psychology and Social Work: Research Cultures Do Matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holosko, Michael J.; Barner, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We sought the answer to one major research question--Does psychology have a more defined culture of research than social work? Methods: Using "U.S. News and World Report" 2012 and 2013 rankings, we compared psychology faculty (N = 969) from their 25 top ranked programs with a controlled sample of social work faculty (N = 970)…

  4. DoD Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program for High School Students, 1995-󈨤 Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    University of Florida Sports Medicine Honor Roll Weightlifting , Swimming NAME: RACE: SEX: HIGH SCHOOL: ANTICIPATED COLLEGE: ANTICIPATED MAJOR...program. Three of the students took a Psychology course, one took a Nutritional Science class, one a Math course and two of them took a Meteorology...Awards and Scholarships: Honor Roll 13. Activities/Hobbies: Weightlifting , Swimming (Suggested Form) INFORMATION FOR EACH APPRENTICE

  5. A Program for Improving Undergraduate Psychology Students' Basic Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Carolyn R.; Wood, Rebecca M.; Austad, Carol Shaw; Fallahi, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    We examined the effects of in-class writing instruction, practice, peer review, and feedback on writing skills of undergraduates enrolled in a general psychology course. We rated writing for grammar, writing style, mechanics, and American Psychological Association referencing style. Significant differences emerged on the 4 writing skill domains (p…

  6. School Oral Health Program in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Jitendra; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Nazar, Huda

    2014-01-01

    The School Oral Health Program (SOHP), Kuwait, is a joint venture between the Ministry of Health, Kuwait, and Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., USA. This program provides oral health education, prevention and treatment to almost 280,000 public school children in Kuwait. Services are delivered through a system of center- and school-based clinics and preventive mobile teams. One of the recent developments is the effective use of portable dental units for the delivery of preventive care to children in schools without the need for children to go to dental clinics. Preventive procedures performed under this program are the biannual application of fluoride varnish and the placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted permanent molars and premolars. During recent years, the SOHP has improved its coverage of children, with prevention up to 80%. This has resulted in a considerable reduction in treatment needs, which is evident from the reduced number of composite restorations performed under this program during the last 6 years. This indicates that the disease level is on a decline, which can be confirmed from the results of the ongoing National Oral Health Survey on Kuwaiti school children. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. ACE: A Collaborative School Consultation Program for Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Caroline; Massé, Line

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a description of ACE (Accompagnement collaboratif des enseignants (Collaborative teacher accompaniment)), a new program designed to guide secondary school teachers in integrating students with behavioral problems in their classrooms. ACE proposes collaborative accompaniment inspired by behavioral and mental health…

  8. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity Representation in School Psychology Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of the current intervention research is critical to the adoption of evidence-based practices in the delivery of psychological services; however, the generalizability and utility of intervention research for culturally and linguistically diverse youth may be limited by the types of research samples utilized. This study addresses…

  9. Promoting Resilience in Schools: A View from Occupational Health Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers teacher resilience from the viewpoint of a discipline concerned with the interactions between work design, management style and employee health and well-being: occupational health psychology. It will be suggested that there are strong parallels between interventions designed to promote resilience and those designed to reduce…

  10. An Introduction to Adlerian Psychology for the School Counsellor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Alan M.

    The life and work of Alfred Adler is outlined with a listing and explanation of the five principles of his Individual Psychology: (1) social interest, (2) self-determinism, (3) goal directed behavior, (4) subjectively interpreted perception, and (5) holism. The Adlerian terms, life style and family constellation are likewise explained. There is…

  11. Body image and psychological well-being in adolescents: the relationship between gender and school type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfabbro, Paul H; Winefield, Anthony H; Anderson, Sarah; Hammarström, Anne; Winefield, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents (N=1281; M age = 15.2 years, SD = 0.51 years) from a state-wide sample of schools provided information about their psychological well-being, family functioning, extraversion, and perceived physical attractiveness and weight, using a questionnaire completed at school. Consistent with previous research, girls were significantly more likely than boys to be dissatisfied with their weight and physical appearance, and these factors explained significantly more variation in self-esteem than in life satisfaction or other measures of psychological well-being. The strong relationship between body dissatisfaction and self-esteem for adolescent girls was not moderated by school type (single sex or educational). However, girls who were dissatisfied but psychologically well adjusted tended to be more extraverted, have more close friends and receive greater family support.

  12. The Development of Intercultural Competency in School Psychology Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.; Lewis, Abigail A.; Anderson, Amy E.; Bernstein, Elana R.

    2015-01-01

    School psychologists often have the opportunity to work with students and families from varied backgrounds and cultures. While this can be an exciting and enriching part of the job, it can also be daunting for some practitioners, particularly those who are inadequately prepared. A number of strategies have been implemented in school psychology…

  13. Psychological Predictors of Career Decision Among School-going ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the contributory impact of spirituality, parental involvement and locus of control to the prediction of career decision-making among school going adolescents. A multiple regression statistical method was used in analyzing the data collected from 150 final year secondary school students. They were ...

  14. Ten Ways to Infuse Positive Psychology in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Scott

    2012-01-01

    School professionals, including school psychologists, have often operated from a problem- or deficit-based perspective with a focus on identifying and remediating psychoeducational disorders in children and adolescents. However, positive psychologists have argued that an exclusive focus on deficits does not offer a comprehensive perspective of…

  15. Helping Minority Children in School Psychology: Failures, Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    Observations that led to the development of the book, "Meeting the Psychoeducational Needs of Minority Students: Evidence-Based Guidelines for School Psychologists and Other School Personnel" (Frisby, 2013), will be discussed. This will be followed by a summary of the wide variety of the difficult and complex issues embedded within…

  16. Contingent self-worth moderates the relationship between school stressors and psychological stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizu, Kenichiro

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the moderating role of contingent self-worth on the relationships between school stressors and psychological stress responses among Japanese adolescents. A total of 371 Japanese junior high school students (184 boys and 187 girls, M age  = 12.79 years, SD = 0.71) completed the Japanese version of the Self-Worth Contingency Questionnaire and a mental health checklist at two points separated by a two-month interval. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were then used to determine whether contingent self-worth moderated the relationship between school stressors and psychological stress responses. The results indicated that, when psychological stress responses were controlled for at Time 1, contingent self-worth did not predict the psychological stress responses at Time 2. However, a two-way interaction between contingent self-worth and stressors was found to significantly influence psychological stress responses, thus indicating that stressors had a stronger impact on psychological stress responses among those with high contingent self-worth compared to those with low contingent self-worth. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Foods and Beverages Sold Outside of the School Meals Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the area of foods and beverages sold outside of the school meals program. (Contains 3 tables, 1 figure, and 2…

  18. Psychological intervention reduces self-reported performance anxiety in high school music students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M Braden

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Music performance anxiety (MPA can be distressing for many young people studying music, and may negatively impact upon their ability to cope with the demands and stressors of music education. It can also lead young people to give up music or to develop unhealthy coping habits in their adult music careers. Minimal research has examined the effectiveness of psychological programs to address MPA in young musicians. Sixty-two adolescents were pseudo-randomised to a cognitive behavioural (CB group-delivered intervention or a waitlist condition. The intervention consisted of psychoeducation, cognitive restructuring and relaxation techniques, identification of strengths, goal-setting, imagery and visualisation techniques to support three solo performances in front of judges. Significant reductions in self-rated MPA were found in both groups following the intervention and compared to their baseline MPA. This reduction was maintained at two-months follow-up. There appeared to be inconsistent effects of the intervention upon judge-rated MPA, however the presence of floor effects precluded meaningful reductions in MPA. There appeared to be no effect of the intervention upon judge-rated performance quality. This study highlights the potential for group-based CB programs to be delivered within school music curricula to help young musicians develop skills to overcome the often debilitating effects of MPA.

  19. Essential KPIs for School Nutrition Program Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the project was to develop a research based resource to support SN professionals in effectively utilizing KPIs to manage their programs. Methods: This project consisted of four phases. In Phase 1, a think tank of eight school nutrition professionals identified the general topic areas and format for the resource.…

  20. High School Peer Helping: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgariff, Lisa; Solomon, Mindy; Zanotti, Mary; Chambliss, Catherine

    Peer helpers can act as liaisons to high school guidance departments by identifying problems, making appropriate referrals, and encouraging others to obtain professional help if necessary. An active program can help ensure that in the future students are better prepared to handle conflicts that arise within marriage, career, and family. This study…

  1. 75 FR 21506 - Magnet Schools Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 280 RIN 1855-AA07 [Docket ID ED-2010-OII-0003] Magnet Schools Assistance Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education. ACTION: Interim... in the Federal Register an interim final rule and requested comments on that rule for the Magnet...

  2. School Recycling Programs: A Handbook for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This brochure describes some of the many recycling program options that schools can implement in their communities. It focuses on implementing actual recycling projects as a way of teaching the importance and benefits of recycling. The text examines the solid waste crisis and why Americans cannot continue to possess a disposable mentality. It…

  3. [Union-Endicott Schools: Foreign Language Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Raymond S.

    This brochure describing language programs to both parents and prospective high school language students in Endicott, New York focuses on developing student motivation and interest. Topics discussed include: (1) reasons for studying foreign language, (2) stages of foreign language learning, (3) course offerings, (4) homework, and (5) examinations.…

  4. A True Middle School Physical Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenoschok, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the various ways in which the developmental needs of middle school students can be met in a physical education program. The themes of exploration and individualization appear throughout the article to emphasize the importance of providing a variety of sports, games and physical activity options for middle…

  5. How To Prepare Program Proposals for the American Psychological Association Annual Convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    The purpose of this paper is to dispel myths about preparing program proposals for the American Psychological Association's annual convention. The report's goal is to increase the number of student presenters at future annual conventions. It has been determined that, for a variety of reasons, psychology graduate students participate more in poster…

  6. Analyzing the Psychological Symptoms of Students in Undergraduate Program in Elementary Mathematics Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masal, Ercan; Koc, Mustafa; Colak, Tugba Seda; Takunyaci, Mithat

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to analyse whether there is a difference or not in levels of having psychological symptoms of the students of undergraduate program in elementary mathematics teaching. Another aim of the research is to determine whether the levels of having psychological symptoms of the students differ or not regarding various…

  7. Rapid Growth of Psychology Programs in Turkey: Undergraduate Curriculum and Structural Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sümer, Nebi

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the other developing countries, undergraduate psychology programs in Turkish universities have rapidly grown in the last two decades. Although this sharp increment signifies the need for psychologists, it has also caused a number of challenges for effective teaching of psychology. The department chairs (N = 42) were interviewed with an…

  8. A Survey of Graduate Training Programs and Coursework in Forensic Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burl, Jeffrey; Shah, Sanjay; Filone, Sarah; Foster, Elizabeth; DeMatteo, David

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of graduate programs are available to students interested in the study of forensic psychology. The growth of forensic training opportunities is reflective of the wider development of forensic psychology as a discrete specialty area. An Internet-based survey was conducted to provide descriptive information to academic advisors…

  9. The School Psychology and Perception of Education Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Gravena Vanalli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at verifying the education professionals' perception about the performance of school psychologists. To attain this goal, 24 education professionals were interviewed, being 19 educators and five school psychologists from 11 private and public schools of two cities of São Paulo state. Based on descriptions about the psychologists' performance found in the literature, it is possible to compare them to the school psychologists' performance and to the education professionals' perception. From the data obtained, it was verified that the participants had knowledge, even though in a general perspective, about the performance area and considered important the service of those professionals to the school as an institution. However, it was noticed the difference of perception between the performances reported by the psychologists and these professionals' performance described by the other education professionals interviewed, seeming to generate dissatisfaction and possible conflicts. Therefore, it is necessary that the psychologist attributions become clearer and widespread so their interventions could match educators' expectations, provide satisfying results and be more frequently included in school institutions.

  10. Self-esteem and communication skills as predictors of psychological resilience for Turkish vocational school students

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem TAGAY; Sibel Karakelle

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes whether or not communication skills and self-esteem of vocational school students can predict their psychological resilience. The data of the study were collected from a total of 295 vocational school students including 147 female and 148 male in Burdur and Isparta. The study benefited from the Ego Resiliency Scale developed by Block and Kremen (1996) and adapted by Karaırmak (2007), the Communication Skills Evaluation Scale developed by Korkut (1996), and the Rosenberg Se...

  11. The Influences of Leadership Style and School Climate to Faculty Psychological Contracts: A Case of S University in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chin; Fu, Chi-Jung

    2006-01-01

    This study was to investigate the impacts of leadership style and school climate on faculty psychological contracts. Demographic variables were also tested. The findings indicated that overall perceptions of the faculties toward leadership style, school climate, and psychological contract were favorable. Moreover, leadership style and school…

  12. Strategies and Attributes of Highly Productive Scholars and Contributors to the School Psychology Literature: Recommendations for Increasing Scholarly Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rebecca S.; Floyd, Randy G.; Erichsen, Luke W.

    2011-01-01

    In all academic fields, there are scholars who contribute to the research literature at exceptionally high levels. The goal of the current study was to discover what school psychology researchers with remarkably high levels of journal publication do to be so productive. In Study 1, 94 highly productive school psychology scholars were identified…

  13. 78 FR 9529 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... collection burden inventory for the National School Lunch Program is 12,181,012. These changes are contingent... American children and adolescents: What changes in prevalence rates could not reveal. International Journal... purchase and consume at school. Researchers concluded that these kinds of changes in food exposure and...

  14. Student Performance in Introductory Psychology Following Termination of the Programmed Achievement Contingency at Mid-Semester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, Jack R.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the Programmed Achievement learning system in an introductory psychology course. This system is based on an instructional system of motivation and reward in which a crucial ingredient is the testing procedure. (Author/JR)

  15. Parental, Behavioral, and Psychological Factors Associated with Cigarette Smoking among Secondary School Students in Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Mao, Rong; Stanton, Bonita; Zhao, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We designed this study to assess parental, behavioral, and psychological factors associated with tobacco use among Chinese adolescents. The data were collected from 995 middle school students in Nanjing, China. Both smoking experimentation and current smoking (smoking in the past 30 days) were assessed among the study sample. Psychosocial measures…

  16. Trends in Methodological Rigor in Intervention Research Published in School Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.; Klingbeil, David A.; Ysseldyke, James E.; Petersen-Brown, Shawna

    2012-01-01

    Methodological rigor in intervention research is important for documenting evidence-based practices and has been a recent focus in legislation, including the No Child Left Behind Act. The current study examined the methodological rigor of intervention research in four school psychology journals since the 1960s. Intervention research has increased…

  17. Minority Students' Psychological Adjustment in the School Context: An Integrative Review of Qualitative Research on Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Elena; Birman, Dina

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at systematically analyzing the findings reported in qualitative research on acculturation and psychological adjustment in the school context. Content analysis was conducted using the deductively developed and inductively enriched system of categories. The results of the study provide insights into youths' acculturation and…

  18. Stress among School-Going Adolescents in Relation to Psychological Hardiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raminder

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the stress among school-going adolescents in relation to psychological hardiness and also to study the gender and locale-wise differences in various dimensions and components of stress. The study was conducted over a sample of 200 (100 rural and 100 urban) adolescents studying in 10+1 and 10+2 classes…

  19. Administrative Pressure to Practice Unethically and Burnout within the Profession of School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Dana E.; Weisz, Gaston; Lefkowitz, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This investigation involved the surveying of school psychology practitioners (N = 291) to determine the possible existence of a relationship between administrative pressure to practice unethically and impaired occupational health, as manifested in elevated levels of burnout, job dissatisfaction, and intent to exit the workforce. Almost one-third…

  20. A History of the Founding and Early Development of the "Journal of School Psychology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Thomas K.; Jack, Sabrina L.

    2012-01-01

    Historical aspects of the founding and early development of the "Journal of School Psychology" are discussed. Emphases are placed on the first decade of the journal, the factors in its founding and development, persons who have served as editors and members of the editorial boards and corporate leadership, and the journal's changing formats. The…

  1. School Psychology: How Universal Are Ethical Principles Approved by International Associations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, Jean L.

    2004-01-01

    Globalization is a dominant issue in all aspects of business and professional activities in the 21st Century. The International School Psychology Association and the International Test Commission have adopted ethics and competency guidelines to raise the standards of practice for their members. Other international organizations are doing likewise.…

  2. Psychological Correlates of School Bullying Victimization: Academic Self-Concept, Learning Motivation and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims at detecting the association between students' bullying victimization at school and some psychological dimensions, referred to academic self-concept (for both Mathematics and Reading), learning motivation (intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, commitment to study) and test anxiety. A questionnaire including these measures was…

  3. The Importance of the Beginning Teachers' Psychological Contract: A Pathway toward Flourishing in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollansky, Tracy D.

    2014-01-01

    Beginning teachers enter the profession with notions about what their school organization will provide for them and what they will give their organization, in exchange. Psychological contracts, as defined by Schein exist between beginning teachers and their organization. I contend, with the use of a conceptual framework, that if the implicit terms…

  4. The Emergence and Evolution of School Psychology Literature: A Scientometric Analysis from 1907 through 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuyan; Oakland, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this current study is to identify the growth and development of scholarly literature that specifically references the term "school psychology" in the Science Citation Index from 1907 through 2014. Documents from Web of Science were accessed and analyzed through the use of scientometric analyses, including HistCite and…

  5. School Psychology in China (PRC), Hong Kong and Taiwan: A Cross-Regional Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Kuo, Yi-Lung; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Although China (People's Republic of China [PRC]), Hong Kong and Taiwan have many similarities in language, culture, values, Confucian traditions, family systems and other social-environmental variables, school psychological services in the three regions are distinctly different in both history and practice. Few studies in the psychology…

  6. Effects of a Sexual Health Education Programme on School Psychological Counsellor Candidates' Sexism Tendencies in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Hanife

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a sexual health curriculum developed for school psychological counsellors in Turkey on the sexual health knowledge of the participating candidates, their beliefs in sexual myths and their tendencies towards ambivalent sexism and sexism in romantic relationships. The study adopted a semi-experimental design. Study…

  7. Advancing Child Protection through Respecting Children's Rights: A Shifting Emphasis for School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorvanti, Christina M.; Brassard, Marla R.

