WorldWideScience

Sample records for school media center

  1. Budgeting for School Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drott, M. Carl

    1978-01-01

    Describes various forms of budgets and discusses concepts in budgeting useful to supervisors of school media centers: line item budgets, capital budgets, creating budgets, the budget calendar, innovations, PPBS (Planning, Programing, Budgeting System), zero-based budgeting, cost-benefit analysis, benefits, benefit guidelines, and budgeting for the…

  2. Planning for the Automation of School Library Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarella, Edward P.

    1996-01-01

    Geared for school library media specialists whose centers are in the early stages of automation or conversion to a new system, this article focuses on major components of media center automation: circulation control; online public access catalogs; machine readable cataloging; retrospective conversion of print catalog cards; and computer networks…

  3. Designing a School Library Media Center for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Rolf; Markuson, Carolyn

    This booklet presents guidance on building superior school library media centers by outlining conceptual plans from actual school libraries and explaining how to address specific planning and operational issues. The booklet discusses how to address the unique ergonomic and technology needs of children; how to control costs using proven bidding and…

  4. Management Matters. Virtual School Library Media Center Management Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a management manual she maintained while working as a school library media specialist. She started the manual when she was a student in the organization and administration course in the library science program and kept it current with information gleaned from conferences, workshops, and networking with other…

  5. Automation and Its Funding in the Library Media Centers in Secondary Schools in Georgia: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Ann Utsey

    This report presents the results of a study whose purpose was to determine what automation is present in the library media centers in Georgia secondary schools and how it has been funded. A three-part questionnaire was sent to the media specialists in 50% of the secondary schools in Georgia, which were randomly selected. The analysis of the…

  6. Library/Media Centers in U.S. Public Schools: Growth, Staffing, and Resources. Full Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Kathy D.; Holmes, Dwight R.

    2016-01-01

    At the request of New Business Item: 89 (NBI: 89) adopted at the 2015 NEA Representative Assembly, this study examines the extent to which students have access to public school library/media centers with qualified staff and up-to-date resources. The study explores trends in library/media center openings and closings as well as staffing patterns…

  7. Serving Special Needs Students in the School Library Media Center. Greenwood Professional Guides in School Librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Caren L., Ed.; Keefe, Margaret J., Ed.

    This collection of papers considers how the school library media specialist serves special needs students and classroom teachers in multiple roles as teacher, information specialist, and instructional consultant or collaborator. Included are the following papers: "Teaching Library and Information Skills to Special Needs Students" (Caren…

  8. SLJ's Technology Survey 2006: New Technologies--Like Blogs and Wikis--Are Taking Their Place in the School Media Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Sally; Milam, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    This article presents findings from the School Library Journal's 2006 national technology survey that investigated the trend in today's library media centers. As this study demonstrates, technology continues to be a significant aspect of K-12 media centers. Despite restricted funding and schedules stretched to the limit, media specialists have…

  9. Getting Lead-Bottomed Administrators Excited about School Library Media Centers. Building Partnerships Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Timothy

    The purpose of this book is to help professional librarians gain administrator support for the library media center. The book is divided into three sections. Part 1, "Setting the Stage," explores the challenge and aspects of accountability that can be lost in the pressures of daily accomplishment. It details the personality characteristics found…

  10. Public Relations for School Library Media Programs: 500 Ways To Influence People and Win Friends for Your School Library Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Helen F.

    This informative how-to guide explains public relations strategies and the audiences they target, with tips for customizing these tactics for particular libraries. Helpful techniques are recommended for promoting the use of library media services by students, faculty, building administrators, and school support staff. Readers will also learn how…

  11. Plan for Progress in the Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines.

    The outpouring of new instructional materials and techniques has resulted in a demand for instructional materials centers at the elementary school level. This handbook has been published to assist in planning and developing such a facility. The media center's usefullness to students, teachers, and administrators is outlined. The qualifications and…

  12. Expenditures for Resources in School Library Media Centers, FY 1991-92.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marilyn L.; Shontz, Marilyn

    1993-01-01

    The sixth in a series of "School Library Journal" reports on trends in school library expenditures for program development shows that commitment to the teaching and motivating of reading is in conflict with fascination with technology and that access to books is being seriously curtailed by the deteriorating state of school library collections.…

  13. The Access Gap: Poverty and Characteristics of School Library Media Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribesh, Shana; Gavigan, Karen; Dickinson, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Stephen Krashen believes that schools can counter the effects of poverty in at least one area: access to books. However, little research has been done to determine whether students living in poverty have access to school library services comparable to those attending schools with low concentrations of students living in poverty. We examined the…

  14. An Automation Survival Guide for Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whaley, Roger E.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews factors that should affect the decision to automate a school media center and offers suggestions for the automation process. Topics discussed include getting the library collection ready for automation, deciding what automated functions are needed, evaluating software vendors, selecting software, and budgeting. (CLB)

  15. Management Matters. Display and Promotion Ideas for Library Media Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2005-01-01

    School library media centers should be warm and inviting places where the environment entices children to read and explore. Creative bulletin board and case displays along with other exhibits help to make the library media center an exciting place. Bulletin board displays that promote authors, books, and exciting ideas motivate children to find…

  16. School Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  17. Transforming the Hidden Curriculum: Gender and the Library Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, Hilary S.

    1998-01-01

    Library media specialists are critically positioned to make a significant contribution to instituting gender-fair practices within a school. This article discusses instructional materials, curriculum, and collection development; gender culture and the media center; sports, gender, and different ways of knowing; and science, gender, and different…

  18. Current Technology Trends for School Library Media Specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Leticia Ekhaml; Joan Hubbard

    2003-01-01

    An overview of some of the current technology trends used in classroom instruction and school library media centers in provided in this article such as the use of handheld electronic organizers, CD recorders, digital video cameras, and interactive whiteboards. The article offers some suggestions or ideas on how to acquire new technologies to school library media centers that are low in budgetary funds.

  19. BeagleBone media center

    CERN Document Server

    Lewin, David

    2015-01-01

    Whether you are a hobbyist or a professional, this book will get you fully equipped to resolve the most commonly occurring media-related challenges. If you want to expand your horizons beyond lighting an LED and push the limits of your board, this is just the book for you. Working knowledge of BeagleBone is assumed.

  20. Current Technology Trends for School Library Media Specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Ekhaml

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview of some of the current technology trends used in classroom instruction and school library media centers in provided in this article such as the use of handheld electronic organizers, CD recorders, digital video cameras, and interactive whiteboards. The article offers some suggestions or ideas on how to acquire new technologies to school library media centers that are low in budgetary funds.

  1. School-Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care group, such as a community health center, hospital, or health department. A few are run by the school district itself. Centers often get money from charities and the government so they can give care ...

  2. The Retrieval of Information in an Elementary School Library Media Center: An Alternative Method of Classification in the Common School Library, Amherst, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Linda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the problems encountered by elementary school children in retrieving information from a library catalog, either the traditional card catalog or an OPAC (online public access catalog). An alternative system of classification using colors and symbols is described that was developed in the Common School (Amherst, Massachusetts). (Author/LRW)

  3. School Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining student health, safety, and welfare is a primary goal for any K-12 school system. If a child becomes sick, is injured, or seems in any other way incapacitated at school, it is the understood responsibility that the school will provide care and, if necessary, contact the parents and direct the child to outside treatment. Beyond that…

  4. Media and Attention, Cognition, and School Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marie Evans; Vandewater, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    Marie Evans Schmidt and Elizabeth Vandewater review research on links between various types of electronic media and the cognitive skills of school-aged children and adolescents. One central finding of studies to date, they say, is that the content delivered by electronic media is far more influential than the media themselves. Most studies, they…

  5. Social Media Strategies for School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Dan; McLeod, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe, analyze, and interpret the experiences of school principals who use multiple social media tools with stakeholders as part of their comprehensive communications practices. Additionally, it examined why school principals have chosen to communicate with their stakeholders through social media.…

  6. High School Students’ Social Media Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz, Levent; Gürültü, Ercan

    2018-01-01

    Theaim of this study is to investigate high school students’ social mediaaddiction. The study was conducted with 473 students who were educated in2014-2015 academic year at 6 different schools in İstanbul, Eyüp disctrict.‘Social Media Addiction Scale’ developed by Tutgun, Ünal and Deniz (2015) wasused to determine the students’ social media addiction. The results in general showedthat high school students have a medium level social media addiction. Besides,it was also concluded that high scho...

  7. Social Media Integration into State-Operated Fusion Centers and Local Law Enforcement: Potential Uses and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited SOCIAL MEDIA...DATE December 2010 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Social Media Integration into State-Operated Fusion...technologies, particularly social media, within fusion centers and local law enforcement entities could enable a more expedient exchange of information among

  8. The Media, Marketing, and Single Sex Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The Australian media's interest in education, as in many Anglophone countries, is frequently dominated by concerns about boys in schools. In 2002, in a country region of the Australian State of Queensland, this concern was evident in a debate on the merits of single sex schooling that took place in a small local newspaper. The debate was fuelled…

  9. Russian Ural and Siberian Media Education Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The comparative analysis of the models and functions of the media education centres showed that despite having some definite differences and peculiarities, they have the following common features: differentiated financing resources (public financing, grants, business organizations, etc.) and regional media information support; presence of famous…

  10. Media space of the modern school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Vakneeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available What should be the media of a modern education institution? How is the educational organization supposed to be represented in social media? What methods of increasing the level of media literacy of teachers and students should optimally use?As the purpose of this study the authors can see in the development and presentation of an optimal model of media space for modern educational institutions which will take into account not only the changes in the education process, but also the needs of the modern audience – teachers, students, parents, and educational partners. The resources of “Moscow e-school” become part of the educational media sphere of modern educational organizations.Resources and methods: resources of an educational institution, namely, social media, blogs and microblogs, users’ accounts, channels, educational platforms, which present the work of educators. The importance of analyzing media of the modern educational institution is that media-education serves as a pedagogical system, allowing the use of modern techniques and technologies through the development of critical thinking, which occurs under the influence of information flows. In this regard, there is a need for the comprehensive approach to the media organization in the modern school. An integral element of the complex approach is the creation of conditions for the development of media literacy for teachers and learners.The result of this research is the optimal model of media space for the modern school, which includes social networking profiles, microblogging, blogs, users’ accounts, and web resources, each of which has its own purpose and functional features.As a conclusion we can note that one of the core values of the media model is the development of creative and critical thinking, the acquisition of experience and tools of media, independent search, the ability to use information flows for the effective communication, solving educational and cognitive

  11. School Library Media Certification Requirements: 1990 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perritt, Patsy H.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a compilation of school library media certification requirements taken from responses to a national survey. For each state, existing certificates or endorsements are listed, along with credit hours and/or experience required, whether it is an accredited or approved program, and required subject areas or competencies. A directory of…

  12. Media and attention, cognition, and school achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marie Evans; Vandewater, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    Marie Evans Schmidt and Elizabeth Vandewater review research on links between various types of electronic media and the cognitive skills of school-aged children and adolescents. One central finding of studies to date, they say, is that the content delivered by electronic media is far more influential than the media themselves. Most studies, they point out, find a small negative link between the total hours a child spends viewing TV and that child's academic achievement. But when researchers take into account characteristics of the child, such as IQ or socioeconomic status, this link typically disappears. Content appears to be crucial. Viewing educational TV is linked positively with academic achievement; viewing entertainment TV is linked negatively with achievement. When it comes to particular cognitive skills, say the authors, researchers have found that electronic media, particularly video games, can enhance visual spatial skills, such as visual tracking, mental rotation, and target localization. Gaming may also improve problem-solving skills. Researchers have yet to understand fully the issue of transfer of learning from electronic media. Studies suggest that, under some circumstances, young people are able to transfer what they learn from electronic media to other applications, but analysts are uncertain how such transfer occurs. In response to growing public concern about possible links between electronic media use and attention problems in children and adolescents, say the authors, researchers have found evidence for small positive links between heavy electronic media use and mild attention problems among young people but have found only inconsistent evidence so far for a link between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and media use. The authors point out that although video games, interactive websites, and multimedia software programs appear to offer a variety of possible benefits for learning, there is as yet little empirical evidence to suggest that

  13. School Library Media Specialist-Teacher Collaboration: Characteristics, Challenges, Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, O. P.; Bray, Marty

    2011-01-01

    The most successful school library media specialists are those who collaborate with teachers as full partners in the instructional process. Without assertive action by the school library media specialist, however, school administrators and teachers are likely to be more aware of the media specialist's administrative role than the roles of teacher,…

  14. Color centers inside crystallic active media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Kaczmarek, Slawomir M.; Kopczynski, Krzysztof

    1995-03-01

    This paper presents research results on color centers induced by radiation of a xenon lamp in non doped crystals of yttrium aluminum garnet Y3Al5O12 (YAG), strontium- lanthanum aluminate SrLaAlO4 (SLAO), strontium-lanthanum gallate SrLaGa3O7 (SLGO), and in doped crystals: Nd:YAG, Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG (CTH:YAG), Nd:SLAO and Nd:SLGO. In all these investigated crystals under the influence of intensive exposure by xenon lamp radiation additional bands connected with centers O-2, O2 and centers F came up near the short-wave absorption edge. In the case of doped crystals the observed processes are much more complicated. In crystals CTH:YAG the greatest perturbations in relation to basic state are present at the short-wave absorption edge, as well as on areas of absorption bands of ions Cr+3 and Tm+3 conditioning the sensibilization process of ions Ho+3. These spectral structure disturbances essentially influence the efficiency of this process, as proven during generating investigations. In the case of SrLaGa3O7:Nd+3 under the influence of exposure substantial changes of absorption spectrum occurred on spectral areas 346 divided by 368 nm, 429 divided by 441 nm and 450 divided by 490 nm. Those changes have an irreversible character. They disappear not before the plate is being held at oxidizing atmosphere. Investigations of laser rods Nd:SLGO, CTH:YAG, and Nd:YAG in a free generation demonstrated that the color centers of these crystals are induced by pomp radiation from the spectral area up to 450 nm.

  15. Sweet vs. Snap! Effective Dispositions in the Media Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard, April

    2011-01-01

    In "What Defines an Exemplary School Librarian," Jami Jones and Gail Bush make a strong argument that professional disposition is the key to a successful library media program. The authors emphasize the relevance of INTASC standards which specify that teachers must promote "positive social interaction and (develop) healthy and helping…

  16. Science and Math in the Library Media Center Using GLOBE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Teresa L.; Levine, Elissa R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program which helps school library media specialists and science and math teachers bring earth science, math, information literacy, information technology, and student inquiry into the classroom. Discusses use of the Internet to create a global network to study the…

  17. All Librarians Do Is Check out Books, Right? A Look at the Roles of a School Library Media Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Media centers have been transformed from warehouses for books and equipment into the hub of the learning community. Media specialists keep the hub functioning properly. If school library media specialists are doing their job well, they are making a difference in the ways teachers teach and in the ways students learn. On any given day, a media…

  18. The Perception of Teachers and School Library Media Specialist on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Perception of Teachers and School Library Media Specialist on the Role of School Library Media Specialists in Selected Secondary Schools in Ogun State. ... Journal Home > Vol 9, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text ...

  19. The Oprah Revolution: Book Clubs in Library Media Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, Carol

    2006-01-01

    When Oprah Winfrey began her successful book club in 1996, she continued a tradition that public libraries have provided for decades. Oprah placed a spotlight on reading that encouraged many women who had never read a book "to read." Book clubs sprang up in neighborhoods, bookstores, and on Web sites. Library media centers began offering book…

  20. Media Culture and Media Education in Modern School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolic, Mirela

    2011-01-01

    Culture is no longer conceivable without the media and/or new phenomena called. "Cyber" culture. The article discusses issues in what respect the different media, like TV, film and Internet are with different cultures, how it changes everyday life under influence of various forms of sophisticated communications media and what…

  1. Lean Mean Times--Budgeting for School Media Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Discusses budgeting strategies for school media technology programs. Highlights include sources for school funding, school district budget information, control of the budget, how to write an effective budget, working with other community and school groups, local politics, and sidebars that discuss spreadsheets and maintenance budgets. (LRW)

  2. Alphabet Soup: School Library Media Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Universities offering school library media programs seek accreditation from various regional and national organizations. This accreditation makes the programs valid and marketable. School media programs within a college of education seek accreditation from specialized accrediting bodies. The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education…

  3. Library Media Services. Multicultural Nonsexist Education in Iowa Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Dept. of Public Instruction, Des Moines.

    Intended as an aid for Iowa school library media specialists, this pamphlet identifies resources and provides guidelines for the development of multicultural, nonsexist (MC-NS) school library media programs. Definitions of terms used in the pamphlet are given. The rationale and philosophy underlying elementary and secondary curricula design are…

  4. Social Media and Professional School Counselors: Ethical and Legal Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Patrick R.; Griffith, Catherine; Greene, Jennifer H.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of social media continues to expand in prevalence and is a medium of communication for individuals of all ages. Schools are using social media to engage their stakeholders at increasing rates. Therefore, school counselors require the knowledge and appreciation of ethical and legal issues regarding the use of such technology. The purpose of…

  5. Social Media in Schools: A Treasure Trove or Hot Potato?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinying

    2013-01-01

    In the sphere of education, social media has posed enormous challenges and unleashed its potential as a venue to communicate with stakeholders. This case is a fictionalized version of several real cases related to the school leaders' struggle with utilizing social media to accomplish changes in schools. This case describes two high school…

  6. Social Media Arrive in School; Principals Look at Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armistead, Lew

    2010-01-01

    Social media have the potential to improve educational opportunities for high school students, but also present legal and policy challenges for public school principals. Those were among opinions expressed in the 2010 Principals' Partnership Poll. The most frequently-cited request by the 306 respondents was help in integrating social media into…

  7. Dissolving the School Space: Young People's Media Production in and outside of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupiainen, Reijo

    2013-01-01

    Young people bring their own media and literacy practices to school as an important part of their identity, taste and social life. These practices are changing the media ecology of schools, making the physical boundaries of schools more permeable and creating new, unofficial spaces at school. During peer-based learning, the enhanced media…

  8. Student Media in U.S. Secondary Schools: Associations with School Demographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkowski, Piotr S.; Goodman, Mark; Bowen, Candace Perkins

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an up-to-date counting of student media in U.S. public high schools. The analysis underscores the importance of school demographic characteristics in predicting whether schools offer student media. The disparities identified here should inform how journalism schools, scholastic journalism organizations, funding agencies, and…

  9. Social Media And Libraries In View Of Sabancı University Information Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Özel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on how a university library / information center should use social media tools. The importance of sharing in social media with users has been expressed in the example of Sabancı University Information Center.

  10. [State school children's opinions regarding violence in the media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrahita S, Laura E

    2009-01-01

    To describe the opinion of schoolage children, from a public school, regarding the violence they perceive in the media. Descriptive-exploratory research with a sample, selected according to the child's age in a public school. Quantitative data were collected. There were found common issues related to the child's opinion about the violence present in the media such as frequent exposure to the media violence and lack of parental supervision. Social context and constant exposure to the media violence affect the children's opinion about the violence phenomenon and their predisposition to it.

  11. Practical Public Relations: Effective PR Techniques for School Library/Media Specialists. Monograph Series No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Mary W., Ed.

    This handbook of publicity ideas suggests activities and themes to highlight services and resources of school media centers, including approaches to students, faculty, administration, and the community at large. A 14-item annotated bibliography and six mailing list addresses are provided as additional sources for ideas. Clip art illustrations…

  12. Middle School Students' Social Media Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Wang, Chuang; Petty, Teresa; Wang, Weichao; Wilkins, Patti

    2018-01-01

    Cyber bullying, digital identity, impact of digital footprints, and use of inappropriate social media are topics that are gaining attention in K-12 schools. As more schools and school districts are implementing 1-1 and "bring your own technology" initiatives, attention to these topics is becoming increasingly important. A total of 593…

  13. 'Uncrunching' time: medical schools' use of social media for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Peter S; Benjamin, Emelia J; Shanahan, Christopher W

    2013-06-27

    The difficulty of attracting attendance for in-person events is a problem common to all faculty development efforts. Social media holds the potential to disseminate information asynchronously while building a community through quick, easy-to-use formats. The authors sought to document creative uses of social media for faculty development in academic medical centers. In December 2011, the first author (P.S.C.) examined the websites of all 154 accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada for pages relevant to faculty development. The most popular social media sites and searched for accounts maintained by faculty developers in academic medicine were also visited. Several months later, in February 2012, a second investigator (C.W.S.) validated these data via an independent review. Twenty-two (22) medical schools (14.3%) employed at least one social media technology in support of faculty development. In total, 40 instances of social media tools were identified--the most popular platforms being Facebook (nine institutions), Twitter (eight institutions), and blogs (eight institutions). Four medical schools, in particular, have developed integrated strategies to engage faculty in online communities. Although relatively few medical schools have embraced social media to promote faculty development, the present range of such uses demonstrates the flexibility and affordability of the tools. The most popular tools incorporate well into faculty members' existing use of technology and require minimal additional effort. Additional research into the benefits of engaging faculty through social media may help overcome hesitation to invest in new technologies.

  14. Public relations and marketing of Nigerian School Library Media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Public relations and marketing of Nigerian School Library Media Centre ... the prevailing group of users in their environment would determine the price range. ... need a very good knowledge of the marketing mix to achieve huge results.

  15. Digital Media and Youth: A Primer for School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, Elena; Mills, Jennifer L.; Atwood, Kelly; Cha, Jason

    2017-01-01

    The growing proliferation of digital media over the past few decades has engendered both significant promise and significant concerns regarding children's development. Digital media have changed the ways young people learn, interact with others, and develop essential cognitive and social-emotional skills. This paper provides school psychologists…

  16. Media Accounts of School Performance: Reinforcing Dominant Practices of Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutsis, Aspa

    2016-01-01

    Media reportage often act as interpretations of accountability policies thereby making the news media a part of the policy enactment process. Within such a process, their role is that of policy reinforcement rather than policy construction or contestation. This paper draws on the experiences of school leaders in regional Queensland, Australia, and…

  17. Repositioning teaching in Nigerian secondary schools using media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repositioning teaching in Nigerian secondary schools using media resources in a digital age. ... Lagos Journal of Library and Information Science ... that the new tools served as an added advantage on the traditional method of teaching and learning, especially in information delivery; channelled through media resources.

  18. Social Media for School Communication. Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    It's easy to dismiss social media as a fascination of young people but to do so minimizes one of the fastest growing trends in technology. The Pew Internet and American Life Project recently found that over 71% of teens have a Facebook profile and 75% of adults have one too. Social media tools have become the way for a school or business to…

  19. Perceptions of School Children of Using Social Media for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert; Millard, David; Woollard, John

    2017-01-01

    Social media is lauded as a powerful tool for informal learning, and a tool of choice for teenagers. This paper reports on the findings of a survey of 384 secondary school pupils in the UK (aged 11-17) over a 12 week period. Our findings indicate a pervasiveness of social media usage amongst this age group, but variety in the types of engagement…

  20. Why Social Media Must Have a Place in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutka, Daniel G.; Carpenter, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    While most young people regularly consume and produce social media content, many schools focus on what students should not do with these technologies rather than address what students and teachers can do. The authors share ways that some educators leverage social media to enhance the who, when, where, why, how, and what of educational processes.

  1. Innovative Uses of Social Media in High Schools. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravender, Marlena

    2010-01-01

    The use of social media is a phenomenon that is changing the way people communicate. Along with the Internet, social media provide unparalleled opportunity for schools to interact with students, families and community. They also provide incredible resources for improving curricular experiences and improving instruction. Because the growth of…

  2. Corporate Schooling Meets Corporate Media: Standards, Testing, and Technophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational publishing corporations and media corporations in the United States have been converging, especially through the promotion of standardization, testing, and for-profit educational technologies. Media and technology companies--including News Corp, Apple, and Microsoft--have significantly expanded their presence in public schools to sell…

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENTS’ MEDIA LITERACY IN THE PROCESS OF CREATING SCHOOL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Rybina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, a rapid development of information and communication technologies enables combine a number of formats for presenting information into one communication unit. That is why the media (Internet especially is not just tools for young generation for learning the modern world. Children enjoy in dealing with modern technologies. However not everyone has sufficient skills to objectively assess the true meaning of the information received. That is why children are more inclined for their mind to be manipulated and they are more inclined for blind imitating of attractive images. Owning to the above, the most priority-driven of modern education is the usage of information and communication technologies and media education for forming the skills of students' orientation in the information field and for forming the development of media immunity of the personality which makes the personality able to resist to the aggressive media space. Teachers face the challenge of introducing media education in middle and high schools. To implement the media education at the municipal institution regional specialized residential school “Giftedness” the pedagogical experiment was carried out there. The basis of the experiment is the generalized model of media literacy development for students that was used during for making and functioning the school newspaper «D.A.R-media». Theoretical aspects of the implementation of media education in the teaching and educational process of a specialized educational institution are considered in this study. A model for the development of the media literacy of students in the process of creating a school printed publication is proposed. Some results of research on the level of media literacy of students are highlighted and prospects for work on introducing media education of teachers and teachers are outlined.

  4. Mass Media and the School: Descartes or McLuhan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Pierre

    1980-01-01

    Compares the world of learning with the world of the media, with emphasis on the areas of common interest. Discusses areas of potential cooperation, including local audiovisual centers, adaptation of new media to educational content, computer technology, telematics, and accumulation of audiovisual stock on topics pertinent to education. (DB)

  5. Mediating the media discourse of health with high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Caetano da Silva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is the result of a completed dissertation held in the Physical Education Post Graduate Program at UFSC, in which goal was to reflect on the media discourse about health and physical activity among young high school students, in Physical Education, from a education intervention. The study was based on methodological elements of action research and was attended by 22 students. The intervention was carried out on the basis of school mediation strategies, along with the teacher who is responsible for the class. As a conclusion, the study indicates that media education can be associated to any knowledge of school culture, in a longitudinal basis, starting from students’ knowledge about the content transmitted by the media and the effort of a media education cannot be overlooked.

  6. How the Media Misleads the Story of School Consumerism: A Perspective from School Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Kieran

    2007-01-01

    Noting the dramatic rise in media reporting on the topic of school commercialism and consumer activity in schools, this research explores the fiscal benefits of such activities. Though a variety of activities frequently associated with school consumerism generate revenues for schools, in the example of student activity fees there is very little…

  7. Access Denied: School Librarians' Responses to School District Policies on the Use of Social Media Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiScala, Jeffrey; Weeks, Ann Carlson

    2013-01-01

    Public school districts often block access to online social media tools. While considered a preventive measure to ensure student safety and limit district liability, this policy strips school librarians and their collaborating teachers of opportunities to instruct students in using social media tools creatively and responsibly. Using one school…

  8. Social media for school nurses: promoting school health in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Regina

    2015-05-01

    People across the globe use social media to connect with one another, stay in touch with friends and family, and exchange information. Health care has embraced social media, and nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and NASN have a presence in the social media landscape. The students in our schools today are digital natives who grew up with and are at home in the world of technology. With so many options in the digital world, the question is how can school nurses harness this technology to connect with their students and families? More importantly, how can school nurses use social media in a professional and responsible manner and help to enhance the profession of school nursing overall? This article will outline the planning and implementation of an ongoing social media campaign on wellness and healthy behaviors by one Texas suburban school district. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. 78 FR 42788 - School-Based Health Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration School-Based... Gadsden County. SUMMARY: HRSA will be transferring a School-Based Health Center Capital (SBHCC) Program... support the expansion of services at school-based health centers will continue. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  10. MEDIA EDUCATION IN FOREIGN LANGUAGE LESSONS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna O. Taraba

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with possible ways of the use of media education in the process of teaching foreign languages in elementary school, which corresponds to innovative educational trends. The task of the teacher is to build a learning process so that the children were interested. The author analyzes the concept of media education and suggests possible ways of formation of skills of using media education for primary school pupils. This will allow teachers to use self-made educational material based on the personal characteristics of the students, their level of preparation, the individual way of perception of information and work with it in order to develop their autonomy, the ability to analyze, synthesize and generalize information, to form a culture of communication with the media, creative, communicative abilities, critical thinking.

  11. Empowering Learners: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of School Librarians (NJ3), 2009

    2009-01-01

    As we approach the second decade of the twenty-first century, school library media programs continue to undergo momentous changes that have heightened the importance of technology and evidence-based learning. The focus has moved from the library as a confined place to one with fluid boundaries that is layered by diverse needs and influenced by an…

  12. Keeping Current: Emotional Intelligence and the School Library Media Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses emotional intelligence and its importance for school library media specialists, based on a book by Daniel Goleman called "Emotional Intelligence." Highlights include managing emotions and relationships; self-motivation; and how emotional intelligence fits in with Standards for Information Literacy. (LRW)

  13. Framing of school violence in the South African printed media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... largely unnoticed by journalists. I argue that the main frames provided to readers in South African newspapers fail largely to elicit social responsibility, while at the same time promoting civic indifference. Keywords: emotional violence; media framing; physical violence; school violence; sexual violence; social responsibility ...

  14. Multicultural Education: An Action Plan for School Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeele, Rosemary W.; Schall, Patricia L.

    1994-01-01

    Offers a definition of and a rationale for multicultural education based on changing demographics and suggests ways for school library media specialists to bring a multicultural perspective to collection development, evaluation of multicultural materials, library services, curriculum integration, and curriculum activities. (Contains 21…

  15. Religious Education and the Media in the Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Sister Mary

    1981-01-01

    This discussion of positive and negative aspects of media in religious education is based on Church documents, including and following the Documents of Vatican II, and on the author's own experiences as an elementary school teacher. Eleven references are listed. (Author/LLS)

  16. Framing of school violence in the South African printed media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The way in which the media report on school violence influences public .... papers, Jones (2005:151-158) found a “significant breakdown in ethical journalism”, ..... of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. (84th ...

  17. Computers, Mass Media, and Schooling: Functional Equivalence in Uses of New Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Debra A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents a study of 156 California eighth grade students which contrasted their recreational and intellectual computer use in terms of academic performance and use of other media. Among the conclusions were that recreational users watched television heavily and performed poorly in school, whereas intellectual users watched less television,…

  18. Digital Media in Primary Schools: Literacy or Technology? Analyzing Government and Media Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sara; Pereira, Luís

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the political and the media discourses concerning the Portuguese governmental program responsible for delivering a laptop named "Magalhães" to all primary school children. The analysis is based on the official documents related to the launch and development of the initiative as well as the press coverage of this…

  19. A Pedagogy of Inquiry: Toward Student-Centered Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Background: Almost three decades have passed since the Grunwald Declaration on Media Education was issued by the representatives of 19 nations at UNESCO's International Symposium on Media Education in Germany (UNESCO 1982). Cycles of information revolution and education reform over this period have led to significant changes in the sectors of…

  20. A Symbiosis of Sorts: School Violence and the Media. Choices Briefs, Number 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeroff, Gene I.

    This brief examines the effects of media coverage of school violence on school violence. The news media take notice precisely because shootings in a school are unusual. The media did not take much notice of shootings in the 1980s and 1990s in inner city communities because these infractions were not judged to be anomalies; they did not measure up…

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mesa Unified School District Reaps Economic

    Science.gov (United States)

    and Environmental Benefits with Propane Buses Mesa Unified School District Reaps Economic and School District Reaps Economic and Environmental Benefits with Propane Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mesa Unified School District Reaps Economic and Environmental Benefits with

  2. The Complementary Roles of the School Nurse and School Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondeck, Lynnette; Combe, Laurie; Baszler, Rita; Wright, Janet

    2015-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that the unique combination of school nursing services and school-based health centers (SBHCs) facilitate positive health outcomes for students. The registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) is responsible for management of the daily health…

  3. The relationship between media literacy and health literacy among pregnant women in health centers of Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarinejad, Farideh; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Shahrzadi, Leila

    2017-01-01

    The ability to access, analyze, evaluate, and convey information in various forms of media including print and nonprint requires media literacy, but the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic information and services needed for appropriate decisions regarding health, considered an important element in a woman's ability to participate in health promotion and prevention activities for herself and her children, is needed to a level of health literacy. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between media literacy and health literacy among pregnant women in health centers in Isfahan. This study used a descriptive correlation study. Data collection tools include Shahin media literacy and functional health literacy in adults' questionnaires. The population include pregnant women in health centers of Isfahan (4080 people). Ten out of the 351 health centers in Isfahan were selected as cluster. Data were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Media literacy of respondents in the five dimensions was significantly lower than average 61.5% of pregnant women have inadequate health literacy, 18.8% had marginal health literacy, and only 19.7% of them have had adequate health literacy. There was a significant positive relationship between media literacy and health literacy among pregnant women. This study showed that the majority of pregnant women covered by health centers had limited health literacy and media literacy. Since one of the basic requirements for the utilization of health information is needed for adequate media literacy, promotion of media literacy is necessary for the respondents.

  4. Technostress in Libraries and Media Centers: Case Studies and Coping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Kate D., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses technostress--i.e., stress brought on by changes in technology--in libraries and media centers. Case studies are presented that show stress in community college libraries caused by the rapid implementation of new technologies; coping strategies for librarians and media specialists are discussed; and strategies for managers are suggested.…

  5. Otitis media in indonesian urban and rural school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraeni, Ratna; Hartanto, Widya W; Djelantik, Bulantrisna; Ghanie, Abla; Utama, Denny S; Setiawan, Eka P; Lukman, Erica; Hardiningsih, Chintriany; Asmuni, Suprihati; Budiarti, Rery; Rahardjo, Sutji Pratiwi; Djamin, Riskiana; Mulyani, Tri; Mutyara, Kuswandewi; Carosone-Link, Phyllis; Kartasasmita, Cissy B; Simões, Eric A F

    2014-10-01

    Although the epidemiology of otitis media is well-known in industrialized countries, the extent of otitis media in developing Asian countries, especially in south East Asia is not well studied. To define the burden of otitis media and its sequelae in children 6-15 years of age, we enrolled elementary and junior high school children in 6 areas in rural and urban Indonesia. Randomly selected schools and classrooms were selected. All children were administered a questionnaire and had ear examinations, pneumatic otoscopy and screening audiometry. Children with any abnormality on examination or with a relevant history underwent diagnostic audiometry and tympanometry, if indicated. Of the 7005 children studied, 116 had chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM), 30 had acute otitis media and 26 had otitis media with effusion. 2.7% of rural children had CSOM compared with 0.7% of urban children (P < 0.0001). The rates per 1000 of CSOM in rural Bali and Bandung were significantly higher (75 and 25, respectively) than in the rest of Indonesia (P < 0.05). In rural Bali, the rate per 1000 children of inactive CSOM was 63 in 6- to 9-year-old children, compared with 37 in children aged 13-15 years. Concomitantly, the rates of tympanosclerosis were 7 and 26/1000, respectively, in these age groups. In Indonesia, the prevalence of CSOM is relatively high with most disease occurring in rural areas. The high rates in rural Bali with early progression to tympanosclerosis suggest a significant burden of potentially vaccine preventable illness.

  6. CONGESTION AS A RESULT OF SCHOOL AND SHOPPING CENTER ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Kumaat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of land use in public facilities such as shopping center and school gives an impact on transportation problem in Manado City, North Sulawesi.  To determine factors which have causal relationship with congestion  as a result of school and shopping center activity then it need to be assessed and studied.  Descriptive study with observational survey was used in this study. The study ran Structural Equation Modelling (SEM by using AMOS program. Estimated method was used to calculate sample size then found 300 repondents, comprised : visitors and mall managers, school visitors, parents, school managers, Public Works department, and urban planning department .The study yielded a statistically significant correlation between  school and shopping center activity with congestion s. The result  indicated that school activity was positively related to congestion with p value  at p=0,000 (p ≤ 0,05. Shopping center activity was positively related to congestion with p value  at p=0,000 (p ≤ 0,05. The closer proximity from school to shooping center will causes severe traffic congestion. The relationship between school facility with proximity was found in p value at  p=0,000 (p ≤ 0,05 . The relationship between shopping center facility with proximity was found in p value at  p= 0,020 (p ≤ 0,05. While, the relationship between proximity with congestion was p= 0,008 (p ≤ 0,05. Monastery school and Mega Mall activity were affecting congestion because a closer proximity of two facilities. This indicates that the occurence of traffic congestion in Monastery School  may be dependent on existence of  Piere Tendean road link

  7. Mis/Representations in School-Based Digital Media Production: An Ethnographic Exploration with Muslim Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahya, Negin; Jenson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss findings from a digital media production club with racialized girls in a low-income school in Toronto, Ontario. Specifically, the authors consider how student-produced media is impacted by ongoing postcolonial structures relating to power and representation in the school and in the media production work of…

  8. A school-wide assessment of social media usage by students in a US dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, M R; Christensen, H L; Nelson, B A

    2014-11-01

    Social media sites have become an established means of communication due to the exponential growth in number of users across the world and the encouragement of interaction between users through site features. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which Loma Linda University School of Dentistry students use social media accounts, the types of accounts they prefer, their interest in incorporating social media into courses and their perceptions of the usefulness of social media in private practice. In addition, we wanted to determine the degree of student interest in the integration of these social tools into their instruction. One thousand one hundred and sixty-two students from Loma Linda University School of Dentistry were invited by e-mail to complete a confidential 18 item multiple choice survey through Surveymonkey.com. The overall response rate was 30% (n = 351) from the pooled response periods; the first in 2011 and the second in 2013. Similar to other studies, Facebook was used by 91% of the School of Dentistry students, and less than half used Google+, Twitter and LinkedIn. Of the respondents, 68% of students reported communicating on social media daily and 80% saw value for practising dentists to operate accounts. Time and privacy concerns were the largest barriers to usage at 16% and 12% respectively. One third of respondents were in favour of the incorporation of social media in their courses.

  9. Recipes for Success: Independent Schools Break the Mold When It Comes to Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most communicators are not giving up print or other traditional media. But they recognize that social media has quickly become an important channel for the audiences they want to reach. Social media adds texture and complexity to the marketing mix. To take advantage of social media, it pays to be nimble. Independent schools' communicators…

  10. Media appeals by pediatric patients for living donors and the impact on a transplant center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Priya S; Garvey, Catherine A; Mauer, Michael S; Matas, Arthur J

    2011-03-27

    Little is published regarding the effect of advertising for kidney donors on transplant centers. At our center, families of nine children used media appeals. Per candidate, there were 8 to 260 potential donor calls, 92 (11.6%) were medically ineligible, 326 (41.1%) voluntarily did not proceed or an alternate donor had been approved, 38 (4.8%) were ABO incompatible, and 327 (41.1%) had positive crossmatch or unsuitable human leukocyte antigens. Media appeals resulted in four living donor transplants and five nondirected donors to other candidates, and we made directed changes in our center. The ethical debate of advertising for organ donors continues.

  11. Student Library Pages: Valuable Resource for the Library Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Eleanor

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of students as library pages at the Loudoun Country Day School (Virginia). Highlights include student selection procedures, including interviews; parental consent form; library page duties; benefits to students; benefits to the library; and parent attitudes. Copies of the student interview form and parental consent form are…

  12. Waldorf Schools: A Child-Centered System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    This paper presents an overview of the philosophy, psychology of learning, teaching methods, and curriculum of the Waldorf Schools. Most Waldorf teachers are influenced by the esoteric form of critical idealism propounded by Rudolf Steiner. The child is considered by Steiner to be a spiritual being who has reincarnated on to earth in a physical…

  13. Administrative Perceptions on the Role of the School Library Media Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kayla

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efforts of local school library media specialists to promote their programming, many administrators do not understand the roles and responsibilities of the school library media specialist. Using a constructivist theoretical framework, this study was designed to examine the local school administrators' perceptions of the role of the…

  14. Practices and Perceptions in School-Media Relations in the Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Clair Everett

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived effectiveness of existing practices in school/media relations; to report on responsibility in school/media relations as perceived by superintendents of schools, the editors of daily newspapers, and television news directors; and to discover the perceived relative importance of each of 40…

  15. Examination of the Attitudes of Middle School Students towards Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulu, Sanser; Numanoglu, Mustafa; Keser, Hafize

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify middle school students` general attitudes towards social media. Participants of this descriptive study were middle school students from three public schools (n = 367) in Ankara. Data was collected using "Demographic Information Form" and "Social Media Attitudes Survey for Students" developed by…

  16. The Principal's Experience through the Process of Implementing Social Media in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovecchio, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    As school districts struggle to identify the role social media will play both inside and outside of the classroom, educational leaders can no longer ignore the benefits that these tools provide to students, stakeholders and faculty members. The potential challenges facing school leaders working in schools that utilize social media is extensive.…

  17. Center for Media Literacy Unveils the CML Medialit Kit[TM]: A Free Educational Framework that Helps Students Challenge and Understand Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Studies, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Five key questions form the basis of the new CML MediaLit Kit, an educational framework and curriculum guide developed by the Center for Media Literacy. Adaptable to all grades, the key questions help children and young people evaluate the thousands of media messages that bombard them daily. More than two years in development and available for…

  18. A survey of social media policies in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Webb, Chadleo

    2014-06-01

    Since social media sites began to appear in the 1990s, their popularity has increased dramatically, especially among younger individuals. With this widespread use of social media, institutions of higher education are finding the need to implement social media policies. The purpose of this study was to gather information from accredited U.S. dental schools on their social media policies. A survey sent to academic deans asked questions related to social media policies and violations of policies. The survey yielded a 35.9 percent (n=23) response rate. Social media policies at the university level were reported by 47.8 percent (n=11) of respondents, and 34.8 percent (n=8) had social media policies specifically in the dental school. Schools that had an institutional social media policy were more likely to have a social media policy in the dental school (p=0.01), and dental schools were more likely to have a policy if the academic dean had been in the position less than five years (p=0.01). All twenty-three responding dental schools have official social media pages. Dental educators and administrators may want to look for opportunities to raise awareness of social media professionalism in their dental schools.

