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Sample records for school admission criteria

  1. Rethinking the admission criteria to nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulruf, Boaz; Wang, Ying Grace; Zhao, Yipin Jessica; Baker, Heather

    2011-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to identify the best predictors for student achievements (Undergraduate Grade Point Average (UGPA)) in their first year in an undergraduate nursing programme. Data were acquired from the Tracking Project database which is held by the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. The data (n=134) included information on student demographics, final year secondary school achievements (National Certificate of Educational Achievement Grade Point Average (NCEAGPA) & NCEA Credits), university admission ranking scores, and achievements in first year in the undergraduate nursing programme (UGPA). Linear regression models were used to identify the best predictors for first year students' UGPA in the nursing programme. The regression models suggest that the best predictor for the first year GPA is the NCEAGPA (beta=.488; R(2)(for the entire model)=.53), followed by the admission ranking scores (beta=.308; R(2)=.40). Based on these findings, it is suggested that a Dual Admission Model (DAM) be utilised whereby students could be admitted either by the current university admission criteria or by an alternative model, which is purely based on the predictability of achievement within the nursing programme. Application of the DAM to other institutions/countries was discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Admission criteria and diversity in medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Vonsild, Maria C; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Dornan, Tim

    2013-06-01

    The under-representation in medical education of students from lower socio-economic backgrounds is an important social issue. There is currently little evidence about whether changes in admission strategies might increase the diversity of the medical student population. Denmark introduced an 'attribute-based' admission track to make it easier for students who may not be eligible for admission on the 'grade-based' track to be admitted on the basis of attributes other than academic performance. The aim of this research was to examine whether there were significant differences in the social composition of student cohorts admitted via each of the two tracks during the years 2002-2007. This prospective cohort study included 1074 medical students admitted during 2002-2007 to the University of Southern Denmark medical school. Of these, 454 were admitted by grade-based selection and 620 were selected on attributes other than grades. To explore the social mix of candidates admitted on each of the two tracks, respectively, we obtained information on social indices associated with educational attainment in Denmark (ethnic origin, father's education, mother's education, parenthood, parents living together, parent in receipt of social benefits). Selection strategy (grade-based or attribute-based) had no statistically significant effect on the social diversity of the medical student population. The choice of admission criteria may not be very important to widening access and increasing social diversity in medical schools. Attracting a sufficiently diverse applicant pool may represent a better strategy for increasing diversity in the student population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Admission criteria and diversity in medical school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Vonsild, Maria; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    -based” admission track to make it easier for students who may not be eligible for admission through the “grade-based” track, to be admitted on the basis of attributes other than academic performance. The aim of this research was to examine whether there were significant differences in the social composition...... of students admitted via the two tracks between the years 2002-2007. Method: This prospective cohort study included 1074 medical students admitted between the years 2002-2007 to the University of Southern Denmark (USD) medical school. Of these, 454 were admitted by grade-based selection and 620 were selected...

  4. Increasing the relative weight of noncognitive admission criteria improves underrepresented minority admission rates to medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballejos, Marlene P; Rhyne, Robert L; Parkes, Jay

    2015-01-01

    CONSTRUCT: The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of varying the relative weights of cognitive versus noncognitive admission criteria on the proportion of underrepresented minorities admitted to medical school. It answers the question, "Can medical schools increase the admission rates of underrepresented minority (URM) students by balancing cognitive criteria with the experiences, attributes, and metrics of noncognitive data in the admission process?" U.S. demographics are shifting, and by 2042 ethnic minority groups will make up approximately 50% of the population. Increasing diversity of the U.S. population foreshadows the need to increase the number of physicians from underrepresented minorities to help address healthcare disparities that are on the rise. A cohort of three medical school applicant classes (2007-2009) was used to model the impact on URM admission rates as the relative weights of cognitive and noncognitive admission criteria were varied. This study used the minimum admission standards established for the actual incoming classes. The URM rate of admission to medical school was the outcome. Cognitive criteria included Medical College Admission Test scores and grade point averages. Noncognitive criteria included four categories: background and diversity, interest and suitability for a career in medicine, problem-solving and communication skills, and letters of recommendation. A cohort of 480 applicants from the three applicant classes were enrolled in the study. As the weighting scheme was varied from 50% cognitive/50% noncognitive weights to 35%/65%, the proportion of URM students accepted to medical school increased from 24% (42/177) to 30% (57/193; p noncognitive higher relative to cognitive criteria without compromising admission standards. Challenging conventional practice in the admissions process may improve health disparities and diversify the physician workforce.