    2014-01-01

    The moral imperative of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, backed by robust empirical findings, leads to the conclusion that the protection of children from violence and neglect and the promotion of their well-being should be major priorities in every society. This article argues that "School Psychology: A Blueprint for…

  8. Bridging Social Justice and Children's Rights to Enhance School Psychology Scholarship and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, David; Desai, Poonam

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the overlap between the common goals of social justice and children's rights advocates as applied to scholarship and practice in school psychology. We argue that these frameworks overlap a great deal, with a primary distinction being the roots of each approach. Specifically, the origins of social justice movements in…

  9. The Translation of Basic Behavioral Research to School Psychology: A Citation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Derek D.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, school psychology has become increasingly grounded in data-based decision making and intervention design, based upon behavior analytic principles. This paradigm shift has occurred in part by recent federal legislation, as well as through advances in experimental research replicating laboratory based studies. Translating basic…

  10. School Psychology as a Relational Enterprise: The Role and Process of Qualitative Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Daniel S.; Clare, Mary M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the application of qualitative research to establishing a more complete understanding of relational processes inherent in school psychology practice. We identify the building blocks of rigorous qualitative research design through a conceptual overview of qualitative paradigms, methodologies, methods (i.e.,…

  11. The Elaboration Likelihood Model: Implications for the Practice of School Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Richard E.; Heesacker, Martin; Hughes, Jan N.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews a contemporary theory of attitude change, the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) of persuasion, and addresses its relevance to school psychology. Claims that a key postulate of ELM is that attitude change results from thoughtful (central route) or nonthoughtful (peripheral route) processes. Illustrations of ELM's utility for school…

  12. Publishing about Autism Spectrum Disorder in Six School Psychology Journals: 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenney, Elizabeth L. W.; Dorencz, Julie; Bristol, Ryan M.; Hall, Lacey P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rise in the number of students identified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with increasing estimates of prevalence still emerging from cohorts monitored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, dissemination to a school psychology audience about these students' needs has been disparate, with…

  13. An Examination of the Relationship between Supervision and Self-Efficacy in Early Career School Psychologists, School Psychology Interns, and Practicum Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaas, Felicia M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between self-efficacy and supervision in early career school psychologists and school psychology graduate students who are currently completing either their practicum or internship experiences. The sample consisted of practicing early career school psychologists (ECPs) and school psychology…

  14. Social and Psychological Factors Related to Risk of Eating Disorders Among High School Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfoukha, Marwa M; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Banihani, Manar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Prevalence of eating disorders (EDs) has increased among adolescents in Arabic and Western countries. The purposes are to identify the risk of ED and psychosocial correlates of risk of ED among high school girls in Jordan. The researchers employed a cross-sectional, correlational design using 799 high school girls from governmental and private schools in the central region of Jordan. The results indicate that prevalence of the risk of ED was 12%. The risk of ED had significant and positive correlation with body shape dissatisfaction, self-esteem, psychological distress, and pressure from family, peers, and media ( p self-esteem, negative peer pressure, and being young were significant predictors of the risk of EDs. Risk of ED is highly prevalent among high school girls, and school nurses need to adopt a model of care addressing the risk factors while caring for high school girls.

  15. Zero Waste: A Realistic Sustainability Program for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumpert, Kary; Dietz, Cyndra

    2012-01-01

    Eco-Cycle, one of the nation's oldest and largest nonprofit recycling organizations, has coordinated recycling services and environmental education programs for the two Boulder area public school districts (80 schools) since 1987. In 2005, Eco-Cycle launched the Green Star Schools program in four pilot elementary schools with the goal of moving…

  16. Psychological Challenges Affecting Primary School Going Orphans In Wanganui Community Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbwirire John

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to identify psychological challenges affecting primary school orphans in Wanganui Community in Zimbabwe. The study employed a mixed method approach combining questionnaires with teachers and care givers interview sessions with orphans and in-depth interviews with community socialdevelopment worker. The study finds that lack of love lack of attention and withdrawal were the main signs and symptoms of psychological challenge in the community. The study revealed that the term and symptoms of psychological challenges were understood differently between African context and Western context. The study recommended that action must be taken as soon as possible once the signs and symptoms which include lack of love lack of attention to rectify the psychological challenges faced by the community.

  17. Contextualizing School Psychology Practice: Introducing Featured Research Commentaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Matthew K.

    2013-01-01

    Bronfenbrenner (1977) defined ecological-systems theory (EST) as the study of the multiple interconnected environmental systems that influence individual development. To understand the child, psychologists must fully examine the environment in which the child lives including the home, school, community, and culture (Bronfenbrenner, 1986). There…

  18. Negative life events and school adjustment among Chinese nursing students: The mediating role of psychological capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqin; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Tian, Xiaohong; Zou, Guiyuan; Li, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Adjustment difficulties of college students are common and their school adjustment has gained wide concern in recent years. Negative life events and psychological capital (PsyCap) have been associated with school adjustment. However, the potential impact of negative life events on PsyCap, and whether PsyCap mediates the relationship between negative life events and school adjustment among nursing students have not been studied. To investigate the relationship among negative life events, PsyCap, and school adjustment among five-year vocational high school nursing students in China and the mediating role of PsyCap between negative life events and school adjustment. A cross-sectional survey design was conducted. 643 five-year vocational high school nursing students were recruited from three public high vocational colleges in Shandong of China. Adolescent Self-Rating Life Event Checklist (ASLEC), the Psychological Capital Questionnaire for Adolescent Students scale (PCQAS), and the Chinese College Student Adjustment Scale (CCSAS) were used in this study. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of PsyCap. Negative life events were negatively associated with the dimensions of school adjustment (interpersonal relationship adaptation, learning adaptation, campus life adaptation, career adaptation, emotional adaptation, self-adaptation, and degree of satisfaction). PsyCap was positively associated with the dimensions of school adjustment and negatively associated with negative life events. PsyCap partially mediated the relationship between negative life events and school adjustment. Negative life events may increase the risk of school maladjustment in individuals with low PsyCap. Interventions designed to increase nursing students' PsyCap might buffer the stress of adverse life events, and thereby, enhance students' positive adjustment to school. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ethics Education in Professional Psychology: A Survey of American Psychological Association Accredited Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech Rodriguez, Melanie M.; Erickson Cornish, Jennifer A; Thomas, Janet T; Forrest, Linda; Anderson, Austin; Bow, James N

    2014-01-01

    Professional psychologists are expected to know ethical standards and engage in proactive analysis of ethical considerations across professional roles (e.g., practice, research, teaching). Yet, little is known about the current state of doctoral ethics education in professional psychology, including the content covered and pedagogical strategies used to ensure developing this core component of professional competency (de las Fuentes, Willmuth, & Yarrow, 2005). A survey of ethics educators fro...

  20. After-School Academic Enrichment Programs. Information Capsule. Volume 1509

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2016-01-01

    The number of U.S. children attending after-school programs has been steadily increasing. In 2014, the most recent year for which data were available, approximately 10.2 million students, representing about 23 percent of U.S. families, were enrolled in an after-school program. Of the students attending after-school programs, the majority do so at…

  1. Australian Waste Wise Schools Program: Its Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy

    2010-01-01

    The Waste Wise Schools program has a longstanding history in Australia. It is an action-based program that encourages schools to move toward zero waste through their curriculum and operating practices. This article provides a review of the program, finding that it has had notable success in reducing schools' waste through a "reduce, reuse,…

  2. Link for Injured Kids: A Patient-Centered Program of Psychological First Aid After Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Toussaint, Maisha; Woods-Jaeger, Briana; Harland, Karisa; Wetjen, Kristel; Wilgenbusch, Tammy; Pitcher, Graeme; Jennissen, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Injury, the most common type of pediatric trauma, can lead to a number of adverse psychosocial outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder. Currently, few evidence-based parent programs exist to support children hospitalized after a traumatic injury. Using methods in evaluation and intervention research, we completed a formative research study to develop a new program of psychological first aid, Link for Injured Kids, aimed to educate parents in supporting their children after a severe traumatic injury. Using qualitative methods, we held focus groups with parents and pediatric trauma providers of children hospitalized at a Level I Children's Hospital because of an injury in 2012. We asked focus group participants to describe reactions to trauma and review drafts of our intervention materials. Health professionals and caregivers reported a broad spectrum of emotional responses by their children or patients; however, difficulties were experienced during recovery at home and upon returning to school. All parents and health professionals recommended that interventions be offered to parents either in the emergency department or close to discharge among admissions. Results from this study strongly indicate a need for posttrauma interventions, particularly in rural settings, to support families of children to address the psychosocial outcomes in the aftermath of an injury. Findings presented here describe the process of intervention development that responds to the needs of an affected population.

  3. US Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, E; Davis, C

    1998-04-01

    This article reviews the history of the US Department of Agriculture School Breakfast Program (SBP) and provides a synthesis of factors influencing participation rates. Certain children are more likely to participate than others, such as those in lower grades and those from low-income households, and African American, Hispanic, and male students. A few studies in the past 25 y have examined the effectiveness of the SBP in improving the diets and nutritional status of children. The overall pattern that emerges from these studies is that the SBP contributes to improved nutrient intake in program participants. Less attention has been devoted to assessing the effects of SBP on cognitive development. Some of the evidence reviewed here suggests that the SBP significantly improves school performance and reduces absenteeism and tardiness. Future directions for research and operation of the SBP are discussed in light of the changing dietary profile of American children.

  4. Promoting the development of children with disabilities through school inclusion: clinical psychology in supporting teachers in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Tomai

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an intervention study developed within an international cooperation program, and aimed at promoting the school inclusion of children with disabilities in Mozambique. To avoid the risk of exporting models from a local context to another, and in order to favour a sustainable social change, a participatory and ecological framework was adopted. The main aim of the Participatory Action Research (PAR carried out was to explore teachers’ views and beliefs concerning disability and inclusion, and determine best practices to fully include students with disabilities. The paper illustrates the overall outcomes of a participatory research development process, and the results achieved in each phase. The final purpose is to increase the knowledge on school inclusion of children with disabilities in the Global South. Potentials and challenges of using clinical psychological, ecological and collaborative paradigms to address issues concerning health promotion and development of children with disabilities and local development are also discussed.

  5. FORMATION OF SCHOOL MANAGERS: THEORETICAL-PRACTICAL CONTRIBUTIONS OF HISTORICAL-CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Figueiredo Salmen Seixlack Bulhões

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the experience of training school managers based on the theoretical assumptions of historical-cultural psychology. The intervention took place as one of the actions of the Project Education Without Borders (PESF - a partnership between the Municipal Secretary of Education and the psychology department of a state University of São Paulo in assisting schools that have low IDEB (Basic Education Development Index. Study meetings were held monthly with the managers of the six participating schools and with representatives of the pedagogical department of the Municipal Secretary of Education. The themes of the meetings were established based on the demand of the group, which chose as study goals: 1. understanding the production of motives and interests for the students' learning and 2. understanding how the study activity is formed and developed as a main activity at school age. As a strategy of theoretical-practical articulation, the proposition of study tasks on the themes discussed in each meeting was adopted. As a reference, the concept of study task of Davydov and Markova (1987 was used. The results point out that the application of the theoretical assumptions of historical-cultural psychology to the concrete demands of the organization of teaching in the daily school life makes it possible to overcome the traditional dichotomy between theory and practice in teacher education and promotes the construction of new guidelines for pedagogical practice.

  6. The Preparation of School Psychologists in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzichristou, Chryse; Polychroni, Fotini

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the preparation of school psychologists in Greece. It discusses the social and cultural contexts that have influenced the evolution of the discipline of psychology, the beginning of training programs in school psychology, and the current status of school psychological services. The structure of the Graduate Program of School…

  7. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

  8. Psychological disturbance in atopic eczema: the extent of the problem in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absolon, C M; Cottrell, D; Eldridge, S M; Glover, M T

    1997-08-01

    Although psychological factors are widely considered to be important in atopic eczema, there have been few controlled studies to assess the extent of disturbance in affected children and the problems experienced by their parents. This study was designed to find out the degree of psychological difficulty experienced by children with atopic eczema, whether their mothers show higher levels of mental distress than a comparison group, and whether the families of children with atopic eczema have less social support than the comparison group. We investigated 30 school-aged children with atopic eczema for psychological problems using the Rutter parent scale and compared them with 30 children with relatively minor skin lesions such as viral warts. Mental distress in mothers was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire. The Family Support Scale was used to get a measure of the social support experienced by the families. We found twice the rate of psychological disturbance in children in the eczema group compared with the control group. This difference was statistically significant for children with moderately severe eczema and severe eczema, but not for children with very mild eczema. Levels of mental distress were no greater in mothers of children with eczema than in parents of the control group and there was no difference in the degree of social support experienced by their families. These findings indicate that school-aged children with moderate and severe atopic eczema are at high risk of developing psychological difficulties, which may have implications for their academic and social development.

  9. School Wellness Programs: Magnitude and Distribution in New York City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Leanna; Elbel, Brian; Prescott, Melissa Pflugh; Aneja, Siddhartha; Schwartz, Amy Ellen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Public schools provide students with opportunities to participate in many discretionary, unmandated wellness programs. Little is known about the number of these programs, their distribution across schools, and the kinds of students served. We provide evidence on these questions for New York City (NYC) public schools. METHODS Data on wellness programs were collected from program websites, NYC’s Office of School Food and Wellness, and direct contact with program sponsors for 2013. Programs were grouped into categories, nutrition, fitness, and comprehensive, and were combined with data on school characteristics available from NYC’s Department of Education. Numbers of programs and provision of programs were analyzed for relationships with demographic and school structural characteristics, using descriptive statistics and multiple regression. RESULTS Discretionary wellness programs are numerous, at 18 programs. Little evidence supports inequity according to student race/ethnicity, income, or nativity, but high schools, new schools, co-located schools, small schools, and schools with larger proportions of inexperienced teachers are less likely to provide wellness programs. CONCLUSIONS Opportunities exist to further the reach of wellness programs in public schools by modifying them for high school adoption and building capacity in schools less likely to have the administrative support to house them. PMID:27917485

  10. Brief report: Association between psychological sense of school membership and mental health among early adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Jorge; Rojas-Barahona, Cristian A; Olivares, Esterbina; Araya, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Mental health problems among adolescents are prevalent and are associated with important difficulties for a normal development during this period and later in life. Understanding better the risk factors associated with mental health problems may help to design and implement more effective preventive interventions. Several personal and family risk factors have been identified in their relationship to mental health; however, much less is known about the influence of school-related factors. One of these school factors is school belonging or the psychological sense of school membership. This is a well-known protective factor to develop good academic commitment, but it has been scarcely studied in its relationship to mental health. We explored this association in a sample of early adolescents and found that students who reported having a high level of school membership had lower mental health problems, even after controlling for several personal and family factors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Psychological distress and its correlates among dental students: a survey of 17 Colombian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Mafla, Ana Cristina; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sánchez-Molina, Marisol; Gallego-Gómez, Clara Liliana; Vélez-Jaramillo, Luis Fernando; Tamayo-Cardona, Julián Andrés; Pérez-Cepeda, David; Vergara-Mercado, Martha Ligia; Simancas-Pallares, Miguel Ángel; Polychronopoulou, Argy

    2013-06-26

    Links between the demanding nature of studies in the health sciences, students' personality traits and psychological distress have been well-established. While considerable amount of work has been done in medicine, evidence from the dental education arena is sparse and data from Latin America are lacking. The authors conducted a large-scale investigation of psychological distress among dental students in Colombia and sought to determine its curriculum and student-level correlates. The Spanish version of the Derogatis' Symptoms Checklist Revised (SCL-90-R) was administered to all students officially registered and attending classes or clinics in 17 dental schools in 4 geographic districts of Colombia between January and April 2012. Additional information was collected on participants' socio-demographic information and first career choice, as well as school's characteristics such as class size. The Global Severity Index (GSI) score, a measure of overall psychological distress, served as the primary analytical endpoint. Analyses relied on multilevel mixed-effects linear and log-binomial regression, accounting for study design and sample characteristics. A total of 5700 dental students completed the survey, a response rate of 67%. Pronounced gradients were noted in the association between socio-economic status and psychological distress, with students in higher strata reporting fewer problems. After adjustment for all important covariates, there was an evident pattern of increasing psychological distress corresponding to the transition from the didactic, to the preclinical and clinical phases of training, with few differences between male and female students. Independent of other factors, reliance on own funds for education and having dentistry as the first career choice were associated with lower psychological distress. Levels of psychological distress correlated with students' socio-economic and study-level characteristics. Above and beyond the influence of person

  12. Psychological Treatment as Part of Dropout Prevention: An Israeli Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Hava; Hain, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the integration of psychotherapy in a comprehensive dropout prevention program developed at the Dean of Students' office of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel. The program's psychologists conducted psychotherapy with a subset of dropout prevention program participants who had reacted with emotional turmoil to the…

  13. Physiological and Psychological Effects on High School Students of Viewing Real and Artificial Pansies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho Igarashi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The relaxation effects of gardening have attracted attention; however, very few studies have researched its physiological effects on humans. This study aimed to clarify the physiological and psychological effects on high school students of viewing real and artificial pansies. Forty high school students (male: 19, female: 21 at Chiba Prefectural Kashiwanoha Senior High School, Japan, participated in this experiment. The subjects were presented with a visual stimulation of fresh yellow pansies (Viola x wittrockiana “Nature Clear Lemon” in a planter for 3 min. Artificial yellow pansies in a planter were used as the control. Heart rate variability was used as a physiological measurement and the modified semantic differential method was used for subjective evaluation. Compared with artificial pansies, visual stimulation with real flowers resulted in a significant decrease in the ratio of low- to high-frequency heart rate variability component, which reflects sympathetic nerve activity. In contrast, high frequency, which reflects parasympathetic nerve activity, showed no significant difference. With regard to the psychological indices, viewing real flowers resulted in “comfortable”, “relaxed”, and “natural” feelings. The findings indicate that visual stimulation with real pansies induced physiological and psychological relaxation effects in high school students.

  14. A Volunteer Program for Abnormal Psychology Students: Eighteen Years and Still Going Strong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scogin, Forrest; Rickard, Henry C.