  19. Early childhood otitis media and later school performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fougner, Vincent; Kørvel-Hanquist, Asbjørn; Koch, Anders

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Otitis media (OM) is a common disease in childhood and hearing loss (HL) is the most common complication. Prolonged HL may lead to language delay and cognitive difficulties. However, the consequences of HL due to OM are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine...... proportional odds regression. RESULTS: Out of 94,745 successful pregnancies, 35,946 children without malformations and their parents completed a questionnaire at age 11 years. No associations were observed between number of OM episodes and school performance, even in children with ≥7 OM episodes. CONCLUSION......: This national birth-cohort study did not support the hypothesis that the number of OM episodes in childhood is associated with reduced self-reported school performance in children at 11 years of age....

  20. High School Students' Experiences of Bullying and Victimization and the Association with School Health Center Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine; Deardorff, Julianna; Lahiff, Maureen; Soleimanpour, Samira; Sakashita, Kimi; Brindis, Claire D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bullying and victimization are ongoing concerns in schools. School health centers (SHCs) are well situated to support affected students because they provide crisis intervention, mental health care, and broader interventions to improve school climate. This study examined the association between urban adolescents' experiences of…

  1. Going against the Grain: Gender-Specific Media Education in Catholic High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapayese, Yvette V.

    2012-01-01

    The Catholic Church has addressed the power of media, as well as the critical importance of understanding and educating Catholic youth on the media's role and place in modern culture. In this article, the narratives of female Catholic teachers are prioritized to illustrate how gender-specific media education influences the schooling experiences of…

  2. A RESEARCH REPORT ON OPERATIONAL PLANS FOR DEVELOPING REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA RESEARCH CENTERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARPENTER, C.R.; AND OTHERS

    THE NEED AND FEASIBILITY OF ESTABLISHING A NUMBER OF "REGIONAL EDUCATIONAL MEDIA RESEARCH CENTERS WITH A PROGRAMMATIC ORIENTATION" WERE INVESTIGATED. A PLANNING GROUP WAS ESTABLISHED TO SERVE AS A STEERING COMMITTEE. CONFERENCES IN WHICH GROUPS IN RESEARCH AND EDUCATION IN WIDELY DISTRIBUTED REGIONS OF THE COUNTRY PARTICIPATED WERE HELD…

  3. Inference in media space. The case of IBM Software Executive Briefing Center - Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Marino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In our paper we apply Peirce's model of Arguments (Statistical Deduction, Probabilistic Deduction, Induction and Abduction to a communication process where negotiating sense and meanings is emphasized. We selected a communication space where everything is planned as a medium of sense (video terminals, screens, lights, etc. namely the IBM Software Executive Briefing Center in Italy, a workplace used to exchange views, negotiate or transact. It is based in Rome in the same building as the International Development Laboratory of the IBM Software Group. The Software Center is the place where IBM welcomes its potential customers and has the opportunity to show them its technology and offer solutions. This paper focuses on "media space" in the Center which is structured by the seller according to his/her idea of the buyer's interpretive process. This paper analyzes the roles of visual codes in the allocation of functions. It also looks into the relation between the symbolism of the company with its marketing, past history and media space in order to define the buyer's typology of inference (deduction, induction or abduction in relation to the communication strategy of the media space design. The research is conducted directly in the field by interviewing the Manager of the IBM Center as well as asking people who use it to fill in an anonymous questionnaire, which analyses both the media space and the plan of the building.

  4. Inside the Digital Wild West: How School Leaders Both Access and Avoid Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Laurie; Robertson, Lorayne

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the roles of Canadian school leaders in response to the rising phenomenon of student use of social media which impacts school climate and safety. The use of social media has resulted in more online text and image-based communication to multiple users and less face-to-face communication with single users. Adolescent…

  5. Attitudes, Values and Background of High School Journalists Compared with the Media Elite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sammye

    To compare attitudes, values, and background of high school journalists with those of the media elite (journalists already working in the media), a survey was administered to 132 public and private high school students attending the Trinity University Journalism Institute during June 5-9, 1983. These students were the editors of their newspapers,…

  6. The Integration of New Media in Schools: Comparing Policy with Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Nurzali

    2015-01-01

    Beyond policy, this paper investigates the actual practice related to the integration of new media in schools. Despite continuous government effort to integrate new media in schools, the use of digital technologies for teaching and learning in the classroom remains limited. This study suggests that, apart from the issue related to the state of…

  7. School Library Media Specialists Inform Technology Preparation of Library Science Students: An Evidence-Based Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Donna L.; Miller, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    What is the relative importance of current and emerging technologies in school library media programs? In order to answer this question, in Fall 2007 the authors administered a survey to 1,053 school library media specialists (SLMSs) throughout the state of Pennsylvania. As a part of the MSLS degree with Library Science K-12 certification, Clarion…

  8. Children’s Play with digital media in pre-primary school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Helle Hovgaard

    2017-01-01

    Danish schools are obliged to work ‘in a playful way’ with digital media according to the demands in the description of the curricula for the pre-primary education (Undervisningsministeriet, 2015). Much money has been spent on the digital infrastructure, but still the professionals in pre......-primary education say, that they are short of time, experience and knowledge when it comes to actual implementation of new media in every day school life. On the other hand most children come from media rich homes. The article addresses the gap between in-and-out of school from a child perspective. The key concepts...... are play and media literacy, and the project’s take on play is inspired by the paradigmatic change towards a participatory and child oriented scientific position. The understanding of media literacy is narrowed down to a trichotomy that implies having access to the media, understanding the media...

  9. Children’s play with digital media in a Danish pre-primary school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Helle Hovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Danish schools are obliged to work ‘in a playful way’ with digital media according to the demands in the descriptions of the curricula for pre-primary education (Undervisningsministeriet, 2015). Much money has been spent on digital infrastructure, but still professionals in preprimary education say...... that they are short of time, experience and knowledge when it comes to actual implementation of new media in everyday school life. On the other hand, most children come from media-rich homes. This article addresses the gap between in and out of school from a child’s perspective. The key concepts are play and media...... literacy, and the project’s take on play is inspired by the paradigmatic change towards a participatory and child-oriented scientific position. The understanding of media literacy is narrowed down to a trichotomy that implies having access to media, understanding media and creating/ expressing oneself...

  10. Insights of School Head About Marketing Education Services Through Digital Media

    OpenAIRE

    Samer Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    This study mainly focuses on the insights of a private school’s head pertaining to the use of digital media in educational marketing. The qualitative research paradigm was chosen for this study and in depth phenomenological interview was conducted from a head of a private school. Two themes were extracted from the data: Marketing educational services through digital media and its challenges, and digital media tool for marketing education services. The study revealed that the school head perce...

  11. Media-Educational Habitus of Future Educators in the Context of Education in Day-Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrichs-Liesenkötter, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    This research explores these questions: (1) How are the forms of media-educational habitus of future educators shaped? (2) What conditions influence whether or not media education is done in day-care centers? The qualitative study consists of six semi-structured interviews with media education teachers in educator training, four focus group…

  12. Role Expectations for School Library Media Specialists: A Collective Case Study of Two Medium-Sized Wisconsin School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Mark Keith

    2013-01-01

    During this period of radical change in the field of information technology there is evidence of confusion about the role of school library media specialists in the implementation, and the administration of emerging information technologies in Wisconsin public schools. This study sought to answer the question what is the role of the school library…

  13. Understanding and Predicting Social Media Use Among Community Health Center Patients: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of social media by health care organizations is growing and provides Web-based tools to connect patients, caregivers, and providers. Objective The aim was to determine the use and factors predicting the use of social media for health care–related purposes among medically underserved primary care patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 444 patients of a federally qualified community health center. Results Community health center patients preferred that their providers use email, cell phones for texting, and Facebook and cell phone apps for sharing health information. Significantly more Hispanic than white patients believed their providers should use Facebook (P=.001), YouTube (P=.01), and Twitter (P=.04) for sharing health information. Use and intentions to use social media for health-related purposes were significantly higher for those patients with higher subjective norm scores. Conclusions Understanding use and factors predicting use can increase adoption and utilization of social media for health care–related purposes among underserved patients in community health centers. PMID:25427823

  14. Internal Social Media at Marshall Space Flight Center - An Engineer's Snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David W.

    2013-01-01

    In the brief span of about six years (2004-2010), social media radically enhanced people's ways of maintaining recreational friendships. Social media's impact on public affairs (PAO) and community engagement is equally striking: NASA has involved millions of non-NASA viewers in its activities via outward-facing social media, often in a very two-way street fashion. Use of social media as an internal working tool by NASA's tens of thousands of civil servants, onsite contractor employees, and external stakeholders is evolving more slowly. This paper examines, from an engineer's perspective, Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) efforts to bring the power of social media to the daily working environment. Primary emphasis is on an internal Social Networking Service called Explornet that could be scaled Agency-wide. Other topics include MSFC use of other social media day-to-day for non-PAO purposes, some specialized uses of social techniques in space flight control operations, and how to help a community open up so it can discover and adopt what works well.

  15. Developing android-based science instructional media to improve scientific literacy of junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida, I. I.; Jumadi; Wilujeng; Senam

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study are: to develop android-based science instructional media and to reveal the characteristic, the quality, and the effectiveness of android-based science instructional media with global warming topic to increase junior high school students’ scientific literacy. This study is a development research. The instructional media were reviewed by a media expert, a material expert, science teachers, peer reviewers, and students. The data was collected using media evaluation questionnaires. The results of the study showed that: (1) the android-based science instructional media has characteristics including interesting visualization, easy to use, flexible, and practical, (2) the android-based science instructional media was appropriate for teaching, in terms of material evaluation aspects, media evaluation aspects, and based on student test results, and (3) the android-based science instructional media can effectively used for teaching.

  16. The Complexity integrated-Instruments components media of IPA at Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angreni Siska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims at describing the complexity of Integrated Instrument Components media (CII in learning of science at Elementary schools in District Siulak Mukai and at Elementary schools in District Siulak. The research applied a descriptive method which included survey forms. Instruments used were observation sheets. The result of the research showed Integrated Instrument Components media (CII natural science that complexity at primary school district Siulak was more complex compared with that at primary school district Siulak Mukai. is better than from primary school district Mukai

  17. Violent Media, Guns and Moral Panics: The Columbine High School Massacre, 20 April 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springhall, John

    1999-01-01

    Attempts to place the shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, in a historical perspective. Describes the shootings in Littleton and the high school shootings since 1996. Interprets the possible reasons for the Columbine shootings, such as the role of the high school, access to guns, and violence in the mass media. (CMK)

  18. Collection Development for the School Library Media Program: A Beginner's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Mona

    2006-01-01

    A valuable resource for new or experienced school librarians, "Collection Development for the School Library Media Program: A Beginner's Guide" is an easy-to-use guide to collection development. It provides practical and relevant information about collection development issues such as: the school users, policies, selection criteria and sources,…

  19. An approach for integrating media education into everyday school-life and instruction at secondary school level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter SPANHEL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The new media as a challenge for school education require to redefine its aims and methods. It is no longer sufficient to transmit knowledge and help young people to build up special competences. In addition and primarily they must learn to deal with unknown problems in the future, with uncertainty and insecurity, with an increasing lot of information, changing knowledge and truth and with the unknown. Therefore school must help students to build up flexible structures of operational thinking and orientation, abstract conceptual frames, phantasy and creativity and acquire the capability of learning to learn, to reorganize learning structures and knowledge and the ability for lifelong learning. within this context media in schools have two fundamental functions: they are instruments of teaching-learning-processes as well as subject matter helping students to acquire media competence. Our approach to integrated media education for secondary schools can be characterized as follows: It should imply all sorts of media, it should involve all teachers and embrace all subject matters (lessons. There should no longer be made a distinction between media education and computer literacy because of the integration of all media on the basis of ongoing digitalization. The different media with their specific capacities should be used naturally as a means of improving teaching and learning, as tools for problem-solving and coping with tasks, and as instruments of communication and self-reflexion, of documentation and formation, of expression and publicity. The realization of a sustainable media education is confronted with two difficulties: 1. Most teachers mostly are not trained for media education and they fear the great burden of this task. 2. Media education requires open forms and varying methods of instruction and specific media facilities must be at hand at any time and everywhere.

  20. Determining Effect of Digital And Media Activities On Media And Science Literacy Of Middle-School Students And Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge CAN

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims determining effect of digital and media activities on media and science literacy of middle-school students and parents and identifying the relationship between them. Quasi- experimental model has been used by which pretest-posttest studies have been held on one group by using quantitative data during research. The sample of the research consists of 60 students and 119 parents who attend a school in the province of Bursa in the academic year of 2013-2014. According to data analysis obtained in the research, there is a significant relation between pretests and posttests about scientific literacy of middle-school students and parents relating to Digital and Media Activities. There is a relation between media and scientific literacy of students and mothers as parents. There is a difference between the applied PISA and TIMSS exams and the students' science literacy. In the light of these results, some suggestion has been offered with regard to focusing on the importance of 21st century skills and literacy, developing scientific and media literacy level and obtaining more comprehensive results.

  1. High School Students' Social Media Usage Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezci, Erdogan; Içen, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Social media which is an important product of Computer and Internet Technologies has a growing usage level day by day. Increasing social media usage level gives opportunity for new software developments and making investments in this area. From this aspect, therefore, social media has not only economic function but also make persons participate in…

  2. Selection of Learning Media Mathematics for Junior School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Sri Adi; Wahyudin

    2018-01-01

    One of the factors that determine the success of mathematics learning is the learning media used. Learning media can help students to create mathematical abstract mathematics that is abstract. In addition to media, meaningful learning is a learning that is adapted to the students' cognitive development. According to Piaget, junior high school…

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center

  4. Social Media as an Engagement Tool for Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Emily

    2018-01-01

    Objective. To describe the importance of and potential approaches to social media strategy development for schools and colleges of pharmacy. Findings. In recent years, pharmacy educators have begun exploring the benefits of social media. Effectively utilizing social media as a tool to fulfill marketing, recruitment, and student engagement initiatives is contingent on having a fully developed social media strategy that is well-positioned for success. Developing a sustainable social media strategy involves the following important components: establishing goals and objectives, identifying target audiences, performing competitive and channel analyses, developing content strategy, activities planning, identifying roles, budget and resources planning, and analyzing ongoing performance. Summary. This paper provides relevant information and guidance for colleges and schools of pharmacy that wish to enhance their social media presence.

  5. Social Media as an Engagement Tool for Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Emily; DiVall, Margarita

    2018-05-01

    Objective. To describe the importance of and potential approaches to social media strategy development for schools and colleges of pharmacy. Findings. In recent years, pharmacy educators have begun exploring the benefits of social media. Effectively utilizing social media as a tool to fulfill marketing, recruitment, and student engagement initiatives is contingent on having a fully developed social media strategy that is well-positioned for success. Developing a sustainable social media strategy involves the following important components: establishing goals and objectives, identifying target audiences, performing competitive and channel analyses, developing content strategy, activities planning, identifying roles, budget and resources planning, and analyzing ongoing performance. Summary. This paper provides relevant information and guidance for colleges and schools of pharmacy that wish to enhance their social media presence.

  6. Patient-centered medical home model: do school-based health centers fit the model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Satu A; Chapman, Susan A

    2013-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are an important component of health care reform. The SBHC model of care offers accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family-centered, coordinated, and compassionate care to infants, children, and adolescents. These same elements comprise the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model of care being promoted by the Affordable Care Act with the hope of lowering health care costs by rewarding clinicians for primary care services. PCMH survey tools have been developed to help payers determine whether a clinician/site serves as a PCMH. Our concern is that current survey tools will be unable to capture how a SBHC may provide a medical home and therefore be denied needed funding. This article describes how SBHCs might meet the requirements of one PCMH tool. SBHC stakeholders need to advocate for the creation or modification of existing survey tools that allow the unique characteristics of SBHCs to qualify as PCMHs.

  7. E-Everything and the School Library Media Specialist: Grist for the Mill (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses electronic books and the need for school library media specialists to merge information literacy and library skills with technology skills. Highlights include advancing technology for electronic books; helpful Web sites, including Project Gutenburg; and reader software. (LRW)

  8. A Preliminary Evaluation of a School-Based Media Education and Reduction Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickham, David S; Hswen, Yulin; Slaby, Ronald G; Rich, Michael

    2018-06-01

    While media education and reduction programs have been proposed to prevent adverse health and academic outcomes related to heavy electronic media use among school-aged children, few have been formally piloted and evaluated. We used a quasi-experimental design to evaluate the effectiveness of Take the Challenge (TtC), a school-based media education/reduction program for the primary prevention of sleep deprivation, dysfunctional social-emotional behaviors, and poor academic performance. Sixth- to eighth-grade students at a rural Midwestern U.S. middle school received the TtC program, while a similar school in the same district served as the comparison group. Health-related and academic measures were collected from students and teachers at both schools before and after the intervention. The primary outcome measure was student-reported electronic media use (television, video games, Internet). Secondary measures included student health behaviors (student-reported sleep, exercise, and outdoor play) and academic activities (teacher-reported homework and classroom performance). Compared to the comparison group, students receiving TtC slept more and reduced television viewing, background television time, after-school video gaming, and weekend Internet use. Teachers reported increases in the extent to which TtC students completed homework assignments and stayed on task in the classroom. Well-designed school-based programs such as TtC can reduce electronic media use among middle-school children and improve related health and academic outcomes.

  9. Exploring Home and School Involvement of Young Children with Web 2.0 and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Diane

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on young children's use of Web 2.0 and social media. A background is provided about the use of Web 2.0 and social media among young children. Strengths and concerns are discussed as well as home and school use of Web 2.0 and social media. Exemplary websites are shared. The article concludes with potential changes in the…

  10. Administrative Decentralization in School Systems and Its Effect on the Organization of Media Services. Atlanta Public Schools: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. David

    This study reviews the literature on public school administration and on decentralization to establish the groundwork for an analysis of the administration of a decentralized school system and its media services, discusses some of the confusion in the centralization vs. decentralization debate, and presents a heuristic study of the administration…

  11. Student Drug Testing and the Surveillance School Economy: An Analysis of Media Representation and Policy Transfer in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Emmeline

    2018-01-01

    Anxieties relating to the health, safety and security of schoolchildren have been met with a variety of surveillance apparatus in schools internationally. Drawing on findings from a content analysis of newspaper reports relating to drug testing in Australian schools, this article seeks to excavate the ways in which the media shapes, informs,…

  12. Social Media Use, Loneliness, and Academic Achievement: A Correlational Study with Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Roque; Golz, Nancy; Polega, Meaghan

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the association between social media use, loneliness, and academic achievement in high school students and identified the demographic characteristics associated with these three elements. This study also aimed to identify the percentage of variance in loneliness accounted for by social media use and GPA. Participants were 345…

  13. The Association for Educational Communications and Technology: Division of School Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary Mock

    1993-01-01

    Reports on the Division of School Media Specialists of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT). Highlights include the mission statement; publications; board members and committee chairs; activities at the AECT conferences; and future concerns, including public relations and marketing plans for media specialists and…

  14. The Media's Influence on Female Relational Aggression and Its Implications for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    The author of this paper explores the media's role in the normalization of relational aggression of females and the implications this can have in schools. It is important that those who teach, support, and develop curricula for students be aware of the media's role in the use, and the effects, of indirect aggression and have information on how to…

  15. In the Public Eye: Swedish School Inspection and Local Newspapers: Exploring the Audit-Media Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronnberg, Linda; Lindgren, Joakim; Segerholm, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the dual dependencies apparent at the intersection of the media society and the audit society by empirically exploring and discussing the relationship between Swedish local newspaper coverage and school inspection activities. The research questions pertain to the Inspectorate's media strategy, how inspection is represented…

  16. Navigating Social Networking and Social Media in School Psychology: Ethical and Professional Considerations in Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.

    2014-01-01

    Social networking and social media have undoubtedly proliferated within the past decade, allowing widespread communication and dissemination of user-generated content and information. Some psychology graduate programs, including school psychology, have started to embrace social networking and media for instructional and training purposes; however,…

  17. Building an Understanding of the Role of Media Literacy for Latino/a High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boske, Christa; McCormack, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Popular media is a social phenomenon, especially for young audiences. This qualitative study examined how eleven Latino/a high school students and a Latino teacher understood the impact of media messages in an animated children's film. Findings suggest participants identified negative cultural messages embedded throughout the film regarding…

  18. Framing of School Violence in the South African Printed Media--(Mis)information to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    The way in which the media report on school violence influences public perceptions, gives rise to particular attitudes and can influence decisions by policy makers. The more frequently an issue is presented in a specific way, the more likely it is for readers to perceive the media's version as the truth. Although news is assumed to be reliable,…

  19. Utilizing Social Media to Increase Student Engagement: A Study of Kern County Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Steven Lance

    2011-01-01

    Social media has permeated almost every aspect of the lives of anyone who utilizes the internet. Teachers and students are no exception. Students are most likely to use social media sites such as MySpace, Facebook and Twitter. This research focuses on best practices related to augmenting school curriculum to utilize these tools to increase student…

  20. Development of Interactive Media for ICT Learning at Elementary School Based on Student Self Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Huning Anwariningsih; Sri Ernawati

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of information and comunication technology (ICT) curriculum at elementary school is the educational sector development. ICT subject is a practical subject which require a direct practice to make easier in the student understanding. Therefore, a teacher is demanded to make a learning media which helps the student to understand the material of study. This research is aimed at describing the model of ICT study in elementary school and using of learning media. Moreover, the des...

  1. Politics and the success of school-based health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzo, B A; Button, J W; Wald, K D

    2000-10-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to health services by bringing providers to children (and sometimes parents) and furnishing low cost services in an atmosphere of trust. While the number of SBHCs has continued to grow and some clinics have continued to expand their services, others have barely survived and some have even closed. This study investigated factors, particularly political forces, that affected the success of SBHCs. Using a national survey of clinic directors, this study assessed clinic success in terms both of longevity and service delivery. Findings indicate the factors most consistently and significantly associated with success include not only measures of "need" (school size and percent African-American enrollment or population) but of "politics" (citizen political ideology and Southern conservatism). Thus, politics matters more than previous studies suggested.

  2. High school students' experiences of bullying and victimization and the association with school health center use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine; Deardorff, Julianna; Lahiff, Maureen; Soleimanpour, Samira; Sakashita, Kimi; Brindis, Claire D

    2015-05-01

    Bullying and victimization are ongoing concerns in schools. School health centers (SHCs) are well situated to support affected students because they provide crisis intervention, mental health care, and broader interventions to improve school climate. This study examined the association between urban adolescents' experiences of school-based bullying and victimization and their use of SHCs. Data was analyzed from 2063 high school students in 5 Northern California school districts using the 2009-2010 California Healthy Kids Survey. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used to measure associations. Students who were bullied or victimized at school had significantly higher odds of using the SHCs compared with students who were not, and were also significantly more likely to report confidentiality concerns. The magnitude of associations was largest for Asian/Pacific Islander students, though this was likely due to greater statistical power. African American students reported victimization experiences at approximately the same rate as their peers, but were significantly less likely to indicate they experienced bullying. Findings suggest that SHCs may be an important place to address bullying and victimization at school, but confidentiality concerns are barriers that may be more common among bullied and victimized youth. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  3. [Violence in schools: Prospective study conducted in an emergency reception center for victims of aggression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, O; Hiquet, J; Saint-Martin, P; Christin, E; Fougas, J; Gromb-Monnoyeur, S

    2016-12-01

    Although violence in schools is quite well conveyed in the media, the French literature data remain patchy, and the figures available arise mainly from surveys of victimization. This study had two main purposes: to add to the national epidemiological data on this phenomenon and to emphasize the actions that can be undertaken by the practitioner facing such events. This was a prospective descriptive study that was conducted from September 1st, 2014, to June 30, 2015, in a single center, the CAUVA, an emergency center within the Bordeaux University Hospital for victims of assault. Included in the study was any person alleging acts of violence on the way to school, in the neighborhood, or within the school itself, and who was examined at the CAUVA following a judicial requisition. An anonymized questionnaire was distributed during the consultation. We collected 41 questionnaires over a 10-month period with 70.7% males (n=29) and 29.3% females (n=12), with a mean age of 14 years and 5 months (range, 7-49 years). The subjects included two teachers and 39 students. The time between the event and the forensic examination at CAUVA was mostly less than or equal to 7 days (n=18), between 7 and 15 days (n=14), 15 and 30 days (n=6), and more than 30 days (n=3). Twenty-six attacks (63%) took place inside the school - 21 middle schools - eight near the school, and seven between the student's home and the school. Inside the school, the events took place during a break (n=15), in the classroom (n=9), and during cultural outings (n=2). For one student out of two (n=25), the event reported was the first with acts of physical (n=37), psychological (n=20), or sexual violence (n=2). In 14.6% (n=6) of the cases, the assailant was a teacher and in almost 83% (n=34) of the cases it was another student, either from the same class (n=19) or another class (n=14), or a former student (n=1). This study brings out trends that can assist the practitioner during consultations related

  4. A Comparative Analysis of Social Media Usage and Academic Performance in Public and Private Senior High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingle, Jeffrey; Adams, Musah; Adjei, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    The study comparatively analyzed social media usage and academic performance in public and private senior high schools. The issue of social media and academic performance has been a very debatable topic with regard to its effect. This study further explores the relation between private and public schools in relation to social media use and…

  5. School Violence: Data & Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Social Media Publications Injury Center School Violence: Data & Statistics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The first ... Vehicle Safety Traumatic Brain Injury Injury Response Data & Statistics (WISQARS) Funded Programs Press Room Social Media Publications ...

  6. Threats of school violence in Pennsylvania after media coverage of the Columbine High School massacre: examining the role of imitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinsky, S; Bixler, E O; Kettl, P A

    2001-09-01

    Following the April 20, 1999, massacre at Columbine High School, Littleton, Colo, school administrators, law enforcement officials, and the media reported a rash of successive bomb threats and threats of school violence that were attributed to imitation. To establish that the clustering of threats of school violence following the Columbine massacre was initiated by imitation. A database of threats of school violence reported to the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency, Harrisburg, during the 50 days following the Columbine incident was examined to determine the daily frequency of threats. To determine factors that predict the occurrence of these threats, counties and school districts in which threats occurred were noted. Pennsylvania school districts reported 354 threats of school violence during the 50 days after the Columbine massacre, far exceeding the 1 or 2 threats per year estimated by school administrators before 1999. The frequency of these threats over time demonstrated a crescendo-decrescendo pattern. Fifty-six percent of the threats were made on or before day 10 after the incident, and more than one third occurred on days 8, 9, and 10. Factors that predicted the likelihood of a school's receiving a threat after the massacre included a greater proportion of white students and larger school enrollment. Successive threats of violence follow a publicized act of school violence. The media should recognize that imitation threats can occur and craft their stories accordingly.

  7. SLJ's Book Buying Survey: When It Comes to Purchasing Supplemental Books, Librarians' Clout Extends Far beyond the Media Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Debra Lau

    2004-01-01

    Media specialists and teachers spend an estimated $1.4 billion annually on nonfiction titles. And even though most librarians, like Shirley Morand of New Richmond High School in Ohio, expect budget cuts this academic year, they still plan to dish out a sizable chunk of money on books that support students' textbooks, according to School Library…

  8. Media Use in School-Aged Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This policy statement focuses on children and adolescents 5 through 18 years of age. Research suggests both benefits and risks of media use for the health of children and teenagers. Benefits include exposure to new ideas and knowledge acquisition, increased opportunities for social contact and support, and new opportunities to access health-promotion messages and information. Risks include negative health effects on weight and sleep; exposure to inaccurate, inappropriate, or unsafe content and contacts; and compromised privacy and confidentiality. Parents face challenges in monitoring their children's and their own media use and in serving as positive role models. In this new era, evidence regarding healthy media use does not support a one-size-fits-all approach. Parents and pediatricians can work together to develop a Family Media Use Plan (www.healthychildren.org/MediaUsePlan) that considers their children's developmental stages to individualize an appropriate balance for media time and consistent rules about media use, to mentor their children, to set boundaries for accessing content and displaying personal information, and to implement open family communication about media. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  9. Cyberbullying and Social Media: Information and Interventions for School Nurses Working With Victims, Students, and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elizabeth; Vessey, Judith A; Pfeifer, Lauren

    2018-02-01

    Social media has become an increasingly prevalent fixture in youths' lives, with over 90% of teenagers reporting daily usage. These online sites and applications have provided many positive opportunities for youths to connect and share ideas with others; however, social media has also become a major platform for cyberbullying. Victims often experience negative health outcomes directly related to cyberbullying. For this reason, it is critical that third parties, such as school nurses, are well versed in social media and the warning signs of those being victimized by cyberbullying. Therefore, this integrative review examines school nurses' knowledge of cyberbullying and social media and identifies the implications for school nursing practice regarding prevention and intervention processes.

  10. Insights of School Head about Marketing Education Services through Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Samer

    2016-01-01

    This study mainly focuses on the insights of a private school's head pertaining to the use of digital media in educational marketing. The qualitative research paradigm was chosen for this study and in depth phenomenological interview was conducted from a head of a private school. Two themes were extracted from the data: Marketing educational…

  11. The Investigation of Human Values Perceived from the Use of Social Media of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ahmet; Tekin, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    This research has been carried out to investigate the relation between social media usage of secondary school students and their perceived human values. The population of the research consisted of 1952 students, of which 48% were female and 52% were male, 7th and 8th grade students attending secondary schools in central Adiyaman in 2014-2015…

  12. School and Nation: Identity Politics and Educational Media in an Age of Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Peter, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    At a time when the power of schools and both state and federal education authorities to guide young people's sense of belonging is being challenged by multilingualism, by the claims of supra- and subnational regions and minorities, by memories of national catastrophes and crimes, and by out-of-school educational media, this collection of essays…

  13. Utilization of Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Ranbir M.; Cusson, Regina; White-Frese, Jesse; Walsh, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Background: We summarize utilization patterns for mental health services in school-based health centers. Methods: Administrative data on school-based health center visits in New Haven, Connecticut were examined for the 2007-2009 school years. Relative frequencies of mental health visits by age were calculated as a percentage of all visits and were…

  14. Professional Development for School Library Media Professionals: Elements for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carol A.; Dotson, Lana Kaye; Yontz, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    The American Association for School Librarians suggests an important mission for school librarians is to ensure personal growth through ongoing exposure to conferences, journal articles, webinars, presentations, and membership in professional organizations. As professional educators, School Librarians should exemplify the vision for being…

  15. Using social media in a high school physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In today's classrooms students have ever increasing access to technology and social media. Rather than try and suppress the use of it in my classroom, I have embraced it and use it as a tool to foster collaboration and science writing with my physics students. There are many platforms to engage your students online, from simple and free to dynamic and costly, but the benefits of using social media for your students is worth giving it try.

  16. Effects of a brief school-based media literacy intervention on digital media use in adolescents: cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Birte; Hanewinkel, Reiner; Morgenstern, Matthis

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a four-session school-based media literacy curriculum on adolescent computer gaming and Internet use behavior. The study comprised a cluster randomized controlled trial with three assessments (baseline, posttest, and 12-month follow-up). At baseline, a total of 2,303 sixth and seventh grade adolescents from 27 secondary schools were assessed. Of these, 1,843 (80%) could be reached at all three assessments (Mage=12.0 years; SD=0.83). Students of the intervention group received the media literacy program Vernetzte www.Welten ("Connected www.Worlds ") implemented by trained teachers during class time. The control group attended regular class. Main outcome measures were adolescents' computer gaming and Internet use: days per month, hours per day, and addictive use patterns. Parental media monitoring and rules at home were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results of multilevel growth-curve models revealed a significant intervention effect in terms of a lower increase in self-reported gaming frequency (β = -1.10 [95% CI -2.06, -0.13]), gaming time (β = -0.27 [95% CI -0.40, -0.14]), and proportion of excessive gamers (AOR=0.21 [95% CI 0.08, 0.57]) in the intervention group. There were also significant group-time interactions for the addictive gaming scale (β=-0.08 [95% CI -0.12, -0.04]), and the Internet Addiction Scale (β = -0.06 [95% CI -0.10, -0.01]). No effect was found for days and hours of Internet use or parental media behavior. The study shows that the program Vernetzte www.Welten can influence adolescents' media use behavior. Future research should address mediating and moderating variables of program effects.

  17. Exposure to violent and sexual media content undermines school performance in youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Çetin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Humans are hard-wired to pay attention to violent and sexual cues. Because humans have limited attention capacity, attention allocated to violent and sexual cues decreases attention that can be allocated to encoding important information in school. This study examined the effects of exposure to violent and sexual media on general school performance and Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL scores in Turkish youth. Methods: The relationship between exposure to violent and sexual media on school performance was assessed in a sample of 1545 Turkish adolescents. Then, we compared the TOEFL scores of 143 Turkish boys aged 14 to 18 divided in 71 living in dormitories in which consumption of media was strictly regulated and 72 living at home. Results: A significant negative relationship was found between exposure to violent/sexual media and school success. The effects remained significant even after controlling for the total amount of media exposure. In addition, boys living in the dormitory in which consumption of media was strictly regulated outscored those living at home on the TOEFL post-test immediately after the end of the study, and on a delayed post-test one week later. Conclusions: Because there was no difference between boys living at home and those living in a dormitory on the pre-test, the post-test and delayed post-test differences cannot be attributed to initial differences in English language proficiency. These results suggest that exposure to violent and sexual media impairs adolescent school performance and foreign language memory.

  18. Social Media Illuminates: Some Truths about School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenreich, Megan; Jaffe-Walter, Reva

    2015-01-01

    Montclair Cares About Schools (MCAS) is a citizen-activist group in Montclair, New Jersey, that used Facebook, emails, and online petitions to inform and organize citizens on local educational policy issues. Emerging in response to a new superintendent's plans to reshape Montclair schools with new teacher evaluations, administrative hires, and…

  19. Staff Development Strategies for School Library and Media Centres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Selfdesigned questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  20. Media Leader Tapped to Head New York City Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2010-01-01

    When Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg sought a leader for the New York City schools in 2002, his outside-the-box choice was Joel I. Klein, a former assistant U.S. attorney general who had no experience as a school administrator. Eight years later, in seeking a replacement for Mr. Klein, Mr. Bloomberg has tapped yet another person from outside education:…

  1. Staff development strategies for school library media centres: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Self-designed questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  2. Foundations of Socio-Cultural Ecology: Consequences for Media Education and Mobile Learning in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rummler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This conceptual paper offers insights to the foundations of Socio-Cultural Ecology and relates this concept to traditional concepts of Ecology e.g. media ecology or Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model of child development. It will further discuss the term «ecology» as a relation between learners and their surrounding physical and structural world, e. g. an ecology of resources or the classroom as an ecological system. Thirdly more recent concepts in ecology will be considered e. g. Digital Media Ecology including media ecology (German: Medienökologie from a German perspective. This contribution tries to describe common principles of (media ecologies and will ask after their meaning and relation to media education and mobile learning. One of the main results is the realisation that cultural practices of school learning and cultural practices of media acquisition take place in different worlds or in different ecological spheres. The question is thus again of how to bridge these ecological spheres, and how «agency» developed outside school, can be nourished inside school. In other words: how can we bridge socio-cultural and technological structures within these cultural practices.

  3. The Use of Geometry Learning Media Based on Augmented Reality for Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohendi, D.; Septian, S.; Sutarno, H.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the geometry especially of three-dimensional space is still considered difficult by some students. Therefore, a learning innovation is required to overcome students’ difficulties in learning geometry. In this research, we developed geometry learning media based on augmented reality in android flatform’s then it was implemented in teaching three-dimensional objects for some junior high school students to find out: how is the students response in using this new media in geometry and is this media can solve the student’s difficulties in understanding geometry concept. The results showed that the use of geometry learning media based on augmented reality in android flatform is able to get positive responses from the students in learning geometry concepts especially three-dimensional objects and students more easy to understand concept of diagonal in geometry than before using this media.

  4. Media Competence as an Integral Quality of a New Teacher for a New School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila A. Ivanova

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed article considers the issue of social and cultural determinants having impact on qualitative alteration of requirements to teacher’s personality, media competence as an integral property of a new teacher for a new school. The main ideas of media education’s development are represented in the social-humanitarian context of realization of presidential initiatives “Our New School” which reflect subjective aspect of interpreting the category “media competence” in a wide social and cultural meaning.

  5. Factors influence the digital media teaching of primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EAOSA

    Keywords: digital media; flipped classroom; learning achievement; teaching ... Despite the negative high start-up cost, Touchton (2015) has argued that ... results in the cognition, affection and skills and so on”. ... teachers have ignored the importance of establish- .... Guided by engagement researches and theories, this.

  6. Research into Learning Resulting from Quality School Library Media Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Maurice P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This annotated bibliography of 20 research reports identifies what has been determined about the effects of library media services on learning and suggests methodologies available for similar studies. Organization is according to area of learning affected--academic achievement; language, reading, and library skills; mathematics; science; social…

  7. Teaching Electronic Literacy A Concepts-Based Approach for School Library Media Specialists

    CERN Document Server

    Craver, Kathleen W

    1997-01-01

    School library media specialists will find this concepts-based approach to teaching electronic literacy an indispensable basic tool for instructing students and teachers. It provides step-by-step instruction on how to find and evaluate needed information from electronic databases and the Internet, how to formulate successful electronic search strategies and retrieve relevant results, and how to interpret and critically analyze search results. The chapters contain a suggested lesson plan and sample assignments for the school library media specialist to use in teaching electronic literacy skills

  8. Evaluation of a school-based violence prevention media literacy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingar, Kathryn R; Jolls, Tessa

    2014-06-01

    Evaluate whether Beyond Blame, a violence prevention media literacy curriculum, is associated with improved knowledge, beliefs and behaviours related to media use and aggression. Using a quasi-experimental design, from 2007 to 2008, teachers from schools across Southern California administered the curriculum with or without training or served as controls. Students were tested before and after the curriculum was implemented, and during the fall semester of the next academic year. Multivariate hierarchical regression was used to compare changes from baseline to follow-up between the intervention and control groups. Compared with controls, at the first post-test, students in the trained and untrained groups reported increased knowledge of five core concepts/key questions of media literacy, increased self-rated exposure to media violence, as well as stronger beliefs that media violence affects viewers and that people can protect themselves by watching less. Regarding behaviours, controls were more likely to report ≥8 h of media consumption at the second post-test than at baseline (OR=2.11; 95% CI 1.13 to 3.97), pushing or shoving another student (OR=2.16; 95% CI 1.16 to 4.02) and threatening to hit or hurt someone (OR=2.32; 95% CI 1.13 to 4.78). In comparison, there was no increase in these behaviours in the trained and untrained groups. This study suggests media literacy can be feasibly integrated into schools as an approach to improving critical analysis of media, media consumption and aggression. Changing the way youth engage media may impact many aspects of health, and an important next step will be to apply this framework to other topics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Social Media Use for Cancer Education at a Community-Based Cancer Center in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jaesung; Chun, Mison; Lee, Hyun Woo; Woo, Jeong-Hee

    2016-12-12

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the education system using social media. Eight educational video clips were developed instructing the viewer on cancer-related issues such as prevention, treatment, and survivorship. Each video was made with participation of medical professors and posted on a YouTube channel. A mobile phone application was produced containing a scheduler function, introduction of a community cancer center program, and cancer information. A medical blog was established to provide stationary materials such as images and articles. Descriptive analysis was done by Google analytics. From May of 2014 to June of 2016, 15,247 total views were recorded on the YouTube channel, and the average view duration was about 3 min. The most popular video was about chemotherapy treatment; 5409 (36%) people watched this video, and 3615 (23.5%) people viewed a video on balanced dietary habits. As well as South Korea, 1,113 (7%) views were confirmed in the United States and 175 (1%) in Japan. The equipment used to watch the contents were mobile phones (59%), laptops (33%), and tablets (6%). Five hundred people installed the smartphone application from March of 2015 to July of 2016. Three hundred eighty-three medical contents were posted on the blog since March of 2015. Cancer education is necessary to address the education needs of patients with cancer and their caregivers. Education based on social media could be an effective method that reaches beyond geographical boundaries.

