WorldWideScience

Sample records for school lunch programs

  1. Plate Waste and Attitudes among High School Lunch Program Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jessica; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) What foods high school students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are discarding the most? (2) How much of these foods they are discarding? and (3) What are their perceptions towards school lunch? Methods: Researchers measured plate waste at two high…

  2. School Lunch Programs in Israel, Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endevelt, Ronit

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The first lunch programs in Palestine were the “soup kitchens,” which were established in Jerusalem before the First World War to feed the poor. Then, in 1923, Henrietta Szold launched a lunch initiative in schools in order to supply basic nutrition to students. As the children at most of the schools prepared the meals themselves with local products, they also learned good, low-cost eating habits and the appropriate use of domestic goods and had educational goals as well. These educational goals were in line with Zionist ideology. School lunch programs lasted through the early years of the nation of Israel, albeit without official governmental support, but they came to an end amid the rising prosperity of the early 1970s. In 2004, in response to the alarming results of a food security survey conducted by the Ministry of Health, the Knesset passed a law establishing a new school lunch program on a trial basis. This article reviews the history of lunch programs in Israel, highlighting both their achievements and their limitations, in order to establish a framework for judging the success of the current school lunch policy.

  3. 77 FR 19525 - National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 210 RIN 0584-AE11 National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010; Approval of... rule entitled ``National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related...

  4. Satisfaction of Middle School Lunch Program Participants and Non-Participants with the School Lunch Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephanie; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine middle school students' satisfaction with the school lunch experience, using two validated surveys; the Middle/Junior High School Student Participation Survey and the Middle/Junior High School Student Non-Participation Survey, both developed by the National Food Service Management…

  5. 76 FR 2493 - Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... Agriculture 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast... Rules#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 RIN 0584-AD59 Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs AGENCY: Food and Nutrition...

  6. 78 FR 79567 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ...: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010... and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 [FNS-2011-0019] RIN 0584-AE09 National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as Required by the...

  7. School lunch program in India: background, objectives and components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutani, Alka Mohan

    2012-01-01

    The School Lunch Program in India (SLP) is the largest food and nutrition assistance program feeding millions of children every day. This paper provides a review of the background information on the SLP in India earlier known as national program for nutrition support to primary education (NP-NSPE) and later as mid day meal scheme, including historical trends and objectives and components/characteristics of the scheme. It also addresses steps being taken to meet challenges being faced by the administrators of the program in monitoring and evaluation of the program. This program was initially started in 1960 in few states to overcome the complex problems malnutrition and illiteracy. Mid Day Meal Scheme is the popular name for school meal program. In 2001, as per the supreme court orders, it became mandatory to give a mid day meal to all primary and later extended to upper primary school children studying in the government and government aided schools. This scheme benefitted 140 million children in government assisted schools across India in 2008, strengthening child nutrition and literacy. In a country with a large percent of illiterate population with a high percent of children unable to read or write; governmental and non-governmental organizations have reported that mid day meal scheme has consistently increased enrollment in schools in India. One of the main goals of school lunch program is to promote the health and well-being of the Nation's children.

  8. The School Lunch Lottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that those interested in advocating healthier school lunches use a "School Lunch Lottery" to convince parents and administrators that change is necessary. During the lottery, key players are invited to experience one of three different school lunch options--a typical school lunch; a healthy bag lunch; and a school cafeteria…

  9. Effects of the National School Lunch Program on Bone Growth in Japanese Elementary School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Toshiyuki; Kaba, Naoko; Itoh, Tatsuki; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese school lunch program with milk was designed to supply 33-50% of the necessary nutrients per day and 50% of the recommended dietary allowance for calcium, which is difficult to obtain from Japanese meals. Although this program contributes to the mental and physical development of children, the effect of these meals on the bone growth in children remains unknown. Therefore, we compared the effect of school lunch with milk on bone growth between elementary school children attending schools that did not enforce the school lunch with milk program (box-lunch group) and those attending schools that did enforce the program (school-lunch group). The study subjects included fourth-grade children during the 2009-2013 school years, of whom 329 children were in the school-lunch group and 484 children in the box-lunch group. The bone area ratio of the right calcaneus was evaluated using quantitative ultrasound (Benus III). Dietary intakes were assessed using brief self-administered diet history questionnaires. The subjects were asked to record their activities for 3 d so that the mean physical activity intensity and the time spent sleeping could be estimated. The bone area ratios (%) were significantly higher in the school-lunch group than in the box-lunch group (males 31.0±0.3 vs. 30.3±0.2; females 30.6±0.2 vs. 29.7±0.2). This tendency did not change even after adjustment for confounding factors associated with bone growth. The results suggest that nutrients supplied by the Japanese school lunch program contributed to increased bone growth in elementary school children.

  10. Plate Waste in School Lunch Programs in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available School plate waste is of particular concern worldwide due to its adverse impacts not only on resource use and the environment, but also on students’ health, physical maturation, and academic achievement in the long term. Previous studies on school plate waste have all been conducted in industrialized countries, and more studies are badly needed in developing countries. In this paper, we report a pilot study on the patterns and causes of plate waste in school lunch programs in Beijing, China, by a combination of physical weighing, questionnaire survey, and semi-structured interview approaches. Our results show that the average amount of food waste generated by school students in Beijing in 2014 was 130 g/cap/meal, accounting for 21% of total food served. Staple food (43% and vegetables (42% were the dominant proportions. Buffet meals resulted in less plate waste than packed meals and set meals. Food supply patterns, the quality of canteen service, and the dietary habit and students’ knowledge of food production were the main influencing factors behind plate waste. To our best knowledge, our pilot study provides a first understanding of the overlooked plate waste in school lunch programs in China, and a good basis for further analysis in this field, and will be helpful in informing policy-making in relevant nutrition and education programs in schools in China.

  11. Plate waste in school lunch programs in Beijing, China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yao; Cheng, Shengkui; Liu, Xiaojie

    2016-01-01

    in industrialized countries, and more studies are badly needed in developing countries. In this paper, we report a pilot study on the patterns and causes of plate waste in school lunch programs in Beijing, China, by a combination of physical weighing, questionnaire survey, and semi-structured interview approaches......School plate waste is of particular concern worldwide due to its adverse impacts not only on resource use and the environment, but also on students' health, physical maturation, and academic achievement in the long term. Previous studies on school plate waste have all been conducted...... in China, and a good basis for further analysis in this field, and will be helpful in informing policy-making in relevant nutrition and education programs in schools in China....

  12. The National School Lunch Program: Ideas, proposals, policies, and politics shaping students' experiences with school lunch in the United States, 1946 - present

    OpenAIRE

    Gosliner, Wendi Anne

    2013-01-01

    AbstractThe National School Lunch Program:Ideas, proposals, policies, and politics shaping students' experiences with school lunch in the United States, 1946 - presentBy Wendi Anne GoslinerDoctor of Public HealthUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor Ann Keller, ChairOn an average school day in 2012, The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) supported the provision of lunch meals to almost 2/3 of school-age youth in the United States. Recent spikes in childhood obesity rates and the emerg...

  13. The School Lunch Lobby: A Charmed Federal Food Program that No Longer Just Feeds the Hungry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Consistent with the intent of the original school-lunch program, created by Congress in 1946 to provide "nutritious agricultural commodities" to children, the major purpose of today's school-lunch program is to ensure that children, especially those from poor and low-income families, have nutritious food at school. Even as contentious and partisan…

  14. 78 FR 39163 - Certification of Compliance With Meal Requirements for the National School Lunch Program Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... of Compliance with Meal Requirements for the National School Lunch Program under the Healthy, Hunger... Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 regarding performance-based cash assistance for school food...-0025] RIN 0584-AE15 Certification of Compliance With Meal Requirements for the National School Lunch...

  15. 78 FR 40625 - National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 245 and 272 RIN 0584-AE10 National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010; Approval of... ``National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy...

  16. School Lunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bottle of water optional dessert (choose one): flavored gelatin, low-fat pudding, oatmeal raisin cookie, graham crackers, ... lunch carries the added responsibility of keeping the food safe to eat. That means keeping hot foods ...

  17. 77 FR 43232 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National... of reimbursement for a half-pint of milk served to non-needy children in a school or institution which participates in the Special Milk Program for Children. The payments and rates are prescribed on an...

  18. 78 FR 45178 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National... of reimbursement for a half-pint of milk served to non-needy children in a school or institution which participates in the Special Milk Program for Children. The payments and rates are prescribed on an...

  19. [Evaluation of the school-lunch program in Campinas, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salay, E; de Carvalho, J F

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the calorie and protein adequacies, to establishoffe operation model and the operational difficulties of the School-Lunch Program in Campinas, Brazil. Six schools randomly selected (1,237 children) were investigated. Calorie and protein consumption were estimated by weighed records. A model food project was developed in order to analyse the city food-service operation. The adequacy values were very low: 48.6 +/- 17.3% for energy and 52.7 +/- 17.2% for protein. The Tukey test indicated that schools did not differ regarding adequacies (alpha = 0.005). The results suggested that the efficiency and/or the impact of Campinas program may be limited by both, lack of resources and several operation failures such as: preparation of large amount of food which is not served to the children; the type of the food served; the ineffective administrative controls; the low supervision frequency, low school garden production and inefficient staff training; as well as the lack of food quality control, evaluations, community participation, nutritional education had integration with health programs.

  20. Food Safety in the National School Lunch Program. USDA Food and Nutrition Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Schools that serve meals under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) are required to maintain proper sanitation and health standards in conformance with all applicable State and local laws and regulations. In addition, schools are required to obtain two school food safety inspections per school year, which are…

  1. 78 FR 47274 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments/Maximum Reimbursement Rates Correction In notice document 2013-17990, appearing on pages...

  2. 78 FR 40625 - Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs; Approval of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... / Monday, July 8, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 RIN 0584-AD59 Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs; Approval of Information Collection Request AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA...

  3. 77 FR 4087 - Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... January 26, 2012 Part II Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal... AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 RIN 0584-AD59 Nutrition Standards in the...

  4. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  5. Participation in the National School Lunch Program: Importance of School-Level and Neighborhood Contextual Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtcheva, Donka M.; Powell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effect of stigma (proxied by school-level peer participation), neighborhood food environment, and demographic characteristics on participation in the U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The 1997 and 2003 waves of the Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of…

  6. Food and Nutrients Intake in the School Lunch Program among School Children in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenru Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the intake of food and nutrients among primary, middle, and high schools students in Shanghai, and provide recommendations for possible amendments in new school lunch standards of Shanghai. Twenty schools were included in the school lunch menu survey. Of those, seven schools enrolled 5389 students and conducted physical measurement of plate waste and a questionnaire survey. The amount of food and nutrients was compared according to the new China National Dietary Guideline for School Children (2016 and Chinese Dietary Reference Intakes (2013. The provision of livestock and poultry meat in menus was almost 5–8 times the recommended amount. The amount of seafood was less than the recommended amount, and mostly came from half-processed food. The average percentage of energy from fat was more than 30% in students of all grades. The greatest amount of food wasted was vegetables with 53%, 42%, and 31%, respectively, among primary, middle and high school students. Intake of Vitamin A, Vitamin B2, calcium, and iron was about 50% of the recommended proportion. Only 24.0% students were satisfied with the taste of school lunches. Higher proportions of livestock and poultry meat and low intake of vegetables have become integral problems in school lunch programs. Additionally, more attention needs to be paid to the serving size in primary schools with five age groups.

  7. Food and Nutrients Intake in the School Lunch Program among School Children in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenru; Gao, Runying; Bawuerjiang, Nadila; Zhang, Yali; Huang, Xiaoxu; Cai, Meiqin

    2017-06-07

    This study aimed to evaluate the intake of food and nutrients among primary, middle, and high schools students in Shanghai, and provide recommendations for possible amendments in new school lunch standards of Shanghai. Twenty schools were included in the school lunch menu survey. Of those, seven schools enrolled 5389 students and conducted physical measurement of plate waste and a questionnaire survey. The amount of food and nutrients was compared according to the new China National Dietary Guideline for School Children (2016) and Chinese Dietary Reference Intakes (2013). The provision of livestock and poultry meat in menus was almost 5-8 times the recommended amount. The amount of seafood was less than the recommended amount, and mostly came from half-processed food. The average percentage of energy from fat was more than 30% in students of all grades. The greatest amount of food wasted was vegetables with 53%, 42%, and 31%, respectively, among primary, middle and high school students. Intake of Vitamin A, Vitamin B₂, calcium, and iron was about 50% of the recommended proportion. Only 24.0% students were satisfied with the taste of school lunches. Higher proportions of livestock and poultry meat and low intake of vegetables have become integral problems in school lunch programs. Additionally, more attention needs to be paid to the serving size in primary schools with five age groups.

  8. Food waste in a school nutrition program after implementation of new lunch program guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byker, Carmen J; Farris, Alisha R; Marcenelle, Michael; Davis, George C; Serrano, Elena L

    2014-01-01

    To assess the amount of food waste by meal components according to the new National School Lunch Program guidelines among pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students. For 5 consecutive school days in 1 elementary school, the research team collected school lunch trays and separated meal components into bins relative to each food or beverage appearing on the school's daily menu. Bins were weighed in grams and converted to ounces and cups at the end of each lunch period. The researchers examined 304 meals from 1 pre-kindergarten class and 5 kindergarten classes. Of 4,988 oz of food and beverages served, 2,261 oz (45.3%) were wasted during 1 full school week, totaling 141 lb. The greatest amount of food waste was generated from vegetables, the main entree, and milk, respectively. Strategies to reduce food waste in school lunch should be researched and implemented. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. School lunches and lunches brought from home: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Craig A; Moreno, Jennette P; El-Mubasher, Abeer; Woehler, Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Considerable effort has been put forth to improve the nutritional quality of school meals by the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). However, a large percentage of children do not obtain their meals from school and instead bring lunch from home. Little research has focused on the content of these lunches. The purpose of the current study was to examine differences between school lunch and lunch brought from home. Children in the 2nd grade from seven schools in a large suburban school district were observed on three separate days. A total of 2107 observations were made, with 38.5% of these being lunches brought from home. Chi-squared analyses evaluated differences in the presence of specific food items between school lunch and lunch brought from home. Compared to children with a school lunch, children with a lunch brought from home were significantly less likely to have fruits (75.9% vs. 45.3%), vegetables (29.1% vs. 13.2%), and dairy (70.0% vs. 41.8%) (p lunch from home were more likely to have snacks high in sugar and/or fat (17.5% vs. 60.0%) and non 100% fruit juice/fruit drink (0.3% vs. 47.2%) (p school lunch. The NSLP has been widely criticized; however, conducting a comparison in this manner demonstrates advantages to children obtaining school lunches. Although it was beyond the scope of this study to examine diet quality (e.g., actual intake and nutrient/caloric density), these results provide compelling evidence that lunches brought from home should be an area of emphasis for research and intervention.

  10. 77 FR 4688 - National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... the NSLP and/or School Breakfast Program to establish, by school year (SY) 2008-2009, a system to... effects, distributive impacts, and equity). Executive Order 13563 emphasizes the importance of quantifying... breakfast and lunch programs. 7 CFR Part 272 Alaska, Civil rights, Claims, Food stamps, Grant programs...

  11. The practices and needs of dietitian in school lunch program in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yueching; Chang, Yu-Jhen

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition-related problems among school-age children nowadays become potentially serious. In order to prevent obesity and other nutritionally related diseases in the young generation, a school lunch program has been proposed and conducted in Taiwan. It is to ensure that students' nutritional intake meets the daily requirement and to help students develop correct eating habits and maintain a healthy lifestyle. A professional dietitian who has a clear concept regarding food material utilization, cooking methods and nutritional values thus becomes important. However, the majority of schools in Taiwan are unable to offer the post of dietitian due to budgetary constraints and lack of organization. The responsibility of a dietitian is usually held by teachers, school nurses and other administrative staff. This problem has hindered the nutritional education in schools and made school lunches less beneficial to the children's nutritional needs. For the current status of dietitians in schools, a large gap is found between the currently supplied school lunches and the nutritionally standardized school lunches. It also exists in relation to education and hygiene. One of the solutions requires an infrastructure to support plans and policy, reasonable adequate budget, well human affairs establishment and coordination of all aspects. While the needed infrastructure is being proposed, an access to the professionalism of the currently employed dietitians can be strategically explored by constructing an education system. Through the system, schools without on-campus dietitians will be able to utilize their expertise with which the improvement of school lunches can be expectedly accomplished.

  12. Methods and Challenges Related to Implementing the New National School Lunch Program Regulations in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajah, Krisha; Getty, Victoria M.; Johnson, Hattie L.; Case, Megan; Herr, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 resulted in updated National School Lunch Program (NSLP) regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The purpose of this research was to investigate the approaches used by school foodservice managers and directors in Indiana in complying with the new regulations and to identify…

  13. Is Lunch Still Gross? A Qualitative Evaluation of a New School Lunch Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohn, Daniel J; Pickering, Rachel; Chin, Nancy P

    2013-01-01

    ... in a metropolitan school district of western New York. Using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Program Evaluation stepwise framework, we focused on stakeholder accountability and student satisfaction...

  14. Impact of Connecticut legislation incentivizing elimination of unhealthy competitive foods on National School Lunch Program participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Michael W; Luedicke, Joerg; Dorsey, Marice; Fiore, Susan S; Henderson, Kathryn E

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed the impact of Connecticut legislation incentivizing voluntary school district-level elimination of unhealthy competitive foods on National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation. We analyzed data on free, reduced, and paid participation in the NSLP from 904 schools within 154 Connecticut school districts from the 2004-2005 to the 2009-2010 school year, resulting in 5064 observations of annual school-level meal participation. We used multilevel regression modeling techniques to estimate the impact of the state competitive food legislation on the count of NSLP lunches served per student in each school. Overall, the state statute was associated with an increase in school lunch participation. We observed increases between 7% and 23% for middle- and high-school meal programs, and a slight decrease of 2.5% for the elementary school free meal eligibility category, leading to an estimated revenue increase of roughly $30 000 for an average school district per school year. This study provides support for national implementation of proposed rigorous competitive food standards that can improve the health of students while supporting local school district finances.

  15. Developing a Best Practice Guide for Increasing High School Student Participation and Satisfaction in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Castillo, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to identify and confirm best practices for increasing high school student participation and satisfaction in school nutrition (SN) programs operating under the regulations of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: Using a modified best practices research model (BPRM; Mold & Gregory,…

  16. Examining Variations in Fourth-Grade Children's Participation in School Breakfast and Lunch Programs by Student and Program Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Finney, Christopher J.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Analyses were conducted to examine variations in fourth-grade children's participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by weekday, month, socioeconomic status, absenteeism, gender, and school-breakfast location. Methods: Fourth-grade children were participants in a dietary-reporting validation study during either…

  17. The effects of the National School Lunch Program on education and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the effects of participating in the National School Lunch Program in the middle of the 20th century on adult health outcomes and educational attainment. I utilize an instrumental variables strategy that exploits a change in the formula used by the federal government to allocate funding to the states. Identification is achieved by the fact that different birth cohorts were exposed to different degrees to the original formula and the new formula, along with the fact that the change of the formula affected states differentially by per capita income. Participation in the program as a child appears to have few long-run effects on health, but the effects on educational attainment are sizable. These results may suggest that subsidized lunches induced children to attend school but displaced food consumption from other sources. Alternatively, the program may have had short-run health effects that dissipated over time but that facilitated higher educational attainment.

  18. Agricultural High School Students' Acquisition of Knowledge and Skills Regarding a Nutritionally Balanced Diet Through Assisting in a School Lunch Program for Elementary and Middle School Pupils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Midori Ishikawa; Nozomi Kubota; Keita Kudo; Martin Meadows; Atsuko Umezawa; Toru Ota

    2012-01-01

      The purpose of this research was to study whether agricultural high school students' attitudes towards social support for consumers would improve with their involvement in a school lunch program...

  19. School lunch source and adolescent dietary behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastert, Theresa A; Babey, Susan H

    2009-10-01

    As rates of childhood obesity rise, the nutritional content of lunches eaten at school is more heavily scrutinized. We examined the association between dietary behaviors and the number of days that adolescents bring lunch to school. We analyzed cross-sectional data for 2,774 adolescents who responded to the 2005 California Health Interview Survey and reported dietary behaviors for a weekday. In bivariate analyses, adolescents who typically brought their lunch from home 5 days per week ate fast food on fewer occasions; consumed fewer servings of soda, fried potatoes, and high-sugar foods; and ate more fruit and vegetables compared with adolescents who never brought their lunch to school. In linear regressions controlling for demographics, body mass index, desire to change weight, parent education, and adult presence after school, students who typically brought their lunch to school 5 days per week ate fast food 0.35 fewer times and consumed 0.35 fewer servings of soda, 0.10 fewer servings of fried potatoes, 0.25 fewer servings of high-sugar foods, and 0.95 more servings of fruit and vegetables per day compared with students who never brought their lunch to school. These findings suggest that adolescents who bring lunch to school from home have more positive dietary behaviors than do adolescents who get their lunches from other sources. Improving the nutritional quality of foods offered from other sources, such as the National School Lunch Program and competitive foods, could help improve adolescent dietary behaviors.

  20. 78 FR 9529 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... sent to Julie Brewer, Chief, Policy and Program Development Branch, Child Nutrition Division, Food and..., Policy and Program Development Branch, Child Nutrition Division, Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park... Standards for Food Sold in Schools in Competition With School Meals Federal child nutrition programs play a...

  1. Agricultural High School Students' Acquisition of Knowledge and Skills regarding a Nutritionally Balanced Diet through Assisting in a School Lunch Program for Elementary and Middle School Pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midori Ishikawa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study whether agricultural high school students' attitudes towards social support for consumers would improve with their involvement in a school lunch program for elementary and middle school pupils. A comparison of the pre- and post-intervention data revealed the food knowledge, production skills, and attitudes towards food production for children among students at the experimental and control schools. A pilot trial study was conducted that involved growing tomatoes and distributing a newsletter on school lunches to primary and middle school children. The study was implemented from April to October every year from 2006 to 2009. A total of 92 agricultural high school students and 20 controlled agricultural students participated during these four years. The evaluation survey comprised questions about food nutrition, food production, and access to health and nutritional support services. The students who worked in assisting the school lunch program exhibited increased knowledge and skills related to producing a newsletter on produce for consumers as compared to the control student group. The students' food knowledge and production skills showed a significant positive correlation with their attitudes towards assisting in the school lunch program. Therefore, the acquisition of knowledge and skills regarding the preparation of a newsletter on produce by agricultural high school students increased significantly through the experience of supporting a school lunch program.

  2. Seasonal Difference in National School Lunch Program Participation and Its Impacts on Household Food Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Kim, Youngmi; Barnidge, Ellen

    2016-11-20

    The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is one of the most important food assistance programs in the United States to ensure children's food security and healthy development. Previous studies have offered mixed results and challenges in estimating the effects of program participation. This study assesses NSLP's effect on household food security using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). SIPP collects information on food security that covers four reference months, including both summer (June, July, August) and nonsummer months. The number of summer months in these four reference months varies by SIPP rotation group. These unique features allow this study to address the potential selection bias in the research of NSLP and food security by examining a seasonal difference in program participation. The analysis found that one more summer month in the reference period increases the difference in low food security rates by about 1.5 percentage points between recipients and nonrecipients eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. Findings have important social work and health policy implications for increasing food security among low-income households with children. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  3. Food Waste in the National School Lunch Program 1978-2015: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byker Shanks, Carmen; Banna, Jinan; Serrano, Elena L

    2017-11-01

    Food waste studies have been used for more than 40 years to assess nutrient intake, dietary quality, menu performance, food acceptability, cost, and effectiveness of nutrition education in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Describe methods used to measure food waste and respective results in the NSLP across time. A systematic review using PubMed, Science Direct, Informaworld, and Institute of Scientific Information Web of Knowledge was conducted using the following search terms: waste, school lunch, plate waste, food waste, kitchen, half method, quarter method, weight, and photography. Studies published through June 2015 were included. The systematic review followed preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses recommendations. The final review included 53 articles. Food waste methodologies included in-person visual estimation (n=11), digital photography (n=11), direct weighing (n=23), and a combination of in-person visual estimation, digital photography, and/or direct weighing (n=8). A majority of studies used a pre-post intervention or cross-sectional design. Fruits and vegetables were the most researched dietary component on the lunch tray and yielded the greatest amount of waste across studies. Food waste is commonly assessed in the NSLP, but the methods are diverse and reporting metrics are variable. Future research should focus on establishing more uniform metrics to measure and report on food waste in the NSLP. Consistent food waste measurement methods will allow for better comparisons between studies. Such measures may facilitate better decision making about NSLP practices, programs, and policies that influence student consumption patterns across settings and interventions. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Student-Faculty Lunch Program to Increase Mentoring and Facilitate Cross-Program Relationships in School of Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Allison; Wainwright, Kristin; Gordon, Helen; Derouin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Let's DU Lunch is a pilot program launched to explore the impact of a low-cost, student-faculty lunch program to increase mentoring and facilitate cross-program relationships. This program gave students the opportunity to go to lunch with a faculty member of their choice. A total of 71 students and 25 faculty participated. This program provided the opportunity for positive student-faculty interaction and mentoring and facilitated cross-program relationships.

  5. The contribution of the USDA school breakfast and lunch program meals to student daily dietary intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Weber Cullen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, the National School Breakfast (SBP and School Lunch Program (NSLP meals are provided for free or at a reduced price to eligible children, and are a nutrition safety net for low income children. Consuming both meals could provide 58% of daily intake. This paper evaluates the contribution of SBP and NSLP meals to the dietary intakes of 5–18 year old children participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES from 2007 through 2012. The participants completed 24-hour dietary recalls. Least-square means and standard errors of the mean for energy and food group intakes for the total day and by school meal, and the percent of daily energy and food groups contributed by school meals were computed by analysis of covariance, with BMI, ethnicity, sex, age and poverty level as covariates. Of the 7800 participating children aged 5–18 years in the entire dataset, 448 consumed both SBP-NSLP meals on a weekday. Almost one-half (47% of the day's energy intake was provided by the two school meals. For the major food groups, the contribution of school meals ranged from between 40.6% for vegetables to 77.1% for milk. Overall, these results provide important information on contribution of the SBP and NSLP meals to low income children's daily dietary intake.

  6. The contribution of the USDA school breakfast and lunch program meals to student daily dietary intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Chen, Tzu-An

    2017-03-01

    In the United States, the National School Breakfast (SBP) and School Lunch Program (NSLP) meals are provided for free or at a reduced price to eligible children, and are a nutrition safety net for low income children. Consuming both meals could provide 58% of daily intake. This paper evaluates the contribution of SBP and NSLP meals to the dietary intakes of 5-18 year old children participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2007 through 2012. The participants completed 24-hour dietary recalls. Least-square means and standard errors of the mean for energy and food group intakes for the total day and by school meal, and the percent of daily energy and food groups contributed by school meals were computed by analysis of covariance, with BMI, ethnicity, sex, age and poverty level as covariates. Of the 7800 participating children aged 5-18 years in the entire dataset, 448 consumed both SBP-NSLP meals on a weekday. Almost one-half (47%) of the day's energy intake was provided by the two school meals. For the major food groups, the contribution of school meals ranged from between 40.6% for vegetables to 77.1% for milk. Overall, these results provide important information on contribution of the SBP and NSLP meals to low income children's daily dietary intake.

  7. Exploring the Influence of the National School Lunch Program on Children Discussion Paper No. 1277-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunifon, Rachel E.; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, 1998?1999 Kindergarten Cohort, the study examines two research questions: What are the effects of participation in the National School Lunch Program on changes in children?s behavior, test scores, and body weight? Do these effects differ by gender? To address issues of selection, we use…

  8. Associations between Participation in the National School Lunch Program, Food Insecurity, and Child Well-Being. JCPR Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunifon, Rachel; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    This study examined the association between food insecurity, participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and child well-being. Participants were children age 6-12 years in families in which at least one child participated in the NSLP. Data came from the 1997 Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Food…

  9. Do School Lunches Contribute to Childhood Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses whether school lunches contribute to childhood obesity. I employ two methods to isolate the causal impact of school lunches on obesity. First, using panel data, I ?nd that children who consume school lunches are more likely to be obese than those who brown bag their lunches even though they enter kindergarten with the same…

  10. Impact of the National School Lunch Program on Fruit and Vegetable Selection in Northeastern Elementary Schoolchildren, 2012–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Bethany A.; Taylor, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Rachel K.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing children's fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption is an important goal of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) National School Lunch Program. Since 2012, the USDA's requirement that children select FVs at lunch as part of the reimbursable school meal has been met with concern and evidence of food waste. We compared elementary schoolchildren's FV selection, consumption, and waste before (10 school visits, 498 tray observations) and after (11 school visits, 944 tray observations) implementation of this requirement using validated dietary assessment measures. More children selected FVs in higher amounts when FVs were required compared with when they were optional (0.69 cups vs. 0.89 cups, pschools through programmatic efforts and in the home environment may help familiarize children with FV offerings and encourage consumption. PMID:26327723

  11. An Innovative Method of Measuring Changes in Access to Healthful Foods in School Lunch Programs: Findings from a Pilot Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison P Hawkes

    Full Text Available A large local health department in Colorado partnered with 15 school districts to develop an approach to evaluate changes in access to healthy foods in reimbursable school lunches and a la carte offerings.School district nutrition managers were engaged at the start of this project. Health department dietitians developed criteria to classify food items as "Lower Fat and less added Sugar" (LFS and "Higher Fat and more added Sugar" (HFS based on the percentage of calories from fat and grams of added sugar. Lunch production sheets were obtained for two time periods, food items and the number of planned servings recorded. LFS and HFS planned servings were summed for each time period, and a LFS to HFS ratio calculated by dividing LFS planned servings by HFS planned servings. Additional analyses included calculating LFS: HFS ratios by school district, and for a la carte offerings.In 2009, the LFS: HFS ratio was 2.08, in 2011, 3.71 (P<0.0001. The method also detected changes in ratios at the school district level. For a la carte items, in 2009 the ratio of LFS: HFS was 0.53, and in 2011, 0.61 (not statistically significant.This method detected an increase in the LFS: HFS ratio over time and demonstrated that the school districts improved access to healthful food/drink by changing the contents of reimbursable school lunches. The evaluation method discussed here can generate information that districts can use in helping sustain and expand their efforts to create healthier environments for children and adults. Although federal regulations now cover all food and beverages served during the school day, there are still opportunities to improve and measure changes in food served in other settings such as child care centers, youth correction facilities, or in schools not participating in the National School Lunch Program.

  12. Validation of the school lunch recall questionnaire to capture school lunch intake of third- to fifth-grade students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Amy; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Fleming, Phyllis; Ammerman, Alice

    2011-03-01

    Children's dietary intake is a key variable in evaluations of school-based interventions. Current methods for assessing children's intake, such as 24-hour recalls and meal observations, are time- and resource-intensive. As part of a study to evaluate the impact of farm-to-school programs, the school lunch recall was developed from a need for a valid and efficient tool to assess school lunch intake among large samples of children. A self-administered paper-and-pencil questionnaire, the school lunch recall prompts for school lunch items by asking children whether they chose a menu item, how much of it they ate, how much they liked it, and whether they would choose it again. The school lunch recall was validated during summer school in 2008 with 18 third- to fifth-grade students (8 to 11 years old) in a North Carolina elementary school. For 4 consecutive days, trained observers recorded foods and amounts students ate during school lunch. Students completed the school lunch recall immediately after lunch. Thirty-seven total observation school lunch recall sets were analyzed. Comparison of school lunch recalls against observations indicated high accuracy, with means of 6% for omission rate (items observed but unreported), 10% for intrusion rate (items unobserved but reported), and 0.63 servings for total inaccuracy (a measure that combines errors for reporting items and amounts). For amounts, accuracy was high for matches (0.06 and 0.01 servings for absolute and arithmetic differences, respectively) but lower for omissions (0.47 servings) and intrusions (0.54 servings). In this pilot study, the school lunch recall was a valid, efficient tool for assessing school lunch intake for a small sample of third- to fifth-grade students. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Vote for School Lunches: School Lunches Provide Superior Nutrient Quality than Lunches Obtained from Other Sources in a Nationally Representative Sample of US Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline A. Vernarelli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Childhood obesity is an ongoing public health program. As such, a major public health research objective is to identify potential targets for intervention; one such area is school lunches (SL. The National School Lunch Program (NSLP serves over 31 million children each day; the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES is uniquely positioned to allow researchers to assess diet quality in federal nutrition assistance programs. The objective of the study was to investigate whether lunches provided by schools provide different nutritional value than lunches obtained elsewhere. In a nationally representative sample of 2190 children, consumption of a school-provided lunch (SL was associated with greater nutritional quality compared to lunches obtained elsewhere across both age and income categories. Children who were eligible for no-cost school lunch, but did not participate in the NSLP consumed approximately 60% more energy, 58% more total fat, 60% more saturated fat, 50% more solid fat, 61% more sodium, double the amount of added sugars and less than half the amount of fruit than NSLP participants (all p < 0.001. The results of this study suggest that though widely criticized, school lunches provide superior nutrient quality than lunches obtained from other sources, particularly for low-income children.

  14. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program participation in elementary schools in the United States and availability of fruits and vegetables in school lunch meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Turner, Lindsey; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2012-06-01

    Dietary intake among children in the United States falls short of national recommendations. Schools can play an important role in improving children's preferences and food consumption patterns. The US Department of Agriculture's Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) aims to improve children's nutrient intake patterns by offering fresh fruits and vegetables as snacks outside the reimbursable meals programs in elementary schools that serve large numbers of low-income children. Using a nationally representative sample of public elementary schools, this cross-sectional study investigated FFVP participation patterns among schools by demographic and school characteristics. Further, the study investigated the association between FFVP participation and availability of fresh fruits, salads, and vegetables at lunch as reported by school administrators and foodservice staff. Data collected via a mail-back survey from 620 public elementary schools participating in the National School Lunch Program during 2009-2010 were analyzed. Almost 70% of the FFVP-participating schools had a majority of students (>50%) eligible for free and reduced-cost meals. Participating in US Department of Agriculture Team Nutrition Program and having a registered dietitian or a nutritionist on staff were significantly associated with FFVP participation. Based on the results from logistic regression analyses schools participating in the FFVP were significantly more likely (odds ratio 2.07; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.53) to serve fresh fruit during lunch meals. Slightly >25% of public elementary schools across the United States participated in the FFVP, and participation was associated with healthier food availability in school lunches. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential improvements in student fruit and vegetable selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program regulations: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to investigate changes in student food selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns during fall 2011. Eight elementary and four intermediate schools in one Houston area school district were matched on free/reduced-price meal eligibili...

  16. National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: nutrition standards for all foods sold in school as required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    This interim final rule amends the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program regulations to establish nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools, other than food sold under the lunch and breakfast programs. Amendments made by Section 208 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) require the Secretary to establish nutrition standards for such foods, consistent with the most recent Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and directs the Secretary to consider authoritative scientific recommendations for nutrition standards; existing school nutrition standards, including voluntary standards for beverages and snack foods; current State and local standards; the practical application of the nutrition standards; and special exemptions for infrequent school-sponsored fundraisers (other than fundraising through vending machines, school stores, snack bars, à la carte sales and any other exclusions determined by the Secretary). In addition, this interim final rule requires schools participating in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program to make potable water available to children at no charge in the place where lunches are served during the meal service, consistent with amendments made by section 203 of the HHFKA, and in the cafeteria during breakfast meal service. This interim final rule is expected to improve the health and well-being of the Nation's children, increase consumption of healthful foods during the school day, and create an environment that reinforces the development of healthy eating habits.

  17. National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Eliminating Applications Through Community Eligibility as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This final rule establishes requirements for State agencies, local educational agencies, and schools operating the Community Eligibility Provision, a reimbursement option that allows the service of school meals to all children at no-cost in high poverty schools without collecting household applications. By eliminating the household application process and streamlining meal counting and claiming procedures through the Community Eligibility Provision, local educational agencies may substantially reduce administrative burden related to operating the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. This rule codifies many requirements that were implemented through policy guidance following enactment of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, as well as provisions of the proposed rule. These requirements will result in consistent, national implementation of the Community Eligibility Provision.

  18. Back to basics - the school lunch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne

    2016-01-01

    . The concept of foodscape captures the school lunch as a specific configuration of food products, social practices and values. The concept of human well-being defined by Amartya Sen and elaborated by Martha C. Nussbaum helps to characterize the needs involved in the school lunch. The assessment is performed...

  19. 76 FR 35301 - National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ... Brewer, Chief, Policy and Program Development Branch, Child Nutrition Division, Food and Nutrition..., Chief, Policy and Program Development Branch, Child Nutrition Division, Food and Nutrition Service, 3101... provided in section 10 of the Child Nutrition Act (42 U.S.C. 1779). The law now requires that the...

  20. Associations between Participation in the National School Lunch Program, Food Insecurity, and Child Well-Being. Discussion Paper No. 1249-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunifon, Rachel; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the associations between food insecurity, participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and children's well-being. We address problems of selection by restricting our sample to children in families in which at least one child participates in the NSLP. Results suggest that food insecurity is associated with…

  1. Study on school lunch of four groups

    OpenAIRE

    大迫, 康子; 小住, フミ子; Yasuko, OSAKO; Fumiko, OZUMI

    1984-01-01

    There are many small islands, villages and fishing ports in Kagoshima. This study was designed to investigate whether a local color in school lnuch exist or not. It was found that the school lunch served in small island had the best nutritional quantity and quality and menu contents. Contradictionus results, vitamin deficiency in village and protein deficiency in fishing ports, were also obtained. There is a correlation between lunch cost and menu contents. The shotage of potatos and beans ob...

  2. Comparing School Lunch and Canteen Foods Consumption of Children in Kayseri, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Ongan, Dilek; Inanc, Neriman; Cicek, Betül

    2014-01-01

    Objective: School Nutrition Programs (SNPs) may have positive effects on children’s food choices through high nutritional quality meals. This cross-sectional & descriptive study was conducted to determine nutritional quality of school lunch and to compare lunch consumption of students who participated in SNP and who did not, at the first governmental school serving school lunch in Kayseri, Turkey. Methods: One hundred and sixteen students aged 9-14 years were divided into two groups after bei...

  3. 75 FR 63689 - National School Lunch Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... individuals who administer the National School Lunch Program in appropriate activities that support the health... environments that encourage physical activity and nourishing diets, ``Let's Move!'' is partnering with the... food, participation in meal programs, physical activity, and nutrition education--all key components...

  4. Decentralization Of The School-lunch Program In Cuiabá: 1993-1996 [descentralização Do Programa De Alimentação Escolar Em Cuiabá: 1993-1996

    OpenAIRE

    Spinelli M.A.D.S.; Canesqui A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The article evaluates the implementation process of the decentralized (municipalism) school-lunch program in Cuiabá (1993-1996). Guided by the process evaluation research, this article analyses the characteristics of the municipalism school lunches' implementation process, in all its dimensions (organizational, personnel, infrastructure and resources). It also considered the opinions of all its agents (decision-makers and implementation agents, as well as the beneficiaries of the program), in...

  5. Differential improvements in student fruit and vegetable selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program regulations: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Karen W.; Chen, Tzu-An; Dave, Jayna M.; Jensen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated changes in student food selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns during fall, 2011. Design Eight elementary and four intermediate schools in one Houston area school district were matched on free/reduced price (FRP) meal eligibility and randomized into control or intervention conditions. Intervention Both intervention and control school cafeterias served the same menu. The intervention school cafeterias posted the new meal pattern daily; students could select one fruit and two vegetable servings per reimbursable meal. Control school students could only select the previous meal pattern: a total of two fruit and vegetable servings per meal. Main outcome measures Students were observed during lunch: gender, foods selected/consumed were recorded. Diet analysis software was used to calculate energy/food groups selected/consumed. Statistical analyses performed Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square tests examined differences in the percent of students selecting each meal component by condition, controlling for gender, grade, and school FRP. ANCOVA assessed differences in amount of energy/food groups selected and consumed, and differences in percent of food groups consumed. Results Observations were conducted for 1149 elementary and 427 intermediate students. Compared with students in the control schools, significantly more intervention elementary and intermediate school students selected total (P<0.001, P<0.05) and starchy vegetables (P<0.001; P<0.01); more intervention intermediate school students selected fruit (P<0.001), legumes (P<0.05), and protein foods (P<0.01). There were significantly greater amounts of these foods selected and consumed, but no differences in the proportion of the foods consumed by condition. Fewer calories were consumed by elementary and intermediate school intervention students. Conclusions More intervention students selected fruit and vegetables at lunch, and

  6. Foods and beverages offered in US public secondary schools through the National School Lunch Program from 2011-2013: Early evidence of improved nutrition and reduced disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M; O'Malley, Patrick M; Johnston, Lloyd D

    2015-09-01

    To present data on trends in foods and beverages offered through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in public middle and high schools in the years immediately preceding and following implementation of new NSLP standards. From 2011 to 2013, primary data collection through the annual Youth, Education, and Society study involved use of mailed questionnaires to obtain data on NSLP meals from schools attended by nationally representative samples of US 8(th), 10(th), and 12(th) grade students (N=792 middle schools and 751 high schools). Each school was weighted to represent the percentage of target grade students enrolled, thus allowing analyses examining changes over time in the percentage of students enrolled in (attending) schools with specified NSLP measure outcomes, as well as disparities in NSLP measures based on school characteristics. Significantly more US secondary students attended schools with specified NSLP measures in 2013 than in 2011; increases were observed at both middle and high school levels. Increase rates for some NSLP measures were moderated by school characteristics; where this was the case, moderating associations decreased prior NSLP nutrition environment disparities that were especially evident in smaller schools and schools with higher percentages of minority students. Meaningful improvements have been made in the nutritional content of NSLP meals offered to US secondary students; these improvements have reduced prior NSLP meal disparities associated with school characteristics. Schools will need continued help with implementation and compliance monitoring in order to have the best opportunity to improve the nutrition environments for US students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule and interim final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    This rule adopts as final, with some modifications, the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program regulations set forth in the interim final rule published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2013. The requirements addressed in this rule conform to the provisions in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 regarding nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools, other than food sold under the lunch and breakfast programs. Most provisions of this final rule were implemented on July 1, 2014, a full year subsequent to publication of the interim final rule. This was in compliance with section 208 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which required that State and local educational agencies have at least one full school year from the date of publication of the interim final rule to implement the competitive food provisions. Based on comments received on the interim final rule and implementation experience, this final rule makes a few modifications to the nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools implemented on July 1, 2014. In addition, this final rule codifies specific policy guidance issued after publication of the interim rule. Finally, this rule retains the provision related to the standard for total fat as interim and requests further comment on this single standard.