    1987-01-01

    A volunteer experience in abnormal psychology is described. The program has been operating for 18 years, and student reactions have been quite positive. The program augments the traditional course offerings and provides reciprocal service for the University of Alabama and mental health facilities. Guidelines for implementing a volunteer program…

  15. School District Program Cost Accounting: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Guilbert C.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the value for school districts of a program cost accounting system and examines different approaches to generating program cost data, with particular emphasis on the "cost allocation to program system" (CAPS) and the traditional "transaction-based system." (JG)

  16. The effect of a communicational program on psychological distress in the elderly suffering from cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Hejazi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological distress is one of the most common psychological symptoms in elderly cancer patients. However, many of these patients do not receive any treatment for distress management. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effect of a communication program on the psychological distress of elderly cancer patients. Materials and Methods: This two-group clinical trial with a before and after design was conducted in Al-Zahra and Seyed-Al-Shohada hospitals affiliated to the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. A total of 64 elderly patients were randomly assigned to two groups: experimental and control groups. A 3-week intervention (communicational program consisting of distributing educational booklets, practices, and phone follow-ups was performed for the intervention group. All sessions were held during the 3-week period with sessions held twice per week both in the form of personal attendance and phone tracking, and the patients were encouraged to do the tasks assigned to them. The control group received routine care, and at the end of the study, the content of the sessions was explained to them. The demographic and clinical data of the participants were recorded, and all participants completed Kessler's Psychological Distress inventory at baseline and at the end of the 3-week intervention. Results: We found a significant difference in the psychological distress scores between the two groups before and after the intervention (P < 0.001, independent t-test. Moreover, the mean psychological distress scores decreased significantly in the experimental group after the intervention (P < 0.001, paired t-test. Conclusions: Our communicational program had a positive effect on psychological distress in elderly patients with cancer. Therefore, this program could be used as an easy, cheap, and practical approach for reducing psychological distress in these patients.

  17. Building Blocks of Psychology: on Remaking the Unkept Promises of Early Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozli, Davood G; Deng, Wei Sophia

    2018-03-01

    The appeal and popularity of "building blocks", i.e., simple and dissociable elements of behavior and experience, persists in psychological research. We begin our assessment of this research strategy with an historical review of structuralism (as espoused by E. B. Titchener) and behaviorism (espoused by J. B. Watson and B. F. Skinner), two movements that held the assumption in their attempts to provide a systematic and unified discipline. We point out the ways in which the elementism of the two schools selected, framed, and excluded topics of study. After the historical review, we turn to contemporary literature and highlight the persistence of research into building blocks and the associated framing and exclusions in psychological research. The assumption that complex categories of human psychology can be understood in terms of their elementary components and simplest forms seems indefensible. In specific cases, therefore, reliance on the assumption requires justification. Finally, we review alternative strategies that bypass the commitment to building blocks.

  18. Effect of Positive Training on Positive Psychological States (Character Strengths of Female High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farnam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available psychological states of female students in second and third grades of high school. The research method was quasi-experimental with pre-test, post-test and follow-up. The sample consisted of forty students selected randomly in two groups (twenty students in each group. To collect data, Positive Psychological State Inventory (Rajaei, Khuy Nzhad and Nesaei was used. The experimental group received ninety minute positive training sessions (for two months and the control group did not receive treatment. The results of analysis  of covariance showed that positive training had positive effects on positive psychological states (trust in God, optimism, self-efficacy, duty, sense of control, targeted, hope, satisfaction with life, meaningful life, pleasant, sociability, self-esteem and self-worth, sense of peace, gratitude, and forgiveness among adolescents  both in the post  and follow-up tests

  19. Addiction Recovery: 12-Step Programs and Cognitive-Behavioral Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow-Braitman, Ann

    1995-01-01

    Provides helping professionals with an overview of treatment issues referred to as spiritual by those recovering from alcohol and drug addictions through 12-step programs. Reviews conflicts between academically trained helping professionals and researchers, and those advocating spiritually oriented treatment programs. Discusses spiritual…

  20. Long working hours and psychological distress among school teachers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannai, Akira; Ukawa, Shigekazu; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Long working hours have the possibility to influence human health. In Japan, it is well known that teachers have long working hours, and the number of leaves of absence due to mental disorders among public school teachers increased from 2,687 in 2002 to 4,960 in 2012. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between long working hours and psychological distress among school teachers. This cross-sectional study was conducted from mid-July to September in 2013 in Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,245 teachers in public junior high schools. Information about basic characteristics, including working hours, and responses to the General Health Questionnaire-28 were collected anonymously. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for the association between long working hours and psychological distress by gender. Of the 1,245 teachers contacted, 558 (44.8%) responded. After excluding responses with missing data, the final sample included 522 teachers (337 males and 185 females). Psychological distress was identified in 47.8% of males and 57.8% of females. Our results showed a significantly increased risk only in males working >60 hours per week (adjusted OR=4.71 [95% CI 2.04-11.56]) compared with those working ≤40 hours per week. There were no significant associations between long working hours and psychological distress for females. There is a significant association between long working hours and psychological distress in male teachers. However, the causal relationship remains unclear. Further studies such as cohort studies with large sample sizes are needed.

  1. Drunk driving among novice drivers, possible prevention with additional psychological module in driving school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eensoo, Diva; Paaver, Marika; Harro, Jaanus

    2011-01-01

    Road traffic collisions caused by drunk driving pose a significant public health problem all over the world. Therefore additional preventive activities against drunk driving should be worked out. The aim of the study was to assess drunk driving in novice drivers after a psychological intervention taking into account also impulsivity, law obedience, and alcohol-related measures. An intervention study was started with 1889 car driver's license attempters during their driving school studies. Subjects were classified as intervention group (n=1083, mean age 23.1 (SD=7.4) years), control group (n=517, mean age 22.8 (SD=7.1) years) and "lost" group (n=289, mean age 23.0 (SD=6.9) years). "Lost" group subjects had been assigned into the intervention group, but they did not participate in the intervention. Subjects of the intervention group participated in a psychological intervention on the dangers of impulsive behavior in traffic. After a three year follow-up period it appeared that in the control group and in the lost group there was a significantly higher proportion of drunk drivers than in the intervention group, 3.3% (n=17), 3.5% (n=10) and 1.5% (n=10) (p=0.026), respectively. Survival analysis confirmed that psychological intervention had a significant impact on drunk driving (p=0.015), and the impact of the intervention was persistent also in the case of higher scores in Mild social deviance. In subjects with higher scores in impulsivity measures and alcohol-related problems the impact of short psychological intervention was not sufficient for preventing drunk driving. It can be concluded that psychological intervention used during the driving school studies is an effective primary prevention activity against drunk driving. However, for drivers with high scores in impulsivity measures and alcohol-related problems, the short psychological intervention is not sufficient in reducing drunk driving behavior.

  2. School Nutrition Programs and the Incidence of Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millimet, Daniel L.; Tchernis, Rusty; Husain, Muna

    2010-01-01

    Given the recent rise in childhood obesity, the School Breakfast Program (SBP) and National School Lunch Program (NSLP) have received renewed attention. Using panel data on more than 13,500 primary school students, we assess the relationship between SBP and NSLP participation and (relatively) long-run measures of child weight. After documenting a…

  3. Colorado's Alternative School Calendar Program and the Four Day Week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubacher, Roy G.; Stiverson, C. L.

    Taking advantage of legislation permitting modified school calendars, the four-day work week has been implemented by 23 small, rural Colorado school districts representing 5,200 children. Thirteen districts implemented the four-day program in the 1980-81 school year. Ten additional districts applied as first year pilot programs in the 1981-82…

  4. Variation in school health policies and programs by demographic characteristics of US schools, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Alexandra B; Brener, Nancy D; McManus, Tim

    2010-12-01

    To identify whether school health policies and programs vary by demographic characteristics of schools, using data from the School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) 2006. This study updates a similar study conducted with SHPPS 2000 data and assesses several additional policies and programs measured for the first time in SHPPS 2006. SHPPS 2006 assessed the status of 8 components of the coordinated school health model using a nationally representative sample of public, Catholic, and private schools at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Data were collected from school faculty and staff using computer-assisted personal interviews and then linked with extant data on school characteristics. Results from a series of regression analyses indicated that a number of school policies and programs varied by school type (public, Catholic, or private), urbanicity, school size, discretionary dollars per pupil, percentage of white students, percentage of students qualifying for free lunch funds, and, among high schools, percentage of college-bound students. Catholic and private schools, smaller schools, and those with low discretionary dollars per pupil did not have as many key school health policies and programs as did schools that were public, larger, and had higher discretionary dollars per pupil. However, no single type of school had all key components of a coordinated school health program in place. Although some categories of schools had fewer policies and programs in place, all had both strengths and weaknesses. Regardless of school characteristics, all schools have the potential to implement a quality school health program. © Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. The psychological reactions after witnessing a killing in public in a Danish high school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, A.; Kurdahl, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: School killings attract immense media and public attention but psychological studies surrounding these events are rare. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and possible risk factors of PTSD in 320 Danish high school students (mean age 18 years) 7.......5%. Furthermore, 25% had PTSD at a subclinical level. Intimacy with the deceased girl; feeling fear, helplessness, or horror during the killing; lack of expressive ability; feeling let down by others; negative affectivity; and dissociation predicted 78% of the variance of the HTQ total scores. CONCLUSION...

  6. Classroom communication in lessons of educational science and psychology at secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Šimáková, Monika

    2017-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with classroom communication during pedagogy and psychology lessons at high schools. The aim of the thesis is to describe classroom communication in the observed subjects in a complex way and to give the reader a realistic idea about the communication between the teachers and their students during instruction. The thesis is divided into a theoretical and an empirical part. The theoretical part focuses on pedagogical communication itself, which is a key term in class...

  7. Psychological changes in alcohol-dependent patients during a residential rehabilitation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi I

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ines Giorgi,1 Marcella Ottonello,2,3 Giovanni Vittadini,4 Giorgio Bertolotti5 1Psychology Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Clinica del Lavoro e della Riabilitazione, IRCCS, Pavia, 2Department of Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Clinica del Lavoro e della Riabilitazione, IRCCS, Genoa, 3Department of Medicine, PhD Program in Advanced Sciences and Technologies in Rehabilitation Medicine and Sport, Università di Tor Vergata, Rome, 4Alcohol Rehabilitation Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Clinica del Lavoro e della Riabilitazione, IRCCS, Pavia, 5Psychology Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Clinica del Lavoro e della Riabilitazione, IRCCS, Tradate, Italy Background: Alcohol-dependent patients usually experience negative affects under the influence of alcohol, and these affective symptoms have been shown to decrease as a result of alcohol-withdrawal treatment. A recent cognitive–affective model suggests an interaction between drug motivation and affective symptoms. The aim of this multicenter study was to evaluate the psychological changes in subjects undergoing a residential rehabilitation program specifically designed for alcohol addiction, and to identify at discharge patients with greater affective symptoms and therefore more at risk of relapse.Materials and methods: The sample included 560 subjects (mean age 46.91±10.2 years who completed 28-day rehabilitation programs for alcohol addiction, following a tailored routine characterized by short duration and high intensity of medical and psychotherapeutic treatment. The psychological clinical profiles of anxiety, depression, psychological distress, psychological well-being, and self-perception of a positive change were assessed using the Cognitive Behavioral Assessment – Outcome Evaluation questionnaire at the beginning and at the end of the program. The changes in the psychological variables of the questionnaire were identified and considered as outcome

  8. Predictors of doctoral student success in professional psychology: characteristics of students, programs, and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James M; Kim, Yang-Hyang

    2011-04-01

    In the face of the rising number of doctoral recipients in professional psychology, many have voiced concerns about the quality of nontraditional training programs. Past research suggests that, on a variety of outcomes, graduates from clinical PhD programs outperform graduates from clinical PsyD and, to a lesser extent, counseling PhD programs. We examine an aggregate archival dataset to determine whether student or university characteristics account for the differences in outcomes among programs. The data show meaningful differences in the outcomes of clinical PhD, PsyD, and counseling PhD programs. Furthermore, graduates from research-intensive universities perform better on the psychology licensure exam and are more likely to become American Board of Professional Psychology diplomates. The available data support the notion that the ability to conduct research is an essential component of graduate education. In this light, PsyD programs represent a unique opportunity to train students in the types of evaluation and outcomes assessments used by practicing psychologists. We discuss implications for graduate-level training in professional psychology. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. High School Principals and the High School Journalism Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jane W.

    A study asked selected high school principals to respond to statements about the value of high school journalism to the high school student and about the rights and responsibilities of the high school journalist. These responses were then checked against such information as whether or not the high school principal had worked on a high school…

  10. The "Generacion Diez" after-school program and Latino parent involvement with schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Medina, Carmen

    2005-11-01

    The current study examines associations between participation in after-school programs and change in Latino parent involvement with schools. Hierarchical linear regression analyses demonstrated that parents of children who had higher after-school program attendance rates were significantly more likely to report increases in the quality of relationships with their children's teachers, frequency of parent-teacher contact, and engagement with their children's schooling over a two-year period. However, greater home educator contacts were related to decreases in quality and quantity of parent-school involvement. A primary implication is that attendance in school-based after-school programs may draw parents into children's regular-day school context. Editors' Strategic Implications The authors illustrate the promising practice of using after-school programs to promote parent involvement and to help integrate the often disparate family and school contexts for Latino children.

  11. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) is described. This program is designed to provide engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students. The students from this work study program which features trips, lectures, written reports, and job experience describe their individual work with their mentors.

  12. Student Assistance Program Sandia High School 1985-86 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce-Prather, Margaret; Shainline, Michael

    This document presents data from the second year of the Student Assistance Program, a counseling program to help students who may be abusing drugs or alcohol, implemented at Sandia High School in the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public School system. Data are included from the program's monthly records sheets, from parent involvement questionnaires,…

  13. [Relationship between cyberbullying and the suicide related psychological behavior among middle and high school students in Anhui Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gengfu; Fang, Yu; Jiang, Liu; Zhou, Guiyang; Yuan, Shanshan; Wang, Xiuxiu; Su, Puyu

    2015-11-01

    To examine the prevalence rate of cyberbullying in middle and high school students in Anhui Province and explore the relationship between cyberbullying and suicide related psychological behavior. A total of 5726 middle and high school students from the 7th to the 12th grades in three regular middle schools and three regular high schools recruited from three cities in the Anhui Province (Tongling, Chuzhou, and Fuyang). Tongling, Chuzhou, and Fuyang are in the south, middle and north of Anhui, respectively. Each city was selected one regular middle school and one regular high school, and 8 classes were selected form each grade from each school. A stratified cluster random sampling method was used to randomly select 5726 participants among the six schools. Self-reports on cyberbullying and suicide related psychological behavior were collected. Among these 5726 adolescents, 46.8% of them involved in cyberbullying. Among them, 3.2% were bullies, 23.8% were victims, and 19.8% were both. Prevalence rates of suicide idea, suicide plan, suicide preparation, suicide implementation were 19.3%, 6.9%, 4.7% and 1.8%, respectively. Cyberbullying involvement, as victims, bullies or bully-victims, increased the risk of four kinds of suicide related psychological behavior (suicide idea, suicide plan, suicide preparation, suicide implementation) (P Cyberbullying has become a common occurrence in middle and high school students. Additionally, cyberbullying is closely related to suicide related psychological behavior among middle and high school students.

  14. Evaluating mediation and moderation effects in school psychology: A presentation of methods and review of current practice

    OpenAIRE

    Fairchild, Amanda J.; McQuillin, Samuel D.

    2010-01-01

    Third variable effects elucidate the relation between two other variables, and can describe why they are related or under what conditions they are related. This article demonstrates methods to analyze two third-variable effects: moderation and mediation. The utility of examining moderation and mediation effects in school psychology is described and current use of the analyses in applied school psychology research is reviewed and evaluated. Proper statistical methods to test the effects are pr...

  15. Assessment of Changes in School Nutrition Programs and the School Environment as a Result of Following the HealthierUS School Challenge Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer S.; Bednar, Carolyn; DiMarco, Nancy M.; Connors, Priscilla L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine changes in school nutrition programs and the school environment as reported by school nutrition directors who are following the U.S. Department of Agriculture's HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) program. The objective was to determine before and after changes in the average lunch…

  16. Psychological intervention programs for reduction of injury in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young-Eun; Morris, Tony; Andersen, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of two psychological interventions designed to reduce injury among dancers by enhancing coping skills. Participants were 35 ballet dancers. They were assigned to three conditions: control (n = 12), autogenic training (n = 12), and a broad-based coping skills condition, including autogenic training, imagery, and self-talk (n = 11). The 12-week interventions were designed on the basis of results from previous studies. For the 12 weeks following the intervention, participants were asked to practice their respective interventions three times a week. During the 24-week period (12 weeks training plus 12 weeks practice), training staff at the dance academies recorded injuries on a record sheet each day. Participants wrote injury records by themselves for another 24 weeks. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and univariate tests for each dependent variable showed that the broad-based coping skills condition enhanced coping skills, in particular, peaking under pressure, coping with adversity, having confidence and achievement motivation, and concentrating. Separate analyses of covariance (ANCOVA), one using preintervention injury frequency as the covariate and one using preintervention injury duration as the covariate, revealed that participants in the broad-based coping skills condition spent less time injured than participants in the control condition.

  17. Can programming frameworks bring smartphones into the mainstream of psychological science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Piwek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key barriers that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use, secure, and becomes freely available.

  18. Can Programming Frameworks Bring Smartphones into the Mainstream of Psychological Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwek, Lukasz; Ellis, David A

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key issues that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use and secure becomes freely available.

  19. Penerapan Jurnalistik Televisi Pada Program School Update Di Riau Televisi

    OpenAIRE

    ", Suyanto; Putri, Vika Gusria

    2015-01-01

    School update program is the only Riau Television progam which its production procces done by students. School update program present as a medium of creativity learning and development of Pekanbaru Senior High School in term of early television journalism implementation to create a young and high quality journalist. The implementation of this television journalism done through basic television journalism training program and practice on the field. The aim of this research is to determine how ...

  20. High school sports programs differentially impact participation by sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Drake

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Sports participation has previously been shown to confer a number of health benefits; as such, school sports programs may be an important, effective, and underused target for public health efforts, including obesity prevention programs. Efforts to increase physical activity among youth should consider both access and choice in school athletic programs. Schools may need to use different strategies to increase sports participation in boys and girls.