  10. Social Media in School Emergency Management: Using New Media Technology to Improve Emergency Management Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Social Media is the use of social networking sites, messaging sites, texting, and other web-based or mobile technologies to support social interaction. Facebook is by far the most widely used social networking site. Twitter is by far the most widely used messaging site. The goals of this presentation are: (1) To provide an understanding of the…

  11. The implementation of new knowledge media in education : Longitudinal research on a secondary school as a living lab, a roadmap to basic knowledge media innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjoerd de Vries; Klaas Jan Huizing; Renny Poelstra

    2013-01-01

    Een van de belangrijkste ontwikkelingen in het onderwijs is het gebruik van nieuwe kennismedia: media voor het genereren, begrijpen en delen van kennis. Denk aan social media, serious gaming, apps, tablets en smartphones. De grote vraag is: hoe ga je als school om met deze mediaontwikkelingen? In

  12. Online Work Force Analyzes Social Media to Identify Consequences of an Unplanned School Closure – Using Technology to Prepare for the Next Pandemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Jeanette J.; Kenney, Jasmine; Wilburn, Ben; Putman, Ami; Zheteyeva, Yenlik; O’Sullivan, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Background During an influenza pandemic, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) may recommend school closures. These closures could have unintended consequences for students and their families. Publicly available social media could be analyzed to identify the consequences of an unplanned school closure. Methods As a proxy for an unplanned, pandemic-related school closure, we used the district-wide school closure due to the September 10–18, 2012 teachers’ strike in Chicago, Illinois. We captured social media posts about the school closure using the Radian6 social media-monitoring platform. An online workforce from Amazon Mechanical Turk categorized each post into one of two groups. The first group included relevant posts that described the impact of the closure on students and their families. The second group included irrelevant posts that described the political aspects of the strike or topics unrelated to the school closure. All relevant posts were further categorized as expressing a positive, negative, or neutral sentiment. We analyzed patterns of relevant posts and sentiment over time and compared our findings to household surveys conducted after other unplanned school closures. Results We captured 4,546 social media posts about the district-wide school closure using our search criteria. Of these, 930 (20%) were categorized as relevant by the online workforce. Of the relevant posts, 619 (67%) expressed a negative sentiment, 51 (5%) expressed a positive sentiment, and 260 (28%) were neutral. The number of relevant posts, and especially those with a negative sentiment, peaked on day 1 of the strike. Negative sentiment expressed concerns about childcare, missed school lunches, and the lack of class time for students. This was consistent with findings from previously conducted household surveys. Conclusion Social media are publicly available and can readily provide information on the impact of an unplanned school closure on students

  13. Online Work Force Analyzes Social Media to Identify Consequences of an Unplanned School Closure - Using Technology to Prepare for the Next Pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Jeanette J; Kenney, Jasmine; Wilburn, Ben; Putman, Ami; Zheteyeva, Yenlik; O'Sullivan, Megan

    During an influenza pandemic, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) may recommend school closures. These closures could have unintended consequences for students and their families. Publicly available social media could be analyzed to identify the consequences of an unplanned school closure. As a proxy for an unplanned, pandemic-related school closure, we used the district-wide school closure due to the September 10-18, 2012 teachers' strike in Chicago, Illinois. We captured social media posts about the school closure using the Radian6 social media-monitoring platform. An online workforce from Amazon Mechanical Turk categorized each post into one of two groups. The first group included relevant posts that described the impact of the closure on students and their families. The second group included irrelevant posts that described the political aspects of the strike or topics unrelated to the school closure. All relevant posts were further categorized as expressing a positive, negative, or neutral sentiment. We analyzed patterns of relevant posts and sentiment over time and compared our findings to household surveys conducted after other unplanned school closures. We captured 4,546 social media posts about the district-wide school closure using our search criteria. Of these, 930 (20%) were categorized as relevant by the online workforce. Of the relevant posts, 619 (67%) expressed a negative sentiment, 51 (5%) expressed a positive sentiment, and 260 (28%) were neutral. The number of relevant posts, and especially those with a negative sentiment, peaked on day 1 of the strike. Negative sentiment expressed concerns about childcare, missed school lunches, and the lack of class time for students. This was consistent with findings from previously conducted household surveys. Social media are publicly available and can readily provide information on the impact of an unplanned school closure on students and their families. Using social media to

  14. Far Away, so Close: Preservices School Library Media Specialists' Perceptions of AASL's "Standards for the 21st-Century Learner"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardis, Marcia A.; Dickinson, Gail K.

    2009-01-01

    Preservice school library media specialists will implement the AASL Standards for the "21st Century Learner" in their new roles. Drafted in 2007, the Standards reflect principles which school library media specialist must impart to learners to prepare them to be knowledge consumers, producers, and communicators in global environments.…

  15. Teachers' Stages of Concern for Media Literacy Education and the Integration of MLE in Chinese Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Chang; Sang, Guoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Media literacy is an essential skill for living in the twenty-first century. School-based instruction is a critical part of media literacy education (MLE), while research on teachers' concerns and integration of MLE is not sufficient. The objective of this study is to investigate teachers' stages of concern (SoC), perceived need, school context,…

  16. Combining In-School and Community-Based Media Efforts: Reducing Marijuana and Alcohol Uptake among Younger Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael D.; Kelly, Kathleen J.; Edwards, Ruth W.; Thurman, Pamela J.; Plested, Barbara A.; Keefe, Thomas J.; Lawrence, Frank R.; Henry, Kimberly L.

    2006-01-01

    This study tests the impact of an in-school mediated communication campaign based on social marketing principles, in combination with a participatory, community-based media effort, on marijuana, alcohol and tobacco uptake among middle-school students. Eight media treatment and eight control communities throughout the US were randomly assigned to…

  17. Blueprint for Tomorrow: Redesigning Schools for Student-Centered Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    The United States has about $2 trillion tied up in aging school facilities. School districts throughout the country spend about $12 billion every year keeping this infrastructure going. Yet almost all of the new money we pour into school facilities reinforces an existing--and obsolete--model of schooling. In "Blueprint for Tomorrow,"…

  18. Social media use and cybercivility guidelines in U.S. nursing schools: A review of websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gagne, Jennie C; Yamane, Sandra S; Conklin, Jamie L; Chang, Jianhong; Kang, Hee Sun

    This research analyzes to what extent U.S. nursing schools use social media, their policies or guidelines on cybercivility in social media, online classrooms, and email correspondence, and whether these protocols are readily available to students. This website-based study employs a descriptive, cross-sectional, non-experimental search design. Data were collected in nursing schools offering master's programs (n=197) and online graduate programs in master's degree (n=110) listed in the 2017 edition of U.S. News and World Report. School ranking was positively correlated with the total number of social networking sites being used in the schools, but not with the presence of cybercivility guidelines. About a third of the nursing schools in the sample had policies/guidelines concerning social media, while fewer than 10% had policies/guidelines about online classroom conduct (n=14) or email use (n=16). Key features of these protocols were professionalism, expected behaviors, and consequences. Establishing and implementing policies and guidelines regarding cybercivility is a vital step to promote a culture of civility online. It is especially important to do so in nursing schools where standards should reflect the values of the profession. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Opportunities for Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Feld, Ashley L.; O'Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods: We conducted structured interviews in the fall of 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North…

  20. SOCIAL MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    RESPONSIBILITY CENTCOM COALITION MEDIA SOCIAL MEDIA NEWS ARTICLES PRESS RELEASES IMAGERY VIDEOS TRANSCRIPTS VISITORS AND PERSONNEL FAMILY CENTER FAMILY READINESS CENTCOM WEBMAIL SOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY ACCOUNTABILITY HomeMEDIASOCIAL MEDIA Social Media CENTCOM'S ENGLISH SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS There are many U.S. military commands

  1. "Making History Go" at a Local Community Center: Popular Media and the Construction of Historical Knowledge among African American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Looks at how young people use historical knowledge, gained from media sources, to deal with current situations. A group of young African Americans draw on behavioral examples from the film, "Panther," instead of school-based learning, to give them ways to deal with the Ku Klux Klan in their neighborhood. (DAJ)

  2. Evaluating the Sustainability of School-Based Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Stephanie; Zirkle, Dorothy L; Barr, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    The United States is facing a surge in the number of school-based health centers (SBHCs) owing to their success in delivering positive health outcomes and increasing access to care. To preserve this success, experts have developed frameworks for creating sustainable SBHCs; however, little research has affirmed or added to these models. This research seeks to analyze elements of sustainability in a case study of three SBHCs in San Diego, California, with the purpose of creating a research-based framework of SBHC sustainability to supplement expertly derived models. Using a mixed methods study design, data were collected from interviews with SBHC stakeholders, observations in SBHCs, and SBHC budgets. A grounded theory qualitative analysis and a quantitative budget analysis were completed to develop a theoretical framework for the sustainability of SBHCs. Forty-one interviews were conducted, 6 hours of observations were completed, and 3 years of SBHC budgets were analyzed to identify care coordination, community buy-in, community awareness, and SBHC partner cooperation as key themes of sustainability promoting patient retention for sustainable billing and reimbursement levels. These findings highlight the unique ways in which SBHCs gain community buy-in and awareness by becoming trusted sources of comprehensive and coordinated care within communities and among vulnerable populations. Findings also support ideas from expert models of SBHC sustainability calling for well-defined and executed community partnerships and quality coordinated care in the procurement of sustainable SBHC funding.

  3. Insights of School Head About Marketing Education Services Through Digital Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Iqbal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study mainly focuses on the insights of a private school’s head pertaining to the use of digital media in educational marketing. The qualitative research paradigm was chosen for this study and in depth phenomenological interview was conducted from a head of a private school. Two themes were extracted from the data: Marketing educational services through digital media and its challenges, and digital media tool for marketing education services. The study revealed that the school head perceived the digital media to be cost-effective marketing strategy that was multidimensional and value-driven, but due to lack of awareness, skills, attitude, and sense of maturity among stakeholders, digital media was ignored and was not much used as a cost-effective marketing tool. Nevertheless, it is proposed that by hiring marketing personnel to promote services professionally, by aligning their strategies according to the demands of their customers, and by inviting customers’ voice on digital platforms, digital media can become a cost-effective and a valuable tool for mercerization of education.

  4. School Library Media Specialists and the Internet: Road Kill or Road Warriors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses use of the Internet by school library media specialists and its importance in the development of the library profession. Highlights include how to access the Internet and resources about the Internet, including information about networks as well as three sources that provide introductions to the general concepts of the Internet. (LRW)

  5. 100 Library Lifesavers: A Survival Guide for School Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Pamela S.

    This book contains tips (author's suggestions), tools (ready-to-use lifesavers), and talk (quotes from practicing media specialists) for school librarians at all grade levels. A total of 100 lifesavers are included, covering areas such as inventory, motivation strategies, disciplinary approaches, library checkout, Internet searching, the traveling…

  6. Teacher-School Library Media Specialist Collaboration through Social Marketing Strategies: An Information Behavior Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immroth, Barbara; Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This research was supported in part though an IMLS Kent State University Grant supporting Information Literacy. Based on the importance of teacher-school library media specialist collaboration, this study seeks to advance knowledge involving the dynamics of this special relationship. The subjects were a group of student librarians--themselves…

  7. A Travel Agent in Cyber School: The Internet and the Library Media Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBaron, John F.; And Others

    The global computing networks that are revolutionizing our society have created an opportunity for school libraries and librarians. Taking the position that librarians occupy key positions in the educational technology revolution, this book explores how technology-enhanced education improvements fit together with the library media program and how…

  8. New Media, New Voices: A Complex School Public Relations and Human Resources Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Craig M.; Mullen, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    An unprecedented increase in students' personal technology use presents a new area for study within the educational leadership and administration field. Cellular phones, video posting websites, and online social networking destinations empower students to create and distribute school-related images and stories. Student-developed media content can…

  9. Continuing Education Needs and the Professional Reading of School Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrobe, Kathy

    1992-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of school library media specialists in Oklahoma regarding continuing education activities and topics. Data are presented on the relative importance of several continuing education activities, percentage of respondents regularly reading specific journals, and continuing education topics ranked by respondents' prioritized…

  10. School-Based Smoking Prevention with Media Literacy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Melinda C.; Schmidt, Spring J.; Shields, David; Zwarun, Lara; Sherblom, Stephen; Pulley, Cynthia; Rucker, Billy

    2011-01-01

    School-based tobacco prevention programs have had limited success reducing smoking rates in the long term. Media literacy programs offer an innovative vehicle for delivery of potentially more efficacious anti-tobacco education. However, these programs have been neither widely implemented nor well evaluated. We conducted a pre-post evaluation of a…

  11. School Communications 2.0: A Social Media Strategy for K-12 Principals and Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Daniel Dean

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, multiple-case study was two-fold: 1) to describe, analyze, and interpret the experiences of school principals and superintendents who use multiple social media tools such as blogs, microblogs, social networking sites, podcasts, and online videos with stakeholders as part of their comprehensive communications…

  12. Critical Media Literacy in Middle School: Exploring the Politics of Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Jesse S.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores issues of critical media literacy with middle school students in an urban setting in the United States. The author focuses on data from a qualitative study engaging students in the reading and writing of video texts. The article examines intersections of issues relating to the "crisis of representation" in social science…

  13. Marketization on Export: Representations of the Swedish Free School Model in English Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rönnberg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how "social democratic" Sweden initiated and implemented choice reforms that attracted the interest of "liberal" England. By studying how English media framed and portrayed the Swedish free school "export" from 2008 to 2014, this paper aims to describe and discuss how a market-oriented policy idea,…

  14. Digital Media and "Girling" at an Elite Girls' School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Claire

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I draw on Judith Butler's notion of performativity to investigate the role of digital technologies in processes of gendered subjectification (or "girling") in elite girls' education. Elite girls' schooling is a site where the potential of digital technologies in mediating student-led constructions and explorations of…

  15. After School Centers Project. Final Reports. Winter 1968-1969; Summer 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Graduate School of Education.

    Two final reports, winter 1968-1969 and summer 1969, respectively describe the sixth and seventh sessions of the Cambridge School Department's After School Center Program and involving six elementary schools. Both the winter and the summer programs were designed to give disadvantaged children remedial instruction in reading and mathematics along…

  16. Factual accuracy and the cultural context of science in popular media: Perspectives of media makers, middle school students, and university students on an entertainment television program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Evan; Osborne, Jonathan; Patterson, Alexis D

    2017-07-01

    Popular media influences ideas about science constructed by the public. To sway media productions, public policy organizations have increasingly promoted use of science consultants. This study contributes to understanding the connection from science consultants to popular media to public outcomes. A science-based television series was examined for intended messages of the creator and consulting scientist, and received messages among middle school and non-science university students. The results suggest the consulting scientist missed an opportunity to influence the portrayal of the cultural contexts of science and that middle school students may be reading these aspects uncritically-a deficiency educators could potentially address. In contrast, all groups discussed the science content and practices of the show, indicating that scientific facts were salient to both media makers and audiences. This suggests popular media may influence the public knowledge of science, supporting concerns of scientists about the accuracy of fictional television and film.

  17. Social Media Analytics in Education: What Is It, How Is It Useful, and What Does It Tell Us about How Schools Are Discussed in Social Media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Dick M., II; Robertson, Jenifer Walsh; Johnson, Michele E.; Blum, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This study measured the salience of, sentiment of, and topics about schools in social media. Based on a mixed-methods approach, results indicated that school districts do not appear to be discussed often or widely, but the small numbers of people who communicate about districts do so repeatedly, positively, and in concentration. Larger and…

  18. Keeping Current: Feng Shui and the School Library Media Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the changing shift in education, including learning resources centers, from a production to a consumer mind-set, focusing on the activity of learning rather than teaching. Highlights include learning communities; personal mastery; developing a vision; the interconnectedness of organizations; harmony and balance, similar to feng shui; and…

  19. Regional Media Education Centers (For Non-Professionals in the Media Fields) in the European Part of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitskaya, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    In the European parts of Russia (Archangelsk, Belgorod, Vladimir, Voronezh, Kazan, Krasnodar, Penza, Rostov-on-Don, St. Petersburg, Saratov, Smolensk, Taganrog, Tambov, Tver, Tolyatti and so on.) there is a lot of pedagogues, who strive to develop media competence among different age groups with different social status. More and more media…

  20. Adolescent use of school-based health centers and high school dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Suzanne E U; Pullmann, Michael D; Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Lyon, Aaron R; Cosgrove, T J; Bruns, Eric J

    2011-07-01

    To determine the association between use of school-based health centers (SBHCs) and school dropout. Quasi-experimental longitudinal analysis of a retrospective student cohort, with SBHC use as the independent variable. We statistically controlled for dropout risk and used propensity score regression adjustment to control for several factors associated with SBHC use. Integrated database from an urban public school district (academic outcomes) and department of public health (SBHC use). District-enrolled students in their first semester of ninth grade in 2005 (N = 3334), followed up through their anticipated on-time graduation semester of 12th grade in 2009. Students were divided into 4 groups: never used (47%); low use (23%); moderate use (20%); and high users (10%). Time to nongraduation (described as dropout). Low to moderate SBHC use (0.125-2.5 visits per semester) was associated with a 33% reduction in dropout compared with non-SBHC users. The high-use group (>2.5 visits per semester) did not have dropout rates that differed from nonusers. For SBHC users who did drop out, dropout occurred approximately 1 semester later than nonusers. Exploratory analyses revealed that the association between SBHC use and prevention of dropout was greatest for higher-risk students. This study found an association between low to moderate SBHC use and reductions in dropout for high school students in an urban school district, especially for students at higher risk for dropout. This study supports the theory that benefits of SBHCs extend beyond managing physical and mental health needs to include academic outcomes.

  1. How Media Companies Should Create Value: Innovation Centered Business Models and Dynamic Capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, H.L. van; Ziggers, G.W.; Friedrichsen, M.; Mühl-Benninghaus, W.; Picard, R.; Vartanova, E.

    2014-01-01

    Globalization, deregulation, technological innovation and the convergence of previously separated industries such as media, entertainment, information, and consumer electronics industries, have changed the media landscape into a turbulent environment. As a consequence of these developments, many

  2. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  3. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements

  4. Revisiting Factors Associated With Screen Time Media Use: A Structural Study Among School-Aged Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantcha, Marcus; Janssen, Eric; Godeau, Emmanuelle; Ehlinger, Virginie; Le-Nezet, Olivier; Beck, François; Spilka, Stanislas

    2018-06-01

    Screen-based media overuse has been related to harmful consequences especially among children and adolescents. Given their complex interrelationships, predictors of screen time (ST) should be analyzed simultaneously rather than individually to avoid incomplete conclusions. Structural equation models were conducted to examine associations between media ST (television, video games, and computers) along with harmful consequences in adolescents' well-being, such as underweight and overweight, depression, and school failure. Predictors included individual (gender, age, and physical activity), family (structure and socioeconomic background), and substance use variables. We used the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey organized in 2014, including eighth- and ninth-grade students living in France (N = 3720). Students reported spending 3 hours per day in front of each media. Spending more than 2 hours behind each of those 3 media was associated with lower life satisfaction, less physical activity, active school bullying, and grade repetition. Socioeconomic status was the most important predictor of ST, whereas regular substance uses showed modest associations. The main implication of our findings is to sensitize parents and stakeholders about the limitation of ST, including their own use that adolescents are likely to mimic. Alternative measures such as off-line time should be encouraged.

  5. Potentials and pitfalls of the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringskou, Lea Thomsen; Gravesen, David Thore

    Our research offers a qualitative, in depth-perspective on the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools in Denmark. In our presentration we will, in a cross-cultural perspective, reappraise the roles of leisure-time pedagogues and discuss the potentials and pitfalls of the encou......Our research offers a qualitative, in depth-perspective on the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools in Denmark. In our presentration we will, in a cross-cultural perspective, reappraise the roles of leisure-time pedagogues and discuss the potentials and pitfalls...... of the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools. In 2014, the Danish Primary School was reformed. To a considerable extent, the reform can be understood in response to receding results in international tests (Knudsen 2010). The official aim of the reform is to challenge all pupils, regardless...... the encounter between leisure-time centers and primary schools?...

  6. The School System and New Media – Reasons in Favour of Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marković

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the education system reform which is currently underway in Serbia and in most countries of the region, considerable attention has been paid to modern media technologies. Although a whole decade has passed since the initiation of the reform there have been no significant developments regarding the school system computerisation, which resulted in raising the issue of integration and seeking valid arguments which indicate the key role of new media in the re-structuring of the school system. In that context, the basic goal of this paper is an analysis of primary research studies which suggest the reasons for the inte-gration of new media into the school system in order to set out the reform guidelines regarding the application of information and communication tech-nologies in formal education. The results of the analysis attest to a large num-ber of compelling reasons for implementing modern media technologies into the system of educational institutions. Among them one should distinguish the general reasons which deal with improving the quality of and bridging the gap between formal and informal education. The selected research studies state objective reasons such as rationality and cost-effectiveness, as well as peda-gogical reasons relating to the learning context innovation, presence of new knowledge sources provided by Internet resources, changes in the process of learning instigated by the development of e-learning and a higher motivation of the participants in the process of education. In the conclusion of this re-search the authors emphasise the necessity of integrating media technologies into the school system for the purposes of creating a modern coherent system founded on networking, communication and exchange.

  7. The 3D Digital Story-telling Media on Batik Learning in Vocational High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiaty, I.; Achdiani, Y.; Kuntadi, I.; Mubaroq, S. R.; Zakaria, D.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to make 3D digital Story-telling Media on Batik Learning in Vocational High School. The digital story-telling developed in this research is focused on 3D-based story-telling. In contrast to the digital story-telling that has been developed in existing learning, this research is expected to be able to improve understanding of vocational students about the value of local wisdom batik more meaningful and “live”. The process of making 3D digital story-telling media consists of two processes, namely the creation of 3D objects and the creation of 3D object viewer.

  8. Bringing Wellness to Schools: Opportunities and Challenges to Mental Health Integration in School Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Karen; Guo, Sisi; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Roya; Puffer, Maryjane; Kataoka, Sheryl H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective School-based health centers (SBHCs) reduce mental health access-to-care barriers and improve educational outcomes for youth. This qualitative study evaluates the innovations and challenges of a unique network of SBHCs in a large, urban school district, as they attempt to integrate health, mental health, and educational services. Methods The 43 participants sampled included mental health providers, primary care providers, and care coordinators at 14 SBHCs. Semi-structured interviews with each participant were audio-recorded and transcribed. Themes were identified and coded using Atlas.ti 5.1, and collapsed into three domains: Operations, Partnership, and Engagement. Results Interviews revealed provider models ranging from single agencies offering both health and mental health services to co-located services. Sites with the Health Agency providing at least some mental health services reported more mental health screenings. Many sites utilized SBHC coordinators and coordination team meetings to facilitate relationships between schools and Health Agency and Community Mental Health Clinic providers. Partnership challenges included confidentiality policies and staff turnover. Participants also highlighted student and parent engagement, through culturally sensitive services, peer health advocates, and “drop-in” lunches. Conclusions Staffing and operational models are critical in the success of health-mental health-education integration. Among the provider models observed, the combined health and mental health provider model offered the most integrated services. Despite barriers, providers and schools have begun to implement novel solutions for operational problems and family engagement in mental health services. Implications for future SBHCs as an integrated model are described. PMID:27417895

  9. Into the Curriculum. Guidance: Sense of Self, Self-Esteem; Health: Clean Hands, Clean Books; Mathematics/Science: What's the Heaviest Thing in the Library Media Center?; Reading/Language Arts: Merry-Go-Round Mooo-ving Picture Show; Social Studies: I Came to School By !; Social Studies: Revolutionary War Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Provides six fully developed library media activities that are designed for use with specific curriculum units in guidance, health, mathematics, science, reading, language arts, and social studies. Library media skills, curriculum objectives, grade levels, resources, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each…

  10. School Library Journal's Spending Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley; Shontz, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    This year's "School Library Journal's" spending survey showed that, despite the recession, the vast majority of media centers around the country have retained their credentialed media specialists. For example, almost 85% of elementary schools and more than 95% of middle and high schools have a full-time certified librarian. In addition, salaries…

  11. Is All Well?: Relationship of Media Consumption of Filipino Out of School Youth with their Subjective Wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika S. Deveza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on youth media consumption and its effects on their being have always been the interest of many studies all over the globe. It is because of youth’s importance in the society and the roles they will play in the future, most specifically the educated ones. However, in the Philippines, there is only little information about the out of school youth. This study aims to determine the media consumption of the out of school youth since they are one of the most deprived individuals on having sufficient knowledge about media and its effects on individuals. Among other types of media, television has the highest percentage of consumption among the Filipino out of school youth more than the Internet and radio. Using statistical methods, we relate the relationship of consuming a specific media to their subjective wellbeing. Findings revealed that not all media affects the out of school youth’s feelings of being contented, joyful, and relaxed, only specific media types affects such feelings. Overall, the study shows that the out of school youth and their consumption of media are indeed related with each other.

  12. The Restorative Justice Center: An Alternative to School Detention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Julie; Van Bockern, Steve; Ailts, Julie; Donnelly, Jason; Erickson, Kelsey; Woltermann, Jenna

    2008-01-01

    The traditional "stay silent, sit still, do nothing" school detention approach is a punitive and ineffective way to change behavior. It does little to create positive school climates. For children who have been traumatized through fear, isolation, and emotional abuse, poorly managed detention can add to that trauma. A restorative justice approach…

  13. Development of Interactive Media for ICT Learning at Elementary School Based on Student Self Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Huning Anwariningsih

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of information and comunication technology (ICT curriculum at elementary school is the educational sector development. ICT subject is a practical subject which require a direct practice to make easier in the student understanding. Therefore, a teacher is demanded to make a learning media which helps the student to understand the material of study. This research is aimed at describing the model of ICT study in elementary school and using of learning media. Moreover, the description can be bocome one of the basic from the development of interactive study model base on student self learning. Besides, the arraging of this study model is hoped to make habitual and self learning.

  14. The Practice of Learner-Centered Method in Upper Primary Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Department of Pedagogy, Faculty of Education, Jimma University , Jimma Ethiopia. E-mail: .... teacher used one of the 33 Learner-centered methods or not. .... Sex. No. of teachers in selected schools. Teaching Experience. Male. Female.

  15. Elementary School Principals' Learning-Centered Leadership and Educational Outcomes: Implications for Principals' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, R. Martin

    2011-01-01

    This article arises from research in one school district (utilizing the Vanderbilt Assessment of Leadership in Education, VAL-ED) into the relationships among the perceptions of elementary school leaders of their learning-centered leadership, and student achievement on state-mandated tests of reading in Virginia. Beyond the percentage of students…

  16. A Better Way to Budget: Building Support for Bold, Student-Centered Change in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    "A Better Way to Budget" provides practical, innovative advice on how to overcome the political and social pushback that often prevents district and school leaders from shifting scarce resources to the most student-centered uses. Nathan Levenson shows how school leaders can uncover the sources of potential conflicts and create a…

  17. Adolescent Health Care in School-Based Health Centers. Position Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2008

    2008-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are considered one of the most effective strategies for delivering preventive care, including reproductive and mental health care services, to adolescents--a population long considered difficult to reach. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies to assure…

  18. Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Ranbir Mangat; Diallo, Ana F.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues affect 20-25% of children and adolescents, of which few receive services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide access to mental health services to children and adolescents within their schools. A systematic review of literature was undertaken to review evidence on the effectiveness of delivery of mental health services…

  19. School-Based Health Centers and Childhood Obesity: "An Ideal Location to Address a Complex Issue"

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    One of today's most pressing public health problems is the rise in childhood overweight and obesity. School-based health centers (SBHCs)--the convergence of public health, primary care, and mental health in schools--represent an important element in the public health toolbox for combating the challenging epidemic. When working side-by-side in a…

  20. "Kalosara" Revitalization as an Ethno-Pedagogical Media in the Development of Character of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar; Suardika, I. Ketut; Mursidin, T.; Suleiman, Abdul Rauf; Syukur, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    The aims of the research are (1) to identify types of character through "kalosara" revitalization as an ethno-pedagogical media in social sciences (IPS) learning at junior high school (SMP), (2) to develop strategy of "kalosara" revitalization as an ethno-pedagogical media in the development of characters of students, and (3)…

  1. Development of an Android Application in the Form of a Simulation Lab as Learning Media for Senior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astra, I Made; Nasbey, Hadi; Nugraha, Aditiya

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to create learning media for senior high school students through an android application in the form of a simulation lab. The method employed in the study is research and development. A simulation lab which has been made subsequently validated by concept and media experts, further empirical testing by teachers and…

  2. Teachers' professional development needs and current practices at the Alexander Science Center School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargus, Gerald Vincent

    This investigation represents an in-depth understanding of teacher professional development at the Alexander Science Center School, a dependent charter museum school established through a partnership between the California Science Center and Los Angeles Unified School District. Three methods of data collection were used. A survey was distributed and collected from the school's teachers, resulting in a prioritized list of teacher professional development needs, as well as a summary of teachers' opinions about the school's existing professional development program. In addition, six key stakeholders in the school's professional development program were interviewed for the study. Finally, documents related to the school's professional development program were analyzed. Data collected from the interviews and documents were used to develop an understand various components of the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program. Teachers identified seven areas that had a high-priority for future professional development including developing skills far working with below-grade-level students, improving the analytical skills of student in mathematics, working with English Language Learners, improving students' overall reading ability levels, developing teachers' content-area knowledge for science, integrating science across the curriculum, and incorporating hands-on activity-based learning strategies to teach science. Professional development needs identified by Alexander Science Center School teachers were categorized based on their focus on content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, or curricular knowledge. Analysis of data collected through interviews and documents revealed that the Alexander Science Center School's professional development program consisted of six venues for providing professional development for teachers including weekly "banked time" sessions taking place within the standard school day, grade-level meetings, teacher support

  3. Teaching Youth Media: A Critical Guide to Literacy, Video Production, & Social Change. The Series on School Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Steven

    This book explores the power of using media education to help urban teenagers develop their critical thinking and literacy skills. Drawing on 20 years of experience working with inner-city youth at the Educational Video Center (EVC) in New York City, the author looks at both the problems and possibilities of this model of media education.…

  4. Combining in-school and community-based media efforts: reducing marijuana and alcohol uptake among younger adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael D; Kelly, Kathleen J; Edwards, Ruth W; Thurman, Pamela J; Plested, Barbara A; Keefe, Thomas J; Lawrence, Frank R; Henry, Kimberly L

    2006-02-01

    This study tests the impact of an in-school mediated communication campaign based on social marketing principles, in combination with a participatory, community-based media effort, on marijuana, alcohol and tobacco uptake among middle-school students. Eight media treatment and eight control communities throughout the US were randomly assigned to condition. Within both media treatment and media control communities, one school received a research-based prevention curriculum and one school did not, resulting in a crossed, split-plot design. Four waves of longitudinal data were collected over 2 years in each school and were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models to account for clustering effects. Youth in intervention communities (N = 4,216) showed fewer users at final post-test for marijuana [odds ratio (OR) = 0.50, P = 0.019], alcohol (OR = 0.40, P = 0.009) and cigarettes (OR = 0.49, P = 0.039), one-tailed. Growth trajectory results were significant for marijuana (P = 0.040), marginal for alcohol (P = 0.051) and non-significant for cigarettes (P = 0.114). Results suggest that an appropriately designed in-school and community-based media effort can reduce youth substance uptake. Effectiveness does not depend on the presence of an in-school prevention curriculum.

  5. Engaging Community Stakeholders to Evaluate the Design, Usability, and Acceptability of a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Social Media Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don; Paige, Samantha; Payne-Purvis, Caroline; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, PS; Alber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often report inadequate access to comprehensive patient education resources. Objective The purpose of this study was to incorporate community-engagement principles within a mixed-method research design to evaluate the usability and acceptability of a self-tailored social media resource center for medically underserved patients with COPD. Methods A multiphase sequential design (qual → QUANT → quant + QUAL) was incorporated into the current study, whereby a small-scale qualitative (qual) study informed the design of a social media website prototype that was tested with patients during a computer-based usability study (QUANT). To identify usability violations and determine whether or not patients found the website prototype acceptable for use, each patient was asked to complete an 18-item website usability and acceptability questionnaire, as well as a retrospective, in-depth, semistructured interview (quant + QUAL). Results The majority of medically underserved patients with COPD (n=8, mean 56 years, SD 7) found the social media website prototype to be easy to navigate and relevant to their self-management information needs. Mean responses on the 18-item website usability and acceptability questionnaire were very high on a scale of 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree) (mean 4.72, SD 0.33). However, the majority of patients identified several usability violations related to the prototype’s information design, interactive capabilities, and navigational structure. Specifically, 6 out of 8 (75%) patients struggled to create a log-in account to access the prototype, and 7 out of 8 patients (88%) experienced difficulty posting and replying to comments on an interactive discussion forum. Conclusions Patient perceptions of most social media website prototype features (eg, clickable picture-based screenshots of videos, comment tools) were largely positive. Mixed-method stakeholder feedback was

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fleet Application for School Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propane Buses Jan. 26, 2016 Video thumbnail for Biodiesel Offers an Easy Alternative for Fleets Biodiesel thumbnail for Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama Biodiesel Fuels Education in Alabama May 1, 2012 Video School Transportation Videos on YouTube Video thumbnail for New Hampshire Cleans up with Biodiesel Buses

  7. Media use as a reason for meal skipping and fast eating in secondary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bulck, J; Eggermont, S

    2006-04-01

    This study examined self-reported meal skipping and eating faster than usual with the goal of watching television or playing computer games. Respondents reported their media use and indicated how often they skipped a meal to watch a favourite television programme or to play a computer game, and how often they ate faster than usual in order to watch television or play a computer game. Respondents were 2546 adolescents of 13 (first year of secondary school) and 16 years (fourth year of secondary school) of age. About one respondent in 10 skipped at least one meal every week for either television viewing or computer game playing. Weekly meal skipping for television viewing occurs more regularly in boys and first-year students, but particularly in teenagers who view 5 h or more daily (15% of the sample). The category of teenagers who play computer games four times a week or more (25.3% of the sample) is at increased risk of meal skipping; those who play more than four times a week are 10 times more likely weekly to skip a meal. A quarter of the adolescents eat faster at least once a week to be able to watch television or play a computer game. Regardless of gender and school year, teenagers' risk of eating faster progressively increases with their use of the media. Those who watch 4 h or more daily are about seven times more likely to skip a meal for television and those who play computer games at least four times a week are nine times more likely weekly to skip a meal. Unhealthy eating habits can be a side effect of heavy or excessive media use. Teenagers' use of television or game computers during nonworking or out-of-school hours partly displaces the amount of time that needs to be spent at meals. Practitioners and educators may try to encourage or restore a pattern of healthful meal consumption habits by reducing the amount of media use, and by supporting parental rule-making regarding children's eating habits and media use.

  8. Combined influence of media use on subjective health in elementary school children in Japan: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Harunobu; Ohara, Kumiko; Kouda, Katsuyasu; Fujita, Yuki; Mase, Tomoki; Miyawaki, Chiemi; Okita, Yoshimitsu; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2012-06-13

    In recent years in Japan, electronic games, home computers, and the internet have assumed an important place in people's lives, even for elementary school children. Subjective health complaints have also become a problem among children. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between media use and health status in elementary school children in Japan. A cross-sectional school-based population survey was conducted in 2009 with a sample of fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade children (age range: 10-12 years old) in elementary schools in Japan (n = 3,464). Self-reported health, lifestyle habits, and time spent using media were assessed. The use of games, television, and personal computers was significantly associated with lifestyle (p media used for more than 1 hour was, the higher the odds ratio of the association of media use with unhealthy lifestyle and subjective health complaints was. The plural use of these media had stronger associations with unhealthy lifestyle and subjective health complaints. Game, television, and personal-computer use were mutually associated, and the plural use of these media had stronger associations with unhealthy lifestyle and subjective health complaints. Excessive use of media might be a risk for unhealthy lifestyle and subjective health complaints.

  9. Naval Postgraduate School Cost Center Financial Management Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Expenditures on Official Business 1. Advance registration fees for local workshops , seminars, classes, etc., of less than ten hours duration and...HCOOOHC999 0721-0730 63 Metorology Dept HD HDO0 -HD999 1 073 1-0740 Figure FA6 Sub-Cost Center OPTAR Document SerWa Numb~ers (con’t) Appendix F Page

  10. Behind the Photos and the Tears: Media Images, Neoliberal Discourses, Racialized Constructions of Space and School Closings in Chicago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allweiss, Alexandra; Grant, Carl A.; Manning, Karla

    2015-01-01

    This critical article provides insights into how media frames influence our understandings of school reform in urban spaces by examining images of students during the 2013 school closings in Chicago. Using visual framing analysis and informed by framing theory and critiques of neoliberalism we seek to explore two questions: (1) What role do media…

  11. Experiences of Leaders in One Texas School District Integrating Social Media as a Communication Medium: Bounded Phenomenological Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Bradley D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this bounded phenomenological case study was to investigate the experiences of leaders in one Texas school district integrating social media into communication practices. The participants in this study were twelve campus leaders, four district level leaders, and the superintendent of schools. The focus groups consisted of three…

  12. Enhancing Student Engagement Through Social Media A School of Business Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Glowatz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While many universities have been deploying both electronic learning (eLearning and social media applications for academic purposes, there is currently little research on the impact on their use on students’ overall learning experiences and associated learning possibilities. This paper elaborates on several online academic activities, such as Facebook, Twitter and quizzes for one classroom taught school of business undergraduate (UG module. The similarities and differences discovered across all aspects of this paper’s research findings are examined against Chickering & Gamson’s [1] seven principles of good practice teaching and Astin’s [2] five tenets of engagement. Online activities were tracked over a period of one academic semester (fifteen weeks and results insinuate that innovative and sustainable social media can indeed be utilised in higher education to enhance student learning and engagement.

  13. The Use of Social Media Tools by School Principals to Communicate between Home and School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Joseph A., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits of parent involvement in children's education including increased attendance, increased test scores and better behavior. Access to increased and meaningful communication between home and school enhances parent involvement. The utilization of technology through the use of the Internet and e-mail for school…

  14. School Censorship in the 21st Century: A Guide for Teachers and School Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, John S.; Dresang, Eliza T.

    As the world enters the 21st century, the access to information and freedom of speech provided by the Internet and other digital technologies have revolutionized the nature of censorship challenges and opened an entirely new realm of legal and social ramifications for censorship in United States schools. In the midst of this digital revolution,…

  15. MEDIA ENVIRONMENT AS FACTOR OF REALIZATION OF CREATIVE POTENTIAL OF FUTURE TEACHERS` IN THE MOUNTAIN SCHOOLS OF THE UKRAINIAN CARPATHIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Lebedieva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article shows up “media environment” as a factor of future teachers` creative potential realization in the mountainous schools of the Ukrainian Carpathians. The problem of using media environment as a factor of future teachers` creative potential in the mountainous schools of the Ukrainian Carpathians and the ways of its optimization is the main point of this research. Highlights ways to modernize social and professional orientation training of students in the creative process of nature is situates in information education and educational environment of high school. We consider the causal link use media environment as a factor of future teachers` creative potential and complexity of the teacher in the mountainous schools of the Ukrainian Carpathians. The basic function of the media environment are extensity, instrumental, communicative, interactive, multimedia. Reveals some aspects of training students to creatively active teaching process we describe subjects with objective possibilities in the formation of professional skills of future teachers` and which directly affect the realization of creative potential – “Ukrainian folk art”, “Basic recitation and rhetoric”, “The basis of pedagogical creativity”. The necessity of creating a full-fledged media environment in higher education is important condition of successful education as an important factor that allows the efficiency of the creative potential of future teachers` in the mountainous schools of the Ukrainian Carpathians.

  16. Developing a Multicultural Library Media Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houff, Suzanne G.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the development of a multicultural library media program based on experiences at a Virginia middle school. Highlights include the media center as a cultural and curricular resource; establishing philosophies and goals; reviewing current materials and establishing guidelines for new material selection; staff development; and an integrated…

  17. Cross-lagged associations between substance use-related media exposure and alcohol use during middle school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joan S; Miles, Jeremy N V; D'Amico, Elizabeth J

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the reciprocal longitudinal associations between alcohol or other drug (AOD)-related media exposure and alcohol use among middle school students, and explores whether these associations differ by ethnicity or gender. The analytic sample is 7th grade students who were recruited from 16 California middle schools and surveyed in the spring semester of two academic years. Students reported on their background characteristics, exposure to seven types of AOD-related media content (Internet videos, social networking sites, movies, television, magazine advertisements, songs, and video games) in the past 3 months, and alcohol use in the past 30 days. Structural equation modeling was used to examine cross-lagged associations between media exposure and alcohol use. Greater AOD-related media exposure in 7th grade was significantly associated with a higher probability of alcohol use in 8th grade (p = .02), and alcohol use in 7th grade was marginally associated with greater AOD-related media exposure in 8th grade (p = .07). These cross-lagged associations did not statistically differ by ethnicity (Hispanic vs. non-Hispanic white) or gender. Further, there was no evidence that certain types of media exposure were more strongly associated with alcohol use than others. Results from this study suggest that AOD-related media effects and media selectively form a reciprocal, mutually influencing process that may escalate adolescent alcohol use over time. Addressing adolescents' exposure to AOD-related media content and its effects on behavior, such as through media literacy education, may hold promise for improving the efficacy of alcohol prevention efforts for middle school students. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, S; Chapman, S; Spetz, J; Brindis, CD

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers (SBHCs) may be one strategy to decrease health disparities.Empirical studies between 2003 and 2013 of US pediatric populations and of US SBHCs were included if rese...