  8. Comparing school lunch and canteen foods consumption of children in kayseri, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongan, Dilek; Inanc, Neriman; Cicek, Betül

    2014-05-01

    School Nutrition Programs (SNPs) may have positive effects on children's food choices through high nutritional quality meals. This cross-sectional & descriptive study was conducted to determine nutritional quality of school lunch and to compare lunch consumption of students who participated in SNP and who did not, at the first governmental school serving school lunch in Kayseri, Turkey. One hundred and sixteen students aged 9-14 years were divided into two groups after being matched according to gender, age, grade; 58 participants (school lunch group; SL-G) and 58 nonparticipants (school canteen group; SC-G) were recruited. Energy-nutrient content of 5-day school lunch was determined by recipes. Socio-demographic data and lunch consumption on 5 consecutive weekdays with weighed left overs were obtained. Lunch energy-nutrient intakes and anthropometric measurements were compared. School lunch was adequate for vitamins (E & C), fibre, iron, inadequate for energy, carbohydrate, folate, calcium. Contribution of fat (36.6±6.8%) and saturated fat (12.2±3.5%) to energy and sodium content was high (1001 mg) in school lunch. SL-G consumed significantly higher protein, vitamin C, thiamine, vitamin B6, potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc (pschool should be revised with collaboration of school management, catering firm, dietetic professionals. Policy should focus on reducing fat, saturated fat, sodium content and meeting energy-nutrient requirements of school aged children.

  9. 77 FR 25024 - Certification of Compliance With Meal Requirements for the National School Lunch Program Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... is to provide additional funding for SFAs to implement new meal pattern requirements, thus increasing.... The regulatory framework reflects the reality that a reduction in program payments of any amount is... increased nutritional standards for both programs without imposing unnecessary burdens likely to discourage...

  10. School setting and irregular lunch consumption among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh Pedersen, Trine; Holstein, Bjørn Evald; Rasmussen, Mette

    level variables and irregular lunch consumption. Lunch consumption was measured by lunch frequency questions. Results: We found that the school level factors, “Availability to canteen” and “Adult present in lunch breaks” were associated with irregular lunch consumption. Students with no access...... the association. Conclusion: The structural setting of the school was associated with children and adolescents’ regularity of lunch consumption in a multilevel model controlled for individual level factors. From the findings we can conclude that availability of canteen and school stall did not promote regular......Abstract Background: There is little knowledge of the association between the structural setting of the school and irregular lunch consumption among adolescents. Objectives: To study whether the structural setting of the school was associated with adolescents’ irregular lunch consumption...

  11. The Importance of Improving the Nutritional Quality of Packed Lunches in U.S. Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyak, Sarah; Farris, Alisha; Mann, Georgianna; Serrano, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Schools represent an ideal venue to influence dietary habits of large numbers of children. While the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is mandated to meet clear nutrition standards for calories, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, milk, sodium, fat, and saturated fat, there are no nutritional requirements for packed lunches. This Current Issue…

  12. Middle school student perceptions of school lunch following revised federal school meal guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assessed student perceptions of school meals under the new federal meal patterns for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Student feedback is instrumental in developing strategies to increase and maintain NSLP participation, satisfaction, and ultimately provide students with a health...

  13. Middle School Cafeteria Food Choice and Waste Prior to Implementation of Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Changes in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Priscilla; Bednar, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The study objective was to document choices of entrées, vegetables, fruits, grains/breads, and beverages on lunch trays and to determine the amount of each that was discarded after mealtime. Methods: A convenience sample of two urban middle school cafeterias in Texas participated in the study which took place in the 2010-2011…

  14. Economic viability of new launched school lunch programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Smed, Sinne; Mørkbak, Morten Raun

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate determinants for the viability of school lunch programmes with a zero-price start-up period. The study is based on a Danish pilot experiment, in which 38 schools were subsidized to provide free school lunch for all pupils during a two-month start...... activities related to the schools’ support and the users’ feeling of ownership, as well as internal professionalism and leadership in the implementation of the school lunch programme are important for the viability of the programme. Strong performance on the latter factors might to some extent compensate...... for the gap between cost and users’ willingness to pay for school lunches....

  15. School meal sociality or lunch pack individualism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sidse Schoubye; Holm, Lotte; Baarts, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    the social life of a school class, and how these arrangements involve strategies of both inclusion and exclusion. Two types of school meals are compared in the intervention study: a hot meal based on Nordic ingredients and the normal Danish school meal arrangement in which children bring lunch packs......The present article specifies and broadens our understanding of the concept of commensality by investigating what it means to ‘share a meal’. The study utilizes a school meal intervention carried out in Denmark in 2011/2012. It shows how different types of school meal arrangement influence...... to school. The study discusses commensality by examining and comparing lunchtime interactions within the same group of children in the two contrasting meal situations. The results fail to confirm the conventional view that shared meals have greater social impacts and benefits than eating individualized...

  16. The Non-Participation Survey: Understanding Why High School Students Choose Not to Eat School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to develop and validate a survey that will enable school nutrition (SN) directors and managers to identify and address issues affecting the non-participation of high school students in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The research was conducted in two phases. Qualitative data…

  17. Factors Predicting Staying in School to Eat Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Dominique; Godin, Gaston

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Easy access to fast-food restaurants in the immediate environment of a high school is such that a high proportion of students do not remain in school for lunch. Hence, the probability that they will eat a healthy meal is reduced. The aim of this study is to identify the behavioral determinants of "staying in school to eat lunch" among…

  18. A comparison of fruits, vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages, and desserts in the packed lunches of elementary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Alisha R; Misyak, Sarah; Duffey, Kiyah J; Mann, Georgianna R; Davis, George C; Hosig, Kathy; Atzaba-Poria, Naama; McFerren, Mary M; Serrano, Elena L

    2015-06-01

    An estimated 40% of children bring a packed lunch to school. These lunches are not required to meet nutrition standards. The aim of this study was to compare differences in the nutritional quality of elementary packed lunches by the presence or absence of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), desserts, and fruits and vegetables (FVs). Observational data for prekindergarten and kindergarten packed lunches were collected from three schools in rural Virginia for 5 consecutive school days and analyzed for macro- and micronutrients and by the presence or absence of food and beverage items. Of the 561 packed lunch observations collected, 41.7% contained no FV, 41.2% contained an SSB, and 61.1% contained a dessert. The nutrient profile of packed lunches with at least one fruit or vegetable had significantly higher levels of carbohydrate, fiber, sugar, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Packed lunches containing an SSB had significantly higher levels of sugar and vitamin C and significantly lower levels of protein, fiber, vitamin A, calcium, and iron. Packed lunches containing a dessert had significantly higher levels of energy, carbohydrate, fat, saturated fat, sodium, sugar, vitamin C, and iron and significantly lower levels of vitamin A. Additional research is needed to fully understand parent and child motivations for packing lunches and the decision processes that influence the inclusion of food items. The development of packed lunch interventions, encouragement of National School Lunch Program participation, or enactment of school policies to increase the nutritional value of packed lunches is warranted.

  19. Consuming Identities: Law, School Lunches, and What it Means to be American

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mortazavi, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    .... With it, law shapes, reflects, and may even--at times--dictate American identities. Perhaps nowhere is the law's impact on food and identity more immediately apparent than in the context of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP...

  20. Food Attitudes of High School Students (part 1) : The form of lunch and the consciousness of school lunch

    OpenAIRE

    小林, 幸子; コバヤシ, サチコ; Sachiko, Kobayashi

    1983-01-01

    This study was investigated the form of daily lunch in the high school students. 1) Thirty two percent of the students were satisfied the present form of daily lunch. Among these students, the students in the 1st and the 2nd grade, who have been taking a home-made lunch showed higher rate of satisfaction in the present lunch and in the 3rd grade, the students have been taking commercially readymade lunch showed higher rate of satisfaction. 2) Fifty percent of the students wanted to be given a...

  1. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary School Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lunch packs play a significant role in the nutritional status and academic performance of school children. Available data show a high prevalence of malnutrition among school‑age children. Aims: The aim of this study is to document the nutritional contents of lunch packs of primary school children in Nnewi, ...

  2. Accuracy of 11-year-olds selfreported school lunch consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nina

    Background This thesis is embedded in the emerging scientific discipline of public health nutrition and explores the methodological aspect of measuring children’s ability to report their school lunch consumption accurately. Children’s dietary intake does not concurwith nutritional recommendations...... or food-based dietary guidelines which constitutes a public health concern for several reasons. In Denmark children’s food consumption during school hours constitutes more than a third of children’s daily energy intake. Assessment of school lunch consumption among children in their natural settings holds...... among children has addressed accuracy in relation to school meals. However, in several countries including Denmark packed lunch is the prevalent lunch format and the lack of packed lunch reporting accuracy studies needs to be addressed to increase the knowledge about school hour reporting accuracy...

  3. [Role of school lunch in primary school education: a trial analysis of school teachers' views using an open-ended questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayama, T; Kashiwazaki, H; Sakamoto, M

    1998-12-01

    We tried to analyze synthetically teachers' view points associated with health education and roles of school lunch in primary education. For this purpose, a survey using an open-ended questionnaire consisting of eight items relating to health education in the school curriculum was carried out in 100 teachers of ten public primary schools. Subjects were asked to describe their view regarding the following eight items: 1) health and physical guidance education, 2) school lunch guidance education, 3) pupils' attitude toward their own health and nutrition, 4) health education, 5) role of school lunch in education, 6) future subjects of health education, 7) class room lesson related to school lunch, 8) guidance in case of pupil with unbalanced dieting and food avoidance. Subjects described their own opinions on an open-ended questionnaire response sheet. Keywords in individual descriptions were selected, rearranged and classified into categories according to their own meanings, and each of the selected keywords were used as the dummy variable. To assess individual opinions synthetically, a principal component analysis was then applied to the variables collected through the teachers' descriptions, and four factors were extracted. The results were as follows. 1) Four factors obtained from the repeated principal component analysis were summarized as; roles of health education and school lunch program (the first principal component), cooperation with nurse-teachers and those in charge of lunch service (the second principal component), time allocation for health education in home-room activity and lunch time (the third principal component) and contents of health education and school lunch guidance and their future plan (the fourth principal component). 2) Teachers regarded the role of school lunch in primary education as providing daily supply of nutrients, teaching of table manners and building up friendships with classmates, health education and food and nutrition

  4. State Laws Are Associated with School Lunch Duration and Promotion Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Leider, Julien; Piekarz-Porter, Elizabeth; Schwartz, Marlene B; Merlo, Caitlin; Brener, Nancy; Chriqui, Jamie F

    2017-10-27

    The changes in school meal programs stemming from the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 have expanded interest in strategies that increase student participation in school lunch and reduce plate waste. However, it remains unclear what factors are associated with schools' use of such strategies. This study examines whether state laws are associated with two types of school meal-related practices: (a) using promotional strategies (ie, taste tests, using posters or announcements) and (b) duration of lunch periods. This cross-sectional study utilized the nationally representative 2014 School Health Policies and Practices Study, combined with corresponding state laws gathered by the National Wellness Policy Study. School data were available from 414 public schools in 43 states. Outcome measures included 16 strategies to promote school meals and the amount of time students had to eat lunch after being seated. Multivariate logistic regression and Poisson regression were used to examine associations between state laws and school practices, after accounting for school demographic characteristics. Compared to schools in states with no law about engaging stakeholders in meal programs, schools in states with a law were more likely to conduct taste tests (64% vs 44%, P=0.016), collect suggestions from students (67% vs 50%, P=0.017), and invite family members to a school meal (71% vs 53%, P=0.015). Schools used more promotion strategies in states with a law than in states without a law (mean=10.4 vs 8.8, P=0.003). Schools were more likely to provide students at least 30 minutes to eat lunch after being seated in states with laws that addressed a minimum amount of time for lunch duration (43% vs 27%, P=0.042). State-level policy provisions are associated with school practices. Policy development in more states may support school practices that promote lunch participation and consumption. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  5. School Lunch before and after Implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ethan A.; Englund, Tim; Taylor, Katie Weigt; Watkins, Tracee; Schepman, Stephen; Rushing, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study compares the mean nutrients selected and consumed in National School Lunch Program (NSLP) meals before and after implementation of the new nutrition standards mandated by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) in July 2012. Four elementary schools achieving Healthier US Schools Challenge awards serving…

  6. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary School Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    school hours alleviate short term hunger, increase attention span, facilitate learning and obviate the need for children to leave school in search of food.[4] Healthier and better nourished children stay in school longer, learn more and later become healthier and more productive adults. Content of lunch pack should supply a ...

  7. From Policy to Practice: Parent Perceptions of the 2010 Federal School Lunch Mandate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golembiewski, Elizabeth H.; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Elchert, Daniel M.; Leicht, Erika A.; Scheidel, Carrie A.; Delger, Patti J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate parent awareness and perceptions of changes to the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) implemented as a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHKA) of 2010. Methods: An online survey of parents of school age (K-12) children in a Midwestern state was conducted (n = 2,189). The…

  8. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: Associations with school food environment and policies

    OpenAIRE

    Story Mary; Hannan Peter J; French Simone A; Neumark-Sztainer Dianne; Fulkerson Jayne A

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. Methods A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained resear...

  9. School Lunch Is Not a Meal: Posthuman Eating as Folk Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Bradley; Rocha, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    School lunch is one of the least critiqued aspects of compulsory schooling. As a result, there may be a tendency to think of school lunch as part of the hidden curriculum, but what and how students eat are evident and ubiquitous parts of the schooling experience. In demarcating the school lunch as an overt educational event, this article attempts…

  10. Cost-free and sustainable incentive increases healthy eating decisions during elementary school lunch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, D W; Parker, J S; Getz, B R; Jackson, C M; Le, T-A P; Riggs, S B; Shay, J M

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to develop a cost-free and sustainable program to influence healthier eating decisions during elementary school lunch. Baseline food and beverage choices were assessed for 9 days during lunch service at two racially and economically diverse elementary schools in Spartanburg County, SC, USA. After being informed that the labeled items on the daily lunch menu represented the healthiest choice, students were allowed to ring a call bell in the cafeteria for public recognition when they chose all of the identified healthiest food and beverage items during lunch service. Using menus matched to the baseline phase, food and beverage choices were measured during a 9-day intervention phase. After 30 days, food and beverage choices were reassessed during a 3-day follow-up phase. Healthiest food & beverage choices increased 49% with >60% of students choosing non-flavored milk over flavored milk during the intervention phase. There was no difference in the success of the program between the two schools. The program continued and healthy eating decisions were significantly sustained at a 30-day follow-up assessment. Public recognition through bell ringing appears to be an effective practice to sustain increases in healthy eating decisions during elementary school lunch and warrants expansion to larger scale, longitudinal trials.

  11. 3 CFR 8436 - Proclamation 8436 of October 9, 2009. National School Lunch Week, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... This program can also teach children about the importance of good eating habits, which is vital to our... leaders to learn and thrive. The National School Lunch Program serves more than 31 million students every... work and concentration. Students distracted by hunger cannot match the focus of their peers. Poorly...

  12. The Income Volatility See-Saw: Implications for School Lunch. Economic Research Report Number 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance

    2006-01-01

    Income volatility challenges the effectiveness of the safety net that USDA food assistance programs provide low-income families. This study examines income volatility among households with children and the implications of volatility for eligibility in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). The results show that income volatility was higher for…

  13. Changes in foods selected and consumed after implementation of the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns in southeast Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen W. Cullen

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The findings that students had similar consumption rates for fruit, whole grains, and most vegetables in this study are encouraging. Regular monitoring of student food selection and consumption at school is needed to assess whether the new meal patterns improve intake at school.

  14. Impact of school lunch programmes on nutritional status of children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SLP had a positive significant effect on the nutritional status of participating children. More schools and parents in similar environments should therefore be encouraged to venture into the SLP because of their positive outcome on nutritional status as well as the diet quality of participating children. Key words: School Lunch ...

  15. Factors Associated with School Lunch Consumption: Reverse Recess and School "Brunch".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Leah Elizabeth; Cohen, Juliana; Canterberry, Melanie; Carton, Thomas W

    2017-09-01

    While school foods have become healthier under the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act, research suggests there is still substantial food waste in cafeterias. It is therefore necessary to study factors that can impact food consumption, including holding recess before lunch ("reverse recess") and starting lunch periods very early or very late. This study examined the association between the timing of recess (pre-lunch vs post-lunch recess), the timing of the lunch period, and food consumed by students at lunch. We conducted a secondary data analysis from a repeated cross-sectional design. An 8-week plate waste study examining 20,183 trays of food was conducted in New Orleans, LA, in 2014. The study involved 1,036 fourth- and fifth-grade students from eight public schools. We measured percent of entrées, fruit, vegetables, and milk consumed by students at lunch. We used mixed-model analyses, controlling for student sex, grade, and the timing of the lunch period, and examined the association between reverse recess and student lunch consumption. Mixed-model analyses controlling for student sex, grade, and recess status examined whether the timing of the lunch period was associated with student lunch consumption. On average, students with reverse recess consumed 5.1% more of their fruit than students with post-lunch recess (P=0.009), but there were no significant differences in entrées, vegetables, or milk intake. Compared to students with "midday" lunch periods, on average students with "early" lunch periods consumed 5.8% less of their entrées (Precess was associated with increased fruit consumption. "Early" lunch periods were associated with decreased entrée and milk consumption, and "late" lunch periods were associated with decreased entrée and fruit consumption. Additional research is recommended to determine whether these associations are causal. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. School lunch waste among middle school students: nutrients consumed and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Richardson, Scott; Austin, S Bryn; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2013-02-01

    The National School Lunch Program has been guided by modest nutrient standards, and the palatability of meals, which drives consumption, receives inadequate attention. School food waste can have important nutritional and cost implications for policymakers, students, and their families. Nutrient losses and economic costs associated with school meal waste were examined. The study also assessed if school foods served were valid proxies for foods consumed by students. Plate waste measurements were collected from middle school students in Boston attending two Chef Initiative schools (n=1609) and two control schools (n=1440) during a 2-year pilot study (2007-2009) in which a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to make healthier school meals. The costs associated with food waste were calculated and the percentage of foods consumed was compared with a gold standard of 85% consumption. Analyses were conducted in 2010-2011. Overall, students consumed less than the required/recommended levels of nutrients. An estimated $432,349 of food (26.1% of the total food budget) was discarded by middle school students annually at lunch in these Boston middle schools. For most meal components, substantially less than 85% was consumed. There is substantial food waste among middle school students in Boston. Overall, students' nutrient consumption levels were below school meal standards, and foods served were not valid proxies for foods consumed. The costs associated with discarded foods are high; if translated nationally for school lunches, roughly $1,238,846,400 annually is wasted. Students might benefit if additional focus were given to the quality and palatability of school meals. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. School Lunch Waste among Middle School Students: Implications for Nutrients Consumed and Food Waste Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F.W.; Richardson, Scott; Austin, S. Bryn; Economos, Christina D.; Rimm, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The National School Lunch Program has been guided by modest nutrient standards, and the palatability of meals, which drives consumption, receives inadequate attention. School food waste can have important nutritional and cost implications for policy makers, students, and their families. Purpose Nutrient losses and economic costs associated with school meal waste were examined. The study also assessed if school foods served were valid proxies for foods consumed by students. Methods Plate waste measurements were collected from middle school students in Boston attending two Chef Initiative schools (n=1609) and two control schools (n=1440) during a two-year pilot study (2007-2009) where a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to make healthier school meals. The costs associated with food waste were calculated and the percent of foods consumed was compared with a gold standard of 85% consumption. Analyses were conducted in 2010-2011. Results Overall, students consumed less than the required/recommended levels of nutrients. An estimated $432,349 of food (26.1% of the total food budget) was discarded by middle school students annually at lunch in Boston middle schools. For most meal components, significantly less than 85% was consumed. Conclusions There is substantial food waste among middle school students in Boston. Overall, students' nutrient consumption levels were below school meal standards and foods served were not valid proxies for foods consumed. The costs associated with discarded foods are high; if translated nationally for school lunches, roughly $1,238,846,400 annually is wasted. Students would benefit if additional focus was given to the quality and palatability of school meals. PMID:23332326

  18. Increasing portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school lunch program can increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicole; Reicks, Marla; Redden, Joseph P; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Vickers, Zata

    2015-08-01

    Increasing portion size can increase children's consumption of food. The goal of this study was to determine whether increasing the portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school cafeteria environment would increase children's consumption of them. We measured each child's consumption of the fruit and vegetables served in a cafeteria line on a control day (normal cafeteria procedures) and on two intervention days. When we increased the portion size of 3 of the 4 fruits and vegetables by about 50%, children who took those foods increased their consumption of them. Although this was an effective strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among students who took those foods, many children chose not to take any fruits or vegetables. Further efforts are needed to increase children's selection and consumption of fruits and vegetables in an environment of competing foods of higher palatability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary School Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    range of nutrients, a child needs to consume a good variety of foods from different food groups, every day and in the right proportions.[6] Packing adequate meals including fruits and. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary. School Children in Nnewi, Nigeria. Ugochukwu EF, Onubogu CU, Edokwe ES, Okeke KN.

  20. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: associations with school food environment and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; French, Simone A; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2005-10-06

    This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained research staff. Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p off during lunch time, students purchased soft drinks from vending machines 1.4 +/- 1.6 days/week as compared to 1.9 +/- 1.8 days/week in schools in which soft drink machines were turned on during lunch (p = .040). School food policies that decrease access to foods high in fats and sugars are associated with less frequent purchase of these items in school among high school students. Schools should examine their food-related policies and decrease access to foods that are low in nutrients and high in fats and sugars.

  1. Lunch frequency among adolescents: associations with sociodemographic factors and school characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Holstein, Bjørn E; Krølner, Rikke; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Jørgensen, Thea Suldrup; Aarestrup, Anne Kristine; Utter, Jennifer; McNaughton, Sarah A; Neumark-Stzainer, Dianne; Rasmussen, Mette

    2016-04-01

    To investigate: (i) how lunch frequency of adolescents varies between schools and between classes within schools; (ii) the associations between frequency of lunch and individual sociodemographic factors and school characteristics; and (iii) if any observed associations between lunch frequency and school characteristics vary by gender and age groups. Cross-sectional study in which students and school headmasters completed self-administered questionnaires. Associations were estimated by multilevel multivariate logistic regression. The Danish arm of the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study 2010. Students (n 4922) aged 11, 13 and 15 years attending a random sample of seventy-three schools. The school-level and class-level variations in low lunch frequency were small (intraclass correlation coefficient School-level analyses suggested that having access to a canteen at school was associated with low lunch frequency (OR=1·47; 95% CI 1·14, 1·89). Likewise not having an adult present during lunch breaks was associated with low lunch frequency (OR=1·44; 95% CI 1·18, 1·75). Cross-level interactions suggested that these associations differed by age group. Lunch frequency among Danish students appears to be largely influenced by sociodemographic factors. Additionally, the presence of an adult during lunch breaks promotes frequent lunch consumption while availability of a canteen may discourage frequent lunch consumption. These findings vary between older and younger students.

  2. A school meal study: comparing platewaste and likings of packed lunch and school lunch based on the New Nordic Diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Anne Vibeke; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Christensen, Lene M.

    Background and objectives: The majority of Danish children do not eat in accordance with the national dietary guidelines. The OPUS School Meal Study is a school-based intervention study testing the health effects of the New Nordic Diet (NND). The aim of this sub-study was to compare edible plate...... waste and self-reported likings between packed lunch from home and the served NND meal. Methods: The OPUS School Meal study is a cluster-randomized controlled 2-period cross-over study consisting of two three-month periods: an intervention period (NND) and a control period. 187 children (8-11y) at two...... schools were assigned to the food waste sub-study. Edible plate waste was measured by weighing individually the meal for 5 consecutive days before and after lunch at the end of each dietary period. Self-reported smiley ratings from a web-based dietary assessment software for children were compared...

  3. A school meal study: comparing platewaste and likings of packed lunch and school lunch based on the New Nordic Diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Anne Vibeke; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Christensen, Lene M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives: The majority of Danish children do not eat in accordance with the national dietary guidelines. The OPUS School Meal Study is a school-based intervention study testing the health effects of the New Nordic Diet (NND). The aim of this sub-study was to compare edible plate...... waste and self-reported likings between packed lunch from home and the served NND meal. Methods: The OPUS School Meal study is a cluster-randomized controlled 2-period cross-over study consisting of two three-month periods: an intervention period (NND) and a control period. 187 children (8-11y) at two...... schools were assigned to the food waste sub-study. Edible plate waste was measured by weighing individually the meal for 5 consecutive days before and after lunch at the end of each dietary period. Self-reported smiley ratings from a web-based dietary assessment software for children were compared...

  4. The national school lunch and competitive food offerings and purchasing behaviors of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Anastasia M; Korba, Casey; Burkey, Alyvia

    2007-12-01

    Across the nation, schools have become actively involved in developing obesity prevention strategies both in classrooms and in cafeterias. We sought to determine the type of foods being offered during lunch in the cafeteria of 3 public high schools in 1 county and if this reflects the purchasing patterns of students. By labeling foods based on nutrient density using a stoplight approach of green, yellow, and red colors, we were able to categorize all foods including the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and competitive foods available in the cafeteria. Over a 4-week cycle, daily food purchases were gathered and the proportions of green, yellow, and red foods offered and purchased was compared. Findings from this study suggest that students in these 3 high schools purchased foods in relative proportion to what was available in the school cafeteria for the NSLP. Green and yellow foods included in the NSLP comprised 77% of the offerings and 73% of the purchases. In contrast, 61% of the competitive foods were classified as red foods, and the purchasing of red foods made up 83% of competitive food sales. These results indicate that students purchase foods of minimal nutritional value at greater proportions in the school cafeteria. These results suggest that the nutritional policy for the NSLP promotes the offerings of a wide array of foods. Schools should consider a nutrition policy that regulates the sale of competitive foods.

  5. Soy Goes to School: Acceptance of Healthful, Vegetarian Options in Maryland Middle School Lunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazor, Kathleen; Chapman, Nancy; Levine, Elyse

    2010-01-01

    Background: Soyfoods provide healthful options for school breakfasts and lunches that are lower in saturated fat, cholesterol, fat, and calories and can help meet demands for vegetarian choices. Researchers tested acceptance of soy-based options substituted for popular lunch items with a diverse student population. Methods: Researchers conducted a…

  6. Parental perception of the nutritional quality of school meals and its association with students' school lunch participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam

    2014-03-01

    This study explores the association between parental perception of the nutritional quality of school meals and whether students eat lunch served at school. We use data from five low-income cities in New Jersey that have high minority populations. Students whose parents perceive the quality of school meals to be healthy have greater odds of eating meals served at school. Recent changes in guidelines for the United States Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program met with resistance from several fronts. Advocates for and implementers of improved school meals may benefit from partnering with parents to increase the acceptance and utilization of improved school offerings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Healthy Eating and School Lunch Meals among Adolescents: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payán, Denise D; Sloane, David C; Illum, Jacqueline; Farris, Tahirah; Lewis, LaVonna B

    2017-09-01

    We explored how perceived barriers and facilitators influence healthy eating and investigated the acceptability of changes to school lunch meals among adolescents after implementation of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. We conducted 8 focus groups with adolescents (N = 64) at 3 South Los Angeles high schools. Data collection instruments included a semi-structured guide and questionnaire. Two researchers independently coded transcripts. Most participants believed fruits and vegetables were available in their community and reported high relative cost, poor quality, and lack of motivation as barriers to consumption. Many said school meals were an important source of healthy food and were aware of recent changes to the school lunch program. A primary facilitator to eating school lunches was access to fresh food items (eg, a salad bar). Perceived barriers included long cafeteria lines, time constraints, lack of variety, and limited quantities of preferred items. Adolescents viewed off-campus food establishments near the school as competition to school meals. Our findings suggest the need to measure perceived and actual barriers to healthy eating among adolescents and to examine the effect of these barriers on dietary behavior. We provide programmatic and policy recommendations.

  8. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: associations with school food environment and policies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; French, Simone A; Hannan, Peter J; Story, Mary; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2005-01-01

    .... Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p < .001...

  9. Small prizes increased healthful school lunch selection in a Midwestern school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Barnes, Allison S; Hiller, Elizabeth; Kipp, Roger; Robison, Debora L; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Hudgens, Michelle E

    2016-04-01

    As obesity has become a pressing health issue for American children, greater attention has been focused on how schools can be used to improve how students eat. Previously, we piloted the use of small prizes in an elementary school cafeteria to improve healthful food selection. We hoped to increase healthful food selection in all the elementary schools of a small school district participating in the United States Department of Agriculture Lunch Program by offering prizes to children who selected a Power Plate (PP), which consisted of an entrée with whole grains, a fruit, a vegetable, and plain low-fat milk. In this study, the PP program was introduced to 3 schools sequentially over an academic year. During the kickoff week, green, smiley-faced emoticons were placed by preferred foods, and children were given a prize daily if they chose a PP on that day. After the first week, students were given a sticker or temporary tattoo 2 days a week if they selected a PP. Combining data from the 3 schools in the program, students increased PP selection from 4.5% at baseline to 49.4% (p < 0.0001) during an intervention period of 2.5 school weeks. The school with the longest intervention period, 6 months, showed a PP selection increase of from 3.9% to 26.4% (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, giving small prizes as rewards dramatically improves short-term healthful food selection in elementary school children.

  10. School lunch and snacking patterns among high school students: Associations with school food environment and policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Story Mary

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study examined associations between high school students' lunch patterns and vending machine purchases and the school food environment and policies. Methods A randomly selected sample of 1088 high school students from 20 schools completed surveys about their lunch practices and vending machine purchases. School food policies were assessed by principal and food director surveys. The number of vending machines and their hours of operation were assessed by trained research staff. Results Students at schools with open campus policies during lunchtime were significantly more likely to eat lunch at a fast food restaurant than students at schools with closed campus policies (0.7 days/week vs. 0.2 days/week, p Conclusion School food policies that decrease access to foods high in fats and sugars are associated with less frequent purchase of these items in school among high school students. Schools should examine their food-related policies and decrease access to foods that are low in nutrients and high in fats and sugars.

  11. Elementary school lunch categorisation and correlations with dietitian recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Lara A; Pasch, Keryn E; Bartholomew, John B

    2016-01-01

    Numerous interventions have been designed to impact children's diet in the elementary school setting. One popular strategy is to label foods in the elementary cafeteria as more or less healthy. An example is the Coordinated Approach To Child Health (CATCH) labels of 'go', 'slow', or 'whoa' foods. In many respects, this has been successful, as food purveyors have responded by offering more healthy versions of popular foods (e.g. hamburgers with a high soy content) in an effort to avoid the less healthy, 'whoa' label. While this provides an obvious benefit to children's dietary choices and overall risk of obesity, it may have the unintended consequence of not setting up youth to make healthy choices in the environment outside of schools where these foods have not been altered. In response, the current study was designed to compare school labels and registered dietitian (RD) recommendations of common elementary lunch options. In the spring of 2010, 28 RDs provided their recommendation of 'generally healthy, choose often'; 'generally less healthy, choose less often'; and 'generally unhealthy, choose rarely' for 48 common school lunch options. RDs were not told how schools categorised each selection. Kappa analyses were used to determine agreement between school labels and RD recommendations. Results indicate some disagreement between school labels and RD recommendations, with higher fat/calorie entrées showing greater discrepancies. Given these inconsistencies, nutrition education in schools should be designed to help children and their parents understand how foods offered in school may differ from those outside the school environment. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  12. Effect of Food Service Nutrition Improvements on Elementary School Cafeteria Lunch Purchase Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluss, Patricia A.; Fee, LuAnn; Culyba, Rebecca J.; Bhat, Kiran B.; Owen, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Background: Schools can play a major role in prevention and intervention for childhood obesity. We describe changes in elementary school cafeteria lunch sales patterns resulting from nutritional improvements in menu offerings that were part of a community-wide focus on health. Methods: Elementary school lunch sales data were collected for 1 week…

  13. Body Mass Index and Sociodemographic Predictors of School Lunch Purchase Behavior during a Year-Long Environmental Intervention in Middle School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacey A. Greece

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Modifying the school food environment is on the national agenda as one strategy to improve the nutritional quality of children’s diets. Because few environmental-level interventions have been rigorously evaluated, the evidence base to inform programs and policies is limited. Of concern is the impact that changes to cafeteria offerings will have on participation in school meal programs. This study evaluates school lunch participation in the setting of a year-long middle school cafeteria intervention by examining the association between body mass index (BMI, sociodemographics, and the purchases of school lunch meals. IMOVE meals were healthier choices that met stringent nutritional criteria and were offered alongside standard lunch meals. Students who were overweight had a significantly higher purchase rate for both types of meals compared to those with a healthy BMI. Non-white race, younger age, being male, and low-income status were also significantly associated with participation in school lunch. Results indicate that nutritionally vulnerable students participate in school lunch and are equally likely to buy healthy alternatives or standard meals. This behavioral observation has important implications for school foodservice programs and policies. These results are timely given recent federal legislation to improve the school food environment to influence students’ food choice behaviors.

  14. Consuming Identities: Law, School Lunches, and What it Means to be American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Food, eating, and the rituals surrounding food impact people as individuals, as groups, and as citizens. Through direct regulation, food aid, subsidies, and property rights, law shapes and even determines food choices in America. With it, law shapes, reflects, and may even--at times--dictate American identities. Perhaps nowhere is the law's impact on food and identity more immediately apparent than in the context of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Federally subsidized school meals feed over fifty million students a day and serve over seven billion school meals annually. Whether it is pork's removal from snack lists being likened to "fatwa" or cafeterias segregating paying and non-paying students, the lessons of school meals go far beyond nutritional content and send resounding messages about civic values, inclusion, and exclusion. In recent years school meals have come under increasing scrutiny, but as legislative consideration of nutritional goals in the school lunch program has improved, discussion of political, social, and cultural goals has lagged. This Article is the first to examine the social and political dimensions of school meals, and concludes that current treatment of these values in food regulation undermines key values in American civil society. The school lunch program teaches students a simplified, uniform, and even discriminatory account of what it means to eat and be American. Students under this regime must choose to either be American and sit down at the table with the "normal" kids or retain your beliefs, your identity, and perhaps even your health and well-being. This is a choice no child should have to make--especially not on an empty stomach.

  15. Lunch-time food source is associated with school hour and school day diet quality among Canadian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugault-Lafleur, C N; Black, J L; Barr, S I

    2017-07-31

    There is limited research on the dietary behaviours of Canadian children at school, including where students obtain food from during school hours or whether lunch-time food source influences diet quality. Nationally representative cross-sectional data from 24-h dietary recalls were analysed from the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey (n = 4589). Dietary outcomes included school hour and school day dietary intakes and School Healthy Eating Index (S-HEI) scores. Survey-weighted covariate-adjusted linear regression models examined differences in dietary outcomes across lunch-time food source groups. The majority of children (72.8%) reported bringing lunch from home, whereas fewer students obtained lunch from off-campus locations (11.6%), schools (9.6%) or skipped lunch (5.9%). Compared to off-campus lunches, home-packed lunches were significantly higher in fibre, vitamins A, D and C, thiamin, magnesium, iron, grains, vegetables and fruit, but lower in total calories, fat and calories from minimally nutritious foods. Average school hour diet quality required improvement for all age groups, although S-HEI scores did not differ significantly by lunch-time food source among 6-8-year-old children. However, for children age 9-17 years, bringing a home-packed lunch was associated with significantly higher S-HEI scores compared to students obtaining lunch from off-campus locations. After adjusting for age and sex, lunch-time food source was also significantly associated with whole day dietary quality. Although the nutritional quality of off-campus lunches was lower than home-packed lunches, the quality of foods was suboptimal, regardless of food source. Strategies are needed to enhance access to nutritious foods on campus and improve the nutritional quality of packed lunches, which supply the majority of lunch-time foods consumed by Canadian children. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  16. Nutritional contents of lunch packs of primary school children in nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, Ef; Onubogu, Cu; Edokwe, Es; Okeke, Kn

    2014-07-01

    Lunch packs play a significant role in the nutritional status and academic performance of school children. Available data show a high prevalence of malnutrition among school-age children. The aim of this study is to document the nutritional contents of lunch packs of primary school children in Nnewi, Anambra state, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1018 primary 1-6 pupils selected by stratified systematic random sampling from six primary schools, two each of private, - mission, - and government (public) - owned schools in Nnewi metropolis with the aid of the semi-structured questionnaire. Lunch packs of the pupils were examined. Majority of the pupils (77.8% [792/1018]) had lunch packs although about half of pupils in public schools had no lunch pack. Only 12.4% (98/792) and 19.2% (152/792) of pupils with lunch packs had balanced meals and fruits/vegetables in their lunch packs, respectively. The odds of not coming to school with packed lunch was about 13 and 12 times higher for mothers with no formal education or only primary education, respectively, compared with those with tertiary education. Type of school had a strong influence on possession and contents of lunch pack (χ(2) = 2.88, P schools were more likely to have a lunch pack compared with public schools (51.0% [206/404]). However, pupils in private schools were most likely to have a balanced meal (32.5% [66/203] vs. 5.8% [24/411] in mission and 2.0% [8/404] in public schools) and fruits/vegetables (48.3% [98/203] vs. 10.2% [42/411] in mission and 3.0% [12/404] in public schools) in their lunch packs. Mothers' educational status and parents' occupation were significantly associated with lunch pack contents. Majority of the lunch packs of primary school pupils contain poor quality food especially in public schools. Mother's educational status and parent's occupation are important determinants of the nutritional contents of lunch packs.

  17. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary School Children in Nnewi, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugochukwu, EF; Onubogu, CU; Edokwe, ES; Okeke, KN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lunch packs play a significant role in the nutritional status and academic performance of school children. Available data show a high prevalence of malnutrition among school-age children. Aims: The aim of this study is to document the nutritional contents of lunch packs of primary school children in Nnewi, Anambra state, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1018 primary 1-6 pupils selected by stratified systematic random sampling from six primary schools, two each of private, – mission, – and government (public) – owned schools in Nnewi metropolis with the aid of the semi-structured questionnaire. Lunch packs of the pupils were examined. Results: Majority of the pupils (77.8% [792/1018]) had lunch packs although about half of pupils in public schools had no lunch pack. Only 12.4% (98/792) and 19.2% (152/792) of pupils with lunch packs had balanced meals and fruits/vegetables in their lunch packs, respectively. The odds of not coming to school with packed lunch was about 13 and 12 times higher for mothers with no formal education or only primary education, respectively, compared with those with tertiary education. Type of school had a strong influence on possession and contents of lunch pack (χ2 = 2.88, P schools were more likely to have a lunch pack compared with public schools (51.0% [206/404]). However, pupils in private schools were most likely to have a balanced meal (32.5% [66/203] vs. 5.8% [24/411] in mission and 2.0% [8/404] in public schools) and fruits/vegetables (48.3% [98/203] vs. 10.2% [42/411] in mission and 3.0% [12/404] in public schools) in their lunch packs. Mothers’ educational status and parents’ occupation were significantly associated with lunch pack contents. Conclusion: Majority of the lunch packs of primary school pupils contain poor quality food especially in public schools. Mother's educational status and parent's occupation are important determinants of the nutritional contents

  18. School Lunch Take up and Attainment in Primary and Secondary Schools in England

    OpenAIRE

    Michael eNelson; Karen eGibson; Jo eNicholas

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Average levels of attainment in primary and secondary schools in England in 2010 and 2011 are positively associated with changes in average school lunch take up between 2008–2009 and 2010–2011. Subjects/methods Average school lunch take up and attainment data were available for 2009–2011 for primary and secondary sectors in a minimum of 106 local authorities (LAs) in England and 853 individual primary schools in six LAs. Associations between attainment at 11–12 years (pr...

  19. Changes in Children's Consumption of Tomatoes through a School Lunch Programme Developed by Agricultural High-School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Midori; Kubota, Nozomi; Kudo, Keita; Meadows, Martin; Umezawa, Atsuko; Ota, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to discover whether tomato consumption in elementary- and middle-school students could be increased through a school lunch programme developed by agricultural high-school students acting as peer educators. Design: The high-school lunch programme included the process of growing tomatoes and providing a…

  20. Examination of the Food and Nutrient Content of School Lunch Menus of Two School Districts in Mississippi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavon Young

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the diet quality of the school meals in two Mississippi school districts and compared them to the national guidelines. We examined the lunch menus of the two school districts that participated in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program focusing on food quality and assessing both healthy and unhealthy foods and eating behaviors. This analysis was completed through a computerized review used to accurately determine the nutrient content. Both the standard and the alternative meals provided by the cafeterias in the two school districts exceeded the minimum requirement for calories for all grade levels. The meals from the urban schools cafeteria provide more calories than meals from the cafeteria in the rural school district. Although schools believe that they are making positive changes to children’s diets, the programs are falling short of the nutrient recommendations. Poor nutrition and improper dietary practices are now regarded as important risk factors in the emerging problems of obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and other chronic diseases, with excessive energy intake listed as a possible reason. Dieticians, school professionals and other health care practitioners need to accurately assess energy intake and adequately promote a dietary responsible lifestyle among children.