  1. PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AQUATIC ACTIVITY IN HYDROTHERAPY PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Amelia Elena Stan

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the hydrotherapy programs are the recovery and relaxation of the patient. Traditional methods of on land, like Yoga, Pilates, Watsu and Tai Chi, include exercises that simultaneously stretch and strengthen muscles, helping to build a total fitness quickly and efficiently. The research method was the bibliographic study. All information gathered about relaxation techniques in water had a single result - the relaxation techniques through aquatic therapy lead to a release of da...

  2. Middle School Program and Participatory Planning Drive School Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kevin

    1996-01-01

    Uses the example of award-winning Black Hawk Middle School in Minnesota to examine: (1) developing a middle school architecture; (2) benefits of the house concept; (3) the need for staff involvement in school design; (4) assembling houses into schools; (5) reduced discipline problems; (6) fostering teacher collaboration; and (7) measuring success.…

  3. A Pilot Study of a Kindergarten Summer School Reading Program in High-Poverty Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Carolyn A.; Solari, Emily J.; Ciancio, Dennis J.; Hecht, Steven A.; Swank, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined an implementation of a kindergarten summer school reading program in 4 high-poverty urban schools. The program targeted both basic reading skills and oral language development. Students were randomly assigned to a treatment group (n = 25) or a typical practice comparison group (n = 28) within each school; however,…

  4. Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Program: Benefits of Improving Air Quality in the School Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools (IAQ TfS) Program to help schools prevent, identify, and resolve their IAQ problems. This publication describes the program and its advantages, explaining that through simple, low-cost measures, schools can: reduce IAQ-related health risks and…

  5. School Wellness Programs: Magnitude and Distribution in New York City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Leanna; Elbel, Brian; Pflugh Prescott, Melissa; Aneja, Siddhartha; Schwartz, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Public schools provide students with opportunities to participate in many discretionary, unmandated wellness programs. Little is known about the number of these programs, their distribution across schools, and the kinds of students served. We provide evidence on these questions for New York City (NYC) public schools. Methods: Data on…

  6. Integrated Pest Management in Schools Program Brochure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Nation's children spend a considerable amount of their time in schools, as do teachers and school support staff. EPA is working to reduce the risk that both children and employees experience from pests and pesticides in and around schools.

  7. School Culture: Reflections on Speaking from a sociocultural view of educational psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Guzmán Utreras

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The following article discusses the relative importance of school culture as the main element of educational intervention to be considered by the educational psychology, understood in this context as a discipline plays in formal educational settings. From a sociocultural school look, culture and intervention, it seeks to synthesize some basic elements that must be taken into account in developing the practice of psychologists in these areas, giving rise to complex, embedded interventions in a context education and in relation to all participating actors and members of the institutions, thus creating the potential to develop shared changes and transformations between those who build this school culture. The following sections granted emphasize three specific points and tensions highlight and work as proposed: 1 The problem of school culture and the inclusion of educational psychologist; 2 School culture as an object of interest from a sociocultural look; and their interaction with the curriculum; and 3 a description of some basic guidelines for intervention counselors from the school culture, from the perspective of an educational psychologist focused on a cultural paradigm.

  8. Psychological wellbeing and self-esteem in students across the transition between secondary school and university: A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinauskas Romualdas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This longitudinal study investigated the psychological wellbeing and self-esteem of students during the transition between secondary school and university. The sample comprised 197 students (82 male; 115 female. The mean age of the students at the start of the study was 18.54 years (SD = 0.78. Students completed measures of psychological wellbeing (Ryff Psychological Wellbeing Scale and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale during their final year of secondary school and again at the start of their university studies. Repeated measures (RM multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA was used to investigate how transition status and gender affected aspects of psychological wellbeing and self-esteem. Multivariate analysis showed main effect of the transition from school to university on psychological wellbeing and self-esteem. Univariate analysis indicated that psychological wellbeing was higher at the start of university studies than during the final year of secondary school, but failed to confirm the effect of the transition on self-esteem. Gender by transition status interactions for two psychological wellbeing dimensions (autonomy and purpose in life were found.

  9. Diagnosing and Solving School Learning Disabilities in Epilepsy: Part 5, School and Psychological Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    In the last article, the author covered the social and psychological causes to learning difficulty that can be created by epilepsy. Over the last two articles, the author gained a fairly complete picture of problems that may be due to the physical disorder of epilepsy and problems due to its unique impact on the social aspects of the classroom. In…

  10. Training in Strength-Based Intervention and Assessment Methodologies in APA-Accredited Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kayla; Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    The importance of identifying and building on individual strengths has been a key component of many psychoeducational theories and modalities focused on developing interventions. However, program training in this growing area is not well known. As such, this is the first study designed to ascertain the American Psychological Association-accredited…

  11. The Effects of Satisfaction of Basic Psychological Needs at School on Children’s Prosocial Behavior and Antisocial Behavior: The Mediating Role of School Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Tian

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Grounded in Basic Psychological Need Theory, we examined the direct effects of the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs at school (i.e., satisfaction of autonomy needs at school, satisfaction of relatedness needs at school, and satisfaction of competence needs at school on prosocial behavior and antisocial behavior as well as the mediation effects of school satisfaction on the relations between the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs at school and prosocial behavior as well as antisocial behavior. We employed a sample of 801 Chinese children (429 males; Mage = 9.47 in a three-wave longitudinal study, with each wave occurring 6 months apart. Direct and indirect effects were estimated by Structural Equation Modeling. Results indicated that: (1 Satisfaction of relatedness needs at school and competence needs at school, but not satisfaction of autonomy needs at school, displayed direct effects on prosocial behavior. Also, satisfaction of relatedness needs at school, but not satisfaction of autonomy needs at school or competence needs at school, displayed direct effects on antisocial behavior. (2 Both satisfaction of relatedness needs at school and competence needs at school displayed indirect effects on prosocial behavior and antisocial behavior via school satisfaction as a mediator. However, satisfaction of autonomy needs at school failed to have indirect effects on prosocial behavior or antisocial behavior via school satisfaction. These findings suggest differential predictors of children’s prosocial and antisocial behavior, supporting the separability of the two constructs. The findings also suggest developmental differences in need satisfaction, with the satisfaction of autonomy needs playing a relatively less important role in school-age children. We also discussed limitations and practical applications of the study.

  12. 77 FR 19525 - National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the Healthy... Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010'' on June... sold in a school and purchased with funds from the nonprofit school food service account, other than...

  13. The Effects of an After-School Tutoring Program on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the challenges of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, many schools and school districts are implementing after-school tutoring programs to provide students additional instruction to score proficient or better in reading and mathematics. This doctoral study analyzed the effects of the ABC Middle School Educational Assistance Program…

  14. Parent Interest in a School-Based, School Nurse-Led Weight Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lee, Jiwoo

    2014-01-01

    Because one in three children is already overweight or obese, school-based interventions targeting secondary obesity prevention merit consideration. This study assessed parent interest in participating in a school-based, school nurse-led weight management program for young school-aged children. A random sample of parents ("n" = 122) of…

  15. School Psychology 2010--Part 2: School Psychologists' Professional Practices and Implications for the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jose M.; Curtis, Michael J.; Gelley, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Every 5 years, the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) conducts a national study of the field. Surveys are sent to randomly selected regular members of NASP to gather information on school psychologists' demographic characteristics, context for professional practices, and professional practices. The latest iteration of the national…

  16. Educational Exchange: Investigation of a Videoconference-Based Instructional Program for Educational Psychology Undergraduates and Fifth Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Allison G.; Lenore, Sandra; Nunez, Jenifer

    2018-01-01

    An innovative learning partnership took place between undergraduates in an educational psychology course and fifth graders at a local elementary school. The goals for the partnership were: (a) to use videoconferencing to provide educational psychology students with a window into a live classroom, thus allowing opportunities to see theories and…

  17. Psychological and Pedagogical Foundations of Multimedia Technologies Application for School Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa A. Shkutina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the topical problem of psychological and pedagogical basis development for the use of new information technologies at university and at school. Features of the use of multimedia technologies were studied, basing on the analysis of scientific works. Multimedia technologies have a number of advantages and possibilities to influence psychological environment of students and the internal processes of educational information processing by the human brain. The advisability of the use of multimedia technologies, enabling to apply all kinds of information, affecting the sensor channels, and summing up in a single image is proved. High didactic possibilities of multimedia technologies, contributing to the performance of cognitive, creative, informational, social, adaptive and other needs of students are revealed.

  18. Thoughts and recommendations concerning impact and productivity in school psychology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daniel H

    2011-12-01

    Having been personally involved in several examinations of productivity in various sub-disciplines of psychology, I read with great interest the articles in this special issue. I commend the authors for engaging in this activity, as I feel that a field benefits from occasional self-examinations. In this commentary, I caution against placing too much emphasis on impact factors, arguing that they are not measured without error and unethical behaviors could increase if they are weighted too heavily. I recommend examinations of methodological trends, whether implications for practice are based on observational data, whether female participation in the publication process matches their participation as members of the field, and finally including other characteristics in defining highly productive scholars that would attract potential graduate students. Copyright © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Psychological contributors to noncompletion of an adolescent preoperative bariatric surgery program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Megan J; Curran, Jennifer L; Phan, Thao-Ly T; Reichard, Kirk; Datto, George A

    2017-01-01

    Noncompletion of preoperative bariatric programs is a significant problem among adolescents. Adult studies suggest that psychological factors contribute to noncompletion of preoperative bariatric programs. The aim of this study was to determine the association between adolescent psychological functioning and completion of the preoperative phase of a bariatric program. The study was conducted at a tertiary care children's hospital affiliated with a university medical center. Seventy-four adolescents and their parents completed an assessment measure of psychological functioning with the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition. We compared these scores between adolescents who completed the preoperative phase of the bariatric program and proceeded to surgery (completers) to those who did not (noncompleters) using multivariate analysis of covariance and logistic regression analyses, adjusting for demographic characteristics and baseline body mass index. The mean age was 16.0 (1.1) years, most were female (79.8%), and the group was diverse (48.6%, Caucasian; 33.8%, black; 17.6%, other, including Hispanic, Asian, and biracial). Average body mass index was 50.5 (7.6) kg/m 2 . Forty-two percent of participants were noncompleters. Noncompleters were reported by parents to have more clinically significant externalizing and internalizing behaviors and fewer adaptive behaviors. Noncompleters self-reported more clinically significant internalizing symptoms, emotional problems, and poor personal adjustment. Adolescents who did not complete the preoperative phase of a bariatric surgery program had more clinically significant psychological symptoms across multiple domains compared with those who successfully proceeded to bariatric surgery. Early identification and treatment of psychological symptoms may be important in helping adolescents successfully proceed to surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  20. Perceptions of Psychological Contract Violations in School Districts that Serve Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Exploratory Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Julianna D.; Reed, Dianne

    2004-01-01

    This study examined issues of psychological contract violation between parents of children with autism spectrum disorder and school districts that serve them. As such, the sampling strategy was to focus on parents who were dissatisfied with the educational services their child was receiving from the school district so that the parents' "lived…

  1. The Moderating Effect of Psychological Characteristics upon the Visionary Leadership Behavior of Principals from Varying Levels of School Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Sue

    1994-01-01

    Results from a study with 41 Hawaiian elementary school principals indicate that, although there is no significant difference in visionary leadership scores of principals from varying levels of school climate when covaried with psychological characteristics, there is a significant main effect for "capacity of status" on visionary…

  2. Teacher Satisfaction with School and Psychological Well-Being Affects Their Readiness to Help Children with Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Peeter; Värnik, Airi; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Balint, Maria; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Feldman, Dana; Haring, Christian; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Tubiana, Alexandra; Sarchiapone, Marco; Wasserman, Camilla; Carli, Vladimir; Hoven, Christina W.; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In support of a whole-school approach to mental health promotion, this study was conducted to find out whether and how significantly teachers' satisfaction with school and their subjective psychological well-being are related to the belief that they can help pupils with mental health problems. Design: Cross-sectional data were collected…

  3. The Effect of Positive or Negative Frame on the Choices of Students in School Psychology and Educational Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagley, N. S.; Miller, Paul M.; Jones, Robert N.

    1999-01-01

    Doctoral students (N=109) in school psychology and educational administration responded to five decision problems whose outcomes were framed either positively as gains or negatively as losses. Frame and profession significantly affected the number of risky choices. Educational administration students made more risky choices than school psychology…

  4. The Study of Teachers' and Parents' Needs for Psychological Consultation from School Psychologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savina E.A.,

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at the investigation of teachers’ and parents’ needs in consultation with a school psychologist. Participants were 159 teachers and 292 parents from three cities in Russia. Two surveys were designed to measure teachers’ and parents’ desire to receive psychological consultation regarding behavioral, emotional, learning and interpersonal problems of students; teaching methods and relationships with colleagues (for teachers; and child-parent relationships. In addition, the participants were asked to indicate whether they received a consultation from a school psychologist in the past and their satisfaction from the consultation. The results indicated that, in general, both teachers and parents are satisfied with the consultation; however, fewer parents received such a consultation compared to teachers. Both teachers and parents are more willing to receive consultation regarding children’s behavioral and emotional problems and relationships with peers. Teachers are less motivated to receive consultation about teaching methods, students’ learning problems, and teachers’ relationships with colleagues. Parents were less interested to receive consultation about child-parent relationships. The results of this study are interpreted in terms of their alignment with standards, which regulate the school psychology profession and training.

  5. Psychological and biographical differences between secondary school teachers experiencing high and low levels of burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, C M; Molloy, G N

    1990-02-01

    A total of 750 teachers from 16 government and non-government schools from areas of contrasted socio-economic status (SES) responded to a questionnaire designed to investigate associations between selected aspects of burnout among teachers working in secondary schools in Victoria, Australia. By comparing high and low burnout groups on biographic, psychological and work pattern variables, differences between teachers experiencing high and low levels of burnout were identified. Multiple regression analyses assessed the relative importance of these variables in accounting for the variance in each of the three burnout subscales. School type was related to perceptions of stress and burnout. Higher levels of burnout were associated with poorer physical health, higher rates of absenteeism, lower self-confidence and more frequent use of regressive coping strategies. Teachers classified as experiencing high levels of burnout attributed most of the stress in their lives to teaching and reported low levels of career commitment and satisfaction. Further, teachers who recorded high levels of burnout were characterised by lower levels of the personality disposition of hardiness, lower levels of social support, higher levels of role stress and more custodial pupil control ideologies than their low-burnout counterparts. Psychological variables were found to be more significant predictors of burnout than biographical variables.

  6. Prevalence of psychological symptoms in Saudi Secondary School girls in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlGelban, Khalid S.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescence is characterized by rapid physiological, social and cognititive changes. Aim of the present work is to study mental health of Saudi adolescent secondary school girls in Abha city, Aseer region, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 secondary schools for girls using the Arabic version of the symptom-revised checklist 90 (SCL 90-R), a mental health questionnaire that was administered to the girls by fourth-year female medical students. The most prevalent mental symptoms in the 545 female students were phobic anxiety (16.4%), psycchoticism (14.8%), anxiety (14.3%), and somatization (14.2%). The prevalence of depression, paranoid ideation and interpersonal sensitivity amounted to 13.9%, 13.8% and 13.8%, respectively. The least prevalent mental symptoms were hostility (12.8%) and obsessive-compulsive behavior (12.3%). Overall, psychological symptoms (in terms of a positive global severity index) were found in 16.3% of the girls. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, no significant relationship was found with sociodemographic factors. Psychological symptoms and disorders are prevalent in secondary school girls and health professionals need to be able to recognize, manage and follow-up mental health problems in young people. Further research is needed to explore the magnitude of the problem at the national level. (author)

  7. Prevalence of psychological symptoms in Saudi Secondary School girls in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Gelban, Khalid S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Adolescence is characterized by rapid physiological, social and cognititive changes. Aim of the present work is to study mental health of Saudi adolescent secondary school girls in Abha city, Aseer region, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 secondary schools for girls using the Arabic version of the symptom-revised checklist 90 (SCL 90-R), a mental health questionnaire that was administered to the girls by fourth-year female medical students. RESULTS: The most prevalent mental symptoms in the 545 female students were phobic anxiety (16.4%), psychoticism (14.8%), anxiety (14.3%), and somatization (14.2%). The prevalence of depression, paranoid ideation and interpersonal sensitivity amounted to 13.9%, 13.8% and 13.8%, respectively. The least prevalent mental symptoms were hostility (12.8%) and obsessive-compulsive behavior (12.3%). Overall, psychological symptoms (in terms of a positive global severity index) were found in 16.3% of the girls. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, no significant relationship was found with sociodemographic factors. CONCLUSION: Psychological symptoms and disorders are prevalent in secondary school girls and health professionals need to be able to recognize, manage and follow-up mental health problems in young people. Further research is needed to explore the magnitude of the problem at the national level. PMID:19584586

  8. The Status of Positive Psychology Strengths within the Romanian School in the Digital Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Pânişoară

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify the possible correlations between the strengths that are taught in school and those which are necessary for reaching personal success. In order to test the extent to which these strengths correlate, we applied a psychological-assessment tool composed of 24 strengths with a Likert-type response scale. The subjects selected for this research were 100 teachers from Romania, both male and female. The results were processed in SPSS Statistics, where we also calculated Pearson's correlation coefficient. After analyzing the descriptive statistics and the correlation coefficient we noticed that the "Vitality" strength showed a statistically significant negative correlation between the two groups, therefore it is not taught in school but it is considered important for achieving personal success. The "Citizenship" strength showed a statistically significant positive correlation, being concurrently promoted in school and important in achieving success.The neuro-linguistic reprogramming of a young individual will need a considerable effort, first of all as regards being aware of the values which render his well-being, and secondly as regards his orientation towards these values, which as it seems he was not at all oriented to. The new student profile of today’s society, also known as the digital native, needs to assimilate a full set of positive psychology values in order to create a complete model of success for nowadays’ world.