  19. Outcomes in Child Health: Exploring the Use of Social Media to Engage Parents in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Michele P; Shave, Kassi; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Scott, Shannon D; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-03-16

    With the rapid growth of technology and its improved accessibility globally, social media is gaining an increasingly important role in health care. Patients are frequently engaging with social media to access information, share content, and interact with others in online health communities. However, the use of social media as a stakeholder engagement strategy has been minimally explored, and effective methods for involving participants in research on the identification of patient-centered outcomes remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of using social media to engage parents in identifying patient-centered outcomes, using acute respiratory infections in children as an example to gauge feasibility. We conducted a process evaluation of a two-phase Web-based strategy to engage parents in research on patient-centered outcomes. In the first phase, we developed a website and study-specific Facebook and Twitter accounts to recruit parents to complete a Web-based survey identifying patient-centered outcomes. In the second phase, we used Facebook to host discussion with parents based on the survey results. The reach of social media as an engagement strategy and the characteristics of the population recruited were assessed. During the first phase, there were 5027 visits to the survey site, 110 participants completed the survey, 553 unique users visited the study website (675 visits), the Facebook page received 104 likes, and the Twitter account gained 52 followers over the 14-week study period. Most survey respondents identified Facebook (51.8%, 57/110) or a friend (45.5%, 50/110) as their source of referral. It was found that 70.0% (77/110) of respondents resided in Canada, in urban centers (92.7%, 102/110), and 88.2% (97/110) had a college or university degree or higher. The median year of birth was 1978 and 90.0% (99/110) were female. Most survey responses (88.2%, 97/110) were completed during the first month of the study. In the second phase, 4

  20. The Educator´s Approach to Media Training and Computer Games within Leisure Time of School-children

    OpenAIRE

    MORAVCOVÁ, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes possible ways of approaching computer games playing as part of leisure time of school-children and deals with the significance of media training in leisure time. At first it specifies the concept of leisure time and its functions, then shows some positive and negative effects of the media. It further describes classical computer games, the problem of excess computer game playing and means of prevention. The paper deals with the educator's personality and the importance of ...

  1. Social Activity, School-Related Activity, and Anti-Substance Use Media Messages on Adolescent Tobacco and Alcohol Use

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Sung Seek; Rao, Uma

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present the effects of three hypothesized protective factors: social activities, school-related activities, and anti-substance use media messages on adolescent tobacco and alcohol use. Data were drawn from the “Monitoring the Future” (MTF) research project, which was conducted by the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. The sample included 2,551 twelfth-grade students. The results of the structural equation model showed that exposure to media anti-d...

  2. Social Activity, School-Related Activity, and Anti-Substance Use Media Messages on Adolescent Tobacco and Alcohol Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sung Seek; Rao, Uma

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present the effects of three hypothesized protective factors: social activities, school-related activities, and anti-substance use media messages on adolescent tobacco and alcohol use. Data were drawn from the "Monitoring the Future" (MTF) research project, which was conducted by the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. The sample included 2,551 twelfth-grade students. The results of the structural equation model showed that exposure to media anti-drug messages had an indirect negative effect on tobacco and alcohol use through school-related activity and social activity. The results suggest that comprehensive ecological interventions encompassing media, family, and school can increase on the preventive effects of adolescent's substance use.

  3. What is the Better Social Media for Mathematics Learning? A Case Study at A Rural School in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Sulisworo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The penetration of social media in the community has been very high. Nowadays, almost all students at the school are using smartphones for their daily activities. This study is a descriptive quantitative exploratory research to find out how the students' response when learning using social media is implemented as a mobile learning system. Data were taken from four different schools in the rural area of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Mathematics learning using a different social media (WeChat, Line@, Socrative, and Edmodo was applied to student of grade 7 of each school. Data collection used USE questionnaire which measured whether the implemented learning model using social media could be well received by students and appropriate learning expectations. USE questionnaire has 4 measured factors i.e. usefulness, ease to use, ease of learning, and satisfaction. From the data, it shows that all factors were high. The highest one was satisfaction (3.15 then, usefulness (3.11, ease to learn (3.00, and ease to use (2.94 respectively. On average, the social media got the highest student’s response as a learning system was Socrative (3.18, then Edmodo (3.15, Line@ (3.00 and WeChat (2.89. Further analysis using statistical technique showed that students have good perception to Socrative and Edmodo. This finding implies that the social media especially Socrative and Edmodo are valuable to be used in the leaning using flexible learning strategy.

  4. DEVELOPING OF INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA-BASED ANIMATION VIDEO ON ENZYME AND METABOLISM MATERIAL IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mustofa Yusuf

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to product a learning material related to animation video on enzyme and metabolism material for high school student which is validated by media and material experts, educational practition and student legibility. Research and development model is ADDIE with quantitative-qualitative data analyzing methode. Data collection was obtained from validation results by media and material experts, educational partition and student legibility. The validation results were scores and suggestion. The percentage of product from expert media validation (100%, expert material validation (89,58%, educational practition (84,61%, and student legibility (81,91% showed valid of the criteria and feasible to use after revision.

  5. Child-Centered Play Therapy in the Schools: Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Dee C.; Armstrong, Stephen A.; Balkin, Richard S.; Jayne, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    The authors conducted a meta-analysis and systematic review that examined 23 studies evaluating the effectiveness of child centered play therapy (CCPT) conducted in elementary schools. Meta-analysis results were explored using a random effects model for mean difference and mean gain effect size estimates. Results revealed statistically significant…

  6. Truancy Assessment and Service Centers (TASC): Engaging Elementary School Children and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Judith L. F.; Thomas, Johanna M.; Lemieux, Catherine M.; Cain, Daphne S.; Guin, Cecile C.

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews literature describing truancy and its correlates, and it analyzes the current research on truancy prevention programs. Few truancy prevention programs exist in elementary school settings. This article describes Truancy Assessment and Service Centers, a theory-driven program providing case management services to children in 85…

  7. School Age Center Connections: Site-Based Management Strategies for Implementation of Quality Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Dahna R.

    This paper describes the outcomes of a practicum that initiated site-based-management strategies to support the consistent implementation of a quality school-age child-care program. Implemented at a multisite child-care center, the program sought to enhance staff members' job satisfaction and maximize their opportunities for professional growth…

  8. Measuring Malaysia School Resource Centers' Standards through iQ-PSS: An Online Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainudin, Fadzliaton; Ismail, Kamarulzaman

    2010-01-01

    The Ministry of Education has come up with an innovative way to monitor the progress of 9,843 School Resource Centers (SRCs) using an online management information system called iQ-PSS (Quality Index of SRC). This paper aims to describe the data collection method and analyze the current state of SRCs in Malaysia and explain how the results can be…

  9. Leaders' Experiences with High School-College Writing Center Collaborations: A Qualitative Multiple-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multiple-case study was to explore academic leaders' experiences with the organizational elements of their own high school-college writing center collaborations. Conjoining theories framed this study: collaborative leadership theory, Kenneth Bruffee's notion of social constructionism and collaborative learning…

  10. 7 CFR 226.19 - Outside-school-hours care center provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., snacks and suppers. In addition, outside-school-hours care centers shall be eligible to serve lunches to... claimed for more than two meals and one snack provided daily to each child or for meals served to children... licensed capacity, whichever is less) were eligible for free or reduced price meals or were title XX...

  11. Teacher-Centered Management Style of Public School Principals and Job Satisfaction of Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ki-Suck

    A concept of teacher-centered management was proposed as a style of leadership behavior for school administrators to reduce the incompatibility between social/psychological needs of teachers and monocratic/bureaucratic management patterns in educational organizations. Data obtained from self-report questionnaires distributed to teachers in 21…

  12. Does a Business School's Writing Center Encourage Students To Write Like Men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jean-Paul

    An educator at Bryant College (Rhode Island), a business-oriented college, sought to better understand the effects of gender as they operate within and through the school's writing center. Bryant College's female students attend a college with a student body of about 40% females and 60% males. The hypothesis in a study was that female students…

  13. Promoting Ecological Health Resilience for Minority Youth: Enhancing Health Care Access through the School Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline C. C.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the demographic realities of children of color in the U.S., with a focus on health care needs and access issues that have an enormous influence on health status. An ecologic model is presented that incorporates cultural values and community structures into the school health center. (Contains 50 references.) (GCP)

  14. Innovative Services Offered by School-Based Health Centers in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisselman, Amanda; Strolin-Goltzman, Jessica; Auerbach, Charles; Sharon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) continue to provide essential health care services to children and families in underserved neighborhoods across the country. Preliminary studies show that students who use SBHCs have better attendance rates as well as higher rates of academic achievement and attachment to the learning environment. Few studies,…

  15. Quality Improvement Initiative in School-Based Health Centers across New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, John M.; Schluter, Janette A.; Carrillo, Kris; McGrath, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background: Quality improvement principles have been applied extensively to health care organizations, but implementation of quality improvement methods in school-based health centers (SBHCs) remains in a developmental stage with demonstration projects under way in individual states and nationally. Rural areas, such as New Mexico, benefit from the…

  16. [Effect of school-based peer leader centered smoking prevention program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung Rae; Oh, Pok Ja; Youn, Hye Kyung; Shin, Sun Hwa

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a school-based peer leader centered smoking prevention program. Non-equivalent control group with a pre/post-test design was used. Students (n=174) in two boys' junior high schools located in D city, Korea participated with 85 being selected for the experimental group and 89 for the control group. Five sessions were given to the experimental group and a 50 minute lecture to the control group. Knowledge, attitude, non-smoking intention, and non-smoking efficacy were measured for the both experimental and control group at two weeks before the program and one month after the program was completed. Data were analyzed using χ²-test, Fisher's exact test, independent t-test and paired t-test with the SPSS 21.0 program. The experimental group showed higher overall knowledge, negative attitude toward smoking, and higher non-smoking intention and efficacy. After receiving the school based peer leader centered smoking prevention program scores for attitude toward smoking and non-smoking efficacy increased in the experimental group were higher than in the control group. The school-based peer leader centered smoking prevention program needs longitudinal evaluation, but from this study, there is an indication that this program can be used with junior high school students and effectively change students' attitude toward smoking and promote non-smoking efficacy.

  17. Active Living: development and quasi-experimental evaluation of a school-centered physical activity intervention for primary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kann, Dave H H; Jansen, M W J; de Vries, S I; de Vries, N K; Kremers, S P J

    2015-12-29

    The worldwide increase in the rates of childhood overweight and physical inactivity requires successful prevention and intervention programs for children. The aim of the Active Living project is to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior of Dutch primary school children by developing and implementing tailored, multicomponent interventions at and around schools. In this project, school-centered interventions have been developed at 10 schools in the south of the Netherlands, using a combined top-down and bottom-up approach in which a research unit and a practice unit continuously interact. The interventions consist of a combination of physical and social interventions tailored to local needs of intervention schools. The process and short- and long-term effectiveness of the interventions will be evaluated using a quasi-experimental study design in which 10 intervention schools are matched with 10 control schools. Baseline and follow-up measurements (after 12 and 24 months) have been conducted in grades 6 and 7 and included accelerometry, GPS, and questionnaires. Primary outcome of the Active Living study is the change in physical activity levels, i.e. sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA), moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and counts-per-minute (CPM). Multilevel regression analyses will be used to assess the effectiveness of isolated and combined physical and social interventions on children's PA levels. The current intervention study is unique in its combined approach of physical and social environmental PA interventions both at school(yard)s as well as in the local neighborhood around the schools. The strength of the study lies in the quasi-experimental design including objective measurement techniques, i.e. accelerometry and GPS, combined with more subjective techniques, i.e. questionnaires, implementation logbooks, and neighborhood observations. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN25497687 (registration date 21

  18. Association of school social networks' influence and mass media factors with cigarette smoking among asthmatic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-03-01

    Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks' influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. This study included 9755 asthmatic and 38,487 non-asthmatic middle and high school students. Secondary data analysis incorporated the complex sample design; and univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression statistics. Asthmatic students had greater odds of smoking than non-asthmatic students. Asthmatic female students were more likely than asthmatic male students to have been exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms or cars and to smoking actors, but less likely to associate smoking with intent to wear tobacco-marketing products, or with looking cool/fitting in. Asthmatic male and female students, who have smoking friends, were exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms (only girls) or cars, intended to smoke if best friends offered cigarettes, or received/bought tobacco marketing products had greater odds of smoking than other asthmatic students. The observed associations suggest the need for general interventions to reduce middle and high school students' cigarette smoking as well as targeted interventions for asthmatic adolescent students. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  19. “Honestly, We’re Not Spying on Kids”: School Surveillance of Young People’s Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Regan Shade

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Social media is one of the top activities and sites for young people’s socialization in North America, raising concerns over their social privacy, because of reported instances of cyberbullying and sexting, and their informational privacy, because of commercial data collection. A trend in schools and school districts in the United States is to monitor and track, through third party applications and software, student social media during and after school, in an attempt to prevent or reduce the perceived dissemination of violence, bullying, threats, or hate instigated by students and directed toward other students or entire schools. This article will provide an overview of four of these US companies (Geo Listening, Varsity Monitor, Snaptrends, Digital Fly and consider the policy and ethical issues of data monitoring with respect to young people’s rights to privacy and their freedom of speech.

  20. The Effects of Antismoking Messages From Family, School, and Mass Media on Smoking Behavior and Smoking Intention Among Chinese Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaohua; Koplan, Jeffrey; Eriksen, Michael P; Yao, Shuo; Redmon, Pamela; Song, Julia; Uretsky, Elanah; Huang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of adolescent smoking has been increasing rapidly in China. Expanding adolescent exposure to antismoking messages may be an effective approach to prevent tobacco use among this population. Using a cross-sectional sample of 8,444 high school students in four Chinese cities, this study assessed the relation between self-reported exposure to antismoking messages from families, schools, and mass media and the rate of past 30-day smoking and smoking intention among junior and senior high school students. Results from logistic regression suggested that antismoking messages delivered via school and media inhibited both tobacco use and the intention to smoke. The effects of familial warnings about harmful effects of smoking, in contrast, were at best insignificant.

  1. Prevalence and Management of Otitis Media with Effusion Amongst the School Going Children of a Rural Area in Puducherry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Babu K

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background :  Otitis Media with Effusion(OME also known as  Secretory Otitis Media, has been identified as the commonest middle ear condition causing deafness in children in developed countries. Neither the indication for surgical treatment nor the types and number of procedures used are uniform. Possible treatment includes myringotomy with or without insertion of ventilation tube either alone or with adenoidectomy and occasionally tonsillectomy. Aims and Objectives :  To assess the prevalence and the different modes of presentation of Otitis Media with Effusion among the rural school children of Puducherry and to assess the improvement in hearing after 6 months of surgical intervention done on patients with Otitis Media with Effusion. Materials and Methods:  A school screening camp was conducted on 600 children in the age group of 5-12 years in a government middle school near our medical college hospital for identifying children with Otitis Media with Effusion. Students with Otitis Media with Effusion were further classified into 4 groups for various interventional procedures namely adenotonsillectomy with bilateral grommet insertion (Group A, adenoidectomy with bilateral grommet insertion (Group B, bilateral grommet insertion (Group C,  bilateral myringotomy with wide field incision in the antero-inferior quadrant (Group D. Result : The prevalence was almost in equal proportions in the age group between 5-12 years and the overall prevalence of Otitis Media with Effusion among the study population was 13.3%. The adenotonsillectomy with bilateral grommet insertion procedure had shown a significant improvement in hearing, which was measured by using pure tone audiometry by assessing the mean air-bone gap, which was 9.81, 8.27 and 6.73 at the end of 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months respectively, when compared to the other procedures.   Conclusion : Adenotonsillectomy with bilateral grommet insertion should be considered in a child with Otitis

  2. Bringing Wellness to Schools: Opportunities for and Challenges to Mental Health Integration in School-Based Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Karen; Guo, Sisi; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Roya; Puffer, Maryjane; Kataoka, Sheryl H

    2016-12-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) reduce access barriers to mental health care and improve educational outcomes for youths. This qualitative study evaluated the innovations and challenges of a unique network of SBHCs in a large, urban school district as the centers attempted to integrate health, mental health, and educational services. The 43 participants sampled included mental health providers, primary care providers, and care coordinators at 14 SBHCs. Semistructured interviews with each participant were audio recorded and transcribed. Themes were identified and coded by using Atlas.ti 5.1 and collapsed into three domains: operations, partnership, and engagement. Interviews revealed provider models ranging from single agencies offering both primary care and mental health services to colocated services. Sites where the health agency provided at least some mental health services reported more mental health screenings. Many sites used SBHC wellness coordinators and coordination team meetings to facilitate relationships between schools and health agency and community mental health clinic providers. Partnership challenges included confidentiality policies and staff turnover. Participants also highlighted student and parent engagement through culturally sensitive services, peer health advocates, and "drop-in" lunches. Staffing and operational models are critical in the success of integrating primary care, mental health care, and education. Among the provider models observed, the combined primary care and mental health provider model offered the most integrated services. Despite barriers, providers and schools have begun to implement novel solutions to operational problems and family engagement in mental health services.

  3. Student-Centered Teaching Meets New Media: Concept and Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Holzinger

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available There exists empirical evidence proving that students who are given the freedom to explore areas based on their personal interests, and who are accompanied in their learning by a supportive, understanding facilitator, not only achieve superior academic results but also develop socially and grow personally. However, pure Student-Centered Teaching is more demanding in terms of communication, organization, as well as the provision of learning material. Thus, the basic idea underlying our paradigm is to combine Student-Centered Teaching with eLearning in order to exploit the advantages of the two approaches. We refer to this combined style as Student-Centered eLearning (SCeL. Strongly simplified, the computer takes over the task of providing information, while presence phases can be used for giving the content more meaning by means of transparent, open, respectful and empathic interactions within the group. Our case study indicates that Student-Centered eLearning has the potential of reducing the increased demands of Student-Centered Teaching in the long run, while fully retaining all its benefits, such as deeper learning processes, personal growth, social skills, and a higher degree of flexibility. Furthermore, the maturity for life-long learning is cultivated. In this paper we introduce our concept and derive first hypotheses on the conditions under which our paradigm appears most effective. While potential continuations of our studies are manifold, we intend to employ SCeL in the course of the new curriculum of the medical faculty of GrazUniversity where a Virtual Medical Campus (http://vmc.uni-graz.at is currently being developed.

  4. Media Choice for Intra-School Communication: The Role of Environment, User, and Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Avner; Blau, Ina

    2011-01-01

    The influence of media richness, media attentional load, social influence and users' prior experience with media on selection of media to transmit different messages to peers within an educational organization was tested. Media were discriminated by all potential variables. Support was found for the role of prior experience and social influence in…

  5. Nursing schools and academic health centers: toward improved alignment and a synergistic partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emami A

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Azita Emami,1 Darcy Jaffe,2 Paula Minton-Foltz,3 Grace Parker,4 Susan Manfredi,5 Theresa Braungardt,6 Kelly W Marley,1 Laura Cooley,1 Staishy Bostick Siem7 1University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 3Patient Care Services, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA; 4University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 5Patient Care Services, Northwest Hospital and Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 6Valley Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA; 7Marketing and Communications, University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: This paper presents the findings from a national survey which the University of Washington conducted among leaders of 32 US academic nursing institutions that are part of academic health centers (AHCs and complements these findings with results from a separate report by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. While expressing overall satisfaction with their AHC relationships, these leaders find that nursing is often given greater parity in matters of education and research than in mission setting, financial, and governance matters. AHCs are being asked to meet new health care challenges in new ways, starting with the education of health care professionals. AHCs need to be restructured to give nursing full parity if the nation’s and world’s needs for preventive and clinical care are to be best met.Keywords: nursing parity, academic nursing institutions, nurse leaders, institutional alignment

  6. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…

  7. Depression as a moderator of benefit from Media Smart: a school-based eating disorder prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilksch, Simon M; Wade, Tracey D

    2014-01-01

    To investigate if baseline depression moderated response to Media Smart, an 8-lesson school-based program previously found to achieve a long-term risk reduction effect in young adolescents. 540 Grade 8 students (M age = 13.62 years, SD = .37) from 4 schools participated with 11 classes receiving the Media Smart program (126 girls; 107 boys) and 13 comparison classes receiving their normal lessons (147 girls; 160 boys). Shape and weight concern, media internalization, body dissatisfaction, dieting, ineffectiveness, and perceived pressure were the outcome variables. Moderation was indicated by significant interaction effects for group (Media Smart; Control) × moderator (high depression; low depression) × time (post-program; 6-month follow-up; 2.5-year follow-up), with baseline entered as a covariate. Such effects were found for shape and weight concern, media internalization, body dissatisfaction, ineffectiveness and perceived pressure. Post-hoc testing found high depression Media Smart participants scored significantly lower than their control counterparts at post-program on shape and weight concern, media internalization and dieting, whereas low depression Media Smart participants scored significantly lower on shape and weight concern at 2.5-year follow-up. Media Smart achieved a reduction in eating disorder risk factors for high-depression participants and a reduced rate of growth in risk factor scores for low-depression participants. Trial registry name: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Registration identification number: ACTRN12608000545369. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Private [School] Matter: The State of Materials Challenges in Private College Preparatory School Libraries in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Renee E.

    2008-01-01

    Materials challenges and censorship occur often in public and private educational settings. Private schools and their library media centers are not subject to the First Amendment but research reported in this article examines the state of challenges to materials held in private schools media centers in the southeast United States as a way to gauge…

  9. DESIGN APPLICATIONS BASED ON WEB MOBILE AT GAYA BARU SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL, CENTRAL LAMPUNG REGENCY AS PROMOTIONAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Yudi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gaya Baru Senior High School is one of the educational institutions in Lampung which is a less favorite institution in the area is precisely located in the district of Seputih Surabaya Central Lampung Regency. Gaya Baru Senior High School has already had a website but not many known. This Senior High School is also no information system through mobile web to promote the institution. Nevertheless, in its development, students or community want to find information about the school can be directly through the mobile web application. So in its development requires fast service. From research that conducted in Gaya Baru High School, existence of new mobile web application system will facilitate student or society of that area, especially in subdistrict Seputih Surabaya district Central Lampung, and present information about the info about situation in high school of new style it can be accessed directly through the mobile web media.

  10. Charter Schools Indicators: A Report from the Center on Educational Governance, University of Southern California. CSI-USC 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Educational Governance, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report, which is the second annual report on charter schools in California by the University of Southern California's (USC's) Center on Educational Governance, offers a unique view of charter school performance. Using both financial and academic data submitted by school districts to the state of California, this report looks well beyond test…

  11. The Perceptions of Primary School Teachers and Teacher Candidates towards the Use of Mass Media in Teaching Turkish Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadag, Ruhan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore the perceptions of primary school teachers and teacher candidates of the use of mass media in teaching Turkish in primary education. The data for this descriptive study is collected via semi-structured interviews--one of the qualitative data analysis methods and the collected data is analyzed by employing…

  12. Gender Analysis of the Development of School and University Theme in Soviet and Russian Audiovisual Media Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitskaya, Anastasia; Seliverstova, Lyudmila; Mamadaliev, Anvar

    2017-01-01

    The article is written within the framework of a broader study investigating school and university representation in the Soviet/Russian and foreign audiovisual media texts. The research outlines that in Soviet cinema the image of the female teacher was transformed in the following sequence: a heroine-revolutionary; a heroine of hard work; an…

  13. SOME ASPECTS OF TEACHING MEDIA LITERACY TO PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN IN SLOVENIA FROM A PERCEPTION STANDPOINT OF TEACHERS AND PARENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurka Lepičnik Vodopivec

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with media literacy as a multidimensional skill that parents and teachers possess. In this context we warn of the media-technical aspect of this skill and, within this aspect, of parents’ and teachers’ opinion on the presence of media in children’s lives. Following that, the paper explores teachers’ media-didactic competence as a component of educators’ media literacy. In the empiric part we used two aspects of fostering media literacy. One is the media-technical competence of parents and educators, while the other is the media-didactic competence of educators. We found that both parents and teachers believe that media have a strong presence in everyday lives of pre-school children and that they play an important role in teaching pre-school children. Teachers are aware of the importance of early teaching with media, for media and about media with the purpose of developing children’s media literacy, so they will not be afraid of media when they grow up.

  14. How static media is understood and used by high school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Miguel

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the role of static media in textbooks, as defined by Mayer (2001) in the form of printed images and text, and how these media are viewed and used by high school science teachers. Textbooks appeared in the United States in the late 1800s, and since then pictorial aids have been used extensively in them to support the teacher's work in the classroom (Giordano, 2003). According to Woodward, Elliott, and Nagel (1988/2013) the research on textbooks prior to the 1970s doesn't present relevant work related to the curricular role and the quality and instructional design of textbooks. Since then there has been abundant research, specially on the use of visual images in textbooks that has been approached from: (a) the text/image ratio (Evans, Watson, & Willows, 1987; Levin & Mayer, 1993; Mayer, 1993; Woodward, 1993), and (b) the instructional effectiveness of images (Woodward, 1993). The theoretical framework for this study comes from multimedia learning (Mayer, 2001), information design (Pettersson, 2002), and visual literacy (Moore & Dwyer, 1994). Data was collected through in-depth interviews of three high school science teachers and the graphic analyses of three textbooks used by the interviewed teachers. The interview data were compared through an analytic model developed from the literature, and the graphic analyses were performed using Mayer's multimedia learning principles (Mayer, 2001) and the Graphic Analysis Protocol (GAP) (Slough & McTigue, 2013). The conclusions of this study are: (1) pictures are specially useful for teaching science because science is a difficult subject to teach, (2) due this difficulty, pictures are very important to make the class dynamic and avoid students distraction, (3) static and dynamic media when used together can be more effective, (4) some specific type of graphics were found in the science textbooks used by the participants, in this case they were naturalistic drawings, stylized

  15. Cross-sectional study of use of electronic media by secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatrungrit, Komsan; Hongsanguansri, Sirichai

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing concern about the negative psychological effects of excessive use of various electronic media by adolescents but the monitoring of these behaviors in low- and middle-income countries has some methodological flaws. Assess the use of all types of electronic media among secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand. A stratified random sample of students from four schools in Bangkok completed a modified version of a questionnaire used in a major study in the United States. Among the 768 participants, 443 (57.7%) were female and 325 (42.3%) were male; their mean (sd) age was 15.4 (1.5) years. Almost all respondents had easy access to multiple types of electronic media; 94% had mobile phones, 77% had a television in their bedroom, and 47% had internet access in their bedroom. Over the prior day 39% had watched television shows or movies for more than 3 hours, 28% spent more than 3 hours on social networking sites, 25% listened to music for more than 3 hours, and 18% played computer games for more than 3 hours. Overall, 27% reported using electronic devices for more than 12 hours in the previous day. Only 19% reported parental rules about the use of electronic devices in the home that were regularly enforced. Time engaged in the various activities was not related to parental education or, with the exception of time playing computer games, to students' grade point average. Younger students and male students spent less time than older students and female students using these devices to engage in interactive social activities (e.g., talking on the phone or social networking), while male students spent much more time than female students playing games on the devices. Adolescents spend a substantial part of every single day using different types of electronic devices. Longitudinal studies with precise time logs of device usage and descriptions of the type of content accessed are needed to determine the extent to which these activities have negative (or

  16. Association of School Social Networks’ Influence and Mass Media Factors With Cigarette Smoking Among Asthmatic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H.; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks’ influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. METHODS This study included 9755 asthmatic and 38,487 non-asthmatic middle and high school students. Secondary data analysis incorporated the complex sample design; and univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression statistics. RESULTS Asthmatic students had greater odds of smoking than non-asthmatic students. Asthmatic female students were more likely than asthmatic male students to have been exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms or cars and to smoking actors, but less likely to associate smoking with intent to wear tobacco-marketing products, or with looking cool/fitting in. Asthmatic male and female students, who have smoking friends, were exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms (only girls) or cars, intended to smoke if best friends offered cigarettes, or received/bought tobacco marketing products had greater odds of smoking than other asthmatic students. CONCLUSIONS The observed associations suggest the need for general interventions to reduce middle and high school students’ cigarette smoking as well as targeted interventions for asthmatic adolescent students. PMID:25611937

  17. Alcohol Advertising Exposure Among Middle School-Age Youth: An Assessment Across All Media and Venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca L; Martino, Steven C; Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Becker, Kirsten M; Shadel, William G; D'Amico, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify middle school youth's exposure to alcohol advertisements across media and venues, determine venues of greatest exposure, and identify characteristics of youth who are most exposed. Over a 10-month period in 2013, 589 Los Angeles-area youth ages 11-14 from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds completed a short paper-and-pencil survey assessing background characteristics and then participated in a 14-day ecological momentary assessment, logging all exposures to alcohol advertisements on handheld computers as they occurred. African American and Hispanic youth were exposed to an average of 4.1 and 3.4 advertisements per day, respectively, nearly two times as many as non-Hispanic White youth, who were exposed to 2.0 advertisements per day. Girls were exposed to 30% more advertisements than boys. Most exposures were to outdoor advertisements, with television advertisements a close second. Exposure to alcohol advertising is frequent among middle school-age youth and may put them at risk for earlier or more frequent underage drinking. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising outdoors and on television should be considered by regulators and by the alcohol industry and should focus particularly on reducing exposure among minority youth.

  18. Blood and Bones: The Influence of the Mass Media on Australian Primary School Children's Understandings of Genes and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

    2014-02-01

    Previous research showed that primary school children held several misconceptions about genetics of concern for their future lives. Included were beliefs that genes and DNA are separate substances, with genes causing family resemblance and DNA identifying suspects at crime scenes. Responses to this work `blamed' the mass media for these misunderstandings. This study aimed to determine whether that blame had any foundation by examining the media habits and conceptions about genes and DNA of Australian children. With little prior research considering the influence of entertainment mass media on children's academically relevant knowledge, this was an exploratory study with a mixed modes design. Data were collected by detailed media questionnaires and face-to-face interviews with 62 children aged 10-12 years, and subjected to content and thematic analysis. Specific mass media examples children reported using were examined for genetics content. Results indicate 5 h/day of media use, mostly television including crime shows, and that children perceived television to be their main source of information about genetics. Most children (89 %) knew DNA, 60 % knew genes, and more was known about uses of DNA outside the body such as crime solving or resolving family relationships than about its biological nature and function. Half believed DNA is only in blood and body parts used for forensics. These concepts paralleled the themes emerging from the media examples. The results indicate that the mass media is a pervasive teacher of children, and that fundamental concepts could be introduced earlier in schools to establish scientific concepts before misconceptions arise.

  19. Web-Based Media Literacy to Prevent Tobacco Use among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps-Tschang, Jane S.; Miller, Elizabeth; Rice, Kristen; Primack, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitator-led smoking media literacy (SML) programs have improved media literacy and reduced intention to smoke. However, these programs face limitations including high costs and barriers to standardization. We examined the efficacy of a Web-based media literacy program in improving smoking media literacy skills among adolescents. Sixty-six 9th…

  20. The Impact of a Well-Developed Social Media Communication Strategy on K12 Schools in a Social Media Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesick, Curtis W.

    2015-01-01

    The digital revolution has created a new ways for society to interact. As technology continues to evolve so does the way culture begins to use it as a channel for communication. Social media has developed as a two way communication tool used by both corporate America as well as individuals. This research begins to look at how Missouri school…

  1. Foreign language education: Principles of teaching English to adults at commercial language schools and centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Tarnopolsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing spread of English as the language of global communication leads to ever-increasing demand for learning it among adult populations of non-English-speaking countries. If such people did not have a chance of acquiring English during their school or university years but urgently need it for professional or personal purposes, they have no other choice but to go and learn it at courses offered by numerous commercial language schools and centers. In post-Communist countries, such as Ukraine, commercial language schools and centers are responsible for English language training of the majority of adults learning that language after their secondary or tertiary school studies. They also serve the needs of many high and higher schools’ students who, due to various reasons, are not satisfied with learning English at their educational institutions. However, despite the importance and spread of this specific type of language education, its pedagogical and methodological foundations have hardly been developed at all. The present article is an attempt of partly filling this gap in pedagogy and methodology of English language education in non-English-speaking countries. The paper develops some theoretical underpinnings of that kind of education in the form of six principles underlying the organization of commercial English language courses, formulating their goals, selecting the learning contents, and choosing the methods of teaching and learning. The practical consequences of adopting the six suggested principles are outlined.

  2. Utilization of Mental Health Services in School-Based Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bains, Ranbir M; Cusson, Regina; White-Frese, Jesse; Walsh, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    We summarize utilization patterns for mental health services in school-based health centers. Administrative data on school-based health center visits in New Haven, Connecticut were examined for the 2007-2009 school years. Relative frequencies of mental health visits by age were calculated as a percentage of all visits and were stratified by sex, ethnicity/race, and insurance status. Mental health visits accounted for the highest proportion of visits (31.8%). The proportion of mental health visits was highest at 8 years (42.8%) and at 13 years (39.0%). The proportion of mental health visits among boys (38.4%) was higher than among girls (26.7%). Hispanic students had a lower proportion of mental health visits than black students (23.5% vs 35.8%) in all but 2 age groups. Students in the white/other ethnicity category had higher proportions of mental health visits than Hispanic and black students between ages 12 and 15. Students with no health insurance (22.5%) had lower proportions of mental health visits than students covered by Medicaid (34.3%) or private insurance (33.9%). The percentage of mental health visits by students with private insurance was highest (37.2%-49%) in the 13-15 age range. Usage patterns for mental health issues show pronounced, nonrandom variation relative to age and other demographic characteristics especially with 8-year-old boys. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  3. Ethical media competence as a protective factor against cyberbullying and cybervictimization among german school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christin R; Pfetsch, Jan; Ittel, Angela

    2014-10-01

    The use of digital information and communication technologies is an integral part of adolescents' everyday life. Besides various opportunities for information, entertainment, and communication, media use is associated with risks such as cyberbullying. Cyberbullying refers to aggressive behavior in the context of computer-mediated communication, characterized by repetition, an intention to harm, and power imbalance. Previous studies have shown that increased media use is a major risk factor for cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Given that restricting media use is not a practical way to reduce the negative effects inherent in media use, the present study examines the relevance of ethical media competence. We expected ethical media competence to buffer the effect of increased media use on cyberbullying and cybervictimization. A survey was conducted with 934 students (53% female) aged 10-17 years (M=13.26, SD=1.63). As expected, hierarchical regression analyses showed a positive main effect of media use, a negative main effect of ethical media competence, and a negative interaction effect of media use and media competence on cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Simple slope analyses revealed that at high levels of ethical media competence, media use has almost no effect on cybervictimization and a significant negative effect on cyberbullying. Consequently, promoting ethical media competence constitutes a potential measure to prevent the risks of increased media use for cyberbullying and cybervictimization.

  4. Accumulation of specific pollutants in various media in the area affected by a petrochemical center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oprea, C.D.; Mihul, Al.

    2002-01-01

    The results on monitoring of oil pollution around the town of Ploiesti (South Romania), known for its petrochemical and chemical industry complexes and crude oil activity, are reported. The distribution of heavy metals, rare earth and other microelements along the wind rose profile (the oil complex ∼ 20 km distance) was examined through the analysis of soil samples. Mosses were chosen as biomonitors of local atmospheric pollution with heavy metals and other toxic elements. The trace element content of vegetation growing near the territory of the plant was compared with that of the background one. The contamination of the river flowing in the vicinity of the plant was examined. Comparison of the spatial trends of different pollutants shows the influence of the same atmospheric transport phases on the uptake of trace elements by vegetation. A comparative evaluation of the results was carried out to find to what extent the amount of pollutants in the atmosphere or the amount deposited in the soil or transported by sediments contributes to pollution of the local ecosystem in the vicinity of a petrochemical center. (authors)

  5. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Background: Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Methods: Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Results: Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. Conclusions: The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction. PMID:29707649

  6. Tracking Active Learning in the Medical School Curriculum: A Learning-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Kellar, Charlyn; Morgan, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Medical education is moving toward active learning during large group lecture sessions. This study investigated the saturation and breadth of active learning techniques implemented in first year medical school large group sessions. Data collection involved retrospective curriculum review and semistructured interviews with 20 faculty. The authors piloted a taxonomy of active learning techniques and mapped learning techniques to attributes of learning-centered instruction. Faculty implemented 25 different active learning techniques over the course of 9 first year courses. Of 646 hours of large group instruction, 476 (74%) involved at least 1 active learning component. The frequency and variety of active learning components integrated throughout the year 1 curriculum reflect faculty familiarity with active learning methods and their support of an active learning culture. This project has sparked reflection on teaching practices and facilitated an evolution from teacher-centered to learning-centered instruction.

  7. Bio-energy and youth: Analyzing the role of school, home, and media from the future policy perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halder, Pradipta; Havu-Nuutinen, Sari; Pietarinen, Janne; Pelkonen, Paavo

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the relationships between students' perceived information on bio-energy from school, home and media and their perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge regarding bio-energy. The study also analyzed the scope of future policies to raise awareness among young students about bio-energy. Data drawn from 495 Finnish students studying in ninth grade revealed that the students were more positive in their attitudes towards bio-energy compared to their perceptions of it. They were very positive about learning about bio-energy, while not so eager towards its utilization. It appeared that school, home, and media all had statistically significant effects on students' perceptions, attitudes, and level of knowledge related to bio-energy. Three principal components emerged from students' perceptions and attitudes towards bio-energy viz. 'motivation' revealing students' eagerness to know more about bio-energy; 'considering sustainability' revealing their criticality of forest bio-energy; and 'utilization' revealing their state of interests to use bio-energy. Bio-energy policies to be effective must consider the role of school, home, and media as important means to engage young students in bio-energy related discussions. It is also desirable to establish interactions between energy and educational policies to integrate the modern renewable energy concepts in the school curriculum.

  8. Bio-energy and youth: Analyzing the role of school, home, and media from the future policy perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, Pradipta; Pelkonen, Paavo [School of Forest Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, 80101 Joensuu (Finland); Havu-Nuutinen, Sari [School of Applied Educational Science and Teacher Education, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, 80101 Joensuu (Finland); Pietarinen, Janne [School of Educational Sciences and Psychology, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, 80101 Joensuu (Finland)

    2011-04-15

    The study investigated the relationships between students' perceived information on bio-energy from school, home and media and their perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge regarding bio-energy. The study also analyzed the scope of future policies to raise awareness among young students about bio-energy. Data drawn from 495 Finnish students studying in ninth grade revealed that the students were more positive in their attitudes towards bio-energy compared to their perceptions of it. They were very positive about learning about bio-energy, while not so eager towards its utilization. It appeared that school, home, and media all had statistically significant effects on students' perceptions, attitudes, and level of knowledge related to bio-energy. Three principal components emerged from students' perceptions and attitudes towards bio-energy viz. 'motivation' revealing students' eagerness to know more about bio-energy; 'considering sustainability' revealing their criticality of forest bio-energy; and 'utilization' revealing their state of interests to use bio-energy. Bio-energy policies to be effective must consider the role of school, home, and media as important means to engage young students in bio-energy related discussions. It is also desirable to establish interactions between energy and educational policies to integrate the modern renewable energy concepts in the school curriculum. (author)

  9. The Opinions of Russian School Students and Teachers about Media Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of media violence upon Russian teenagers is rather significant. About half the teenagers were positive about its demonstration: they enjoyed films, television shows, and computer games containing on-screen violence and they admired the characters - including "bad guys". A third of the teenagers were not sure about their opinion of on-screen violence, although they claimed to not be attracted by it. Just 18% of teenagers discuss and share their opinions with their parents. The influence of Russian schools upon the teenage relationship with on-screen violence is minimal. The findings of our analysis: - on the whole students are more tolerant than the teachers to screen violence (men outnumber women. - entertainment is the leading factor attracting audiences to violent scenes in both groups; - watching violent programs in high spirits is for students three times oftener than for teachers; - both students and teachers are most likely to watch and discuss violent scenes together with friends; - students do not like watching violent programs alone; - 1 out of 5 teachers is eager to watch violent content media with their students, 1 out of 3 teachers is ready to discuss it with the students; - on the average, 1 in 10 students would like to share this activity with the teacher; - students talk about violence on the screen twice as much as teachers; - 3 times more students than teachers reported that their aggressiveness increases after the violence seen on the screen; - images of the screen violence linger in girls’/women’ mind longer than in boys’/ men’; - about half of the respondents reported that they remember scenes of violence for a long time; - both the majority of students and teachers tend to believe that screen violence affects the increase of crime in society; - one third of teachers and students agree that most violent media texts should be banned; - quarter of teachers and students think it is necessary to prohibit all

  10. Interactive fundamental physics. [THE REAL STUFF: The New Expanded Media Physics Course for secondary school students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.L.