  1. Descentralização do Programa de Alimentação Escolar em Cuiabá: 1993-1996 Decentralization of the School-Lunch Program in Cuiabá: 1993-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angélica dos Santos Spinelli

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo trata da avaliação do processo de implementação do programa descentralizado (municipalizado de alimentação escolar em Cuiabá, no período de 1993 a 1996. À luz da pesquisa de avaliação de processo, aborda as características da municipalização da merenda escolar nas suas dimensões organizacionais: dos recursos humanos, da infra-estrutura, dos insumos e das opiniões dos seus agentes implementadores, decisores e beneficiários, para aferir o desempenho do programa (o alcance das metas e objetivos e a sua eficácia social, além das condições e fatores de êxito ou fracasso da implementação. Trata-se de um estudo de caso do programa municipal, que utilizou dados primários (entrevistas e redações de alunos e secundários. Conclui que a descentralização da merenda ocorrida no município foi mista, resultando na fragmentação do programa quanto ao atendimento às redes de ensino (estadual e municipal. A cobertura da clientela foi ampla, detectando-se, porém problemas na qualidade, no controle e na supervisão da alimentação. Os problemas institucionais persistentes, no entanto, não minimizaram a importância do programa para gestores, diretores e usuários.The article evaluates the implementation process of the decentralized (municipalism school-lunch program in Cuiabá (1993 - 1996. Guided by the process evaluation research, this article analyses the characteristics of the municipalism school lunches' implementation process, in all its dimensions (organizational, personnel, infrastructure and resources. It also considered the opinions of all its agents (decision-makers and implementation agents, as well as the beneficiaries of the program, in order to compare the program objectives and goals to its performance, achievement, and social efficiency, and to conclude about the conditions and factors affecting the implementation's success or failure. This case study of the school-lunch program in the Cuiab

  2. Lunch Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Affluent and disadvantaged children stand in lunch lines and dine in school cafeterias as equals at the Bay Shore Schools (NY). Thanks to a computerized "LunchBox" point-of-sale system, cashiers know children by name, their birthdays, who suffers from which food allergies, and which children are entitled to free or reduced-price meals.…

  3. Fruits and vegetables displace, but do not decrease, total energy in school lunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontrager Yoder, Andrea B; Schoeller, Dale A

    2014-08-01

    The high overweight and obesity prevalence among US children is a well-established public health concern. Diet is known to play a causal role in obesity. Increasing fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption to recommended levels is proposed to help reduce obesity, because their bulk and low energy density are believed to reduce energy-dense food consumption (volume displacement hypothesis). This study tests this hypothesis at the lunch meal among upper-elementary students participating in a Farm to School (F2S) program. Digital photographs of students' school lunch trays were visually analyzed to identify the food items and amounts that were present and consumed before and after the meal. Using the USDA Nutrient Database, total and FV-only energy were calculated for each tray. Analysis of total- and non-FV energy intake was performed according to (1) levels of FV energy intake, (2) FV energy density, and (3) previous years of Farm to School programming. Higher intake of FV energy displaced non-FV energy, but total energy did not decrease across FV energy intake groups. High-FV-energy-density trays showed lower non-FV energy intake than low-FV-energy-density trays (470±179 vs. 534±219 kcal; pschools with more previous years of F2S programming decreased total and non-FV energy intake from school lunches (p for trend<0.0001, both). Increased FV consumption reduces non-FV energy intake, but does not reduce total energy intake. Therefore, this study does not support the volume displacement hypothesis and suggests calorie displacement instead.

  4. Validation of a digital photographic method for assessment of dietary quality of school lunch sandwiches brought from home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Marianne S; Toft, Ulla; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2013-01-01

    intake from school lunch sandwiches brought from home among children aged 7-13 years. DESIGN: School lunch sandwiches (n=191) were prepared to represent randomly selected school lunch sandwiches from a large database. All components were weighed to provide an objective measure of the composition...... and the Meal IQ obtained from the digital images were validated against the objective weighed foods of the school lunch sandwiches. To determine interrater reliability, the digital images were evaluated by a second image analyst. RESULTS: Correlation coefficients between the DPM and the weighed foods ranged...... and reliable method for assessing the dietary quality of school lunch sandwiches brought from home....

  5. Lunch with School Counselors: Reaching Parents through Their Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janice E.; Hines, Peggy LaTurno

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program where school counselors go to parents instead of waiting for parents to come to them. Outlines program development, the importance of employer cooperation, program successes and challenges, such as increased communication between employee-parents and school counselors, and the considerable time commitment the program requires.…

  6. Nutritional Contents of Lunch Packs of Primary School Children in Nnewi, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ugochukwu, EF; Onubogu, CU; Edokwe, ES; Okeke, KN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lunch packs play a significant role in the nutritional status and academic performance of school children. Available data show a high prevalence of malnutrition among school-age children. Aims: The aim of this study is to document the nutritional contents of lunch packs of primary school children in Nnewi, Anambra state, Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1018 primary 1-6 pupils selected by stratified systematic random sampling from six prim...

  7. The Effect of Nutrition Education on Third Graders' School Lunch Consumption in a School Offering Food Pyramid Choice Menus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    Elementary school lunches planned and served under Oregon's Food Pyramid Choice Menus (FPCM) system are based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and they comply with the current U.S. Department of Agriculture menu standards for school lunches. The study discussed in this report was conducted from February through April 1997; data were…

  8. Nutrient intakes among children and adolescents eating usual pizza products in school lunch compared with pizza meeting HealthierUS School Challenge criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, In Young; Marquart, Len; Reicks, Marla

    2014-05-01

    Pizza is a popular food that can contribute to high intakes of saturated fat and sodium among children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to compare daily nutrient intakes when a pizza product meeting the US Department of Agriculture's criteria for competitive food entrées under the HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) was substituted for usual pizza products consumed during foodservice-prepared school lunch. The study used National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2008) dietary recall data from a cross-sectional sample of US children and adolescents (age 5 to 18 years, n=337) who ate pizza during school lunch on 1 day of dietary recall. Daily nutrient intakes based on the consumption of usual pizza products for school lunch (pre-modeled) were compared with intakes modeled by substituting nutrient values from an HUSSC whole-grain pizza product (post-modeled). Paired t tests were used to make the comparison. Post-modeled intakes were lower in daily energy, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium compared with pre-modeled intakes among children and adolescents (Pschool lunch, indicating that it could be an effective approach to improve the nutritional quality of school lunch programs. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High school off-campus lunch policies and adolescent motor vehicle crash risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Lorraine M; Runyan, Carol W

    2005-01-01

    To examine differences in motor vehicle crash involvement for teenagers in communities with and without school policies enabling teens to drive off campus during lunchtime. Comparison of lunchtime motor vehicle crashes involving teen drivers in two North Carolina counties having open-lunch policies with a third county without an open-lunch policy. We also compare crash rates during the before-school period and at all times of the day in the three counties. Data were analyzed by computing rate ratios of teens' involvement in a crash during the three time periods and comparing them among the three counties. Crash rates over the lunch hours were significantly higher for teenagers in the counties with open-lunch policies, despite these counties having no elevated crash risk during other time periods. This resulted in a relative risk of lunchtime crash involvement of 3.10 and 2.98 (95% CI 1.97-4.89 and 1.87-4.74, respectively) compared with the county without an open-lunch policy. Number of vehicle occupants also increased during the lunch hours in the counties with open-lunch policies. Open-lunch policies contribute to motor vehicle crashes in teenagers and encourage a situation where there are multiple occupants per vehicle, a known risk factor for teenage motor vehicle crashes.

  10. State farm-to-school laws influence the availability of fruits and vegetables in school lunches at US public elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Lisa; Turner, Lindsey; Schneider, Linda; Chriqui, Jamie; Chaloupka, Frank

    2014-05-01

    State laws and farm-to-school programs (FTSPs) have the potential to increase fruit and vegetable (FV) availability in school meals. This study examined whether FV were more available in public elementary school lunches in states with a law requiring/encouraging FTSPs or with a locally grown-related law, and whether the relationship between state laws and FV availability could be explained by schools opting for FTSPs. A pooled, cross-sectional analysis linked a nationally representative sample of public elementary schools with state laws. A series of multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for school-level demographics were performed according to mediation analysis procedures for dichotomous outcomes. Roughly 50% of schools reported FV availability in school lunches on most days of the week. Schools with the highest FV availability (70.6%) were in states with laws and schools with FTSPs. State laws requiring/encouraging FTSPs were significantly associated with increased FV availability in schools and a significant percentage (13%) of this relationship was mediated by schools having FTSPs. Because state farm-to-school laws are associated with significantly higher FV availability in schools-through FTSPs, as well as independently-enacting more state legislation may facilitate increased FTSP participation by schools and increased FV availability in school meals. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  11. Chefs move to schools. A pilot examination of how chef-created dishes can increase school lunch participation and fruit and vegetable intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, David R; Wansink, Brian; Hanks, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a main dish designed by a professional chef in the National School Lunch Program and to document the impact on child participation, a chef was recruited to design pizza to be served in an upstate New York school district. The pizza was designed to meet both the cost and ingredient requirements of the NSLP. High school students were significantly more likely to select the pizza prepared by the chef. While the chef had no significant impact on main dish consumption given selection, more students took a vegetable and vegetable consumption increased by 16.5%. This pilot study demonstrates the plausibility of using chefs to boost participation in the school lunch program, and potentially increase nutrition through side selection, among high school students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lunch Salad Bars in New Orleans' Middle and High Schools: Student Intake of Fruit and Vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carolyn C; Myers, Leann; Mundorf, Adrienne R; O'Malley, Keelia; Spruance, Lori Andersen; Harris, Diane M

    2017-04-13

    The school lunch salad bar (SB) is a recommended food environmental strategy to increase access to, and consumption of fruit and vegetables (F/V). In a study to examine use of school lunch SBs, middle and high school students provided data via the Automated Self-Administered 24-h dietary recall (24HDR) tool for kids (ASA24-Kids-2012), a web-based data collection platform. Kilocalories were computed, food groups were assigned and F/V sources were obtained. Students (n = 718) from 12 schools with SBs and nine schools without SBs were approximately 87% African American, over 64% female and most were 7th and 8th graders. SB school students had higher median energy consumption at lunch but a higher percent of non-SB students reported eating fruit at lunch compared to SB students. Most students reporting eating F/V at lunch obtained F/V from the cafeteria main line; only 19.6% reported eating F/V exclusively from the SB. In SB schools median intake of cups F/V was higher among students using the SB (0.92) compared to those not using the SB (0.53). Results of this study are mixed, but encouraging. Additional factors, e.g., nutrition education, marketing, and kinds of foods offered on the SB need to be examined for potential influence on SB use.

  13. Lunch Salad Bars in New Orleans’ Middle and High Schools: Student Intake of Fruit and Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carolyn C.; Myers, Leann; Mundorf, Adrienne R.; O’Malley, Keelia; Spruance, Lori Andersen; Harris, Diane M.

    2017-01-01

    The school lunch salad bar (SB) is a recommended food environmental strategy to increase access to, and consumption of fruit and vegetables (F/V). In a study to examine use of school lunch SBs, middle and high school students provided data via the Automated Self-Administered 24-h dietary recall (24HDR) tool for kids (ASA24-Kids-2012), a web-based data collection platform. Kilocalories were computed, food groups were assigned and F/V sources were obtained. Students (n = 718) from 12 schools with SBs and nine schools without SBs were approximately 87% African American, over 64% female and most were 7th and 8th graders. SB school students had higher median energy consumption at lunch but a higher percent of non-SB students reported eating fruit at lunch compared to SB students. Most students reporting eating F/V at lunch obtained F/V from the cafeteria main line; only 19.6% reported eating F/V exclusively from the SB. In SB schools median intake of cups F/V was higher among students using the SB (0.92) compared to those not using the SB (0.53). Results of this study are mixed, but encouraging. Additional factors, e.g., nutrition education, marketing, and kinds of foods offered on the SB need to be examined for potential influence on SB use. PMID:28406472

  14. Long-term impact of a chef on school lunch consumption: findings from a 2-year pilot study in Boston middle schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Smit, Liesbeth A; Parker, Ellen; Austin, S Bryn; Frazier, A Lindsay; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2012-06-01

    School cafeterias can play an important role in providing healthy meals. Although schools participating in the National School Lunch Program are required to meet minimum program standards, advocates recommend that innovations be sought to enhance menu dietary quality. This study evaluated the Chef Initiative, a 2-year pilot study in two Boston middle schools, designed to increase the availability and consumption of healthier school foods. Between 2007 and 2009, a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to prepare healthier school lunches (ie, more whole grains, fresh/frozen fruits and vegetables, and less sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fats). Meal nutrient compositions were monitored from 2007 to 2009, and a plate waste study conducted in the spring of 2009 compared food selection and consumption patterns among students at Chef Initiative schools, with students receiving standard school lunches at two matched control schools. Paired t tests and descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in menus and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to analyze differences in students' food selection and consumption between Chef Initiative and control schools. Overall, the Chef Initiative schools provided healthier lunches and the percent of foods consumed at Chef Initiative and control schools were similar (61.6% vs 57.3%; P=0.63). Of the areas targeted, there was greater whole-grain selection and vegetable consumption; 51% more students selected whole grains (P=0.02) and students consumed 0.36 more vegetable servings/day (P=0.01) at Chef Initiative schools. The potential of chefs collaborating with cafeteria staff to improve the availability, selection, and consumption of healthier meals is promising. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Social Equality as Groundwork for Sustainable Schooling: The Free Lunch Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairiene, Brigita; Sprindziunas, Andrius

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to discuss the way of organizing free lunch at public schools as an important precondition for social equality and sustainability in school, by revealing acute forms of social disjunction in Lithuanian schools as a major incongruity with Children Rights, and an obstacle to the achievement of general education…

  16. Perceived reactions of elementary school students to changes in school lunches after implementation of the United States Department of Agriculture's new meals standards: minimal backlash, but rural and socioeconomic disparities exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2014-08-01

    Updated standards for meals sold through the USDA's National School Lunch Program took effect at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year. The current study assessed the perceptions of school staff regarding student reactions to these changes in school lunches and how perceptions varied across schools. Mailback surveys were gathered from administrators and food service staff at a nationally representative sample of 557 US public elementary schools in the second half of the 2012-2013 school year. Half of the respondents (56.4%) agreed that students complained about the meals at first, but 70% agreed that students like the new lunches. Perceived student complaints were significantly higher among respondents from rural schools (n=184) than from urban (n=127) or suburban (n=171) schools. Respondents at rural schools also were more likely to report that they perceived that fewer students were purchasing the meals and that students were consuming less of the meals than during the previous year. Perceived student complaints were higher at schools not offering regular (i.e., higher-fat) pizza. Respondents at socioeconomically disadvantaged schools (>66% of students eligible for free/reduced-priced meals) perceived that more students were buying lunch and that students were eating more of the meal than in the previous year. Perceptions of school personnel suggest reasonable acceptance of school lunches subsequent to revisions. Given the importance of offering healthful foods at school, the revised USDA meals standards are a promising strategy to improve the diets of children.

  17. Factors affecting fruit and vegetable school lunch waste in Wisconsin elementary schools participating in Farm to School programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontrager Yoder, Andrea B; Foecke, Leah L; Schoeller, Dale A

    2015-10-01

    To examine characteristics potentially associated with school lunch fruit and vegetable waste, both overall and pre/post implementation of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act. Multi-year (2010-2013) cross-sectional study using pre- and post-meal digital photographs of students' school lunch trays to estimate fruit and vegetable availability and consumption. Fruit and vegetable items were categorized for factors suspected to impact waste: prior farm to school years, placement (main menu, salad bar), procurement (local, conventional), preparation (cooked, raw) and meal component (entrée, side, topping). Analyses to assess within-category differences in waste volume were performed using a Tobit model. Wisconsin elementary schools participating in farm to school programmes, USA. Children in third to fifth grade. Many within-factor differences were detected overall and/or across time. Cooked fruits were wasted less than raw, while cooked vegetables were wasted more than raw. Where identified, locally sourced items were wasted more than conventionally sourced (+0·1 cups, Pschool years decreased waste (-0·02 cups, Pschool lunch meal pattern requirement implementation did not uniformly impact fruit and vegetable waste across all categories and there was no change in waste for seven of fifteen assessed categories. Many factors impact elementary students' school lunch waste. These factors may be helpful for school food-service authorities to consider when planning school menus.

  18. Improvements and Disparities in Types of Foods and Milk Beverages Offered in Elementary School Lunches, 2006–2007 to 2013–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Powell, Lisa; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Children consume much of their daily energy intake at school. School district policies, state laws, and national policies, such as revisions to the US Department of Agriculture’s school meals standards, may affect the types of foods and beverages offered in school lunches over time. Methods This study evaluated changes and disparities in school lunch characteristics from 2006–2007 to 2013–2014. Data were obtained from annual cross-sectional surveys at 4,630 public elementary schools participating in the National School Lunch Program. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to examine lunch characteristics. Results The percentage of schools regularly offering healthful items such as vegetables (other than potatoes), fresh fruit, salad bars, whole grains, and more healthful pizzas increased significantly from 2006–2007 to 2013–2014, and the percentage of schools offering less healthful items such as fried potatoes, regular pizza, and high-fat milks decreased significantly. Nevertheless, disparities were evident in 2013–2014. Schools in the West were significantly more likely to offer salad bars than were schools in the Northeast, Midwest, or South (adjusted prevalence: West, 66.3%; Northeast, 22.3%; Midwest, 20.8%; South, 18.3%). Majority-black or majority-Latino schools were significantly less likely to offer fresh fruit than were predominantly white schools (adjusted prevalence: majority black, 61.3%; majority Latino, 73.0%; predominantly white, 87.8%). Schools with low socioeconomic status were significantly less likely to offer salads regularly than were schools with middle or high socioeconomic status (adjusted prevalence: low, 38.5%; middle, 47.4%; high, 59.3%). Conclusion Much progress has been made in improving the quality of school lunches in US public elementary schools, but additional opportunities for improvement remain. PMID:26986542

  19. Improvements and Disparities in Types of Foods and Milk Beverages Offered in Elementary School Lunches, 2006-2007 to 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Powell, Lisa; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2016-03-17

    Children consume much of their daily energy intake at school. School district policies, state laws, and national policies, such as revisions to the US Department of Agriculture's school meals standards, may affect the types of foods and beverages offered in school lunches over time. This study evaluated changes and disparities in school lunch characteristics from 2006-2007 to 2013-2014. Data were obtained from annual cross-sectional surveys at 4,630 public elementary schools participating in the National School Lunch Program. Multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to examine lunch characteristics. The percentage of schools regularly offering healthful items such as vegetables (other than potatoes), fresh fruit, salad bars, whole grains, and more healthful pizzas increased significantly from 2006-2007 to 2013-2014, and the percentage of schools offering less healthful items such as fried potatoes, regular pizza, and high-fat milks decreased significantly. Nevertheless, disparities were evident in 2013-2014. Schools in the West were significantly more likely to offer salad bars than were schools in the Northeast, Midwest, or South (adjusted prevalence: West, 66.3%; Northeast, 22.3%; Midwest, 20.8%; South, 18.3%). Majority-black or majority-Latino schools were significantly less likely to offer fresh fruit than were predominantly white schools (adjusted prevalence: majority black, 61.3%; majority Latino, 73.0%; predominantly white, 87.8%). Schools with low socioeconomic status were significantly less likely to offer salads regularly than were schools with middle or high socioeconomic status (adjusted prevalence: low, 38.5%; middle, 47.4%; high, 59.3%). Much progress has been made in improving the quality of school lunches in US public elementary schools, but additional opportunities for improvement remain.

  20. Accuracy and reliability of direct observations of home-packed lunches in elementary schools by trained nutrition students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Shannon L; Vandervet, Laura M; Macaskill, Lesley A; Salvadori, Marina I; Seabrook, Jamie A; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2012-10-01

    Increased attention has been directed toward the school food environment because children consume important contributions toward their daily food intake while at school. In Canada, most elementary school students bring a lunch to school and there are minimal data on the composition and consumption of these lunches. Dietary assessment of home-packed lunches is challenging compared with assessment of standardized school meals due to greater diversity of items, nonstandard portions, and opaque containers. We assessed accuracy and reliability of a food observation method whereby upper-year nutrition students (n=15) were trained to assess packed lunch contents and intake in elementary schools. Accuracy and reliability was assessed during 2010-2011 in three observational phases: sample lunches, volunteer-consumed lunches, and elementary school students' lunches (n=32). Observers accurately identified 96% and 95% of items in the sample and volunteer lunches, respectively. Similarly, they accurately reported portion sizes for 86% and 94% of the items in the sample and volunteer lunches, thus showing improvements in successive phases. Interobserver reliability for amount consumed, by portion size and macronutrient content, ranged from 0.79 to 0.88 in the volunteer-consumed lunches and 0.78 to 0.86 in the students' lunches, with a majority ≥0.80. It is noteworthy that the analyses for the amount consumed were conducted as absolute amounts with no allowances for discrepancies, which differs from other interobserver reliability assessments where as much as 25% discrepancy is considered agreement. Observers with prior nutrition knowledge assessed packed lunch contents and intake accurately and reliably by direct observation in an elementary school setting. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. School Lunch Quality Following Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine; Bergman, Ethan A.; Englund, Tim; Ogan, Dana; Barbee, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigates the effect of meal component changes by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) on school lunch quality and consumption in elementary school students, grade 2-5 before and after the HHFKA guidelines were implemented in July 2012 using the Healthy Eating Index. Methods: In Spring 2012, before…

  2. Nordic Children's Conceptualizations of Healthy Eating in Relation to School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Linda; Talvia, Sanna; Fossgard, Eldbjørg; Arnfjörð, Unnur Björk; Hörnell, Agneta; Ólafsdóttir, Anna Sigríður; Gunnarsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Wergedahl, Hege; Lagström, Hanna; Waling, Maria; Olsson, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Pupils' perspective should be better taken into account when developing nutrition education at school. The purpose of this paper is to explore Nordic children's perspectives on the healthiness of meals in the context of school lunches. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 78 focus group discussions were conducted with 10-11-year-old…

  3. Back-to-School Health Tips: Breakfast & Lunch | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Back-to-School Health Tips Back-to-School Health Tips: Breakfast & Lunch Past Issues / Fall 2013 ... to eating too many calories. Pay attention to hunger and fullness cues before, during, and after meals. ...

  4. Children eat their school lunch too quickly: an exploratory study of the effect on food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zandian Modjtaba

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Speed of eating, an important aspect of eating behaviour, has recently been related to loss of control of food intake and obesity. Very little time is allocated for lunch at school and thus children may consume food more quickly and food intake may therefore be affected. Study 1 measured the time spent eating lunch in a large group of students eating together for school meals. Study 2 measured the speed of eating and the amount of food eaten in individual school children during normal school lunches and then examined the effect of experimentally increasing or decreasing the speed of eating on total food intake. Methods The time spent eating lunch was measured with a stop watch in 100 children in secondary school. A more detailed study of eating behaviour was then undertaken in 30 secondary school children (18 girls. The amount of food eaten at lunch was recorded by a hidden scale when the children ate amongst their peers and by a scale connected to a computer when they ate individually. When eating individually, feedback on how quickly to eat was visible on the computer screen. The speed of eating could therefore be increased or decreased experimentally using this visual feedback and the total amount of food eaten measured. Results In general, the children spent very little time eating their lunch. The 100 children in Study 1 spent on average (SD just 7 (0.8 minutes eating lunch. The girls in Study 2 consumed their lunch in 5.6 (1.2 minutes and the boys ate theirs in only 6.8 (1.3 minutes. Eating with peers markedly distorted the amount of food eaten for lunch; only two girls and one boy maintained their food intake at the level observed when the children ate individually without external influences (258 (38 g in girls and 289 (73 g in boys. Nine girls ate on average 33% less food and seven girls ate 23% more food whilst the remaining boys ate 26% more food. The average speed of eating during school lunches amongst groups

  5. Children eat their school lunch too quickly: an exploratory study of the effect on food intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Speed of eating, an important aspect of eating behaviour, has recently been related to loss of control of food intake and obesity. Very little time is allocated for lunch at school and thus children may consume food more quickly and food intake may therefore be affected. Study 1 measured the time spent eating lunch in a large group of students eating together for school meals. Study 2 measured the speed of eating and the amount of food eaten in individual school children during normal school lunches and then examined the effect of experimentally increasing or decreasing the speed of eating on total food intake. Methods The time spent eating lunch was measured with a stop watch in 100 children in secondary school. A more detailed study of eating behaviour was then undertaken in 30 secondary school children (18 girls). The amount of food eaten at lunch was recorded by a hidden scale when the children ate amongst their peers and by a scale connected to a computer when they ate individually. When eating individually, feedback on how quickly to eat was visible on the computer screen. The speed of eating could therefore be increased or decreased experimentally using this visual feedback and the total amount of food eaten measured. Results In general, the children spent very little time eating their lunch. The 100 children in Study 1 spent on average (SD) just 7 (0.8) minutes eating lunch. The girls in Study 2 consumed their lunch in 5.6 (1.2) minutes and the boys ate theirs in only 6.8 (1.3) minutes. Eating with peers markedly distorted the amount of food eaten for lunch; only two girls and one boy maintained their food intake at the level observed when the children ate individually without external influences (258 (38) g in girls and 289 (73) g in boys). Nine girls ate on average 33% less food and seven girls ate 23% more food whilst the remaining boys ate 26% more food. The average speed of eating during school lunches amongst groups increased to 183 (53

  6. Children eat their school lunch too quickly: an exploratory study of the effect on food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandian, Modjtaba; Ioakimidis, Ioannis; Bergström, Jakob; Brodin, Ulf; Bergh, Cecilia; Leon, Michael; Shield, Julian; Södersten, Per

    2012-05-14

    Speed of eating, an important aspect of eating behaviour, has recently been related to loss of control of food intake and obesity. Very little time is allocated for lunch at school and thus children may consume food more quickly and food intake may therefore be affected. Study 1 measured the time spent eating lunch in a large group of students eating together for school meals. Study 2 measured the speed of eating and the amount of food eaten in individual school children during normal school lunches and then examined the effect of experimentally increasing or decreasing the speed of eating on total food intake. The time spent eating lunch was measured with a stop watch in 100 children in secondary school. A more detailed study of eating behaviour was then undertaken in 30 secondary school children (18 girls). The amount of food eaten at lunch was recorded by a hidden scale when the children ate amongst their peers and by a scale connected to a computer when they ate individually. When eating individually, feedback on how quickly to eat was visible on the computer screen. The speed of eating could therefore be increased or decreased experimentally using this visual feedback and the total amount of food eaten measured. In general, the children spent very little time eating their lunch. The 100 children in Study 1 spent on average (SD) just 7 (0.8) minutes eating lunch. The girls in Study 2 consumed their lunch in 5.6 (1.2) minutes and the boys ate theirs in only 6.8 (1.3) minutes. Eating with peers markedly distorted the amount of food eaten for lunch; only two girls and one boy maintained their food intake at the level observed when the children ate individually without external influences (258 (38) g in girls and 289 (73) g in boys). Nine girls ate on average 33% less food and seven girls ate 23% more food whilst the remaining boys ate 26% more food. The average speed of eating during school lunches amongst groups increased to 183 (53)% in the girls and to 166 (47

  7. Nutrient Density and the Cost of Vegetables from Elementary School Lunches123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishdorj, Ariun; Capps, Oral; Murano, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Vegetables are the major source of the dietary fiber, magnesium, potassium, and vitamins A and C that are crucial in the diets of children. This study assessed the nutrient content of vegetables offered through the National School Lunch Program and examined the relation between the overall nutrient density of vegetable subgroups and the costs of nutrients offered and wasted before and after the changes in school meal standards. Using data collected from 3 elementary schools before and after the changes in school meal standards, we found that vegetable plate waste increased from 52% to 58%. Plate waste for starchy vegetables, exclusive of potatoes, was relatively high compared with other subgroups; however, plate waste for white potatoes was the lowest among any type of vegetable. Energy density; cost per 100 g, per serving, and per 100 kcal; and percentage daily value were calculated and used to estimate nutrient density value and nutrient density per dollar. Cost per 100 kcal was highest for red/orange vegetables followed by dark green vegetables; however, nutrient density for red/orange vegetables was the highest in the group and provided the most nutrients per dollar compared with other subgroups. Given that many vegetables are less energy dense, measuring vegetable costs per 100 g and per serving by accounting for nutrient density perhaps is a better way of calculating the cost of vegetables in school meals. PMID:26773034

  8. Nutrient Density and the Cost of Vegetables from Elementary School Lunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishdorj, Ariun; Capps, Oral; Murano, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Vegetables are the major source of the dietary fiber, magnesium, potassium, and vitamins A and C that are crucial in the diets of children. This study assessed the nutrient content of vegetables offered through the National School Lunch Program and examined the relation between the overall nutrient density of vegetable subgroups and the costs of nutrients offered and wasted before and after the changes in school meal standards. Using data collected from 3 elementary schools before and after the changes in school meal standards, we found that vegetable plate waste increased from 52% to 58%. Plate waste for starchy vegetables, exclusive of potatoes, was relatively high compared with other subgroups; however, plate waste for white potatoes was the lowest among any type of vegetable. Energy density; cost per 100 g, per serving, and per 100 kcal; and percentage daily value were calculated and used to estimate nutrient density value and nutrient density per dollar. Cost per 100 kcal was highest for red/orange vegetables followed by dark green vegetables; however, nutrient density for red/orange vegetables was the highest in the group and provided the most nutrients per dollar compared with other subgroups. Given that many vegetables are less energy dense, measuring vegetable costs per 100 g and per serving by accounting for nutrient density perhaps is a better way of calculating the cost of vegetables in school meals. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Younger Elementary School Students Waste More School Lunch Foods than Older Elementary School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaki, Shahrbanou F; Moore, Carolyn E; Chen, Tzu-An; Weber Cullen, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Children may not receive nutritional benefits from school lunch meals if they do not eat the foods served. This study investigated whether there were differences in school lunch foods consumed and wasted by grade level of elementary school students. In this cross-sectional study, anonymous meal observations were conducted after students selected their reimbursable school lunch meals in the cafeteria lunch line. The amounts of foods selected and consumed were recorded using the quarter waste method and food waste was calculated using the information recorded. During the spring of 2013, eight elementary schools (50% low income) enrolling children in kindergarten through grade 5 in one school district in the Houston, TX, area were selected by the Child Nutrition Director. The amount of calories and foods consumed and the percentage wasted were assessed. Analysis of covariance and post hoc analysis were used to examine food consumption and plate waste by grade level (kindergarten and grade 1 [K-Gr1], grades 2 and 3 [Gr2-3], and grades 4 and 5 [Gr4-5]), controlling for student sex and school-level free/reduced priced meal eligibility. There were 568 nonrandom lunch meal observations of students included in the analyses. Approximately 48% of the observations were from boys; 50% were from low-income schools, and were evenly divided by grade. In general, students in K-Gr1 consumed fewer calories than both Gr2-3 and Gr4-5, and Gr2-3 students consumed significantly fewer calories than Gr4-5. K-Gr1 students also consumed less and wasted more total and red-orange vegetables, total/whole/refined grains, and total protein foods than the older students. Gr2-3 students wasted more calories and total grains than Gr4-5 students. K-Gr1 students wasted more fruit than Gr2-3 students. Overall, younger students in elementary schools (K-Gr-1) consumed less of the foods they selected for their lunch meals, and wasted more than older elementary school students. Future studies should

  10. Back-to-School Health Tips: Breakfast & Lunch | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues For an enhanced version of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Back-to-School Health Tips: Breakfast & Lunch Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Remember that nutrition is an important factor in ...

  11. Quantitative Evaluation of HHFKA Nutrition Standards for School Lunch Servings and Patterns of Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echon, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to provide baseline data and characteristics of food served and consumed prior to the recently mandated nutrition standards as authorized by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA). Methods: Over 600,000 school lunch menus with associated food production records from 61 elementary schools…

  12. Plate waste and intake of school lunch based on the New Nordic Diet and on packed lunches: A randomised controlled trial in 8- to 11-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Anne Vibeke; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare total food intake, total and relative edible plate waste and self-reported food likings between school lunch based on the new Nordic diet (NND) and packed lunch from home. In two 3-month periods in a cluster-randomised controlled unblinded cross......-over study 3rd- and 4th-grade children (n 187) from two municipal schools received lunch meals based on NND principles and their usual packed lunch (control). Food intake and plate waste (n 1558) were calculated after weighing lunch plates before and after the meal for five consecutive days and self...... with the packed lunch period. Self-reported likings were negatively associated with percentage plate waste (P school meal programmes. New strategies with focus on reduction of plate waste, children's likings and nutritious school meals...

  13. Psychosocial Outcomes of "Lunch Is in the Bag", a Parent Program for Packing Healthful Lunches for Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweitzer, Sara J.; Briley, Margaret E.; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Harrist, Ronald B.; Staskel, Deanna M.; Almansour, Fawaz D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study evaluated effects of "Lunch is in the Bag" on behavioral constructs and their predictive relationship to lunch-packing behaviors of parents of young children. Methods: Six child care centers were pair-matched and randomly assigned to intervention (n = 3) and comparison (n = 3) groups. Parent/child dyads participated.…

  14. Fourth graders' reports of fruit and vegetable intake at school lunch: does treatment assignment affect accuracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen Fleege; Kohler, Connie L; McClure, Leslie A; Franklin, Frank A

    2009-01-01

    Dietary interventions with children often use self-reported data to assess efficacy despite that objective methods rarely support self-report findings in validation studies. This study compared fourth graders' self-reported to observed lunch fruit and vegetable intake to determine if the accuracy of self-reported intake varied by treatment condition. Matched randomized follow-up design examined three treatment groups (high and low intensity interventions and control) post-intervention. Three hundred seventy-nine middle-school children participating in a randomized controlled trial of a school-based fruit and vegetable intervention were observed during school lunch one day and asked to recall intake the following day. Food items were coded as: "match," "omission," or "intrusion." Students were classified as accurate if all food items matched, otherwise inaccurate. Matched foods' portions were compared for accuracy. Servings were computed for total fruit and vegetable intake. Accuracy for fruits and vegetables were compared in separate analyses and tested for multiple potential associates: treatment condition, sex, race, body mass index, subsidized meal eligibility, school district, fruit/vegetable availability, age, and test scores. Fitted multivariable regression models included variables found to be significant in univariate or chi(2) analyses. Variables found to be significant for fruit item accuracy were availability at lunch, body mass index, and subsidized lunch eligibility. For vegetable item accuracy, availability at lunch was significant. No differences were found for food portions or for efficacy of the intervention between the two methods of dietary data collection: observation and self-report. Condition assignment did not bias recalled fruit and vegetable intakes among fourth graders.

  15. Development and validation of a Meal Index of dietary Quality (Meal IQ) to assess the dietary quality of school lunches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Marianne; Toft, Ulla; Andersen, Klaus K.

    2012-01-01

    of school lunches for children aged 7–13 years. Design A Meal Index of dietary Quality (Meal IQ) was developed to consist of seven components (nutrients and food groups) based on dietary issues for children aged 7–13 years, which were identified in a national dietary survey. The Meal IQ was validated...... of a school food programme. In addition thirty-two lunches provided at eighteen other public schools were included. Subjects A total of 254 school lunches. Results A higher Meal IQ score was associated with a higher overall dietary quality, including lower contents of fat, saturated fat and added sugars......, higher contents of fibre, various vitamins and minerals, and more fruits, vegetables and fish. Conclusions The Meal IQ is a valid and useful evaluation tool for assessing the dietary quality of lunches provided by schools or brought to school from home....

  16. Development and validation of a Meal Index of dietary Quality (Meal IQ) to assess the dietary quality of school lunches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabinsky, Marianne S; Toft, Ulla; Andersen, Klaus Kaae

    2012-01-01

    of school lunches for children aged 7-13 years. DESIGN: A Meal Index of dietary Quality (Meal IQ) was developed to consist of seven components (nutrients and food groups) based on dietary issues for children aged 7-13 years, which were identified in a national dietary survey. The Meal IQ was validated...... of a school food programme. In addition thirty-two lunches provided at eighteen other public schools were included. SUBJECTS: A total of 254 school lunches. RESULTS: A higher Meal IQ score was associated with a higher overall dietary quality, including lower contents of fat, saturated fat and added sugars......, higher contents of fibre, various vitamins and minerals, and more fruits, vegetables and fish. CONCLUSIONS: The Meal IQ is a valid and useful evaluation tool for assessing the dietary quality of lunches provided by schools or brought to school from home....

  17. Associations between usual school lunch attendance and eating habits and sedentary behaviour in French children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, C; Lioret, S; Dufour, A; Volatier, J L; Lafay, L; Turck, D

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to investigate whether school lunch attendance was associated with overall eating habits and sedentary behaviour in a French sample of children and adolescents. Data for the study were taken from the second French cross-sectional dietary survey (INCA2-2006-07). In total, 1413 school children aged 3-17 years old were classified according to their school type and their usual school lunch attendance. Eating habits included meal regularity, dietary diversity, purchase in vending machine, snacking habits and frequency of eating in fast-foods. Two composite indices of eating habits were derived from multiple correspondence analyses. Sedentary behaviour was assessed by the average daily screen times for TV and computer. The association between school lunch attendance and each variable was tested. Multivariate association between school lunch attendance and the composite indices of eating habits and sedentary behaviours was studied. In all, 69.0% (CI(95%): 64.2-73.9) of secondary school children and 63.0% (CI(95%): 58.5-67.5) of pre- and elementary school children usually attended school lunch at least once a week. Pre- and elementary school children attending school lunches showed a higher dietary diversity score (P=0.02) and ate morning snacks more frequently (P=0.02). In secondary school children, attending school canteen was related to a lower rate of skipping breakfast (P=0.04) and main meals (P=0.01). In all school children, school lunch attendance was simultaneously associated with healthier overall eating habits and less sedentary behaviour. In France, children attending school canteens seem to have healthier eating habits and display less sedentary behaviour, independently of their socio-economic and demographic background.

  18. Formação para merendeiras: uma proposta metodológica aplicada em escolas estaduais atendidas pelo programa nacional de alimentação escolar, em Salvador, Bahia Professional training for school lunch cooks: a methodological experiment done in state schools supported by the National School Feeding Program in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Lima Leite

    2011-04-01

    directed at school lunch cooks in state schools supported by the National School Feeding Program. METHODS: This descriptive study was carried out among school lunch cooks from 97 state schools, in Salvador (Bahia , Brazil. Definition and implementation of the professional training consisted of three stages: a preliminary survey among the cooks in search of contents and methodology, professional training activities and the subjects' assessment of such activities. RESULTS: The preliminary survey pointed to both those contents of major interest among the cooks and the methodology. Professional training activities were designed as a 20-hour event for groups of about 35 people, taking place in school units. The activity program carried a number of different contents, including the National School Feeding Program, the school lunch cooks in the school feeding system, feeding and nutrition principles, and Good Manufacturing Practices. Methodological resources comprised dramatization, dialogued presentations, workshops, group contests, practical activities, interactive games, form completion, guided group activities and a printed brochure with all presentations. At the end of the event, an assessment was requested from the subjects as to the following features: content presentation, resources employed, pace of activities, question answering, content learning, positive and negative aspects as well as suggestions. CONCLUSION: The experiment showed the feasibility of building a new professional training model by using and valuing the contributions from the target subjects, thus allowing the reframing of traditional professional training practices and increasing the chances of success, since the subjects' specific demands were taken into account.

  19. Reliability of the School Food Checklist for in-school audits and photograph analysis of children's packed lunches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S A; Miles, C L; Brennan, L; Matthews, J

    2010-02-01

    Assessment of children's diets is problematic, typically relying on error-prone parent or child recall or reporting, or resource intensive direct observation. The School Food Checklist (SFC) is an objective instrument comprising of 20 food and beverage categories designed to measure the foods contained in children's packed lunches. The present study aimed to assess intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of each of the food and beverage categories of the SFC for both in-school audits and photograph analysis of children's school lunches. Participants comprised 176 children aged 5-8 years from five primary schools in Northern Metropolitan Melbourne. The SFC was used to measure the foods contained in children's packed lunches in the school setting and using photographs. Photograph analysis was conducted by the auditors 2-3 months after completion of in-school audits. Both intra-rater [intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.78-1] and inter-rater (ICC = 0.50-0.95) reliability analysis indicated strong agreement for in-school auditing. With the exception of the food category titled 'leftovers', there was strong intra-rater reliability for auditors' live audits and their analysis of photographs [ICC = 0.57-0.98 (Auditor 1); ICC = 0.72-0.90 (Auditor 2)], and strong inter-rater reliability for photograph analysis (ICC = 0.68-0.92). The SFC is a reliable method of measuring the foods and beverages contained in children's packed lunches when used in the school setting or for photograph analysis. This finding has broad implications, particularly for the use of photograph analysis, because this approach offers a convenient and cost effective method of measuring what food and beverages children bring to school in home packed lunches.

  20. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  1. Bureau of School Lunches Past, Present, Future: An Overview, Working Note No. 4 in a Series: School Food Service in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of the Deputy Chancellor.

    This paper describes the early history, present status, and future trends of the Bureau of School Lunches of the New York City Board of Education. A review of its early history indicates that although various citizen groups and the Department of Welfare served lunches to needy children prior to 1946, it was the passage of the National School Lunch…

  2. School lunch, policy, and environment are determinants for preventing childhood obesity: Evidence from a two-year nationwide prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yiing Mei; Yang, Ya-Lan; Wang, Ting-Yao; Huang, Chiu-Mieh

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effects of the school lunches related factors on student obesity rates. In this 2-year prospective census, we collected data on the obesity rate in 2007 and 2008 and school lunch data for 2007 from the Student Health Examination and School Health Profile Database. We used geographic information system software to collect spatial environmental data. Hierarchical regression was used to analysis data. A total of 2208 elementary and junior high schools, excluding offshore islands in Taiwan were collected. The highest obesity rate (13.5%) was observed at a school in which one school meal cost less than US$ 0.83 in 2008. The obesity rates in schools that employed dietitians were lower than in schools that did not (pSchool lunches and childhood obesity exert a greater effect on boys than on girls. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The relationship between school lunch attendance and the food intakes of French schoolchildren aged 3-17 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Carine; Lioret, Sandrine; Dufour, Ariane; Calamassi-Tran, Gloria; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Lafay, Lionel; Turck, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Recently, school meal composition regulations have been implemented in France in order to improve the nutritional status of children. The present study investigated the link between school lunch attendance and the food intakes of schoolchildren aged 3-17 years. Second French cross-sectional dietary survey (2006-2007). Eating frequencies were assessed for twenty-four food groups with a 7 d food record. Eating locations were recorded for main meals. Food group intakes at weekday lunches were compared for the school canteen and for other locations. The children's overall dietary intake was compared based on school lunch attendance. Mainland France. Schoolchildren aged 3-17 years (n 1068). Lunchtime food intake differed between the school canteen and other locations. Some intakes at school canteens were more in accordance with the regulations (more fruit and vegetables, fish and dairy products, and less sandwiches, soft drinks, chocolate and confectionery), whereas others highlighted needs for improvement (more sweet biscuits and pastries, ice cream and dairy desserts, pizzas and salty pastries). Many of these differences were also observed in the children's overall diet: children regularly attending school lunches ate more mashed fruit, fish and sweet biscuits or pastries, and less sandwiches and soft drinks. The link between school lunch attendance and overall diet was less pronounced in secondary-school children. School canteen attendance is associated with both potentially beneficial and deleterious differences in the lunchtime and overall diets of French children. These findings are important to consider when setting national regulations for school meal composition.