  9. Self-esteem and communication skills as predictors of psychological resilience for Turkish vocational school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem TAGAY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes whether or not communication skills and self-esteem of vocational school students can predict their psychological resilience. The data of the study were collected from a total of 295 vocational school students including 147 female and 148 male in Burdur and Isparta. The study benefited from the Ego Resiliency Scale developed by Block and Kremen (1996 and adapted by Karaırmak (2007, the Communication Skills Evaluation Scale developed by Korkut (1996, and the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale developed by Morris Rosenberg (1965. The study made use of the standard multiple regression analysis in order to prove the power of the assessment of communication skills and self-esteem to predict psychological levels of resilience of vocational school students. The data were tested on a 0.05 level of significance. This study shows that the assessment of communication skills and self-esteem positively co- relates with the personal strengths of pulling oneself together. The positive self-assessment predicts self- esteem positively and significantly as well. A positive sense of an individual’s about oneself positively co- relates with high self-esteem.

  10. Psychological stress in undergraduate dental students: baseline results from seven European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Gerry; Blinkhorn, Andy; Freeman, Ruth; Gorter, Ronald; Hoad-Reddick, Gillian; Murtomaa, Heikki; O'Sullivan, Robin; Splieth, Christian

    2002-02-01

    To determine the degree of psychological distress, the experience of emotional exhaustion, and the extent of stress associated with course work in dental students and to compare these measurements among seven European dental schools. Multi-centred survey. Dental Schools at Amsterdam, Belfast, Cork, Greifswald, Helsinki, Liverpool and Manchester. 333 undergraduate first-year dental students. General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Dental Environment Stress Questionnaire (DES), demographic variables. Questionnaire administered to all students attending first year course. Completed questionnaires sent to central office for processing. Seventy-nine percent of the sampled students responded. Over a third of the students (36%) reported significant psychological distress (morbidity) at the recommended cut-off point (>3 on GHQ). These scores were similar to those reported for medical undergraduates. Twenty-two percent recorded comparatively high scores on emotional exhaustion. A wide variation in these 2 measurements was found across schools (p'sStress levels indicated by the DES were less variable (p>0.5). Some evidence showed that contact with patients and the level of support afforded by living at home may be protective. Higher than expected levels of emotional exhaustion were found in a large sample of first-year undergraduate dental students in Europe.

  11. Case Studies of Successful Assistance in Urban School Improvement Programs. I. The Teacher Growth Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piety-Jacobs, Sharon R.

    As part of a research project on "Patterns of Successful Assistance in Urban School Programs," this paper presents a case study of an assister's work in a Teacher Growth Program (TGP) at an elementary school in Staten Island, New York. The school has an experienced teaching staff, a supportive principal, a cross-sectional student…

  12. Impact of School Flu Vaccine Program on Student Absences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaspohl, Sara S.; Dixon, Betty T.; Streater, James A.; Hausauer, Elizabeth T.; Newman, Christopher P.; Vogel, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Literature provides evidence that school attendance correlates with academic performance and student success. Influenza is a contributing factor to school absences. Primary prevention for influenza includes immunization. School-located influenza vaccine (SLIV) programs provide greater access for students to be immunized. A retrospective review of…

  13. Using School Lunch Programs To Promote Positive Dietary Habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    The variety of school lunch foods available has dramatically expanded as school food managers strive to increase sales and generate revenue. Though lunchtime offerings are often based on student preferences versus nutritional value, with a small investment of effort and commitment to student well-being, schools can create lunch programs that…

  14. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based... Gadsden County. SUMMARY: HRSA will be transferring a School-Based Health Center Capital (SBHCC) Program... support the expansion of services at school-based health centers will continue. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  15. School Indoor Air Quality Assessment and Program Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prill, R.; Blake, D.; Hales, D.

    This paper describes the effectiveness of a three-step indoor air quality (IAQ) program implemented by 156 schools in the states of Washington and Idaho during the 2000-2001 school year. An experienced IAQ/building science specialist conducted walk-through assessments at each school. These assessments documented deficiencies and served as an…

  16. Program Development for Primary School Teachers' Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonjeam, Waraporn; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: 1) to study the elements and indicators of primary school teachers' critical thinking, 2) to study current situation, desirable situation, development technique, and need for developing the primary school teachers' critical thinking, 3) to develop the program for developing the primary school teachers'…

  17. U.S. Teachers' Perceptions of School Violence Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnut, Natakie

    2016-01-01

    In response to high profile violent incidents and crimes, many schools have developed plans that address school discipline to create a school climate and culture wherein everyone is valued and treated with respect. The problem that prompted this study is teachers are struggling with effectively implementation prevention program. The purpose of…

  18. Plate Waste and Attitudes among High School Lunch Program Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jessica; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) What foods high school students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are discarding the most? (2) How much of these foods they are discarding? and (3) What are their perceptions towards school lunch? Methods: Researchers measured plate waste at two high…

  19. The Full-Time School Program in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño, Marcela Georgina Gómez; Fahara, Manuel Flores; de la Garza, Lorena Alemán

    2014-01-01

    The Full-time Schools Program in Mexico ("Programa Escuelas de Tiempo Completo," PETC), began in the 2007-2008 school year with the aim of improving the learning opportunities of basic education students by extending the school day to eight hours a day, in order to offer an innovative and flexible pedagogical proposal that includes six…

  20. A Mentoring Program for New School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Connie

    2003-01-01

    Until recent years, school nursing practice consisted mainly of screenings and first aid. However, the changing health, social, and emotional needs of children in the school setting have brought about an expansion of school nursing services. Now school nurses must not only perform routine first aid and screenings, but they must also carry out…

  1. Research on the psychological gap, personality and achievement of in-school youth based on regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although our society is in rapid development, the psychological problems among in-school university students are increasingly obvious. According to this problem, this thesis applied the Psychological Gap Scale made by Caixia Ma with EPQ and AMS, and made random questionnaire survey among 400 students in a comprehensive university. The survey found out that the average scores of all psychological gap dimensions exceeded the critical value 3, showing most students in that university have psychological gap. Their personality stability, introversion and extroversion are all above the national norm level while their stubbornness is lower than it. Besides, the students’ motivation in pursuing success is stronger than their motivation in avoiding failure. In the last part, this thesis reached the conclusion that personality leaves a great impact in the students’ psychology through regression analysis model and study of the quantitative relations among personality, achievement and psychological gap.

  2. The effect of a psychological empowerment program based on psychodrama on empowerment perception and burnout levels in oncology nurses: Psychological empowerment in oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbaş, Azize Atli; Tel, Havva

    2016-08-01

    Oncology nursing is stressful by its nature, and nurses in the field experience a high amount of stress and burnout. In order to cope with occupational stress, nurses need to employ flexible adjustment mechanisms that allow them the power to process their experiences. Failure of efficient stress management causes burnout, and burnout is closely related to powerlessness. It is therefore believed that the occurrence of burnout can be reduced by means of psychological empowerment of nurses. Our study was conducted to determine the effect of a "psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program" on (1) the perception of empowerment and (2) the levels of burnout in oncology nurses. The sample was made up of 82 oncology nurses (38 nurses in the study group and 44 in the control/comparison group). Study data were collected using the Psychological Empowerment Scale, the Nurse Work Empowerment Scale, and Maslach's Burnout Inventory. The study group attended a "psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program" (2 hours, 1 day a week, for 10 weeks). For data assessment, we employed an independent t test and one-way analysis of variance. The psychological empowerment and workplace empowerment scores of nurses in the study group increased and their burnout scores decreased following attendance in the psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program. We found that the psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program increased psychological empowerment and enhanced perception of workplace empowerment while decreasing levels of burnout in oncology nurses. The program is recommended and should allow oncology nurses to benefit from their personal experiences and thus increase self-empowerment, to enhance their perception of empowerment, and to prevent burnout.

  3. Guidelines for cognitive behavioral training within doctoral psychology programs in the United States: report of the Inter-organizational Task Force on Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology Doctoral Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepac, Robert K; Ronan, George F; Andrasik, Frank; Arnold, Kevin D; Belar, Cynthia D; Berry, Sharon L; Christofff, Karen A; Craighead, Linda W; Dougher, Michael J; Dowd, E Thomas; Herbert, James D; McFarr, Lynn M; Rizvi, Shireen L; Sauer, Eric M; Strauman, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    The Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies initiated an interorganizational task force to develop guidelines for integrated education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology at the doctoral level in the United States. Fifteen task force members representing 16 professional associations participated in a year-long series of conferences, and developed a consensus on optimal doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology. The recommendations assume solid foundational training that is typical within applied psychology areas such as clinical and counseling psychology programs located in the United States. This article details the background, assumptions, and resulting recommendations specific to doctoral education and training in cognitive and behavioral psychology, including competencies expected in the areas of ethics, research, and practice. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Psychological Types of Female Primary School Teachers in Anglican State-Maintained Schools in England and Wales: Implications for Continuing Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Leslie J.; Lankshear, David W.; Robbins, Mandy

    2011-01-01

    A sample of 221 female primary school teachers in Anglican state-maintained schools in England and Wales completed the Francis Psychological Type Scales (FPTS). The data demonstrated clear preferences for Extraversion (E) over Introversion (I), for Sensing (S) over Intuition (N), for Feeling (F) over Thinking (T) and for Judging (J) over…

  5. Development Contexts, Psychological Distress, Social Self- Esteem and School Violence from a Gender Perspective in Mexican Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Villarreal-González

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between three development contexts -family, school and community-, and school violence, examining psychological distress and social selfesteem from a gender perspective in Mexican adolescents. To test these relationships, 1,285 Mexican students between 12 and 18 years of age in secondary (n = 634 and high school (n = 651 were recruited. To analyze these relationships, Structural Equation Modeling With EQS was used. Results showed that familial context is directly related to school violence, and that school and community context is indirectly related to school violence through social self-esteem and psychological distress. Finally, results and their possible implications regarding gender are discussed.

  6. Why and How Schools Make Nutrition Education Programs "Work"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kathleen J.; Koch, Pamela A.; Contento, Isobel R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: There are many potential health benefits to having nutrition education programs offered by expert outside sources in schools. However, little is known about why and how schools initiate, implement, and institutionalize them. Gaining this understanding may allow the impact and reach of nutrition and other health education programs in…

  7. Analysis of School Food Safety Programs Based on HACCP Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kevin R.; Sauer, Kevin; Sneed, Jeannie; Kwon, Junehee; Olds, David; Cole, Kerri; Shanklin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine how school districts have implemented food safety programs based on HACCP principles. Specific objectives included: (1) Evaluate how schools are implementing components of food safety programs; and (2) Determine foodservice employees food-handling practices related to food safety.…

  8. Cyberbullying Prevention and Intervention Programs in Schools: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a systematic review of school-based cyberbullying prevention and intervention programs. Research presenting empirical evidence about the effectiveness of a school-based cyberbullying prevention or intervention program published before August 2016 was searched. Seventeen studies were obtained and reviewed. The findings showed…

  9. Building Rural Communities through School-Based Agriculture Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.; Henry, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory for community development by school-based agriculture programs through grounded theory methodology. Data for the study included in-depth interviews and field observations from three school-based agriculture programs in three non-metropolitan counties across a Midwestern state. The…

  10. Stakeholder Knowledge Levels of Coordinated School Health Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Lisa Crouch

    2012-01-01

    Acute and chronic health conditions may be important factors impacting absenteeism and student achievement in schools. Coordinated school health programs can support students who have these conditions. Although such programs have had documented success, implementation can be costly and time consuming. The local problem addressed in this project…

  11. Parental psychological symptoms and familial risk factors of children and adolescents who exhibit school refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahali, K; Tahiroglu, A Y; Avci, A; Seydaoglu, G

    2011-12-01

    To assess the levels of psychological symptoms in the parents of children with school refusal and determine the familial risk factors in its development. This study was performed on 55 pairs of parents who had children exhibiting school refusal and were compared with a control group. A socio-demographic data form, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Symptom Checklist-90 revised were applied to these parents. Parents of the school refusal group had higher anxiety and depression scores than the controls. Among the risk factors for school refusal, physical punishment by the parents, a history of organic disease in the parents or children, and a history of psychiatric disorders in the parents or other relatives were found to be significant. Depending on genetic and environmental factors, parents with psychiatric disorders appeared to be associated with development of psychiatric disorders in their children. Moreover, psychiatric disorders in parents negatively affected the treatment of their children and adolescents who exhibited school refusal. It is therefore vital to treat psychiatric disorders of parents with the children having psychiatric disorders, and thus increase parent participation in their children's therapeutic process.

  12. Autonomy, belongingness, and engagement in school as contributors to adolescent psychological well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ryzin, Mark J; Gravely, Amy A; Roseth, Cary J

    2009-01-01

    Self-determination theory emphasizes the importance of school-based autonomy and belongingness to academic achievement and psychological adjustment, and the theory posits a model in which engagement in school mediates the influence of autonomy and belongingness on these outcomes. To date, this model has only been evaluated on academic outcomes. Utilizing short-term longitudinal data (5-month timeframe) from a set of secondary schools in the rural Midwest (N = 283, M age = 15.3, 51.9% male, 86.2% White), we extend the model to include a measure of positive adjustment (i.e., hope). We also find a direct link between peer-related belongingness (i.e., peer support) and positive adjustment that is not mediated by engagement in school. A reciprocal relationship between academic autonomy, teacher-related belongingness (i.e., teacher support) and engagement in learning is supported, but this reciprocal relationship does not extend to peer-related belongingness. The implications of these findings for secondary schools are discussed.

  13. Compensatory and Remedial Programs: What School Leaders Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, Leonard; Anderson, Lorin

    1993-01-01

    A recent study of state-funded remedial and compensatory programs in South Carolina concluded that about 40% of the state's principals lacked sufficient understanding of such programs to determine which delivery model was most appropriate and to integrate the programs successfully into their schools' total instructional programs. Obviously,…

  14. Obesity Prevention Interventions in US Public Schools: Are Schools Using Programs That Promote Weight Stigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Wintner, Suzanne; Lee, Rebekka M; Austin, S Bryn

    2017-12-28

    Despite substantial research on school-based obesity prevention programs, it is unclear how widely they are disseminated. It is also unknown whether schools use obesity programs that inadvertently promote weight stigma or disordered weight-control behaviors. In spring 2016, we distributed an online survey about school wellness programming to a simple random sample of US public school administrators (N = 247 respondents; 10.3% response rate). We analyzed survey responses and conducted immersion/crystallization analysis of written open-ended responses. Slightly less than half (n = 117, 47.4%) of schools offered any obesity prevention program. Only 17 (6.9%) reported using a predeveloped program, and 7 (2.8%) reported using a program with evidence for effectiveness. Thirty-seven schools (15.0%) reported developing intervention programs that focused primarily on individual students' or staff members' weight rather than nutrition or physical activity; 28 schools (11.3% of overall) used staff weight-loss competitions. School administrators who reported implementing a program were more likely to describe having a program champion and adequate buy-in from staff, families, and students. Lack of funding, training, and time were widely reported as barriers to implementation. Few administrators used educational (n = 12, 10.3%) or scientific (n = 6, 5.1%) literature for wellness program decision making. Evidence-based obesity prevention programs appear to be rarely implemented in US schools. Schools may be implementing programs lacking evidence and programs that may unintentionally exacerbate student weight stigma by focusing on student weight rather than healthy habits. Public health practitioners and researchers should focus on improving support for schools to implement evidence-based programs.

  15. PROGRAMMING IS GOOD FOR CHILDREN? A CRITICAL VIEW ABOUT TEACHING PROGRAMMING IN SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell Bento Geraldes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents reflections on teaching programming in schools and the positive and negative impact of this new methodology today. The study also discusses the initiatives relating to teaching programming in schools, considering also the opinion of experts on the subject. The following questions are addressed: Is it good for children to learn to program computers in schools? Can all people learn to program computers? What is the importance of learning for today's society? The pros and cons regarding teaching programming in schools will be discussed in search of answers to these questions.

  16. A multidisciplinary weight-loss program: the importance of psychological group therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Duarte Ferrari

    Full Text Available Abstract In addition to dietary factors and sedentary habits, there is a relationship between obesity and psychological variables, even without a clear distinction between cause, effect, and correlation. Despite this relationship, weight-loss programs are limited to a combination of nutrition and physical education, leaving psychological intervention out of the treatment plan. Self-esteem issues, depression, and anxiety are just some of the emotional conditions related to obesity. However, there is no information in the literature about the importance of psychological counseling in a multidisciplinary program for weight-loss in adults. In this context, the main objective of this study was to analyze the effect of cognitive-behavioral therapy in groups (CBTG combined with nutrition and physical education within a multidisciplinary approach to treat obesity. 46 individuals (7 men and 39 women were divided into two groups: control (GC and psychology (GP. Baseline and intervention measures were obtained prior to intervention and before the final meeting, including physical capacity tests and the administering the International Physical Activities Questionnaire (IPAQ. Both groups attended weekly lectures given by a nutritionist and two physical education professionals for 12 weeks. In addition, the GP participated in weekly sessions of CBTG for the same period. After the program, there were significant changes in body mass index, waist circumference, body fat percentage, and strength of the lower limbs in both groups. In addition to these changes, the GP also showed improvements in diastolic blood pressure and IPAQ scores, being the only one that increased its time of weekly physical activity. Thus, it was concluded that the psychological treatment might play an important role in a multidisciplinary weight-loss program.

  17. Music in the educational programs of primary school teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Coelho de Souza, Cássia

    2012-01-01

    Two situations indicate the need of bringing closer music education and the educational community. Elementary school teachers struggle to mediate a relation between their students and knowledge about music. In addition, a contradiction between Brazilian elementary schools and educational programs for primary school teacher exists, in relation to knowledge about music. In an attempt to bridge this gap, the present article aims to review the main ideas on educational programs for primary ...

  18. Walking school bus programs in U.S. public elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Chriqui, Jamie F; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-07-01

    Active transportation to school provides an important way for children to meet physical activity recommendations. The "walking school bus" (WSB) is a strategy whereby adults walk with a group of children to and from school along a fixed route. This study assessed whether school-organized WSB programs varied by school characteristics, district policies, and state laws. School data were gathered by mail-back surveys in nationally representative samples of U.S. public elementary schools during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school years (n = 632 and 666, respectively). Corresponding district policies and state laws were obtained. Nationwide, 4.2% of schools organized a WSB program during 2008-2009, increasing to 6.2% by 2009-2010. Controlling for demographic covariates, schools were more likely to organize a WSB program where there was a strong district policy pertaining to safe active routes to school (OR = 2.14, P law requiring crossing guards around schools (OR = 2.72, P laws are associated with an increased likelihood of elementary schools organizing these programs. Policymaking efforts may encourage schools to promote active transportation.