    1992-11-24

    THE REAL STUFF is an Expanded Media Physics Course aimed at students still in the formative early years of secondary school. Its consists of a working script for an interactive multimedia study unit in basic concepts of physics. The unit begins with a prologue on the Big Bang that sets the stage, and concludes with a lesson on Newton's first law of motion. The format is interactive, placing the individual student in control of a layered hypermedia'' structure that enables him or her to find a level of detail and difficulty that is comfortable and meaningful. The intent is to make physics relevant, intellectually accessible and fun. On-screen presenters and demonstrators will be females and males of various ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and will include celebrities and physicists of note. A lean, layered design encourages repeated, cumulative study and makes the material useful for self-directed Teaming even by college students. THE REAL STUFF introduces a new science teaching paradigm, a way to teach science that will engage even students who have declined'' to be interested in science in the past. Increased participation in science by women, African-Americans and Spanish-speaking students is a particular goal.

  11. Between school, family and media: do the children carry energy-saving messages and practices?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartiaux, Francoise (Inst. of Demography, Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)). e.mail: francoise.bartiaux@uclouvain.be

    2009-07-01

    Today, children are the focus of communication and sensitisation measures to increase their environmental concern and their energy saving behaviours. This paper aims at exploring whether, with whom and how children may be actors relative to these environment and energy issues. In particular, this paper identifies the sources of information and influence of the children and shows whether the children influence other actors, especially their family, to save energy in their daily life. This paper is based on a qualitative research that has been realised in French-speaking Belgium in 2007-2008; data were gathered in 13 families whose elder child is 10 or 11 years old. In-depth interviews were realised with at least this child (and sometimes with younger brother(s) and/or sister(s) too) and one parent. Topics covered included energy-related practices and knowledge of the children as well as the network of actors surrounding them. Results indicate that the child is neither powerful nor passive, nor a trustful carrier of energy-related 'good' practices. The necessary conditions for the child being such a good carrier are shed into light and depend on the relations within and between the different organisations the child belongs to (family, school, pairs) or has access to (media, Internet).

  12. Promoting Books and Media: A Native American Indian Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses children's literature on Native American Indians and suggests ideas for using the literature in the school library media center or classroom by the library media specialist or by the classroom teacher. Activities and appropriate materials are suggested for the topics of housing, poetry, food, biography, crafts and music, and traditional…

  13. Youth Foresight: We Will All Be Media in 2035

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilavskaya, Irina; Ivanova, Tatiana; Dubover, Denis; Onuchina, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the Media Environment in 2035 Foresight Session held on September 27, 2015 at Artek International Child Center during International Youth Media Forum. The event was attended by 158 school children--the winners of regional Youth Journalism contests. The researchers were entrusted with the task of…

  14. Learning Through Media; An IMC Handbook for Chelmsford Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James; Wallace, Daniel

    This handbook is designed to provide basic information that is necessary to use the Chelmsford School System's Instructional Media Center (IMC). It defines six different media (print, sound, television, photography, movies and design) and suggests a series of separate classroom production activities in each. An emphasis is given to the ways in…

  15. Sources and frames in the media discourse of school bullying in El Mundo and El País

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sahuquillo Verde

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research outlines an analysis of the treatment of school bullying in two Spanish newspapers based on the ability of the media to set the public agenda and influence the perception of topics of interest. Journalistic texts are analyzed from September 2014 to June 2015 following the approach of framing theory to identify the main sources and reveal whether the messages convey a particular representation of the phenomenon, investigate the causes, suggest a moral evaluation or what its treatment should be in the future. The newspapers we selected for the analysis were El Pais and El Mundo as they are the main national print references. This research shows that despite being an ongoing phenomenon, school bullying only receives media attention when a dramatic event takes place, such as the death of a teenager.

  16. The financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: findings from six institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, William T

    2006-06-01

    To explore three questions surrounding the financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: How do medical schools allocate institutional funds to centers and institutes? How and by whom are those decisions made? What are the implications of these decision-making models on the future of the academic biomedical research enterprise? Using a qualitative research design, the author and associates interviewed over 150 faculty members and administrators at six medical schools and their parent universities in 2004. Interview data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. This methodology generated rich descriptions and explanations of the six medical schools, which can produce extrapolations to, but not necessarily generalizable findings to, other institutions and settings. An examination of four dimensions of financial decision-making-funding timing, process, structure, and culture-produces two essential models of how medical schools approach the financial management of research centers. In the first, a "charity" model, center directors make hat-in-hand appeals directly to the dean, the result of which may depend on individual negotiation skills and personal relationships. In the second, a "planned-giving" model, the process for obtaining and renewing funds is institutionalized, agreed upon, and monitored. The ways in which deans, administrators, department chairs, and center directors attend to, decide upon, and carry out financial decisions can influence how people throughout the medical school think about interdisciplinary and collaborative activities marshalled though centers and institutes.

  17. Restricted use of electronic media, sleep, performance, and mood in high school athletes--a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Anette; Gundersen, Hilde; Mørk-Andreassen, Pia; Thun, Eirunn; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-12-01

    The study aims to evaluate whether 4 weeks with restricted use of electronic media after 22:00 affects sleep, athletic performance, cognitive performance, and mood in high school athletes. Eighty-five athletes were randomized to either an intervention group (n = 44), who was instructed to not use any electronic media after 22:00, or a control condition (n = 41), where they could act as they preferred in terms of media use. Primary outcomes were sleep habits measured with a sleep diary. Secondary outcomes were (a) physical performance measured with a set of standardized tests (beep test, 20-m linear sprint, chin-up test, hanging sit-ups test, counter movement jump and sit-n-reach test); (b) cognitive performance (response time and response accuracy); and (c) positive and negative affect. Differences between groups were tested with mixed between-within subject analyses of variance. Thirty-five and 40 of the athletes in the intervention and control group, respectively, completed the study. Results showed that restricted use of electronic media after 22:00 did not improve sleep habits, athletic performance, cognitive performance, or mood in a group of high school top athletes with already good sleep habits. However, these findings give us knowledge about sleep habits and performance in this population that is of importance when designing future studies. Copyright © 2015 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Influences of Family, Peers, School and Media in Children ’s Proso-cial Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠菲

    2014-01-01

    Children’s skills of social interaction is a significant index of their following psychological development. Prosocial be-haviors which influenced by many factors are fundamental representatives of social interaction. Present essay illustrates an in-depth review of literature concerning the impacts of family,peers, school and media in Children ’s prosocial behaviors and also in-dicates the limitations of each research.

  19. Getting down to Dollars and Cents: What Do School Districts Spend to Deliver Student-Centered Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lawrence J.; Gross, Betheny; Ouijdani, Monica

    2012-01-01

    In the era of No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top, school districts are under increasing pressure from policymakers to hold all students to high performance standards. In response, a growing number of schools are embracing the principles of student-centered learning (SCL). SCL is a contemporary approach that combines progressive and…

  20. Center for Ukrainian Cultural Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laarse, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Amsterdam-based Center for Ukrainian Cultural Studies (UCS) unites Dutch scholars in Ukrainian art, cinema, media, memory, language, and literature. Launched by the Amsterdam School for Heritage, Memory and Material Culture (AHM) and the University of Amsterdam’s Department of Slavic Languages

  1. Lectures given at the Banach Center and C.I.M.E. Joint Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Lachowicz, Mirosław

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this volume that presents Lectures given at a joint CIME and Banach Center Summer School, is to offer a broad presentation of a class of updated methods providing a mathematical framework for the development of a hierarchy of models of complex systems in the natural sciences, with a special attention to Biology and Medicine. Mastering complexity implies sharing different tools requiring much higher level of communication between different mathematical and scientific schools, for solving classes of problems of the same nature. Today more than ever, one of the most important challenges derives from the need to bridge parts of a system evolving at different time and space scales, especially with respect to computational affordability. As a result the content has a rather general character; the main role is played by stochastic processes, positive semigroups, asymptotic analysis, kinetic theory, continuum theory and game theory.

  2. Engaging Stakeholders in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Regarding School-Based Sealant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Milgrom, Peter; Gillette, Jane

    2018-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use qualitative methods to describe the key lessons learned during the stakeholder engagement stage of planning a randomized clinical trial comparing outcomes of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) as an alternative to pit-and-fissure sealants in a school-based delivery system. Methods: Eighteen caregivers and community-based stakeholders with involvement in the school-based sealant program Sealants for Smiles from the state of Montana, were recruited for this qualitative study. United States (U.S.) Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) methodology standards were used to develop two semi-structured interview guides consisting of 6 questions. One interview guide was used for telephone interviews with caregivers and the second was used for a stakeholder focus group. Content analytic methods were used to analyze the data. Results: All participants believed that a study comparing SDF and sealants was clinically relevant. Non-caregiver stakeholders agreed with the proposed primary outcome of the study (caries prevention) whereas caregivers also emphasized the importance of child-centered outcomes such as minimizing dental anxiety associated with dental care. Stakeholders described potential concerns associated with SDF such as staining and perceptions of safety and discussed ways to address these concerns through community engagement, appropriate framing of the study, proper consent procedures, and ongoing safety monitoring during the trial. Finally, stakeholders suggested dissemination strategies such as direct communication of findings through professional organizations and encouraging insurance plans to incentivize SDF use by reimbursing dental providers. Conclusions: Involving key stakeholders in early planning is essential in developing patient-centered research questions, outcomes measures, study protocols, and dissemination plans for oral health research involving a school-based delivery system. Copyright © 2018

  3. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RICHMOND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN SUSANVILLE, CA SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the performance evaluation study of the Aquatic Treatment Systems, Inc. (ATS) adsorptive media arsenic removal system at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, Californi...

  4. Education in Science Centers: Evaluating School Visits to an Astronomical Observatory in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Donizete Colombo Junior

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article analyzes the activity “Guided Visit of School Groups” carried out at Astronomical Observatory of the Center for Scientific and Cultural Diffusion (CDCC of University of Sao Paulo (USP with K4 and K5 pupils. The objectives of this research were to identify influences of such activity on learning of astronomical concepts and on pupils’ motivation. The results demonstrate that pupils have difficulties to understand Solar System concepts and the distances involved, on the other hand, the activity motivates the pupils to return with their parents and friends to the Observatory. At last, the success of visits to science centers aiming at the learning of basic concepts and motivation comprises at least three moments: the one that precedes the visit, the visit itself and the return to the classroom.

  5. The ability to produce media presentation among beauty study program students to prepare competence vocational school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widowati, Trisnani

    2018-03-01

    One of the challenges of this 21st century teachers are teachers who are professionals and always use it in creative ways to convey the subject matter, including the creative use of media in learning. Problems that arise are as Vocational School teachers, Beauty Study Program students have not mastered the manufacture of media presentations. Class action research conducted in three phases with the learning cycle include planning actions, implementation measures, observation/evaluation of the action, and reflection, showed an increase in the results of the study are seen from the average value derived from 55.76 on Cycle I became 71.59 on cycle II and 78.33, in cycle 3. The obstacles encountered in the process of learning that is a limited time for any learning, students are not used to plan the creation of media presentations, limitations of materials supporting the creation of student-owned media presentations: images, animations, videos and the custom copy-paste material. The given solution to overcome the barriers that is emphasized again the steps of making a media presentation, the granting of duty as an exercise, and evaluation.

  6. Remote Sensing Training for Middle School through the Center of Excellence in Remote Sensing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, L. B.; Johnson, D.; Baltrop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing has steadily become an integral part of multiple disciplines, research, and education. Remote sensing can be defined as the process of acquiring information about an object or area of interest without physical contact. As remote sensing becomes a necessity in solving real world problems and scientific questions an important question to consider is why remote sensing training is significant to education and is it relevant to training students in this discipline. What has been discovered is the interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, specifically remote sensing, has declined in our youth. The Center of Excellence in Remote Sensing Education and Research (CERSER) continuously strives to provide education and research opportunities on ice sheet, coastal, ocean, and marine science. One of those continued outreach efforts are Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Middle School Program. Sponsored by the National Science Foundation CReSIS Middle School Program offers hands on experience for middle school students. CERSER and NSF offer students the opportunity to study and learn about remote sensing and its vital role in today's society as it relate to climate change and real world problems. The CReSIS Middle School Program is an annual two-week effort that offers middle school students experience with remote sensing and its applications. Specifically, participants received training with Global Positioning Systems (GPS) where the students learned the tools, mechanisms, and applications of a Garmin 60 GPS. As a part of the program the students were required to complete a fieldwork assignment where several longitude and latitude points were given throughout campus. The students had to then enter the longitude and latitude points into the Garmin 60 GPS, navigate their way to each location while also accurately reading the GPS to make sure travel was in the right direction. Upon completion of GPS training the

  7. The Impact of New York's School Libraries on Student Achievement and Motivation: Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Ruth V.; Snyder, Jaime; Parker, Katie

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, a number of statewide research studies have been conducted to determine the impact of school library media centers and their school library media specialists (SLMSs) on student achievement. Research studies in eighteen states have clearly established the relationship between well-staffed, well-funded school libraries on student…

  8. The Impact of Social Media on the Academic Development of School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Tarek A. El-Badawy; Yasmin Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Today, it is crucial to determine the impact of social media on the academic performance of students. Technology is booming rapidly from year to year, and the younger generations are the ones caught in this rapid change. Questionnaires were distributed through Facebook and E-mails, to find out whether students academic performance is impacted by social media or not. The findings demonstrate that there is no relationship between social media and academic performance; this is clearly projected ...

  9. Innovative Educational Aerospace Research at the Northeast High School Space Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyet, Audra; Matarazzo, Anthony; Folta, David

    1997-01-01

    Northeast High Magnet School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a proud sponsor of the Space Research Center (SPARC). SPARC, a model program of the Medical, Engineering, and Aerospace Magnet school, provides talented students the capability to successfully exercise full simulations of NASA manned missions. These simulations included low-Earth Shuttle missions and Apollo lunar missions in the past, and will focus on a planetary mission to Mars this year. At the end of each scholastic year, a simulated mission, lasting between one and eight days, is performed involving 75 students as specialists in seven teams The groups are comprised of Flight Management, Spacecraft Communications (SatCom), Computer Networking, Spacecraft Design and Engineering, Electronics, Rocketry, Robotics, and Medical teams in either the mission operations center or onboard the spacecraft. Software development activities are also required in support of these simulations The objective of this paper is to present the accomplishments, technology innovations, interactions, and an overview of SPARC with an emphasis on how the program's educational activities parallel NASA mission support and how this education is preparing student for the space frontier.

  10. Happy crisis tests hospitals' PR plan. Septuplets' arrival swamps Iowa hospitals with national, international media. Blank Children's Hospital, Iowa Methodist Medical Center, Des Moines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The public relations staff believed the birth of healthy septuplets would become a human interest story for local media. But the staff was stunned at the outpouring of international and national media knocking at their front doors. The staff of both Iowa Methodist Medical Center and Blank Children's Hospital in Des Moines, Iowa, organized a communications plan for 14 official press conferences, constant updates to the media and a website to handle ongoing inquiries from the public. As a result, the story of the McCaughey septuplets was shown in more than 10,000 television stories around the world. The hospitals received more than 36,000 magazine and newspaper articles. The public relations staff not only fielded more than 2,000 phone calls in the days following the Nov. 19 birth, but more than 15 major networks parked their vehicles and satellite dishes in front of the hospital.

  11. Use of RE-AIM to develop a multi-media facilitation tool for the patient-centered medical home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glasgow Russell E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been written about how the medical home model can enhance patient-centeredness, care continuity, and follow-up, but few comprehensive aids or resources exist to help practices accomplish these aims. The complexity of primary care can overwhelm those concerned with quality improvement. Methods The RE-AIM planning and evaluation model was used to develop a multimedia, multiple-health behavior tool with psychosocial assessment and feedback features to facilitate and guide patient-centered communication, care, and follow-up related to prevention and self-management of the most common adult chronic illnesses seen in primary care. Results The Connection to Health Patient Self-Management System, a web-based patient assessment and support resource, was developed using the RE-AIM factors of reach (e.g., allowing input and output via choice of different modalities, effectiveness (e.g., using evidence-based intervention strategies, adoption (e.g., assistance in integrating the system into practice workflows and permitting customization of the website and feedback materials by practice teams, implementation (e.g., identifying and targeting actionable priority behavioral and psychosocial issues for patients and teams, and maintenance/sustainability (e.g., integration with current National Committee for Quality Assurance recommendations and clinical pathways of care. Connection to Health can work on a variety of input and output platforms, and assesses and provides feedback on multiple health behaviors and multiple chronic conditions frequently managed in adult primary care. As such, it should help to make patient-healthcare team encounters more informed and patient-centered. Formative research with clinicians indicated that the program addressed a number of practical concerns and they appreciated the flexibility and how the Connection to Health program could be customized to their office. Conclusions This primary care practice

  12. SOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    RESPONSIBILITY CENTCOM COALITION MEDIA SOCIAL MEDIA NEWS ARTICLES PRESS RELEASES IMAGERY VIDEOS TRANSCRIPTS VISITORS AND PERSONNEL FAMILY CENTER FAMILY READINESS CENTCOM WEBMAIL SOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY ACCOUNTABILITY HomeVISITORS AND PERSONNELSOCIAL MEDIA SECURITY FAQ on Security for Social Media Due to the widespread use of

  13. Phosphorus removal from aquaculture effluents at the Northeast Fishery Center in Lamar, Pennsylvania using iron oxide sorption media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip; Kehler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Three different iron oxide-based sorption media samples were tested for removal of phosphorus (P) from fish hatchery effluents using fixed bed processing. Two of the media samples were derived from residuals produced by the treatment of acid mine drainage, which were then compared to granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), a commercially available sorption medium. All of the media types removed from 50 to 70% of the P from the incoming aquaculture wastewater over 70–175 days of operation without regeneration. In some of the sorption trials, the GFH media showed superior adsorption in the earlier stages of the trial, but the GFH appeared to reach saturation more quickly, so that media performance was similar – at about 60% removal of P – over a longer time period of 175 days. Media regeneration tests were also conducted for both the commercial and mine drainage media, and demonstrated longer term performance, with overall P removal of 50–55%, over 223 days of total operation, with the advantages of phosphorus recycle and media reuse.

  14. Qualitative process evaluation of an Australian alcohol media literacy study: recommendations for designing culturally responsive school-based programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe S. Gordon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol media literacy programs seek to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of alcohol advertising on children’s drinking intentions and behaviours through equipping them with skills to challenge media messages. In order for such programs to be effective, the teaching and learning experiences must be tailored to their specific cultural context. Media in the Spotlight is an alcohol media literacy program aimed at 9 to 12 year old Australian children. This study evaluates the process and implementation of the program, outlining the factors that facilitated and inhibited implementation. From this evaluation, a pedagogical framework has been developed for health professionals implementing culturally responsive programs in school settings. Methods Process measures included: semi-structured interviews with teachers before and after the program was implemented (n = 11 interviews, program evaluation questionnaires completed by children (n = 166, lesson observations completed by teachers (n = 35 observations, and reflective journal entries completed by the researcher (n = 44 entries. A thematic analysis approach was used to analyse all of the data sets using NVivo. Inductive coding was used, whereby the findings were derived from the research objectives and multiple readings and interpretations of the data. Results Five key pedagogical considerations were identified that facilitated implementation. These were: connecting to the students’ life worlds to achieve cultural significance; empowering students with real-world skills to ensure relevance; ensuring programs are well structured with strong connections to the school curriculum; creating developmentally appropriate activities while providing a range of assessment opportunities; and including hands-on and interactive activities to promote student engagement. Three potential inhibitors to implementing the alcohol media literacy program in upper

  15. Qualitative process evaluation of an Australian alcohol media literacy study: recommendations for designing culturally responsive school-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chloe S; Kervin, Lisa K; Jones, Sandra C; Howard, Steven J

    2017-02-02

    Alcohol media literacy programs seek to mitigate the potentially harmful effects of alcohol advertising on children's drinking intentions and behaviours through equipping them with skills to challenge media messages. In order for such programs to be effective, the teaching and learning experiences must be tailored to their specific cultural context. Media in the Spotlight is an alcohol media literacy program aimed at 9 to 12 year old Australian children. This study evaluates the process and implementation of the program, outlining the factors that facilitated and inhibited implementation. From this evaluation, a pedagogical framework has been developed for health professionals implementing culturally responsive programs in school settings. Process measures included: semi-structured interviews with teachers before and after the program was implemented (n = 11 interviews), program evaluation questionnaires completed by children (n = 166), lesson observations completed by teachers (n = 35 observations), and reflective journal entries completed by the researcher (n = 44 entries). A thematic analysis approach was used to analyse all of the data sets using NVivo. Inductive coding was used, whereby the findings were derived from the research objectives and multiple readings and interpretations of the data. Five key pedagogical considerations were identified that facilitated implementation. These were: connecting to the students' life worlds to achieve cultural significance; empowering students with real-world skills to ensure relevance; ensuring programs are well structured with strong connections to the school curriculum; creating developmentally appropriate activities while providing a range of assessment opportunities; and including hands-on and interactive activities to promote student engagement. Three potential inhibitors to implementing the alcohol media literacy program in upper-elementary school classrooms were identified. These included topic

  16. Cyberbullying and Social Media: Information and Interventions for School Nurses Working with Victims, Students, and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elizabeth; Vessey, Judith A.; Pfeifer, Lauren

    2018-01-01

    Social media has become an increasingly prevalent fixture in youths' lives, with over 90% of teenagers reporting daily usage. These online sites and applications have provided many positive opportunities for youths to connect and share ideas with others; however, social media has also become a major platform for cyberbullying. Victims often…

  17. Deference, Denial, and Beyond: A Repertoire Approach to Mass Media and Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymes, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines two general research approaches, within the education world, to these mass-mediated formations: "Deference" and "Denial." Researchers who recognize the social practices that give local meaning to mass media formations and ways of speaking do not attempt to recontextualize youth media in their own social…

  18. Refusing the Stereotype: Decoding Negative Gender Imagery through a School-Based Digital Media Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Naomi; White, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The media plays a significant role in shaping cultural norms and attitudes, concomitantly reinforcing "body" and "beauty" ideals and gender stereotypes. Unrealistic, photoshopped and stereotyped images used by the media, advertising and fashion industries influence young people's body image and impact on their feelings of body…

  19. Critical Media Literacy and Gender: Teaching Middle School Children about Gender Stereotypes and Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchner, Laurel; Markowitz, Linda; Hedley, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the implementation of a small-scale critical media literacy curriculum unit focused on gender stereotypes, especially as they pertain to occupations. The research question was whether students exposed to the critical media literacy (CML) curriculum were more likely than students not exposed to believe: that…

  20. Care Coordination with Schools: The Role of Family-Centered Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Stevens, Tara; Carpenter, Julianna

    2017-05-01

    Objectives Family-centered care has been associated with positive outcomes for children with special health care needs. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship of family-centered care as associated with care coordination with schools and school absences (e.g., missed days) as reported by parents of children with special health care needs. Methods The current study utilized data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs 2009-201 (N = 40,242) to achieve this purpose. The National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs may be considered a nationally-representative and community-based sample of parent responses for children with special health care needs across the United States. Results Results from the current study indicate that family-centered care is associated with fewer absences and improved care coordination with schools when applicable. The variables of functional difficulties, poverty level, and the number of conditions were statistically controlled. Conclusions We suggest that the positive influence of family-centered care when practiced extends beyond the family and interacts with educational outcomes. We also suggest that the role of schools appears to be under-studied given the role that schools can play in family-centered care.

  1. Living and Leading in a Digital Age: A Narrative Study of the Attitudes and Perceptions of School Leaders about Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Kerrigan R.; Khwaja, Tehmina

    2016-01-01

    Students graduating from K-12 education need media literacy skills to engage, participate, and learn in a world in which literacy must keep pace with rapidly changing technologies. Given the significant roles school administrators play in providing leadership and vision to their schools, this narrative study addresses the research question: What…

  2. Determination of Media and Television Literacy Levels of Sport Consumers Filtered out of the Students of the School of Physical Education and Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine the literacy levels of media and television and the level of addiction of sport consumers filtered out of the students of the School of Physical Education and Sports and to investigate the relationship between these two levels. Sport consumers studying in Mugla University, School of Physical Education and Sports…

  3. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part A: Benefits, Challenges, and Recommendations for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    Social media consist of powerful tools that impact not only communication but relationships among people, thus posing an inherent challenge to the traditional standards of who we are as dental educators and what we can expect of each other. This article examines how the world of social media has changed dental education. Its goal is to outline the complex issues that social media use presents for academic dental institutions and to examine these issues from personal, professional, and legal perspectives. After providing an update on social media, the article considers the advantages and risks associated with the use of social media at the interpersonal, professional, and institutional levels. Policies and legal issues of which academic dental institutions need to be aware from a compliance perspective are examined, along with considerations and resources needed to develop effective social media policies. The challenge facing dental educators is how to capitalize on the benefits that social media offer, while minimizing risks and complying with the various forms of legal constraint.

  4. Status of teaching elementary science for English learners in science, mathematics and technology centered magnet schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alyson Kim

    According to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (2001), one in three students speaks a language other than English. Additionally, the Commission stated that a student is considered to be an English learner if the second language acquisition is English. In California more than 1.4 million English learners enter school speaking a variety of languages, and this number continues to rise. There is an imminent need to promote instructional strategies that support this group of diverse learners. Although this was not a California study, the results derived from the nationwide participants' responses provided a congruent assessment of the basic need to provide effective science teaching strategies to all English learners. The purpose of this study was to examine the status of elementary science teaching practices used with English learners in kindergarten through fifth grade in public mathematics, science, and technology-centered elementary magnet schools throughout the country. This descriptive research was designed to provide current information and to identify trends in the areas of curriculum and instruction for English learners in science themed magnet schools. This report described the status of elementary (grades K-5) school science instruction for English learners based on the responses of 116 elementary school teachers: 59 grade K-2, and 57 grade 3-5 teachers. Current research-based approaches support incorporating self-directed learning strategy, expository teaching strategy, active listening strategies, questioning strategies, wait time strategy, small group strategy, peer tutoring strategy, large group learning strategy, demonstrations strategy, formal debates strategy, review sessions strategy, mediated conversation strategy, cooperative learning strategy, and theme-based instruction into the curriculum to assist English learners in science education. Science Technology Society (STS) strategy, problem-based learning strategy, discovery learning

  5. Media in guidance and counseling services: a tool and innovation for school counselor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Alhadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Guidance and counseling services is an element of education that aims to support the achievement of the objectives of education. Guidance and counseling can prevent students experience problems and may even alleviate student of his problems. One of the efforts that need to be done to improve the effectiveness of guidance and counseling services is the development of media guidance and counseling. Media guidance and counseling can make different colors of guidance and counseling services so that the interests of students increase when following the guidance and counseling services. Used media must be relevant with the objectives/ competency of the guidance and counseling and relevant with material guidance and counseling services. Media in guidance and counseling services plays an important role in the implementation of guidance and counseling so that student can better understand, understand, and internalize the material guidance and counseling services to the student.

  6. Media education and media influence on youth

    OpenAIRE

    LILÁK, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor´s work is focused on the questions of the medial education and the medias themselves. This work also investigate with the influence of the action of medias to the students of apprenticeship. The first part of the theoretical work has generally explains what is media education, what is its significance for society and for the benefit of education in school. They are given functions, types and objectives of media education and communications capabilities via the media. The second part ...

  7. Primary school teachers’ and students’ perception of values and media literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Renes-Arellano; Sara Barral-Aramburu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Ephemeral changes, cultural diversity, globalization processes, the media and the crisis of values in modern society require a profound reflection on the role of education and teachers in the integral formation of students. This paper has the purpose of knowing the perception and experience of teachers and students in the field of media based literacy and education in values. The methods of investigation used were qualitative, by using techniques such as the daily observation logs a...

  8. Awareness of a rape crisis center and knowledge about sexual violence among high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sara H; Stark, Amrita K; O'Riordan, Mary Ann; Lazebnik, Rina

    2015-02-01

    This study examined awareness among adolescents of a local rape crisis center as well as their knowledge about sexual violence. The Cleveland Rape Crisis Center (CRCC) conducts sexual violence prevention programs for high school students. A written, anonymous survey was distributed to students prior to the start of the program. Students were asked if they had heard of the CRCC; knowledge about sexual violence was assessed with a series of 7 statements (rape myths) that participants identified as true or false. Surveys were reviewed retrospectively. Analyses were carried out for individual questions and frequencies compared using chi-square analysis. A total of 1633 surveys were collected; 1118 (68.5%) participants were female and 514 (31.5%) were male; ages ranged from 12 to 19 years. Respondents described themselves as being of European descent (45.9%), African descent (26.2%), or mixed race (17.7%). Just over half (863, 52.9%) of survey respondents had heard of the CRCC. Over half (950, 58.2%) of participants answered 5 or more questions correctly (range of correct answers 0 to 7). In general, more participants who were aware of the CRCC were able to identify statements about rape correctly (P rape. Females were consistently more likely to get an answer correct, as were participants of European descent. Awareness of the CRCC was associated with increased knowledge about sexual violence. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Affiliations of community health centers with the accredited schools and colleges of optometry in the states and territories of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    In 2006, the American Optometric Association Community Health Center Committee surveyed schools/colleges of optometry in the United States and its territories to assess collaborations between community health centers and optometric institutions. The survey investigated the number and structure of affiliations that existed between Federally Qualified Health Centers and schools/colleges of optometry in the United States. The survey reached the schools through the American Optometric Association Faculty Relations Committee or personal contact (Inter-American University of Puerto Rico). The survey showed wide variation in affiliations of community health centers with optometry programs. Six schools had no affiliations, whereas the remaining 11 ranged from 1 to 14. Information relating to 37 community health centers was reported. Results showed that schools utilized community health centers for fourth-year students in 5 schools, and both third- and fourth-year students in the remaining 6 schools. Schools vary regarding how precepting is managed with either full-time faculty (64.9%) or adjunct faculty. Business models also vary between schools. Affiliations between school/colleges of optometry and community health centers differ considerably. Optometric affiliations with community health centers can result in increased access to eye care for underserved populations and increased clinical experience for optometry students and residents. Opportunities exist to establish additional affiliations. Educational benefits and costs associated with affiliations should be explored before entering into a collaborative model of eye care delivery.

  10. Evaluation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Concussion Initiative for High School Coaches: "Heads up: Concussion in High School Sports"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Kelly; Mitchko, Jane; Klein, Cynthia; Wong, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Background: To reduce the number of sports-related concussions, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with the support of partners and experts in the field, has developed a tool kit for high school coaches with practical, easy-to-use concussion-related information. This study explores the success of the tool kit in changing…

  11. Gathering the Dreamers: The Transformation Process to a Learner-Centered School. The Reinventing School Series. Part Two and Viewing Guide. Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrello, Leonard C.; DiLaura, Nancy

    This videotape and viewing guide present an emerging learner-centered paradigm of teaching and learning and answer questions of why and how a staff changes its practices. The viewing guide describes the elementary school in the videotape, noting the full inclusion of 50 students identified as disabled, the team approach in which teachers are…

  12. The development of mini project interactive media on junior statistical materials (developmental research in junior high school)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziah, D.; Mardiyana; Saputro, D. R. S.

    2018-05-01

    Assessment is an integral part in the learning process. The process and the result should be in line, regarding to measure the ability of learners. Authentic assessment refers to a form of assessment that measures the competence of attitudes, knowledge, and skills. In fact, many teachers including mathematics teachers who have implemented curriculum based teaching 2013 feel confuse and difficult in mastering the use of authentic assessment instruments. Therefore, it is necessary to design an authentic assessment instrument with an interactive mini media project where teacher can adopt it in the assessment. The type of this research is developmental research. The developmental research refers to the 4D models development, which consist of four stages: define, design, develop and disseminate. The research purpose is to create a valid mini project interactive media on statistical materials in junior high school. The retrieved valid instrument based on expert judgment are 3,1 for eligibility constructions aspect, and 3,2 for eligibility presentation aspect, 3,25 for eligibility contents aspect, and 2,9 for eligibility didactic aspect. The research results obtained interactive mini media projects on statistical materials using Adobe Flash so it can help teachers and students in achieving learning objectives.

  13. Use of social media in dental schools: pluses, perils, and pitfalls from a legal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Joseph W; Turner, Sharon P

    2014-11-01

    One of the ways dental education is changing the way it is preparing the next generation of learners is through efficient utilization of interactive social media. Social media, which facilitates interaction and sharing of new ideas, is being utilized to educate students, residents, and faculty. Unfortunately, as with most improvements in technology, there are growing pains. Faculty, student, and patient interaction on social media platforms, such as Facebook and Twitter, can lead to inappropriate or embarrassing situations. Striking the appropriate balance between free speech rights of students and faculty and the need for colleges and universities to have efficient operations is often left to the judicial system. The concepts of free speech and contract law and how each is applied in educational settings should be understood by students, faculty, and administrators. This article provides a review of legal cases that led to current social media policies, as well as present-day cases that exemplify the application of these principles, to help dental educators gain a greater understanding of the boundaries of protected speech. It also provides a set of sample guidelines for communicating through these media.

  14. Tone perception in Mandarin-speaking school age children with otitis media with effusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Cai

    Full Text Available The present study explored tone perception ability in school age Mandarin-speaking children with otitis media with effusion (OME in noisy listening environments. The study investigated the interaction effects of noise, tone type, age, and hearing status on monaural tone perception, and assessed the application of a hierarchical clustering algorithm for profiling hearing impairment in children with OME.Forty-one children with normal hearing and normal middle ear status and 84 children with OME with or without hearing loss participated in this study. The children with OME were further divided into two subgroups based on their severity and pattern of hearing loss using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. Monaural tone recognition was measured using a picture-identification test format incorporating six sets of monosyllabic words conveying four lexical tones under speech spectrum noise, with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions ranging from -9 to -21 dB.Linear correlation indicated tone recognition thresholds of children with OME were significantly correlated with age and pure tone hearing thresholds at every frequency tested. Children with hearing thresholds less affected by OME performed similarly to their peers with normal hearing. Tone recognition thresholds of children with auditory status more affected by OME were significantly inferior to those of children with normal hearing or with minor hearing loss. Younger children demonstrated poorer tone recognition performance than older children with OME. A mixed design repeated-measure ANCOVA showed significant main effects of listening condition, hearing status, and tone type on tone recognition. Contrast comparisons revealed that tone recognition scores were significantly better under -12 dB SNR than under -15 dB SNR conditions and tone recognition scores were significantly worse under -18 dB SNR than those obtained under -15 dB SNR conditions. Tone 1 was the easiest tone to identify and

  15. Tone perception in Mandarin-speaking school age children with otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ting; McPherson, Bradley; Li, Caiwei; Yang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The present study explored tone perception ability in school age Mandarin-speaking children with otitis media with effusion (OME) in noisy listening environments. The study investigated the interaction effects of noise, tone type, age, and hearing status on monaural tone perception, and assessed the application of a hierarchical clustering algorithm for profiling hearing impairment in children with OME. Forty-one children with normal hearing and normal middle ear status and 84 children with OME with or without hearing loss participated in this study. The children with OME were further divided into two subgroups based on their severity and pattern of hearing loss using a hierarchical clustering algorithm. Monaural tone recognition was measured using a picture-identification test format incorporating six sets of monosyllabic words conveying four lexical tones under speech spectrum noise, with the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions ranging from -9 to -21 dB. Linear correlation indicated tone recognition thresholds of children with OME were significantly correlated with age and pure tone hearing thresholds at every frequency tested. Children with hearing thresholds less affected by OME performed similarly to their peers with normal hearing. Tone recognition thresholds of children with auditory status more affected by OME were significantly inferior to those of children with normal hearing or with minor hearing loss. Younger children demonstrated poorer tone recognition performance than older children with OME. A mixed design repeated-measure ANCOVA showed significant main effects of listening condition, hearing status, and tone type on tone recognition. Contrast comparisons revealed that tone recognition scores were significantly better under -12 dB SNR than under -15 dB SNR conditions and tone recognition scores were significantly worse under -18 dB SNR than those obtained under -15 dB SNR conditions. Tone 1 was the easiest tone to identify and Tone 3 was the most

  16. Media influence on pre-middle school African Americans' perceptions toward science, mathematics, and technology courses and careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sharon Campbell

    2005-07-01

    A variety of previous studies have suggested that inaccurate, stereotypical or missing media depictions of science, engineering, and technology (SET) workers and fields have contributed to a growing shortage of youth interested in pursuing careers within the scientific endeavor. However, studies on the perceptions of African American youth have not usually been the focus of such research. In this exploratory study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 34 fifth grade African American students to determine the relative influence television and film portrayals of SET workers had on these children's perceptions of roles in SET fields and careers and school coursework related to them. Framed within the theoretical perspectives of cultivation analysis and the construction of social reality, results indicated the majority of participants perceived scientists as ambiguous, possessing either mythic characteristics of the fantastic persona or they saw them as altruistically inclined figures that saved the world from disease, destruction, and decay. Television and film portrayals of SET workers were found in varying degrees and ways to shape these African American children's perceptions toward SET careers. While children exhibited self-concepts about SET workers that were sometimes idealistic, distorted, or unrealistic, most had favorable perceptions toward math and science courses in school. However, it was the absence of television and film portrayals of African Americans in SET roles that was problematic for the majority of students. Recommendations for media producers, educators, scientific research foundations, and parents were suggested to dispel some of these commonly found media stereotypes of SET workers and African Americans in these roles and their effects.

  17. THE USE OF PEDAGOGICAL SYSTEM “SCHOOL IS THE JUNIOR ACADEMY OF SCIENCES” FOR THE INTEGRATION OF MEDIA EDUCATION INTO THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Y. Bilous

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Actuality of the research presented in the article is confirmed by possibility of implementation of the tasks of Conception of introduction of media education in Ukraine, at the use of development and modernizations of the in Conception of introduction of media education in Ukraine, at the use of development and modernization of the pedagogical system «School-Minor Academy of Sciences».

  18. Produce Live News Broadcasts Using Standard AV Equipment: A Success Story from the Le Center High School in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, John

    1997-01-01

    Describes the production of news broadcasts on video by a high school class in Le Center, Minnesota. Topics include software for Apple computers, equipment used, student responsibilities, class curriculum, group work, communication among the production crew, administrative and staff support, and future improvements. (LRW)

  19. Remaking Poems: Combining Translation and Digital Media to Interest High School Students in Poetry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Amy Beth

    2017-01-01

    In American high schools, the practice of poetry analysis as a study of language art has declined. Outworn methods have contributed to the trend away from close interactions with the text, to the unfortunate end that millennial high school students neither understand nor enjoy poetry. Digital technology coupled with principles of translation…

  20. Supporting the Social Media Needs of Emergency Public Information Officers with Human-Centered Design and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Amanda Lee

    2012-01-01

    Emergency response agencies, which operate as command-and-control organizations, push information to members of the public with too few mechanisms to support communication flowing back. Recently, information communication technologies (ICTs) such as social media have challenged this one-way model by allowing the public to participate in emergency…

  1. Associations between Electronic Media Use and Involvement in Violence, Alcohol and Drug Use among United States High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denniston, Maxine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We identified associations between time spent watching television and time spent playing video or computer games or using computers and involvement in interpersonal violence, alcohol and drug use in a nationally representative sample of United States high school students.Methods: We analyzed data from the 2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Exposure variables were time spent watching television and time spent playing computer or video games or using computers (hereafter denoted as “computer/video game use” on an average school day; outcome variables included multiple measures assessing involvement in violence and alcohol or drug use. Chi-square tests were used to identify statistically significant associations between each exposure variable and each of the outcome variables. We used logistic regression to obtain crude odds ratios for outcome variables with a significant chi-square p-value and to obtain adjusted odds ratios controlling for sex, race, and grade in school.Results: Overall, 35.4% (95% CI=33.1%-37.7% of students reported frequent television (TV use and 24.9% (95% CI=22.9%-27.0% reported frequent computer/video game use. A number of risk behaviors, including involvement in physical fights and initiation of alcohol use before age 13, were significantly associated with frequent TV use or frequent computer/video game use, even after controlling for sex, race/ethnicity and grade.Conclusion: Findings highlight the need for additional research to better understand the mechanisms by which electronic media exposure and health-risk behaviors are associated and for the development of strategies that seek to understand how the content and context (e.g., watching with peers, having computer in common area of media use influence risk behaviors among youth. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(3:310-315.