  5. Admission criteria to Saudi medical schools. Which is the best predictor for successful achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albishri, Jamal A; Aly, Syed M; Alnemary, Yasir

    2012-11-01

    To assess the relationship between current pre-admission criteria and medical student's grade point average (GPA) at the end of year 6 in 3 medical schools in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We conducted this observational analytical study at 3 government medical schools in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2011 and February 2012. High school grades, achievement test (Tahsili test) scores, aptitude test (Qudraat tests) scores, Mathematics, and English grades in the high school were used to predict medical student's GPA at the end of year 6. The criterion variable was student's cumulative GPA at the end of year 6. Correlation between pre-admission variables and GPA was calculated using Pearson's correlation, and multiple regression analyses. The Institutional review board and ethical committee at Taif Medical College approved the study. We included 727 students in this study from the chosen medical schools. A significant positive correlation was observed among all pre-admission variables and GPA. Inclusion of all 5 sets in multiple regression analyses revealed that the achievement test, English grade in the high school, high school grade and aptitude test (Qudraat tests) were statistically predictive of GPA. A 20.8% variance in the GPA can be accounted for by the pre-admission criteria. Multiple pre-admission factors predict medical students GPA. Achievement test is the most important predictor. High school grades in English emerged as an independent predictor. Medical schools should give more attention to these predictors during admissions.

  6. Relationship between hand-skill exercises and other admissions criteria and students' performance in dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Cheramie, Toby

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of correlations between dental admissions criteria, including a chalk carving exercise, and students' subsequent academic performance. The retrospective cohort study examined the records of dental students at Louisiana State University Health Science Center School of Dentistry for the years 1998 to 2008. Only those students who could be categorized into the following four groups were included: 1) those who graduated in the top 10% of their class, 2) those who graduated in the bottom 10% of their class, 3) those who repeated a year of dental school, and 4) those who were dismissed or resigned. The study sample consisted of 176 students: 62 in the first group, 62 in the second group, 25 in the third group, and 27 in the fourth group. Data collected were each student's undergraduate grade point average (GPA); chalk carving score; undergraduate biology, chemistry, physics (BCP) GPA; Dental Admission Test (DAT) Academic Average; Perceptual Ability Test (PAT) score of the DAT; total DAT score; grade in preclinical operative dentistry class; grade in morphology and occlusion class; and dental school GPA at graduation. The results showed that only the undergraduate GPA and BCP GPA were significantly higher for students in the top 10% of their class than for other groups. The only positive correlation involving the chalk carving scores was with the preclinical operative dentistry course grade. This study thus found limited correlations between this institution's admissions criteria and its students' success in dental school.

  7. Admission Criteria for MBA Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana Dakduk; José Malavé; Carmen Cecilia Torres; Hugo Montesinos; Laura Michelena

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a review of studies on admission criteria for MBA programs. The method consisted in a literary review based on a systematic search in international databases (Emerald, ABI/INFORM Global, ProQuest Education Journals, ProQuest European Business, ProQuest Science Journal, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Psychology Journals, ProQuest Social Science Journals and Business Source Complete) of studies published from January 1990 to December 2013, which explore the academic perf...

  8. Admission Criteria for MBA Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Dakduk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a review of studies on admission criteria for MBA programs. The method consisted in a literary review based on a systematic search in international databases (Emerald, ABI/INFORM Global, ProQuest Education Journals, ProQuest European Business, ProQuest Science Journal, ProQuest Research Library, ProQuest Psychology Journals, ProQuest Social Science Journals and Business Source Complete of studies published from January 1990 to December 2013, which explore the academic performance of students or graduates of MBA programs. A quantitative review was performed. Results show that most researchers studied relations between GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test and UGPA (Undergraduate Grade Point Average as predictors of GGPA (Graduate Grade Point Average. On the other hand, work experience and personal traits (such as personality, motivation, learning strategies, self-efficacy beliefs and achievement expectations and their relation with GGPA had been less studied, and results are not consistent enough to consider them valid predictors of student performance at this time.

  9. An admission model for medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Elam, C L; Wagoner, N E

    2001-12-01

    Complex societal issues affect medical education and thus require new approaches from medical school admission officers. One of these issues--the recognition that the attributes of good doctors include character qualities such as compassion, altruism, respect, and integrity--has resulted in the recent focus on the greater use of qualitative variables, such as those just stated, for selected candidates. In addition, more emphasis is now being placed on teaching and licensure testing of the attributes of the profession during the four-year curriculum. The second and more contentious issue concerns the system used to admit white and minority applicants. Emphasizing character qualities of physicians in the admission criteria and selection process involves a paradigm shift that could serve to resolve both issues. To make this or any paradigm shift in admission policy, medical schools must think about all the elements of admission and their interrelationships. A model of medical school admission is proposed that can provide understanding of the admission system and serve as a heuristic guide. This model consists of (1) the applicant pool; (2) criteria for selection; (3) the admission committee; (4) selection processes and policies; and (5) outcomes. Each of these dimensions and the interrelationships among the dimensions are described. Finally, a hypothetical example is provided in which the model is used to help a medical school change its admission process to accommodate a new emphasis in the school's mission.

  10. Do Traditional Admissions Criteria Reflect Applicant Creativity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretz, Jean E.; Kaufman, James C.