  19. Effect of Growth Mindset on School Engagement and Psychological Well-Being of Chinese Primary and Middle School Students: The Mediating Role of Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Zeng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of positive education is not only to improve students’ well-being but also their academic performance. As an important concept in positive education, growth mindset refers to core assumptions about the malleability of a person’s intellectual abilities. The present study investigates the relation of growth mindsets to psychological well-being and school engagement. The study also explores the mediating function of resilience in this relation. We recruited a total of 1260 (658 males and 602 females Chinese students from five diversified primary and middle schools. Results from the structural equation model (SEM show that the development of high levels of growth mindsets in students predicts higher psychological well-being and school engagement through the enhancement of resilience. The current study contributes to our understanding towards the potential mechanisms of how positive education (e.g. altering the mindset of students can impact psychological well-being and school engagement.

  20. USAF Summer Research Program - 1995 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 14, Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  1. Ocoee Junior High School's Total School Reading Program on a Shoestring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Bess; Williams, Robert W.

    The total school reading program described in this booklet includes a program for remedial, developmental, and special education students. Faculty members and students not participating in this program spend one half hour a day in a silent reading program. The booklet outlines each facet of the program, lists the equipment and materials used,…

  2. Evaluation of Clark County School District's Alternative Route to Licensure Program from the Program Participants' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, James J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This evaluation assesses the Alternative Route to Licensure (ARL) program of the Clark County School District (CCSD), in Clark County, Nevada from the program participants' perspectives. The program was implemented to reduce teacher shortages in the school district and allow persons with non-education-related Bachelor's Degrees to obtain teaching…

  3. From Procedures To Objects: A Research Agenda For The Psychology Of Object-oriented Programming Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorma Sajaniemi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Programming education has experienced a shift from imperative and procedural programming to object-orientation. This shift has been motivated by educators' desire to please the information technology industry and potential students; it is not motivated by research either in psychology of programming or in computer science education. There are practically no results that would indicate that such a shift is desirable, needed in the first place, or even effective for learning programming. Moreover, there has been an implicit assumption that classic results on imperative and procedural programming education and learning apply to object-oriented programming (OOP as well. We argue that this is not the case and call for systematic research into the fundamental cognitive and educational issues in learning and teaching OOP. We also present a research agenda intended to improve the understanding of OOP and OOP education.

  4. Research Productivity in Top-Ranked Schools in Psychology and Social Work: Does Having a Research Culture Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barner, John R.; Holosko, Michael J.; Thyer, Bruce A.; King, Steve, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    The "h"-index for all social work and psychology tenured or tenure-track faculty in the top 25 social work programs and psychology departments as ranked by "U.S. News and World Report" in 2012 and 2013, respectively, were obtained, permitting comparison of the scholarly influence between members (N = 1,939) of the two fields.…

  5. Research quality and psychological theory in publications on school shooters with multiple victims - A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål Grøndahl

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available School shooting homicide events generate considerable attention. A substantial number of research reports have tried to explain the phenomenon. However, the outcome of these studies has produced a conflicting picture of the issue. Our systematic review explored the quality of research in publications on school shooters. Research quality was assessed concerning description of design, method and interpretation of results according to PRISMA and CRD criteria. We investigated evidence of the impact of psychological theories on how research was designed and interpreted. A total of 10 papers met the criteria for inclusion in the review. With a few exceptions, the research quality was low. Only three studies contained a separate methods section. Two out of ten studies reported from an interview with a school shooter. Secondary sources such as school, hospital and/or psychological evaluations were used in four studies, while the rest had only applied tertiary data sources. There was a void of psychological theoretical analysis to inform the creation of relevant research designs. No study discussed psychological theories to inform inference from empirical data to conclusion. Higher quality of research and enhanced focus on theoretical understanding of psychological factors in school shooting are called upon.

  6. School lunch program in India: background, objectives and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutani, Alka Mohan

    2012-01-01

    The School Lunch Program in India (SLP) is the largest food and nutrition assistance program feeding millions of children every day. This paper provides a review of the background information on the SLP in India earlier known as national program for nutrition support to primary education (NP-NSPE) and later as mid day meal scheme, including historical trends and objectives and components/characteristics of the scheme. It also addresses steps being taken to meet challenges being faced by the administrators of the program in monitoring and evaluation of the program. This program was initially started in 1960 in few states to overcome the complex problems malnutrition and illiteracy. Mid Day Meal Scheme is the popular name for school meal program. In 2001, as per the supreme court orders, it became mandatory to give a mid day meal to all primary and later extended to upper primary school children studying in the government and government aided schools. This scheme benefitted 140 million children in government assisted schools across India in 2008, strengthening child nutrition and literacy. In a country with a large percent of illiterate population with a high percent of children unable to read or write; governmental and non-governmental organizations have reported that mid day meal scheme has consistently increased enrollment in schools in India. One of the main goals of school lunch program is to promote the health and well-being of the Nation's children.

  7. Psychological distress and its correlates in secondary school students in Pavia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, A; Degrate, A; Villani, S; Gerzeli, S

    1997-10-01

    Adolescence is a time of social as well as biological transition; nevertheless, there are very few epidemiological studies in this field in Italy. Therefore, we felt it would be useful to conduct a cross-sectional study on a sample of 1346 adolescents aged 14-19 years attending high schools in the Health Authority Area of Pavia (northern Italy) through a multi-dimensional approach, taking into consideration physical and psychological health, life habits, family environment and social life of teen-agers. We used a structured self-administered questionnaire consisting of 264 question items to achieve the study aim, which was to find the variables (among personal data, scholastic, family, relational characteristics and habits) correlated with psychological distress. The results showed that in this sample psychological distress (evaluated by GHQ-30) was significatively (p parent (from a region different from that of residence), little love for parents and poor parental psycho-physical health status, staying at home on the weekend, smoking and using psychoactive medicines.

  8. A School Uniform Program That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    According to advocates, school uniforms reduce gang influence, decrease families' clothing expenditures, and help mitigate potentially divisive cultural and economic differences. Aiming to improve school climate, a California elementary school adopted uniforms as a source of pride and affiliation. This article describes the development of the…

  9. A School Voucher Program for Baltimore City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Baltimore City's public school system is in crisis. Academically, the school system fails on any number of measures. The city's graduation rate is barely above 50 percent and students continually lag well behind state averages on standardized tests. Adding to these problems is the school system's current fiscal crisis, created by years of fiscal…

  10. Psychological Factors behind Truancy, School Phobia, and School Refusal: A Literature Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Hans; Eriksson, Rikard

    2013-01-01

    Truancy is a problem that normally leads to treatment interventions within different organizations. Within these organizations different perspectives on the causes and consequences of the above problem can be found. The purpose of this literature study is to map out and describe the current state of research within the fields of school refusal,…

  11. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was $1000 US, and the yearly maintenance cost was <$500 with funds typically allocated from existing school resources. The facilitator was a school official or volunteer for 81% of schools. Average estimated training time commitment per student was <2 hours. Automated external defibrillators are available in 98% of schools, and 61% include automated external defibrillator training in their curriculum. Despite perceived barriers, school CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effectiveness of a Nondiet Multidisciplinary Weight Reduction Program for Severe Overweight Patients with Psychological Comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Bannert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. For successful sustainable weight reduction, a multimodal program including behaviour therapy is needed. Lifestyle modification is mostly used for obesity BMI 40 kg/m2 with psychological comorbidity. Research Methods and Procedere. A retrospective data analysis of 99 participants who passed the program based on moderate activity, healthy and regular food intake over metabolic rate and behaviour therapy was conducted. Results. 64 had a BMI >40 kg/m2 (mean value 49.99±8.74. The relative weight reduction was −6.9 ± 3.9%; (Friedman test P40 kg/m2 may achieve significant changes of weight reduction and psychological symptoms. However, the primary outcome should not be weight reduction. It is necessary to identify the benefits of lifestyle modification on changing risk profiles and emotional regulation of food intake.

  13. Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Psychology Doctoral Programs: Core Competencies and a Framework for Training

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, Robert J.; Johnson, Shara M.; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Rausch, Emilie M.; Conroy, Mary Alice

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and counseling psychology programs currently lack adequate evidence-based competency goals and training in suicide risk assessment. To begin to address this problem, this article proposes core competencies and an integrated training framework that can form the basis for training and research in this area. First, we evaluate the extent to which current training is effective in preparing trainees for suicide risk assessment. Within this discussion, sample and methodological issues are ...

  14. Execution of Educational Mechanical Production Programs for School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuhide; Itoh, Goroh; Shibata, Takayuki

    The authors are conducting experience-based engineering educational programs for elementary and junior high school students with the aim to provide a chance for them to experience mechanical production. As part of this endeavor, we planned and conducted a program called “Fabrication of Original Magnet Plates by Casting” for elementary school students. This program included a course for leading nature laws and logical thinking method. Prior to the program, a preliminary program was applied to school teachers to get comments and to modify for the program accordingly. The children responded excellently to the production process which realizes their ideas, but it was found that the course on natural laws and logical methods need to be improved to draw their interest and attention. We will continue to plan more effective programs, deepening ties with the local community.

  15. Preventing violence against children in schools: Contributions from the Be Safe program in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Steven; Zwart, Christine; Chahal, Inem; Lane, David; Cummings, Harry

    2018-02-01

    Violence against children is a global public health issue with serious social, economic, physical, and emotional impacts. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a school-based program aimed to prevent and respond to physical, sexual, and psychological violence against children in Sri Lanka from the perspective of parents. A cross-sectional retrospective study design was used. A total of 835 parents of children who participated in the program were surveyed across seven districts in Sri Lanka. Dose-response analyses were conducted to assess for correlations between program exposure and perceived prevention of violence against children. Low to moderate correlations were found between exposure to the program and perceived child safety in schools, school policies, and in the community. The findings provide preliminary evidence of program effectiveness; however, more efforts are needed to validate and sustain outcomes. Implications for future violence prevention programming, along with the use of dose-response evaluations, are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. School feeding programs' role in forming eating habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Cervato-Mancuso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To identify teaching managers' perceptions regarding the relationship of school feeding and the promotion of healthy eating habits among students. METHODS A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was developed in the city of Guarulhos (Southeast Brazil. Key informants from municipal public schools were interviewed. Public schools were selected (n=13 and classified as to the level of social exclusion, size and economic activity of the region where the school was located. Pedagogic coordinators and school principals were individually interviewed with semi-structured questions. RESULTS From school principals and pedagogical coordinators' perceptions, three categories were identified: Food in the school context; School feeding program's role and the Concept of food and nutrition security, which indicate that they considered meals as part of school routine in order to attain physiological needs of energy and nutrients. Their answers also indicated that they did not consider school meals as a pedagogical action related to their specific responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The relationship between the school feeding and the formation of eating habits is not a topic usually discussed between the different professionals involved with health and education. The implementation of health promoting policies will only be possible after a debate about how schools and their pedagogical team adopt the program guidelines and how the professionals decode these strategies in daily activities.

  17. School feeding programs' role in forming eating habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervato-Mancuso, Ana Maria; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Araki, Erica Lie; Bógus, Claudia Maria

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify teaching managers' perceptions regarding the relationship of school feeding and the promotion of healthy eating habits among students. METHODS A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was developed in the city of Guarulhos (Southeast Brazil). Key informants from municipal public schools were interviewed. Public schools were selected (n=13) and classified as to the level of social exclusion, size and economic activity of the region where the school was located. Pedagogic coordinators and school principals were individually interviewed with semi-structured questions. RESULTS From school principals and pedagogical coordinators' perceptions, three categories were identified: Food in the school context; School feeding program's role and the Concept of food and nutrition security, which indicate that they considered meals as part of school routine in order to attain physiological needs of energy and nutrients. Their answers also indicated that they did not consider school meals as a pedagogical action related to their specific responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The relationship between the school feeding and the formation of eating habits is not a topic usually discussed between the different professionals involved with health and education. The implementation of health promoting policies will only be possible after a debate about how schools and their pedagogical team adopt the program guidelines and how the professionals decode these strategies in daily activities.

  18. School-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Programs in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj; Branscum, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse, or substance abuse, is a substantial public health problem in the United States, particularly among high school students. The purpose of this article was to review school-based programs implemented in high schools for substance abuse prevention and to suggest recommendations for future interventions. Included were English language…

  19. The Profile of a School and Measurement of a Multi-School Organization Change Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitler, Fred C.

    Modern organization theory and research from business and industry predicts that schools which change toward the Likert participative group organizations will increase productivity. This paper reports interventions of a one-year organization development program carried out with 12 schools and the change results measured by the Profile of a School.…

  20. Measuring the academic, social, and psychological effects of academic service learning on middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Valarie A.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an academic service learning project on ninth-grade students' science achievement and attitudes. A quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design was used with four classes of one teacher in a rural school. The treatment was an Energy Fair service project. Two treatment classes that were chosen by random assignment (n = 58) were compared to two control classes (n = 64), who performed an alternative assignment. The Energy Fair was conducted for the elementary school students and on a limited basis for fellow students (peers). The academic effect was measured by a teacher-designed end-of-unit ecology test, with a subset of the questions on energy use. Psychological effects were measured by a self-esteem questionnaire, which measured both self-esteem and the satisfaction felt about one's self-esteem. Social effects were measured by three semantic differentials, one each for "adults," "peers," and "elementary students." The teacher was interviewed regarding her observations about the project. Written reflections from both the treatment and control groups were coded and analyzed. Pretest results were divided into thirds of high, medium, and low for all variables to search for the possibility of an attribute-treatment interaction. Analysis of covariance was used to reduce the possibility of pretest bias, to test for significant effects, and to test for a level by treatment interaction. Although the posttest means favored the experimental group, no statistically significant difference was found for academic results. No significant effect was found for either of the psychological measures. No change was found for the social results regarding "adults." A statistically significant effect was found for social results in the categories of "elementary students" and "peers." No statistically significant level by treatment interaction was found. Further research on the effects of academic service learning projects is needed at

  1. Transformational Leadership in a High School Choral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen Brian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a high school choral program to discover how the leadership behaviors of the teacher contributed to the success of the program. The teacher's leadership behaviors were examined through the framework of Transformational Leadership. Criteria for the selection of this program included a recent performance at a…

  2. Christmas and Easter Art Programs in Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncum, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Describes art programs that were given at several elementary Australian schools focusing on Christmas and Easter. Explains that the programs are based on the accounts of the birth and death of Jesus given in the Bible. States that the programs integrate studio art, art criticism, and art history. (CMK)

  3. Evaluation of the Pilot Program for Home School and ChalleNGe Program Recruits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, F

    2001-01-01

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (FY 99) directed a 5-year pilot program to treat graduates of home schools and graduates of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program holding General Education Development (GED...

  4. Farm-to-School Programs: Perspectives of School Food Service Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T.; Alaimo, Katherine; Hamm, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This qualitative study used a case study approach to explore the potential of farm-to-school programs to simultaneously improve children's diets and provide farmers with viable market opportunities. Design: Semistructured interviews were the primary data collection strategy. Setting: Seven farm-to-school programs in the Upper Midwest…

  5. The Bridges SOI Model School Program at Palo Verde School, Palo Verde, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, William A.; DiSalvo, Pamela M.

    The Bridges SOI Model School Program is an educational service based upon the SOI (Structure of Intellect) Model School curriculum. For the middle seven months of the academic year, all students in the program complete brief daily exercises that develop specific cognitive skills delineated in the SOI model. Additionally, intensive individual…

  6. Experiences of School Teachers on Participation in a Brief School Mental Health Program: A Qualitative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrinivasa, Basavaraj; Reshma, B. K.; Virupaksha, H. G.; Chaithra, Chandrakanth; Vidya, Naik; Nithyananda, S.; Joseph Arthur, Julian Anthony; Amaresha, Anekal C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: School mental health programs (SMHPs) aim to strengthen school teachers' understanding about issues related to child and adolescent mental health and their management. Many studies have looked at outcomes of such programs quantitatively. However, there is a lack of studies on the qualitative effects of SMHPs. With this in mind, the aim…

  7. Evaluating mediation and moderation effects in school psychology: a presentation of methods and review of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Amanda J; McQuillin, Samuel D

    2010-02-01

    Third variable effects elucidate the relation between two other variables, and can describe why they are related or under what conditions they are related. This article demonstrates methods to analyze two third-variable effects: moderation and mediation. The utility of examining moderation and mediation effects in school psychology is described and current use of the analyses in applied school psychology research is reviewed and evaluated. Proper statistical methods to test the effects are presented, and different effect size measures for the models are provided. Extensions of the basic moderator and mediator models are also described.

  8. Evaluating mediation and moderation effects in school psychology: A presentation of methods and review of current practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Amanda J.; McQuillin, Samuel D.

    2017-01-01

    Third variable effects elucidate the relation between two other variables, and can describe why they are related or under what conditions they are related. This article demonstrates methods to analyze two third-variable effects: moderation and mediation. The utility of examining moderation and mediation effects in school psychology is described and current use of the analyses in applied school psychology research is reviewed and evaluated. Proper statistical methods to test the effects are presented, and different effect size measures for the models are provided. Extensions of the basic moderator and mediator models are also described. PMID:20006988

  9. Extracurricular Physical Activity Programs in California Private Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2017-12-01

    Interscholastic, intramural, and club physical activity (PA) programs can be important contributors to student PA accrual at schools. Few studies have assessed factors related to the provision of these extracurricular PA programs, especially in private schools. We used a 16-item questionnaire to assess the associations and influences of selected factors relative to extracurricular PA program policies and practices in 450 private California secondary schools. Associations were evaluated using contingency table analyses (i.e., chi-squared, effect size, and post-hoc analyses). Six factors were associated with schools providing extracurricular PA programs: school location, level, enrollment, and religious classification and whether the physical education (PE) program met state PE time standards and was taught by PE specialists. Both static factors (e.g., school location, level, enrollment, and religious affiliation) and modifiable factors (e.g., meeting PE standards and employing specialists) affect the provision of extracurricular PA programs. As education is state-mandated, additional study is recommended to assess the generalizability of these findings to other states and to public schools.