  2. Quartet cards as the media of career exploration for lower-grade primary school students

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    Yulia Ayriza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A career developed through the optimization of one’s potentials will irrevocably play a role in the development of self-identity as well as the psychological well-being of the individual. When children are introduced and allowed to explore as many career options as possible during their developmental stage, they are more likely to have a fruitful career development in the future. The preceding study showed that the career interests and knowledge of lower-grade primary students fit the Holland Career Categories: realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional (RIASEC. It was also found that the students’ career interest and knowledge levels varied, with most in the low level. This second-year study aims to expand the results of the previous study by developing the use of Quartet cards as the media of career exploration for lower-grade primary students. By using the research and development method, this study develops Quartet Career Cards into three difficulty levels: low, medium, and high. The Quartet cards media have undergone feasibility tests conducted by experts in theory and media, as well as a series of field testing consisting of preliminary, main, and operational stages among a total of 266 primary students of grades 1, 2, and 3. A revision was made on several components including the images, information, colors, font sizes, illustration styles, and card sizes. The findings show that Quartet Career Cards meet the feasibility standards for the media of career exploration

  3. Evidence of the Value of the Smoking Media Literacy Framework for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Melinda C.; Zwarun, Lara; Sherblom, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Susceptibility to future smoking, positive beliefs about smoking, and perceptions of antismoking norms are all factors that are associated with future smoking. In previous research, smoking media literacy (SML) has been associated with these variables, even when controlling for other known risk factors for smoking. However, these…

  4. Remote Control Childhood: Combating the Hazards of Media Culture in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Background: Media culture touches most aspects of the lives of children growing up today, beginning at the earliest ages. It is profoundly the lessons children learn as well as how they learn, thereby contributing to what this article characterizes as "remote control childhood." Educators need to understand remote control childhood so…

  5. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part B: Curricular Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this article is to describe the broad curricular constructs surrounding teaching and learning about social media in dental education. This analysis takes into account timing, development, and assessment of the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors needed to effectively use social media tools as a contemporary dentist. Three developmental stages in a student's path to becoming a competent professional are described: from undergraduate to dental student, from the classroom and preclinical simulation laboratory to the clinical setting, and from dental student to licensed practitioner. Considerations for developing the dental curriculum and suggestions for effective instruction at each stage are offered. In all three stages in the future dentist's evolution, faculty members need to educate students about appropriate professional uses of social media. Faculty members should provide instruction on the beneficial aspects of this communication medium and help students recognize the potential pitfalls associated with its use. The authors provide guidelines for customizing instruction to complement each stage of development, recognizing that careful timing is not only important for optimal learning but can prevent inappropriate use of social media as students are introduced to novel situations.

  6. Media Specialists Can Learn Web 2.0 Tools to Make Schools More Cool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Media specialists today are required to use more and more technology. Their responsibilities encompass everything from repairing overhead projectors to administrating an entire library's automated system. These responsibilities are in addition to working with students on research and information literacy, making book selections, and collaborating…

  7. The analysis of mathematics literacy on PMRI learning with media schoology of junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardono; Mariani, S.

    2018-03-01

    Indonesia as a developing country in the future will have high competitiveness if its students have high mathematics literacy ability. The current reality from year to year rankings of PISA mathematics literacy Indonesian students are still not good. This research is motivated by the importance and low ability of the mathematics literacy. The purpose of this study is to: (1) analyze the effectiveness of PMRI learning with media Schoology, (2) describe the ability of students' mathematics literacy on PMRI learning with media Schoology which is reviewed based on seven components of mathematics literacy, namely communication, mathematizing, representation, reasoning, devising strategies, using symbols, and using mathematics tool. The method used in this research is the method of sequential design method mix. Techniques of data collection using observation, interviews, tests, and documentation. Data analysis techniques use proportion test, appellate test, and use descriptive analysis. Based on the data analysis, it can be concluded; (1) PMRI learning with media Schoology effectively improve the ability of mathematics literacy because of the achievement of classical completeness, students' mathematics literacy ability in PMRI learning with media Schoology is higher than expository learning, and there is increasing ability of mathematics literacy in PMRI learning with media Schoology of 30%. (2) Highly capable students attain excellent mathematics literacy skills, can work using broad thinking with appropriate resolution strategies. Students who are capable of achieving good mathematics literacy skills can summarize information, present problem-solving processes, and interpret solutions. low-ability students have reached the level of ability of mathematics literacy good enough that can solve the problem in a simple way.

  8. Social skills headteachers of schools centers. Las habilidades sociales en directores de centros escolares

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    Margarita Salvador

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available

    This study aims to discover the extent of public school directors have developed and practiced their social skills, in performing his managerial functions, to plan and propose, based on the results, the training necessary additions to the exercise such leadership reach higher levels of efficiency. The sample was composed of 99 directors of schools of Public Elementary and Secondary Education, in the provinces of Granada and Almeria. The results obtained in this research provide us with reliable knowledge, hitherto non-existent, the profiles that characterize the current directors of schools, in their social and interpersonal skills. A summary of results is as follows: a half of the principals (49% obtained scores that are above the 75 centile, in behavior and social skills assertion b nearly half of the directors in our sample are characterized by implementing social skills, through behavior, where the "self-expression", "say no", "initiate interactions” and “express their anger", are the most relevant components and c the level of the center, the number of students at the school and the old director has made some significant differences.


    Key words: Social skills, school directors, managerial function, leadership.

    Este estudio pretende conocer, en qué medida los directores escolares de centros públicos tienen desarrolladas y practican las habilidades sociales en el desempeño de sus funciones directivas, con objeto de planificar y proponer, en función de los resultados, los necesarios complementos formativos, para que el ejercicio de dicha función directiva alcance niveles más altos de eficacia. La muestra ha estado compuesta por 99 directores, de Centros Educativos Públicos de Primaria y Secundaria, de las provincias de Granada y Almería. Los resultados obtenidos en esta investigación nos proporcionan un conocimiento fiable, hasta ahora inexistente, sobre los perfiles que caracterizan a los

  9. The VISA Center: An Interdisciplinary Collaboration Serving Students Suspended from School for Violent or Aggressive Behavior, Substance Abuse, or Weapons Possession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lawrence; Maguin, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    The University at Buffalo School of Social Work established the VISA Center (the acronym stands for "vision, integrity, service, and accountability") in collaboration with the school district of Buffalo, New York. With funding from the New York State Education Department, a university on-campus center was set up to serve 30 students at a…

  10. Teachers’ dialogue in a learner centered professional development initiative In a us urban high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Alvarez Gutiérrez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using paradigms emerging from Learner Centered Professional Development (LCPD, dialogic education and Transformative Pedagogical Practices (TPPs, this research study examined pedagogies that ignited a revitalization of shared values as a community of learners, challenged assumptions about learning while invigorating professional identities and cultivating possibilities for transforming praxis of a group of female teachers and female administrators in an urban high school. The LCPD initiative engaged teachers (13 and administrators (3 in dialogue, self-examination, and reflection, while also chipping away dearth perceptions of Latina/o student as learners and nourish possibilities for their successes. The data for this study is part of a larger corpus of data exploring teacher professional development initiatives in a large urban city in the southwestern region of Texas. Narrative analysis was the methodological tool used to code and analyze the data. The authors highlight the pedagogies that served to renew teachers and administrators’ sense of community, professional identities and modifications of teachers’ attitudes and pedagogies regarding themselves and Latina/o students. Our research findings underscore the urgency of educational reform to include on-going LCPD in order to transform and encourage professional enrichment, teacher agency and revive pedagogies that support all students’ academic and social successes.

  11. A Defense of Using Pop Media in the Middle-School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, Mitzi

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the ways that middle school English teachers can use popular teen culture within the context of general English instruction. Suggests bringing television, film, comics, advice columns, and teen magazines into the English classroom. (HB)

  12. Psychological Distress in Parents and School-Functioning of Adolescents: Results from the World Trade Center Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Lisa M; Dechen, Tenzin; Cone, James E; Stellman, Steven D; Brackbill, Robert M

    2017-10-01

    Poor school-functioning can be indicative of parent and adolescent mental health and adolescent behavior problems. This study examined 472 adolescents enrolled in the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry, with a two-step path analysis, using regression-based models, to unravel the relationships between parent and adolescent mental health, adolescent behavior problems, and adolescent unmet healthcare need (UHCN) on the outcome school-functioning. WTC exposure was associated with UHCN and parental mental health was a significant mediator. There was no evidence that family WTC exposure was associated with UHCN independent of its effect on parental mental health. For the second path, after accounting for the effects of adolescent mental health, behavioral problems, and UHCN, there remained a significant association between parental mental health and school-functioning. Interventions for poor school-functioning should have multiple components which address UHCN, mental health, and behavioral problems, as efforts to address any of these alone may not be sufficient.

  13. Parental mediation of adolescent media use and demographic factors as predictors of Kenyan high school students' exposure to sexual content in television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngula, Kyalo wa; Mberia, Hellen K; Miller, Ann Neville

    2016-01-01

    Research in Western nations suggests that parents' involvement in their children's media use can make a difference in how adolescents select, process and respond to sexual television messages. Little or no published research has investigated this issue in sub-Saharan Africa, even though adolescents and young adults remain among the groups at highest risk for HIV transmission. This study investigated the relationship between Kenyan adolescents' level of exposure to sexual television content and their parents' mediation of their television use. A cluster sample of 427 Nairobi public high school students was surveyed regarding parental mediation of their media use and their intake of sexual television content. Co-viewing with opposite sex friends was associated with higher intake of sexual TV content. This relationship was stronger among boarding school students than among day school students. Parental mediation and co-viewing variables predicted three times as much variance among boarding than among day school students.

  14. The Influence of Social Media on the Prevalence of Sexual Harassment among Teenagers: A Case Study of Secondary Schools in Kandara Sub-County, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Njeri Kamaku; Helen Mberia

    2014-01-01

    Social media use by teenagers in secondary schools is on the increase with more and more students accessing face book, twitter, You-tube, email and other social sites. Whereas students use such social networking positively, the amount of time spent on the sites that consume academic time has resulted to alarming poor performance which research has associated with lack of adequate revision time, inadequate sleep amounting to poor concentration, and truancy in schools. Sexual harassment is on t...

  15. Being a Learner Using Social Media in School: The Case of Space2cre8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasbø, Kristin Beate; Silseth, Kenneth; Erstad, Ola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to gain knowledge about what it means to be a learner using social media in an educational setting. The article presents an ethnographic study of students in a multiethnic community in Oslo who participate in a social networking site called Space2cre8 (S28). In this article, we set out to explore the kind of space for…

  16. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THREE DIMENSIONAL ANIMATION FILM FOR CHARACTER EDUCATION MEDIA IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cepi Riyana

    2015-06-01

    Abstrak. Pembentukan karakter merupakan salah satu tujuan pendidikan nasional. Pasal 1 UU Sisdiknas tahun 2003 menyatakan bahwa di antara tujuan pendidikan nasional adalah mengembangkan potensi peserta didik untuk memiliki kecerdasan, kepribadian dan akhlak mulia. Saat ini penguatan terhadap karakter bangsa menjadi prioritas program strategis pendidikan nasional, mengingat kondisi bangsa harus dikembalikan pada karakterisasi jati diri bangsa. Berbagai upaya perlu dilakukan untuk membangun pendidikan karakter, diantaranya melalui pemodelan (modeling karakter melalui tayangan Fim Animasi 3D. Kekuatan media ini adalah daya tariknya yang mampu menghipnosis anak sehingga muatan-muatan pendidikan karakter dapat diinternalisasi pada diri anak. Tujuan Penelitian ini adalah “mengembangkan Film Animasi 3D untuk Pendidikan Karater di Sekolah Dasar”, Penelitian ini menggunakan metode Research & Development (R&D melalui tahapan : (1 Analisis kebutuhan Media, (2 Pengembangan Media , (3 Validasi dan Diseminasi Produk. Subyek penelitian adalah siswa SD, dengan lokasi di tiga wilayah Jawa Barat (Cimahi, Kabupaten Bandung Barat dan Cianjur. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa model animasi yang didesain dengan ABC (animation character building berdampak pada pembiasaan positif sebagai langkah awal untuk pembentukan karakter pada siswa SD. Kata Kunci : Pendidikan Karakter, Film 3D Animasi

  17. The ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE2ST (Water-Energy Education, Science, and Technology): Lessons Learned from an Innovative Research-Education-Outreach Center at Colorado School of Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, T. S.; Blaine, A. C.; Martin, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE2ST (Water-Energy Education, Science, and Technology) is a testament to the power of collaboration and innovation. WE2ST began as a partnership between ConocoPhillips (foundation gift) and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) with the goal of fostering solutions to water-energy challenges via education, research and outreach. The WE2ST center is a training ground for the next generation of water-energy-social scientists and engineers and is a natural fit for CSM, which is known for its expertise in water resources, water treatment technologies, petroleum engineering, geosciences, and hydrology. WE2ST has nine contributing faculty researchers that combine to create a web of expertise on sustainable energy and water resources. This research benefits unconventional energy producers, water-reliant stakeholders and the general public. Areas of focus for research include water sources (quality and quantity), integrated water-energy solution viability and risk, and social-corporate responsibility. The WE2ST Center currently provides annual support for 8-9 Graduate Fellows and 13 Undergraduate Scholars. Top-tier graduate students are recruited nationally and funded similar to an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF). Undergraduate Scholars are also recruited from across the CSM campus to gain experience in faculty laboratories and on research teams. All WE2ST students receive extensive professional skills training, leadership development, communication skills training, networking opportunities in the water-energy industries, and outreach opportunities in the community. The corner stone of the WE2ST Center is a focus on communication with the public. Both in social science research teams and in general interactions with the public, WE2ST seeks to be "an honest broker" amidst a very passionate and complex topic. WE2ST research is communicated by presentations at technical conferences, talking with people at public gatherings

  18. Prophylaxis of post-ERC infectious complications in patients with biliary obstruction by adding antimicrobial agents into ERC contrast media- a single center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobser, Hella; Gunesch, Agnetha; Klebl, Frank

    2017-01-13

    Patients with biliary obstruction are at high risk to develop septic complications after endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). We evaluated the benefits of local application of antimicrobial agents into ERC contrast media in preventing post-ERC infectious complications in a high-risk study population. Patients undergoing ERC at our tertiary referral center were retrospectively included. Addition of vancomycin, gentamicin and fluconazol into ERC contrast media was evaluated in a case-control design. Outcomes comprised infectious complications within 3 days after ERC. In total, 84 ERC cases were analyzed. Primarily indications for ERC were sclerosing cholangitis (75%) and malignant stenosis (9.5%). Microbial testing of collected bile fluid in the treatment group was positive in 91.4%. Detected organisms were sensitive to the administered antimicrobials in 93%. The use of antimicrobials in contrast media was associated with a significant decrease in post-ERC infectious complications compared to non-use (14.3% vs. 33.3%; odds ratio [OR]: 0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.114-0.978). After adjusting for the variables acute cholangitis prior to ERC and incomplete biliary drainage, the beneficial effect of intraductal antibiotic prophylaxis was even more evident (OR = 0.153; 95% CI: 0.039-0.598, p = 0.007). Patients profiting most obviously from intraductal antimicrobials were those with secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Local application of a combination of antibiotic and antimycotic agents to ERC contrast media efficiently reduced post-ERC infectious events in patients with biliary obstruction. This is the first study that evaluates ERC-related infectious complications in patients with secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Our first clinical results should now be prospectively evaluated in a larger patient cohort to improve the safety of ERC, especially in patients with secondary sclerosing cholangitis.

  19. Diet as a risk factor for pneumococcal carriage and otitis media: a cross-sectional study among children in day care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiainen, Terhi; Paalanne, Niko; Arkkola, Tuula; Renko, Marjo; Pokka, Tytti; Kaijalainen, Tarja; Uhari, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Pharyngeal bacteria are exposed to different sugar conditions depending on the diet of the child. We hypothesized that dietary factors such as daily intake of carbohydrates could be associated with pneumococcal carriage and the occurrence of otitis media in children. Our study design was a cross-sectional study among 1006 children attending child day care centers. Parents filled in a food frequency questionnaire. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from each child. The primary outcome was the occurrence of pneumococcal carriage and the secondary outcome the number of acute otitis media episodes during life. Principal component analysis was used to group dietary intake into nine factors. The models were adjusted for age, gender of the child and educational level of the mother. The dietary factor which included high consumption of sweet pastries and jam was associated with an increased risk of pneumococcal carriage (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.36, P-value 0.04). The factor including frequent consumption of fruit and berries was associated with a decreased risk of acute otitis (regression coefficient -0.51, 95% CI -0.98 to -0.03, P=0.04). A high intake of consumption of sweets and snacks (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.80, P=0.03) was associated with an increased risk of caries. Diet was associated with a risk of pneumococcal carriage and the occurrence of otitis media. Diet may thus be a modifiable risk factor for the occurrence of acute otitis media.

  20. Prevalence of and risk factors for otitis media with effusion in primary school children: case control study in Erzurum, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucur, Cüneyt; Şimşek, Eda; Kuduban, Ozan; Özbay, İsa

    2015-01-01

    A total of 1,021 children attending 2 primary schools in districts in Erzurum were enrolled in a study evaluating the prevalence of otitis media with effusion (OME) and its relationship with various risk factors. The prevalence of OME in this study was 6.8% (69/1021). The difference in OME prevalence between age groups (9 years) was statistically significant (p0.05), consanguineous marriage (p>0.05) and history of hearing loss in the parents (p>0.05) were not statistically significant. Parents need to be informed about the symptoms of and risk factors for OME to avoid delayed diagnosis, which can lead to permanent hearing loss.

  1. Mídia, escola e leitura crítica do mundo Media, school and critical reading of the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Caldas

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O texto faz uma reflexão sobre o uso da imprensa na sala de aula e sua relação com o processo de aprendizagem. Questiona a excessiva inserção de fragmentos do discurso jornalístico nos livros didáticos em detrimento de outros gêneros. Discute a qualidade da narrativa jornalística e os riscos que ela encerra se não houver uma leitura crítica da mídia. Defende a necessidade de trabalho integrado entre educadores e jornalistas para a real compreensão do processo de produção da imprensa, construção da linguagem e da linha editorial dos veículos de comunicação.This paper focuses on the classroom use of newspaper and magazine texts and its connection with the learning process. It criticizes the excessive usage of fragments of journalistic discourse in school textbooks, to the detriment of other text forms. The quality of journalistic narration is questioned and the risks incumbent on an acritical reading of the media. It advocates the necessity of cooperation between educators and journalists to foster an effective understanding of the news production process, to improve language construction, and to generate awareness of the media's editorial lines and policies.

  2. Cyber dating abuse among teens using school-based health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Rebecca N; McCauley, Heather L; Jones, Kelley A; Tancredi, Daniel J; Goldstein, Sandi; Blackburn, Samantha; Monasterio, Erica; James, Lisa; Silverman, Jay G; Miller, Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence of cyber dating abuse among youth aged 14 to 19 years seeking care at school-based health centers and associations with other forms of adolescent relationship abuse (ARA), sexual violence, and reproductive and sexual health indicators. A cross-sectional survey was conducted during the 2012-2013 school year (participant n = 1008). Associations between cyber dating abuse and study outcomes were assessed via logistic regression models for clustered survey data. Past 3-month cyber dating abuse was reported by 41.4% of this clinic-based sample. More female than male participants reported cyber dating abuse victimization (44.6% vs 31.0%). Compared with no exposure, low- ("a few times") and high-frequency ("once or twice a month" or more) cyber dating abuse were significantly associated with physical or sexual ARA (low: adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-4.4; high: aOR 5.4, 95% CI 4.0-7.5) and nonpartner sexual assault (low: aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.5; high: aOR 4.1, 95% CI 2.8-5.9). Analysis with female participants found an association between cyber dating abuse exposure and contraceptive nonuse (low: aOR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7; high: aOR 4.1, 95% CI 2.0-8.4) and reproductive coercion (low: aOR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.2; high: aOR 5.7, 95% CI 2.8-11.6). Cyber dating abuse is common and associated with ARA and sexual assault in an adolescent clinic-based sample. The associations of cyber dating abuse with sexual behavior and pregnancy risk behaviors suggest a need to integrate ARA education and harm reduction counseling into sexual health assessments in clinical settings. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Blood and Bones: The Influence of the Mass Media on Australian Primary School Children's Understandings of Genes and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

    2014-01-01

    Previous research showed that primary school children held several misconceptions about genetics of concern for their future lives. Included were beliefs that genes and DNA are separate substances, with genes causing family resemblance and DNA identifying suspects at crime scenes. Responses to this work "blamed" the mass media for these…

  4. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  5. Television in the Schools: Instructional Television and Educational Media Resources at the National Public Broadcasting Archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In 1964, in "A Guide to Instructional Television," editor Robert M. Diamond defined "educational television" as a "broad term usually applied to cultural and community broadcasting which may include some programs for in-school use" (p. 278). His definition for instructional television was "television used within the formal classroom context on any…

  6. Children, Extracurricular Activities, and Digital Media: The Process of Displacement and School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourgela, Vasiliki; Pacurar, Ecaterina

    2018-01-01

    This work, situated in the Greek sociocultural context, attempts to analyze the time spent by primary school students on digital and traditional extracurricular activities and the impact of these activities on the educational outcome. The first objective was to determine, by means of a quantitative survey, if the children as "digital…

  7. Using Social Media to Reinforce Environmental Learning and Action-Taking for School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Alan; Eames, Chris; Irving, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    Environmental experiences often engage learners and create an intention to act, which is then not followed through once the learner is removed from the environment. This study utilized an exploratory, interpretive framework with younger primary school classes to investigate if transfer of learning from field trip experiences "in" and…

  8. Teacher and Student Perceptions on High School Science Flipped Classrooms: Educational Breakthrough or Media Hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, Rebecca C.

    For years educators have struggled to ensure students meet the rigors of state mandated tests. Challenges that often impede student success are student absences, school closings due to weather, and remediation for students who need additional help while advanced students can move ahead. Many educators, especially secondary math and science teachers, have responded to these issues by implementing a teaching strategy called the flipped classroom where students view lectures, power points, or podcasts outside of school and class time shifts to allow opportunities for collaborative learning. The purpose of this research was to evaluate teacher and student perceptions of high school flipped science classrooms. A qualitative phenomenological study was conducted to observe 3 high school science teachers from Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee selected through purposeful sampling who have used the flipped classroom method for a minimum of 2 years. Analysis of data from an online survey, direct observation, teacher interviews, and student focus groups helped to identify challenges and benefits of this teaching and learning strategy. Findings indicated that teachers find the flipped classroom beneficial to build student relationships but requires a significant amount of time to develop. Mixed student reactions revealed benefits of a flipped classroom as a successful learning tool for current and future endeavors for college or career preparation.

  9. How Activists and Media Frame Social Problems: Critical Events versus Performance Trends for Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on the process by which a social problem is redefined in response to a critical events, such as economic depressions, environmental disasters, intense physical confrontations, or strategic initiatives by a social movement organization. Examines a conservative movement's attempt to redefine "the problem" of the schools at the time…

  10. Politics, Media and Youth: Understanding Political Socialization via Video Production in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmore, Kate; Lagos, Taso G.

    2008-01-01

    Research on the lack of civic and political engagement on the part of today's youth has relied on traditional, often quantitative, measures of political knowledge that may miss important elements of the process. Using an ethnographic approach with a group of inner-city high school students, our study reveals a richer construction of students'…

  11. The Effectiveness of a New School-Based Media Literacy Intervention on Adolescents’ Doping Attitudes and Supplements Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lucidi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a media literacy intervention targeting, for the first time, the specific topic of Performance and Appearance Enhancing Substances (PAESs use in high-school students. Overall, 389 students (52% male aged between 13 and 19 years (mean = 16.56 year; SD = 1.26 participated to a media literacy intervention (i.e., “intervention group” while 103 students aged between 14 and 19 year (mean = 16.10 year; SD = 1.38 were considered as the control group (i.e., “control group”. In two separate occasions over the course of six consecutive months, students in both groups filled out a set of questionnaires which included measures of social-cognitive beliefs (i.e., attitudes, subjective norms, intentions and a self-reported measure of retrospective use of doping (Yes/No and supplements (Yes/No. Compared to students in the control group (Mean(time1 = 1.96; SD(time1 = 0.85; and Mean(time2 = 2.09; SD(time2 = 0.94, intervention students on average expressed relatively stronger attitudes against doping use over time (Mean(time1 = 2.2; SD(time1 = 0.85; and Mean(time2 = 2.05; SD(time2 = 0.82. Students in the latter group also showed a statistically significant decrease in self-reported supplement use (Use(time1 = 6.7%; Use(time2 = 3.8%; p = 0.05, McNemar Test. Interestingly, albeit marginally significant, students in the control group showed a relative increment in the self-reported use of supplements over time (Use(time1 = 4.9%; Use(time2 = 8.7%; p = 0.22, McNemar Test. Overall, the media literacy intervention investigated in the present study was effective in decreasing adolescent student’s positive attitudes toward doping use and in reducing the use of legal PAES. These findings supported the generalizability and the usefulness of a media literacy approach in the specific field of PAES.

  12. La Clínica del Pueblo: a model of collaboration between a private media broadcasting corporation and an academic medical center for health education for North Carolina Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calles-Escandón, Jorge; Hunter, Jaimie C; Langdon, Sarah E; Gómez, Eva M; Duren-Winfield, Vanessa T; Woods, Kristy F

    2009-12-01

    La Clínica del Pueblo, a health education collaboration between the Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and Qué Pasa Media, Inc., disseminates culturally appropriate health information to the North Carolina (NC) Latino community. The program includes a weekly radio show and corresponding newspaper column addressing four areas: childhood health, adult health, safety, and utilization. The radio show format includes a didactic presentation followed by a call-in question and answer period. Over 200 consecutive weeks of programming have been completed, averaging 11 calls per show. A Latino healthcare resource guide and hotline also provide resource information. Participant demographic information indicates that 50% of the target population comes from Mexico, 60% are women, and 70% of the community is younger than 38 years. There was an increase in the use of the media as a source of health information over the course of the project, from an initial 33% of respondents to 58% in the last survey. Listenership to La Clínica del Pueblo displayed a pronounced increase (18% initial survey to 55% in last survey, P education level (P < 0.0001), female gender (P < 0.01) and radio listenership (P < 0.05). The first three variables predicted higher scores; however, radio listening recognition of our radio program was more common among individuals who had lower scores. In conclusion, La Clínica del Pueblo is a model for a novel approach that can reach the Latino community to improve medical knowledge and possibly affect health behaviors in a positive manner.

  13. ICT media design for higher grade of elementary school mathematics learning using CS6 program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainil, M.; Prahmana, R. C. I.; Helsa, Y.; Hendri, S.

    2017-12-01

    Technological innovation contributes to the emerging of new possibilities to change the learning process. The development of technology could bring the higher quality of education through the integration of technology in the learning. The purpose of this research is to create an interactive multimedia using CS6 program for mathematics learning in higher grade of elementary school. It was a development research using ADDIE model which consists of analysis, design, and evaluation stages. It has successfully developed interactive multimedia in a form of learning CD used in the material of plane figures and solid figures. The prototype has been validated and then tested for the 4th grade of elementary schools. Two schools were involved and the students taught by utilizing the prototype, and then, in the end of learning, they are examined to determine the learning result. There were 72% of the students passed the examination as they classified at good and excellent categories. Finally, the use of CS6 program is promising to help the students learning plane and solid figure in mathematics learning.

  14. Center for commercial applications of combustion in space (CCACS); A partnership for space commercialization at the Colorado School of Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.; Kee, Bob; Linne, Mark; McKinnon, Tom; Moore, John; Parker, Terry; Readey, Dennis; Tilton, John E.; Helble, Joe

    1997-01-01

    The Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) is a NASA/Industry/University consortium at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). The mission of the Center is to assist industry in developing commercial products by conducting combustion research which takes advantage of the unique properties of space. By conducting experiments in near-zero gravity, convection and buoyancy effects can be minimized and new fundamental design-related knowledge can be gained which can be used to improve combustion-related products and processes on earth. Companies, government laboratories and universities most actively involved in CCACS at present include ABB Combustion, ADA Technologies, Advanced Refractory Technologies, Golden Technologies, Lockheed-Martin, Southwest Sciences, Space Systems/Lora, NASA-Lewis, JPL, the Baylor Dental School and the University of Connecticut. Products and processes of interest to the Center participants include industrial process combustors; catalytic combustion; Halon replacements; ceramic powders, whiskers and fibers; metal-matrix composites; NiTi for bone replacement; diamond coatings for oil-well drill bits; zeolites; imaging sensor arrays and other instrumentation for flame and particulate diagnostics. The center also assists member companies in marketing the resulting products and processes.

  15. Student engagement in the school : interpersonal and inter-center differences.

    OpenAIRE

    Ros Martínez de Lahidalga, Iker

    2012-01-01

    This research project aim to identify differences in students’ engagement in school life, in terms of both sociopersonal characteristics (sex and educational stage) and type of school (state, private with some state funding and cooperative). Participants were 1229 students aged between 9 and 17 (598 from a worker cooperative and 631 from state and private stated-funded schools of the Basque Country and Catalonia). Three components were distinguished in engagement (emotional, behavioural and ...

  16. Student Engagement in the School: Interpersonal and Inter-Center Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Ros Martínez de Lahidalga, Iker; Goikoetxea Piédrola, Javier; Gairín, Joaquín; Lekue Rodríguez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Traducido al castellano e inglés [EN[This research project aims to identify differences in students’ engagement in School life, in terms of both socio-personal characteristics (sex and educational stage) and type of school (state, private with some state funding and cooperative). Participants were 1229 students aged between 9 and 17 (598 from a worker cooperative and 631 from state and private stated-funded schools of the Basque Country and Catalonia). Three components were distinguishe...

  17. Finding a Golden Mean in Education Policy: Centering Religious and Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bruce S.; McSween, Rose Byron; Murphy, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The separation between Church and State, private and public education, is blurring, and coming together, as the government gives families vouchers to attend private and religious schools. Religious groups are starting and supporting their own charter schools, and local jurisdictions (cities and counties) are providing free transportation and food…

  18. Chronic Childhood Trauma, Mental Health, Academic Achievement, and School-Based Health Center Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Satu; Chapman, Susan; Spetz, Joanne; Brindis, Claire D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Children and adolescents exposed to chronic trauma have a greater risk for mental health disorders and school failure. Children and adolescents of minority racial/ethnic groups and those living in poverty are at greater risk of exposure to trauma and less likely to have access to mental health services. School-based health centers…

  19. Active Living: development and quasi-experimental evaluation of a school-centered physical activity intervention for primary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kann, D.H.H. van; Jansen, M.W.J.; Vries, S.I. de; Vries, N.K. de; Kremers, S.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The worldwide increase in the rates of childhood overweight and physical inactivity requires successful prevention and intervention programs for children. The aim of the Active Living project is to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior of Dutch primary school children

  20. Middle School Students' Use of Epistemological Resources while Reasoning about Science Performance Tasks and Media Reports of Socioscientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Brandy L. E.

    The goal of science education is to prepare students to make decisions about the complicated socioscientific issues that are an inescapable part of modern life, from personal medical decisions to evaluating a political candidate's environmental platform. We cannot expect adults to maintain a deep conceptual understanding of the current state of every branch of science that might prove relevant to their lives, so we must prepare them to rely on other knowledge to make these decisions. Epistemological beliefs about scientific knowledge--what it is, its purpose, how it is constructed--are one type of knowledge that could be brought to bear when evaluating scientific claims. Complicating this situation is the fact that most adults will get most of their information about these socioscientific issues from the news media. Journalists do not have the same goals or norms as scientists, and this media lens can distort scientific issues. This dissertation addresses the question of whether we can assess epistemological change in a way that gives us meaningful information about how people will apply their epistemological understanding of science when they make decisions in the real world. First, I designed a written assessment made up of performance tasks to assess middle school students' implicit epistemological beliefs, and looked at whether we can use such an assessment to see epistemological change over two years. I then gave the same students news articles about whether there is a link between vaccines and autism and looked at their reasoning about this issue and how the journalistic features of two different articles impacted their reasoning. Finally, I examined the external validity of the epistemology assessment by looking at whether it predicted anything about students' responses to the news articles. While I was able to find evidence of differences between eighth graders' and sixth graders' use of epistemological resources within the performance tasks, I found that

  1. New Media and Children: Internet Content Preferences of Primary School Children in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Bati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As the technology develops and expands, computers have a very significant role in the world of children. The aim of this survey is to study the internet habits of 6-13 age groups of children. Moreover, we will deal with how they utilize the new media tools in Turkey. A questionnaire is prepared content with this research and is applied on 366 participants from various regions of Turkey. Sampling of the research consists of 366 children of 6-13 age groups. The research data are analyzed in the program of SPSS 10.0 in the frequency and chi square test analysis. The results of the field survey reveals: 61,9 % of children have internet access at home. In addition, 95,8 % of the children are internet users. 49,1 % of the children are in the internet to play games, 26 % of them to communicate with friends and only 6,0 % of the children use internet to do “homework”.

  2. School Libraries...Unfinished Business: A Report on New York City's Elementary School Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fund for New York City Public Education.

    Effective school library media centers are a cost-efficient way for schools to provide children with the sophisticated knowledge, research, and computer skills they will need for the growing demands of work and citizenship in the 21st century. The libraries' cultivation of literacy, research, and thinking skills is particularly crucial in…

  3. An adaptive approach to family-centered intervention in schools: linking intervention engagement to academic outcomes in middle and high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Connell, Arin; Dishion, Thomas J

    2009-09-01

    This study examined the impact of an adaptive approach to family intervention in public schools on academic outcomes from age 11 to 17. Students were randomly assigned to the three-session Family Check-Up (FCU), which is designed to motivate change in parenting practices by using an assessment-driven approach and strengths-based feedback. All services were voluntary, and approximately 25% of the families engaged in the FCU. Compared with matched controls, adolescents whose parents received the FCU maintained a satisfactory GPA into high school, and intervention engagement was associated with improved attendance. The highest-risk families were the most likely to engage in the family-centered intervention, suggesting the efficacy of integrating supportive services to families in the context of other schoolwide approaches to promote the success and achievement of vulnerable students.

  4. Prevalence of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM and Associated Hearing Impairment Among School-aged Children in Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Muftah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM is one of the leading causes of preventable disabling hearing impairment (DHI in developing countries. Early detection and management complements advances made in other survival programs, improves work capacity, and enhances learning opportunities for school children. We aimed to determine the prevalence of CSOM and associated DHI among school children aged six to 16 years in Socotra Island, Yemen. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional community-based survey, from 20 April 2011 to 20 June 2011. The study procedures involved completing a questionnaire, an otoscopic ear examination, an audiometric test of hearing, and tuning fork tests for the type of DHI. Results: A total of 686 children were interviewed and examined for CSOM and associated DHI of CSOM cases. The prevalence of CSOM was 7.4%, (95% CI 5.5–9.4. CSOM status was significantly associated with DHI (p=0.001, but no significant associations were found between demographic characteristics and CSOM status. Logistic regression identified four significant independent contributing factors: history of ear discharge in the last 12 months (odds ratio (OR 7.8, 95% CI 3.9–15.6; swimming in local pools (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.4–25.4; recurrent respiratory tract infection more than three times per year (OR 5.3, 95% CI 2.5–11.0; and overcrowding with more than three families per house (OR 4.4, 95% CI 1.7–11.5. . Conclusion: The burden of CSOM in the children studied indicates a high level of DHI in these communities within Yemen. A history of ear discharge, swimming in local pools, recurrent respiratory infections, and overcrowded housing were the strongest predictors for CSOM. There is a need for better ear care and screening programs for early detection and management of this disease.

  5. Efektivitas Corporate Identity Join Pre-School and Enrichment sebagai Media Promosi di Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendy Hosana M

    2009-01-01

    perusahaannya. Pencitraan diri dari suatu lembaga atau perusahaan yang sering kita kenal dengan corporate identity inilah yang akan dibahas melalui studi ini. Kata kunci: pendidikan usia dini, corporate identity, logo, media promosi.

  6. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 16, Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  7. Summer Research Program - 1997 High School Appenticeship Program Volume 16 Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  8. User-centered applications: Use of mobile information technologies to promote sustainable school healthcare services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida Veldsman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The youth, especially school going children, are the future of any society. It is therefore important that children should receive adequate healthcare support at an early age in order to strive to preserve and ensure better education and welfare of the children and continuity in societal success. Despite the strategic initiatives that aim at improving the general health of school going children, such as South Africa’s Integrated School Health Policy, there still exist challenges in support programmes meant to alleviate the barriers to effective healthcare towards improved education for the school children. Advances in ICT enable a fundamental redesign of healthcare processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to user-centric applications. This paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of user-centred technologies for healthcare in schools. The paper employs the User Experience Management Model (UXM2 to review the current and emerging trends, and highlights challenges related to the design of a typical m-ICT application that supports delivery of healthcare in schools. The paper reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain.

  9. Acceptability of School-Based Health Centers for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Visits: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Caitlin E; Okoloko, Edirin; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; North, Anna; Niccolai, Linda M

    2017-09-01

    Countries with high human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates have achieved this success largely through school-based vaccination. Using school-based health centers (SBHCs) in the United States, where HPV vaccine remains underutilized, could improve uptake. In this mixed-methods study, we examined acceptability, facilitators, and barriers of HPV vaccination visits at SBHCs from the perspectives of adolescents and parents. We conducted qualitative interviews and structured surveys with adolescents and parents recruited from an urban, hospital-based clinic. Interviews with parents (N = 20) and adolescents (N = 20) were audio-recorded and transcribed for analysis using an iterative thematic approach. Quantitative measures for a survey administered to parents (N = 131) were derived from the qualitative findings. Survey results were analyzed by chi-square tests. Many participants expressed favorable opinions of HPV vaccination at SBHCs in qualitative interviews. Facilitators included convenience, ease of scheduling, and not missing work or school. However, barriers were noted including concerns about obtaining care outside the medical home, fragmentation of medical records, and negative perceptions about SBHCs. Quantitative findings revealed that a higher proportion of parents with experience using SBHCs were willing to use a middle school (59.5%) or high school (80.5%) SBHC for HPV vaccinations compared with those who had not used SBHCs (p HPV vaccination visits at SBHCs were acceptable, and SBHC users expressed more favorable attitudes. Barriers to HPV vaccination at SBHCs can be addressed through more education about SBHCs' role, and improvement of systems to coordinate care. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  10. Assessment of indoor and outdoor PM species at schools and residences in a high-altitude Ecuadorian urban center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raysoni, Amit U; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, M Margaret; Montoya, Teresa; Eschanique, Patricia; Racines, Marcia; Li, Wen-Whai

    2016-07-01

    An air monitoring campaign to assess children's environmental exposures in schools and residences, both indoors and outdoors, was conducted in 2010 in three low-income neighborhoods in Z1 (north), Z2 (central), and Z3 (southeast) zones of Quito, Ecuador - a major urban center of 2.2 million inhabitants situated 2850 m above sea level in a narrow mountainous basin. Z1 zone, located in northern Quito, historically experienced emissions from quarries and moderate traffic. Z2 zone was influenced by heavy traffic in contrast to Z3 zone which experienced low traffic densities. Weekly averages of PM samples were collected at schools (one in each zone) and residences (Z1 = 47, Z2 = 45, and Z3 = 41) every month, over a twelve-month period at the three zones. Indoor PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 10.6 ± 4.9 μg/m(3) (Z1 school) to 29.0 ± 30.5 μg/m(3) (Z1 residences) and outdoor PM2.5 concentrations varied from 10.9 ± 3.2 μg/m(3) (Z1 school) to 14.3 ± 10.1 μg/m(3) (Z2 residences), across the three zones. The lowest values for PM10-2.5 for indoor and outdoor microenvironments were recorded at Z2 school, 5.7 ± 2.8 μg/m(3) and 7.9 ± 2.2 μg/m(3), respectively. Outdoor school PM concentrations exhibited stronger associations with corresponding indoor values making them robust proxies for indoor exposures in naturally ventilated Quito public schools. Correlation analysis between the school and residential PM size fractions and the various pollutant and meteorological parameters from central ambient monitoring (CAM) sites suggested varying degrees of temporal relationship. Strong positive correlation was observed for outdoor PM2.5 at Z2 school and its corresponding CAM site (r = 0.77) suggesting common traffic related emissions. Spatial heterogeneity in PM2.5 concentrations between CAM network and sampled sites was assessed using Coefficient of Divergence (COD) analysis. COD values were lower when CAM sites were paired with outdoor

  11. Treatment of wastewater from a school in a decentralized filtration system by percolation over organic packing media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón-Zúñiga, M A; Buelna, G

    2011-01-01

    Based on results obtained in the laboratory a WWTP composed of a septic tank and an aerated percolating filter packed with organic media was built for a school. The system can treat 18 m3 d(-1) and was operated with a hydraulic loading rate of 0.078 (m3 m(-2) d(-1). For 360 days different operational conditions including start-up; stabilization; operation with aeration and non aeration; effect of rainy season, breaks from activities due to holidays and restart; were monitored and described in the article. Once stabilized, the system was able to remove, without the need for mechanical aeration, 97% of BOD5, 71% of COD, 93% of TKN, 11% of PO(4-)-P, 95% of TSS, 96% of VSS, in addition to having a removal efficiency of 4 log units of Faecal Coliforms (FC) and 100% helminthes eggs (HE). With this quality, the treated wastewater can be chlorinated and reused to irrigate green areas and/or in toilets. Although sanitary wastewater has a high concentration of Total-N (250 mg L(-1)) and a C/N ratio of less than 1, the system removed 65% of Total-N. Finally it was observed that after non activity periods, there was neither system failure nor the need to re-stabilize the system.