    2017-01-01

    College admissions decisions have traditionally focused on high school academic performance and standardized test scores. An ongoing debate is the validity of these measures for predicting success in college; part of this debate includes how success is defined. One potential way of defining college success is a student's creative accomplishments.…

  11. Correlation of admissions criteria with academic performance in dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Donald A; Lind, Samuel L; Plesh, Octavia; Finzen, Frederick C

    2007-10-01

    Our purpose was to compare admissions criteria as predictors of dental school performance in underachieving and normally tracking dental students. Underachieving dental students were identified by selecting ten students with the lowest class grade point average following the first year of dental school from five classes, resulting in a pool of fifty students. Normally tracking students served as a control and were randomly selected from students who had completed their first year of dental school not in the underachieving group. Admission measures of college grade point average (GPA), science grade point average (SGPA), academic average (AA), Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), college rigor, and academic load in college were evaluated with descriptive statistics, correlation, and regression analysis with first-year and graduating GPA as the dependent variables. Admissions criteria were generally weak predictors of first-year and graduating GPA. However, first-year dental school GPA was a strong predictor (R(2)=0.77) of graduating GPA for normally tracking students and a moderate predictor (R(2)=0.58) for underachieving students. Students who completed the first year of dental school having a low GPA tended to graduate with a low GPA. Therefore, remediation and monitoring would be important during the dental school experience for these students.

  12. Admission to Selective Schools, Alphabetically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurajda, Stepan; Munich, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    One's position in an alphabetically sorted list may be important in determining access to over-subscribed public services. Motivated by anecdotal evidence, we investigate the importance of the position in the alphabet of Czech students for their admission chances into over-subscribed schools. Empirical evidence based on the population of students…

  13. Student Admission Criteria as Predictors of Research Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Gary L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study at one university found that traditional admission criteria for a graduate microbiology program, undergraduate grade point average, and Graduate Record Examination scores, were not good predictors of student potential as a researcher, as measured by faculty ratings. (MSE)

  14. Admission to Law School: New Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Marjorie M.; Zedeck, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Standardized tests have been increasingly controversial over recent years in high-stakes admission decisions. Their role in operationalizing definitions of merit and qualification is especially contested, but in law schools this challenge has become particularly intense. Law schools have relied on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and an INDEX…

  15. Grade Inflation and Law School Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsurawat, Winai

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence on whether grade inflation has led to an increasing emphasis on standardized test scores as a criterion for law school admissions. Design/methodology/approach: Fit probabilistic models to admissions data for American law schools during the mid to late 1990s, a period during which…

  16. On the use of broadened admission criteria in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, A. Susan M.; Meijer, Rob R.

    There is an increasing interest in the use of broadened criteria for admission to higher education, often assessed through noncognitive instruments. We argue that there are several reasons why, despite some significant progress, the use of noncognitive predictors to select students is problematic in

  17. Knowledge and Utilization of ICU Admission Criteria and Guidelines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ICU team concentrated on prompt diagnosis, treatment and insisted on discharge once patient's condition stabilized and was out of danger. ... that although nurses have a high level of both knowledge and utilization of ICU admission criteria and guidelines, almost all of them have not trained in critical care nursing.

  18. On the Use of Broadened Admission Criteria in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, A Susan M; Meijer, Rob R

    2017-05-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of broadened criteria for admission to higher education, often assessed through noncognitive instruments. We argue that there are several reasons why, despite some significant progress, the use of noncognitive predictors to select students is problematic in high-stakes educational selection and why the incremental validity will often be modest, even when studied in low-stakes contexts. Furthermore, we comment on the use of broadened admission criteria in relation to reducing adverse impact of testing on some groups, and we extend the literature by discussing an approach based on behavioral sampling, which showed promising results in Europe. Finally, we provide some suggestions for future research.

  19. Perspective: Medical school admissions and noncognitive testing: some open questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardes, Charles L; Best, Peggy Carey; Kremer, Sara J; Dienstag, Jules L

    2009-10-01

    Medical schools use a variety of criteria in selecting applicants for admission, attempting to assess both the academic preparation and the personal characteristics suitable for a career in medicine. While assessing academic preparation is fairly straightforward, assessing applicants' personal characteristics is difficult and controversial. The possibility of implementing standardized testing of personal characteristics, so-called "noncognitive testing," has been proposed as part of the admissions process. Such a proposal, however, raises numerous questions about the validity, fairness, and cost of such testing and the impact of commercial test-preparation services on test performance and reliability. Therefore, before noncognitive testing is adopted for screening applicants to medical school, open discussion among all stakeholders in the admissions process is critically important.