  4. Nourishing a partnership to improve middle school lunch options: a community-based participatory research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Stephanie M; Kay, Joseph S; Lin, Grace C

    2015-01-01

    Community-based participatory research is predicated on building partnerships that tackle important issues to the community and effectively improve these issues. Community-based participatory research can also be an empowering experience, especially for children. This article describes a university-community partnership in which students at a low-income middle school worked to improve the quality of the cafeteria food provided to the 986 students eligible for free and reduced price lunches. The project led to menu changes, improved communication between youth, school administrators, and district staff, and enabled youth to enact school improvements that were beneficial for their health.

  5. A Validation Study of the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2014 Version, at School Lunch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Caroline F; DuPaul, George J; Hoffman, Jessica A

    2017-05-01

    Obtaining valid and reliable estimates of usual dietary intake at a reasonable cost is a challenge in school-based nutrition research. The Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2014 version (ASA24 Kids-2014), a self-administered, computerized 24-hour dietary recall, offers improved feasibility over traditional interviewer-administered 24-hour recalls. This mixed-methods study examined ASA24 Kids-2014's validity for measuring dietary intake from National School Lunch Program lunches. After 24% attrition, 96 middle-school students from three urban schools in eastern Pennsylvania participated in the study. A subsample of 27 participants completed qualitative interviews. Data were collected in the spring of 2014. Self-reported ASA24 Kids-2014 data were compared to direct observations of school lunch, which served as the criterion measure. Dependent variables included eight meal components selected from the National School Lunch Program guidelines (fruit, vegetables, grains, protein-rich foods, dairy, oils, solid fats, and added sugars). A supplemental interview collected qualitative data regarding students' perceptions of content and substantive validity. The Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman's ρ examined criterion-related validity; qualitative content analysis examined content and substantive validity. Participants inaccurately recalled food items eaten at lunch, as 58% of foods were reported in error. However, among foods recalled correctly, no statistically significant differences emerged for estimates of portions consumed for six meal components (fruit, vegetables, grains, protein-rich foods, oils, and added sugars). In addition, statistically significant positive correlations emerged between ASA24 Kids-2014 and direct observation for all estimates. Qualitative data identified students' interest and motivation, comprehension, memory, and English-language fluency as relevant sources of error. Middle school students have difficulty

  6. The Four Billion Dollar Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautter, R. Craig

    1978-01-01

    Discusses problems with the National School Lunch Program, including the high proportion of food thrown away by students, problems with food preparation, nutritional standards, and competition from junk foods. Suggestions for nutrition education are offered and organizations and books for further reference are listed. (JMB)

  7. Psychosocial outcomes of Lunch is in the Bag, a parent program for packing healthful lunches for preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweitzer, Sara J; Briley, Margaret E; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Harrist, Ronald B; Staskel, Deanna M; Almansour, Fawaz D

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated effects of Lunch is in the Bag on behavioral constructs and their predictive relationship to lunch-packing behaviors of parents of young children. Six child care centers were pair-matched and randomly assigned to intervention (n = 3) and comparison (n = 3) groups. Parent/child dyads participated. Constructs of knowledge, outcome expectations, perceived control, subjective norms, and intentions were measured by a pre/post questionnaire. Hierarchical linear regression was used, and P < .05 was considered significant. There were significant increases in knowledge (P = .01); outcome expectations for whole grains (P < .001); and subjective norms for fruit (P = .002), vegetables (P = .046), and whole grains (P = .02). Perceived control, outcome expectations, and intentions significantly predicted packing vegetables and knowledge predicted whole grains. Lunch is in the Bag is a feasible intervention to improve the lunch-packing behaviors of parents of preschool-aged children. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The National Evaluation of School Nutrition Programs: program impact on dietary intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, S; Vermeersch, J; Gale, S

    1984-08-01

    This article describes the dietary analysis component of the National Evaluation of School Nutrition Programs. It addresses two research questions: 1) do participants and nonparticipants in the school nutrition programs have different calorie and nutrient intakes for 24 h, breakfast, and/or lunch and 2) if there are differences in the nutritional quality or total quantity of food consumed? Students who participate in the School Lunch Program get more than nonparticipants of almost all nutrients that were examined, both at lunch and during 24 h. The superior lunch and 24-h intakes of Lunch Program participants are due to the higher nutritional quality of the School Lunch compared with lunches that nonparticipants eat. The most important impact of the School Breakfast is that when the program is available, it increases the likelihood that children will eat breakfast, and children who eat breakfast have significantly higher intakes of nutrients than children who skip breakfast. The School Breakfast provides more calcium, phosphorus, protein, and magnesium than a non-US Department of Agriculture breakfast, but less vitamin A, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, and iron. The positive impacts of calcium and phosphorus carry over 24 h, while the negative impacts for vitamin A, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, and iron are made up during the remainder of the day. Although strong conclusions cannot be drawn about the impact of the Milk Program, milk is an important component of all US Department of Agriculture school nutrition programs and makes a major contribution to student dietary intake. Its presence in the meal patterns probably accounts for some of the greater nutrient intakes associated with participation in the School Lunch Program and most of the greater intakes associated with participation in the School Breakfast Program.

  9. Lunch at school and children's cognitive functioning in the early afternoon: results from the Cognition Intervention Study Dortmund Continued (CoCo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Maike; Müller, Katrin; Falkenstein, Michael; Stehle, Peter; Kersting, Mathilde; Libuda, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Studies about effects of school lunch on children's cognition are rare; two previous studies (CogniDo, CogniDo PLUS) generally found no negative effects of lunch on children's cognitive performance at the end of lunch break (i.e. 45 min after finishing lunch), but suggested potential beneficial effects for single parameters. Therefore, the present study investigated the hypothesis of potential positive effects of school lunch on cognitive performance at early afternoon (90 min after finishing lunch). A randomised, cross-over intervention trial was conducted at a comprehensive school with fifth and sixth grade students. Participants were randomised into two groups: On day 1, group 1 did not eat lunch, whereas group 2 received lunch ad libitum. On day 2 (1 week later), group 2 did not eat lunch and group 1 received lunch ad libitum. The cognitive parameters task switching, working memory updating and alertness were tested using a computerised test battery 90 min after finishing the meal. Of the 204 recruited children, fifty were excluded because of deviations from the study protocol or absence on one of the 2 test days, which resulted in 154 participants. Data showed no significant effects of lunch on task switching, working memory updating and alertness (P values between 0·07 and 0·79). The present study suggests that school lunch does not seem to have beneficial effects on children's cognitive functions regarding the conducted tests at early afternoon. Together with our previous studies, we conclude that school lunch in general has no negative effects on cognitive performance in children. However, beneficial effects seem to be restricted to a relatively short time period after eating lunch.

  10. Nutrition Report Cards: an opportunity to improve school lunch selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wansink

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility and implementation efficiency of Nutritional Report Cards (NRCs in helping children make healthier food choices at school. METHODS: Pilot testing was conducted in a rural New York school district (K-12. Over a five-week period, 27 parents received a weekly e-mail containing a NRC listing how many meal components (fruits, vegetables, starches, milk, snacks, and a-la-carte foods their child selected. We analyzed choices of students in the NRC group vs. the control group, both prior to and during the intervention period. Point-of-sale system data for a-la-carte items was analyzed using Generalized Least Squares regressions with clustered standard errors. RESULTS: NRCs encouraged more home conversations about nutrition and more awareness of food selections. Despite the small sample, the NRC was associated with reduced selection of some items, such as the percentage of those selecting cookies which decreased from 14.3 to 6.5 percent. Additionally, despite requiring new keys on the check-out registers to generate the NRC, checkout times increased by only 0.16 seconds per transaction, and compiling and sending the NRCs required a total weekly investment of 30 minutes of staff time. CONCLUSIONS: This test of concept suggests that NRCs are a feasible and inexpensive tool to guide children towards healthier choices.

  11. Impact of the 2010 US Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act on School Breakfast and Lunch Participation Rates Between 2008 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudrin, Nicole; Lloyd, Kristen; Yedidia, Michael J; Todd, Michael; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam

    2017-11-21

    To evaluate National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation over a 7-year period before and after the implementation of the 2010 Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA), which required healthier school lunch options beginning in school year (SY) 2012-2013 and healthier school breakfast options beginning in SY2013-2014. Data were gathered from low-income, high-minority public schools in 4 New Jersey cities. We conducted longitudinal analyses of annual average daily participation (ADP) in school meals among enrolled students overall and among those eligible for free or reduced-price meals. We used linear mixed models to compare NSLP and SBP participation rates from SY2008-2009 to SY2014-2015. NSLP participation rates among students overall differed little across years (from 70% to 72%). SBP rates among enrolled students were stable from the beginning of the study period to SY2013-2014 and then increased from 52% to 59%. Among students eligible for free or reduced-price meals, the ADP was lowest in SY2012-2013 (when the HHFKA was implemented) before rebounding. The HHFKA did not have a negative impact on school meal participation over time. Public Health Implications. The HHFKA-strengthened nutrition standards have not affected school meal participation rates. With time, students are likely to accept healthier options. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print November 21, 2017: e1-e3. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2017.304102).

  12. School Nutrition Programs and the Incidence of Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millimet, Daniel L.; Tchernis, Rusty; Husain, Muna

    2010-01-01

    Given the recent rise in childhood obesity, the School Breakfast Program (SBP) and National School Lunch Program (NSLP) have received renewed attention. Using panel data on more than 13,500 primary school students, we assess the relationship between SBP and NSLP participation and (relatively) long-run measures of child weight. After documenting a…

  13. The School Administrator and the Food Service Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, John N.

    The aim of this publication is to offer information that will assist the elementary school principal in the establishment or improvement of a school lunch program. The material focuses on the necessary ingredients of an effective school food service, the necessity of nutrition education as a part of a food service program, and the importance of…

  14. Validation of a digital photographic method for assessment of dietary quality of school lunch sandwiches brought from home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne S. Sabinsky

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is a challenge to assess children's dietary intake. The digital photographic method (DPM may be an objective method that can overcome some of these challenges. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of a DPM to assess the quality of dietary intake from school lunch sandwiches brought from home among children aged 7–13 years. Design: School lunch sandwiches (n=191 were prepared to represent randomly selected school lunch sandwiches from a large database. All components were weighed to provide an objective measure of the composition. The lunches were photographed using a standardised DPM. From the digital images, the dietary components were estimated by a trained image analyst using weights or household measures and the dietary quality was assessed using a validated Meal Index of Dietary Quality (Meal IQ. The dietary components and the Meal IQ obtained from the digital images were validated against the objective weighed foods of the school lunch sandwiches. To determine interrater reliability, the digital images were evaluated by a second image analyst. Results: Correlation coefficients between the DPM and the weighed foods ranged from 0.89 to 0.97. The proportion of meals classified in the same or an adjacent quartile ranged from 98% (starch to 100% (fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grain, and Meal IQ. There was no statistical difference between fish, fat, starch, whole grains, and Meal IQ using the two methods. Differences were found for fruits and vegetables; Bland–Altman analyses showed a tendency to underestimate high amounts of these variables using the DPM. For interrater reliability, kappa statistics ranged from 0.59 to 0.82 across the dietary components and Meal IQ. Conclusions: The standardised DPM is a valid and reliable method for assessing the dietary quality of school lunch sandwiches brought from home.

  15. Validation of a digital photographic method for assessment of dietary quality of school lunch sandwiches brought from home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabinsky, Marianne S; Toft, Ulla; Andersen, Klaus K; Tetens, Inge

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenge to assess children's dietary intake. The digital photographic method (DPM) may be an objective method that can overcome some of these challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of a DPM to assess the quality of dietary intake from school lunch sandwiches brought from home among children aged 7-13 years. School lunch sandwiches (n=191) were prepared to represent randomly selected school lunch sandwiches from a large database. All components were weighed to provide an objective measure of the composition. The lunches were photographed using a standardised DPM. From the digital images, the dietary components were estimated by a trained image analyst using weights or household measures and the dietary quality was assessed using a validated Meal Index of Dietary Quality (Meal IQ). The dietary components and the Meal IQ obtained from the digital images were validated against the objective weighed foods of the school lunch sandwiches. To determine interrater reliability, the digital images were evaluated by a second image analyst. Correlation coefficients between the DPM and the weighed foods ranged from 0.89 to 0.97. The proportion of meals classified in the same or an adjacent quartile ranged from 98% (starch) to 100% (fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grain, and Meal IQ). There was no statistical difference between fish, fat, starch, whole grains, and Meal IQ using the two methods. Differences were found for fruits and vegetables; Bland-Altman analyses showed a tendency to underestimate high amounts of these variables using the DPM. For interrater reliability, kappa statistics ranged from 0.59 to 0.82 across the dietary components and Meal IQ. The standardised DPM is a valid and reliable method for assessing the dietary quality of school lunch sandwiches brought from home.

  16. Elementary school children's recess schedule and dietary intake at lunch: a community-based participatory research partnership pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsberger, Monica; McGinnis, Paul; Smith, Jamie; Beamer, Beth Ann; O'Malley, Jean

    2014-02-12

    School recess before lunch (e.g., reverse recess) has been suggested as a means to improve dietary intake and classroom behavior but limited research explores this school-based policy. This pilot study tests the impact of recess scheduling on dietary intake at school lunch. A mixed methods approach included assessment of dietary intake assessed by measured plate waste on five non-consecutive days at Madras Elementary School, Madras, Oregon, United States (n = 104 intervention; 157 controls). Subjects included primary school children in grades kindergarten, first and second. Logistic regression was used to test associations between recess timing and dietary intake. Four focus groups involving teachers and staff explored reactions to the intervention. Qualitative data was transcribed verbatim and assessed for key themes. Milk consumption was 1.3 oz greater in the intervention group (5.7 oz vs. 4.4 oz); and 20% more of the intervention participants drank the entire carton of milk (42% vs. 25%, p < 0.0001). Intervention participants were 1.5 times more likely to meet the nutritional guidelines for calcium (≥267 mg, p = 0.01) and fat (≤30% of total energy, p = 0.02). Consumption of entrees, vegetables, and fruits did not differ between groups. Teachers perceived recess before lunch beneficial to classroom behavior and readiness to concentrate following lunch. The recess before lunch intervention yielded increased milk consumption; the nutritional and social benefits observed warrant policy change consideration. Future research should assess the impact of recess before lunch in larger districts.

  17. Plate waste and intake of school lunch based on the new Nordic diet and on packed lunches: a randomised controlled trial in 8- to 11-year-old Danish children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Anne V; Lassen, Anne D; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Christensen, Lene M; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja; Andersen, Rikke; Damsgaard, Camilla T; Michaelsen, Kim F; Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare total food intake, total and relative edible plate waste and self-reported food likings between school lunch based on the new Nordic diet (NND) and packed lunch from home. In two 3-month periods in a cluster-randomised controlled unblinded cross-over study 3rd- and 4th-grade children (n 187) from two municipal schools received lunch meals based on NND principles and their usual packed lunch (control). Food intake and plate waste (n 1558) were calculated after weighing lunch plates before and after the meal for five consecutive days and self-reported likings (n 905) assessed by a web-based questionnaire. Average food intake was 6 % higher for the NND period compared with the packed lunch period. The quantity of NND intake varied with the menu (P self-reported likings. The edible plate waste was 88 (sd 80) g for the NND period and 43 (sd 60) g for the packed lunch period whereas the relative edible plate waste was no different between periods for meals having waste (n 1050). Edible plate waste differed between menus (P vegetarian days (23 %) compared with the packed lunch period. Self-reported likings were negatively associated with percentage plate waste (P < 0·0001). The study suggests that portion sizes need to be considered in new school meal programmes. New strategies with focus on reduction of plate waste, children's likings and nutritious school meals are crucial from both a nutritional, economic and environmental point of view.

  18. Comparison of the nutrient-based standards for school lunches among South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Meeyoung; Abe, Satoko; Zhang, Chengyu; Kim, Soyoung; Choi, Jiyu; Hernandez, Emely; Nozue, Miho; Yoon, Jihyun

    2017-01-01

    Nutritional standards are important guidelines for providing students with nutritionally-balanced school meals. This study compared nutrient-based school lunch standards regulated by South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. The data were collected from relevant literature and websites of each country during September 2014. The number of classification groups of target students was 8, 5, and 5 for South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan, respectively. Gender was considered across all age groups in South Korea but only for high school students in Taiwan. Gender was not considered in Japan. Along with energy, the number of nutrients included in the standards for South Korea, Japan and Taiwan was 9, 12, and 4, respectively. The standards for all three countries included protein and fat among macronutrients. The standards for South Korea and Japan included vitamin A, B-1, B-2, and C, while the standards for Taiwan did not include any vitamins. Calcium was the only mineral commonly included in the three standards. The proportions of recommended daily intakes as reference values for each nutrient differed among the countries. Japan differentiated the proportions among 33%, 40%, or 50%, reflecting the target students' intake status of the respective nutrients. Taiwan differentiated either two-fifths or one-third of the recommended daily intakes. South Korea applied the proportion of recommended daily intake as one-third for all selected nutrients. This study could be valuable information for countries in developing nutrient-based standards for school lunches and for South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan in the process of reforming nutrient-based standards.

  19. Associations between structural characteristics of the school setting and irregular lunch consumption – are there gender differences?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh Pedersen, Trine; Holstein, Bjørn Evald; Krølner, Rikke

    .52 (1.26-1.82). At the individual level, irregular lunch consumption was associated with being a boy, attending 7th grade, medium and low family social class, migration status, and living in a single and reconstructed family structure. Analyses stratified by gender showed similar results but among girls...... schoolchildren, and 2) examine whether gender modified these associations. Methods: Danish data from the international cross-sectional study ‘Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children in 2010 were used. Data were collected among schoolchildren aged 11, 13 and 15 years from a random sample of 75 schools....... The schoolchildren (N=4922) completed a self-administered questionnaire at school (response rate=86.3%). School principals (N=69) completed the school setting questionnaire (response rate=92 %). Associations between school level variables and irregular lunch consumption were estimated by multilevel logistic...

  20. Development of an Intervention Programme to Encourage High School Students to Stay in School for Lunch Instead of Eating at Nearby Fast-Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Dominique; Godin, Gaston

    2012-01-01

    Many schools have recently adopted food policies and replaced unhealthy products by healthy foods. Consequently, adolescents are more likely to consume a healthy meal if they stay in school for lunch to eat a meal either prepared at home or purchased in school cafeterias. However, many continue to eat in nearby fast-food restaurants. The present…

  1. Lunch at school, at home or elsewhere. Where do adolescents usually get it and what do they eat? Results of the HELENA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Katrin; Libuda, Lars; Diethelm, Katharina; Huybrechts, Inge; Moreno, Luis A; Manios, Yannis; Mistura, Lorenza; Dallongeville, Jean; Kafatos, Anthony; González-Gross, Marcela; Cuenca-García, Magdalena; Sjöström, Michael; Hallström, Lena; Widhalm, Kurt; Kersting, Mathilde

    2013-12-01

    Considering the lack of uniformity regarding school meals in Europe, information on adolescents' school lunch patterns is of public health importance. Thus, the aim of this analysis was to describe and evaluate lunchtime energy and food intake of European adolescents at different lunch locations. Data on nutritional and health-related parameters were derived from the HEalthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence Cross-Sectional Study (HELENA-CSS). A sub-sample of 891 adolescents (47% male) with plausible data on total and lunchtime energy intake (2 × 24 h recall) as well as usual lunch location was considered. Food intake was compared to lunch of the Optimized Mixed Diet (OMD) for children and adolescents. Although energy intake was nearly in line with the recommendations, food intake was suboptimal compared to the OMD regardless of usual lunch location. Adolescents had more potatoes and less sweets at school, and more drinks (water, coffee and tea) and vegetables at home when each compared with the other locations. Food intake of adolescents getting their lunch elsewhere was characterized by the smallest amounts of potatoes and the highest amounts of sweets. Although lunch patterns may differ among countries, schools in Europe do not seem to reveal all their potential to offer access to a healthy lunch for adolescents yet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The contribution of school meals and packed lunch to food consumption and nutrient intakes in UK primary school children from a low income population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, L; Nelson, M

    2011-06-01

    The Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey described the food consumption and nutrient intake of UK children in low income households in 2003-2005. To describe food consumption and nutrient intake associated with school meals and packed lunches, based on a cross-sectional analysis of 680, 24-h dietary recalls from 311 school children aged 4-11 years. In children from low income households, pupils who took a packed lunch consumed more white bread, fats and oils, crisps and confectionery and fewer potatoes (cooked with or without fat) at lunchtime compared to other pupils. Many of these differences persisted when diet was assessed over the day. For younger pupils (4-7 years), packed lunches provided the least amount of folate, the highest amount of sodium, and the highest average percentage of food energy from fat and saturated fatty acids (SFA) compared to free school meals (FSMs). Over the whole day, in both younger (4-7 years) and older (8-11 years) children, there were no notable differences in energy or nutrient intake between those eating a packed lunch or a school meal. Older children's packed lunches contributed a significantly higher proportion of fat, SFA, calcium and sodium to the day's nutrient intake compared to a FSM. In children from low income households, packed lunches are less likely to contribute towards a 'healthier' diet compared to a school meal. The difference was more apparent in younger children. Key differences were the high consumption of sodium, SFA and non-milk extrinsic sugars by pupils who had packed lunches. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  3. Lunch frequency among adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Trine Pagh; Holstein, Bjørn E; Krølner, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    frequency was most common among students who were boys, 13- and 15-year-olds, from medium and low family social class, descendants of immigrants, living in a single-parent family and in a reconstructed family. School-level analyses suggested that having access to a canteen at school was associated with low......OBJECTIVE: To investigate: (i) how lunch frequency of adolescents varies between schools and between classes within schools; (ii) the associations between frequency of lunch and individual sociodemographic factors and school characteristics; and (iii) if any observed associations between lunch...... frequency and school characteristics vary by gender and age groups. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study in which students and school headmasters completed self-administered questionnaires. Associations were estimated by multilevel multivariate logistic regression. SETTING: The Danish arm of the Health Behaviour...

  4. Staying in school for lunch instead of eating in fast-food restaurants: results of a quasi-experimental study among high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Dominique; Godin, Gaston

    2012-12-01

    Following the adoption of food policies replacing unhealthy products by healthy foods in school, the present study tested the effectiveness of an intervention aimed at encouraging high-school students to stay in school for lunch instead of eating in fast-food restaurants. A 12-week multi-strategy intervention targeting specific determinants of behaviour was evaluated via a quasi-experimental pre- and post-intervention design. A self-administered questionnaire was employed based on the theory of planned behaviour. An experimental (n 129) and a control school (n 112) in central Canada. High-school students aged 12 to 17 years. Compared with control school students, those in the experimental school significantly increased the mean number of days that they stayed in school for lunch (relative risk = 1.55; 95 % CI 1.06, 2.27; P = 0.024), as well as the proportion who remained in school for lunch every day (relative risk = 1.21; 95 % CI 1.04, 1.40; P = 0.014). Among the psychosocial variables targeted, only self-efficacy appeared to be influenced by the intervention, mainly because of a decline in control group values. Mediation analysis indicated a significant mediating effect of self-efficacy on the mean number of days that students stayed in school for lunch (bias-corrected and accelerated point estimate = 0.079; 95 % CI 0.0059, 0.1958). These results suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing self-efficacy can successfully contribute to students staying in school during lunch time. Such interventions should be considered in obesity prevention programmes adapted to high-school students.

  5. Role of free school lunch in the associations between family-environmental factors and children's fruit and vegetable intake in four European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray, C.; Roos, E.; Brug, J.; Behrendt, I.; Ehrenblad, B.; Yngve, A.; te Velde, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an association exists between different clusters of fruit- and vegetable-specific family-environmental factors and children's daily fruit and vegetable intake, and whether these associations differ between countries with different school lunch policies. Design

  6. Socio-economic and demographic variations in school lunch participation of French children aged 3-17 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuisson, Carine; Lioret, Sandrine; Dufour, Ariane; Calamassi-Tran, Gloria; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Lafay, Lionel; Turck, Dominique

    2011-02-01

    To assess school canteen attendance in a French nationally representative sample of children and to analyse its association with the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of the children and their families. Data from the second French national cross-sectional food consumption survey (INCA2), performed in 2006-2007, were used. Information on usual weekly school canteen attendance was collected through a self-reported questionnaire, and demographic and socio-economic variables through a face-to-face questionnaire. The associations between school canteen attendance and the socio-economic and demographic variables were investigated by multivariate logistic regression analyses. The INCA2 sample was representative of the children aged 3-17 years in France. Analysis was performed on 1413 schoolchildren who completed the school canteen attendance questions. Some 65·6 % of schoolchildren aged 3-17 years had school lunch at least once weekly. This rate of attendance was positively correlated with age. Whatever the school level, school canteen attendance was positively associated with the educational level of the caregiver/parent. In pre- and elementary-school children, enrolment at the school canteen was also higher when the caregiver/parent worked, or in single-parent families. In secondary-school children, school lunch participation decreased with children living in more densely populated areas and increased with the level of the household's living standards. School canteen attendance was positively associated with children's socio-economic background. This could reduce the effectiveness of the forthcoming school meal composition regulations designed to improve the diet of children from deprived backgrounds, who are more likely to have unhealthy food habits.

  7. School lunch and learning behaviour in primary schools: an intervention study

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michael; Golley, Rebecca; Baines, Ed; Bassett, Paul; Wood, Lesley; Pearce, Jo

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background/Objectives: In addition to the nutritional benefits of healthier school food, anecdotes describe improvements in children's behaviour and educational outcomes when school food or the school dining room environment is improved. This study hypothesised that a school food and dining room intervention would improve pupils' learning-related classroom behaviour. Subjects/Methods: A controlled intervention trial involving six primary schools matched in triplets and ...

  8. School Nutrition Programs and the Incidence of Childhood Obesity. NBER Working Paper No. 14297

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millimet, Daniel L.; Tchernis, Rusty; Husain, Muna

    2008-01-01

    In light of the recent rise in childhood obesity, the School Breakfast Program (SBP) and National School Lunch Program (NSLP) have received renewed attention. Using panel data on over 13,500 primary school students, we assess the relationship between SBP and NSLP participation and (relatively) long-run measures of child weight. After documenting a…

  9. The impact of food and nutrient-based standards on primary school children's lunch and total dietary intake: a natural experimental evaluation of government policy in England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Spence

    Full Text Available In 2005, the nutritional content of children's school lunches in England was widely criticised, leading to a major policy change in 2006. Food and nutrient-based standards were reintroduced requiring primary schools to comply by September 2008. We aimed to determine the effect of the policy on the nutritional content at lunchtime and in children's total diet. We undertook a natural experimental evaluation, analysing data from cross-sectional surveys in 12 primary schools in North East England, pre and post policy. Dietary data were collected on four consecutive days from children aged 4-7 years (n = 385 in 2003-4; n = 632 in 2008-9. We used linear mixed effect models to analyse the effects of gender, year, and lunch type on children's mean total daily intake. Both pre- and post-implementation, children who ate a school lunch consumed less sodium (mean change -128 mg, 95% CI: -183 to -73 mg in their total diet than children eating home-packed lunches. Post-implementation, children eating school lunches consumed a lower % energy from fat (-1.8%, -2.8 to -0.9 and saturated fat (-1.0%; -1.6 to -0.5 than children eating packed lunches. Children eating school lunches post implementation consumed significantly more carbohydrate (16.4 g, 5.3 to 27.6, protein (3.6 g, 1.1 to 6.0, non-starch polysaccharides (1.5 g, 0.5 to 1.9, vitamin C (0.7 mg, 0.6 to 0.8, and folate (12.3 µg, 9.7 to 20.4 in their total diet than children eating packed lunches. Implementation of school food policy standards was associated with significant improvements in the nutritional content of school lunches; this was reflected in children's total diet. School food- and nutrient-based standards can play an important role in promoting dietary health and may contribute to tackling childhood obesity. Similar policy measures should be considered for other environments influencing children's diet.

  10. The impact of food and nutrient-based standards on primary school children's lunch and total dietary intake: a natural experimental evaluation of government policy in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Suzanne; Delve, Jennifer; Stamp, Elaine; Matthews, John N S; White, Martin; Adamson, Ashley J

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the nutritional content of children's school lunches in England was widely criticised, leading to a major policy change in 2006. Food and nutrient-based standards were reintroduced requiring primary schools to comply by September 2008. We aimed to determine the effect of the policy on the nutritional content at lunchtime and in children's total diet. We undertook a natural experimental evaluation, analysing data from cross-sectional surveys in 12 primary schools in North East England, pre and post policy. Dietary data were collected on four consecutive days from children aged 4-7 years (n = 385 in 2003-4; n = 632 in 2008-9). We used linear mixed effect models to analyse the effects of gender, year, and lunch type on children's mean total daily intake. Both pre- and post-implementation, children who ate a school lunch consumed less sodium (mean change -128 mg, 95% CI: -183 to -73 mg) in their total diet than children eating home-packed lunches. Post-implementation, children eating school lunches consumed a lower % energy from fat (-1.8%, -2.8 to -0.9) and saturated fat (-1.0%; -1.6 to -0.5) than children eating packed lunches. Children eating school lunches post implementation consumed significantly more carbohydrate (16.4 g, 5.3 to 27.6), protein (3.6 g, 1.1 to 6.0), non-starch polysaccharides (1.5 g, 0.5 to 1.9), vitamin C (0.7 mg, 0.6 to 0.8), and folate (12.3 µg, 9.7 to 20.4) in their total diet than children eating packed lunches. Implementation of school food policy standards was associated with significant improvements in the nutritional content of school lunches; this was reflected in children's total diet. School food- and nutrient-based standards can play an important role in promoting dietary health and may contribute to tackling childhood obesity. Similar policy measures should be considered for other environments influencing children's diet.

  11. School lunch and learning behaviour in primary schools: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golley, R; Baines, E; Bassett, P; Wood, L; Pearce, J; Nelson, M

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the nutritional benefits of healthier school food, anecdotes describe improvements in children's behaviour and educational outcomes when school food or the school dining room environment is improved. This study hypothesized that a school food and dining room intervention would improve pupils' learning-related classroom behaviour. A controlled intervention trial involving six primary schools matched in triplets and randomly assigned to a 12-week intervention (promotion of healthier school food at lunchtime and changes in the school dining environment) or 12-week wait-listed control group. Study outcome was learning-related behaviours measured in a random sample of 146 pupils in years 3-5. On-task and off-task behaviours were observed and used as proxy measures for concentration and disengagement (disruption), respectively. Teacher-pupil on-task engagement was 3.4 times more likely in the intervention schools compared with the control schools (adjusted model odds ratio (OR)=3.40 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.56, 7.36), P=0.009). However, on-task pupil-pupil behaviour was less likely in the intervention group (adjusted model OR=0.45 (95% CI=0.28, 0.70), Pschool food and dining room intervention can have a positive impact on pupils' alertness. However, if raised alertness is not channelled and supervised, it may result in increased off-task behaviour when pupils are working together.

  12. Breakfast and lunch meal skipping patterns among fourth-grade children from selected public schools in urban, suburban, and rural maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Susan M; Bronner, Yvonne; Welch, Claudette; Dewberry-Moore, Natalie; Paige, David M

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to describe breakfast and lunch consumption patterns of fourth-grade students from selected public schools in Maryland and how they differ by geographic location. Data were collected from a sample of 540 fourth-grade public school children (46% male, 62% white; mean age=9 years) from three geographically distinct regions of Maryland (30% rural, 30% suburban, and 40% urban). Data on breakfast and lunch consumption were collected using an in-classroom questionnaire. chi(2) tests were used to compare skipping meal behavior by geographic location. Twenty percent of fourth-grade students reported skipping breakfast and/or lunch at least three times per week. Urban students were more than twice as likely to skip breakfast and to eat school-prepared meals compared with suburban and rural students. Dietitians in all regions need to explore new ways to encourage regular meal consumption among students in their schools.

  13. How the CATCH eat smart program helps implement the USDA regulations in school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelscher, Deanna M; Mitchell, Paul; Dwyer, Johanna; Elder, John; Clesi, Ann; Snyder, Patricia

    2003-08-01

    This article describes the implementation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program (NSLP) standards in school lunch menus in 56 intervention and 20 control schools from the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) 5 years after the main trial, compared with 12 schools previously unexposed to CATCH. School food service personnel completed questionnaires to assess CATCH guideline implementation, demographic data, behavioral constructs, training, program material use, and participation in competing programs. Five days of menus and recipes were collected from school cafeteria staff, averaged, and compared to USDA School Meal Initiative (SMI) standards. Significant differences between intervention and unexposed schools were found for training and knowledge of CATCH and in mean percentage energy from fat and carbohydrates. Intervention schools most closely met USDA SMI recommendations for fat. Thus, the CATCH Eat Smart Program assisted school cafeterias in meeting USDA guidelines 5 years postimplementation.

  14. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Second Congress, First Session on Nutrition and Human Needs. Part 4--Implementation, 1970 Amendments to the National School Lunch Act. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., May 3-4, 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    In trying to solve the problem of hunger in the classroom, the Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs heard the testimony of many witnesses, among whom were: Miss Barbara Bode, Program Director, The Children's Foundation; Miss Barbara Hockert, President, Burlington Ad Hoc Committee on School Lunches; and, Mrs. Joseph H. Young,…

  15. Locally Sustainable School Lunch Intervention Improves Hemoglobin and Hematocrit Levels and Body Mass Index among Elementary Schoolchildren in Rural West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiyama, Makiko; Roosita, Katrin; Ohtsuka, Ryutaro

    2017-08-12

    School lunch is not provided in public elementary schools in Indonesia, and students frequently buy and eat snacks at school. We hypothesized that providing a traditional Sundanese meal as school lunch would be beneficial for children in rural West Java. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effect of a 1-month school lunch intervention aiming at sustainability and based on children's nutritional intake, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, and body mass index (BMI). A lunch (including rice, vegetable dish, animal protein dish, plant protein dish, and fruit) containing one-third of the recommended daily allowance of energy was offered every school day for 1 month, targeting 68 fourth-grade elementary schoolchildren. At baseline, the prevalence of anemia was 33.3%. The prevalence of stunting and underweight were 32.4% and 2.9%, respectively, whereas that of overweight and obesity combined was 17.6%, indicating a double burden of malnutrition among the subjects. During the intervention, intakes of protein ( p < 0.05), calcium ( p < 0.05), and vitamin C ( p < 0.001) significantly increased, while that of fat significantly decreased ( p < 0.001). After the intervention, hemoglobin ( p < 0.05) and hematocrit ( p < 0.05) levels were significantly improved, thereby almost halving the rate of anemia. These changes were significantly larger in the baseline anemic group than the non-anemic group ( p < 0.01). BMI significantly increased in the baseline underweight/normal group ( p < 0.001) but not in the overweight/obese group. The school lunch intervention significantly improved nutritional intakes and health statuses, implying its potential for reducing anemia and resolving the double burden of malnutrition among rural Indonesian schoolchildren.

  16. "Lunch Is Gross": Gaining Access to Powerful Literacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This ethnographic study documents how a space for critical literacy practices emerged as one teacher attempted to make literacy learning authentic. The school lunch program in an urban elementary district provided the theme for an authentic and focused literacy unit. Throughout this focus unit, the students not only met state standards but also…

  17. The impact of the availability of school vending machines on eating behavior during lunch: the Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohyun; Sappenfield, William M; Huang, Youjie; Sherry, Bettylou; Bensyl, Diana M

    2010-10-01

    Childhood obesity is a major public health concern and is associated with substantial morbidities. Access to less-healthy foods might facilitate dietary behaviors that contribute to obesity. However, less-healthy foods are usually available in school vending machines. This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence of students buying snacks or beverages from school vending machines instead of buying school lunch and predictors of this behavior. Analyses were based on the 2003 Florida Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey using a representative sample of 4,322 students in grades six through eight in 73 Florida public middle schools. Analyses included χ2 tests and logistic regression. The outcome measure was buying a snack or beverage from vending machines 2 or more days during the previous 5 days instead of buying lunch. The survey response rate was 72%. Eighteen percent of respondents reported purchasing a snack or beverage from a vending machine 2 or more days during the previous 5 school days instead of buying school lunch. Although healthier options were available, the most commonly purchased vending machine items were chips, pretzels/crackers, candy bars, soda, and sport drinks. More students chose snacks or beverages instead of lunch in schools where beverage vending machines were also available than did students in schools where beverage vending machines were unavailable: 19% and 7%, respectively (P≤0.05). The strongest risk factor for buying snacks or beverages from vending machines instead of buying school lunch was availability of beverage vending machines in schools (adjusted odds ratio=3.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.2 to 5.7). Other statistically significant risk factors were smoking, non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity, Hispanic ethnicity, and older age. Although healthier choices were available, the most common choices were the less-healthy foods. Schools should consider developing policies to reduce the availability of less-healthy choices

  18. The Feud over Food: The Truth about the School Lunch Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Serving meals and snacks at school is fraught with politics and pitfalls. While the battle rages in school cafeterias over menu choices, beverage sales, vending foods, and outright bans on what students can buy or even bring to school, there is some good news. More school districts are reducing the number of fried foods, increasing the levels of…

  19. The Amount of Time to Eat Lunch is Associated with Children’s Selection and Consumption of School Meal Entrée, Fruits, Vegetable, and Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F.W.; Jahn, Jaquelyn L.; Richardson, Scott; Cluggish, Sarah A.; Parker, Ellen; Rimm, Eric B.

    2015-01-01

    Background There are currently no national standards for school lunch period lengths and little is known about the association between the amount of time students have to eat and school food selection and consumption. Objectives To examine plate waste measurements from students in the control arm from the MEALS study (2011-2012 school year) for the association of the amount of time to eat with school meal selection and consumption. Design Prospective study using up to six repeated measures among students over the school year. Participants/Setting 1001 students in grades 3-8 attending 6 participating elementary/middle schools in an urban, low-income school district where lunch period lengths varied from 20-30 minutes. Main Outcome Measures School food selection and consumption were collected using plate waste methodology. Statistical Analyses Performed Logistic regression and mixed-model ANOVA was used to examine food selection and consumption. Results Compared with meal component selection when students had at least 25 minutes to eat, students were significantly less likely to select a fruit (44% vs. 57%; p=0.0001) compared with when students had fewer than 20 minutes to eat. There were no significant differences in entrée, milk, or vegetable selection. Among those who selected a meal component, students with fewer than 20 minutes to eat consumed 13% less of their entrée (p<0.0001), 10% less of their milk (p<0.0001), and 12% less of their vegetable (p=0.0002) compared to when students had at least 25 minutes to eat. Conclusions Over the school year, a substantial number of students had insufficient time to eat, which was associated with significantly decreased entrée, milk, and vegetable consumption compared with students who had more time to eat. School policies that encourage lunches with at least 25 minutes of seated time may reduce food waste and improve dietary intake. PMID:26372337

  20. Using a Problem-Solving/Decision-Making Model to Evaluate School Lunch Salad Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carolyn C.; Spruance, Lori Andersen; O'Malley, Keelia; Begalieva, Maya; Myers, Leann

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Evaluation of school-based activities is a high priority for school personnel. Nutrition activities, such as salad bars (SBs) incorporated into school lunchrooms, may increase children's consumption of low-energy, high fiber diets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a problem-solving/ decision-making model and demonstrate…

  1. School Lunch Consumption among 3 Food Service Providers in New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canterberry, Melanie; Francois, Samantha; van Hattum, Taslim; Rudov, Lindsey; Carton, Thomas W.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Louisiana has one of the highest rates of overweight and obese children in the United States. The Healthy School Food Collaborative (HSFC) was created to allow New Orleans's schools to select their own healthy school Food Service Provider (FSP) with requirements for higher nutritional standards than traditional options. The goal of…

  2. Determination of plate waste in primary school lunches by weighing and visual estimation methods: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liz Martins, Margarida; Cunha, Luís M; Rodrigues, Sara S P; Rocha, Ada

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the visual estimation method for aggregated plate waste of main dish at Portuguese primary school canteens. For this purpose plate waste at school lunch was measured for 505 individual servings, using weighing individual servings and plate waste and visual estimation method by a 6-point scale, as developed by Comstock et al. (1981). A high variability of initial serving weights was found with serving sizes ranging from 88.9 to 283.3g and with a coefficient of variation ranging from 5.5% to 24.7%. Mean plate waste was 27.5% according to the weighing method. There was a significant bias in the conversion of the visual waste estimations to actual waste, being overestimated by an average of 8.0 g (ranging from -12.9 g to 41.4 g). According to Bland and Altman plot, the mean difference between methods was of 8.0 g and the amplitude interval was 102.6g. The study showed that the visual estimation method is not as accurate as the weighing method in assessing nonselective aggregated plate waste at primary school canteens. Our findings are thus very important on considering plate waste assessment, since the wide variation on initial servings introduces a relevant bias when considering standard portions or a random sample of initial servings. Although, greater convenience, time-saving and the possibility to monitor plate waste of large groups, make the visual estimation method an important method to assess plate waste at school canteens, these results highlighted the need of portions standardization and control of initial servings to allow for its use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nutritional quality and acceptability of a weekly vegetarian lunch in primary-school canteens in Ghent, Belgium: 'Thursday Veggie Day'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Keyzer, Willem; Van Caneghem, Sven; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Vanaelst, Barbara; Verschraegen, Mia; De Henauw, Stefaan; Huybrechts, Inge

    2012-12-01

    To determine the nutritional adequacy and acceptability to children of vegetarian lunches served on 'Thursday Veggie Day' - a public health initiative in Ghent (Belgium) primary schools. A comparison of food leftovers from main courses on regular days and Thursdays was made using a visual plate waste method. The nutritional value of the vegetarian meat analogue and meat components of main courses served on five 'Thursday Veggie Days' and five comparable conventional main courses was evaluated using three criteria (maximum 30 % of energy from fat, maximum of one-third of fat as saturated fat and minimum 1.5 g of dietary fibre per 420 kJ). Two canteens from primary schools in Ghent, Belgium, participating in the 'Thursday Veggie Day' campaign. Primary-school children aged between 6 and 12 years. In total, 1242 and 472 main course plate waste observations of conventional and vegetarian menus, respectively, were evaluated. There was no significant difference in plate waste between vegetarian (16.7 %) and conventional (17.3 %) main courses. Overall, the five vegetarian components were found to be nutritionally adequate with a mean score of 2.2 out of 3, compared with 0.4 for the meat component. However, three of the vegetarian components provided >30 % of energy from fat and, in one, the amount of saturated fat exceeded one-third of total fat. Vegetarian canteen meals offered as part of 'Thursday Veggie Day' appear to be nutritionally appropriate and as acceptable as conventional main courses to children in primary schools in Ghent.