  12. DIY Media in the Classroom: New Literacies Across Content Areas (Middle Through High School). Language & Literacy Series (Practitioner's Bookshelf)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetti, Barbara; Elliot, Kate; Welsch, Diana

    2010-01-01

    This book shows teachers how to bring students' Do-It-Yourself media practices into the classroom (Grades 6-12). In one accessible resource, the authors explain DIY media, identify their appealing features for content area instruction, and describe the literacy skills and strategies they promote. Chapters address: Adolescents' DIY Media as New…

  13. Looking through Time: A Longitudinal Study of Children's Media Violence Consumption at Home and Aggressive Behaviors at School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Linder, Jennifer R.; Walsh, David A.

    Many studies have shown that media violence has an effect on children's subsequent aggression. This study expands upon previous research in three directions: (1) by examining several subtypes of aggression (verbal, relational, and physical); (2) by measuring media violence exposure across three types of media (television, movies/videos, and video…

  14. CVD Prevention Through Policy: a Review of Mass Media, Food/Menu Labeling, Taxation/Subsidies, Built Environment, School Procurement, Worksite Wellness, and Marketing Standards to Improve Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Afshin, Ashkan; Penalvo, Jose; Del Gobbo, Liana; Kashaf, Michael; Micha, Renata; Morrish, Kurtis; Pearson-Stuttard, Jonathan; Rehm, Colin; Shangguan, Siyi; Smith, Jessica D.; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Poor diet is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease in the USA and globally. Evidence-based policies are crucial to improve diet and population health. We reviewed the effectiveness for a range of policy levers to alter diet and diet-related risk factors. We identified evidence to support benefits of focused mass media campaigns (especially for fruits, vegetables, salt), food pricing strategies (both subsidies and taxation, with stronger effects at lower income levels), school procuremen...

  15. Comprehension with Instructional Media for Middle School Science: Holistic Performative Design Strategy and Cognitive Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Matthew Owen

    This study identifies three distinct levels of text-image integration in page design in a linear relationship of lesser to greater integration: prose primary, prose subsumed, and fully integrated strategies. Science textbook pages were redesigned according to these holistic design strategies for 158 7th-grade students. There were three separate treatment tests, as well as a pre-test and post-test, and pilot tests with both undergraduate students and the subjects themselves. Subjects found the fully integrated strategy to produce the most visually interesting designs and the prose primary strategy to produce the least interesting, with prose subsumed definitively in between (according to 95% confidence intervals). The strategy employed significantly altered interest in science subject matter in one of three treatments (ANOVA, P=0.0446), where a Student's t-test revealed that the prose subsumed strategy produced higher interest in subject matter than prose primary. The strategy employed significantly altered comprehension of abstract relationships in one of three treatments (ANOVA, P=0.0202), where a Student's t-test revealed that the fully integrated strategy resulted in greater comprehension than prose primary. For the same treatment condition significant differences were found through ANOVA for factual-level knowledge (P=0.0289) but not conceptual-level knowledge ( P=0.0586). For factual-level knowledge prose primary resulted in lesser comprehension than both prose subsumed and fully integrated. Comprehension is defined according to cognitive load theory. No strategy impact on perception of task difficulty was found. This study was approved by North Carolina State University's Institutional Review Board and Wake County Public School System's Research Review Committee.

  16. School Library Supplement. Putting Your Library Automation System to Work [and] Using Videodiscs in Research Projects [and] Library Security: What to Look For [and] Expanding Library/Media Services with Media Retrieval [and] How to Network CD-ROMs (and) The School Library Resource Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpisek, Marian; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents five articles and a company resource directory to help librarians successfully incorporate technology into school libraries. Discusses actual situations, examines student needs, and gives advice to help librarians with library automation systems, videodiscs, library security systems, media retrieval, networking CD-ROMs, and locating…

  17. Trends in internet search activity, media coverage, and patient-centered health information after the FDA safety communications on surgical mesh for pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Benjamin V; Forde, James C; Levit, Valerie B; Lee, Richard K; Te, Alexis E; Chughtai, Bilal

    2016-11-01

    In July 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety communication regarding serious complications associated with surgical mesh for pelvic organ prolapse, prompting increased media and public attention. This study sought to analyze internet search activity and news article volume after this FDA warning and to evaluate the quality of websites providing patient-centered information. Google Trends™ was utilized to evaluate search engine trends for the term "pelvic organ prolapse" and associated terms between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2014. Google News™ was utilized to quantify the number of news articles annually under the term "pelvic organ prolapse." The search results for the term "pelvic organ prolapse" were assessed for quality using the Health On the Net Foundation (HON) certification. There was a significant increase in search activity from 37.42 in 2010 to 57.75 in 2011, at the time of the FDA communication (p = 0.021). No other annual interval had a statistically significant increase in search activity. The single highest monthly search activity, given the value of 100, was August 2011, immediately following the July 2011 notification, with the next highest value being 98 in July 2011. Linear regression analysis of news articles per year since the FDA communication revealed r 2  = 0.88, with a coefficient of 186. Quality assessment demonstrated that 42 % of websites were HON-certified, with .gov sites providing the highest quality information. Although the 2011 FDA safety communication on surgical mesh was associated with increased public and media attention, the quality of relevant health information on the internet remains of poor quality. Future quality assurance measures may be critical in enabling patients to play active roles in their own healthcare.

  18. High and low use of electronic media during nighttime before going to sleep: A comparative study between adolescents attending a morning or afternoon school shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrona-Palacios, Arturo

    2017-12-01

    This study compared the effects of time spent on electronic media devices during nighttime before going to sleep on the sleep-wake cycle, daytime sleepiness, and chronotype in 568 Mexican students (288 girls, mean age = 14.08) attending a double school shift system (287 from morning shift and 281 from afternoon shift). Students completed anonymous self-report questionnaires. Results suggest that high exposure to an electronic media device may have an impact on their sleep-wake cycle, regardless of their school shift. Adolescents from the afternoon shift reported more time spent on devices. Those from the morning shift reported daytime sleepiness with the use of MP3 player, and from the afternoon shift with the use of computer, MP3 player, and television. Both school shifts reported an intermediate chronotype with all electronic media devices, but the afternoon shift with a tendency towards eveningness with the use of the computer, smartphone, and MP3 player. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. THEORETICAL ASPECTS OF READINESS OF TEACHERS IN VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO IMPLEMENT STUDENT-CENTERED APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Tkachuk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the problem of readiness for professional (educational activity of teachers in vocational schools. The paper determines the relevance of readiness of teachers of special subjects of vocational schools to personality-oriented professional interaction with students and singled pedagogical conditions that determine this process. The analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature on the interpretation of the concepts of "readiness" and "commitment to the professional (educational activities" is conducted. The features of this type of activity are revealed. It is determined that in the modern branch of science the phenomenon of readiness for professional work is studied at the personal, functional and personal-activity levels. The author suggests the generalized definition of "readiness for professional (teaching activity" in the context of personal interaction between the participants of the educational process of vocational school.

  20. Youth Rising: Centering Youth Voice in the Quest for Equitable and Inclusive Schools. Equity by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Taucia; Love, Larry D.; Johnson, Mary L.; Picón, Ninoska; Velázquez, Josué

    2017-01-01

    This Equity Brief focuses on disrupting the dominant narratives around inclusion by asking the question, "Whose Voice Matters" in creating inclusive schools. Ensuring that youth from historically marginalized groups have leadership opportunities and have their voices heard is one way to support and empower them. Supporting students of…

  1. Know Your School District: Tips for Parents. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets. PHP-c112

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Becoming familiar with the school district will help parents become active and involved partners in their child's education. Research has demonstrated that family involvement in children's education can boost their academic success. Knowing about the following areas, which are discussed in this information sheet, can help parental involvement at…

  2. Development of a Student-Centered Instrument to Assess Middle School Students' Conceptual Understanding of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and field test of the Sound Concept Inventory Instrument (SCII), designed to measure middle school students' concepts of sound. The instrument was designed based on known students' difficulties in understanding sound and the history of science related to sound and focuses on two main aspects of sound: sound…

  3. Creating a Sustainable Model for Establishing Youth Gardens in Schools and Childcare Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William; Friese, Bettina; Carrel, Aaron; Meinen, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The goal of the program was to establish youth gardens across Wisconsin by conducting workshops for school staff and childcare providers on how to start and sustain a youth garden with limited resources. Methods: Evaluation utilized an end-of-workshop questionnaire and follow-up survey. The end-of-workshop questionnaire focused…

  4. School Subsidies for the Poor: Evaluating the Mexican Progresa Poverty Program. Center Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, T. Paul

    In rural Mexico, the Progresa program provided educational grants to poor mothers of children enrolled in grades 3-9 and attending 85 percent of the school days. Payments were increased at the higher grades, a premium was paid for girls enrolled in grades 7-9, and every 6 months the grants were adjusted upward to compensate for inflation. The…

  5. Foreign Language Education: Principles of Teaching English to Adults at Commercial Language Schools and Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnopolsky, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    The ever-increasing spread of English as the language of global communication leads to ever-increasing demand for learning it among adult populations of non-English-speaking countries. If such people did not have a chance of acquiring English during their school or university years but urgently need it for professional or personal purposes, they…

  6. Cataract in children attending schools for the blind and resource centers in eastern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msukwa, Gerald; Njuguna, Margaret; Tumwesigye, Cillasy; Shilio, Bernadeth; Courtright, Paul; Lewallen, Susan

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe results of a representative sample of children who have undergone cataract surgery in schools for the blind in 4 African countries. Cross-sectional study. Children enrolled at schools for the blind in Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda. We used a population-proportional-to-size methodology to select a representative sample of schools for the blind and annexes and included all the children attending the selected schools. Trained teams using standardized examination methods and a modified World Health Organization form examined the children. The form was modified specifically to collect information on outcomes of cataract surgery. Operative status and postoperative visual acuity. Of 1062 children examined, 196 (18%) had undergone cataract surgery or had cataract as the major cause of visual impairment; 140 (71%) had bilateral surgery, 24 (12%) had unilateral surgery, and 32 (16%) had not had surgery. Of operated eyes, 118 (41%) had visual acuity > or =20/200. Intraocular lenses were implanted in 65% of the operated eyes. Eyes with intraocular lens were more likely to have better vision than those without (P for trend = 0.04). Amblyopia was the most common cause of poor visual acuity in children who had undergone cataract surgery. The number of children in the schools who receive cataract surgery has increased greatly since 1995. The high rate of amblyopia highlights the critical need for programs to find children earlier and to ensure adequate follow-up after surgery. Without such programs, the value of training pediatric surgeons will not be fully realized. The authors have no proprietary or commercial interest in any materials discussed in this article.

  7. Partnering with Universities, a NASA Visitor Center, Schools, and the INSPIRE Project to Perform Research and Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M.; Smith, J. A.; Kloostra, E.; Knupp, K. R.; Taylor, K.; Anderson, S.; Baskauf, C. J.; Buckner, S.; DiMatties, J.; Fry, C. D.; Gaither, B.; Galben, C. W.; Gallagher, D. L.; Heaston, M. P.; Kraft, J.; Meisch, K.; Mills, R.; Nations, C.; Nielson, D.; Oelgoetz, J.; Rawlins, L. P.; Sudbrink, D. L.; Wright, A.

    2017-12-01

    For the August 2017 eclipse, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center partnered with the U.S. Space and Rocket Center (USSRC), Austin Peay State University (APSU) in Clarksville, Tennessee, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), the Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiments (INSPIRE) Project, and the local school systems of Montgomery County, Tennessee, and Christian County, Kentucky. Multiple site visits and workshops were carried out during the first eight months of 2017 to prepare local teachers and students for the eclipse. A special curriculum was developed to prepare USSRC Space Camp and INSPIRE students to observe and participate in science measurements during the eclipse. Representatives from Christian County school system and APSU carried out observations for the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) Experiment in two separate locations. UAH and APSU as part of the Montana State Ballooning Project, launched balloons containing video cameras and other instruments. USSRC Space Camp students and counselors and INSPIRE students conducted science experiments that included the following: atmospheric science investigations of the atmospheric boundary layer, very-low frequency and Ham radio observations to investigate ionospheric responses to the eclipse, animal and insect observations, solar-coronal observations, eclipse shadow bands. We report on the results of all these investigations.

  8. School-Based Health Centers Make Sense: Ensuring All Kids Have Access to the Health Care They Need to Be Healthy and Safe, and to Do Their Best in School. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children Now, 2014

    2014-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) are an innovative and effective way to address California's severe health care access problem among children. By providing critical health care services to kids in school, SBHCs ensure children get the medical, mental health, and dental care they need to be healthy and safe, and to support their ability to…

  9. Benefits and costs of Channel One in a middle school setting and the role of media-literacy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Erica Weintraub; Chen, Yi-Chun Yvonnes; Pinkleton, Bruce E; Quintero Johnson, Jessie

    2006-03-01

    Channel One is a public-affairs program that includes 10 minutes of news and 2 minutes of paid product advertising or public service announcements. Advocates assert that it increases public-affairs knowledge, but critics charge that it garners a captive audience for teen-targeted advertising. This experiment analyzed the differential effects of Channel One depending on whether early-adolescent viewers received a media-literacy lesson in conjunction with viewing the program. Outcomes included perceptions of Channel One news programming, recall of program content and advertising, materialism, and political efficacy. Researchers used a posttest-only field experiment (N = 240) of seventh- and eighth-grade students using random assignment to conditions. Conditions included a control group, a group that received a fact-based lesson, and a group that received the same lesson content using a more emotive teaching style. It was expected that the emotion-added lesson condition would be more effective than the logic-only lesson condition because of its motivational component. On average, students remembered more ads from Channel One than news stories. Participants in the control group remembered fewer news stories than did the groups that received the lessons. Students reported having purchased during the preceding 3 months an average of 2.5 items advertised on the program. Both fact-based and affect-added training increased student skepticism toward advertisers. As expected, student liking of the program enhanced their learning from it and was associated with higher levels of political efficacy. Students held misconceptions about the role of their school in the production of Channel One. The use of Channel One by schools can have benefits, but these come with risk that some may consider unacceptable. On the positive side, student liking of the program was associated with their political efficacy. Although those who responded positively to program content and presentation

  10. Young People’s Narratives of Media and Identity: Mediagraphy as Identity Work in Upper Secondary School

    OpenAIRE

    Schofield, Daniel; Kupiainen, Reijo P.

    2015-01-01

    The article explores how upper secondary students use the learning activity mediagraphy to reflect on their identity and on media as constraining and enabling factors in their social practice. In mediagraphy, the students research four generations of their own families, including themselves. They write a mediagraphy essay on the differences and similarities across the generations in media use and turning points in individuals’ lives, in addition to societal and media-related developments. Dat...

  11. The current state of the center for the creation and dissemination of new Japanese nursing science: The 21st century Center of Excellence at Chiba University School of Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    中村 伸枝; 石垣, 和子; 正木, 治恵; 宮崎, 美砂子; 山本, 則子

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The Center of Excellence for the Creation and Dissemination of a New Japanese Nursing Science at Chiba University School of Nursing is now in its third year of operation. This center aims to develop nursing science that is appropriate for Japanese culture and to internationally disseminate the importance of culturally based care. Our project seeks to systematically transform the art of nursing practise into a nursing science. Method: To date, multiple frameworks have been created through...

  12. School Choice Considerations and the Role of Social Media as Perceived by Computing Students: Evidence from One University in Manila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansigan, Rolando R.; Moraga, Shirley D.; Batalla, Ma. Ymelda C.; Bringula, Rex P.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study utilized a validated questionnaire that gathered data from freshmen of two different school years. Demographic profile, marketers (i.e., source of information of students about the school), influencers (i.e., significant others that persuaded them to enroll in the school), level of school choice, and level of consideration…

  13. The home electronic media environment and parental safety concerns: relationships with outdoor time after school and over the weekend among 9-11 year old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Hannah J; Standage, Martyn; Gillison, Fiona B; Cumming, Sean P; Katzmarzyk, Peter T

    2018-04-05

    Time spent outdoors is associated with higher physical activity levels among children, yet it may be threatened by parental safety concerns and the attraction of indoor sedentary pursuits. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between these factors and outdoor time during children's discretionary periods (i.e., after school and over the weekend). Data from 462 children aged 9-11 years old were analysed using generalised linear mixed models. The odds of spending > 1 h outdoors after school, and > 2 h outdoors on a weekend were computed, according to demographic variables, screen-based behaviours, media access, and parental safety concerns. Interactions with sex and socioeconomic status (SES) were explored. Boys, low SES participants, and children who played on their computer for  1 h outside after school than girls, high SES children and those playing on a computer for ≥2 h, respectively. Counterintuitive results were found for access to media devices and crime-related safety concerns as both of these were positively associated with time spent outdoors after school. A significant interaction for traffic-related concerns*sex was found; higher road safety concerns were associated with lower odds of outdoor time after school in boys only. Age was associated with weekend outdoor time, which interacted with sex and SES; older children were more likely to spend > 2 h outside on weekends but this was only significant among girls and high SES participants. Our results suggest that specific groups of children are less likely to spend their free time outside, and it would seem that only prolonged recreational computer use has a negative association with children's outdoor time after school. Further research is needed to explore potential underlying mechanisms, and parental safety concerns in more detail.

  14. Within the School and the Community--A Speaker's Bureau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Joy H.

    Student interest prompted the formation of a Speaker's Bureau in Seminole Senior High School, Seminole, Florida. First, students compiled a list of community contacts, including civic clubs, churches, retirement villages, newspaper offices, and the County School Administration media center. A letter of introduction was composed and speaking…

  15. Family-centered services for children with complex communication needs: the practices and beliefs of school-based speech-language pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandak, Kelsey; Light, Janice

    2018-06-01

    This study used an online focus group to examine the beliefs and practices of school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who served children with complex communication needs regarding their provision of family-centered services. Participants revealed that despite their desire for family involvement and reported beliefs in the importance of family-centered services, there were barriers in place that often limited family-centered service provision. Across the SLPs, many were dissatisfied with their current provision of family-centered services. The SLPs varied in their reported practices, with some reporting family-centered services and others, professional-centered services. Future research is recommended in order to investigate which factors contribute to the variation among SLPs and how the variation impacts children who require augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and their families. Potential clinical implications for in-service and pre-service SLPs are discussed to improve future family-centered AAC services.

  16. Using a mixed-methods approach to measure impact of a school-based nutrition and media education intervention study on fruit and vegetable intake of Italian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Elena; Evans, Alexandra; Ranjit, Nalini; Pria, Simona Dalla; Messina, Laura

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of a school-based nutrition and media education intervention on the promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption to help prevent childhood obesity. The 10-week-long intervention included sessions on nutrition education and media literacy. It also included a health communication media-based campaign workshop during which the children created posters, newsletters and video commercials related to fruits and vegetables targeted to their parents. For evaluation purposes, the study utilized a mixed-methods approach, including a quasi-experimental study (with one intervention group and one control group) and a focus group study. Four different elementary schools in Treviso (Veneto Region of Italy) agreed to participate in the research. The target population for the study included 10-year-old Italian children and their parents. Data indicate that this intervention was effective for children but not for parents. Evaluation results show that the intervention was effective in significantly increasing children's fruit and vegetable intake (Pmedia education intervention to address the children's obesity issue and, in particular, to increase children's fruit and vegetable intake. The study also opens a new perspective on the theoretical constructs investigated, because the development of 'ability of expression' could be considered one of the most important factors to determine the efficacy of the intervention.

  17. Otitis Media: Implications of Fluctuating, Conductive Hearing Loss on Learning and Behaviour in High School Age Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenton, Jan

    This paper provides an overview of the effects of otitis media on the learning and behavior of children and youth. It begins by describing the conductive hearing loss that is caused by otitis media and the classroom behavior that can result, including poor concentration and attention, disobedience, irritability, and poor social skills. Discussed…

  18. Solar energy system performance evaluation: Scattergood School Recreation Center, West Branch, Iowa, September 1977--May 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-07-01

    An operational summary is provided of the solar energy system performance at Scattergood School, West Branch, Iowa. This analysis is made by evaluation of measured system performance and by comparison of measured climatic data with long term average climatic conditions. Performance of major subsystems is also presented to illustrate their operation. The solar energy system, utilizing 2496 square feet of flat plate, air collectors, supplies a portion of the space heating and domestic hot water requirements for the 6900 square foot gymnasium and 1966 square feet of locker rooms at the Scattergood School, West Branch, Iowa. The solar energy system was installed during building construction. A 6000 bushel grain dryer, installed later, may also use the solar system during its operation. Included are: a brief system description, review of actual system performance during the report period, analysis of performance based on evaluation of climatic, load and operational conditions, and an overall discussion of results. The Scattergood solar energy system availability was 65 percent for the ECSS subsystem, 95 percent for the space heating subsystem and 55 percent for the hot water heating subsystem. The ECSS availability was affected by a malfunction of the total solar system during April 1--8 and April 14 through May 11. The hot water availability was greatly affected by the failure of the subsystem and resultant repair interval. The space heating subsystem operated throughout the entire reporting period except when the solar system was down in April and May.

  19. A multilevel approach to family-centered prevention in schools: process and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishion, T J; Kavanagh, K

    2000-01-01

    The Adolescent Transitions Program (ATP) is a multilevel approach to family-based interventions within a middle-school setting. The intervention strategy is based on an ecological framework for studying social and emotional development in children and adolescents, emphasizing a network of contextual factors within which parenting is both directly and indirectly influential on the development of problem behavior. The ATP model includes a universal, selected, and indicated strategy for serving families with young adolescents. The model is designed to address the needs of families of young adolescents that present with a range of problem behavior and diverse developmental histories. The three interventions levels are described, and outcome data are presented, that support the effectiveness of the ATP model. This approach and the associated data are consistent with a broad literature supporting the effectiveness of family interventions, especially for high-risk youth. The effective implementation of family interventions within a school context suggests that these interventions can make a significant contribution to reducing problem behavior and substance use from a public health perspective.

  20. Assessment of Two School-Based Programs to Prevent Universal Eating Disorders: Media Literacy and Theatre-Based Methodology in Spanish Adolescent Boys and Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Mora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the long-term effects of two school-based prevention programs administered to a universal mixed-sex sample of school-going adolescents on disturbed eating attitudes, aesthetic ideal internalization, and other eating disorder risk factors, when compared to a control group. Methods. Participants were 200 adolescents aged 12–15 selected by means of incidental sampling from second-year compulsory secondary education at schools. An interactive multimedia media literacy program (ML + NUT, Media Literacy and Nutrition and a program focused on the same topics using dramatic arts (Theatre Alive were applied and compared with a control group. Pretest, posttest (1 month later, and 5- and 13-month follow-up measurements were taken. Analyses were conducted with two-way mixed 3×3 ANCOVA (group × phase adjusted by baseline levels, body mass index, and sex. Results. Participants in both experimental groups showed significantly higher self-esteem scores than the control group over time. The ML + NUT group also presented lower aesthetic ideal internalization scores than the control group. Discussion. Both programs can benefit students’ self-esteem. Moreover, ML + NUT program was useful in reducing thin-ideal internalization. However, differences in body dissatisfaction and disordered eating attitudes were not found. The programs may be protective on the core psychological variables, which are essential to adaptive adolescent development.

  1. Screen media time usage of 12-16 year-old Spanish school adolescents: Effects of personal and socioeconomic factors, season and type of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devís-Devís, José; Peiró-Velert, Carmen; Beltrán-Carrillo, Vicente J; Tomás, José Manuel

    2009-04-01

    This study examined screen media time usage (SMTU) and its association with personal and socioeconomic factors, as well as the effect of season and type of day, in a Spanish sample of 12-16 year-old school adolescents (N=323). The research design was a cross-sectional survey, in which an interviewer-administered recall questionnaire was used. Statistical analyses included repeated measures analyses of variance, analysis of covariance and structural equation models. Results showed an average of 2.52h per day of total SMTU and partial times of 1.73h per day in TV viewing, 0.27h per day in computer/videogames, and 0.52h per day in mobile use. Four significant predictors of SMTU emerged. Firstly, the type of school was associated with the three media of our study, particularly students from state/public school spent more time on them than their private schools counterparts. Secondly, older adolescents (14-16 years old) were more likely to use computer/videogame and mobile phone than younger adolescents. Thirdly, the more accessibility to household technology the more probable computer/videogames and mobile phone were used. Finally, boys spent significantly more time in mobile phone than girls. Additionally, results revealed that adolescents seemed to consume more TV and computer/videogames in autumn than in winter, and more TV and mobile phones on weekends than on weekdays, especially among state school students. Findings from this study contribute to the existing knowledge on adolescents' SMTU patterns that can be transferred to families and policies.

  2. Child-centered versus teacher-directed teaching practices: Associations with the development of academic skills in the first grade at school

    OpenAIRE

    Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Kiuru, Noona; Pakarinen, Eija; Poikkeus, Anna-Maija; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Siekkinen, Martti; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which child-centered versus teacher-directed teaching practices predicted the development of children’s reading and math skills in the first year of elementary school. In addition, we investigated whether associations between teaching practices and children’s academic skills development in Grade 1 differed among children who had low, average, or high initial academic skills at the beginning of school. The reading and math skills of 1,132 Finnish c...

  3. Introduction to Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riler, Robert

    Designed for senior high school students, this one semester course focuses on four aspects of modern media: television, film, radio, and advertising. Each topic is worked into a weekly lesson plan format that stresses the active involvement of students in the learning process. The course outline contains lists of objectives and media materials…

  4. An Adaptive CBPR Approach to Create Weight Management Materials for a School-Based Health Center Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Sussman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. From our previous clinical work with overweight/obese youth, we identified the need for research to create an effective weight management intervention to address the growing prevalence of adolescent metabolic syndrome. Formative assessment through an adaptive community-based participatory research (CBPR approach was conducted toward the development of a nutritional and physical activity (DVD and clinician toolkit for a school-based health center (SBHC weight management intervention. Methods. We first conducted parent and adolescent interviews on views and experiences about obesity while convening a community advisory council (CAC recruited from two participating urban New Mexico high schools. Thematic findings from the interviews were analyzed with the CAC to develop culturally and developmentally appropriate intervention materials. Results. Themes from the parent and adolescent interviews included general barriers/challenges, factors influencing motivation, and change facilitators. The CAC and university-based research team reached consensus on the final content of nutrition and physical activity topics to produce a DVD and clinician toolkit through six monthly sessions. These materials used in the SBHC intervention resulted in a greater reduction of body mass index when compared to adolescents receiving standard care. Conclusions. Formative assessment using an adaptive CBPR approach resulted in the creation of culturally and age appropriate weight reduction materials that were acceptable to study participants. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00841334.

  5. National Science Resources Center Project for Improving Science Teaching in Elementary Schools. Appendix A. School Systems With Exemplary Elementary Science Programs. Appendix B. Elementary Science Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    Glass, Lawrence, Deer Park High School Glass, Millard, K-12 Science Supervisor Bloomfield Municipal School District Glassman, Neil, Gleason, Steve...Superientendent Vaughn Municipal Schools Knop, Ronald N., Teacher Grissom Junior High School Knox, Amie, Director of Master Teacher Program W. Wilson...Science Supervisor Pequannock Township Public Schools Mercado , Roberto, Science Coordinator Colegio Radians, Inc. Merchant, Edwin, K-12 Science

  6. Addressing medical school diversity through an undergraduate partnership at Texas A&M Health Science Center: a blueprint for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Alan R; Daniels, Dennis E; Hester, R Kelly; Colenda, Christopher C

    2008-05-01

    Imperative to increasing diversity in the physician workforce is increasing the pool of qualified underrepresented minority applicants to medical schools. With this goal in mind, the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine (A&M College of Medicine) has partnered with Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU), a historically black college and university that is a component of the Texas A&M university system, to develop the undergraduate medical academy (UMA). The UMA was established by legislative mandate in 2003 and is a state-funded program. The authors describe the development of partnership between the A&M College of Medicine and PVAMU, focusing on the key attributes that have been identified for success. The administrative structure of the UMA ensures that the presidents of the two institutions collaborate to address issues of program oversight and facilitates a direct relationship between the dean and associate dean for academic affairs of A&M College of Medicine and the director of the UMA to define the program objectives and structure. The authors delineate the admission process to the UMA, as well as the academic requirements of the program. Students attend lecture series during the academic year and participate in summer programs on the A&M College of Medicine campus in addition to receiving intensive academic counseling and opportunities for tutoring in several subjects. The authors also describe the initial success in medical school admissions for UMA students. This partnership provides a model blueprint that can be adopted and adapted by other medical schools focused on increasing diversity in medicine.

  7. Stennis Space Center Salinity Drifter Project. A Collaborative Project with Hancock High School, Kiln, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcic, Maria; Turowski, Mark; Hall, Callie

    2010-01-01

    Presentation topics include: importance of salinity of coastal waters, habitat switching algorithm, habitat switching module, salinity estimates from Landsat for Sabine Calcasieu Basin, percent of time inundated in 2006, salinity data, prototyping the system, system as packaged for field tests, salinity probe and casing, opening for water flow, cellular antenna used to transmit data, preparing to launch, system is launched in the Pearl River at Stennis Space Center, data are transmitted to Twitter by cell phone modem every 15 minutes, Google spreadsheet I used to import the data from the Twitter feed and to compute salinity (from conductivity) and display charts of salinity and temperature, results are uploaded to NASA's Applied Science and Technology Project Office Webpage.

  8. Nursing schools and academic health centers: toward improved alignment and a synergistic partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Azita; Jaffe, Darcy; Minton-Foltz, Paula; Parker, Grace; Manfredi, Susan; Braungardt, Theresa; Marley, Kelly W; Cooley, Laura; Siem, Staishy Bostick

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a national survey which the University of Washington conducted among leaders of 32 US academic nursing institutions that are part of academic health centers (AHCs) and complements these findings with results from a separate report by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. While expressing overall satisfaction with their AHC relationships, these leaders find that nursing is often given greater parity in matters of education and research than in mission setting, financial, and governance matters. AHCs are being asked to meet new health care challenges in new ways, starting with the education of health care professionals. AHCs need to be restructured to give nursing full parity if the nation's and world's needs for preventive and clinical care are to be best met.

  9. Accountability Synopticism: How a Think Tank and the Media Developed a Quasimarket for School Choice in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Michael; Webb, P. Taylor

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes how a locally developed school ranking system affected student enrolment patterns in British Columbia over time. In developing an annual school "report card" that was published in newspapers and online, the Vancouver-based Fraser Institute created a marketplace for school choice by devising an accountability scheme…

  10. Relationship between age at menarche and exposure to sexual content in audio-visual media and other factors in Islamic junior high school girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tity Wulandari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In recent decades, girls have experienced menarche at earlier ages, which may have negative effects on health. Exposure to audio-visual media and other factors may influence the age at menarche, although past studies have produced inconsistent results. Objective To assess for relationships between the age at menarche and audio-visual media exposure, socio-economic status, nutritional status, physical activity, and psychosocial dysfunction in adolescent girls. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted from August to October 2015 in students from two integrated Islamic junior high schools in Medan, North Sumatera. There were 216 students who met the inclusion criteria: aged 10-16 years and experienced menarche. They were asked to fill out questionnaires that had been previously validated, regarding their history of exposure to audio-visual media, physical activity, and psychosocial dysfunction. The data were analyzed by Chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests in order to assess for relationships between audio-visual media exposure and other potential factors with the age at menarche. Results Of 261 female students at the two schools, 216 had undergone menarche, with a mean age at menarche of 11.6 (SD 1.13 years. There was no significant relationship between age at menarche and audio-visual media exposure (P=0.68. Also, there were no significant relationships between factors such as socio-economic and psychosocial status with age at menarche (P=0.64 and P=0.28, respectively. However, there were significant relationships between earlier age at menarche and overweight/obese nutritional status (P=0.02 as well as low physical activity (P=0.01. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that low physical activity had the strongest influence on early menarche (RP=2.40; 95%CI 0.92 to 6.24. Conclusion Age at menarche is not significantly associated with sexual content of audio-visual media exposure. However, there were significant

  11. A model for training medical student innovators: the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care Abundance Agents of Change program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, David B; Sullivan, Erin E; Minter-Jordan, Myechia; Giesen, Lindsay; Ellner, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care established the Abundance Agents of Change (AoC) program to promote interprofessional learning and innovation, increase partnership between 15 academic and community health centers (CHCs) in Boston's most under-served communities, and increase medical student interest in primary care careers. The AoC is modeled in the form of a 'grants challenge', offering $20,000 to interprofessional student teams to develop an innovative solution that addresses a healthcare delivery need identified by CHCs. The program's initial two years were characterized by a four-stage process which included working with CHCs and crafting a request for proposals, forming interprofessional 20 student teams comprising students from across and outside of Harvard University, training students using a systems-based innovation curriculum, and performing program evaluation. Our evaluation data from cohorts 1 and 2 of the AoC program demonstrate that we succeeded in training students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams. We also learned valuable lessons regarding creating better alignment with CHC priorities, extending the program cycle from 12 to 18 months, and changing the way funding is disbursed to 25 students, which will be incorporated in later versions of the program. Based on our experience and evaluation data, we believe that this program is a replicable way to train students as innovators and members of interprofessional teams to address the current complex healthcare environment.

  12. Cafe Society: Do School Libraries Need a Double Shot of Espresso?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Debra Lau

    2008-01-01

    When Jim Chadwell, the former principal of Northwest High School in Texas, renovated his media center four years ago, he had two things in mind: Starbucks and Barnes & Noble. According to Media Specialist Naomi Bates, Chadwell wanted a place where students could read, do research, and work on classroom assignments, but also socialize. That is…

  13. Library Automation Report, 1996. Multimedia Computers in U.S. Public Schools, 1995-96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Education Data, Inc., Denver, CO.

    District library media directors face dual demands including competition for limited educational dollars and the need to meet increasingly sophisticated student research requests. To solve these dilemmas, many districts are automating their schools' library media centers. Quality Education Data (QED) is an education research firm providing…

  14. Motricity, art and corporal expression. An experience through school center visits to exhibition rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Irene Hernández Rodríguez

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we intend to go beyond the educational possibilities that a non formal context generates. Art, motricity and expression are the main features of this research. We developed an activity called «Visitas culturales» , cultural visits, in several schools in Almería, where we worked with art and corporal expression at the same time from a wide point of view. The sensations and emotions of the children played the main role, highlighting the personal identity of each one. Our main aim was using art and corporal expression as a means to discover, arousing sensations and significances in the children that, probably they went unnoticed, enlarging the knowledge, not only of themselves but also of the world that sourrounds them. We consider that it is crucial creating a series of competences in the pupils, as well as appreciating and valuing in a critical way the different cultural and artistic expressions. It is also important using them as a source of enjoyment and personal enrichment. Becoming familiar with past and present expressions, boosting the aesthetic development, the creativity, the convergent and divergent thinking to facilitates the communication as well as the enrichment of differents realities and productions connected to the world of arts and culture.

  15. Using Carl Rogers' person-centered model to explain interpersonal relationships at a school of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Venise D; Lindo, Jascinth; Anderson-Johnson, Pauline; Weaver, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Faculty members are viewed as nurturers within the academic setting and may be able to influence students' behaviors through the formation of positive interpersonal relationships. Faculty members' attributes that best facilitated positive interpersonal relationships according to Carl Rogers' Person-Centered Model was studied. Students (n = 192) enrolled in a 3-year undergraduate nursing program in urban Jamaica were randomly selected to participate in this descriptive cross-sectional study. A 38-item questionnaire on interpersonal relationships with nursing faculty and students' perceptions of their teachers was utilized to collect data. Factor analysis was used to create factors of realness, prizing, and empathetic understanding. Multiple linear regression analysis on the interaction of the 3 factors and interpersonal relationship scores was performed while controlling for nursing students' study year and age. One hundred sixty-five students (mean age: 23.18 ± 4.51years; 99% female) responded. The regression model explained over 46% of the variance. Realness (β = 0.50, P < .001) was the only significant predictor of the interpersonal relationship scores assigned by the nursing students. Of the total number of respondents, 99 students (60%) reported satisfaction with the interpersonal relationships shared with faculty. Nursing students' perception of faculty members' realness appeared to be the most significant attribute in fostering positive interpersonal relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A escola na mídia: entre inovações e controles/School on the media: among innovations and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristianne Maria Farmer Rocha

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A mídia se constituiu, ao longo dos últimos tempos, em um espaço privilegiado de circulação de saberes e conhecimentos sobre a vida em geral. Em relação à escola, não tem sido diferente. Com o objetivo de analisar a produtividade de alguns dos discursos sobre a escola, presentes na mídia – particularmente aquela impressa –, busquei, nas reportagens sobre a violência escolar e sobre o incentivo à utilização das novas tecnologias, confirmar a existência de um dispositivo (FOUCAULT, 1989 continuamente utilizado pela mídia para enfatizar a relevância da escola entre nós. Os exemplos aqui trazidos ilustram a variedade, a quantidade e a “qualidade” dos argumentos utilizados em relação à escola e, ainda que as conclusões não sejam (nem pretendam ser definitivas, talvez a única saída para a escola contemporânea, apontada pelas reportagens, seja, diante das constantes ameaças, fazer uso das inovadoras tecnologias e dos infinitos mecanismos de controle para manter “nas” escolas os incivis, indisciplinados e mal-educados que ainda não conseguiram aprender a acreditar na importância da mesma (e na educação por ela praticada. In recent times, the media have been a privileged arena for the circulation of wisdom and knowledge about life in general. The same applies to school. In order to analyze the productivity of some discourses present on the media – particularly in their printed version – about school, I attempted to confirm the existence of a ‘device’ (FOUCAULT, 1989. It is permanently used by the media to stress school’s relevance among us. The examples presented here illustrate the variety, quantity, and ‘quality’ of the arguments regarding school. Furthermore, although conclusions are not (and do not intend to be final, perhaps the only solution pointed out by news articles for contemporary school facing constant threats is to use new technologies and the endless control mechanisms to keep

  17. Climate change science education across schools, campuses, and centers: strategies and successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J.; Harcourt, P.; Rogers, M.; Buttram, J.; Petrone, C.; Veron, D. E.; Sezen-Barrie, A.; Stylinski, C.; Ozbay, G.

    2016-02-01

    With established partnerships in higher education, K-12, and informal science education communities across Delaware and Maryland, the NSF-funded MADE CLEAR project (Maryland Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment, and Research) has instituted a suite of professional development strategies to bring climate change science into science education methods courses, K-12 classrooms, university lecture halls, and public park facilities. MADE CLEAR partners have provided consistent climate literacy topics (mechanisms, human contributions, local and global impacts, mitigation and adaptation) while meeting the unique needs of each professional community. In-person topical lectures, hands-on work with classroom materials, seed funding for development of new education kits, and on-line live and recorded sessions are some of the tools employed by the team to meet those needs and build enduring capacity for climate change science education. The scope of expertise of the MADE CLEAR team, with climate scientists, educators, learning scientists, and managers has provided not only PD tailored for each education audience, but has also created, fostered, and strengthened relationships across those audiences for long-term sustainability of the newly-built capacity. Specific examples include new climate change programs planned for implementation across Delaware State Parks that will be consistent with middle school curriculum; integration of climate change topics into science methods classes for pre-service teachers at four universities; and active K-12 and informal science education teams working to cooperatively develop lessons that apply informal science education techniques and formal education pedagogy. Evaluations by participants highlight the utility of personal connections, access to experts, mentoring and models for developing implementation plans.

  18. Predictors of Academic Performance and School Engagement--Integrating Persistence, Motivation and Study Skills Perspectives Using Person-Centered and Variable-Centered Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Paulo A. S.; Dias, Paulo; Vaz, Filipa Machado; Vaz, Joao Machado

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for the integration of various theoretical perspectives on academic performance, especially the theories on educational persistence, and motivational theories. Recent models of students' engagement with school incorporate different dimensions of students, family and school. However, some authors are arguing that academic…

  19. of Schools*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elementary Schools' (1908) and the 'School Health Service. Regulations' (1953). ... to the social and medical changes which have taken place during the past 20 years. ... both by mass media, and group discussion between teachers and the ...

  20. The Effect of a Workshop on School Counselor Trainee's Child-Centered Play Therapy Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes, and Self-Estimate of Counseling Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    The results of this experimental study have demonstrated that following participation in a 12-hour training in Child-Centered Play Therapy (CCPT), school counselor trainees significantly increased their CCPT knowledge and skills in employing CCPT, as compared to a control group. Participants reported that they had learned enough of the philosophy…

  1. Changes in Social Capital and Networks: A Study of Community-Based Environmental Management through a School-Centered Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Teresa; Leahy, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) is a social science research tool that has not been applied to educational programs. This analysis is critical to documenting the changes in social capital and networks that result from community based K-12 educational collaborations. We review SNA and show an application of this technique in a school-centered,…

  2. Adventures in Cooking: A Collection of Recipes for Use in Nursery Schools, Day Care Centers, Head Start Programs, Kindergartens, and Primary Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Florence P.