  20. Implicit Racial Bias in Medical School Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capers, Quinn; Clinchot, Daniel; McDougle, Leon; Greenwald, Anthony G

    2017-03-01

    Implicit white race preference has been associated with discrimination in the education, criminal justice, and health care systems and could impede the entry of African Americans into the medical profession, where they and other minorities remain underrepresented. Little is known about implicit racial bias in medical school admissions committees. To measure implicit racial bias, all 140 members of the Ohio State University College of Medicine (OSUCOM) admissions committee took the black-white implicit association test (IAT) prior to the 2012-2013 cycle. Results were collated by gender and student versus faculty status. To record their impressions of the impact of the IAT on the admissions process, members took a survey at the end of the cycle, which 100 (71%) completed. All groups (men, women, students, faculty) displayed significant levels of implicit white preference; men (d = 0.697) and faculty (d = 0.820) had the largest bias measures (P bias, 48% were conscious of their individual results when interviewing candidates in the next cycle, and 21% reported knowledge of their IAT results impacted their admissions decisions in the subsequent cycle. The class that matriculated following the IAT exercise was the most diverse in OSUCOM's history at that time. Future directions include preceding and following the IAT with more robust reflection and education on unconscious bias. The authors join others in calling for an examination of bias at all levels of academic medicine.

  1. Successful Admission Criteria to Predict Academic and Clinical Success in Entry-Level Radiography Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrassia, Jennett M

    2016-05-01

    To examine successful admission criteria in health education programs. Health sciences databases were searched for admission criteria in medical and allied health education. Special emphasis was placed on radiologic technology investigations. Many medical and health sciences programs use cognitive and noncognitive factors to predict student success. However, research has not identified common admission criteria that can be used to predict academic and clinical success of candidates in radiologic technology education programs. Further research is needed to investigate the use of cognitive and noncognitive factors as admission criteria for radiologic technology programs and to determine whether these factors can be used to predict student success.

  2. Making School Admissions Fairer? 'Quasi-Regulation' under New Labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Anne; Ingram, Dabney

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes implementation of Labour government reforms to the secondary school admissions process in England. Presents policy recommendations to address existing problems with the new admission regulations. (Contains 14 references.) (PKP)

  3. Assessing Practical Intelligence in Business School Admissions: A Supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Jennifer; Wilt, Jeanne M.; Nebel, Kristina L.; Ashford, Susan J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is the most widely used measure of managerial potential in MBA admissions. GMAT scores, although predictive of grades in business school, leave much of the variance in graduate school performance unexplained. The GMAT also produces disparities in test scores between groups, generating the potential for…

  4. Agreement between the 2009 STOPP Criteria and the 2003 Beers Criteria at the time of hospital admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Muñoz García

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Potentially inappropriate prescription in elderly patients can be evaluated by different methods. The STOPP Criteria and Beers Criteria stand out among the explicit criteria most widely used. Objective: The main objective of this study is to identify the agreement in the detection of potentially inappropriate prescribing between the STOPP criteria and the Beers Criteria, in elderly patients assessed at the time of hospital admission. Method: An observational retrospective study was designed in order to estimate the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescription in the habitual treatment before admission, and to compare the agreement in detection capability between the 2003 Beers Criteria and the 2009 STOPP Criteria, in >70-yearold patients with an emergency hospital admission. There was also a specific analysis of the prescription of first-generation antihistamines, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which are considered drugs with irregular management and potential toxicity. Results: The total prevalence of patients with a potentially inappropriate prescription was 23.8% using the Beers Criteria and 33.3% using the STOPP Criteria. There was a low level of agreement between both questionnaires. First-generation antihistamines (Beers and pharmacological duplication (STOPP J were the criteria most frequently found. There were differences in the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescription in the four pharmacological groups selected; and in all cases, detection by Beers Criteria was superior. Conclusion: There is no agreement between the STOPP Criteria and the Beers Criteria regarding the detection of patients with potentially inappropriate prescribing at the time of hospital admission.

  5. Assessment of Communications-related Admissions Criteria in a Three-year Pharmacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Frederick R.; Lang, Lynn A.; Purnell, Miriam; Acedera, Lisa; Ngonga, Ferdinand

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine if there is a correlation between TOEFL and other admissions criteria that assess communications skills (ie, PCAT variables: verbal, reading, essay, and composite), interview, and observational scores and to evaluate TOEFL and these admissions criteria as predictors of academic performance. Methods. Statistical analyses included two sample t tests, multiple regression and Pearson’s correlations for parametric variables, and Mann-Whitney U for nonparametric variables, which were conducted on the retrospective data of 162 students, 57 of whom were foreign-born. Results. The multiple regression model of the other admissions criteria on TOEFL was significant. There was no significant correlation between TOEFL scores and academic performance. However, significant correlations were found between the other admissions criteria and academic performance. Conclusion. Since TOEFL is not a significant predictor of either communication skills or academic success of foreign-born PharmD students in the program, it may be eliminated as an admissions criterion. PMID:26430273

  6. Assessment of Communications-related Admissions Criteria in a Three-year Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Jayesh R; Tejada, Frederick R; Lang, Lynn A; Purnell, Miriam; Acedera, Lisa; Ngonga, Ferdinand