  10. Development of ACTION! Wellness Program for Elementary School Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Larry S; Johnson, Carolyn C; Rose, Donald; Rice, Janet C

    2007-11-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased dramatically in the adult population over the past 2 decades. Almost two-thirds of the adult population works outside the home; thus, interventions implemented at the worksite are viable for obesity reduction. Elementary schools are worksites that have a number of resources that can encourage a healthy lifestyle. The purpose of this paper is to describe the formative research activities and how these were used to design the ACTION! Wellness Program for Elementary School Personnel. Formative data were collected using focus groups, a school survey, and an environmental audit. Focus groups were conducted in three elementary schools, whereas the school survey and environmental audit were collected in 24 elementary schools. The intervention was then tested as a pilot study in one school to determine feasibility and receptivity and refine its components. Participants in the focus groups indicated that most had experience with trying to lose weight, some had positive social support, and most had little free time at school; however, most were very receptive to having a weight control intervention program at their school. Eighteen (75%) of the schools had snack vending machines on the school site, and all had cold drink machines. All 24 schools had at least one indoor site that could be used for physical activity programs. All schools were in neighborhoods conducive for walking. ACTION! will take advantage of the school resources in implementing an environmental intervention to reduce overweight and obesity. This paper describes the progression of events that led to the final trial.

  11. A systematic review of school-based suicide prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Cara; Bolton, Shay-Lee; Katz, Laurence Y; Isaak, Corinne; Tilston-Jones, Toni; Sareen, Jitender

    2013-10-01

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among youth today. Schools are a cost-effective way to reach youth, yet there is no conclusive evidence regarding the most effective prevention strategy. We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on school-based suicide prevention programs. Studies were identified through MEDLINE and Scopus searches, using keywords such as "suicide, education, prevention and program evaluation." Additional studies were identified with a manual search of relevant reference lists. Individual studies were rated for level of evidence, and the programs were given a grade of recommendation. Five reviewers rated all studies independently and disagreements were resolved through discussion. Sixteen programs were identified. Few programs have been evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing suicide attempts. Most studies evaluated the programs' abilities to improve students' and school staffs' knowledge and attitudes toward suicide. Signs of Suicide and the Good Behavior Game were the only programs found to reduce suicide attempts. Several other programs were found to reduce suicidal ideation, improve general life skills, and change gatekeeper behaviors. There are few evidence-based, school-based suicide prevention programs, a combination of which may be effective. It would be useful to evaluate the effectiveness of general mental health promotion programs on the outcome of suicide. The grades assigned in this review are reflective of the available literature, demonstrating a lack of randomized controlled trials. Further evaluation of programs examining suicidal behavior outcomes in randomized controlled trials is warranted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. An evaluation of the California Instructional School Garden Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Eric L; Moreno, Elizabeth; Beall, Deborah L; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2012-02-01

    California Assembly Bill 1535 awarded $US 15 million to California public schools to promote, develop and sustain instructional school gardens through the California Instructional School Garden Program (CISGP). The present study was designed to assess the effectiveness of the CISGP at assisting schools in implementing, maintaining and sustaining an academic school garden programme, determine how schools utilized the funding they received and assess the impact of the California state budget crisis on the CISGP. A mid-term evaluation was used to assess the degree to which schools achieved their instructional garden-related goals. California. Only schools that applied for the CIGSP grant as part of a school district and also provided a contact email and had a unique contact person were included in the study (n 3103, 80·6 %). In general, many schools reported not achieving their predicted goals with regard to the CISGP grant. Only 39·4 % of schools reported accomplishing all of their garden-related goals. Over one-third (37·8 %) of schools reported that their school gardens were negatively affected by the California budget deficit. The difference between predicted and actual utilization of the CISGP grants may be due to a combination of the effects of budget shortfall and insufficiency of the grant award amount.

  13. Grading School Choice: Evaluating School Choice Programs by the Friedman Gold Standard. School Choice Issues in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, The Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice published a report titled "Grading Vouchers: Ranking America's School Choice Programs." Its purpose was to measure every existing school choice program against the gold standard set by Milton and Rose Friedman: that the most effective way to improve K-12 education and thus ensure a stable…

  14. 25 CFR 39.132 - Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school integrate Language Development programs into... Language Development Programs § 39.132 Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program? A school may offer Language Development programs to students as part of its...

  15. Global Climate Change as Perceived by Elementary School Teachers in Yogyakarta , Indigenous Psychology Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquilina Tanti Arini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe how the global climate change was perceived by teachers of elementary schools. The subjects were 111 teachers from 7 elementary schools in Yogyakarta City and Sleman district. The data were collected using open-ended questions (including perception about the weather, feeling evoked by global warming words and free responses related to global warming issues. The data were analyzed using the technique of qualitative and quantitative content analysis with Indigenous Psychology Approach. The result showed that only one teacher reported that there was no weather anomaly, while 110 teachers reported that they perceived weather anomaly. Of those who perceived weather anomaly mostly referred to natural conditions (including global climatic condition and environmental destruction and human behavior as its causes. Responses about feeling as evoked by global warming word were classified into three categories, i.e. emotional, physical and irrelevant responses. Free responses about global warming were classified into four categories respectively from the highest frequency of responses: prevention (including statement “must be prevented”, prevention behaviors and prevention efforts, states (including the weather states and feeling, causes (including technological advances and human behavior generally, and others. The research finding was discussed in the frame of environmental concern as a means of character education in elementary school.

  16. Profiling the Psychological Training and Support Needs of Oncology Staff, and Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Level 2 Psychological Support Training Program Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffan, Amanda J; Daniels, Jo; Osborn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The importance of training non-psychology healthcare professionals to offer psychological support to people with cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. This small-scale pilot project sought to identify the training and support needs of oncology staff and to evaluate the effectiveness of a Level 2 Psychological Support Training Program workshop. Semi-structured interviews with five members of multidisciplinary oncology staff identified that training needs were primarily around communication skills, recognizing and dealing with emotions, offering support and empathy, and self-care. Pre and post-training questionnaires developed with these themes in mind revealed that the Level 2 Training Program workshops run in this network of hospitals are effective in increasing participants' levels of perceived knowledge and confidence across each of these domains. Recommendations are made for further enhancing this effectiveness.

  17. Rationale for the Cultural Construction of School Mental Health Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G.; Nastasi, Bonnie K.; Leff, Stephen S.

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of evidence-based psychological programming to meet the needs of a global population has been impeded by the translation of theories and research findings across populations and settings without due consideration of cultural factors. The purpose of this article is to discuss the rationale for use of partnership-based methods in…

  18. Effective Inclusive Schools: Designing Successful Schoolwide Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehir, Thomas; Katzman, Lauren I.

    2012-01-01

    This book presents lessons learned from in-depth case studies of some of our most effective inclusive public schools. The authors conclusively demonstrate that schools can educate students with mild and severe disabilities in general education classrooms by providing special education services that link to and bolster general education…

  19. School District Cash Management. Program Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Legislative Commission on Expenditure Review, Albany.

    New York State law permits school districts to invest cash not immediately needed for district operation and also specifies the kinds of investments that may be made in order to ensure the safety and liquidity of public funds. This audit examines cash management and investment practices in New York state's financially independent school districts.…

  20. High school sports programs differentially impact participation by sex

    OpenAIRE

    Keith M. Drake; Meghan R. Longacre; Todd MacKenzie; Linda J. Titus; Michael L. Beach; Andrew G. Rundle; Madeline A. Dalton

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among numerous health benefits, sports participation has been shown to reduce the risk of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Schools represent an ideal environment for increasing sports participation, but it is unclear how access and choice influence participation and whether characteristics of the school sports program differentially influence boys' and girls' participation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of high school athletic pro...

  1. Family environment and adolescent psychological well-being, school adjustment, and problem behavior: a pioneer study in a Chinese context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, D T

    1997-03-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 365) responded to instruments measuring their family environment, psychological well-being, school adjustment, and problem behavior. Measures of the family environment include perceived paternal and maternal parenting styles, family functioning, and conflict with father and mother. Results from bivariate and canonical correlation analyses showed that in general, adolescents' perceptions of parenting styles, family functioning, and parent-adolescent conflict were significantly related to scores on measures of psychological well-being (general psychiatric morbidity, life satisfaction, purpose in life, hopelessness, and self-esteem), school adjustment (perceived academic performance and school conduct), and problem behavior (smoking and psychotropic drug abuse). The findings suggest that family factors play an important role in influencing the psychosocial adjustment, particularly the positive mental health, of Chinese adolescents.

  2. Federal Aviation Administration Curriculum Guide for Aviation Magnet Schools Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Prepared ca. 1994. This publication is designed to provide: : - a brief history of the role of aviation in motivating young : people to learn. : - examples of aviation magnet activities, programs, projects and : school curriculums. : - documentation ...

  3. Optimizing Violence Prevention Programs: An Examination of Program Effectiveness among Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompkins, Amanda C.; Chauveron, Lisa M.; Harel, Ofer; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: While demand for youth violence prevention programs increases, the ability of the school-day schedule to accommodate their time requirements has diminished. Viable school-based prevention programs must strike a balance between brevity and effectiveness. This article reports results from an effectiveness trial of a 12-session…

  4. Special Food and Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaison, Elaine Fontenot; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of special food and/or nutrition needs in school nutrition programs. In addition, researchers focused on the issues surrounding these needs and the role of the school nutrition (SN) directors and managers in meeting these needs. Methods: An expert panel was used to…

  5. Summary of Program Evaluation Results: 1985-1986 School Year Pre-Kindergarten Educational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Robert W.; And Others

    Reported are findings of the 1985-86 program evaluation of the prenatal-to-preschool and preschool programs operating under the auspices of the Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate. Evaluation of the prenatal-to-preschool program (the Kupulani Program) included item analysis of the Questions about Pregnancy Test, development of a revised data…

  6. Middle school girls and one STEM OST program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holba, Andrea

    This dissertation examines motivation in middle school girls involved in one STEM OST program. Specifically, motivation is examined through four distinct components. These components are attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction. Although these components are unique, they cumulatively create a holistic picture of motivation in program design. The middle school girl participants were observed at program workshops and personal interviews. Exploring program design elements through this lens of motivation was a qualitative effort to both understand how participants respond to design elements, and what might encourage future participation in STEM activities.

  7. Effect of different exercise programs on the psychological and cognitive functions of people with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Teresa Bucken Gobbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of different exercise programs on the psychological and cognitive functions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Forty-five patients with PD participated in the study. The participants were randomized in three intervention programs: Group-1 (n=15, cognitive-activities, Group-2 (n=15, multimodal exercise and Group-3 (n=15, exercises for posture and gait. The clinical, psychological and cognitive functions were assessed before and after 4 months of intervention. Univariate analysis did not reveal significant interactions between groups and time (p>0.05. However, univariate analysis for time revealed differences in stress level and memory. Participants showed less physical stress (p<0.01 and overall stress (p < 0.04 and higher performance in episodic declarative memory (p < 0.001 after exercise. These findings suggest that group work with motor or non-motor activities can improve cognitive and psychological functions of patients with PD.

  8. Cyberbullying and Primary-School Aged Children: The Psychological Literature and the Challenge for Sociology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley-Anne Ey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyberbullying is an international issue for schools, young people and their families. Whilst many research domains have explored this phenomenon, and bullying more generally, the majority of reported studies appear in the psychological and educational literatures, where bullying, and more recently, cyberbullying has been examined primarily at the individual level: amongst adolescents and young people, with a focus on the definition, its prevalence, behaviours, and impact. There also is growing evidence that younger children are increasingly accessing technology and engaging with social media, yet there is limited research dedicated to this younger age group. The purpose of this paper is to report on a systematic literature review from the psychological and educational research domains related to this younger age group, to inform future research across the disciplines. Younger children require different methods of engagement. This review highlights the methodological challenges associated with this age group present in the psychological literature, and argues for a greater use of sociological, child-centred approaches to data collection. This review examined studies published in English, between 2009 and 2014, and conducted with children aged 5–12 years, about their experiences with cyberbullying. Searches were conducted on seven key databases using keywords associated with cyberbullying and age of children. A Google Scholar search also examined published and unpublished reports. A total of 966 articles and reports were retrieved. A random peer review process was employed to establish inter-rater reliability and veracity of the review. Findings revealed 38 studies reported specifically on children aged 5–12 years. The dominant focus of these articles was on prevalence of cyberbullying, established through survey methodology. Few studies noted impacts, understanding and behaviours or engaged children’s independent voice. This review

  9. Applying cognitive developmental psychology to middle school physics learning: The rule assessment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinen, Nicole R.; Chi, Min; Chin, Doris B.; Prempeh, Joe; Blair, Kristen P.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive developmental psychology often describes children's growing qualitative understanding of the physical world. Physics educators may be able to use the relevant methods to advantage for characterizing changes in students' qualitative reasoning. Siegler developed the "rule assessment" method for characterizing levels of qualitative understanding for two factor situations (e.g., volume and mass for density). The method assigns children to rule levels that correspond to the degree they notice and coordinate the two factors. Here, we provide a brief tutorial plus a demonstration of how we have used this method to evaluate instructional outcomes with middle-school students who learned about torque, projectile motion, and collisions using different instructional methods with simulations.

  10. A study on psychological assessment of adolescent girls in rural schools of West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalya Manna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the adolescent population constitutes one-sixth of the total global population, their physical and mental health have become a serious concern. Depression is becoming the most common mental health problem. According to the WHO, depression is projected to become the second leading cause of disability after heart disease. Anxiety and its manifestations are influenced by cultural beliefs, practices and associated with substantial negative effects on children’s social, emotional and academic success. Specific effects include poor social and coping skills, loneliness, low self-esteem, and difficulty forming friendships. The objectives of the present study were to assess the psychological health profile of students using DASS21 Scale. This cross-sectional study was done among 435 rural school students selected by random sampling. Statistically significant association of depression with absence of sibling, self-reported scholastic performance, and relationship with parents and peers were found.

  11. A study on psychological assessment of adolescent girls in rural schools of West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalya Manna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the adolescent population constitutes oneHsixth of the total global population, their physical and mental health have become a serious concern. Depression is becoming the most common mental health problem. According to the WHO, depression is projected to become the second leading cause of disability after heart disease. Anxiety and its manifestations are influenced by cultural beliefs, practices and associated with substantial negative effects on children’s social, emotional and academic success. Specific effects include poor social and coping skills, loneliness, low selfHesteem, and difficulty forming friendships. The objectives of the present study were to assess the psychological health profile of students using DASS21 Scale. This cross sectional study was done among 435 rural school students selected by random sampling. Statistically significant association of depression with absence of sibling, self Hreported scholastic performance, relationship with parents and peers were found.

  12. Cyberbullying, psychological distress and self-esteem among youth in Quebec schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cénat, Jude Mary; Hébert, Martine; Blais, Martin; Lavoie, Francine; Guerrier, Mireille; Derivois, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    The advent of new technologies and social media offers a host of possibilities for teenagers to consolidate social networks. Unfortunately, new technologies also represent a potential setting for experiences of victimization. The present study explores the prevalence of cyberbullying victimization in a representative sample of 8 194 teenagers in Quebec and the adverse associated consequences. Results indicate that 18% of boys and close to 1 out of 4 girls report at least one incident of cyberbullying in the past 12 months. Cyberbullying victimization contributes to the prediction of low selfesteem and psychological distress over and above other experiences of bullying in schools or other settings. Cyberbullying appear as one important target for the design of prevention and intervention services designed for youth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A case study of school support and the psychological, emotional and behavioural consequences of HIV and AIDS on adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikhia, Olubusayo Aduke; Mohangi, Kesh

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have reported a huge increase in the numbers of orphaned adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa and its effects on their psychological, emotional and behavioural development. Yet, their needs are seldom recognised or adequately addressed in policy and programmes.This article uses a qualitative study to report the experiences of 11 orphaned adolescents (5 boys and 6 girls aged between 15 and 18 years) affected by HIV and AIDS in a secondary school (in Atteridgeville, Pretoria, South Africa) and the school support provided by them. The primary data-generation strategies were informal interviews and the Beck Youth Inventories-II (BYI-II) (adopted to measure the participants' level of emotional, behavioural and psychological problems). All interview transcriptions with the participants were thematically analysed. BYI-II data were subjected to T scores (in percentages) to know the participant's psychological, behavioural and emotional problems in order to compare it with their perceptions on the degree of support provided by the school. Result shows that participants have a high prevalence of psychological, behavioural and emotional problems and that the school support provided to them (teachers' support, the general school environment and the degree of discrimination, labelling and bullying that exists in the school) was not sufficient. The participants, however, reported a high level of support from the principal. In conclusion, we have suggested the urgent need for teachers to acquire and possess basic knowledge and skills in caring and paying attention to learners affected by HIV and AIDS and for government agencies and NGOs working with HIV-and AIDS-affected children, to focus on proposals that address the psychological, behavioural and emotional problems in such affected adolescents.

  14. Constructive conflict coverage - A social-psychological research and development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Kempf

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Peace journalism is a relatively new research area in psychology which emerged in the last decade of the last century. Building on findings from social psychology (group processes, social influence, conflict research, attitude change, propaganda, and enemy concept research and on models of conflict management and the constructive transformation of conflicts, an investigation is made of the factors that determine the escalation oriented bias of conventional war reporting, and of how this can be transformed into de-escalation and/or peace oriented conflict reporting. This paper provides an outline of this research and development program in six sections: (1 Interest Perception, (2 Task Formulation, (3 Basic Theoretical Assumptions, (4 War Discourse vs. Peace Discourse, (5 a Two Step Model, and (6 Journalist Training.