  4. School lunch debit card payment systems are associated with lower nutrition and higher calories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, David R; Wansink, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Debit card payment systems are known to induce more frivolous purchases in adults, but their impact on children is unknown. Using a national survey of 2,314 public school students in the United States, food purchases in schools with debit-only systems to those in schools with both debit and cash options are compared. Students in debit and cash schools purchase more fresh fruit and vegetables and fewer total calories. Payment systems with cash options have a lower purchase incidence of less healthy foods and higher purchase incidence of more healthy foods. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. 5 Reasons to Pack Your Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... school! Here are the top 5 reasons to pack your lunch — and snacks — at least twice a week: 1. Control. Do you ever wait in the lunch line only to find when you get to the front that you don't like what they're ...

  6. [Hygienic-sanitary conditions in school lunch rooms in the municipality of Oviedo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Díaz, C; Blanco Fernández, N; Rodríguez Fidalgo, A; Tardón García, A; Cueto Espinar, A

    1998-01-01

    To ascertain the health and hygiene-related conditions of school lunchrooms within the municipality of Oviedo by means of conducting a health and hygiene inspection of these facilities. A descriptive epidemiological cross-sectional study was made of 24 schools in the municipality of Oviedo, 9 of which were government-subsidized private schools and another 15 of which were public schools, according to information from the Ministry of Education and Science. An inspection was conducted entailing a protocol based on the Public Lunchroom Health and Hygiene Regulations. The variables are the health and hygiene-related conditions of the premises (kitchens, lunchrooms and lavatories), of the utensils, the health of the employees and the conditions of the raw materials and foods. These conditions have been considered to be inadequate or deficient whenever they failed to met the criteria of the protocol in question. The deficiencies found n most of the school lunchrooms inspected were the lack of protection of the lighting components, of window screens to prevent the entry of insects and of soap dispensers which are not hand-operated, disposable paper towels and liquid soap both in kitchens as well as in lavatories. The variables entailed in this study have been compared among public schools and government-subsidized private schools, for which purpose a Student T Test was employed, significant differences having been found to exist between these two types of schools solely in the condition of the kitchens and in the total of the items. Most of the irregularities found in both the public schools and in the government-subsidized private schools are of an organizational nature and with regard to the facilities stemming from a lack of knowledge of the laws in force. It is deemed advantageous for training in Hygiene to be provided, given the positive attitude shown by those in charge of the schools in question.

  7. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for low back pain among professional cooks working in school lunch services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temmyo Yoshiomi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of self-reported low back pain among professional cooks was estimated to examine the effects of daily life conditions, job-related factors, and psychological factors on this disorder. Methods Data was collected using a mailed self-administered questionnaire. Results Of 7100 cooks, 5835 (82% replied to the questionnaire, including 1010 men and 4825 women. The mean age was 41.4 for men and 47.5 for women. The prevalence of low back pain during a 1-month period was 72.2% among men and 74.7% among women, with no significant differences between groups. By logistic regression analyses, factors significantly associated with the prevalence of low back pain in 1 month were female gender (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.32; 95% CI, 1.03–1.68, current smoking (PR 1.57; 95% CI, 1.24–1.98, and past smoking (PR 1.35; 95% CI, 1.01–1.79. As for job-related factors, the number of cooked lunches per person (PR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.05–1.56, breaks in the morning session (PR 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13–1.56, kitchen environment (PR 1.09; 95%, CI, 1.03–1.15, and height of cooking equipment (PR 1.13; 95% CI, 1.08–1.19 were associated with the prevalence of low back pain. As for psychological factors, job satisfaction (PR 1.22; 95% CI, 1.03–1.45, stress at work (PR 1.68; 95% CI, 1.42–1.99, financial constraints (PR 1.23; 95% CI, 1.03–1.47, health-related stress (PR 1.31; 95% CI, 1.08–1.59 and worries about the future (PR 1.24; 95% CI, 1.01–1.52 were similarly associated. Conclusion Daily life conditions, job-related factors, and psychological factors are associated with the occurrence of low back pain. It is important to take comprehensive preventive measures to address a range of work and life conditions that can be improved to decrease the incidence of low back pain for professional cooks.

  9. The potential contribution of yellow cassava to dietary nutrient adequacy of primary-school children in Eastern Kenya; the use of linear programming

    OpenAIRE

    Talsma, Elise F.; Borgonjen-van den Berg, Karin J.; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Mayer, Eva V.; Verhoef, Hans; Demir, Ayşe Y.; Ferguson, Elaine L.; Kok, Frans J.; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Introduction of biofortified cassava as school lunch can increase vitamin A intake, but may increase risk of other deficiencies due to poor nutrient profile of cassava. We assessed the potential effect of introducing a yellow cassava-based school lunch combined with additional food-based recommendations (FBR) on vitamin A and overall nutrient adequacy using Optifood (linear programming tool). Design: Cross-sectional study to assess dietary intakes (24 h recall) and derive model par...

  10. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-Based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program: The HEALTHY Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A.; El Ghormli, Laure; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multicomponent intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program…

  11. Barriers and Advantages to Student Participation in the School Breakfast Program Based on the Social Ecological Model: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Neyman, Stephanie M.; Warren, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in school meals is a preventive measure against childhood hunger. Participation in the School Breakfast Program (SBP) continues to lag behind that of the National School Lunch Program. The purpose of this literature review was to investigate the barriers and advantages to student participation in the SBP. Using the adaptable…

  12. Foods and Beverages Sold Outside the School Meals Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... schools had either a vending machine or a school store, canteen, or snack bar where students could purchase foods ... sugars from a vending machine or in a school store, canteen, or snack bar during lunch periods. 1 • 12. ...

  13. [Microbiological study of the meals served in school lunch rooms on the island of Tenerife, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Díaz, Julia; Rodríguez Alvarez, Cristobalina; Sierra López, Antonio; Arias Rodríguez, Angeles

    2003-01-01

    School lunchrooms and catered meals are of major importance from the Public Health standpoint. This study is aimed at evaluating the microbiological quality of the meals served in school lunchrooms for the purpose of ascertaining whether it is suitable or, to the contrary, the intake thereof may involve a serious health problem for this high-risk group. A transversal descriptive epidemiological study. An analysis was conducted of a total of 898 food samples collected from the lunchrooms at 101 schools in Tenerife, selected by a stratified random probabillistic sampling procedure, fifty-eight of which were prepared at the school proper (direct management) and 43 involving meals served by a catering firm (prepared under contract). No disease-causing Salmonella spp. or Listeria monocytogenes bacteria were isolated from any of the samples. A total 79% of the foods studies showed counts for this parameter, (91%) in salads and (85%) in main courses. A total 15% of the samples analyzed tested positive for total Enterobacteriaceae. Escherichia coli was isolated in 24% of the salads, in 4% of the side dishes and in 1% of the main dishes. Staphylococcus aureus having in isolated in three foods. The highest counts were found for the total aerobic mesophyllic microorganisms. A total 8.24% of the samples analyzed exceeded one or more of the limits stipulated for the parameters studies. The microbiological quality of the meals served in these school lunchrooms is acceptable, although due to a certain percentage of the foods having exceeded the stipulated limits for microorganisms indicative of and revealing a lack of hygiene, and school-children being a high-risk group, a revision of the surveillance related to critical checkpoints will be necessary.

  14. 78 FR 39067 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... accompaniments such as butter, cream cheese, salad dressing, etc. Entr e items sold la carte must contain no more... advocacy organizations; health care organizations; industry and trade associations; farm and industry...

  15. 78 FR 65890 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Eliminating Applications Through...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... communities by providing nutritional balanced meals and helping children develop healthful eating habits early... percentage of identified students, who are students certified for free meals through means other than individual household applications (e.g., students directly certified through the Supplemental Nutrition...

  16. The Income Volatility See-Saw: Implications for School Lunch. ERS Report Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance

    2006-01-01

    Income volatility challenges the functioning of the safety net provided by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) food assistance programs for low-income families in time of need. Low-income families may be on a see-saw of income changes that make it difficult for program administrators to accurately target benefits and to define sensible…

  17. The Impact of Multiple Strategies to Encourage Fruit and Vegetable Consumption during School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Emily; Johnson, David C.; Leite-Bennett, Amy; Ding, Yingmei; Mehrotra, Komal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hennepin County partnered with schools to implement lunchroom strategies to encourage fruit and vegetable consumption. An in-depth evaluation measured changes in consumption following implementation of encouragement strategies including slicing apples and attractive labels. Methods: A pre-post prospective evaluation measured changes in…

  18. Many Eligible Children Don't Participate in School Nutrition Programs: Reauthorization Offers Opportunities to Improve. National Issue Brief Number 85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    This brief uses data from the 2013 Current Population Survey's Food Security Supplement to document levels of participation in two of the largest programs authorized by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010--the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program--by region and place type (rural, suburban, and city), to identify…

  19. The potential contribution of yellow cassava to dietary nutrient adequacy of primary-school children in Eastern Kenya; the use of linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talsma, Elise F; Borgonjen-van den Berg, Karin J; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Mayer, Eva V; Verhoef, Hans; Demir, Ayşe Y; Ferguson, Elaine L; Kok, Frans J; Brouwer, Inge D

    2018-02-01

    Introduction of biofortified cassava as school lunch can increase vitamin A intake, but may increase risk of other deficiencies due to poor nutrient profile of cassava. We assessed the potential effect of introducing a yellow cassava-based school lunch combined with additional food-based recommendations (FBR) on vitamin A and overall nutrient adequacy using Optifood (linear programming tool). Cross-sectional study to assess dietary intakes (24 h recall) and derive model parameters (list of foods consumed, median serving sizes, food and food (sub)group frequency distributions, food cost). Three scenarios were modelled, namely daily diet including: (i) no school lunch; (ii) standard 5d school lunch with maize/beans; and (iii) 5d school lunch with yellow cassava. Each scenario and scenario 3 with additional FBR were assessed on overall nutrient adequacy using recommended nutrient intakes (RNI). Eastern Kenya. Primary-school children (n 150) aged 7-9 years. Best food pattern of yellow cassava-based lunch scenario achieved 100 % RNI for six nutrients compared with no lunch (three nutrients) or standard lunch (five nutrients) scenario. FBR with yellow cassava and including small dried fish improved nutrient adequacy, but could not ensure adequate intake of fat (52 % of average requirement), riboflavin (50 % RNI), folate (59 % RNI) and vitamin A (49 % RNI). Introduction of yellow cassava-based school lunch complemented with FBR potentially improved vitamin A adequacy, but alternative interventions are needed to ensure dietary adequacy. Optifood is useful to assess potential contribution of a biofortified crop to nutrient adequacy and to develop additional FBR to address remaining nutrient gaps.

  20. HB 2578--Relating to the School Meals Program. Testimony, 79th Texas State Legislature (April 26, 2005)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagert, Celia

    2005-01-01

    The Center for Public Policy Priorities supports HB 2574. Why encourage school districts to offer free meals to all students? The link between adequate nutrition and improved academic performance creates a clear incentive for Texas to increase participation in the school breakfast and lunch programs, particularly among low-income children.…

  1. Identifying Sources of Children’s Consumption of Junk Food in Boston After-School Programs, April–May 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Kenney, Erica L; Austin, S. Bryn; Cradock, Angie L; Giles, Catherine M.; Lee, Rebekka M.; Kirsten K. Davison; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children’s dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received progra...

  2. Intergenerational Programs in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Jensen, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the prevalence, types, and perceived impact of intergenerational programs in schools. Programs involving senior volunteers assisting children, or children participating in activities with older people were considered. Of the schools reached, 47% reported intergenerational programming. Thirty-three schools in the Tel-Aviv region participated in the study. Data were collected from 85 seniors, 26 teachers, and 20 coordinators. Assessments included program characteristics, program preparation, and perceived benefits and difficulties. Both programs were reported to have beneficial effects for seniors and to benefit children in the academic, social, and emotional domains. However, programs appeared to attract different types of volunteers and different degrees of volunteer commitment. Findings suggest that there is a need to pay additional attention to both participants' specific requests and needs and to the allocation of resources to improve the design and implementation of intergenerational programs.

  3. Variation in school health policies and programs by demographic characteristics of US schools, 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Alexandra B; Brener, Nancy D; McManus, Tim

    2010-12-01

    To identify whether school health policies and programs vary by demographic characteristics of schools, using data from the School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) 2006. This study updates a similar study conducted with SHPPS 2000 data and assesses several additional policies and programs measured for the first time in SHPPS 2006. SHPPS 2006 assessed the status of 8 components of the coordinated school health model using a nationally representative sample of public, Catholic, and private schools at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Data were collected from school faculty and staff using computer-assisted personal interviews and then linked with extant data on school characteristics. Results from a series of regression analyses indicated that a number of school policies and programs varied by school type (public, Catholic, or private), urbanicity, school size, discretionary dollars per pupil, percentage of white students, percentage of students qualifying for free lunch funds, and, among high schools, percentage of college-bound students. Catholic and private schools, smaller schools, and those with low discretionary dollars per pupil did not have as many key school health policies and programs as did schools that were public, larger, and had higher discretionary dollars per pupil. However, no single type of school had all key components of a coordinated school health program in place. Although some categories of schools had fewer policies and programs in place, all had both strengths and weaknesses. Regardless of school characteristics, all schools have the potential to implement a quality school health program. © Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  4. The Impact of Food and Nutrient-Based Standards on Primary School Children’s Lunch and Total Dietary Intake: A Natural Experimental Evaluation of Government Policy in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Suzanne; Delve, Jennifer; Stamp, Elaine; Matthews, John N. S.; White, Martin; Adamson, Ashley J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the nutritional content of children’s school lunches in England was widely criticised, leading to a major policy change in 2006. Food and nutrient-based standards were reintroduced requiring primary schools to comply by September 2008. We aimed to determine the effect of the policy on the nutritional content at lunchtime and in children’s total diet. We undertook a natural experimental evaluation, analysing data from cross-sectional surveys in 12 primary schools in North East England, pre and post policy. Dietary data were collected on four consecutive days from children aged 4–7 years (n = 385 in 2003–4; n = 632 in 2008–9). We used linear mixed effect models to analyse the effects of gender, year, and lunch type on children’s mean total daily intake. Both pre- and post-implementation, children who ate a school lunch consumed less sodium (mean change −128 mg, 95% CI: −183 to −73 mg) in their total diet than children eating home-packed lunches. Post-implementation, children eating school lunches consumed a lower % energy from fat (−1.8%, −2.8 to −0.9) and saturated fat (−1.0%; −1.6 to −0.5) than children eating packed lunches. Children eating school lunches post implementation consumed significantly more carbohydrate (16.4 g, 5.3 to 27.6), protein (3.6 g, 1.1 to 6.0), non-starch polysaccharides (1.5 g, 0.5 to 1.9), vitamin C (0.7 mg, 0.6 to 0.8), and folate (12.3 µg, 9.7 to 20.4) in their total diet than children eating packed lunches. Implementation of school food policy standards was associated with significant improvements in the nutritional content of school lunches; this was reflected in children’s total diet. School food- and nutrient-based standards can play an important role in promoting dietary health and may contribute to tackling childhood obesity. Similar policy measures should be considered for other environments influencing children’s diet. PMID:24205190

  5. Grab a Cup, Fill It Up! An Intervention to Promote the Convenience of Drinking Water and Increase Student Water Consumption During School Lunch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Gortmaker, Steven L; Carter, Jill E; Howe, M Caitlin W; Reiner, Jennifer F; Cradock, Angie L

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated a low-cost strategy for schools to improve the convenience and appeal of drinking water. We conducted a group-randomized, controlled trial in 10 Boston, Massachusetts, schools in April through June 2013 to test a cafeteria-based intervention. Signage promoting water and disposable cups were installed near water sources. Mixed linear regression models adjusting for clustering evaluated the intervention impact on average student water consumption over 359 lunch periods. The percentage of students in intervention schools observed drinking water during lunch nearly doubled from baseline to follow-up compared with controls (+ 9.4%; P < .001). The intervention was associated with a 0.58-ounce increase in water intake across all students (P < .001). Without cups, children were observed drinking 2.4 (SE = 0.08) ounces of water from fountains; with cups, 5.2 (SE = 0.2) ounces. The percentage of intervention students observed with sugar-sweetened beverages declined (-3.3%; P < .005). The current default of providing water through drinking fountains in cafeterias results in low water consumption. This study shows that an inexpensive intervention to improve drinking water's convenience by providing cups can increase student water consumption.

  6. Breaking with Tradition: Can a Public School District Take Such a Step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    An Arkansas school district increased student participation in the school lunch program by using top quality food, a large variety of menu items, and a dedicated staff. The district pulled all its secondary schools from the federal lunch program; however, any student could eat free by assisting in the cafeteria for at least 20 minutes. (MLF)

  7. Occurrence of selected perfluorinated alkyl acids in lunch meals served at school canteens in Italy and their relevance for children's intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellatte, Elena; Brambilla, Gianfranco; De Filippis, Stefania Paola; di Domenico, Alessandro; Pulkrabova, Jana; Eschauzier, Christian; Klenow, Stefanie; Heinemeyer, Gerhard; de Voogt, Pim

    2013-01-01

    Ready-to-eat servings may be more contaminated with perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) than the corresponding unprocessed foods due to the presence of PFAAs in and transfer from food contact materials (FCM) and cookware. Therefore, the presence of selected PFAAs in meals served weekly at lunch time in six Italian school canteens was assessed. Five towns were selected representing different areas with local water and food supply. Daily lunch menus were sampled and pooled to form a composite. Analyses were carried out on the weekly composite from each canteen. UPLC-MS/MS quantification limits were in the 6.0-12 pg g⁻¹ range for the selected PFAAs (PFHxA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA, PFHxS, branched and non-branched PFOS). Non-branched PFOS was quantified in four out of six composites, with levels ranging from 14 to 25 pg g⁻¹, while PFOA and PFDA were determined in two out of six in the range 6.5-8.2 pg g⁻¹. Theoretical estimates and analytical results in the same order of magnitude indicate a negligible contribution from food processing and serving to meal contamination. When composite analytical data are transposed into dietary estimates, it is shown that Italian school-age children have intakes in the range of 0.3-1.1 and 0.5-1.4 ng kg⁻¹ bw day⁻¹ for PFOA and PFOS respectively, well below the corresponding tolerable daily intakes (TDIs).

  8. The Influence of Physical and Social Contexts of Eating on Lunch-Time Food Intake among Southern Ontario, Canada, Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Sarah J.; Hanning, Rhona M.; McGoldrick, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Among students, little is known about the physical and social context of eating lunch. The objective of this study was to determine if food intake (including the type of food and beverages and portion sizes) was associated with specific aspects of the physical and social lunch environment (location, with whom lunch was consumed, who…

  9. Evaluation of Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children: comparing reported fruit, juice and vegetable intakes with plasma carotenoid concentration and school lunch observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Bysted, Anette; Trolle, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    their diet, the children's school lunch was photographed and weighed before and after eating. In the week after the diet reporting, fasting blood samples were taken. Self-reported intake of FJV and estimated intake of carotenoids were compared with plasma carotenoid concentration. Accuracy of self......Web-based Dietary Assessment Software for Children (WebDASC) was developed to estimate dietary intake in a school meal intervention study among 8- to 11-year-old Danish children. The present study validates self-reported fruit, juice and vegetable (FJV) intakes in 8- to 11-year-old children...... by comparing intake with plasma carotenoid concentration, and by comparing the reported FJV intake to actually eaten FJV, as observed by a photographic method. A total of eighty-one children, assisted by parents, reported their diet for seven consecutive days. For the same five schooldays as they reported...

  10. School Breakfast Program and School Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Alan; And Others

    Children who participate in the School Breakfast Program show significant improvement in academic performance and tardiness rates, and a trend toward improvement in absenteeism. The School Breakfast Program was created by Congress in 1966 to provide a breakfast on school days for low income children who would otherwise have none. Children…

  11. Plate waste and intake of school lunch based on the New Nordic Diet and on packed lunches: A randomised controlled trial in 8- to 11-year-old Danish children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Anne Vibeke; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford

    2015-01-01

    for the NND period and 43 (sd 60) g for the packed lunch period whereas the relative edible plate waste was no different between periods for meals having waste (n 1050). Edible plate waste differed between menus (P vegetarian days (23 %) compared...

  12. School Breakfast Program and School Performance

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1989-01-01

    The effects of participation in the school breakfast program by low income children on academic achievement and rates of absence and tardiness are reported from the Department of Pediatrics, Boston City Hospital, Boston, MA.

  13. School Health and Nutrition Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Yabanci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Schools play an effective role for adopt and maintain healthy eating and physical activity behaviors in children and adolescents. Schools are an important part of national efforts to prevent chronic diseases such as childhood obesity, coronary heart diseases, diabetes and cancer. Nutrition programs in schools can help children and adolescents participate in full educational potential; improve academic performance and health quality. To ensure a healthy future for our children, school-based nutrition education programs must become a national priority. Governments, community leaders, doctors, dieteticians, nurses, teachers, and parents must commit to implementing and sustaining nutrition education programs within the schools. School health and nutrition programs which part of public health and education are summarized in this review. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(3.000: 361-368

  14. Efforts to Improve School Lunch Programs--Are They Paying Off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-09

    but most districts do not serve these whole- grain products. Fulton County, which consistently served whole-grain breads and pasta in its conventional...several entrees each day, making a weekly average undeterminable. Consequently, instead of a 5-day composite sample, we had each fast-food entree analyzed...of our body tissues and is particularly important in the formation of brain and nervous system tissues. Generally, the body manufactures enough

  15. 78 FR 12221 - National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... This Rulemaking Section 104 of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-265... implemented through USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) Memorandum SP 32-2011, Child Nutrition... proposed rule. Of these, 4 were from nutrition, health, or child advocacy organizations at the national...

  16. Methods Document for the CDC and Bridging the Gap Local School Wellness Policy Briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 and, more recently, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 required all school districts participating in the federal Child Nutrition Programs (e.g., National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, Special Milk Program, Afterschool Snack Program) to adopt and implement a local…

  17. 10 Healthy Breakfast and Lunch Tips | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Back to School, the Healthy Way 10 Healthy Breakfast and Lunch Tips Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents School children eating a healthy lunch. ...

  18. Occurrence of selected perfluorinated alkyl acids in lunch meals served at school canteens in Italy and their relevance for children’s intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellatte, E.; Brambilla, G.; De Filippis, S.P.; Di Domenico, A.; Pulkrabova, J.; Eschauzier, C.; Klenow, S.; Heinemeyer, G.; de Voogt, P.

    2013-01-01

    Ready-to-eat servings may be more contaminated with perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) than the corresponding unprocessed foods due to the presence of PFAAs in and transfer from food contact materials (FCM) and cookware. Therefore, the presence of selected PFAAs in meals served weekly at lunch time

  19. School Programming for the Prevention of Addictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Marilyn A.

    1992-01-01

    Defines "addiction" and discusses models of addiction. Discusses implications for school prevention programs. Discusses role of school counselor in implementation of a comprehensive addiction prevention program, including assessment, curricular components, intervention programs, and staff development. Presents questions and criteria to…

  20. Wake Up to School Breakfast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Nationally, only 49 percent of schools offering federally subsidized lunches take part in the breakfast program. Research indicates a connection between breakfast and learning. For many children, eating breakfast at home is not an option. Lists some of the unfounded concerns about breakfast programs that school officials raise, and provides…

  1. Dietary analysis of randomly selected meals from the Child Hunger and Education Program School Nutrition Program in Saskatchewan, Canada, suggests that nutrient target levels are being provided.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gougeon, Laura A R; Henry, Carol J; Ramdath, Dan; Whiting, Susan J

    2011-03-01

    In Canada, school meals are regarded as important for social, educational, and nutritional reasons and have been provided for several years because of concerns about the health and welfare of children, especially those from low-income households. They are generally offered as local community organization and individual schools, are not regulated by law, and have no set national nutrition standards. The Canadian scientific literature lacks quantitative information on the nutritional adequacy of school meals. Better and more evaluation of such programs would encourage and guide administrators to assess other local programs in a similar fashion. Here, we describe the dietary assessment process of 1 school meal program in Canada and the nutritional adequacy of the meals. Throughout 10 years (1997-2007), the contents of 159 lunches and 90 breakfasts were collected mainly from elementary schools participating in the Child Hunger and Education Program Good Food, Inc's school nutrition program initiative in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. We collected, weighed, and analyzed food samples from meals served to children at participating schools. We then compared their nutrient content against standards based on the Dietary Recommended Intakes for children aged 4 to 8 and 9 to 13 years using one third of the recommendations as the standard for lunches and one fourth for breakfasts. Overall, both meals had a good nutrient profile and met the standards for most analyzed macronutrients and micronutrients throughout the years. Although energy was persistently low, vitamin and mineral contents were often above the standards, reflecting a tendency to offer nutrient-dense foods in lieu of energy-dense foods. The rigorous methodology described in this manuscript can be followed to assess other small local programs. Furthermore, the dietary assessment presented can encourage not only the implementation of school meal programs in other locations but also the assessment of already

  2. A School Discovers the Gustatory Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechman, Jurgen

    1987-01-01

    Gives a brief report on an experimental program that provided good tasting nutritious food to students during school breaks as an alternative to cafeteria school lunches. Describes program planning, how and where the food supplies were purchased, and how the program gained general acceptance. Includes a sample menu. (AEM)

  3. ATLAS Christmas lunch

    CERN Multimedia

    Francois Butin; Markus Nordberg

    The end of the year ATLAS pit lunch is now a well established tradition: the 4th edition took place in the most prestigious place at CERN; the "Globe de l'innovation", or simply "the Globe". This end-of-year event is the opportunity to thank all those working so hard at Point 1. The first event took place in December 2003. At that time, there was no Globe yet, and the party took place in SX1 building, at the top of the shafts leading to the ATLAS cavern, with some 100 guests. In December 2004, we had the privilege to be the first to organize a lunch in the Globe with some 200 guests. Since then, many have followed our example! Well, almost: we were requested to refrain from serving "Tartiflette" again in there (a Savoyard specialty, using vast amounts of Reblochon, a smelly cheese...). It was said to have left a poignant odour for following events throughout 2004... Long queues formed for this special event. In December 2005, we were authorized to party in the Globe again (once we promised we would b...

  4. Maintenance of effects of the eat smart school food service program: results from the CATCH-ON study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osganian, Stavroula K; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Zive, Michelle; Mitchell, Paul D; Snyder, Patricia; Webber, Larry S

    2003-08-01

    The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) Eat Smart Program targeted the food service of the 56 CATCH intervention elementary schools to effect positive changes in the total fat and saturated fat content of school lunch. Maintenance of the food service intervention in former intervention (n = 56) and control (n = 20) schools was evaluated 5 years postintervention. After 5 years of follow-up and no further intervention, the former CATCH intervention schools not only maintained prior levels but also had further decreases in the mean percentage of calories from total and saturated fat to 31% and 10.4%, respectively. Significant decreases in these nutrients were also observed in the former CATCH control schools; however, the former intervention schools more closely approached the Eat Smart goal for total fat Overall, sodium levels rose in both school conditions and did not differ significantly at follow-up.

  5. A Study of School Feeding Programs: I. Economic Eligibility and Nutritional Need

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Lillian; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Family income and size are presently used to determine children's eligibility for free school lunches. The need exists for the development of other criteria (such as nutritional data) to include all children whose diets need improving. (DM)

  6. Having lunch at a staff canteen is associated with recommended food habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Eva; Sarlio-Lähteenkorva, Sirpa; Lallukka, Tea

    2004-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of employees having lunch at staff canteens and to examine the association between workplace lunch and recommended food habits. A mailed questionnaire including data on lunch pattern, food habits, sociodemographic background, work-related factors and body weight. Logistic regression models including food habits as dependent variables and lunch pattern, sociodemographic factors, work-related factors and body mass index as independent variables. Helsinki Health Study survey data, collected in spring 2001. Employees from the City of Helsinki reaching 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 years. The data included 2474 women and 591 men; the response rate was 68%. About half of those with a staff canteen at work had lunch there. Those with higher educational level were more likely to have lunch at the staff canteen, as also were women with pre-school children and normal-weight men. Those having lunch at staff canteens were more likely to follow recommended food habits, compared with other subjects. Having lunch at the staff canteen seemed to increase the consumption frequency of vegetables and fish. Having lunch at staff canteens is associated with the quality of the diet. To serve a cooked meal including vegetables during working time may be an efficient way to improve diet among adult employees. More emphasis should be put on increasing the possibility for employees to have lunch at staff canteens.

  7. Role of Child Nutrition Programs in Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M. Josephine

    The role of health educators in integrating child nutrition programs into school health education is discussed and issues attending such programs are considered. The importance of breakfast and lunch programs in the school is stressed with particular emphasis on using these programs to instruct children in sound nutritional practices. It is…

  8. 75 FR 9777 - Magnet Schools Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... race problematic. The Seattle school district used ``white'' and ``nonwhite'' and the Louisville school... CFR Part 280 RIN 1855-AA07 Magnet Schools Assistance Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and... amends the regulations governing the Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) to provide greater...

  9. The Prenatal Care at School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Carol H.; Nasso, Jacqueline T.; Swider, Susan; Ellison, Brenda R.; Griswold, Daniel L.; Brooks, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    School absenteeism and poor compliance with prenatal appointments are concerns for pregnant teens. The Prenatal Care at School (PAS) program is a new model of prenatal care involving local health care providers and school personnel to reduce the need for students to leave school for prenatal care. The program combines prenatal care and education…

  10. Local School Wellness Policies: Where Do They Stand and What Can You Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Local school wellness policies (i.e., wellness policies) provide an opportunity to create and support a healthy school environment, promote student health, and reduce childhood obesity. Because they are required for all school districts participating in the federal Child Nutrition Programs including the National School Lunch Program and the School…

  11. Criteria for Modern School Library Media Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Library Development and Services.

    These guidelines and recommendations for library programs and resources focus on goals, programs, and services for state, district, and individual school levels. The Division of Library Development and Services in the State Department of Education develops all public and school library media programs, while the Office of School Media Services, a…

  12. Identifying sources of children's consumption of junk food in Boston after-school programs, April-May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Austin, S Bryn; Cradock, Angie L; Giles, Catherine M; Lee, Rebekka M; Davison, Kirsten K; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2014-11-20

    Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children's dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received program-provided snacks during after-school time. Our study objective was to determine how different sources of snacks affect children's snack consumption in after-school settings. We recorded snacks served to and brought in by 298 children in 18 after-school programs in Boston, Massachusetts, on 5 program days in April and May 2011. We measured children's snack consumption on 2 program days using a validated observation protocol. We then calculated within-child change-in-change models to estimate the effect of nonprogram snacks on children's dietary intake after school. Nonprogram snacks contained more sugary beverages and candy than program-provided snacks. Having a nonprogram snack was associated with significantly higher consumption of total calories (+114.7 kcal, P foods with added sugars (+0.5 servings; P foods and nearly twice as many calories than on days when they consumed only program-provided snacks. Policy strategies limiting nonprogram snacks or setting nutritional standards for them in after-school settings should be explored further as a way to promote child health.

  13. Heart smart: a multifaceted cardiovascular risk reduction program for grade school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, S M; Johnson, C C; Little-Christian, S; Nicklas, T A; Harsha, D; Arbeit, M L; Webber, L S; Berenson, G S

    1990-05-01

    Abstract Heart Smart Program is a health education intervention for grades kindergarten through six which encourages the acquisition and maintenance of health-enhancing behaviors. These include nutritious eating habits; physical fitness and exercise; saying "no" to cigarette smoking, alcohol, and drugs; and control of stress. Social Cognitive Theory is used to derive the necessary training concepts for children with reinforcement of these concepts occurring in six areas: the curriculum, school lunch, staff development, physical activity, environment, and parental support. The necessary training mechanisms provide mastery experiences, knowledge transfer, role modeling, and emotional and physiological feedback. The program incorporates the influence of the social environment on learning and builds support from parents, teachers and school staff.

  14. SEL-Focused After-School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Noelle; Deutsch, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    After-school programs offer young people opportunities for self-expression, exploring their talents, and forming relationships with supportive adults. That is, after-school programs promote young people's social and emotional learning (SEL) skills--whether the programs use that term or not. Despite these programs' potential, Noelle Hurd and Nancy…

  15. 76 FR 66849 - Applying for Free and Reduced Price Meals in the National School Lunch Program and School...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... language. Application packets were translated into those languages, reviewed by internal and external... McLaughlin Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) reading level tests. FNS conducted focus groups with... information on the primary languages spoken in student households through the Home Language Survey. FNS will...

  16. Lunch is in the Bag: Increasing Fruits, Vegetables and Whole Grains in Sack Lunches of Preschool-age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweitzer, Sara J; Briley, Margaret E.; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Harrist, Ronald B.; Staskel, Deanna M.; Almansour, Fawaz D.

    2010-01-01

    Fruits, vegetables and whole grains are important sources of nutrients for healthy growth and development of young children. Recent evidence suggests that sack lunches packed by parents for children to consume at childcare centers do not regularly meet the goal of one serving of fruit, vegetables and whole grains. Lunch is in the Bag is a childcare center-based nutrition education program targeted to parents of preschool-age children to increase the number of servings of fruits, vegetables and whole grains in sack lunches sent from home that was pilot tested in fall of 2008. In a quasi-experimental design, six childcare centers were paired by size before being randomly assigned to intervention (n=3) and comparison (n=3) groups. The parents of caregivers with primary responsibility for preparing the sack lunches of the three to five year old children attending the centers were enrolled as parent-child dyads. The intervention included parent handouts, classroom activities, educational stations and teacher training. The contents of the lunch sacks for both the intervention group and comparison group were recorded for three non-consecutive days before and immediately after the intervention period to measure the number of servings of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. A total of 132 parent-child dyads completed the study, 81 in the intervention group and 51 in the comparison group. Direct observation of children’s lunches from the intervention group showed an increase in predicted mean number of servings of vegetables, from 0.41 to 0.65 (P < 0.001) and whole grains, from 0.54 to 1.06 (P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the mean number of servings of fruit. Lunch is in the Bag which is designed to fit in the childcare environment and targets parents of three to five year old children is a feasible intervention for improving the nutritional quality of sack lunches. PMID:20630163

  17. No free lunch

    KAUST Repository

    Ture, Ferhan

    2011-01-01

    This work explores the problem of cross-lingual pairwise similarity, where the task is to extract similar pairs of documents across two different languages. Solutions to this problem are of general interest for text mining in the multilingual context and have specific applications in statistical machine translation. Our approach takes advantage of cross-language information retrieval (CLIR) techniques to project feature vectors from one language into another, and then uses locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) to extract similar pairs. We show that effective cross-lingual pairwise similarity requires working with similarity thresholds that are much lower than in typical monolingual applications, making the problem quite challenging. We present a parallel, scalable MapReduce implementation of the sort-based sliding window algorithm, which is compared to a brute-force approach on German and English Wikipedia collections. Our central finding can be summarized as "no free lunch": there is no single optimal solution. Instead, we characterize effectiveness-efficiency tradeoffs in the solution space, which can guide the developer to locate a desirable operating point based on application- and resource-specific constraints.

  18. School lunch menus and 11 to 12 year old children's food choice in three secondary schools in England-are the nutritional standards being met?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Rebecca; Russell, Jean; Barker, Margo E

    2006-01-01

    To determine if the lunchtime food provided to schoolchildren adheres to nutritional standards and to examine the influence of children's food choice on nutrient intake at lunchtime. Seventy-four children aged 11-12 years were recruited from three secondary schools. The school populations spanned a spectrum of socio-economic deprivation. Lunchtime food and nutrient intake was assessed over a 5 day period. Cross-sectional study of menu composition and children's food choice in relation to nutrient intake. Dietary recording was by an indirect weighing method of menu composition and nutrient intake over a 5 day period. Statistical analysis was carried out using general linear modelling techniques including: t-test, one-way ANOVA and ANCOVA. One school met the standards on food group provision. Intakes of total fat, saturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids were greater in boys. Intake of folate was greater in girls. There were between-school differences (independent of gender) for intake of fatty acids, starch, calcium and folate, with socio-economic deprivation associated with a lesser nutrient intake. Children could have chosen meals higher in calcium, iron, folate and zinc and lower in starch and fat, from the extensive cafeteria menu of between 26 and 42 food. For some nutrients, providing 'healthier' food influences intake of those nutrients whilst for other nutrients, children's food choice predominates. The majority of children did not meet the recommended targets for lunchtime nutrient intake, especially for micronutrients. Food provision in two out of three schools did not meet government guidelines and socio-economic deprivation was associated with worse food provision. Children from deprived areas were more likely to choose those foods of limited nutritional value than those from more privileged backgrounds. The statutory nutritional standards on their own, without a pricing policy to encourage healthier food choice or restrictions in food

  19. The Maryland Youth Suicide Prevention School Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    The Maryland State Department of Education developed this framework for a suicide prevention program. The program framework addresses the following goals: (1) increase awareness among school personnel and community awareness among school personnel and community leaders of the incidence of teenage suicide; (2) train school personnel in individual…

  20. Rx for a Healthy School Nutrition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettger, Julie

    2009-01-01

    School nutrition directors face challenges on many fronts, from changing nutrition standards to addressing community interest in sustainability and local food sourcing. Programs are constantly changing to meet these new demands. How does a school business administrator know which changes will affect his/her school nutrition program positively? The…

  1. Declassified: Struggle for Existence (We Used to Eat Lunch Together)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The play, "Declassified: Struggle for Existence (We Used to Eat Lunch Together)," is based on the classic play "Antigone" and was written as part of a college-credit elective the author teaches at Queensborough Community College, geared toward local area high school students. The students were one day away from the scheduled…

  2. Association Between State Laws Governing School Meal Nutrition Content and Student Weight Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Daniel R.; Chriqui, Jamie F.; Powell, Lisa; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Importance This study assessed whether stronger school meal nutrition standards may improve student weight status. Results have immediate implications because of the ongoing implementation of new nutrition standards for the National School Lunch Program. Objective To determine if state laws with stricter school meal nutrition standards are inversely associated with adolescent weight status, while controlling for unmeasured state-level confounders. Design Quasi-experiment. Setting Public schools. Participants Four thousand eight hundred seventy eighth-grade students in 40 states. Students were categorized by type of school lunch they usually obtained (free/reduced price, regular price, or none). Interventions State laws governing school meal nutrition standards. States with standards that exceeded US Department of Agriculture (USDA) school meal standards were compared with states that did not exceed USDA standards. The parameter of interest was the interaction between state laws and student lunch participant status, ie, whether disparities in weight status between school lunch participants and nonparticipants were smaller in states with stricter standards. Main Outcome Measures Body mass index percentile and obesity status. Results In states that exceeded USDA standards, the difference in obesity prevalence between students who obtained free/reduced-price lunches and students who did not obtain school lunches was 12.3 percentage points smaller (95% CI, −21.5 to −3.0) compared with states that did not exceed USDA standards. Likewise, differences in mean body mass index percentile between those student populations were 11 units smaller in states that exceeded USDA standards (95% CI, −17.7 to −4.3). There was little evidence that students compensated for school meal laws by purchasing more sweets, salty snacks, or sugar-sweetened beverages from other school venues (eg, vending machines) or other sources (eg, fast food). Conclusions and Relevance Stringent

  3. Heart Smart: a school health program meeting the 1990 Objectives for the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, A H; Frank, G C; Harsha, D W; Serpas, D C; Little, S D; Nicklas, T A; Hunter, S M; Berenson, G S

    1988-01-01

    The importance of health promotion is recognized throughout the nation. The Surgeon General's report of 1980, Promoting Health/Preventing Disease, delineates objectives for intervention in 15 health priority areas. Approximately one-third of the objectives relate directly to the health of children, and many are addressed by a comprehensive cardiovascular (CV) health promotion program for elementary school children--Heart Smart. Priority areas addressed by this program are high blood pressure control, nutrition, fluoridation and dental health, smoking, misuse of alcohol and drugs, physical fitness and exercise, and control of stress and violence. Heart Smart is a cognitive behavioral intervention designed to address health enabling and reinforcing factors within the school environment. It is based on data from the Bogalusa Heart Study which clearly document the need for CV health intervention beginning early in life. Heart Smart includes a longitudinal classroom curriculum, an aerobic fitness program taught within physical education classes, a school lunch program offering CV healthy foods, and a teacher staff development program. The goal is to reduce CV risk factors in children. With health-enhancing behavior change of the students, family, and elementary school staff, objectives for CV risk reduction in our nation can be achieved.