    2015-08-25

    To determine if there is a correlation between TOEFL and other admissions criteria that assess communications skills (ie, PCAT variables: verbal, reading, essay, and composite), interview, and observational scores and to evaluate TOEFL and these admissions criteria as predictors of academic performance. Statistical analyses included two sample t tests, multiple regression and Pearson's correlations for parametric variables, and Mann-Whitney U for nonparametric variables, which were conducted on the retrospective data of 162 students, 57 of whom were foreign-born. The multiple regression model of the other admissions criteria on TOEFL was significant. There was no significant correlation between TOEFL scores and academic performance. However, significant correlations were found between the other admissions criteria and academic performance. Since TOEFL is not a significant predictor of either communication skills or academic success of foreign-born PharmD students in the program, it may be eliminated as an admissions criterion.

  7. Success and Admission Criteria for Potentially Successful Risks. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Everard

    The focus of this study was upon students who were academic "risks." The basic definition of "risk" was based on a cutoff of 620 in College Board verbal scholastic aptitude scores. A study was made of the past success of these risks, with the major purpose of finding new variables and methods which would assist admissions officers in the selection…

  8. Effectiveness of Admission Criteria on Student Performance in Classroom and Field Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, M.; Roseanna McCleary; Patricia Henry

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of admission criteria on graduate student performance in classroom and field instruction in a new MSW program. Graduate applicants’ undergraduate GPA, GRE, and total weighted admission score consisting of four items were gathered. These were correlated with their classroom and field instruction performance. Findings reveal that GRE, undergraduate GPA, and total weighted admission scores are significantly correlated with their classroom perf...

  9. Admission Criteria, Program Outcomes, and NCLEX-RN(RTM) Success in Second Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Janet Wedge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the outcome performance of second degree students in an Accelerated BSN (ABSN) and an Entry Level MSN (ELMSN) program. In addition to student demographics (ethnicity/race, age, and gender), study variables included admission and end-of-program indicators. Admission criteria included the…

  10. Does emotional intelligence influence success during medical school admissions and program matriculation?: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Christian Jaeger; Cook, Chad E; Hilton, Tiffany N

    2016-01-01

    It aimed at determining whether emotional intelligence is a predictor for success in a medical school program and whether the emotional intelligence construct correlated with other markers for admission into medical school. Three databases (PubMed, CINAHL, and ERIC) were searched up to and including July 2016, using relevant terms. Studies written in English were selected if they included emotional intelligence as a predictor for success in medical school, markers of success such as examination scores and grade point average and association with success defined through traditional medical school admission criteria and failures, and details about the sample. Data extraction included the study authors and year, population description, emotional intelligence I tool, outcome variables, and results. Associations between emotional intelligence scores and reported data were extracted and recorded. Six manuscripts were included. Overall, study quality was high. Four of the manuscripts examined emotional intelligence as a predictor for success while in medical school. Three of these four studies supported a weak positive relationship between emotional intelligence scores and success during matriculation. Two of manuscripts examined the relationship of emotional intelligence to medical school admissions. There were no significant relevant correlations between emotional intelligence and medical school admission selection. Emotional intelligence was correlated with some, but not all, measures of success during medical school matriculation and none of the measures associated with medical school admissions. Variability in success measures across studies likely explains the variable findings.

  11. Does emotional intelligence influence success during medical school admissions and program matriculation?: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Jaeger Cook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose It aimed at determining whether emotional intelligence is a predictor for success in a medical school program and whether the emotional intelligence construct correlated with other markers for admission into medical school. Methods Three databases (PubMed, CINAHL, and ERIC were searched up to and including July 2016, using relevant terms. Studies written in English were selected if they included emotional intelligence as a predictor for success in medical school, markers of success such as examination scores and grade point average and association with success defined through traditional medical school admission criteria and failures, and details about the sample. Data extraction included the study authors and year, population description, emotional intelligence I tool, outcome variables, and results. Associations between emotional intelligence scores and reported data were extracted and recorded. Results Six manuscripts were included. Overall, study quality was high. Four of the manuscripts examined emotional intelligence as a predictor for success while in medical school. Three of these four studies supported a weak positive relationship between emotional intelligence scores and success during matriculation. Two of manuscripts examined the relationship of emotional intelligence to medical school admissions. There were no significant relevant correlations between emotional intelligence and medical school admission selection. Conclusion Emotional intelligence was correlated with some, but not all, measures of success during medical school matriculation and none of the measures associated with medical school admissions. Variability in success measures across studies likely explains the variable findings.