    This is a collection of recipes which children involved in early childhood education centers can prepare for their own consumption. The recipes were contributed by teachers in such schools based on their own successful experiences in using cooking as a learning experience for children to incorporate and integrate a number of intellectual tasks,…

  3. Factors That Explain the Attitude towards Statistics in High-School Students: Empirical Evidence at Technological Study Center of the Sea in Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Kramer, Carlos; Limón-Suárez, Enrique; Moreno-García, Elena; García-Santillán, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze attitude towards statistics in high-school students using the SATS scale designed by Auzmendi (1992). The sample was 200 students from the sixth semester of the afternoon shift, who were enrolled in technical careers from the Technological Study Center of the Sea (Centro de Estudios Tecnológicos del Mar 07…

  4. Design of Kocerin (Smart box interactive Media basic character building on fraction material in the islamic yunior high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    achmad buchori buchori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available abstract Childhood is the Future of the nation should nourished the soul and soul to a review of Children Become Smart, Skilled And Good character. Early child Age Class 7 MTs should be developed gross motor and fine motor skills through play activities. One of Duties and Obligations For the teacher is Constantly working to improve the quality of education by having innovation-innovation learning The prayer only is with using Media Learning to appeal for Students, praying only Media is kocerin (smart box Interactive That can be motivating students to review more Understanding A problem Shape Game The proposed hearts and can be cause of imagination and creative thinking stimulus prepare Son. This research is R & D to develop a media review Kocerin For Students MTs / SMP. Research shows that the product has been validated by 2 kocerin orangutan expert validator material and Learning Media with score  averaged 93.5 and 95.5 means that products used kocerin feasible to review Learning Process in MTs, has applied MTsN 2 Semarang, response then children Very Enthusiastic WITH percentage More Than 90% children Enthusiastic follow with learning Media with smart box interactive in MTsN 2 Semarang. Keywords: Kotak cerdas interaktif, Fractions, MTs

  5. Media Literacy in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Perovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Few countries in the world have introduced media education into their curriculums. Montenegro became one of them in 2009, when “media literacy” was introduced as an optional subject for 16 and 17 year old students of Gymnasium high schools. This article presents the findings of the first and only research conducted so far on media education in Montenegro. It is a national case study which examines the potential of media education to change the school culture and accelerate education system reform towards embracing the new digital education paradigm in the future. The focus is on the results of research conducted through in-depth interviews with media literacy teachers all over the country. Despite the many challenges, all teachers identify the potential of media education to strengthen some of the key competences of the students and to improve their motivation and academic performance. They also identify potential to change positively school culture by transforming teachers into “cultural mediators” (Morcellini, 2007 and by supporting the formation of a “participative culture” (Jenkins & Kelley, 2013 in schools. This research recommends focusing education reform on spreading the media education pedagogy to the entire curriculum in order to embrace the new digital education paradigm in the future.

  6. An All-School Library Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Connie

    2005-01-01

    The library media center is hosting an all-school team challenge, designed to celebrate reading and library skills. Students could choose from the contest categories like "Lord of the Rings", "Harry Potter", Author Facts Challenge and Opening Lines Challenge for the competition and those students who read more challenging books show their…

  7. Balancing media environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Mogens

    The paper examines how students in Danish upper secondary schools experience the uses and effects of the digital environment in relation to their school activities. Theoretically a media ecological perspective (Strate 2006) is applied which understands teaching and learning practices as shaped...... by the interrelation between teacher, student and the media technologies. According to this perspective, media creates an environment that shapes our possibilities for acting and communicating. In a basic sense, teaching and learning is a communicative situation where, traditionally, the teacher sends information...... to the receiving students through a medium (e.g. speech, blackboard, book or online learning platform). Digital media challenge this situation due to their affordances (Gibson 1979) for interactivity. Affordance has become an increasingly popular term within media studies for describing a complementary...

  8. A Qualitative Study of Factors That Influence Contraceptive Choice among Adolescent School-Based Health Center Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, Andrea J; Gilmore, Kelly; Cady, Janet; Akers, Aletha Y; Ahrens, Kym R

    2016-06-01

    Long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods can prevent teen pregnancy yet remain underutilized by adolescents in the United States. Pediatric providers are well positioned to discuss LARCs with adolescents, but little is known about how counseling should occur in pediatric primary care settings. We explored adolescent womens' attitudes and experiences with LARCs to inform the development of adolescent-centered LARC counseling strategies. Qualitative analysis of one-on-one interviews. Participants were recruited from 2 urban school-based, primary care centers. Thirty adolescent women aged 14-18 years, diverse in race/ethnicity, and sexual experience. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded using inductive and deductive coding. Major themes were identified to integrate LARC-specific adolescent preferences into existing counseling approaches. Participants (mean age, 16.2 years; range, 14-18 years) represented a diverse range of racial and/or ethnic identities. Half (15/30) were sexually active and 17% (5/30) reported current or past LARC use. Five themes emerged regarding key factors that influence LARC choice, including: (1) strong preferences about device-specific characteristics; (2) previous exposure to information about LARCs from peers, family members, or health counseling sessions; (3) knowledge gaps about LARC methods that affect informed decision-making; (4) personal circumstances or experiences that motivate a desire for effective and/or long-acting contraception; and (5) environmental constraints and supports that might influence adolescent access to LARCs. We identified 5 factors that influence LARC choice among adolescent women and propose a framework for incorporating these factors into contraceptive counseling services in pediatric primary care settings. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The relationship between new media exposure and fast food consumption among Chinese children and adolescents in school: a rural-urban comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansstein, Francesca Valeria; Hong, Yu; Di, Chen

    2017-09-01

    In recent decades, China has experienced an exponential growth in the number of internet users, especially among the youngest population, as well as a rapid proliferation of Western-type fast food restaurants. The health consequences of internet availability and fast food consumption among youth have been largely studied in Western countries, but few studies have focused on China. This paper has two goals. The first is to evaluate the differences in new media exposure and preferences for fast foods between rural and urban areas. The second goal is to test the association between new media exposure and fast food consumption. The targets of this analysis are Chinese children and adolescents aged 6-18 attending school at the time of the interview. Research hypotheses were tested using mean-groups comparisons for differences between rural urban sub-samples, and logistic regressions with odds ratios to estimate the relationship between media exposure and preferences towards fast foods. Cross-sectional data from the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey were employed. Watching online videos and playing computer games are behaviors associated with higher probabilities of eating at fast food restaurants in both rural and urban young residents, with higher odds in rural areas. Surfing the internet is associated with higher odds of being overweight in both rural and urban settings. Results also show that children living in rural areas spend significantly more time playing computer games, watching TV and videotapes, but less time doing homework than their urban peers. This paper suggests that monitoring the nutritional effects of new media exposure in China is of key importance in order to develop adequate health promotion policies, in both rural and urban areas.

  10. Charter Schools Indicators: A Report from the Center on Educational Governance University of Southern California. CSI-USC 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Educational Governance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Like other public schools, California charter schools are judged primarily by one measure: student test scores. Though necessary, the Academic Performance Index and Average Yearly Progress scores can't assess charter schools' broad dimensions of student learning, program effectiveness and school operations. The state's accountability system…

  11. USC/School Performance Dashboard 2013. A Report from the Center on Educational Governance/University of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Educational Governance, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The USC School Performance Dashboard, now in its seventh year, draws on California school data from 2003-2012 to rate charter schools on academic and financial measures of performance. It also provides an accompanying interactive site at www.uscrossier.org/ceg/. Unlike other school databases, this one assigns values--high, medium, low--to the…

  12. A Historical Materialist Analysis of the Debate in Swedish Print Media on Mobile Phones in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones for teaching and learning in schools has been a controversial matter. In this paper the debate in two Swedish newspapers on the use of mobile phones in schools is analysed using a historical materialist framework. The results are discussed in relation to contemporary research on mobile learning. The analysis reveals that…

  13. Social Media as a Practical Approach in Engaging Key Stakeholders in School Crisis Communication Plans: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, Alisa; Kaiser, Candace

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined how public relations specialists within school systems are developing, implementing, and revising their communication crisis plans in an effort to fully engage all key stakeholders. Four research questions and two hypotheses were posed. Members from a state public relations association for schools were asked to…

  14. Problematising the Notion of 'Authentic School Learning': Insights from Student Perspectives on Media/Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    Creating authentic learning opportunities in schools has been an important mission for educators and educational researchers, where 'authentic' is generally understood to mean connecting school education to students' current and future identities, experiences and expertise. This article aims to problematise the taken-for-granted notion of…

  15. Association of School Social Networks' Influence and Mass Media Factors with Cigarette Smoking among Asthmatic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H.; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks' influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. Methods: This study…

  16. Editorial: Pedagogical Media Ecologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee M. Meister

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available From educational gaming through portable e-readers to cell phones, media are interpenetrating educational spaces and activities. Accordingly, understanding media in environmental or ecological terms has become increasingly important for education internationally. In North America, for example, the centenary of McLuhan’s birth has focused attention on approaches to media – whether oral, textual, electronic or digital– as a kind of environment in which education takes place. In parts of Europe, the so-called mediatic turn – following on the linguistic and iconic turns – has similarly emphasized the role of media as a condition for the possibility of educational activities and programs. With a few exceptions1 the papers in this special issue were first presented at the conference «Educational Media Ecologies: International Perspectives» which took place at the University of Paderborn, Germany, on March 27–28, 2012.2 The event was an interdisciplinary and transatlantic endeavor to bring together a wide range of perspectives on various issues relevant to educational media ecologies,3 and on related debates on mediation, medialization, mediatization, and mediality.4 The purpose of this volume, like the conference, is to foster and deepen international dialogue in the area of educational media. Areas of research and scholarship relevant to this dialogue include educational media, media literacy, educational philosophy, and media and cultural studies. The contributions, described below, put conceptual issues as well as social practices and applications at the center of the debate. Klaus Rummler opens the issue by clarifying the concept of ecology itself. Referencing a range of work over the past 50 years, Rummler describes how ecological models have been cast in sociological, semiotic, cultural, mediatic and other terms, and he explains the implications of these various perspectives for the study of educational contexts. Rummler also

  17. Case study of early detection and intervention of infectious disease outbreaks in an institution using Nursery School Absenteeism Surveillance Systems (NSASSy) of the Public Health Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kayo; Hirayama, Chifumi; Sakuma, Yoko; Itoi, Yoichi; Sunadori, Asami; Kitamura, Junko; Nakahashi, Takeshi; Sugawara, Tamie; Ohkusa, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Detecting outbreaks early and then activating countermeasures based on such information is extremely important for infection control at childcare facilities. The Sumida ward began operating the Nursery School Absenteeism Surveillance System (NSASSy) in August 2013, and has since conducted real-time monitoring at nursery schools. The Public Health Center can detect outbreaks early and support appropriate intervention. This paper describes the experiences of Sumida Public Health Center related to early detection and intervention since the initiation of the system.Methods In this study, we investigated infectious disease outbreaks detected at 62 nursery schools in the Sumida ward, which were equipped with NSASSy from early November 2013 through late March 2015. We classified the information sources of the detected outbreak and responses of the public health center. The sources were (1) direct contact from some nursery schools, (2) messages from public officers with jurisdiction over nursery schools, (3) automatic detection by NSASSy, and (4) manual detection by public health center officers using NSASSy. The responses made by the health center were described and classified into 11 categories including verification of outbreak and advice for caregivers.Results The number of outbreaks detected by the aforementioned four information sources was zero, 25, 15, and 7 events, respectively, during the first 5 months after beginning NSASSy. These numbers became 5, 7, 53, and 25 events, respectively, during the subsequent 12 months. The number of outbreaks detected increased by 47% during the first 5 months, and by 87% in the following 12 months. The responses were primarily confirming the situation and offering advice to caregivers.Conclusion The Sumida Public Health Center ward could achieve early detection with automatic or manual detection of NSASSy. This system recently has become an important detection resource, and has contributed greatly to early

  18. Providing long-acting reversible contraception services in Seattle school-based health centers: key themes for facilitating implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Kelly; Hoopes, Andrea J; Cady, Janet; Amies Oelschlager, Anne-Marie; Prager, Sarah; Vander Stoep, Ann

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the implementation of a program that provides long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) services within school-based health centers (SBHCs) and to identify barriers and facilitators to implementation as reported by SBHC clinicians and administrators, public health officials, and community partners. We conducted 14 semistructured interviews with key informants involved in the implementation of LARC services. Key informants included SBHC clinicians and administrators, public health officials, and community partners. We used a content analysis approach to analyze interview transcripts for themes. We explored barriers to and facilitators of LARC service delivery across and within key informant groups. The most cited barriers across key informant groups were as follows: perceived lack of provider procedural skills and bias and negative attitudes about LARC methods. The most common facilitators identified across groups were as follows: clear communication strategies, contraceptive counseling practice changes, provider trainings, and stakeholder engagement. Two additional barriers emerged in specific key informant groups. Technical and logistical barriers to LARC service delivery were cited heavily by SBHC administrative staff, community partners, and public health officials. Expense and billing was a major barrier to SBHC administrative staff. LARC counseling and procedural services can be implemented in an SBHC setting to promote access to effective contraceptive options for adolescent women. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Making Dutch pupils media conscious: preadolescents' self-assessment of possible media risks and the need for media education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Küter-Luks, Theresa; Heuvelman, A.; Peters, O.

    2011-01-01

    Despite clear European and Dutch policies about media education, there is currently no media education curriculum in Dutch schools. A survey among preadolescents (n = 257) in six primary schools in the Netherlands included questions regarding media access, fears, risks, parental mediation of

  20. Making Dutch Pupils Media Conscious: Preadolescents' Self-Assessment of Possible Media Risks and the Need for Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuter-Luks, Theresa; Heuvelman, Ard; Peters, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Despite clear European and Dutch policies about media education, there is currently no media education curriculum in Dutch schools. A survey among preadolescents (n = 257) in six primary schools in the Netherlands included questions regarding media access, fears, risks, parental mediation of television and the internet, and the need for media…

  1. Media Education: Definitions, Approaches and Development around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Media education is the study of the media with the aim of cultivating people's media literacy. In the past four decades, media education has rapidly developed in school systems and communities all over the world. Each country has its own developmental trajectory. With the rise of the interactive new media, media education is going to…

  2. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  3. Makerspaces: The Next Iteration for Educational Technology in K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strycker, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    With the continually growing number of computers and mobile devices available in K-12 schools, the need is dwindling for dedicated computer labs and media centers. Some schools are starting to repurpose those facilities into different kinds of exploratory learning environments known as "makerspaces". This article discusses this next…

  4. Single-Center Study Investigating Foreign Language Acquisition at School in Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults With Uni- or Bilateral Cochlear Implants in the Swiss German Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeres-Scheenstra, Renske; Ohnsorg, Claudia; Candreia, Claudia; Heinzmann, Sybille; Castellanos, Susana; De Min, Nicola; Linder, Thomas E

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate foreign language acquisition at school in cochlear implant patients. Cohort study. CI center. Forty three cochlear implants (CI) patients (10-18 yr) were evaluated. CI nonusers and patients with CI-explantation, incomplete datasets, mental retardation, or concomitant medical disorders were excluded. Additional data (type of schooling, foreign language learning, and bilingualism) were obtained with questionnaires. German-speaking children with foreign tuition language (English and/or French) at school were enrolled for further testing. General patient data, auditory data, and foreign language data from both questionnaires and tests were collected and analyzed. Thirty seven out of 43 questionnaires (86%) were completed. Sixteen (43%) were in mainstream education. Twenty-seven CI users (73%) have foreign language learning at school. Fifteen of these were in mainstream education (55%), others in special schooling. From 10 CI users without foreign language learning, one CI user was in mainstream education (10%) and nine patients (90%) were in special schooling. Eleven German-speaking CI users were further tested in English and six additionally in French. For reading skills, the school objectives for English were reached in 7 of 11 pupils (64%) and for French in 3 of 6 pupils (50%). For listening skills, 3 of 11 pupils (27%) reached the school norm in English and none in French. Almost 75% of our CI users learn foreign language(s) at school. A small majority of the tested CI users reached the current school norm for in English and French in reading skills, whereas for hearing skills most of them were not able to reach the norm.

  5. Children, Adolescents, and the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Media, from television to the "new media" (including cell phones, iPads, and social media), are a dominant force in children's lives. Although television is still the predominant medium for children and adolescents, new technologies are increasingly popular. The American Academy of Pediatrics continues to be concerned by evidence about the potential harmful effects of media messages and images; however, important positive and prosocial effects of media use should also be recognized. Pediatricians are encouraged to take a media history and ask 2 media questions at every well-child visit: How much recreational screen time does your child or teenager consume daily? Is there a television set or Internet-connected device in the child's bedroom? Parents are encouraged to establish a family home use plan for all media. Media influences on children and teenagers should be recognized by schools, policymakers, product advertisers, and entertainment producers. Copyright © 2013 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Delivering risk information in a dynamic information environment: Framing and authoritative voice in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and primetime broadcast news media communications during the 2014 Ebola outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kott, Anne; Limaye, Rupali J

    2016-11-01

    During a disease outbreak, media serve as primary transmitters of information from public health agencies to the public, and have been shown to influence both behavior and perception of risk. Differences in news frequency, framing and information source can impact the public's interpretation of risk messages and subsequent attitudes and behaviors about a particular threat. The media's framing of an outbreak is important, as it may affect both perception of risk and the ability to process important health information. To understand how risk communication by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during the 2014 Ebola outbreak was framed and delivered and to what extent primetime broadcast news media mirrored CDC's framing and authoritative voice, 209 CDC communications and primetime broadcast transcripts issued between July 24 and December 29, 2014 were analyzed and coded by thematic frame and authoritative voice. Dominant frame and voice were determined for each month and for overall period of analysis. Medical frame was dominant in CDC (60%), Anderson Cooper 360 (49%), The Rachel Maddow Show (47%) and All In with Chris Hayes (47%). The human interest frame was dominant in The Kelly File (45%), while The O'Reilly Factor coverage was equally split between sociopolitical and medical frames (28%, respectively). Primetime news media also changed dominant frames over time. Dominant authoritative voice in CDC communications was that of CDC officials, while primetime news dominantly featured local and federal (non-CDC) government officials and academic/medical experts. Differences in framing and delivery could have led the public to interpret risk in a different way than intended by CDC. Overall, public health agencies should consider adapting risk communication strategies to account for a dynamic news environment and the media's agenda. Options include adapting communications to short-form styles and embracing the concept of storytelling. Copyright © 2016

  7. Making Media Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gauntlett

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This podcast is a recording of a research seminar that took place on December 3, 2015, at the University of Westminster's Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI. In this contribution, David Gauntlett discusses his new book, Making Media Studies, and other new work. In Making Media Studies (Peter Lang, 2015, Gauntlett proposes a vision of media studies based around doing and making – not about the acquisition of skills, as such, but an experience of building knowledge and understanding through creative hands-on engagement with all kinds of media. Gauntlett suggests that media studies scholars have failed to recognise the significance of everyday creativity – the vital drive of people to make, exchange, and learn together, supported by online networks. He argues that we should think about media in terms of conversations, inspirations, and making things happen. Media studies can be about genuine social change, he suggests, if we recognise the significance of everyday creativity, work to transform our tools, and learn to use them wisely. David Gauntlett is a Professor in the School of Media, Arts and Design at the University of Westminster, where he is also the School's Co-Director of Research. He is the author of several books, including: Creative Explorations (2007, Media, Gender and Identity: An Introduction (2nd edition 2008, Making is Connecting (2011, and Making Media Studies (2015. He has made a number of popular online resources, videos and playthings, and has pioneered creative research and workshop methods. He is external examiner for Information Experience Design at the Royal College of Art, London.

  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury ...

  9. Social Media and Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper; Paulsen, Michael

    New research in the Danish upper secondary schools shows that social media like Facebook is the number one attention diverts from the interaction about educational subjects in the classroom. At the same time international research shows that there is a great potential in using social media....... The overriding purpose of the paper is to provide a research-based input to the discussion about the role of social media in schools....... the past seven years (Paulsen & Tække 2009, 2010; Tække & Paulsen 2010). To find out if and how the gap can be reduced, we have initiated the action research project The Socio Media Education Experiment, and in the paper we explain both the background for the project and its preliminary results...

  10. Role of the Library Media Specialist in Greening the Curriculum: A Community-Based Approach to Teaching 21st Century Skills outside of the School Library through the Practice of Urban Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrise, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the author's most valuable experiences as a library media specialist (LMS) were not in a school library. Rather, they were on the streets of Chicago, in community gardens, and on the rooftops of buildings in Humboldt Park, where she was hired by the University of Illinois Community Informatics Initiative as a graduate assistant and LMS in…

  11. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  12. School Libraries Play an Active, Transformational Role in Student Learning and Achievement. A review of: Todd, Ross J. “Student Learning Through Ohio School Libraries: A Summary of the Ohio Research Study.” Ohio Educational Library Media Association 15 Dec. 2003. Ohio Educational Library Media Association (OELMA, 2004. 15 Nov. 2006 .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle Bogel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study explored links between school libraries and student learning outcomes that were defined in a multidimensional context, using data provided by the students themselves. The researchers examined learning outcomes that reached beyond the existing correlations of school library services and standardized test scores. Insight was provided into the interactions between students and school libraries that affect student learning. An overarching goal of the study was to establish ongoing dialogue to focus on evidence based practices that may lead to continuous improvement in school library services and to provide the basis for further research.Design – Web based survey.Subjects – Participants were 13,123 students in grades 3‐12 and 879 faculty at 39 schools across the state.Setting – Ohio Public school libraries.Methods – Thirty‐nine effective school libraries, staffed by credentialed school librarians, were chosen through a judgment sampling process, using criteria based on Ohio Guidelines for Effective School Library Media Programs. The guidelines are aligned to academic content standards, assessments, resources, and professional development. Two web based surveys were used to collect quantitative and qualitative data from students and faculty: 1. The Impacts on Learning Survey, composed of Likert scale responses to 48 statements and an open‐ended critical incident question for students. 2. The Perceptions of Learning Impacts Survey was a similar survey for faculty. Survey questions were based on Dervin’s theory of information seeking that advances the idea of ‘helps’ as the constructive process of bridging gaps in information use that lead to new knowledge or making sense (sense‐making in relation to a perceived information need (Todd and Kuhlthau. The term ‘helps’ includes both inputs (help that the school library provides in engaging students in learning and outputs (learning outcomes of academic

  13. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  14. The Adolescent "Expanded Medical Home": School-Based Health Centers Partner with a Primary Care Clinic to Improve Population Health and Mitigate Social Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Margaret; Laurie, Anna R; Plegue, Melissa A; Richarson, Caroline R

    2016-01-01

    Access to high-quality health care is a crucial social determinant of health. We describe the implementation of an "expanded medical home" partnering a primary care practice (the Ypsilanti Health Center [YHC]) with local school-based health centers (the Regional Alliance for Healthy Schools [RAHS]), and to assess whether this model improves access to and quality of care for shared patients. Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, we define the steps in, barriers to, and facilitating factors in implementing the expanded medical home model. Visits and quality measures were assessed for patients seen by YHC only versus YHC/RAHS at baseline and during the intervention. At baseline, patients seen at YHC/RAHS had higher compliance with most quality metrics compared with those seen at YHC only. The proportion of shared patients significantly increased because of the intervention (P partnership between primary care physicians and school-based health centers increases the number of shared high-risk adolescent patients. Shared patients have improved compliance with quality measures, which may lead to long-term improved health equity. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  15. Exploring Language Choice and Identity Construction in "In-Between" Sites: Ethnic Media and Community Languages Schools in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Antonia; Cruickshank, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Australian research on immigrant languages has paid little attention to interactional approaches to language alternation as identity construction, and sites other than the family and the mainstream school. We argue for the need of studies that take into account a wider range of sites, in particular "community" sites, and adopt…

  16. Beyond the physical examination: the nurse practitioner's role in adolescent risk reduction and resiliency building in a school-based health center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Teresa K

    2005-12-01

    School-based health centers in high schools provide a unique setting in which to deliver risk-reduction and resilience-building services to adolescents. The traditional health care system operating in the United States focuses on the treatment of illness and disease rather than on preventing problems originating from health risk behaviors. Nurse practitioners can promote healthy behavior in adolescents through linkages to parents, schools, and community organizations; by conducting individual risk assessments; and by providing health education and access to creative health programs that build resilience and promote protective factors. With a focus on wellness, nurse practitioners as advanced practice nurses and specialists in disease prevention and health promotion can establish students' health priorities in the context of the primary health care they deliver on a daily basis.

  17. Media Sociography on Weblogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    Weblogs are not only one of the newest technical media for communication, but also one of the most difficult to understand. Are weblogs a kind of mass medium, a personal medium like an online diary, or a medium that gives space for communities to grow? Or are weblogs a medium that enable all...... these possibilities depended on the actual use? This paper throws some light on what weblogs are by using the methodology of Media Sociography (Tække 2003, 2004a, 2004b and 2004c). Media Sociography is a strategy for analysing mediated social systems or in other words a strategy for describing the social in relation...... to the media it is based on. Theoretically seen it is inspired of two theoretical paradigms the Sociological Systems Theory of Niklas Luhmann and the Media Theory (also called the Toronto school). Empirically the paper primary draws on the literature about weblogs, which could be framed as CMC...

  18. Effect of Media Modified To Mimic Cystic Fibrosis Sputum on the Susceptibility of Aspergillus fumigatus, and the Frequency of Resistance at One Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, David A; Moss, Richard B; Hernandez, Cathy; Clemons, Karl V; Martinez, Marife

    2016-04-01

    Studies of cystic fibrosis (CF) patient exacerbations attributed toPseudomonas aeruginosainfection have indicated a lack of correlation of outcome within vitrosusceptibility results. One explanation is that the media used for testing do not mimic the airway milieu, resulting in incorrect conclusions. Therefore, media have been devised to mimic CF sputum.Aspergillus fumigatusis the leading fungal pathogen in CF, and susceptibility testing is also used to decide therapeutic choices. We assessed whether media designed to mimic CF sputa would give different fungal susceptibility results than those of classical methods, assaying voriconazole, the most utilized anti-Aspergillusdrug in this setting, and 30 CFAspergillusisolates. The frequency of marked resistance (defined as an MIC of >4 μg/ml) in our CF unit by classical methods is 7%. Studies performed with classical methods and with digested sputum medium, synthetic sputum medium, and artificial sputum medium revealed prominent differences inAspergillussusceptibility results, as well as growth rate, with each medium. Clinical correlative studies are required to determine which results are most useful in predicting outcome. Comparison of MICs with non-CF isolates also indicated the CF isolates were generally more resistant. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Media and ICT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Media and information and communication technologies (ICTs) have in the past decades been placed firmly on the educational agenda, and will continue to maintain this position, not least as catalysts for educational change. This issue is reflected in the anthology as it aims to respond...... to the question of how the presence of media and ICT in and outside schools both change and qualify educational practice as well as how the cooperation between media, cultures, aesthetics and social relations affect and support new demands on education. The book represents different academic perspectives...

  20. On the Way of Educational Reform: Thai High School Physics Teachers' Conceptions of the Student-Centered Approach and Their Perceptions of Their Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaumklang, Kawin

    During the past two decades, the student-centered approach has been widely promoted and accepted by the educational community as one of the most effective instructional approaches. It has been continually developed and revised to match our current understanding of how humans learn (American Psychological Association, 1997). It is based upon the belief that students should take responsibility for their own learning. Thus, curriculum, instruction, and assessment should be carefully designed to stimulate, facilitate, and accelerate students' learning as much as possible. In order to do so, the teacher needs to take the following factors into consideration: students' cognitive structures, metacognitive and regulative skills, motivation and affective states, developmental and individual differences, and social supports. However, the term student-centered has been defined and described by researchers and scholars in many different ways. Little is known about how practicing teachers conceptualize this term and how they perceive their classroom practices in relation to these conceptions. The purpose of this study was to utilize a qualitative multiple-case study approach to investigate teachers' conceptions of the student-centered approach and their perceptions of their classroom practices. Four Thai high school physics teachers, who were considered products of the current student-centered educational reform movement in Thailand, participated in this study. Data were collected for one learning unit (three to eight weeks) through classroom observations, semi-structured interviews, and document analysis. The data analysis revealed that teachers' conceptions of student-centered curriculum, instruction, and assessment had three common characteristics: (a) students' active participation; (b) special emphasis on students' background knowledge, understanding, motivation, affective states, and learning capability; and (c) benefits to students. The results also indicated that there

  1. Improving Transition from the Middle Grades to High School and from High Schools and Technology Centers to Further Study and Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Every step in a student's life is important for future success. Schools are building stronger frameworks of curricula, instruction and assessments to prepare students to move from one learning environment to another with maximum results as they journey toward adulthood. This issue of "High Schools That Work" contains examples of…

  2. Leer y escribir en la Universidad: propuestas de articulación con la escuela media Reading and writing at the University: articulated proposals with High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Nigro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El paso de los últimos años de la secundaria a la universidad suele ser muy arduo para el alumno, y perjudicial para nuestras sociedades, porque la deserción en los primeros años de la vida académica es alta en casi toda América Latina. A partir de diversas investigaciones de estudiosos del proceso cognitivo que implican la lectura y la escritura y, adhiriendo al movimiento internacional llamado "Writing across the curriculum" (Escribir a través del currículum, propongo algunas claves para mejorar la comprensión y la producción de textos en la universidad y en la escuela media. Esto es: formulo variadas propuestas para ambos niveles educativos sobre la base de mi propia experiencia como profesora de Teoría y Práctica de la Lengua 1 y de Producción Discursiva de los primeros y segundos años de la Facultad de Comunicación de la Universidad Austral y de la lectura de los textos de investigación que se abocan a la "alfabetización académica" y que consigno a lo largo de este artículo. El objetivo es tender un puente entre la universidad y la escuela media para que se articulen mejor ambas instituciones, en bien de los alumnos ingresantes (que ingresan.Passing from High School to the University is usually a hard step for students and harmful for our societies: we know it because desertion levels during the first years of University are very high in almost all Latin American countries. Based on several investigations made by studious of reading and writing cognitive processes and, agreeing with the International Movement "Writing across the curriculum", I propose some key tips to improve comprehension and writing production at High School and University. I give a variety of proposals for both educational levels, based on my own experience as a Teacher of Language Theory and Practice I and Discursive Production in the first and second years of studies at the Communication Faculty in Austral University ( Argentina . I also based my job

  3. Violencias y climas sociales en escuelas medias: experiencias de docentes y directivos Violence and social climate in secondary schools: experiences of teachers and principals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Francisco Di Leo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En el artículo se presenta parte de los resultados de la tesis doctoral del autor, en la que analiza los tipos de climas sociales dominantes en relación a los cuales los sujetos construyen sus experiencias en escuelas medias públicas, tomando como analizador las prácticas y sentidos desplegados por los mismos en torno a las violencias escolares. En el trabajo de campo, desarrollado entre 2005 y 2007 en dos escuelas medias públicas de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina, combinó tres técnicas de investigación social de tipo cualitativo: observaciones participantes, entrevistas semiestructuradas y grupos focales (focus group. Para la determinación de la muestra (muestreo teórico y el análisis del corpus construido siguió los lineamientos generales de la teoría fundamentada (grounded theory, utilizando como herramienta informática auxiliar el programa Atlas.ti 5.0. El artículo se organiza en torno a dos de las categorías centrales identificadas: a violencias escolares y b crisis de la institución y de la autoridad escolar. En las dos primeras secciones se presentan las categorías emergentes de los discursos y prácticas de docentes y directivos, dialogando con herramientas conceptuales de la teoría social contemporánea y otras investigaciones sobre la temática. Finalmente, se propone una articulación entre las mismas, sintetizando las principales características y vinculaciones entre los dos tipos de clima social escolar dominantes en ambas instituciones: desubjetivante e integracionista-normativo.The article presents some of the results of the author's doctorate thesis, in which he analyzes the types of dominant social climates in respect to which the subjects build their experiences in public secondary schools, using as a guiding thread the practices and meanings developed by them around the incidents of school violence. The fieldwork, conducted between 2005 and 2007 at two public secondary schools from the

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's ... Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from ... Resource Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower Protection Transparency Media Room Inside ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans ...

  7. Exploring new ways of media construction of citizenship in schools: from «Antigone» to transmedia storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo JOVER

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available  Recent movements of citizen participation have found on the Internet and the Social Networks a favorable environment for development, which should lead us to a pedagogical reflection about the potential of virtual spaces for citizenship education. This article presents the theoretical basis and the pilot project of a school work which allows us to promote a concept of digital literacy that includes digital and civic competence. From the classic Antigone, conceived as the first act of civil disobedience, we explore the categories of public and private, which are perceived on this narration as opposite areas. Then we propose to understand the school as a space of conversation between both contexts. For this task, the project brings together the provocative capacity of classic literature and the potential of transmedia storytelling, where pupils are not only consumers but also critical participants before the social reality.y.

  8. Reading comprehension in english with audio media input among year 6 primary school students with or without dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Deželan, Tadeja

    2017-01-01

    The findings of scientific research in recent years have begun to emphasize the importance of early detection of general and specific learning difficulties of pupils in schools. Among the specific learning difficulties dyslexia is the most recognizable as well as mostly studied. The latter causes pupils great difficulties in acquiring basic literacy and language skills. Since pupils with dyslexia, among other difficulties, experience problems with reading and consequently reading comprehensio...

  9. USC/School Performance Dashboard 2011. A Report from the Center on Educational Governance/University of Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Educational Governance, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In his 2011 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama declared that charter schools are a way to out-innovate and out-educate our competitors worldwide. The President believes that investment in education must be accompanied by reform, including the expansion of high-quality charter schools. President Obama has challenged states to lift…

  10. Correlation of Managers' Value Systems and Students' Moral Development in High Schools and Pre-University Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Hamid Reza; Rahimipoor, Tahereh

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the managers' value system, the students' moral development, and their relationship in the high schools and pre-universities of District One in Kerman City. The research method used was descriptive-correlational. The statistical population was composed of high school and pre-university managers and…

  11. Characterization of Focal Liver Lesions using CEUS and MRI with Liver-Specific Contrast Media: Experience of a Single Radiologic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Lukas Philipp; Wassermann, Florian; Pregler, Benedikt; Michalik, Katharina; Rennert, Janine; Wiesinger, Isabel; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp; Jung, Ernst Michael

    2017-12-01

     The purpose of this study was to compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using liver-specific contrast agent and a combination of both for the characterization of focal liver lesions (FLL).  83 patients with both benign and malignant liver lesions were examined using CEUS and MRI after the intravenous administration of liver-specific contrast media. All patients had inconclusive results from prior imaging examinations. Histopathological specimens could be obtained in 53 patients. Ultrasound was performed using a multi-frequency curved probe (1 - 6 MHz) after the injection of 1 - 2.4 ml ultrasound contrast media. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of CEUS, MRI and a combination of both (CEUS + MRI) were compared.  The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values regarding lesion classification were 90.9 %, 70.6 %, 92.3 % and 66.6 %, respectively, for CEUS; 90.9 %, 82.4 %, 95.2 % and 70.0 %, respectively, for MRI; and 96.9 %, 70.6 %, 92.7 % and 85.7 % respectively, for CEUS + MRI. There were no statistically significant differences. 6 malignant lesions were missed using CEUS or MRI alone (false negatives). The use of both modalities combined reduced the false-negative results to 2.  CEUS and MRI with liver-specific contrast media are very reliable and of equal informative value in the characterization of focal liver lesions. The number of false-negative results can be decreased using a combination of the two methods. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Psychoactive substances use and associated factors among middle and high school students in the North Center of Morocco: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrouq, B; Bendaou, B; El Asri, A; Achour, S; Rammouz, I; Aalouane, R; Lyoussi, B; Khelafa, S; Bout, A; Berhili, N; Hlal, H; Najdi, A; Nejjari, C; El Rhazi, K

    2016-06-04

    Data on psychoactive substance (PAS) consumption among adolescents in the North Center of Morocco are not at all available. Therefore, the current study aimed at investigating the prevalence and the determinants of psychoactive substances use among middle and high school students in this region. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2012 to November 2013 in public middle and high schools in the North Central Region of Morocco. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used to assess psychoactive substances use among a representative sample of school students from the 7th to the 12th grade, aged 11-23 years, selected by stratified cluster random sampling. Factors associated with psychoactive substance use were identified using multivariate stepwise logistic regression analyses. A total of 3020 school students completed the questionnaires, 53.0 % of which were males. The overall lifetime smoking prevalence was 16.1 %. The lifetime, annual and past month rates of any psychoactive substance use among the study subjects were 9.3, 7.5, and 6.3 % respectively. Cannabis recorded the highest lifetime prevalence of 8.1 %, followed by alcohol 4.3 %, inhalants 1.7 %, psychotropic substances without medical prescription 1.0, cocaine 0.7, heroine 0.3, and amphetamine with only 0.2 %. Psychoactive substance use was associated with males more than females. The risk factors identified by multivariate stepwise logistic regression analyses were being male, studying in secondary school level, smoking tobacco, living with a family member who uses tobacco, and feeling insecure within the family. The prevalence among all school students reported by the current study was comparable to the national prevalence. Efforts to initiate psychoactive substance prevention programs among school students should be made by designing such programs based on the significant factors associated with psychoactive substance use identified in this study.

  13. Psychoactive substances use and associated factors among middle and high school students in the North Center of Morocco: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zarrouq

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on psychoactive substance (PAS consumption among adolescents in the North Center of Morocco are not at all available. Therefore, the current study aimed at investigating the prevalence and the determinants of psychoactive substances use among middle and high school students in this region. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2012 to November 2013 in public middle and high schools in the North Central Region of Morocco. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire was used to assess psychoactive substances use among a representative sample of school students from the 7th to the 12th grade, aged 11–23 years, selected by stratified cluster random sampling. Factors associated with psychoactive substance use were identified using multivariate stepwise logistic regression analyses. Results A total of 3020 school students completed the questionnaires, 53.0 % of which were males. The overall lifetime smoking prevalence was 16.1 %. The lifetime, annual and past month rates of any psychoactive substance use among the study subjects were 9.3, 7.5, and 6.3 % respectively. Cannabis recorded the highest lifetime prevalence of 8.1 %, followed by alcohol 4.3 %, inhalants 1.7 %, psychotropic substances without medical prescription 1.0, cocaine 0.7, heroine 0.3, and amphetamine with only 0.2 %. Psychoactive substance use was associated with males more than females. The risk factors identified by multivariate stepwise logistic regression analyses were being male, studying in secondary school level, smoking tobacco, living with a family member who uses tobacco, and feeling insecure within the family. Conclusions The prevalence among all school students reported by the current study was comparable to the national prevalence. Efforts to initiate psychoactive substance prevention programs among school students should be made by designing such programs based on the significant factors associated with psychoactive

  14. Critical Media Literacy in Action: Uniting Theory, Practice and Politics in Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevenin, Benjamin Joseph

    2012-01-01

    As media literacy is a growing field, there exist a number of distinct approaches to media education with varied political significance. Approaches such as protectionism, media arts education, and critical media literacy draw upon diverse theoretical traditions. Often overlooked in these traditions is the Critical Theory of the Frankfurt School.…

  15. The State of Audiovisual Education Facilities in Japanese Schools and Social Education Centers Today. AVE in Japan No. 32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japan Audio-Visual Education Association, Tokyo.

    This booklet, in English and Japanese, reports on a national survey conducted during the 1992 academic year by the Education Media and Learning Resources Division, Lifelong Leaning Bureau of the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (Japan). Similar surveys are conducted triennially. This report describes the current situation regarding the…

  16. Analisis Kebutuhan Terhadap Program Multi Media Interaktif Sebagai Media Pembelajaran

    OpenAIRE

    waldopo, Waldopo

    2011-01-01

    Multimedia interactive is on instructional media that combines elements of sound, visual and text, and can interact with the users. The aim of this study is to obtain information about the needs of interactive multimedia as instructional media. If needed, what kind of subjects that need to be supported by multi-media and type of format that presented. The population are students, teachers and senior secondary school principals. Sample was taken randomly. From the results of randomization assi...

  17. Media education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  18. Cataloging, Processing, Administering AV Materials. A Model for Wisconsin Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Robert D., Ed.

    The objective of this cataloging manual is to recommend specific methods for cataloging audiovisual materials for use in individual school media centers. The following types of audiovisual aids are included: educational games, filmstrips, flat graphics, kits, models, motion pictures, realia, records, slides, sound filmstrips, tapes,…

  19. The Media and the Message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    The experiences of Columbine and El Cajon high schools with media onslaughts following traumatic shooting incidents underscore the importance of getting the message across and sticking to known facts. In a crisis, speculation can hurt everyone. The most important elements in crisis communications are planning and media relations. (MLH)

  20. SOCIAL MEDIA RISK ANALYSIS: HOW TO USE ACCEPTED RISK ASSESSMENT TOOLS TO ANALYZE SOCIAL MEDIA RISKS IN MILITARY ORGANIZATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Commanders may see value in utilizing the schools of thought to understand how each one influences their judgment of social media risks. For instance...school may represent a view that employs social media to influence the decision-making and behavior of adversaries. Each school of thought differs...the risk further, or accept the risk and move on to the next threat event. Social Media Schools of Thought. Each school of thought may influence