  4. Outcomes of a National Environmental Edutainment Program in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present results of the first longitudinal evaluation of a nation-wide environmental edutainment program. There has recently been rapid growth in curricula on the environment and climate change, yet few reach large and diverse audiences, and fewer still are evaluated. These results are from high schools participating in the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) program. ACE is a 3 year-old program that has reached 1.2 million students with an edutainment presentation incorporating music, multi-media, animation, and documentary footage (www.acespace.org). A projected 850 schools across 23 states will see the presentation this year; 6% of schools (3 classes each) are randomly selected to be evaluated. The data described here were collected in Fall 2011 from 1,270 students in 21 schools; the full evaluation will be complete in May 2012. The sample is ethnically and socio-economically diverse — 29% are white, and 46% receive free/reduced lunches (a proxy for socio-economic status). Outcome measures included a test of climate knowledge and intentions to take (and to ask others to take) climate-related actions. The analyses examined direct effects of the ACE program on climate knowledge and intentions, as well as the moderating effects of student gender and age on learning. Before the ACE presentation, boys had significantly higher knowledge scores than girls (54% vs. 48% correct, respectively, p scores (64% and 63% correct, respectively) and no longer differed from each other in this respect. Before the presentation, girls expressed significantly greater intentions to take climate-related actions than did boys. Afterward, intentions increased significantly in both groups, but the gap between girls and boys remained. The gap-closing pattern was somewhat different for the moderating variable of age. Before the presentation, knowledge and intentions were significantly higher among older students (11th- and 12th-graders) than among younger students (9th- and 10th

  5. Factors Associated with School Meal Participation and the Relationship between Different Participation Measures. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Quinn; Hulsey, Lara; Ponza, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This report investigates three important aspects of National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) participation using recently collected data on a large, nationally representative sample of students certified for free and reduced-price meals during the 2005-2006 school year. First, we examine the factors that influence…

  6. Childhood Obesity and Schools: Evidence from the National Survey of Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Hooker, Neal H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The international prevalence of childhood obesity and obesity-related diseases has received increasing attention. Applying data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we explore relationships between childhood obesity and school type, National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) eligibility,…

  7. Proposed Rule: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School. Legislative Brief 13-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of State Boards of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFK) requires the Secretary of Agriculture to establish standards for foods sold in schools other than those provided as part of the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. According to the HHFK, these standards are to be consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the…

  8. High School Harvest: Combining Food Service Training and Institutional Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, David; Estrin, Hans; Becot, Florence

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses High School Harvest (HSH), an Extension educator-led project in five Vermont schools to provide students with job training and food system education and to provide lightly processed produce to school lunch programs. One hundred and twenty-one students participated, logging 8,752 hours growing, harvesting, and processing…

  9. Directory of Postsecondary Schools with Occupational Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Evelyn R.

    This directory of schools which provide occupational training lists public and private schools which offer programs in preparation for a specific career. The types of listings include schools classified as vocational/technical, business/commercial, cosmetology/barber, flight, arts/design, hospital, and allied health; technical institutes,…

  10. Teachers' Perceptions of the School Breakfast Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragno, Mary B.

    Noting that there is a relationship between hunger and the ability to learn, this study examines teacher opinions of the impact of a school breakfast program on student success. A survey, focusing on grades 1 through 3, was completed by 188 elementary teachers in 100 Connecticut schools in which breakfast programs had been implemented. Respondents…

  11. The potential contribution of yellow cassava to dietary nutrient adequacy of primary-school children in Eastern Kenya; the use of linear programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, Elise F.; Borgonjen-van den Berg, Karin J.; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Mayer, Eva V.; Verhoef, Hans; Demir, Ayşe Y.; Ferguson, Elaine L.; Kok, Frans J.; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Introduction of biofortified cassava as school lunch can increase vitamin A intake, but may increase risk of other deficiencies due to poor nutrient profile of cassava. We assessed the potential effect of introducing a yellow cassava-based school lunch combined with additional

  12. 77 FR 44595 - Application for New Awards; Charter Schools Program (CSP)-Charter School Exemplary Collaboration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... disabilities, English learners, student transportation, professional development and training, and school... Application for New Awards; Charter Schools Program (CSP)-- Charter School Exemplary Collaboration Awards... Information Charter Schools Program (CSP)--Charter School Exemplary Collaboration Awards Notice inviting...

  13. Effect of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program on Cafeterias and on Manager and Staff Member Knowledge and Practice, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari-Thapa, Janani; Bennett, Ashley; Keong, Farrah; Palmer, Wendy; Hardy, Trisha; Welsh, Jean

    The goal of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program is to promote healthy eating in school cafeterias in Georgia by training school nutrition managers and staff members to implement changes in the cafeteria to nudge children to make healthier choices. The objective of our study was to evaluate program effect on (1) school nutrition manager and staff member knowledge of evidence-based strategies and their self-efficacy to make positive changes, (2) the school cafeteria environment, and (3) National School Lunch Program participation. We assessed changes in participant knowledge, beliefs, and self-efficacy by administering a survey before and after training (February-July 2015); a follow-up survey (3 school months posttraining) assessed changes in the cafeteria. A total of 842 school nutrition managers and staff members were trained and completed pre- and posttraining surveys; 325 managers completed the follow-up survey. We used cafeteria records from a subsample of the first schools trained (40 intervention and 40 control) to assess National School Lunch Program participation. From pretraining to posttraining, we found a significant increase in manager and staff member (n = 842) knowledge of strategies for enhancing taste perception through the use of creative menu item names (from 78% to 95%, P cafeteria environment (from 91% to 96%, P 2 locations, P cafeteria managers and staff members in Smarter Lunchrooms Movement techniques may be an effective way to make changes in the school cafeteria environment to encourage healthier choices among students. Additional studies allowing time for more complex changes to be implemented are needed to assess the full effect of the program.

  14. ABC's for Parents. A Guide to NYC Schools = ABC para los Padres. Guia de las escuelas de NYC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Parents Association of New York City, Inc., NY.

    Parents of children in public elementary schools in New York City are given basic information about school policies and practices in this English/Spanish guide. Topics covered include: (1) ancillary school services such as transportation, breakfast and lunch programs, and school health services; (2) Board of Education policy on homework, tests,…

  15. School food environments and policies in US public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Daniel M; Hill, Elaine L; Whitaker, Robert C

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe school food environments and policies in US public schools and how they vary according to school characteristics. We analyzed cross-sectional data from the third School Nutrition and Dietary Assessment study by using a nationally representative sample of 395 US public schools in 129 school districts in 38 states. These 2005 data included school reports of foods and beverages offered in the National School Lunch Program and on-site observations, in a subsample of schools, of competitive foods and beverages (those sold in vending machines and a la carte and that are not part of the National School Lunch Program). Seventeen factors were used to characterize school lunches, competitive foods, and other food-related policies and practices. These factors were used to compute the food environment summary score (0 [least healthy] to 17 [most healthy]) of each school. There were vending machines in 17%, 82%, and 97% of elementary, middle, and high schools, respectively, and a la carte items were sold in 71%, 92%, and 93% of schools, respectively. Among secondary schools with vending and a la carte sales, these sources were free of low-nutrient energy-dense foods or beverages in 15% and 21% of middle and high schools, respectively. The food environment summary score was significantly higher (healthier) in the lower grade levels. The summary score was not associated with the percentage of students that was certified for free or reduced-price lunches or the percentage of students that was a racial/ethnic minority. As children move to higher grade levels, their school food environments become less healthy. The great majority of US secondary schools sell items a la carte in the cafeteria and through vending machines, and these 2 sources often contain low-nutrient, energy-dense foods and beverages, commonly referred to as junk food.

  16. A Chance to Do It Right: Assessing the Impact on Participants of a State-Wide Nutrition Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Trudy; Cunningham, Jo Lynn

    Pursuant to the provisions of the National School Lunch Act and Nutrition Amendments of 1977, Tennessee instituted a statewide nutrition education program aimed at educators, school food service personnel, and children in schools and child care institutions. Establishment of an evaluation team early in the program development process proved…

  17. Evaluating the impact of a Connecticut program to reduce availability of unhealthy competitive food in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Michael W; Henderson, Kathryn E; Schwartz, Marlene B

    2010-10-01

    This article seeks to inform state and local school food policies by evaluating the impact of Connecticut's Healthy Food Certification (HFC), a program which provides monetary incentives to school districts that choose to implement state nutrition standards for all foods sold to students outside reimbursable school meals. Food service directors from all school districts participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) (N = 151) in Connecticut were surveyed about the availability of competitive foods before and after the 2006-2007 implementation of HFC. Food categories were coded as healthy or unhealthy based on whether they met the Connecticut Nutrition Standards. Data on NSLP participation were provided by the State Department of Education. Changes in NSLP participation and availability of unhealthy competitive foods in elementary, middle, and high schools were compared pre- and post-HFC across districts participating (n = 74) versus not participating (n = 77) in HFC. On average, all districts in Connecticut reduced the availability of unhealthy competitive foods, with a significantly greater reduction among HFC districts. Average NSLP participation also increased across the state. Participating in HFC was associated with significantly greater NSLP participation for paid meals in middle school; however, implementing HFC did not increase overall NSLP participation beyond the statewide upward trend. The 2006-2007 school year was marked by a significant decrease in unhealthy competitive foods and an increase in NSLP participation across the state. Participation in Connecticut's voluntary HFC further reduced the availability of unhealthy competitive foods in local school districts, and had either a positive or neutral effect on NSLP participation. © 2010, American School Health Association.

  18. Off ramp : a secondary school TDM program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haq, F. [Better Environmentally Sound Transportation (BEST), Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The cities of Vancouver and Victoria in British Columbia have implemented a high school vehicle trip reduction program entitled Off-Ramp. The program, created by BEST, is about youth empowerment to help youths lead their peers to walk, cycle, skateboard, in-line skate, or carpool to school for a sustainable environment. Students raise awareness through media and drama to counter pop images of driving as being cool. Sponsorship is very important to the success of the program.

  19. 7 CFR Appendix C to Part 210 - Child Nutrition Labeling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Child Nutrition Labeling Program C Appendix C to Part..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM Pt. 210, App. C Appendix C to Part 210—Child Nutrition Labeling Program 1. The Child Nutrition (CN) Labeling Program is a...

  20. Identifying Sources of Children’s Consumption of Junk Food in Boston After-School Programs, April–May 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S. Bryn; Cradock, Angie L.; Giles, Catherine M.; Lee, Rebekka M.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children’s dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received program-provided snacks during after-school time. Our study objective was to determine how different sources of snacks affect children’s snack consumption in after-school settings. Methods We recorded snacks served to and brought in by 298 children in 18 after-school programs in Boston, Massachusetts, on 5 program days in April and May 2011. We measured children’s snack consumption on 2 program days using a validated observation protocol. We then calculated within-child change-in-change models to estimate the effect of nonprogram snacks on children’s dietary intake after school. Results Nonprogram snacks contained more sugary beverages and candy than program-provided snacks. Having a nonprogram snack was associated with significantly higher consumption of total calories (+114.7 kcal, P desserts (+0.3 servings, P < .001), and foods with added sugars (+0.5 servings; P < .001) during the snack period. Conclusion On days when children brought their own after-school snack, they consumed more salty and sugary foods and nearly twice as many calories than on days when they consumed only program-provided snacks. Policy strategies limiting nonprogram snacks or setting nutritional standards for them in after-school settings should be explored further as a way to promote child health. PMID:25412028

  1. Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs in Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddoes, Zack; Castelli, Darla M.

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity declines among children in their tweens and teens. To address physical inactivity as a health risk, national organizations are endorsing the implementation of comprehensive school physical activity programs (CSPAPs). The purpose of this article is to describe the history of school-coordinated approaches to addressing health…

  2. Explaining the Positive Relationship Between Fourth-Grade Children's Body Mass Index and Energy Intake at School-Provided Meals (Breakfast and Lunch)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne D.; Royer, Julie A.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A 2010 publication showed a positive relationship between children's body mass index (BMI) and energy intake at school-provided meals (as assessed by direct meal observations). To help explain that relationship, we investigated 7 outcome variables concerning aspects of school-provided meals: energy content of items selected, number of…

  3. What Are New Zealand Children Eating at School? A Content Analysis of "Consumed versus Unconsumed" Food Groups in a Lunch-Box Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresler-Hawke, Emma; Whitehead, Dean; Coad, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Eating patterns among school-aged children continue to be highly reliant on frequent consumption of food items that are perceived to have low or poor nutritional value. This has become a serious public health concern. In this New Zealand-based study, primary school children's food consumption behaviour was investigated via two sources: a…

  4. Children's Eating Behavior: The Importance of Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Sanchez, Betty; Teneralli, Rachel; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To enhance the impact of school nutrition programs on children's health, more information is needed on the associations between healthy and unhealthy food offerings during school lunch periods and children's eating behavior. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the contributions of food offerings and participation in school lunch…

  5. Missouri School Improvement Program: Support and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Missouri State Board of Education and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education are dedicated to ensuring that all children have access to good schools that prepare them for college and career success. The Missouri School Improvement Program: Support and Intervention Plan takes a differentiated approach to state support based on…

  6. School-Based Child Abuse Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassard, Marla R.; Fiorvanti, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Child abuse is a leading cause of emotional, behavioral, and health problems across the lifespan. It is also preventable. School-based abuse prevention programs for early childhood and elementary school children have been found to be effective in increasing student knowledge and protective behaviors. The purpose of this article is to help school…

  7. Transition Mentoring in School Library Media Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaden, Bea

    2008-01-01

    Mentoring is defined as a professional relationship between an experienced person and inexperienced person. When newly hired library media specialists enter their schools, they often become part of the district's mentoring program. Yet, mentoring these new professionals can be problematic for school districts. In addition, when a library media…

  8. School Compost Programs: Pathways to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumpert, Kary; Dietz, Cyndra

    2012-01-01

    After the oft-repeated three Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle) comes the lesser-known but equally important fourth R: rot. In this case, rot means compost. Classrooms, schools, and school districts can use a number of methods to establish a compost program. The finished product is a valuable soil amendment that adds fertility to local farmland, school…

  9. 77 FR 67572 - Magnet Schools Assistance Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ..., the term meant, in reference to a school, ``a condition in which minority group children constitute... CFR Part 280 RIN 1855-AA07 Magnet Schools Assistance Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education. ACTION: Final regulations. SUMMARY: This document adopts as final a...

  10. Lunch is in the bag: increasing fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in sack lunches of preschool-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweitzer, Sara J; Briley, Margaret E; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Harrist, Ronald B; Staskel, Deanna M; Almansour, Fawaz D

    2010-07-01

    Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are important sources of nutrients for healthy growth and development of young children. Recent evidence suggests that sack lunches packed by parents for children to consume at child-care centers do not regularly meet the goal of one serving of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains. Lunch Is In The Bag is a child-care center-based nutrition education program targeted at parents of preschool-aged children to increase the number of servings of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in sack lunches sent from home that was pilot tested in fall 2008. In a quasiexperimental design, six child-care centers were paired by size before being randomly assigned to intervention (n=3) and comparison (n=3) groups. The parents of caregivers with primary responsibility for preparing the sack lunches of the 3- to 5-year-old children attending the centers were enrolled as parent-child dyads. The intervention included parent handouts, classroom activities, education stations, and teacher training. The contents of the lunch sacks for both the intervention group and comparison group were recorded for 3 nonconsecutive days before and immediately after the intervention period to measure the number of servings of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. A total of 132 parent-child dyads completed the study, 81 in the intervention group and 51 in the comparison group. Direct observation of children's lunches from the intervention group showed an increase in predicted mean number of servings of vegetables, from 0.41 to 0.65 (P<0.001) and whole grains, from 0.54 to 1.06 (P<0.001). No significant difference was observed in the mean number of servings of fruit. Lunch Is In The Bag, which is designed to fit in the child-care environment and targets parents of 3- to 5-year-old children, is a feasible intervention for improving the nutritional quality of sack lunches. Copyright 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of point-of-sale machines in school cafeterias as a method of parental influence over child lunch food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrepont, Emmy; Cullen, Karen W; Taylor, Wendell C

    2011-05-01

    Computerized point-of-sale (POS) machine software that allows parents to place restrictions on their child's school meal accounts is available. Parents could restrict specific foods (eg, chips), identify specific days the child can purchase extra foods, or set monetary limits. This descriptive study examines the use of parental restrictions on student cafeteria POS accounts in a convenience sample of 2 school districts. POS alerts, with student gender, grade, ethnicity, and students' free or reduced-price meal eligibility, were obtained from 2 school food service departments for the 2007-2008 school year. The alerts were coded into 5 categories: financial, medical, restrictions, snacks OK, and extras OK. The distribution of alerts by district, students, and demographics was then tabulated. District A (4839 students) had more students with alerts (n = 789, 16%) than District B (8510 students; n = 217, 2.6%), and 94 District A students had a second alert. District A parents had to provide written permission for their child to purchase snacks (n = 654, 13.5%) and extra meal items (n = 113, 2.3%). Most alerts were for full-pay students in both districts (74% and 66%) and varied by demographics of the students. Few parents actually used this system to limit student purchases of foods outside the school meal. Future studies should investigate the influence of these restrictions on student food choices. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  12. Business Schools' Programs Turn Felons into Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Mike Potts was halfway through a five-year prison sentence outside Houston when he heard about a program that would help him start a business when even buddies with clean records were struggling to find work. The Prison Entrepreneurship Program, run by a nonprofit group of the same name, works with Baylor University's Hankamer School of Business…

  13. School Administrator's Guide to Implementing Language Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The "School Administrator's Guide to Implementing Language Programming" serves as a starting point to plan for and implement language programming. It provides a general overview; suggests practical strategies for working with students, parents, teachers and the surrounding community; and includes details on areas to address in selecting…

  14. Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010: An Opportunity for School Nurses to Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jessica L.; Galon, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 will provide an opportunity for school nurses to intervene in the serious childhood obesity problem in the United States. Major changes in the management of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) will likely challenge schools yet may provide the impetus for a collaborative effort by the…

  15. Amuse Restaurant Set Lunch 2017

    OpenAIRE

    Amuse Restaurant

    2017-01-01

    Since opening, Amuse Restaurant has garnered rave reviews from the Country’s most trusted and renowned food critics. Praise has flowed for Conor’s individual style of cooking, which brings Asian flavours, namely Japanese, to modern French cuisine. The menu focuses mainly on tasting menus as it is the best way to experience this kind of food, however there is a three course set menu available Tuesday to Thursday for mid week dining. The lunch menu is a three course affair with the option of a ...

  16. The Use of Point-of-Sale Machines in School Cafeterias as a Method of Parental Influence over Child Lunch Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrepont, Emmy; Cullen, Karen W.; Taylor, Wendell C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Computerized point-of-sale (POS) machine software that allows parents to place restrictions on their child's school meal accounts is available. Parents could restrict specific foods (e.g., chips), identify specific days the child can purchase extra foods, or set monetary limits. This descriptive study examines the use of parental…

  17. Effect of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act on the Nutritional Quality of Meals Selected by Students and School Lunch Participation Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donna B; Podrabsky, Mary; Rocha, Anita; Otten, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Effective policies have potential to improve diet and reduce obesity. School food policies reach most children in the United States. To assess the nutritional quality of foods chosen by students and meal participation rates before and after the implementation of new school meal standards authorized through the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act. This descriptive, longitudinal study examined changes in the nutritional quality of 1,741,630 school meals at 3 middle schools and 3 high schools in an urban school district in Washington state. Seventy two hundred students are enrolled in the district; 54% are eligible for free and reduced-price meals. Student food selection data were collected daily from January 2011 through January 2014 during the 16 months prior to and the 15 months after implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act. The Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act. Nutritional quality was assessed by calculating monthly mean adequacy ratio and energy density of the foods selected by students each day. Six nutrients were included in the mean adequacy ratio calculations: calcium, vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, fiber, and protein. Monthly school meal participation was calculated as the mean number of daily meals served divided by student enrollment. Mean monthly values of mean adequacy ratio, energy density, and participation were compared before and after policy implementation. After implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, change was associated with significant improvement in the nutritional quality of foods chosen by students, as measured by increased mean adequacy ratio from a mean of 58.7 (range, 49.6-63.1) prior to policy implementation to 75.6 (range, 68.7-81.8) after policy implementation and decreased energy density from a mean of 1.65 (range, 1.53-1.82) to 1.44 (range, 1.29-1.61), respectively. There was negligible difference in student meal participation following implementation of the new meal standards with 47% meal participation (range, 40

  18. Dramatic School Library Literacy Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Many grade K-12 teachers and teacher-librarians know through first-hand experience that drama provides students with very powerful, often nontextual, context in which to build new meanings and avenues for representing and communicating understandings. Similarly, most school districts' language and literacy standards and curriculum reaffirm these…

  19. ACE: A Collaborative School Consultation Program for Secondary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Caroline; Massé, Line

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a description of ACE (Accompagnement collaboratif des enseignants (Collaborative teacher accompaniment)), a new program designed to guide secondary school teachers in integrating students with behavioral problems in their classrooms. ACE proposes collaborative accompaniment inspired by behavioral and mental health…

  20. Children's Selection of Fruit and Vegetables in a "Dream versus Healthy" Lunch-Box Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresler-Hawke, Emma; Whitehead, Dean; Parker, Leigh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Internationally, it is well established that the behaviour, performance, and achievement of schoolchildren is directly linked to the nutritional status of overall diet -- including the contents of their school lunch-boxes. In a previous survey study by the lead authors, primary school children's food consumption behaviour was…

  1. Evaluation of the Healthy Schools Program: Part I. Interim Progress

    OpenAIRE

    Beam, Margaret; Ehrlich, Ginny; Donze Black, Jessica; Block, Audrey; Leviton, Laura C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Federal and state policies identify schools as a setting to prevent childhood obesity, but schools need better health-promoting strategies. The objective of this study was to evaluate interim progress in schools receiving hands-on training from the Healthy Schools Program, the nation's largest school-based program aimed at preventing childhood obesity. The 4-year program targets schools with predominantly low-income, African American, or Hispanic students. Methods In 2010 we asse...

  2. The Status of Child Nutrition Programs in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Daniel C.; Vigil, Herminia J.

    The health and learning potential of Colorado's children are enhanced by the nutritional benefits of several programs. The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is the oldest and largest. Unfortunately, 1980-81 budget cuts, price increases, and other factors caused a decrease in participation of over 40,000 children a day from the 1980 figure of…

  3. Programmed Mathematics, Quemado [New Mexico] High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Darril

    In an effort to resolve the small school problems of limited math offerings, small classes, scheduling, and teacher overload, a secondary teacher from Quemado, New Mexico (a rural area) initiated use of five different programmed mathematics courses in one class period. Objectives were to: increase math offerings; decrease scheduling problems;…

  4. Bennett Public Schools Principal Induction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ross; Beaudoin, Colleen; Carmona, Ruben; Delahanty, Michael; Gartside, William; Oyedele, Abidemi; Teta, Lynne Mooney

    2012-01-01

    Ensuring equity in education and academic success for all students requires a highly skilled principal engages others in continually improving the instructional program in order to meet the needs of students. Over the past few years, a number of reports have indicated that the role of principal is becoming more challenging. School districts are…

  5. Effectiveness of programs to prevent school bullying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldry, A.C.; Farrington, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    Sixteen major evaluations of programs to prevent school bullying, conducted in 11 different countries, are reviewed in detail. Of these 16 evaluations, 8 produced desirable results, 2 produced mixed results, 4 produced small or negligible effects, and 2 produced undesirable results. These varying

  6. 78 FR 46799 - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Privacy Protections of Information From Applicant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. #0;Prices of new books are listed in the... educational agencies (LEAs) administering the National School Lunch Program established under the Richard B... school districts. Accordingly, the revision to Sec. 272.1(c) did not change policy, so new State action...

  7. The School Breakfast Program Provides Needed Fuel for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Edward; Heitman, Jennifer

    1988-01-01

    The article considers the many contributions of school breakfast programs to children's health and academic achievement and also suggests ways in which greater student and school participation in such programs can be achieved. (CB)

  8. Implementation of "Heart Smart:" A Cardiovascular School Health Promotion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Ann M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    "Heart Smart," a research-based health promotion program for elementary schools, was tested in four elementary schools. The program's objectives, strategies, curriculum, and other components are described. (Author/MT)

  9. Play Therapy Training among School Psychology, Social Work, and School Counseling Graduate Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Christina Bechle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined play therapy training across the nation among school psychology, social work, and school counseling graduate training programs. It also compared current training to previous training among school psychology and school counseling programs. A random sample of trainers was selected from lists of graduate programs provided by…

  10. Zero Waste: A Realistic Sustainability Program for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumpert, Kary; Dietz, Cyndra

    2012-01-01

    Eco-Cycle, one of the nation's oldest and largest nonprofit recycling organizations, has coordinated recycling services and environmental education programs for the two Boulder area public school districts (80 schools) since 1987. In 2005, Eco-Cycle launched the Green Star Schools program in four pilot elementary schools with the goal of moving…

  11. HISD After-School Opportunities Programs Description 1990-91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Nanda D.; And Others

    This report describes after-school programs available in the Houston (Texas) Independent School District (HISD). Fifty-nine sites offer either after-school child care or instruction to elementary school students in the HISD. Magnet's Extended Instructional Day program is the largest and the Houston Committee for Private Sector Initiatives'…

  12. Social inequality in breakfast, lunch and evening meal frequency among adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meilstrup, Charlotte; Pagh Pedersen, Trine; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    Abstract Purpose: Regular meal habits facilitate healthy dietary habits and especially low breakfast frequency shows associations with risk of overweight among adolescents. Studies on social inequality in meal frequencies among children and adolescents are limited, and especially studies of lunch...... in School-aged Children in 2010. The study includes schoolchildren in three age groups, 11-, 13-, and 15-year olds from a random sample of schools, participation rate 86.3%, n=4922. Socioeconomic position was measured by parents’ occupational social class. Breakfast, lunch and evening meal consumption were...... inequalities in adolescent meal frequencies. Adolescents from lower socioeconomic position are more likely to have low breakfast, lunch and evening meal frequencies. It is essential to consider socioeconomic position when promoting regular meal habits among adolescents....

  13. Eruption pattern of permanent molars: implications for school-based dental sealant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuthy, R A; Ashton, J J

    1989-01-01

    Dental caries remains a prevalent, chronic disease of childhood. The preponderance of dental caries is located on the pit and fissure surfaces of teeth, an area where dental sealants are most effective in preventing this malady. In the school year 1987-88, 4,879 Ohio schoolchildren participated in an assessment of dental health. Grades chosen for this assessment included 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 11. This study focuses on eruption of first and second permanent molars in development of a timing strategy for placement of occlusal sealants in a school-based program. An eruption score was developed for the determination of the first or second molar eruption status for each child. The data were analyzed for grade, sex, race, locale, fluoridation status, and percent of children on free or reduced-cost lunch programs. Analyses were performed on 2,215 children in grades 1-3 and 1,840 children in grades 6-8. Fifty-seven percent of first graders had all first permanent molars sufficiently erupted for sealant placement on the occlusal surface. Likewise, 23.6 percent of sixth graders had sufficient occlusal exposure on the second molar. Females showed an earlier eruption pattern than males for both first (P less than .05) and second (P less than .001) molars. Black children preceded white children only in the eruption of the second molar (P less than .001). This study provides dental public health decision makers with state-specific information on the earliest time to initiate a school-based occlusal sealant program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Australian Waste Wise Schools Program: Its Past, Present, and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy

    2010-01-01

    The Waste Wise Schools program has a longstanding history in Australia. It is an action-based program that encourages schools to move toward zero waste through their curriculum and operating practices. This article provides a review of the program, finding that it has had notable success in reducing schools' waste through a "reduce, reuse,…

  15. The establishment of the evaluation model for pupil's lunch suppliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chih-Yao; Hou, Cheng-I.; Ma, Rosa

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is the establishment of the evaluation model for the government-controlled private suppliers for school lunches in the public middle and primary schools in Miao-Li County. After finishing the literature search and the integration of the opinions from anonymous experts by Modified Delphi Method, the grade forms from relevant schools in and outside the Miao-Li County will firstly be collected and the delaminated structures for evaluation be constructed. Then, the data analysis will be performed on those retrieved questionnaires designed in accordance with the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). Finally, the evaluation form for the government-controlled private suppliers can be constructed and presented in the hope of benefiting the personnel in charge of school meal purchasing.

  16. Demographic and financial characteristics of school districts with low and high à la Carte sales in rural Kansas Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollen, Nicole L; Kimminau, Kim S; Nazir, Niaman

    2011-06-01

    Reducing à la carte items in schools-foods and beverages sold outside the reimbursable meals program-can have important implications for childhood obesity. However, schools are reluctant to reduce à la carte offerings because of the impact these changes could have on revenue. Some foodservice programs operate with limited à la carte sales, but little is known about these programs. This secondary data analysis compared rural and urban/suburban school districts with low and high à la carte sales. Foodservice financial records (2007-2008) were obtained from the Kansas State Department of Education for all public K-12 school districts (n=302). χ² and t tests were used to examine the independent association of variables to à la carte sales. A multivariate model was then constructed of the factors most strongly associated with low à la carte sales. In rural districts with low à la carte sales, lunch prices and participation were higher, lunch costs and à la carte quality were lower, and fewer free/reduced price lunches were served compared to rural districts with high à la carte sales. Lunch price (odds ratio=1.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 1.4) and free/reduced price lunch participation (odds ratio=3.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 9.8) remained in the multivariate model predicting low à la carte sales. No differences were found between urban/suburban districts with low and high à la carte sales. Findings highlight important factors to maintaining low à la carte sales. Schools should consider raising lunch prices and increasing meal participation rates as two potential strategies for reducing the sale of à la carte items without compromising foodservice revenue. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. School Health Programs in Australia - A Special Insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Philip R.; Rissel, Chris; Rowling, Louise; Marshall, Bernard J.; Sheehan, Margaret M.; Northfield, Jeff R.; Maher, Shelley; Carlisle, Rachel; St. Leger, Lawrence H.; Stewart, Donald E.; Parker, Elizabeth; Gillespie, Amaya; Stokes, Helen; Mukherjee, Dev; Nutbeam, Don; Mitchell, Anne; Ollis, Debbie; Watson, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Eight papers on Australia's school health programs discuss: creating health promoting schools in the United States; intersectoral collaboration for developing a national framework for health promoting schools; school-based health promotion nationwide; auditing health promoting schools policy documentation; the nature of health service/school…

  18. Outcomes for a Comprehensive School-Based Asthma Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Lynn B.; Redden, David; Wittich, Angelina R.; Hains, Coralie; Turner-Henson, Anne; Hemstreet, Mary P.; Feinstein, Ronald; Erwin, Sue; Bailey, William C.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of a comprehensive school-based asthma management program in an inner-city, largely African-American school system. All 54 elementary schools (combined enrollment 13,247 students) from a single urban school system participated in this study. Schools were randomly divided between immediate and delayed…

  19. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Fornari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods: Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results: The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions: Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established.

  20. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

  1. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S; Menzin, Andrew W; Woo, Vivian A; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established.

  2. Kid's Choice Program improves weight management behaviors and weight status in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Helen M; Williams, Keith E; Camise, Thomas S

    2011-04-01

    The present study examined the effectiveness of the Kid's Choice Program (KCP) for increasing children's weight management behaviors, and decreasing body mass index percentile (BMI%) for overweight and average-weight children. It also evaluated KCP characteristics relevant to long-term application in schools. Participants included 382 children assigned to two groups: a KCP group that received token rewards for three "Good Health Behaviors" including eating fruits or vegetables first at meals (FVFIRST), choosing low-fat and low-sugar healthy drinks (HDRINK), and showing 5000 exercise steps recorded on pedometers (EXERCISE), or a control group that received token rewards for three "Good Citizenship Behaviors." School lunch observations and pedometer records were completed for one month under baseline and three months under reward conditions. The school nurse calculated children's BMI% one year before baseline, at baseline, at the end of KCP application, and six months later. The KCP increased FVFIRST, HDRINK, and EXERCISE from baseline through reward conditions, with ANCOVAs demonstrating that these increases were associated with both the offer of reward and nearby peer models. Overweight (n=112) and average-weight (n=200) children showed drops in BMI% after the three-month KCP, but overweight children re-gained weight six months later, suggesting the need for more ongoing KCP application. HDRINK choice was the behavior most associated with BMI% drops for overweight children. Small teams of parent volunteers effectively delivered the KCP, and school staff endorsed parent volunteers as the best personnel to deliver the KCP, which costs approximately two U.S. dollars per child per month of application. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modifying Open-Campus Lunch Policy to Reduce Discipline Violations: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, James S., III

    2016-01-01

    An intervention was implemented to address the high number of discipline violations due to an unconditional open-campus lunch policy at a senior high school. The intent of the intervention was to statistically measure discipline violations among voluntary participants and to determine whether or not a significant change occurred. The research…

  4. School District Program Cost Accounting: An Alternative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Guilbert C.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the value for school districts of a program cost accounting system and examines different approaches to generating program cost data, with particular emphasis on the "cost allocation to program system" (CAPS) and the traditional "transaction-based system." (JG)

  5. Reporting accuracy of packed lunch consumption among Danish 11-year-olds differ by gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Nina; Fagt, Sisse; Davidsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    the qualitative recall accuracy of self-reported consumption of packed lunch among Danish 11-year-old children in relation to gender and dietary assessment method. Design: A cross-sectional dietary recall study of packed lunch consumption. Digital images (DIs) served as an objective reference method to determine...... as match rates (% identified by DIs and reported correctly) and intrusion rates (% not identified by DIs but reported) were determined. Setting and subjects: Three Danish public schools from Copenhagen. A total of 114 Danish 11-year-old children, mean (SE) age = 11.1 (0.03), and body mass index = 18.2 (0...

  6. Variation in School Health Policies and Programs by Demographic Characteristics of US Schools, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Alexandra B.; Brener, Nancy D.; McManus, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Background: To identify whether school health policies and programs vary by demographic characteristics of schools, using data from the School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) 2006. This study updates a similar study conducted with SHPPS 2000 data and assesses several additional policies and programs measured for the first time in SHPPS…

  7. SHPPS 2006: School Health Policies and Programs Study--Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) is a national survey periodically conducted to assess school health policies and programs at the state, district, school, and classroom levels. This brief reports study results in the following areas, as they relate to nutrition: (1) Health Education; (2) Health Services and Mental Health and…

  8. Editors' and Publishers' Handbook for Helping High School Journalism Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Julie E.

    Noting the benefits of high school journalism training, this guidebook familiarizes commercial newspaper editors and publishers with high school journalism programs and publications and helps them become more involved in such programs. Following a look at the positive influence of high school journalism courses on student performance and…

  9. The Maine Sealant Manual for School-Based and School-Linked Dental Sealant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Kneka, Ed.

    This manual is designed for use by school personnel and dental personnel to aid in the development and maintenance of school-based or school-linked dental sealant programs. The sections include (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Guidelines" (school selection, school contacts, dental providers, target grades, and tooth selection…

  10. Effect of nutrition changes on foods selected by students in a middle school-based diabetes prevention intervention program: the HEALTHY experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Connie C; Stadler, Diane D; Staten, Myrlene A; El Ghormli, Laure; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2012-02-01

    The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multicomponent intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and à la carte venues are compared to the experience of control schools. The intervention was implemented in 21 middle schools from winter 2007 through spring 2009 (following a cohort of students from sixth through eighth grades); 21 schools acted as observed controls. The nutrition component targeted school food service environmental change. Data identifying foods and nutrients served (selected by students for consumption) were collected over a 20-day period at baseline and end of study. Analysis compared end of study values for intervention versus control schools. Intervention schools more successfully limited dessert and snack food portion size in NSLP and à la carte and lowered fat content of foods served. Servings of high-fiber grain-based foods and/or legumes were improved in SBP but not NSLP. Intervention and control schools eliminated >1% fat milk and added-sugar beverages in SBP, but intervention schools were more successful in NSLP and à la carte. The HEALTHY program demonstrated significant changes in the nutritional quality of foods and beverages served in the SBP, NSLP, and à la carte venues, as part of an effort to decrease childhood obesity and support beneficial effects in some secondary HEALTHY study outcomes. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. The Elementary Private School Recognition Program: Mike Mulligan's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Richard

    1986-01-01

    Describes the goals, the selection criteria, and the selection process of the Elementary Private School Recognition Program. Includes a listing, by states, of the 60 private elementary schools selected for 1985-86 recognition. (IW)

  12. The "Generacion Diez" after-school program and Latino parent involvement with schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Nathaniel R; Medina, Carmen

    2005-11-01

    The current study examines associations between participation in after-school programs and change in Latino parent involvement with schools. Hierarchical linear regression analyses demonstrated that parents of children who had higher after-school program attendance rates were significantly more likely to report increases in the quality of relationships with their children's teachers, frequency of parent-teacher contact, and engagement with their children's schooling over a two-year period. However, greater home educator contacts were related to decreases in quality and quantity of parent-school involvement. A primary implication is that attendance in school-based after-school programs may draw parents into children's regular-day school context. Editors' Strategic Implications The authors illustrate the promising practice of using after-school programs to promote parent involvement and to help integrate the often disparate family and school contexts for Latino children.

  13. Promoting Engagement in School through Tailored Music Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina Skewes; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale; Bolger, Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Music and arts programs have increasingly been utilized to promote school engagement. Despite the fact that school engagement and music programs can be understood in myriad ways, little attention has been paid to potential distinctions between the types of music programs that underpin engagement. This article describes an investigation of how and…

  14. Student Assistance Program Sandia High School 1985-86 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce-Prather, Margaret; Shainline, Michael

    This document presents data from the second year of the Student Assistance Program, a counseling program to help students who may be abusing drugs or alcohol, implemented at Sandia High School in the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public School system. Data are included from the program's monthly records sheets, from parent involvement questionnaires,…

  15. Program Evaluation Interest and Skills of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astramovich, Randall L.

    2017-01-01

    School counselors participated in a study examining their program evaluation interest and skills. Findings suggest that school counselors understand the importance of program evaluation, yet they may lack the skills and confidence to successfully engage in program evaluation activities. Professional development training may be an important method…

  16. After-school programs for health promotion in rural communities: Ashe County Middle School 4-H After-School Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Michael B; Miller, Jennifer L; Blackburn, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Rural youth have a higher risk for lower health and developmental outcomes, often facing numerous constraints (eg, poor socioeconomic conditions, lower levels of social support, fewer recreational programs and facilities, and inadequate transportation). After-school programs have the potential to effectively deliver health-promoting activities but often face significant challenges in these areas. Ashe County is a rural community in the Appalachian region of North Carolina. Ashe County is economically depressed and its youth population has many poor health and developmental indicators. However, with more than 20 years of sustained activity, one important community resource trying to address disparities in youth health and development is the Ashe County 4-H After-School Program. To successfully overcome inherent challenges, the program has positioned itself as essential to community development, supported and retained qualified personnel, and cultivated a network of key partners to continue its efforts to provide essential youth programs for this rural community.

  17. Assessment of Changes in School Nutrition Programs and the School Environment as a Result of Following the HealthierUS School Challenge Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer S.; Bednar, Carolyn; DiMarco, Nancy M.; Connors, Priscilla L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine changes in school nutrition programs and the school environment as reported by school nutrition directors who are following the U.S. Department of Agriculture's HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) program. The objective was to determine before and after changes in the average lunch…

  18. High school sports programs differentially impact participation by sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Drake

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Sports participation has previously been shown to confer a number of health benefits; as such, school sports programs may be an important, effective, and underused target for public health efforts, including obesity prevention programs. Efforts to increase physical activity among youth should consider both access and choice in school athletic programs. Schools may need to use different strategies to increase sports participation in boys and girls.

  19. A cluster-randomized trial of a middle school gender violence prevention program: Design, rationale, and sample characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Kaleab Z; Jones, Kelley A; Ciaravino, Samantha; Ripper, Lisa; Paglisotti, Taylor; Morrow, Sarah Elizabeth; Grafals, Melanie; Van Dusen, Courtney; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    High rates of adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) and sexual violence (SV) reported among adolescents point to the need for prevention among middle school-age youth. This is a cluster randomized controlled trial to test an athletic coach-delivered ARA/SV prevention program in 41 middle schools (38 clusters). Trained coaches talk to their male athletes about 1) what constitutes harmful vs. respectful relationship behaviors, 2) dispelling myths that glorify male sexual aggression and promoting more gender-equitable attitudes, and 3) positive bystander intervention when aggressive male behaviors toward females are witnessed. A total of 973 male athletes (ages 11-14, grades 6-8) are participating. Athletes complete surveys at the beginning and end of sports season (Time 2), and one year later (Time 3). The primary outcome is an increase in positive bystander behaviors (i.e., intervening in peers' disrespectful or harmful behaviors); secondary outcomes are changes in recognition of what constitutes abusive behavior, intentions to intervene, and gender equitable attitudes (Time 2 and 3) as well as reduction in abuse perpetration (Time 3). Participating schools have a greater proportion of non-White students and students on free/reduced lunch compared to schools that declined participation. Participants' self-reported ethnicities are 54.5% White, 29.0% Black, 1.4% Hispanic and the remainder, multi-racial, other, or not reported. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a coach-delivered ARA/SV prevention program for middle school male athletes. Findings will add to the evidence base regarding developmentally appropriate violence prevention programs as well as the role of coaches in adolescent health promotion. Clinical Trials #: NCT02331238. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Case Study on Jerudong Primary School Adoption Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Sukardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this case study were to describe comprehensively how the SEAMEO-VOCTECH Regional Center conducted the school adoption program, to gain information from teachers and related persons on the implementation of the programs, and to identify various interventions for achieving maximum outputs. The study employed a naturalistic qualitative method with Jerudong primary school and the VOCTECH Center as the major sites of the study. Three methods of data collection were enumeration techniques, participant observation and in-depth interview. The findings indicate how beneficial the program was to the school, and the program appears to be suitable to Indonesian schools, whose communities, conditions, and potencies vary

  1. Reasons for African American student attrition from school psychology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Sherrie L; Truscott, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    This phenomenological study used a series of three in-depth interviews with seven African American participants, for a total of 21 interviews, to explore their experiences in the specialist and doctoral level school psychology programs they left prior to obtaining a professional entry-level degree. The study's purpose was to investigate what factors contributed to participants' attrition. Findings indicate that misalignment between participants' career aims and the practice of school psychology (as presented in the programs they left) contributed to attrition. Poor relationships with school psychology faculty and program cohort peers also played a role in participants' decisions to leave school psychology programs. Results offer a unique lens into racial issues in school psychology. Recommendations for faculty and others interested in preventing African Americans' attrition from school psychology graduate education are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Why and How Schools Make Nutrition Education Programs "Work".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kathleen J; Koch, Pamela A; Contento, Isobel R

    2018-01-01

    There are many potential health benefits to having nutrition education programs offered by expert outside sources in schools. However, little is known about why and how schools initiate, implement, and institutionalize them. Gaining this understanding may allow the impact and reach of nutrition and other health education programs in schools to be extended. A total of 22 school community members from 21 purposefully selected New York City public elementary schools were interviewed using a semistructured interview protocol about their schools' experiences initiating, implementing, and institutionalizing nutrition education programs. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Chronological narratives were written detailing each school's experience and passages highlighting key aspects of each school's experience were identified. These passages (N = 266) were sorted into domains and themes which were regrouped, resorted, and adjusted until all researchers agreed the domains and themes represented the collective experiences of the schools. The interviews elicited 4 broad domains of action: building motivation, choosing programs, developing capacity, and legitimizing nutrition education. Within each domain, themes reflecting specific actions and thoughts emerged. The identified domains of action and their themes highlight specific, practical actions that school health advocates can use to initiate, implement, and institutionalize nutrition education programs in schools. © 2018, American School Health Association.