  12. Educational Options High Schools Admissions Policy Study. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gampert, Richard D.; Blank, Randal

    For the fall 1987 semester, New York City's Board of Education modified the admissions policy for the educational options high schools in order to enhance the equity of opportunity to the desirable programs in these schools and to make the schools more accessible to at-risk students. Of the 17,236 students in educational options schools and…

  13. [Federal admission criteria for levels of perinatal care: definition, interpretation and first conclusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, A; Wenzlaff, P; Lack, N; Misselwitz, B; Kaiser, A; Bartels, D B

    2008-06-01

    The outcome of high risk pregnancies is better in tertiary hospitals. The German government introduced levels of perinatal care only in 2006. The aim of this study was to investigate how many children are to be expected for each level, taking the possible width of interpretation of the admission criteria into account. Perinatal quality assurance data from four German states (2005) were available. Based on the admission criteria used for level definitions, children were categorised into four different levels of care. To illustrate the possible width of interpretation of these admission criteria three analytical strategies were used. In addition, the distribution of children on different types of hospitals prior to the introduction of levels of care was analysed. Most deliveries (86-93 %) correspond to the lowest level, and only 1-5 % to the highest. Up to 15 % of children who should have been cared for in the highest level were born in hospitals with less than 500 annual deliveries. Among the neonates with risk profiles corresponding to the admission criteria for the two highest levels, up to 30 % were born in delivery units without NICUs. The majority (83 %) of attached NICUs had low caseloads (< 50 neonates < 1500 g / year). Most children fulfil the admission criteria for the lowest level of care whereas the need for specialised centres is rather low. Optimising the place of birth appropriately remains a challenge. Definition of levels of care based on admission criteria are difficult to implement due to a broad variety of interpretations.

  14. An Analysis of the Admission Process to U.S. Medical Schools, 1973 and 1976. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Janet Melei

    The medical school admission process is a major determinant of various attributes and characteristics of the American physician manpower pool. This analysis investigated the criteria of national and institutional consequence in selecting students for medical school, the changes in the relative importance of these criteria from 1973 to 1976, the…

  15. A Content Analysis of Medical School Admissions Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Altmaier

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prospective medical school applicants use Internet websites to gain information about medical school interviews as well as to offer their experience in such interviews. This study examined applicants’ reported experiences of interviews and compared them to the purposes of the interview as purported by medical schools. Method. Content analysis of student feedback regarding medical school interviews at 161 medical schools was conducted for entries of over 4600 students applying to medical school who anonymously and voluntarily completed an online questionnaire. Results. Across all medical schools, nearly one half of all cited interview questions addressed non-cognitive characteristics of the applicants. Top ranked medical schools were reported to ask significantly more interpersonal and illegal questions and fewer academic/general knowledge questions than other medical schools. Lower ranked schools did not differ significantly in the types of questions reportedly asked applicants compared to other medical schools. Discussion. Medical school interviews are generally gathering types of information about applicants that admissions personnel identify as important in the admission decision. In addition to measuring interpersonal characteristics, medical school admissions interviews are assessing cognitive abilities and ethical decision-making. Sources on the Internet provide actual medical school interview questions to prospective students. This practice can help them gain an undue advantage in interviewing. Admissions committees and faculty who interview students may want to consider how best to obtain accurate and valid responses from applicants.

  16. Problems in Admissions in U.S. Dental Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Robert W.; Tabb, W. Gary

    1977-01-01

    Dental school admission policy must direct significant attention to the number of selectees who might enter each of the dental career fields and to those who might eventually serve population segments that currently receive little dental care. Specific suggestions for improving the admissions situation are offered. (LBH)

  17. Prediction of Screening Decisions in a Medical School Admission Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstein, Robert M.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    As the first stage of a comprehensive study of admissions, a tree model and a linear model were compared in the prediction of admission process screening decisions for a single year's applicants to the Yale University School of Medicine. Cross-validation of the results was also performed on a sample taken from the following year's applicant class.…

  18. The use of language criteria for admission to higher education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In addition to setting their own point criteria in relation to the NSC, many institutions have chosen to set additional language criteria for admission, which have a bearing on only one or two languages (the current language(s) of teaching and learning, English and Afrikaans), despite the fact that these institutions have ...

  19. The Shaker High School Program for Visiting College Admissions Representatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Paul F.

    1978-01-01

    To achieve successful articulation between secondary school and college for students, guidance counselors and college admissions representatives are both involved in "the high school visit." Taking into consideration needs of all participants becomes of primary importance. This article highlights the Shaker High School program attempting to…

  20. Can we predict podiatric medical school grade point average using an admission screen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Graham P; Velis, Evelio; Molnar, David

    2012-01-01

    Most medical school admission committees use cognitive and noncognitive measures to inform their final admission decisions. We evaluated using admission data to predict academic success for podiatric medical students using first-semester grade point average (GPA) and cumulative GPA at graduation as outcome measures. In this study, we used linear multiple regression to examine the predictive power of an admission screen. A cross-validation technique was used to assess how the results of the regression model would generalize to an independent data set. Undergraduate GPA and Medical College Admission Test score accounted for only 22% of the variance in cumulative GPA at graduation. Undergraduate GPA, Medical College Admission Test score, and a time trend variable accounted for only 24% of the variance in first-semester GPA. Seventy-five percent of the individual variation in cumulative GPA at graduation and first-semester GPA remains unaccounted for by admission screens that rely on only cognitive measures, such as undergraduate GPA and Medical College Admission Test score. A reevaluation of admission screens is warranted, and medical educators should consider broadening the criteria used to select the podiatric physicians of the future.