  15. SCHOOL FEEDING PROGRAM USING RICE-PEA BEVERAGE IN SOME PRIMARY SCHOOLS: DOES IT HAVE BENEFIT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoto Satoto

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT School feeding program is believed to be one effort among others to improve attendance rate, nutritional status and cognitive function of school children, which in turn improve academic performance of them. A study was conducted to evaluate a school feeding program using rice-pea beverage in Bandung, Indonesia. Its objective is to measure effect of the program on attendance rate, nutritional status, cognitive function and academic performance of the children joining the program. A control group design was administered. A number of students of class 3,4 and 5 from schools joining the feeding program were selected as program group, and more or less same number of school children in other schools with similar socio-economic situation were selected as control group. The feeding program was organized for 6 months. Attendance rate was measured by number of absentees, total and due to sickness in one semester. Nutritional status was standardized using WHO-NCHS z-score for weight-for-age (WAZ and height-for-age (HAZ. Cognitive function was measured by Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM, and score of Mathematics and Indonesian Language (Bahasa Indonesia were measured using specific scholastic testings. School and home learning environment, certain food consumption frequencies were collected as covariates. GLM analyses were administered. The study found that after being controlled by some covariates, at the end of the study children in the program group showed better attendance rate, nutritional status, cognitive function and school performance. It is assumed that the improvement was due to better attendance rate as the program attracted the children to attend more days in the schools and due to improvement of food consumption provided by the program and at home. More in-depth, more specific and longer study, administering randomized case-control trial is recommended. Comparison of the use of foodstuffs for the purpose is also interesting to be

  16. Influence of school organizational characteristics on the outcomes of a school health promotion program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, K W; Baranowski, T; Baranowski, J; Hebert, D; deMoor, C; Hearn, M D; Resnicow, K

    1999-11-01

    Researchers assessed the possible moderating effects of school organizational characteristics (school climate, school health, and job satisfaction) on outcomes of a teacher health behavior change program. Thirty-two public schools were matched and randomly assigned either to treatment or control conditions. Organizational, dietary, and physiologic data were collected from third to fifth grade teachers over three years. Treatment schools received a teacher wellness program for two years. Psychometrics of most organizational scales achieved acceptable levels of reliability. Mixed model analyses were conducted to test for moderating effects. Treatment schools with high organizational climate and health scores reported higher fruit and juice and vegetable consumption at Year 2 compared with intervention schools with low scores. Treatment schools with high job satisfaction scores reported higher fruit and juice and lower-fat food consumption at Year 3 compared with intervention schools with low scores. These measures may be used as a tool to assess the environment in which school health promotion programs are presented. Future interventions may need to be tailored to the organizational characteristics of schools.

  17. Psychological Flexibility and Set-Shifting Among Veterans Participating in a Yoga Program: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Timothy; Blasey, Christine; Rosen, Craig; Bayley, Peter

    2018-03-26

    Trauma-focused psychotherapies do not meet the needs of all veterans. Yoga shows some potential in reducing stress and perhaps even PTSD in veterans, although little is understood about the mechanisms of action. This study identifies preliminary correlates of change in PTSD and perceived stress for veterans participating in yoga. Nine veterans (seven males and two females) were recruited from an existing clinical yoga program and observed over 16 wk. Severity of PTSD symptoms (PCL-5) and perceived stress (PSS-10) were collected at baseline and weeks 4, 6, 8, and 16. Psychological flexibility (AAQ-II) and set-shifting (ratio of trail making test A to B) were collected at baseline and at week 6. Subjects attended yoga sessions freely, ranging from 1 to 23 classes over the 16 weeks. The Stanford University Institutional Review Board approved this research protocol. Self-reported PTSD symptoms significantly reduced while perceived stress did not. Lower baseline set-shifting predicted greater improvements in PTSD between baseline and 4 weeks; early improvements in set-shifting predicted overall reduction in PTSD. Greater psychological flexibility was associated with lower PTSD and perceived stress; more yoga practice, before and during the study, was associated with greater psychological flexibility. Other predictors were not supported. In a small uncontrolled sample, psychological flexibility and set-shifting predicted changes in PTSD symptoms in veterans participating in a clinical yoga program, which supports findings from prior research. Future research should include an active comparison group and record frequency of yoga practiced outside formal sessions.

  18. Relationship between acne and psychological burden evaluated by ASLEC and HADS surveys in high school and college students from central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Jiang, Guangbin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Lai, Ruiping; Wen, Xiaoyi

    2015-03-01

    Previously, acne and its effects on psychological well-being have mostly been studied unilaterally in the western population. This study was aimed to investigate bidirectional relationship between acne and stress using Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check (ASLEC) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) surveys from inhabitants of central China. An on-line survey of 2,284 high school and college students from central China was conducted using three questionnaires posted on Chinese professional survey website, the Questionnaire Web. The prevalence and severity of acne were determined using the Pillsbury grading, whereas, the role of stress in acne formation was ascertained by the ASLEC scale. The HADS was employed to assess the psychological well-being. A total of 50.61 % of high school and college students in central China were found to be suffering from acne for more than 6 months, and 19.72 % of them were graded as having severe acne. Negative life events were found to accelerate the occurrence and exacerbation of the condition. Acne-affected groups showed significantly higher HADS-A (HADS-anxiety) and HADS-D (HADS-depression) scores than the controls (7.31 and 7.28 vs. 4.37 and 3.85, respectively; p < 0.01). Despite the apparent neglect of acne in Chinese high school and college students, a close bidirectional relationship was found to exist between stress and acne. It is incumbent on the healthcare professional to introduce school-based educational programs to help students with knowledge and management of acne and prevent the consequent psychological disorders.

  19. Modernizing dermatology interest groups in medical school: Certificate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jordan V; Korta, Dorota Z; Keller, Matthew

    2017-11-15

    This commentary addresses the increasingly competitive nature of applying to dermatology residency programs and how both interest groups in medical schools and their dermatology departments can help to better prepare applicants. As previous literature argued that dermatology has been underemphasized in medical school curricula, we propose five fundamental options that interest groups can implement in order to offer increased exposure to our field in medical training. Furthermore, with therecent trend of many schools conferring certificates in various specialized concentrations, we also discuss interest groups pioneering certificate-grantingprograms in dermatology competency. The pros and cons of having a recognized certificate program in dermatology are presented.

  20. Health for Life in Primary Schools Program, United Kingdom: a Program Impact Pathways (PIP) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Sandra; Donovan, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The Health for Life in Primary Schools Program helps schools promote healthy, active lifestyles through curriculum support related to healthy eating and cooking, growing food, physical activity, and family involvement. These interrelated strands are shown to have the greatest impact on healthy lifestyles, and the Health for Life in Primary Schools Program seeks to make these not one-off lessons, but a sustainable part of a school's culture. Each school involved with the program develops its own Action Plan in order to achieve program goals. Each school is assessed by an audit of facilities, skills, and curriculum at baseline and follow-up, and the pupils complete an on-line questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. Other impact measures are individual to the school and relate to its own Action Plan. Health for Life in Primary Schools sought to assess the cohesiveness and strength of the program using the Program Impact Pathways (PIP) model. The program was deconstructed to its individual parts, with each part assessed in terms of its contribution to the overall program and constraints upon its effectiveness. The PIP analysis helped clarify the logic and structure of the program, whether its objectives can be achieved, the Critical Quality Control Points (CCPs), and the impact measures required to demonstrate success. The core indicators identified for impact evaluation were knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of pupils around healthy eating cooking, growing food, and physical activity. The PIP model confirmed that the Health for Life in Primary Schools Program is well structured and is well suited to achieve its goals. The findings were presented at the Healthy Lifestyles Program Evaluation Workshop held in Granada, Spain, 13-14 September 2013, under the auspices of the Mondelēz International Foundation.

  1. Evaluating Mediation and Moderation Effects in School Psychology: A Presentation of Methods and Review of Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Amanda J.; McQuillin, Samuel D.

    2010-01-01

    Third variable effects elucidate the relation between two other variables, and can describe why they are related or under what conditions they are related. This article demonstrates methods to analyze two third-variable effects: moderation and mediation. The utility of examining moderation and mediation effects in school psychology is described…

  2. An Overview and Analysis of Journal Operations, Journal Publication Patterns, and Journal Impact in School Psychology and Related Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Randy G.; Cooley, Kathryn M.; Arnett, James E.; Fagan, Thomas K.; Mercer, Sterett H.; Hingle, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the results of three studies designed to understand better the journal operations, publishing practices, and impact of school psychology journals in recent years. The first study presents the results of a survey focusing on journal operations and peer-review practices that was completed by 61 journal editors of school…

  3. Articles Published in Six School Psychology Journals from 2005-2009: Where's the Intervention Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Victor; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; McCormick, Anita S.; Simek, Amber; Yoon, Hyunhee

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a content analysis of six school psychology journals spanning the years 2005-2009, with a particular focus on published intervention research. The analysis showed that (a) research articles were the most frequently published, with the largest category being descriptive research; (b) the percentage of intervention studies…

  4. Articles Published in Four School Psychology Journals from 2000 to 2005: An Analysis of Experimental/Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Stacy L.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Hautau, Briana; Carroll, Erin E.

    2008-01-01

    Using an experimenter-developed system, articles from four school psychology journals for the years 2000-2005 (n = 929) were classified. Results showed that 40% of the articles were narrative, 29% correlational, 16% descriptive, 8% causal-experimental, 4% causal-comparative, and 2% were meta-analytic. Further analysis of the causal-experimental…

  5. Psychological Tests Which Might be More Culturally Fair for Elementary School Age Children in Appalachia. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, William R.

    This report lists various factors of psychological testing which might be more relevant and appropriate for elementary school age children in such areas as Appalachia. The areas covered are group individual testing, individual intelligence testing, achievement testing, special clinical testing, social maturity, and personality evaluation…

  6. ANALYSIS OF PSYCHOLOGIC HEALTH STATE AND INFLUENCING FACTORS IN COLLEGE AND SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN SHAANXI PROVINCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective The psychologic health level of college and secondaryschool students and the relevant fac- tors were investigated to scientific basis and guidance for school mental health work. Methods Standard 1251 cases were drawn from 1% of students in colleges and middle schools of Shaanxi province. Taking 14 psychic health level indexes in SCL-90 as dependent variable and 109 indexes of psychic health back ground as in-dependent variable, multi-factor analyses have been made. Results 22.6 % of students had relatively serious psychological problems. The score of SCL-90 in females was a little bit higher than that in males. The scores of students at both universities and se- nior middle schools were higher than that in junior middle schools students. The score of SCL-90 of students who came from the countryside was higher than that of city students. The score of the whole students was higher than that of the normal. The students with psychic problems showed obsession, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, paranoia and hostility. Factor-analysis showed that influencing factors included history of positive individual risking behavior, physical conditions,grade,address, family influences, menses and sexual prombles, bad relation with others, poor self-assessment. Conclusion The psychologic health level of the students investigated is lower than that of the whole society. The factors, which hamper psychic health of students, are biological ,psychological and social in nature.

  7. "I Want to Study Psychology": Vocational Interests and Values of University Preparatory Students with a Preference for Studying Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Franco, Vicente; Baena, Belén Charro; Prieto-Ursúa, María; Toro, Laura Bermejo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to explore the specific vocational identity of secondary school students whose first choice of degree program is Psychology. In particular, this study analyzes when their interest in Psychology began, the curriculum track taken in high school and their profile of vocational interests and values. Method: The…

  8. Strategies for fostering basic psychological needs support in high quality youth leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Corliss; Harlow, Meghan; Kendellen, Kelsey

    2017-04-01

    Youth leadership programming has become an increasingly common context to foster basic psychological needs and promote youth development. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore strategies involved in fostering youth needs support within six leadership programs. Two leaders and 30 youth participated in semi-structured interviews to better understand the strategies used to foster needs support. Findings revealed that leaders were able to foster a sense of relatedness among youth through building trusting adult-youth relationships and nurturing an inclusive environment. Maximizing choice and negotiating youth voice helped to foster youth's autonomy. Finally, creating a task-oriented climate and providing intentional opportunities for skill-building helped to foster youth's competence. Findings suggest that training for leaders is critical in understanding what, and how strategies should be employed to help foster youth needs support in leadership programming. Limitations and future directions are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Impact of a multifaceted community-based falls prevention program on balance-related psychologic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiatrault, Johanne; Gauvin, Lise; Richard, Lucie; Robitaille, Yvonne; Laforest, Sophie; Fournier, Michel; Corriveau, Hélène

    2008-10-01

    To assess the impact of a multifaceted falls prevention program including exercise and educational components on perceived balance and balance confidence among community-dwelling seniors. Quasi-experimental design. Community-based organizations. Two hundred community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and over recruited by community-based organizations. A 12-week multifaceted falls prevention program including 3 components (a 1-hour group exercise class held twice a week, a 30-minute home exercise module to be performed at least once a week, a 30-minute educational class held once a week). Perceived balance and balance confidence. Multivariate analysis showed that the program was successful in increasing perceived balance in experimental participants. However, balance confidence was not improved by program participation. A multifaceted community-based falls prevention program that was successful in improving balance performance among community-dwelling seniors also had a positive impact on perceived balance. However, the program did not improve participants' balance confidence. These results suggest that balance confidence has determinants other than balance and that new components and/or modifications of existing components of the program are required to achieve maximal benefits for seniors in terms of physical and psychologic outcomes.

  10. School-Based Peer Mentoring in High School: A Program Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Felicia Cecile

    2017-01-01

    The dissertation is an initial investigation of a peer mentoring program in a suburban high school in the southeastern United States. Additionally, the Peer Mentoring Program (PMP) study examined whether the Program improves academic performance and attendance, and decreases referrals. Utilizing an experimental design, a Participant and a…

  11. A Positive Psychological Intervention to Promote Well-Being in a Multicultural School Setting in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Dimitropoulou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study seeks to examine the effectiveness of a Positive Psychology Intervention in enhancing well-being in a multicultural school setting. 121 5th and 6th grade primary school male and female students participated in the study. 57.9% were native Greeks and 42.1% were migrant children. 81 students were allocated to the positive intervention group, while 40 students partook in a control group with no positive orientation. Students were asked to complete a questionnaire battery a day prior to the interventions and also fifteen days later. Results indicated that only the positive intervention was effective in enhancing positive emotional experiences, optimism and self-efficacy in peer interactions two weeks after its implementation. The results were mostly undifferentiated for gender, migrant and socioeconomic status as far as positive emotions are concerned, while the patterns of influence of demographic variables on the efficacy of the intervention concerning the participants’ benefits in optimism and self-efficacy are discussed. The PPI group, as opposed to the control group, evaluated the intervention as particularly helpful with respect to all well-being variables, an effect maintained two weeks after the intervention. This positive intervention appears appropriate as a universal mental health promotion vehicle, especially within a demanding multicultural classroom context.

  12. The psychological reactions after witnessing a killing in public in a Danish high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ask Elklit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: School killings attract immense media and public attention but psychological studies surrounding these events are rare. Objective: To examine the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and possible risk factors of PTSD in 320 Danish high school students (mean age 18 years 7 months after witnessing a young man killing his former girlfriend in front of a large audience. Method: The students answered the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ, the Crisis Support Scale (CSS, and the Trauma Symptom Checklist (TSC. Results: Prevalence of PTSD 7 months after the incident was 9.5%. Furthermore, 25% had PTSD at a subclinical level. Intimacy with the deceased girl; feeling fear, helplessness, or horror during the killing; lack of expressive ability; feeling let down by others; negative affectivity; and dissociation predicted 78% of the variance of the HTQ total scores. Conclusion: It is possible to identify students who are most likely to suffer from PTSD. This knowledge could be used to intervene early on to reduce adversities.

  13. Managing an "Organistically-Oriented" School Intervention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrilleaux, Louis E.; Schermerhorn, John R., Jr.

    An "organic" relationship between change agents and clients is a well-popularized goal in recent literature on planned change and organization development. There is, however, a dearth of literature on how to manage change programs under parameters set by this organic value. This paper examines one school organization development program for the…

  14. Enabling Tailored Music Programs in Elementary Schools: An Australian Exemplar

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    McFerran, Katrina Skewes; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale

    2014-01-01

    Participation in meaningful school music programs is the right of all children. Although music education is widely supported by policy, significant gaps exist in practice in most developed Western countries. These gaps mean the extrinsic and intrinsic benefits associated with participation in tailored programs are not equally available to all…

  15. High School Journalism Research: Community College Program Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Jack

    1987-01-01

    Reviews findings from a Journalism Education Association study comparing the American College Testing (ACT) Program standardized scores, writing samples, and Language Arts Survey responses of students who were involved in high school journalism programs with students who were not. Urges community college journalism educators to support high school…

  16. Sequence and Uniformity in the High School Literature Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Edwin H.

    A good, sequential literature program for secondary school students should deal simultaneously with literary forms, with the chronological development of literature, and with broad themes of human experience. By employing the abundance of teaching aids, texts, and improved foreign translations available today, an imaginatively planned program can…

  17. "STOP the Violence": FCCLA Program Tackles School Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "STOP the Violence--Students Taking on Prevention" is a program designed to involve students and address school violence at its core from the peer-to- peer perspective. Developed by members of the Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), the program empowers young persons to recognize, report, and reduce the potential for youth…

  18. Critical Success Factors in a High School Healthcare Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thessin, Rebecca A.; Scully-Russ, Ellen; Lieberman, Daina S.

    2017-01-01

    Research has demonstrated career and technical education (CTE) programs have a strong positive influence on secondary students' behavior, attendance, academic achievement, and college persistence. Critical success factors common to career academies, small schools, and CTE programs include socio-emotional support and community, along with a culture…

  19. A pilot analysis of the psychological themes found during the CARING at Columbia--Music Therapy program with refugee adolescents from North Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Carolyn Mi Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the psychological themes found during the modified CARING at Columbia-Music Therapy (CAC-MT) program with refugee adolescents from North Korea. Nine students attending an alternative school participated in this study. Academically, students belong to an equivalent middle school level. Students participated in a music therapy program comprised of 25 sessions. A multiple case analysis was conducted to gather qualitative results. Students were found to be exposed to various psychosocially stressful life situations such as lack of social support system, family separation, academic difficulty, and economic hardship throughout their adaptation process to their new country. There were 5 common psychological themes--avoidance, distrust, loneliness, feelings of loss, and fear--found among the refugee students over the course of the CAC-MT treatment. For future research, studies with a larger sample size and differing types of session structure should be conducted to closely examine the effects of this program on refugee adolescents.

  20. 76 FR 12719 - Safe Schools/Healthy Students Program; Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools; Safe Schools/Healthy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Safe Schools/Healthy Students Program; Office of Safe and Drug- Free Schools; Safe Schools/Healthy Students Program; Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Numbers: 84... priorities, requirements, and definitions under the Safe Schools/Healthy Students (SS/HS) program. Since...