  3. Playing a computer game during lunch affects fullness, memory for lunch, and later snack intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham-Cooper, Rose E; Hardman, Charlotte A; Nicoll, Charlotte E; Rogers, Peter J; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2011-02-01

    The presence of distracting stimuli during eating increases the meal size and could thereby contribute to overeating and obesity. However, the effects of within-meal distraction on later food intake are less clear. We sought to test the hypothesis that distraction inhibits memory encoding for a meal, which, in turn, increases later food intake. The current study assessed the effects of playing solitaire (a computerized card-sorting game) during a fixed lunch, which was eaten at a fixed rate, on memory for lunch and food intake in a taste test 30 min later. A between-subjects design was used with 44 participants. Participants in the no-distraction group ate the same lunch in the absence of any distracting stimuli. Distracted individuals were less full after lunch, and they ate significantly more biscuits in the taste test than did nondistracted participants (mean intake: 52.1 compared with 27.1 g; P = 0.017). Furthermore, serial-order memory for the presentation of the 9 lunch items was less accurate in participants who had been distracted during lunch. These findings provide further evidence that distraction during one meal has the capacity to influence subsequent eating. They may also help to explain the well-documented association between sedentary screen-time activities and overweight.

  4. Youth Suicide Prevention School Program for the Public Schools of Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Compensatory, Urban, and Supplementary Programs.

    This document describes a program developed by Maryland's Youth Suicide Prevention School Program Committee in response to state legislation, and is intended to: (1) assist in increasing the awareness among school personnel and community leaders of the incidence of teenage suicide; (2) train school personnel in individual and schoolwide strategies…

  5. School Wellness Programs: Magnitude and Distribution in New York City Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiefel, Leanna; Elbel, Brian; Pflugh Prescott, Melissa; Aneja, Siddhartha; Schwartz, Amy E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Public schools provide students with opportunities to participate in many discretionary, unmandated wellness programs. Little is known about the number of these programs, their distribution across schools, and the kinds of students served. We provide evidence on these questions for New York City (NYC) public schools. Methods: Data on…

  6. Effectiveness of School-Based Bullying Intervention Programs in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogini, Eric U.

    2012-01-01

    Bullying behavior has reached pandemic proportions and is a growing concern in primary school. Most intervention programs in primary school are focused on bullying prevention or principally on the behavior of the bully. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a school-based bullying intervention program is an effective method for reducing…

  7. Valor nutricional da merenda e sua contribuição para as recomendações nutricionais do pré-escolar, matriculado em CEAPE The nutritional value of the school lunch and its contribution to the fulfilling of the nutritional recommendations of preschoolers enrolled in the Center for Education and Feeding of the Preschooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Nilda Mazzilli

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o valor nutricional da merenda escolar e os vários tipos de preparações oferecidas aos pré-escolares, matriculados nos Centros de Educação e Alimentação do Pré-Escolar (CEAPEs. Analisou-se sua contribuição para satisfazer as recomendações diárias de energia e de nutrientes desse grupo etário da população. O estudo abrangeu 346 pré-escolares de CEAPEs implantados em 6 cidades do interior do Estado de São Paulo. As preparações servidas com maior freqüência em todos os CEAPEs foram: leite enriquecido, proteína testurizada de soja, sopas e mingaus de produtos à base dessa leguminosa. O valor energético médio variou de 210 a 403 calorias, e o de proteínas, de 5,7 a 12,0 g. Em relação a vitaminas e minerais, a merenda mostrou-se deficiente na maioria desses nutrientes e em todas as cidades estudadas. A contribuição da merenda para as recomendações diárias de energia e de proteína ficou entre 21 e 44% e de 13 a 26%, respectivamente. Quanto ao teor vitamínico, a merenda atendeu ao previsto pelo PNAE em relação às vitaminas A, B1 e B2, apenas em três cidades; quanto aos minerais, somente o cálcio, em uma localidade, atingiu o estabelecido pelo Programa. A merenda ainda que não seja expressiva sua contribuição para as recomendações nutricionais diárias, constitui suplemento na dieta habitual do pré-escolar.The present paper studied the nutritional value of the school lunch and the variety of the preparations offered to preschool children drawn from Preschool Education and Feeding Centres (CEAPE. Its contribution to the energy and nutrients intake of this population group was analysed. Three hundred and forty six preschool children belonging to six towns of the State of S. Paulo were studied. The preparations most often served in all the CEAPEs studied were enriched milk, soy texturized protein, soups and mushes including soy bean. The average energy value of the school lunch varied between 210

  8. Parent Interest in a School-Based, School Nurse-Led Weight Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Martha Y.; Lee, Jiwoo

    2014-01-01

    Because one in three children is already overweight or obese, school-based interventions targeting secondary obesity prevention merit consideration. This study assessed parent interest in participating in a school-based, school nurse-led weight management program for young school-aged children. A random sample of parents ("n" = 122) of…

  9. Does a smoking prevention program in elementary schools prepare children for secondary school?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crone, M.R.; Spruijt, R.; Dijkstra, N.S.; Willemsen, M.C.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    A smoking prevention program was developed to prepare children in elementary school for secondary school. This study assessed the effects on smoking in secondary school. Methods: In 2002, 121 schools in The Netherlands were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention

  10. Program Design Called Crucial across Array of School Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2008-01-01

    While school choice may be one of the most polarizing issues in education today, a new volume of research papers makes the case that innovations aimed at giving families more say in where their children go to school can be whatever their architects make of them. Programs such as magnet schools, charters, tuition tax credits, or open-enrollment…

  11. The Shaker High School Program for Visiting College Admissions Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Paul F.

    1978-01-01

    To achieve successful articulation between secondary school and college for students, guidance counselors and college admissions representatives are both involved in "the high school visit." Taking into consideration needs of all participants becomes of primary importance. This article highlights the Shaker High School program attempting to…

  12. Building an Effective School-Based Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy Ann; Stormont, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth are at risk for failure in school due to various school, family, and community characteristics. To provide more support for youth at risk, school-based mentoring programs have become increasingly popular. However, this seemingly simple intervention is actually quite complex and must be implemented with integrity and fidelity. Although…

  13. Program Development for Primary School Teachers' Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonjeam, Waraporn; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: 1) to study the elements and indicators of primary school teachers' critical thinking, 2) to study current situation, desirable situation, development technique, and need for developing the primary school teachers' critical thinking, 3) to develop the program for developing the primary school teachers'…

  14. The Full-Time School Program in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño, Marcela Georgina Gómez; Fahara, Manuel Flores; de la Garza, Lorena Alemán

    2014-01-01

    The Full-time Schools Program in Mexico ("Programa Escuelas de Tiempo Completo," PETC), began in the 2007-2008 school year with the aim of improving the learning opportunities of basic education students by extending the school day to eight hours a day, in order to offer an innovative and flexible pedagogical proposal that includes six…

  15. Impact of School Flu Vaccine Program on Student Absences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaspohl, Sara S.; Dixon, Betty T.; Streater, James A.; Hausauer, Elizabeth T.; Newman, Christopher P.; Vogel, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Literature provides evidence that school attendance correlates with academic performance and student success. Influenza is a contributing factor to school absences. Primary prevention for influenza includes immunization. School-located influenza vaccine (SLIV) programs provide greater access for students to be immunized. A retrospective review of…

  16. A Mentoring Program for New School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Connie

    2003-01-01

    Until recent years, school nursing practice consisted mainly of screenings and first aid. However, the changing health, social, and emotional needs of children in the school setting have brought about an expansion of school nursing services. Now school nurses must not only perform routine first aid and screenings, but they must also carry out…

  17. Reporting accuracy of packed lunch consumption among Danish 11-year-olds differ by gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Lyng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Packed lunch is the dominant lunch format in many countries including Denmark. School lunch is consumed unsupervised, and self-reported recalls are appropriate in the school setting. However, little is known about the accuracy of recalls in relation to packed lunch. Objective: To assess the qualitative recall accuracy of self-reported consumption of packed lunch among Danish 11-year-old children in relation to gender and dietary assessment method. Design: A cross-sectional dietary recall study of packed lunch consumption. Digital images (DIs served as an objective reference method to determine food items consumed. Recalls were collected with a lunch recall questionnaire (LRQ comprising an open-ended recall (OE-Q and a pre-coded food group prompted recall (PC-Q. Individual interviews (INTs were conducted successively. The number of food items was identified and accuracy was calculated as match rates (% identified by DIs and reported correctly and intrusion rates (% not identified by DIs but reported were determined. Setting and subjects: Three Danish public schools from Copenhagen. A total of 114 Danish 11-year-old children, mean (SE age=11.1 (0.03, and body mass index=18.2 (0.26. Results: The reference (DIs showed that girls consumed a higher number of food items than boys [mean (SE 5.4 (0.25 vs. 4.6 (0.29 items (p=0.05]. The number of food items recalled differed between genders with OE-Q recalls (p=0.005 only. Girls’ interview recalls were more accurate than boys’ with higher match rates (p=0.04 and lower intrusion rates (p=0.05. Match rates ranged from 67–90% and intrusion rates ranged from 13–39% with little differences between girls and boys using the OE-Q and PC-Q methods. Conclusion: Dietary recall validation studies should not only consider match rates as an account of accuracy. Intrusions contribute to over-reporting in non-validation studies, and future studies should address recall accuracy and inaccuracies in

  18. Farm to School Program. Nourishing News. Volume 4, Issue 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idaho State Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho Farm to School Program works towards having Idaho grown food served to students in Idaho Child Nutrition Programs. This important program is emerging at meal times across Idaho and nationwide. Child Nutrition programs are buying fresh food directly from local farmers as a way of improving the quality and taste of their meals. These Farm…

  19. Building Rural Communities through School-Based Agriculture Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.; Henry, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory for community development by school-based agriculture programs through grounded theory methodology. Data for the study included in-depth interviews and field observations from three school-based agriculture programs in three non-metropolitan counties across a Midwestern state. The…

  20. A Neighborhood Watch Program for Inner-City School Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcido, Ramon M.; Ornelas, Vincent; Garcia, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a multimethod study of a neighborhood watch program designed to protect inner city school children from violence while traveling from home and school. Analysis indicated that in addition to contributing to perceptions of enhanced safety, the program also served to improve the quality of neighborhood interaction. Discusses implications…

  1. Analysis of School Food Safety Programs Based on HACCP Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kevin R.; Sauer, Kevin; Sneed, Jeannie; Kwon, Junehee; Olds, David; Cole, Kerri; Shanklin, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine how school districts have implemented food safety programs based on HACCP principles. Specific objectives included: (1) Evaluate how schools are implementing components of food safety programs; and (2) Determine foodservice employees food-handling practices related to food safety.…

  2. Assessment Of Schools In Agricultural Program As A Strategy For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the Schools in agricultural program as a strategy for technology transfer in Edo State, Nigeria. A random sample of 120 students participating in schools in agricultural program was selected for the study. Findings showed that majority of the respondents (62.5%) were between 19 – 22 years old.

  3. High School Students Participate in a CAI Study Skills Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    A 10-module computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program on study skills was field tested to determine its effectiveness with high school students, using 50 advanced seniors in a large Texas high school as subjects. The program consisted of a study skills pretest, the CAI modules, a notebook on study skills, and a posttest. The modules were…

  4. Incorporating Trauma-Informed Care into School-Based Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L.; Ashley, Olivia Silber; White, LeBretia; Axelson, Sarah; Clark, Marc; Burrus, Barri

    2017-01-01

    Background: This article provides an overview of the rationale and process for incorporating trauma-informed approaches into US school-based programs, using school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs as an example. Methods: Research literature is reviewed on the prevalence and outcomes of childhood trauma, including the links between…

  5. HISD Magnet School Program Description 1990-91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Nanda D.; And Others

    This paper describes magnet school programs offering a special or enhanced curricula to attract an ethnically diverse population at all grade levels in the Houston (Texas) Independent School District (HISD). Researchers collected data through interviews, site visits, brochures, campus programs summaries, and an analysis of the Student Master File.…

  6. Extracurricular Physical Activity Programs in California Private Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, David; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Interscholastic, intramural, and club physical activity (PA) programs can be important contributors to student PA accrual at schools. Few studies have assessed factors related to the provision of these extracurricular PA programs, especially in private schools. Methods: We used a 16-item questionnaire to assess the associations and…

  7. Why and How Schools Make Nutrition Education Programs "Work"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Kathleen J.; Koch, Pamela A.; Contento, Isobel R.

    2018-01-01

    Background: There are many potential health benefits to having nutrition education programs offered by expert outside sources in schools. However, little is known about why and how schools initiate, implement, and institutionalize them. Gaining this understanding may allow the impact and reach of nutrition and other health education programs in…

  8. High School Puente Program. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "High School Puente Program" aims to help disadvantaged students graduate from high school, become college eligible, and enroll in four-year colleges and universities. Interdisciplinary in approach, the program has three components: writing, counseling, and mentoring. Students in the ninth and tenth grades receive rigorous writing…

  9. Cyberbullying Prevention and Intervention Programs in Schools: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    This article presents a systematic review of school-based cyberbullying prevention and intervention programs. Research presenting empirical evidence about the effectiveness of a school-based cyberbullying prevention or intervention program published before August 2016 was searched. Seventeen studies were obtained and reviewed. The findings showed…

  10. Can Cutbacks Leave School Programs Viable? ERIC Digest, Number 106.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, James

    Most public schools, out of financial necessity, have had to reduce costs while maintaining facilities and essential programs and remaining accountable for student outcomes. School downsizing can mean making painful decisions about program elimination and staff layoffs. This digest offers suggestions for using downsizing to some…

  11. American Sign Language: An Innovative Middle School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Karen

    2009-01-01

    American Sign Language (ASL) began at Seminole Middle School in August 2007 as part of the program, D.E.C.A.L (Division of Communication and Law), the brainchild of principal, Dr. Kris Black. Her goal was to offer a program that would entice advanced middle school students from around Broward County to Seminole and the hook she used to entice them…

  12. PROGRAMMING IS GOOD FOR CHILDREN? A CRITICAL VIEW ABOUT TEACHING PROGRAMMING IN SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendell Bento Geraldes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents reflections on teaching programming in schools and the positive and negative impact of this new methodology today. The study also discusses the initiatives relating to teaching programming in schools, considering also the opinion of experts on the subject. The following questions are addressed: Is it good for children to learn to program computers in schools? Can all people learn to program computers? What is the importance of learning for today's society? The pros and cons regarding teaching programming in schools will be discussed in search of answers to these questions.

  13. Development of a School Adaptation Program for Elementary School Students with Hearing Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kwon, Myung Soon; Han, Woojae

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although new technology of assistive listening device leads many hard of hearing children to be mainstreamed in public school programs, many clinicians and teachers still wonder whether the children are able to understand all instruction, access educational materials, and have social skills in the school. The purpose of this study is to develop a school adaptation program (SAP) for the hearing-impaired children who attend public elementary school. Subjects and Method...

  14. How can schools help youth increase physical activity? An economic analysis comparing school-based programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babey, Susan H; Wu, Shinyi; Cohen, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    For optimal health, physical activity should be an integral and routine part of daily life. Youth spend a significant amount of time at school yet rarely achieve the recommended 60 min of moderate and vigorous physical activity in physical education (PE) classes or recess. This study assessed the following types of school-based opportunities to improve physical activity for youth: after-school programs, before-school programs, PE classes, extended-day PE, and short physical activity breaks during the school day. An economic analysis conducted in 2013 compared school-based approaches to increasing physical activity. Analysis factors included costs, reach, effects on physical activity gains, cost-effectiveness, and other potentially augmenting benefits. Two programs were significantly superior in terms of reach and cost per student: (1) extending the school day with mandatory PE participation and (2) offering short (10-minute) physical activity breaks during regular classroom hours. After-school program costs per student are high and the programs have a smaller reach, but they offer benefits (such as childcare) that may justify their higher costs. Before-school programs did not appear feasible. Incorporating short physical activity breaks into the existing school day would be a cost-effective way to increase school-based activity. This type of program is inexpensive and has broad reach. Inserting activity breaks throughout the day is appropriate, especially when youth are otherwise largely sedentary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 14, Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  16. USAF Summer Research Program - 1995 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  17. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 15B, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  18. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  19. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 12B, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  20. USAF Summer Research Program - 1995 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 14, Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1995-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  1. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 12A, Armstrong Lab

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  2. USAF Summer Research Program - 1993 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1993-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Programs (USAF- HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  3. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 15A, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  4. USAF Summer Research Program - 1994 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports, Volume 16 AEDC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1994-01-01

    The United States Air Force High School Apprenticeship Program's (USAF-HSAP) purpose is to place outstanding high school students whose interests are in the areas of mathematics, engineering, and science to work in a laboratory environment...

  5. Promoting Diversity through Program Websites: A Multicultural Content Analysis of School Psychology Program Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Leann V.; Blake, Jamilia J.; Graves, Scott L.; Vaughan-Jensen, Jessica; Pulido, Ryne; Banks, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of culturally and linguistically diverse students to graduate programs is critical to the overall growth and development of school psychology as a field. Program websites serve as an effective recruitment tool for attracting prospective students, yet there is limited research on how school psychology programs use their websites to…

  6. Walking school bus programs in U.S. public elementary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lindsey; Chriqui, Jamie F; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2013-07-01

    Active transportation to school provides an important way for children to meet physical activity recommendations. The "walking school bus" (WSB) is a strategy whereby adults walk with a group of children to and from school along a fixed route. This study assessed whether school-organized WSB programs varied by school characteristics, district policies, and state laws. School data were gathered by mail-back surveys in nationally representative samples of U.S. public elementary schools during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 school years (n = 632 and 666, respectively). Corresponding district policies and state laws were obtained. Nationwide, 4.2% of schools organized a WSB program during 2008-2009, increasing to 6.2% by 2009-2010. Controlling for demographic covariates, schools were more likely to organize a WSB program where there was a strong district policy pertaining to safe active routes to school (OR = 2.14, P schools (OR = 2.72, P schools organizing these programs. Policymaking efforts may encourage schools to promote active transportation.

  7. Enhancement of select foods at breakfast and lunch increases energy intakes of nursing home residents with low meal intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Victoria H; Marra, Melissa Ventura; Johnson, Paulette

    2009-03-01

    Nursing facilities often provide enhanced or fortified foods as part of a "food-first" approach to increasing nutrient intakes in residents with inadequate intakes or who are experiencing weight loss. The study objective was to determine whether energy and protein enhancement of a small number of menu items would result in increased three-meal (breakfast, lunch, and supper) calorie and protein intakes in long-term care residents. A randomized cross-over design was used to compare investigator-weighed food intakes under three menu conditions: control (no meals enhanced); lunch only enhanced; and both breakfast and lunch enhanced. Two breakfast foods (juice and hot cereal) and two lunch foods (soup and potato side dish) were chosen for enhancement. Participants were 33 nursing home residents from a facility in South Florida (average age=87.3 years). Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to test the effects of the within-subjects factor (control, lunch enhanced, breakfast and lunch enhanced conditions), the between-subjects factor (smaller vs bigger eater), and the interaction on intakes (gram, kilocalories, and protein). Results revealed that bigger eaters consumed considerably more calories when breakfast foods, but not lunch foods, were enhanced. Smaller eaters achieved an increase in energy intake when either breakfast or lunch was enhanced. Overall daily protein intakes were not substantially increased by food enhancement. These data suggest that for an enhanced food program to be most effective for smaller eaters, who are at greatest risk for undernutrition and weight loss, it should include several enhanced foods at more than one meal.

  8. Incorporating Trauma-Informed Care Into School-Based Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sandra L; Ashley, Olivia Silber; White, LeBretia; Axelson, Sarah; Clark, Marc; Burrus, Barri

    2017-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the rationale and process for incorporating trauma-informed approaches into US school-based programs, using school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs as an example. Research literature is reviewed on the prevalence and outcomes of childhood trauma, including the links between trauma and pregnancy. Information is then presented concerning the implementation of trauma-informed approaches in school settings, describing activities undertaken, barriers encountered, and outcomes achieved. Next, we describe the implications of this literature for school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs, outlining the reasons for including trauma-informed approaches in these programs, the prerequisites for doing so, and some examples of successful implementation. Many children in our country experience trauma, placing them at increased risk of multiple health concerns including adolescent pregnancy. In response to this situation, some schools have successfully incorporated trauma-informed approaches into adolescent pregnancy prevention programs, as well as other programming. Incorporating trauma-informed approaches into school settings, including school-based adolescent pregnancy prevention programs, is a viable and important way to address the multiple needs of traumatized children. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  9. Focusing on food during lunch enhances lunch memory and decreases later snack intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Suzanne; Donohoe, Jessica E

    2011-08-01

    We investigated whether eating lunch mindfully, in contrast to eating with distractions or no particular focus, reduces later snack intake and if this is related to a measure of meal memory. The design was between-subjects with three conditions. Twenty-nine female undergraduate students either ate a fixed lunch while (1) focusing on the sensory characteristics of the food as they ate (food focus group), (2) reading a newspaper article about food (food thoughts control group) or (3) in the absence of any secondary task (neutral control group). Cookie intake later that afternoon was measured as well as rated vividness of memory of the lunch. Participants ate significantly fewer cookies in the food focus group than in both the food thoughts control group or the neutral control group. Rated appetite before the snack session was lower in the food focus group than in the other two groups and rated vividness of lunch memory was higher. Rated vividness of lunch memory was negatively correlated with snack intake. These results suggest that enhancing meal memory by paying attention to food while eating can reduce later intake and are consistent with the suggestion that memory plays an important role in appetite control. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Back school programs. The young patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, J P; Drye, C D

    1992-01-01

    CC's treatment goals were all met with the exception of eliminating the AMNT sign. Slump-sit right knee extension (-15 degrees), right SLR (80 degrees coupled with dorsiflexion), and lumbar flexion (85% coupled with neck flexion) all continued to reproduce right buttock cramping and pain. Currently he is playing basketball without restriction, performing an individualized exercise program that emphasizes lower extremity muscle stretching, AMNT stretching, and advanced truncal stabilization exercises. He has a very good understanding of body mechanics and an awareness of safe SFP during activities of daily living and on the basketball court. His motivation, along with the motivation of parents, coaches, athletic trainer, and physical therapist, greatly assisted CC in returning to competitive basketball. CC is intermittently evaluated to monitor the AMNT sign and the effectiveness of the home exercise program. Currently CC's AMNT appears to regress if he is not monitored on a monthly basis; thus he warrants intermittent treatment. Monitoring of the patient is an integral aspect of long-term management of chronic discogenic disease that is often neglected. It can be hypothesized that monitoring may prevent serious complications in the future for many patients. CC is a patient who needed specific therapeutic intervention beyond rest, general instructions about body mechanics and exercise, modalities, and traditional back school. The history of this patient's problem revealed that rest and general exercises had failed, thus necessitating specific therapeutic treatment. This patient is an excellent example of how physical therapy in the form of manual therapy, specific therapeutic exercise, education through repetition of functional tasks, and the team approach to patient care can lead to a successful treatment outcome.

  11. Group Recommender System for Restaurant Lunches

    OpenAIRE

    Hallström, Erik

    2013-01-01

    A group recommender system for lunch restaurants is developed. The user interface is an Android application which is run on a smartphone. The system features a novel approach for implicit rating collection when a user browses a list of item descriptions. The individual recommendation is based on extracting and comparing tf-idf feature vectors of menu texts as well as individual rankings of the restaurants. The group recommender system works by aggregating the individual estimated scores of th...

  12. A School Uniform Program That Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Paul C.

    1995-01-01

    According to advocates, school uniforms reduce gang influence, decrease families' clothing expenditures, and help mitigate potentially divisive cultural and economic differences. Aiming to improve school climate, a California elementary school adopted uniforms as a source of pride and affiliation. This article describes the development of the…

  13. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Building school health partnerships to improve pediatric asthma care: the School-based Asthma Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakumanu, Sujani; Antos, Nicholas; Szefler, Stanley J; Lemanske, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    Children with asthma require care that is seamlessly coordinated so that asthma symptoms are recognized and managed at home and at school. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent consensus recommendations in school-based asthma care. The School-based Asthma Management Program (SAMPRO) provides a widely endorsed framework to coordinate care with schools and consists of four components: establishing a circle of support around the child with asthma; facilitating bidirectional communication between clinicians and schools; comprehensive asthma education for schools; and assessment and remediation of environmental asthma triggers at school. SAMPRO standardizes recommendations for school-based asthma care coordination and provides a toolkit with websites and resources useful for the care of children with asthma in the school setting. The review will discuss the need for coordinated school asthma partnerships, the inception and development of SAMPRO, and its vision to improve pediatric asthma care coordination within the circle of support, comprising clinicians, school nurses, families, and communities.

  15. Position of the American Dietetic Association: local support for nutrition integrity in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ethan A; Gordon, Ruth W

    2010-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) that schools and communities have a shared responsibility to provide students with access to high-quality, affordable, nutritious foods and beverages. School-based nutrition services, including the provision of meals through the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program, are an integral part of the total education program. Strong wellness policies promote environments that enhance nutrition integrity and help students to develop lifelong healthy behaviors. ADA actively supported the 2004 and proposed 2010 Child Nutrition reauthorization which determines school nutrition policy. ADA believes that the Dietary Guidelines for Americans should serve as the foundation for all food and nutrition assistance programs and should apply to all foods and beverages sold or served to students during the school day. Local wellness policies are mandated by federal legislation for all school districts participating in the National School Lunch Program. These policies support nutrition integrity,including a healthy school environment. Nutrition integrity also requires coordinating nutrition education and promotion and funding research on program outcomes. Registered dietitians and dietetic technicians, registered, and other credentialed staff, are essential for nutrition integrity in schools to perform in policy-making, management, education, and community building roles. A healthy school environment can be achieved through adequate funding of school meals programs and through implementation and evaluation of strong local wellness policies.

  16. [Forms of management of the national school meals program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Sérgio Ribeiro; de Sousa Costa, Maria Bernadete; Torres de Paiva Bandeira, Geovanna

    2016-04-01

    The National School Meals Programme (PNAE in Portuguese initials) is a supplementary program to education that aims to provide school meals for pupils across the school system enrolled in public and philanthropic schools of primary education, secondary education, youth education, adult education and comprehensive education. The principles of the program are the universality and the expansion of student services in order to meet the Organic Law on Food and Nutritional Security (LOSAN), as well as the Food Security and Nutrition System. The objective of this study is to discuss forms of PNAE management to ensure that the students' right to school meals. This study is a reflection on how the resources of school meals are being managed, be it with a centralized, decentralized, semi-centralized or outsourced model. We conclude that the knowledge of the different forms of managing federal resources for food for school communities allows for making an informed choice regarding implementation and enforcement of PNAE.

  17. Active and Healthy Lifestyle - Nationwide Programs in Israeli Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zach, Sima; Inglis, Varda; Zeev, Aviva; Arnon, Michal; Netz, Yael

    2017-07-03

    The World Health Organization (WHO) announced the 'Global School Health Initiative' in 1995 following recommendations formulated in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Hence, the aims of the present study were to describe the various programs for nurturing an active and healthy lifestyle implemented during 2011-12 in schools in Israel, and to identify variables that may explain the success versus lack of success in implementing these programs. Participants were a nationwide representative sample of 126 school principals from six supervisory districts of the Ministry of Education, including six sectors, from the elementary, junior-high and senior-high school levels. Semi-structured telephone interviews were recorded and processed using the ATLAS.ti software for qualitative analysis. Physical education teachers, sciences teachers and social coordinators led the programs' implementation. The programs included four main activities domains: health, physical education, nutrition and sustainability. Three types of program implementation were observed: leading principles, teaching methods, and external programs. Parents were involved mostly in elementary schools. Evidence of program integration into school life was presented by changes in children's behaviors, whereas difficulties stemmed from lack of budget and teaching hours. Science and physical education lessons constituted the anchor for the programs. The schools needed a committed leader to help conduct and maintain the program. Thus, the role of the school principal was to initiate the idea of developing a program, encourage its implementation, select a leader for the program, and then, most importantly, to reinforce the teachers' enthusiasm. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The Cost of Quality Out-of-School-Time Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Lind, Christianne; Hayes, Cheryl; McMaken, Jennifer; Gersick, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Funders and program planners want to know: What does it cost to operate a high-quality after-school or summer program? This study answers that question, discovering that there is no "right" number. Cost varies substantially, depending on the characteristics of the participants, the goals of the program, who operates it and where it is located.…

  19. Transformational Leadership in a High School Choral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen Brian

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a high school choral program to discover how the leadership behaviors of the teacher contributed to the success of the program. The teacher's leadership behaviors were examined through the framework of Transformational Leadership. Criteria for the selection of this program included a recent performance at a…

  20. Lifeskills Program Evaluation at Mammoth Heights Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Emma Moss

    2016-01-01

    This study is a program evaluation of the Life Skills Program at Mammoth Heights Elementary in the Douglas County School District. The overall goal of the Life Skills Program is to increase students' independent and daily living skills through the teaching of communication, social-emotional skills and academic skills. Students in the Life Skills…

  1. School feeding programs' role in forming eating habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervato-Mancuso, Ana Maria; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Araki, Erica Lie; Bógus, Claudia Maria

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify teaching managers' perceptions regarding the relationship of school feeding and the promotion of healthy eating habits among students. METHODS A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was developed in the city of Guarulhos (Southeast Brazil). Key informants from municipal public schools were interviewed. Public schools were selected (n=13) and classified as to the level of social exclusion, size and economic activity of the region where the school was located. Pedagogic coordinators and school principals were individually interviewed with semi-structured questions. RESULTS From school principals and pedagogical coordinators' perceptions, three categories were identified: Food in the school context; School feeding program's role and the Concept of food and nutrition security, which indicate that they considered meals as part of school routine in order to attain physiological needs of energy and nutrients. Their answers also indicated that they did not consider school meals as a pedagogical action related to their specific responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The relationship between the school feeding and the formation of eating habits is not a topic usually discussed between the different professionals involved with health and education. The implementation of health promoting policies will only be possible after a debate about how schools and their pedagogical team adopt the program guidelines and how the professionals decode these strategies in daily activities.

  2. School feeding programs' role in forming eating habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Cervato-Mancuso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To identify teaching managers' perceptions regarding the relationship of school feeding and the promotion of healthy eating habits among students. METHODS A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was developed in the city of Guarulhos (Southeast Brazil. Key informants from municipal public schools were interviewed. Public schools were selected (n=13 and classified as to the level of social exclusion, size and economic activity of the region where the school was located. Pedagogic coordinators and school principals were individually interviewed with semi-structured questions. RESULTS From school principals and pedagogical coordinators' perceptions, three categories were identified: Food in the school context; School feeding program's role and the Concept of food and nutrition security, which indicate that they considered meals as part of school routine in order to attain physiological needs of energy and nutrients. Their answers also indicated that they did not consider school meals as a pedagogical action related to their specific responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The relationship between the school feeding and the formation of eating habits is not a topic usually discussed between the different professionals involved with health and education. The implementation of health promoting policies will only be possible after a debate about how schools and their pedagogical team adopt the program guidelines and how the professionals decode these strategies in daily activities.

  3. 4-H After-School Program: Bloco Drum and Dance, Part 3. Fundraising for Your Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Conklin-Ginop, Evelyn L; Junge, Sharon K; Pulley, Karyn

    2012-01-01

    Part 3 of the curriculum: Fundraising for Your Program. With this 11-part curriculum, you can set up an after-school program that teaches teens leadership, fitness, and good nutrition in an exciting music-and-dance environment.

  4. Evaluation of the Pilot Program for Home School and ChalleNGe Program Recruits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, F

    2001-01-01

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (FY 99) directed a 5-year pilot program to treat graduates of home schools and graduates of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program holding General Education Development (GED...

  5. Implementing a School-Located Vaccination Program in Denver Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlay, Judith C.; Rodgers, Sarah; Lyons, Jean; Romero, Scott; Vogt, Tara M.; McCormick, Emily V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: School-located vaccination (SLV) offers an opportunity to deliver vaccines to students, particularly those without a primary care provider. Methods: This SLV program offered 2 clinics at each of 20 elementary schools (influenza vaccine) and 3 clinics at each of 7 middle/preschool-eighth-grade schools (adolescent platform plus catch-up…

  6. Program Evaluation on the Implementation of a Middle School Concept in Private Christian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James Chapman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of implementing a middle school concept in three private Christian schools using Daniel Stufflebeam's CIPP model of program evaluation. The National Middle School Survey was used to measure faculty and administrative perceptions of both the value and actual implementation of middle school…

  7. School-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Programs in High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj; Branscum, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse, or substance abuse, is a substantial public health problem in the United States, particularly among high school students. The purpose of this article was to review school-based programs implemented in high schools for substance abuse prevention and to suggest recommendations for future interventions. Included were English language…

  8. A Community-Based Volunteer After-School Activity Program Created for Middle School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaser, Thomas C., Jr.

    This practicum was designed to provide an after-school activity program to middle school students not engaged in interscholastic sports. Utilizing community volunteers, an enrichment-prevention program that featured 19 different activities in 2 class sessions per week over a 10-week period was developed and implemented. Activities included…

  9. Schools behind Bars: Windham School System and Other Prison Education Programs. A Performance Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MGT of America, Inc., Tallahassee, FL.

    This report presents results of a performance review undertaken to develop recommendations for improving the effectiveness of the Windham School System (WSS) and educational programs in the four privately operated prison units in Texas. (WSS provides educational programs for inmates who do not possess a high school diploma.) Chapter 1 is an…

  10. The Effects of Participation in School Instrumental Music Programs on Student Academic Achievement and School Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Kevin O.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether or not students that participated in a school sponsored instrumental music program had higher academic achievement and attendance than students that did not participate in a school sponsor instrumental music program. Units of measurement included standardized test scores and attendance, without taking into consideration…

  11. The Bridges SOI Model School Program at Palo Verde School, Palo Verde, Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, William A.; DiSalvo, Pamela M.

    The Bridges SOI Model School Program is an educational service based upon the SOI (Structure of Intellect) Model School curriculum. For the middle seven months of the academic year, all students in the program complete brief daily exercises that develop specific cognitive skills delineated in the SOI model. Additionally, intensive individual…

  12. Measures and programs for preventing violence in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gašić-Pavišić Slobodanka Ž.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In many countries across the world schools are no longer a safe place for both students and school staff. Violence in school is an issue scarcely studied in Serbia and there are few articles in domestic professional literature. At national and local level there are not developed strategies nor programs for preventing violence among students in our schools. There are no data about planned, systematic and organized prevention of violence in the practice of our schools. The data obtained by investigations indicate that it is necessary to apply adequate programs for preventing violence among students in our schools, despite the finding that violence in school is not that much conspicuous and serious problem like in other countries (USA Israel, Japan, Austria, Germany. On the basis of relevant literature review the present paper high­lights some very popular and less notorious measures and prevention programs applied in various countries. The aim of the paper is to transmit basic and essential pieces of information so as to gain insight into diverse existing approaches to prevention of violent behavior in school hopefully to encourage our schools to pay more attention to preventing violence in school as soon as possible before it is too late.

  13. School-community partnerships: a cluster-randomized trial of an after-school soccer program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kristine; Thompson, Hannah; Adkins, Amy; Crawford, Yashica

    2013-04-01

    Identifying community-based programs that increase physical activity among diverse youth could yield sustainable tools to reduce obesity and obesity disparities. To evaluate the impact of a community-based after-school soccer and youth development program, America SCORES, on students' physical activity, weight status, and fitness. Cluster-randomized trial. Study measures were collected in the fall (baseline), winter (midpoint), and spring (end point) of the 2009-2010 school year. After-school programs in 6 schools within a large urban school district. All 4th and 5th grade students in after-school programs at the study schools were eligible. Three schools were randomized to receive the SCORES after-school program, delivered via the train-the-trainer model. Change in minutes of after-school moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), fitness (maximal oxygen consumption), and body mass index over 1 school year. Participants (n = 156) were diverse (42% Latino, 32% Asian, and 12% African American) and 76 (49%) had a body mass index at or above the 85th percentile. There were no significant group differences in the change in physical activity, fitness, or weight status among all students. However, among students with a body mass index at or above the 85th percentile, SCORES significantly increased MVPA after school (3.4 min/d; 95% CI, 0.3-6.5) and on Saturdays (18.5 minutes; 95% CI, 3.4-33.6). Existing community-based programs such as SCORES can increase physical activity among low-income youth, particularly those most at risk for weight-related comorbidities. While evaluating existing programs presents special challenges, partnerships between communities, schools, and researchers are an important component of translational research to address obesity. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01156103.

  14. 25 CFR 39.132 - Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can a school integrate Language Development programs into... Language Development Programs § 39.132 Can a school integrate Language Development programs into its regular instructional program? A school may offer Language Development programs to students as part of its...

  15. A systematic review of school-based suicide prevention programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Cara; Bolton, Shay-Lee; Katz, Laurence Y; Isaak, Corinne; Tilston-Jones, Toni; Sareen, Jitender

    2013-10-01

    Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among youth today. Schools are a cost-effective way to reach youth, yet there is no conclusive evidence regarding the most effective prevention strategy. We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on school-based suicide prevention programs. Studies were identified through MEDLINE and Scopus searches, using keywords such as "suicide, education, prevention and program evaluation." Additional studies were identified with a manual search of relevant reference lists. Individual studies were rated for level of evidence, and the programs were given a grade of recommendation. Five reviewers rated all studies independently and disagreements were resolved through discussion. Sixteen programs were identified. Few programs have been evaluated for their effectiveness in reducing suicide attempts. Most studies evaluated the programs' abilities to improve students' and school staffs' knowledge and attitudes toward suicide. Signs of Suicide and the Good Behavior Game were the only programs found to reduce suicide attempts. Several other programs were found to reduce suicidal ideation, improve general life skills, and change gatekeeper behaviors. There are few evidence-based, school-based suicide prevention programs, a combination of which may be effective. It would be useful to evaluate the effectiveness of general mental health promotion programs on the outcome of suicide. The grades assigned in this review are reflective of the available literature, demonstrating a lack of randomized controlled trials. Further evaluation of programs examining suicidal behavior outcomes in randomized controlled trials is warranted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effect of school wellness policies and the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act on food-consumption behaviors of students, 2006-2016: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Jennifer L; Savaiano, Dennis A

    2017-07-01

    Federal regulation mandates that the US National School Lunch Program nutrition standards align with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. As students consume a substantial proportion of their nutrition during school lunch, increasing access to healthy foods is proposed to improve student dietary outcomes. The purpose of this review is to assess whether policy changes impacted food-consumption behaviors of students during periods when (1) school wellness policies were implemented (2006-2007); (2) the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act was passed (2010-2012); and (3) the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act was implemented (2012-present). PubMed, Web of Science, and Science Direct were searched for primary research studies. Policy evaluations and interventions implemented from 2006 to 2016 were included. A total of 31 studies evaluating plate waste, dietary intake, food selection, and/or purchasing patterns were identified and reviewed. Fourteen of 19 intervention and longitudinal observation studies reported improved food-consumption behaviors (increased selection, intake, and sales of healthy foods, and decreased plate waste). Only 2 of 12 one-time observation studies reported food-consumption behaviors meeting target nutrition standards. The majority of studies indicated that increasing access to healthy foods during school lunch improved students' dietary intakes. Challenges related to study design, adaptation period, quality of foods, and policy implementation likely affect a school lunch program's ability to impact students' food-consumption behaviors. Ongoing evaluation of these programs is warranted.

  17. Accuracy of food photographs for quantifying food servings in a lunch meal setting among Danish children and adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Nielsen, Trine Holmgaard; Ygil, Karin Hess

    2017-01-01

    canteens and in two schools, respectively, to estimate their lunchtime portions based on photographs. Participants were instructed to keep the foods separated on their plate when taking lunch. Participants thereafter estimated their own portions by looking at the relevant series of photographs. The actual...

  18. Teen Suicide in Nevada: The Problem, Effective Intervention & Prevention Programs, Status of Programs in Nevada Schools, Exemplary Programs, [and] Guidelines for Nevada School Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaby, Marlow H.; Downing, Jerry

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: it reviews current national research on adolescent suicide and successful intervention/prevention programs and it surveys the 17 Nevada school districts to determine the presence of successful suicide intervention/prevention programs in the state. Findings include the following: (1) the popular…

  19. Pair Programming and Secondary School Girls' Enjoyment of Programming and the Subject Information Technology (IT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, Janet; Mentz, Elsa; Breed, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study that examined how pair programming shapes the experience of secondary school girls taking IT as a subject, with respect to their enjoyment of programming and the subject itself. The study involved six Grade 11 girls who were doing solo programming in Grade 10 and pair programming in their following Grade.…

  20. Effective Inclusive Schools: Designing Successful Schoolwide Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehir, Thomas; Katzman, Lauren I.

    2012-01-01

    This book presents lessons learned from in-depth case studies of some of our most effective inclusive public schools. The authors conclusively demonstrate that schools can educate students with mild and severe disabilities in general education classrooms by providing special education services that link to and bolster general education…

  1. Development of Effective Teacher Program: Teamwork Building Program for Thailand's Municipal Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantathai, Pimpka; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn

    2015-01-01

    This research is aimed to formulate the effective teacher teamwork program in municipal schools in Thailand. Primary survey on current situation and problem was conducted to develop the plan to suggest potential programs. Samples were randomly selected from municipal schools by using multi-stage sampling method in order to investigate their…

  2. High school sports programs differentially impact participation by sex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith M. Drake Meghan R. Longacre Todd MacKenzie Linda J. Titus Michael L. Beach Andrew G. Rundle Madeline A. Dalton

    ... differentially influence boys' and girls' participation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of high school athletic programs and determine the extent to which these characteristics influenced boys' and girls...

  3. Schooling feeding versus scholarship program : which one is key to ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Schooling feeding versus scholarship program : which one is key to help children learn reading, writing and simple calculation skills?; final draft report. Pheakdey Em; Pheakdey Pheap. URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10625/54705. Date: 2013-10 ...