  1. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 1: literature overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, G H; Spafford, M M; Edwards, J C

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of the admission interview used by schools in four health professions (veterinary medicine, allopathic medicine, optometry, and dentistry) portrays a largely similar approach to selection interviews: INTERVIEW USE: At least 80% of schools interview applicants. For schools that offer interviews, at least 40% of candidates are interviewed (a strong academic profile is the number one determinant of receiving an interview offer). The interview is one of the three most important selection tools used by schools. Less than 26% of schools fix the interview's weight in the selection process (fixed weights range from 31% to 35%). INTERVIEW PURPOSE AND CONTENT: The most common purposes of the interview are to (1) gather information, (2) make decisions, (3) verify information provided in other parts of the application, (4) recruit candidates, and/or (5) promote public relations. The most common characteristics and skills interviewers are interested in assessing are motivation for the profession, interpersonal skills, and communication skills. The desire to assess cognitive ability with the interview (>25% of schools) is surprising in view of the use of other selection tools (e.g., GPA). INTERVIEW FORMAT: Medical schools are more likely to offer two interviews per candidate, while optometry schools are more likely to offer one interview per candidate. Individual interviews (one interviewer, one candidate) are the predominant format among medical schools, while panel interviews (more than one interviewer, one candidate) are the most common format among optometry schools. The duration of the interview is 30 to 45 minutes. Interview questions most often address facts and knowledge, hypothetical situations, and the ability to meet program requirements. Most interviews do not meet the criteria for a structured interview, which has demonstrated greater validity and reliability than semi-structured or unstructured interviews. INTERVIEWERS: Interviewers are most likely to

  2. Increasing the admission rate to upper secondary school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoest, A.; Jensen, V.M.; Nielsen, L.P.

    2013-01-01

    the effects of a school intervention that introduces structured student career guidance in lower secondary school on upper secondary school admission. Disregarding the sunk-cost of implementation, the reform was cost-neutral. In a difference-in-difference framework, we find that the reform increases admission......Although several studies investigate the effects of school resources on student performance, these studies tend to focus more on intervention effect sizes than on their cost-effectiveness. Exploiting policy-induced variation in Denmark and using high-quality administrative data, we investigate...

  3. Investigation of the criteria for involuntary admission to a general hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Malla, A.

    1988-01-01

    The case records of all patients admitted involuntarily to the psychiatric unit of a teaching general hospital between May 1, 1985, and Apr. 30, 1986, were examined to assess the criteria used for admission in relation to several patient characteristics. Of the 55 patients 42 were admitted under the terms of form 1 (application for psychiatric assessment) and 13 under the terms of form 3 (certificate of involuntary admission). All of the former patients and 70% of the latter were admitted und...

  4. Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der Fragebogen-gestützten Erhebung von Soft skills als Zulassungskriterien zum Medizinstudium [Possibilities and limits of questionaire based soft skills evaluation as admission criteria for medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucksch-Beudt, Cornelia

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Due to a reorganization in the admission procedure for German medical students in 2005 Medical Faculties may admit up to 60% of their students according to specific university criteria. Both legislation and public opinion implicitly require nonacademic criteria and personality traits to be included into the selection criteria (motivation, identification, avoidance of misconceptions. Since interviews appear to be not suitable for the high number of applicants the Medical Faculty of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt/Main has developed a questionnaire covering extracurricular achievements. This questionnaire has be answered by first year students of the JWG university Frankfurt and the Medical University Innsbruck at the begin of the winter term 2005/2006. Contrary to initial expectations, only 15% of the students stated specific job experience in a medically related field (emergency service, nurse or similar occupations, whereas more than 60% indicated to play at least one instrument and/or being engaged in sports activities. The summary of these self experiences indicate that only a minority of admitted students have medically related experience to a larger degree. The wide variation in time and duration given for the activities indicate that (online questionnaires should be treated carefully as a preselection method for medical studies admission. [german] Mit der Neuregelung der Studienplatzverteilung von 2005 haben die Universitäten in Deutschland die Möglichkeit, bis zu 60% der Studienplätze nach universitätseigenen Kriterien zu vergeben. Implizit wird vom Gesetzgeber und der öffentlichen Meinung gefordert, nicht-leistungsbezogene Kriterien und Persönlichkeitsmerkmale verstärkt zur Bewerberauswahl einzusetzen (Motivation, Identifikation, Vermeidung von Fehlvorstellungen. Da in Anbetracht der Bewerberzahlen mündliche Auswahlgespräche als ungeeignet erscheinen, wurde vom Fachbereich Medizin der Johann Wolfgang

  5. Predictive Value of the School-leaving Grade and Prognosis of Different Admission Groups for Academic Performance and Continuity in the Medical Course – a Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kadmon, Guni; Resch, Franz; Duelli, Roman; Kadmon, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The school-leaving GPA and the time since completion of secondary education are the major criteria for admission to German medical schools. However, the predictive value of the school-leaving grade and the admission delay have not been thoroughly examined since the amendment of the Medical Licensing Regulations and the introduction of reformed curricula in 2002. Detailed information on the prognosis of the different admission groups is also missing. Aim: To examine the predictive ...