  4. A comparative study of mid-day meal beneficiaries and private school attendees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi Bhargava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: India is undergoing a rapid demographic transition accompanied by an epidemiologic and nutritional transition. The nutritional status of school-going children who form a major section of the population, can give an indication of the changing trends in nutritional profile of the population. According to Planning Commission report, 2010, Mid Day Meal (MDM Program has been successful in addressing classroom hunger and the objective of social equity in government school attendees. Aims & Objectives: To study the pattern of school lunch intake and nutritional status in private and government school-going children of district Dehradun. Material & Methods: This was an observational cross-sectional study in district Dehradun in government and private schools, with participants from class 1 to 12. A 24-hour dietary recall was done to measure caloric intake. Height and weight were measured using Microtoise (accuracy 0.1cm and digital weighing machine (Omron Model: HN286, accuracy 100 gm. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS, version 22. Nutritional status was classified using WHO cut-offs and analyzed using AnthroPlus Software. Student t-test was used to compare caloric intake of subgroups. Association between nutritional status and other variables was assessed using Chi-squared test. Results: Using WHO cut-offs, the proportion of thin children was 5.4% in private school and 21.5% in MDM beneficiaries of government schools. The proportion of children who were overweight was 27.7% in private schools and 3.6% in government schools (p<.0.05. The caloric content of school lunch was 271 Kcal in private school attendees and 375 Kcal in MDM beneficiaries. Proportion of children who skipped school lunch increased as they progressed in higher classes, and this proportion was greater in students of government schools beyond class VIII. Conclusion: The study highlights the need for more large scale nutritional surveys with school lunch in focus.

  5. High school sports programs differentially impact participation by sex

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, Keith M.; Longacre, Meghan R.; MacKenzie, Todd; Titus, Linda J.; Beach, Michael L; Rundle, Andrew G.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among numerous health benefits, sports participation has been shown to reduce the risk of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Schools represent an ideal environment for increasing sports participation, but it is unclear how access and choice influence participation and whether characteristics of the school sports program differentially influence boys' and girls' participation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of high school athletic pro...

  6. Effect of a School-Based Intervention on Nutritional Knowledge and Habits of Low-Socioeconomic School Children in Israel: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Kaufman-Shriqui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Early social and economic deprivation, associated with poor nutrition and physical inactivity, may lead to adverse health trajectories. A cluster-randomized controlled-trial examining the effect of a school-based comprehensive intervention on nutrition knowledge, eating habits, and behaviors among low socioeconomic status (LSES school-aged children was performed. LSES school-aged children (4–7 years and their mothers were recruited from 11 schools, located in one town. The intervention was implemented on three levels: children, mothers, and teachers. The intervention (IArm included nutrition classes for children, mothers, and teachers and physical activity (PA classes for children; the control (CArm received PA only. Interventions were conducted by professional personnel, who were trained during in a two-day session to deliver the specific program in schools. Family data were obtained by parental interviews. Food knowledge observations, packed lunch records, and anthropometric measurements were obtained in school at baseline, six months, and at the end of the school year. Of 258 children enrolled, 220 (87.6% completed the six-month program. Only children in the IArm improved their nutrition knowledge and eating-habits and increased food variety and fruit and vegetable consumption, quality score of packed lunches (p < 0.001 for all, habitual water drinking increased (p = 0.02, and decreased sweet-drink consumption (p = 0.05. A school-based comprehensive nutrition intervention targeting LSES population improved eating habits, nutritional knowledge, and healthier packed lunches.

  7. Adoption of Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Kari; Metzler, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has provided preliminary insight into the implementation of Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program (CSPAP) components in P-12 schools, but additional empirical support is needed to establish the CSPAP model as a viable conceptual framework. The purpose of this review is to examine the extent to which the CSPAP framework is…

  8. 78 FR 26758 - Applications for New Awards; School Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    ... current principals (including current assistant principals) to foster mastery of core leadership skills...) Help them master essential school leadership skills, such as evaluating and providing feedback to... Applications for New Awards; School Leadership Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department...

  9. Accounting Cluster Demonstration Program at Aloha High School. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaverton School District 48, OR.

    A model high school accounting cluster program was planned, developed, implemented, and evaluated in the Beaverton, Oregon, school district. The curriculum was developed with the help of representatives from the accounting occupations in the Portland metropolitan area. Through management interviews, identification of on-the job requirements, and…

  10. Transformational Leaders Wanted: Dallas Independent School District's Aspiring Principals Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, Jennifer Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the development, implementation, and impact of the Dallas Independent School District's (ISD) Aspiring Principals Program. This study of principal preparation has relevance as a K-16 issue for two primary reasons. First, K-12 schools are focused on graduating students who are college and…

  11. A School Social Worker's Impact on a Human Sexuality Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolley-Simic, Josie; Vonk, M. Elizabeth; Ellsworth, William

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the roles and skills of a school social worker assisting a school district in developing a human sexuality education program. Specific challenges faced by the social worker are discussed, and alternatives to several of the social worker's decisions are explored. Specifically, decisions made by the social worker regarding…

  12. 75 FR 32235 - Exchange Visitor Program-Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... school student exchange programs among the general public, the Department will hold this public meeting... in the secondary school student exchange industry (See 74 FR 45385, Sept. 2, 2009). In response to... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Exchange...

  13. Family, School, and Community Partnerships: Practical Strategies for Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn-Stevenson, Matia

    2014-01-01

    Much attention is given today to the importance of forging family, school, and community partnerships. Growing numbers of schools, many of them with afterschool programs, are dedicating resources to support and sustain relationships with families and community-based organizations. And, among government agencies and the philanthropic sector, there…

  14. Developing Program of Creative Leadership for School Administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattana Pakika

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of the research were 1 to investigate components and indicators for creating creative leadership of school administrators, 2 to analyze current conditions, strategies and needs for creating the leadership,3 to develop a program for fostering creative leadership for school administrators and 4 to evaluate results of the program implementation. The research methodology was divided into 4 phases: 1 study of components and indicators for creative leadership from seven experts, 2 analysis of current situation and strategies for developing creative leadership program based on the data collected from 1,225 sample subjects, 3 design of a creative leadership program for school administrators assessed by seven experts, and 4 implementation of the program to ten school administrators. The thirty key informants for the leadership development program consisted of school administrators, academicians, and chairmen of the basic education committee. The statistics using for data analysis included the percentage, mean, standard deviation, modified priority needs index (PNImodified, and t-test. The results of the research were as follows: 1 The findings indicted that there were four key components, each comprising several indicators. These components and indicators for creative leadership consisted of imagination with three indicators: creative ideas, humor and a problem-solving, flexibility with three indicators: independent thinking ability, adaptability, and modernization/ acceptance of new ideas ; vision with three indicators: creation, promotion and implementation and trustworthiness with three indicators: extroversion, confidence and support for others.2 the overall condition of the creative leadership of school administrators was at a high level, and the overall need of the school administrators for creating creative leadership was at the highest level. Four strategies regarding of creating creative leadership were training, self study, field

  15. Opportunities for pregnant and parenting teenagers: a school-based and school-linked intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, M L; Solomon, C; Glass, M B

    1999-12-01

    Three hundred and ninety (390) pregnant and parenting teens participated in a school-based and school-linked federally funded program at 10 high-risk schools. The program was designed to (1) increase the use of referred services and attendance at these services without students' missing school, (2) increase academic skills, and (3) increase health and well-being of the students and their infants. The program provided 18 services coordinated at the school or provided on site. The end-of-year evaluations indicated 88% to 95% of teens attended services that were recommended, and 69% did not miss school to receive these services. The teens' rate of passing their grade level increased at the end of the program year. Additionally, 78% used birth control, and over 90% of the infants received timely health care. The qualitative data provided by students indicated pregnant and parenting teens wanted to remain in school despite the struggles they encountered. The process evaluation provided by the coordinators at each school indicated that communication and cooperation between program staff and school nurses were the key elements in enabling teens to receive the targeted services.

  16. Student Engagement in After-School Programs, Academic Skills, and Social Competence among Elementary School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E. Grogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the relationship between after-school program participation and student outcomes has been mixed, and beneficial effects have been small. More recent studies suggest that participation is best characterized as a multidimensional concept that includes enrollment, attendance, and engagement, which help explain differences in student outcomes. The present study uses data from a longitudinal study of after-school programs in elementary schools to examine staff ratings of student engagement in after-school activities and the association between engagement and school outcomes. The factor structure of the staff-rated measure of student engagement was examined by exploratory factor analysis. Multiple regression analyses found that student engagement in academic, youth development, and arts after-school program activities was significantly related to changes in teacher ratings of academic skills and social competence over the course of the school year and that students with the greatest increase in academic skills both were highly engaged in activities and attended the after-school program regularly. The results of this study provide additional evidence regarding the benefits of after-school programs and the importance of student engagement when assessing student outcomes.

  17. Breaking Child Nutrition Barriers: Innovative Practices in Massachusetts School Breakfast, Summer Food, and After-School Snack Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bryan

    Despite the importance of breakfast, summer, and after-school child nutrition programs, coverage in these programs in Massachusetts is low. This report describes the barriers facing the states School Breakfast, Summer Food Service, and After-School Snack Programs and suggests many innovative solutions and resources that program sponsors can use to…

  18. Willard School Primary Reading Program, Pasadena, Calif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasadena City Unified School District, CA.

    This program, included in "Effective Reading Programs...," serves 460 students in grades one through three and includes black, white, and Spanish-surname children. Begun in 1971, the program uses the Ransom taxonomy of reading skills and Ransom criterion-referenced tests. The group tests, correlated with major basal readers, are…

  19. Space Science for Middle School Teachers: Integrating CINDI E/PO into a Long-Term Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M. R.

    2005-12-01

    Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) targeting pre-college education can be focused on teachers or students, but is ultimately only effective if it impacts classrooms. A challenge in the teacher workshop model is tracking the impact we have actually made. Teachers may be excited by our offerings, and rate workshops highly, but is our E/PO actually making a difference with pre-college students? In June 2005 we ran our second four-day teacher workshop for the joint NASA/U.S. Air Force sponsored ionospheric instrument package, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) with a new twist. We experimented with the integration of our workshop into a long-term professional development program for 6th and 7th grade teachers at UT Dallas. Immediate direct benefits to the CINDI E/PO program included knowledge of teacher backgrounds prior to the workshop, a narrow target grade level range, and the elimination of the need for separate recruiting efforts. More importantly, by working within a year-long program supported by a Teacher Quality Grant we have been able to better assess teacher learning and the impact our outreach efforts is having on the middle school students of participants. The 20-contact hours our workshop contributed to the Teacher Quality Summer Institute were specifically designed to meet Texas standards for middle school science, and made connections between space weather, Earth systems, basic physics, technology, and communications. Participants were able to interact with members of the science team in formal settings and over casual lunches. We will present our motivations for this experiment, participant feedback, and lessons learned. In addition, we will give an update on our CINDI Educator Guide, and the newly completed Cindi in Space comic book. For the latest on CINDI E/PO, curriculum materials, and the comic book in pdf format, go to http://cindispace.utdallas.edu/education/.

  20. A Method for Evaluating Physical Activity Programs in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cheryl; Carpenter, Dick; Tucker, Elizabeth; Luna, Carmen; Donovan, John; Behrens, Timothy K

    2017-09-14

    Providing opportunities for students to be physically active during the school day leads to increased academic performance, better focus, and fewer behavioral problems. As schools begin to incorporate more physical activity programming into the school day, evaluators need methods to measure how much physical activity students are being offered through this programming. Because classroom-based physical activity is often offered in 3-minute to 5-minute bouts at various times of the day, depending on the teachers' time to incorporate it, it is a challenge to evaluate this activity. This article describes a method to estimate the number of physical activity minutes provided before, during, and after school. The web-based tool can be used to gather data cost-effectively from a large number of schools. Strategies to increase teacher response rates and assess intensity of activity should be explored.

  1. Elementary school principals' perceptions of childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J H; Desmond, S M; Stelzer, C M

    1987-11-01

    This survey assessed school principals' perceptions regarding childhood obesity and the schools' role in dealing with the problem. A randomly selected group of 300 school principals was obtained from the National Association of Elementary School Principals; 227 (76%) administrators returned the questionnaire. Fifty-one percent of the principals believed normal weight was important to child health. Although 35% believed schools were not doing enough to alleviate childhood obesity, responses suggested principals oppose schools becoming obesity treatment centers. They do not believe teachers or parents would support such programs. They perceived the school's role to be educational and referral in nature. However, they supported elimination of "junk food" machines (71%) and provision of low calorie lunches (60%). They believed school nurses play the most important role in treating childhood obesity at school.

  2. Comparison of lunch consumed by corporate workers and artisans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lunch is one meal often eaten away from home because it is eaten during official working hours. Foods eaten away from home have been reported to have high sodium, saturated fat and refined sugar content. Objective: This study compared the lunch choices of Ghanaian corporate workers and artisans and ...

  3. Wisconsin Farm to School Programs: Dietary Outcomes in Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontrager Yoder, Andrea Beth H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. High overweight and obesity prevalence has instigated many programs to improve children's health. Farm to School (F2S) is a grassroots-organized program that seeks to improve children's dietary habits, especially fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption, through various educational activities. Long-term goals include reducing obesity…

  4. Enabling Tailored Music Programs in Elementary Schools: An Australian Exemplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina Skewes; Crooke, Alexander Hew Dale

    2014-01-01

    Participation in meaningful school music programs is the right of all children. Although music education is widely supported by policy, significant gaps exist in practice in most developed Western countries. These gaps mean the extrinsic and intrinsic benefits associated with participation in tailored programs are not equally available to all…

  5. Evaluation of School-Based Smoking Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Laura; Iobst, Emily A.; McGrady, Meghan E.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of individuals who will become "smokers" begin smoking during their teenage years. Schools are optimal settings for relaying messages about health risks associated with smoking and for implementing smoking prevention programs. This article presents successful components of smoking prevention programs, describes the evaluation process,…

  6. High School Completion Programs: A Community Guide Systematic Economic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shuli; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K; Hahn, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    On-time high school graduation rate is among the 26 leading health indicators for Healthy People 2020. High school completion (HSC) programs aim to increase the likelihood that students finish high school and receive a high school diploma or complete a GED (General Educational Development) program. This systematic review was conducted to determine the economic impact of HSC interventions, assess variability in cost-effectiveness of different types of programs, and compare the lifetime benefit of completing high school with the cost of intervention. Forty-seven included studies were identified from 5303 articles published in English from January 1985 to December 2012. The economic evidence was summarized by type of HSC program. All monetary values were expressed in 2012 US dollars. The data were analyzed in 2013. Thirty-seven studies provided estimates of incremental cost per additional high school graduate, with a median cost for HSC programs of $69 800 (interquartile interval = $35 900-$130 300). Cost-effectiveness ratios varied depending on intervention type, study settings, student populations, and costing methodologies. Ten studies estimated the lifetime difference of economic benefits between high school nongraduates and graduates; 4 used a governmental perspective and reported benefit per additional high school to range from $187 000 to $240 000; 6 used a societal perspective and reported a range of $347 000 to $718 000. Benefits exceeded costs in most studies from a governmental perspective and in all studies from a societal perspective. Interventions to increase HSC rates produce substantial economic benefits to government and society including averted health care costs. From a societal perspective, the benefits also exceed costs, implying a positive rate of return from investment in HSC programs.

  7. Effect of a School-Based Intervention on Nutritional Knowledge and Habits of Low-Socioeconomic School Children in Israel: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman-Shriqui, Vered; Fraser, Drora; Friger, Michael; Geva, Dikla; Bilenko, Natalya; Vardi, Hillel; Elhadad, Naama; Mor, Karen; Feine, Zvi; Shahar, Danit R.

    2016-01-01

    Early social and economic deprivation, associated with poor nutrition and physical inactivity, may lead to adverse health trajectories. A cluster-randomized controlled-trial examining the effect of a school-based comprehensive intervention on nutrition knowledge, eating habits, and behaviors among low socioeconomic status (LSES) school-aged children was performed. LSES school-aged children (4–7 years) and their mothers were recruited from 11 schools, located in one town. The intervention was implemented on three levels: children, mothers, and teachers. The intervention (IArm) included nutrition classes for children, mothers, and teachers and physical activity (PA) classes for children; the control (CArm) received PA only. Interventions were conducted by professional personnel, who were trained during in a two-day session to deliver the specific program in schools. Family data were obtained by parental interviews. Food knowledge observations, packed lunch records, and anthropometric measurements were obtained in school at baseline, six months, and at the end of the school year. Of 258 children enrolled, 220 (87.6%) completed the six-month program. Only children in the IArm improved their nutrition knowledge and eating-habits and increased food variety and fruit and vegetable consumption, quality score of packed lunches (p nutrition intervention targeting LSES population improved eating habits, nutritional knowledge, and healthier packed lunches. PMID:27110817

  8. The Lamont-Doherty Secondary School Field Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Shaw, A.

    2007-12-01

    Three years ago the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory instituted an educational outreach program with several New York City high schools. The schools all serve lower-income students (greater than 90 percent Title 1 eligible), and are focused on the STEM disciplines as potentially "leveling" areas, where motivated students can make up ground if properly supported. The program enlists high school teachers and several of their students to work alongside Lamont scientists on funded research programs that have a local (NYC/Hudson Valley) field and/or laboratory measurement component. The program runs full-time for 6 weeks in the summer and continues through laboratory visits and enhanced curriculum during the school year. Preliminary results are positive: teachers report that the program has deepened their curriculum; heightened their enthusiasm; and expanded their view of their students' potential. Nearly all of the participating students are college bound, and several are working their way through their freshmen year in college as laboratory technicians. In addition, the participating teachers and students have been able to collect large numbers of samples in the Hudson estuary, contributing concretely to funded research there. Lessons learned and best practices will be discussed for expanding such partnerships, with a focus on issues faced by partnerships between research scientists and public school science programs in urban areas.

  9. Reducing the use of sugar in public schools: a randomized cluster trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rita Adriana Gomes de; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Souza, Amanda de Moura; Sichieri, Rosely

    2013-08-01

    To test the efficacy of nutritional guidelines for school lunch cooks aiming to reduce added sugar in school meals and their own sugar intake. A controlled randomized cluster trial was carried out in twenty public schools in the municipality of Niteroi in Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil, from March to December 2007. A nutrition educational program was implemented in the schools in question through messages, activities and printed educational materials encouraging reduced levels of added sugar in school meals and in the school lunch cooks' own intake. The reduced availability of added sugar in schools was evaluated using spreadsheets including data on the monthly use of food item supplies. The cooks' individual food intake was evaluated by a Food Frequency Questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements were taken according to standardized techniques and variation in weight was measured throughout the duration of the study. There was a more marked reduction in the intervention schools compared to the control schools (-6.0 kg versus 0.34 kg), but no statistically significant difference (p = 0.21), although the study power was low. Both groups of school lunch cooks showed a reduction in the consumption of sweets and sweetened beverages, but the difference in sugar intake was not statistically significant. Weight loss and a reduction in total energy consumption occurred in both groups, but the difference between them was not statistically significant, and there was no alteration in the percentages of adequacy of macronutrients in relation to energy consumption. The strategy of reducing the use and consumption of sugar by school lunch cooks from public schools could not be proved to be effective.

  10. Health Education Program on Stress Management for High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    林, 姫辰; 衛藤, 隆

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a health education program on stress management for high school students. In this program, we intended students to understand the effects of stressors on their mental and physical health, to be aware of their own stress and coping patterns, and to cope and behave in more improved manners. Learning activities in this program consist of brain storming, mapping of stress coping, drawing their own profiles of stressors, stress coping, and stress responses,...

  11. The Effect of Sugar and Processed Food on Student On-Task Behavior in the National School Lunch Program: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Britt L.

    2010-01-01

    Not too long ago, people in the United States ate real, fresh, seasonal food. Today, the prevalence of low quality foods has made it increasingly challenging to feed young children healthy, nutritionally balanced meals. Furthermore, what a child eats is often limited by his/her parents' income. Inexpensive food is often processed, full of…

  12. Characteristics associated with US Walk to School programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelon Brian

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Participation in Walk to School (WTS programs has grown substantially in the US since its inception; however, no attempt has been made to systematically describe program use or factors associated with implementation of environment/policy changes. Objective Describe the characteristics of schools' WTS programs by level of implementation. Methods Representatives from 450 schools from 42 states completed a survey about their WTS program's infrastructure and activities, and perceived impact on walking to school. Level of implementation was determined from a single question to which respondents reported participation in WTS Day only (low, WTS Day and additional programs (medium, or making policy/environmental change (high. Results The final model showed number of community groups involved was positively associated with higher level of implementation (OR = 1.78, 95%CI = 1.44, 2.18, as was funding (OR = 1.56, 95%CI = 1.26, 1.92, years of participation (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.23, 1.70, and use of a walkability assessment (OR = 3.22, 95%CI = 1.84, 5.64. Implementation level was modestly associated with increased walking (r = 0.18. Conclusion Strong community involvement, some funding, repeat participation, and environmental audits are associated with progms that adopt environmental/policy change, and seem to facilitate walking to school.

  13. "School within a School": Examining Implementation Barriers in a Spanish/English Transitional Bilingual Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNicolo, Christina Passos

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the ways that general education and bilingual teachers make sense of a Spanish/English transitional bilingual program housed at one elementary school in a Midwestern school district. An in-depth examination of perceptions and attitudes unmasks key factors regarding the implementation and interpretation of bilingual programs…

  14. Implementing and Sustaining School-Located Influenza Vaccination Programs: Perspectives from Five Diverse School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dulmini; Sanchez, Kathleen M.; Blackwell, Susan H.; Weinstein, Eva; El Amin, A. Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Local health departments have typically led school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) programs, assuming resource-intensive roles in design, coordination, and vaccination. This level of involvement is often not financially sustainable over time. Five diverse school districts in Los Angeles County designed, implemented, refined, and…

  15. School Nutrition Directors' Perceptions of Technology Use in School Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Peggy; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study investigated the types of technology/software currently used by Southwest Region school nutrition directors (SNDs) and assessed their perceptions of barriers to purchasing new technology/software. In addition, the importance of future technology/software acquisitions in meeting school nutrition program (SNP) goals…

  16. Program Evaluation for School Improvement: Guidelines for School Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Warna D.

    1995-01-01

    Fourth-generation program evaluation is a collaborative, responsive approach that attaches great importance to the claims, concerns, and issues set forth by various stakeholders. This model stresses value pluralism and has several community-involvement phases: planning, data collection, results, final evaluation report, and follow-up. (20…

  17. Empowering adolescents with life skills education in schools - School mental health program: Does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikala, Bharath; Kishore, Kumar K V

    2010-10-01

    Mental Health Promotion among adolescents in schools using life skills education (LSE) and teachers as life skill educators is a novel idea. Implementation and impact of the NIMHANS model of life skills education program studied. The impact of the program is evaluated at the end of 1 year in 605 adolescents from two secondary schools in comparison to 423 age, sex, socioeconomic status-matched adolescents from nearby schools not in the program. The adolescents in the program had significantly better self-esteem (P=0.002), perceived adequate coping (P=0.000), better adjustment generally (P=0.000), specifically with teachers (P=0.000), in school (P=0.001), and prosocial behavior (P=0.001). There was no difference between the two groups in psychopathology (P - and adjustment at home and with peers (P=0.088 and 0.921). Randomly selected 100 life skill educator-teachers also perceived positive changes in the students in the program in class room behavior and interaction. LSE integrated into the school mental health program using available resources of schools and teachers is seen as an effective way of empowering adolescents.

  18. School-based sleep education program improves sleep and academic performance of school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Reut; Somerville, Gail; Bergmame, Lana; Fontil, Laura; Paquin, Soukaina

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based sleep education program aimed at improving the sleep and academic performance of school-age children. Using a community-based participatory research approach, we created a school-based sleep education program, "Sleep for Success"™ (SFS), composed of four distinct modules that addressed the children, their family and community, the school staff, and decision makers within the school setting. Implementation was carried out in three elementary schools. Seventy-one students participated in the evaluation of the program. The effectiveness of the SFS program was evaluated using non-randomized controlled before-and-after study groups (intervention and control) assessed over two time points (pre- and post-program implementation). Before (baseline) and after implementation, sleep and academic performance were measured using actigraphy and report card marks, respectively. In the intervention group, true sleep was extended by 18.2 min per night, sleep efficiency improved by 2.3%, and sleep latency was shortened by 2.3 min, and report card grades in mathematics and English improved significantly. No changes were noted in the control group. Participation in the sleep education program was associated with significant improvements in children's sleep and academic performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. School-Based Performance Award Programs, Teacher Motivation, and School Performance: Findings from a Study of Three Programs. CPRE Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Carolyn; Heneman, Herbert, III; Milanowski, Anthony

    This report provides an overview of the findings of 3 studies conducted between 1995 and 1998 on school-based performance award (SBPA) programs. Such programs provide teachers, and often other school staff, with pay bonuses when their school as a whole achieves specific educational objectives. The studies focused on programs in the state of…

  20. Gender dysphoria and the controversy over the Safe Schools program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Patrick

    2017-05-30

    The Safe Schools program has attracted great controversy. On one end of the spectrum, it is defended as an anti-bullying program for young people who identify themselves as gay or lesbian, or have issues concerning their gender identity. On the other end of the spectrum, it is regarded as social engineering. This article seeks to promote a discussion of the way in which gender identity issues are addressed in the Safe Schools program. It is argued that the information in this program to Principals, teachers and young people is inaccurate and misleading. The program, as presently designed, may actually cause harm to children and young people who experience gender identity issues because it promotes gender transitioning without expert medical advice. The Safe Schools materials do not acknowledge that the great majority of children resolve gender dysphoria issues around the time of puberty. It may be much more difficult for a child to accept his or her gender at puberty if he or she has already changed name and gender identity in primary school. These deficits need to be addressed if the program is to continue.

  1. Kenya Comprehensive School Health Policy: Lessons from a Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasonga, Job; Ojeny, Betty; Oluoch, Gordon; Okech, Ben

    2014-02-04

    The study assessed the implementation of Kenya comprehensive school health pilot intervention program. This pilot program has informed the Kenya Comprehensive School Health Policy which is a critical document in the achievement of Millennium Development Goals relating to child health, gender equality, universal education and environmental sustainability. The study was based on focus group discussions, field observations and in-depth interviews with government officers who implemented the pilot program. The findings were categorized into implementation process, what is working well, what is not working well and lessons learned. During the course of the study, it was noted that involvement of all stakeholders enhances program ownership and sustainability but if they are not well coordinated or where supportive supervision and monitoring is not carried out, then some components of the comprehensive school health program may not be sustainable. We learnt that comprehensive school health program increases students' enrolment, attendance and retention, factors that are very important in a country's human resources development. The study has shown that although the formulation of a policy may be participatory and bottom-top, the implementation requires allocation of enough resources and coordination to bridge the gap between policy formulation and implementation.

  2. Kenya comprehensive school health policy: lessons from a pilot program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Job Wasonga

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study assessed the implementation of Kenya comprehensive school health pilot intervention program. This pilot program has informed the Kenya Comprehensive School Health Policy which is a critical document in the achievement of Millennium Development Goals relating to child health, gender equality, universal education and environmental sustainability. The study was based on focus group discussions, field observations and in-depth interviews with government officers who implemented the pilot program. The findings were categorized into implementation process, what is working well, what is not working well and lessons learned. During the course of the study, it was noted that involvement of all stakeholders enhances program ownership and sustainability but if they are not well coordinated or where supportive supervision and monitoring is not carried out, then some components of the comprehensive school health program may not be sustainable. We learnt that comprehensive school health program increases students’ enrolment, attendance and retention, factors that are very important in a country’s human resources development. The study has shown that although the formulation of a policy may be participatory and bottom-top, the implementation requires allocation of enough resources and coordination to bridge the gap between policy formulation and implementation.

  3. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 14. Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  4. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 15B Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  5. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 15C Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  6. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 15A, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  7. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program. Final Reports Volume 15B, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  8. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program. Final Reports, Volume 12A, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  9. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 12, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  10. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 16, Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  11. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 13 Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  12. Summer Research Program - 1997. High School Apprenticeship Program. Final Reports. Volume 15C, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  13. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 13 Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  14. Summer Research Program - 1997 High School Appenticeship Program Volume 16 Arnold Engineering Development Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  15. Summer Research Program - 1996. High School Apprenticeship Program Final Reports. Volume 15B, Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  16. 1997 Summer Research Program (SRP), High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP), Final Reports, Volume 13, Phillips Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  17. Summer Research Program - 1998 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 15A. Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1998-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  18. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 12B, Armstrong Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  19. Summer Research Program - 1997 High School Apprenticeship Program. Volume 14, Rome Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1997-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  20. Summer Research Program - 1996 High School Apprenticeship Program Volume 15A Wright Laboratory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, Gary

    1996-01-01

    The United States Air Force Summer Research Program (USAF-SRP) is designed to introduce university, college, and technical institute faculty members, graduate students, and high school students to Air Force research...

  1. Modification of the School Cafeteria Environment Can Impact Childhood Nutrition: Results from the Wise Mind and LA Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Donald A.; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D.; Martin, Corby K.; Newton, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes in nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs assume that modification of the nutritional serving practices of school cafeterias will result in improved childhood nutrition in the school environment. The primary aim of this paper is to summarize the findings from two recent cluster randomized controlled trials (Wise Mind and LA Health) that tested the hypothesis that modification of school cafeteria environments, including changes in nutrition standards, would yield beneficial changes in childhood nutrition and healthy eating in the school lunch environment. A secondary aim was to investigate the association of participant characteristics and changes in nutrition and healthy eating. A third aim was to investigate the relationships between the food intake of children and: 1) foods selected by the children and 2) food that was uneaten during the lunch meal (plate waste). The studies used similar approaches for modifying the school cafeteria environment and both studies used the digital photography method to measure changes in food intake, food selection, and plate waste. Both studies reported significant improvements in childhood nutrition, and the LA Health study reported improved healthy eating, following introduction of the cafeteria modification program in comparison to baseline and/or control arms. These studies confirm the hypothesis that interventions that modify the school cafeteria environment can beneficially impact childhood nutrition. PMID:23154216

  2. Modification of the school cafeteria environment can impact childhood nutrition. Results from the Wise Mind and LA Health studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Donald A; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Martin, Corby K; Newton, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Recent changes in nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs assume that modification of the nutritional serving practices of school cafeterias will result in improved childhood nutrition in the school environment. The primary aim of this paper is to summarize the findings from two recent cluster randomized controlled trials (Wise Mind and LA Health) that tested the hypothesis that modification of school cafeteria environments, including changes in nutrition standards, would yield beneficial changes in childhood nutrition and healthy eating in the school lunch environment. A secondary aim was to investigate the association of participant characteristics and changes in nutrition and healthy eating. A third aim was to investigate the relationships between the food intake of children and: (1) foods selected by the children and (2) food that was uneaten during the lunch meal (plate waste). The studies used similar approaches for modifying the school cafeteria environment and both studies used the digital photography method to measure changes in food intake, food selection, and plate waste. Both studies reported significant improvements in childhood nutrition, and the LA Health study reported improved healthy eating, following introduction of the cafeteria modification program in comparison to baseline and/or control arms. These studies confirm the hypothesis that interventions that modify the school cafeteria environment can beneficially impact childhood nutrition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Research Program of the Yale Child Study Center School Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, James P.; Emmons, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The Yale Child Study Center School Development Program (SDP) practices an action research approach to look into obstacles to good teaching and learning in schools, and to reduce or eliminate them. A discussion on the SDP explains how the pilot, field-test and dissemination aspects of the work evolved, the intervention methods used and their…

  4. Program to prepare school level supervisors for professional pedagogical guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isdarey Hernández González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Doing an appropriate professional pedagogical guidance becomes a social problem of top priority, due to the fact that when students get to Ninth Grade they face, for the first time, the chance to select a school to continue his studies. However, there are barriers around this social task; like the lack of schools staff preparation and particularly that of the school level supervisors who should lead the School Grade Boards, among its functions are to plan actions for labour and vocational development and also for the professional pedagogical guidance. This article is a result of a research activity carried out by the author who is a Ph. D. Candidate on Pedagogical Sciences. This investigation has as an objective to propose a developmental program to increase the school level supervisors preparation on the professional pedagogical guidance in Junior High School. This program is conceived as a system and starts with an upgrade course, goes on with workshops and ends with a training course. Its main axis is the research method acquisition. This program was carried out through pedagogical practice and showed its efficiency.

  5. Providence school asthma partnership: school-based asthma program for inner-city families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePue, Judith D; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Camillo, Christopher; Alario, Anthony; Klein, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    Over 3 years, 972 families participated in an after-school asthma program at their child's school. Parents and children attended concurrent 2(1/2)-hour workshops. Parents were 74% Latino; 45% non-English speaking, with 77% of children on Medicaid. Asthma symptoms were significantly reduced, from multiple times per week to less than once per week on average. Oral steroid use decreased to one third of baseline use. Hospital days decreased from 11% to 2%; emergency visits decreased 35% to 4%; and school days missed decreased 48% to 20%. This program has now become sustainable with both private and Medicaid insurance coverage.

  6. Acesso à alimentação escolar e estado nutricional de escolares no Nordeste e Sudeste do Brasil, 1997 Access to the school food program and nutritional status of schoolchildren in Northeast and Southeast Brazil, 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Burlandy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Com base na Pesquisa sobre Padrões de Vida de 1996/1997, realizada nas regiões Sudeste e Nordeste do Brasil, analisaram-se informações sobre oferta de refeição gratuita nas escolas e antropometria de crianças de 7-10 anos. Daquelas matriculadas em escolas públicas, 87,4% freqüentavam estabelecimentos que ofereciam refeição gratuita, sendo 77,9% no Nordeste; 93,7% no Sudeste; 77,9% na área rural e 90,7% na área urbana. A oferta nas escolas municipais foi inferior à das estaduais, principalmente no Nordeste rural (90,2% nas estaduais e 69,6% nas municipais. Do total de crianças, 13,2% apresentavam desnutrição por déficit de estatura (13,8% meninos; 12,6% meninas, com maior prevalência no Nordeste rural (22% e menor no Sudeste rural (8,5%. A prevalência de sobrepeso foi expressiva (9,6%, maior no Sudeste urbano (15,6% e menor no Nordeste rural (2,7%. A desnutrição foi prevalente entre crianças que não freqüentavam escolas (27,9% vs. 11,8% ou em escolas que não ofereciam refeição gratuita (17,9% vs. 11,8%; o sobrepeso foi prevalente em crianças que recebiam refeição gratuita (9,8% vs. 5,5%. Percebe-se uma focalização inadequada da oferta quanto aos critérios geográficos, econômicos e biológicos.Access by schoolchildren (7-10 years of age to the School Food Program was investigated in a probabilistic sample of the Brazilian population living in the Northeast and Southeast regions in 1996-97. Among children enrolled in public schools, 87.4% had lunch at school: 77.9% in the Northeast, 93.7% in the Southeast, and 77.9% and 90.7% in the rural and urban areas, respectively. Stunting was observed in 13.2% of children (13.8% of boys and 12.6% of girls and was most prevalent in the rural Northeast (22% and least in the urban Southeast (8.5%. Stunting was more prevalent in children out of school (27.9% or enrolled in schools that did not supply lunch (17.9%. Prevalence of overweight was relatively high (9.6% and similar

  7. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust.

  8. School-Based First Aid Training Programs: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveruzzi, Bianca; Buckley, Lisa; Sheehan, Mary

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the breadth of first aid training delivered to school students and the components that are age appropriate to adolescents. Eligible studies included school-based first aid interventions targeting students aged between 10 and 18 years. Online databases were searched, for peer-reviewed publications available as at August 2014. A total of 20 journal articles were relevant to the review. Research supported programs with longer durations (3 hours or more). Most programs taught resuscitation alone and few included content that was context-specific and relevant to the target group. The training experience of the facilitator did not appear to impact on student outcomes. Incorporating both practical and didactic components was found to be an important factor in delivering material and facilitating the retention of knowledge. Educational resources and facilitator training were found to be common features of effective programs. The review supports first aid in school curriculum and provides details of key components pertinent to design of school-based first aid programs. The findings suggest that first aid training may have benefits wider than the uptake and retention of knowledge and skills. There is a need for future research, particularly randomized controlled trials to aid in identifying best practice approaches. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  9. Peer tutoring programs in health professions schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santee, Jennifer; Garavalia, Linda

    2006-06-15

    Peer tutoring programs may be one method of maintaining quality of pharmacy education in the face of growing student enrollment and a small faculty body. A critical review of the literature was performed to ascertain whether peer tutoring programs improve or maintain the academic performance of health care professional students. Various electronic databases and abstracts from past American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy's annual meetings were searched to identify pertinent research. Only those articles with quantitative data, an experimental design, and comparative statistical analysis were included for review. Most studies found that peer tutoring had a positive impact on academic performance. These results may not be readily generalizable as there were numerous methodological flaws and limited descriptions of the programs and participants. Studies with better designs and more detail are needed to answer definitively whether peer tutoring is of benefit. Details of what resources were required should be included in the study to allow the reader to determine the feasibility of the intervention.

  10. Chocolate Milk Consequences: A Pilot Study Evaluating the Consequences of Banning Chocolate Milk in School Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Andrew S.; Just, David R.; Wansink, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk). If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? Methods In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk–which will be referred to as chocolate milk–was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) were compared year to date. Results Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (pchocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. Conclusions Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more) of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose. PMID:24740451

  11. Chocolate milk consequences: a pilot study evaluating the consequences of banning chocolate milk in school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Andrew S; Just, David R; Wansink, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk). If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk-which will be referred to as chocolate milk-was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) were compared year to date. Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (pmilk increased by 161.2 cartons per day (pmilk was thrown away. Eliminating chocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more) of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose.

  12. Chocolate milk consequences: a pilot study evaluating the consequences of banning chocolate milk in school cafeterias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Hanks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk. If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? METHODS: In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk-which will be referred to as chocolate milk-was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP were compared year to date. RESULTS: Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (p<0.01. Although white milk increased by 161.2 cartons per day (p<0.001, 29.4% of this milk was thrown away. Eliminating chocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. CONCLUSIONS: Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose.

  13. Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The summer of 1997 will not only be noted by NASA for the mission to Mars by the Pathfinder but also for the 179 brilliant apprentices that participated in the SHARP Program. Apprentice participation increased 17% over last year's total of 153 participants. As indicated by the End-of-the-Program Evaluations, 96% of the programs' participants rated the summer experience from very good to excellent. The SHARP Management Team began the year by meeting in Cocoa Beach, Florida for the annual SHARP Planning Conference. Participants strengthened their Education Division Computer Aided Tracking System (EDCATS) skills, toured the world-renowned Kennedy Space Center, and took a journey into space during the Alien Encounter Exercise. The participants returned to their Centers with the same goals and objectives in mind. The 1997 SHARP Program goals were: (1) Utilize NASA's mission, unique facilities and specialized workforce to provide exposure, education, and enrichment experiences to expand participants' career horizons and inspire excellence in formal education and lifelong learning. (2) Develop and implement innovative education reform initiatives which support NASA's Education Strategic Plan and national education goals. (3) Utilize established statistical indicators to measure the effectiveness of SHARP's program goals. (4) Explore new recruiting methods which target the student population for which SHARP was specifically designed. (5) Increase the number of participants in the program. All of the SHARP Coordinators reported that the goals and objectives for the overall program as well as their individual program goals were achieved. Some of the goals and objectives for the Centers were: (1) To increase the students' awareness of science, mathematics, engineering, and computer technology; (2) To provide students with the opportunity to broaden their career objectives; and (3) To expose students to a variety of enrichment activities. Most of the Center goals and

  14. THE SCHOOL HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963

    INVOLVING INDIVIDUALS AS WELL AS ORGANIZATIONS, THE PROGRAM AIMED AT THE OPTIMUM HEALTH OF ALL CHILDREN, AND IMPROVEMENT OF HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS WITHIN THE COMMUNITY. EACH OF THE CHILDREN WAS URGED TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL VACCINATION FOR SMALL POX, THE DPT SERIES AND BOOSTER, THE POLIO SERIES, AND CORRECTIONS OF ALL DENTAL DEFECTS AND…

  15. Program Budgeting for a Graduate School Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Mel

    Program budgeting, a method founded in the systems approach, allows control, management, and planning in the library system, and avoids the more comprehensive analysis required by zero-based budgeting. By evaluation of the impacts of the work accomplished by the library staff, the budgeted amounts can be justified or adjusted in subsequent years.…

  16. Recruiting Youth for After-School Health Intervention Programming: Parent and Student Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, Elizabeth; Judge, Lawrence W.; Dieringer, Shannon T.; Johnson, James E.

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to increase physical activity (PA) in children, some schools are utilizing after-school PA programs. For after-school PA programs to attract children and their parents more effectively, it is important to understand participant perceptions. With input from parents and children, after-school PA programs will be better equipped to…

  17. Scholarly Productivity of School Psychology Faculty Members in Specialist-Level Programs: 2002-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Jeff; Runia, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The scholarly productivity of school psychology faculty members in specialist-level only programs was examined. Information was gathered from the School Psychology Program Information portion of the website for the National Association of School Psychologists. A total of 137 specialist-level only school psychology programs were identified.…

  18. The Impact of an Urban Charter School Leadership Training Program on Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jack Lamar

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the experiences, perspectives, and recommendations of participants in a charter school training program in order to gauge whether the training adequately prepared them for charter school leadership. Charter school leaders are prepared for leadership by university programs, non-profit programs, and charter schools themselves. A…

  19. Childhood obesity and schools: evidence from the national survey of children's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ji; Hooker, Neal H

    2010-02-01

    The international prevalence of childhood obesity and obesity-related diseases has received increasing attention. Applying data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we explore relationships between childhood obesity and school type, National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) eligibility, membership in sports clubs and other sociodemographic, and household factors. Nonlinear regression models with interaction terms were developed to investigate the effects of school type, physical activity, and NSLP/SBP, etc, on children's body mass index (BMI). Probit models then examine the probability of a child being overweight. Though clinically small, statistically significant effects on BMI were found for children from households eligible for the NSLP/SBP, attending public schools. They have a mean BMI value 0.401 higher than counterparts attending private schools (p school and is eligible for the NSLP/SBP, then his or her BMI is 0.725 higher (p probability of being overweight (p schools have higher BMI than those attending private schools. Eligibility for free or reduced-cost lunch or breakfast programs at public schools is positively correlated with children's BMI. Children attending public schools are more likely to be overweight. In lower socioeconomic status households, school type does not have a significant effect on the probability of being overweight. Policy recommendations for factors to address childhood obesity are discussed.

  20. Highland High School Vocational Television; a Salt Lake Schools Exemplary Vocational Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, LaMar C.

    The Highland High School (Salt Lake City, Utah) vocational television production program was designed to provide students with marketable skills in color television studio operation. Among the skills covered in the program were camera set-up and operation, video engineering, production switching, directing, television lighting, audio engineering,…