  6. The Relationship between Admission Criteria and Fieldwork Performance in a Masters-Level OT Program: Implications for Admissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Bathje MS, OTR/L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy (OT graduate programs strive to produce an effective OT workforce with competent and engaged OT practitioners. Admission into OT graduate programs is an increasingly competitive process, with most programs having more applicants than spaces available. Programs need to select applicants that will be the most successful in meeting graduation requirements, including both academic and clinical components. This pilot study was designed to examine the relationship between admission criteria and fieldwork (FW performance. The study utilized a retrospective analysis with a convenience sample of 108 students with complete data from a private university in the Midwest. Independent variables of Graduate Record Examination (GRE subscale scores (GRE-verbal, GRE-quantitative, and GRE-written and undergraduate Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA were included. The dependent variable was level II FW performance, as measured by the AOTA Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FWPE. Results of this study found a significant correlation between CGPA and FWPE scores for level IIA FW experiences, and a significant correlation between GRE-written and FWPE scores for level IIB FW experiences. Regression models for FW IIB indicated that GRE-written was a significant predictor of FWPE scores for the FW IIB experience. This pilot study provides information that may be utilized during OT admission processes.

  7. An approach to using noncognitive variables in dental school admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Margaret B; Sedlacek, William E; Lowery, B Lamont

    2014-04-01

    Dental school admissions committees continue to grapple with challenges associated with recruiting, admitting, and enrolling students who best meet the mission of the particular institution. For many students, particularly underrepresented minority students and those from non-traditional backgrounds, standardized tests such as the Dental Admission Test (DAT) are poor predictors of their potential for success. Noncognitive assessment methods can be used in conjunction with traditional cognitive measures in making admissions decisions. These methods have been employed by hundreds of higher education institutions, foundations, and scholarship programs, but are relatively new in dental education. This article describes a prevalent assessment model and discusses one dental school's implementation of the model, with the outcome of enrolling students from diverse backgrounds whose career goals parallel the mission of the school.

  8. Analysis of Criteria for Admission to the Polytechnic “Nikola Tesla” in Gospić

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Devčić

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Much like in the rest of the world, higher education institutions in the Republic of Croatia are working in a turbulent environment. Croatian polytechnics must recognize and understand the changes in their environment in order to be able to properly respond to them. The Polytechnic “Nikola Tesla” in Gospić is one of the polytechnics facing a growing competition, but also the problem of decreasing enrolment. To solve these problems, it is necessary to apply marketing methods and techniques for understanding the process of deciding on applying for admission to the Polytechnic. In order to better understand this process and how it can be influenced, the authors examined the criteria that students use when making this decision. It was established during the research that some of the criteria had a greater impact on the decision to apply for admission (the location of the Polytechnic, professional orientation, reasonable admission requirements and applicability of professional knowledge in practice and employment prospects as the key decision factor, while others had a much smaller impact. In addition, the research has shown that there is no significant difference between male and female respondents with regard to the importance they attach to different criteria. Using factor analysis, the criteria for admission to the Polytechnic were grouped as follows: the quality of education, studying conditions, image of the institution, the cost of education, and the influence of friends and family.

  9. Perceptions of Nursing Education Administrators Regarding the Relationship of Admission Criteria to Student Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Joy F.

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated admission criteria of baccalaureate nursing students related to their success in a multi-state sample of peer universities in the United States. The researcher used mixed methods to collect data that were analyzed using descriptive and phenomenological approaches. The sample of the study was chairpersons from peer…

  10. Assessing the Accuracy of Psychology Undergraduates' Perceptions of Graduate Admission Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Margaret M.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses how accurately psychology undergraduates perceive: (1) the importance of various graduate admission criteria, including minimum grade point averages needed for consideration by graduate programs; (2) the length of time required to complete graduate degrees; and (3) starting salaries at various educational levels. Presents and discusses…

  11. Re-Examination of Traditional Admissions Criteria in Predicting Academic Success in a Counselor Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, Gregory T.; Lawrence, Christopher; Coaston, Susannah C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate the validity of traditional admissions criteria--UGPA and GRE scores--in predicting academic success for students admitted to a counselor education program in the United States. In contrast to prior research, we also included the newer GRE-Analytical Writing scores in our analyses. In general, we found…

  12. Admission criteria to the Danish Brain Cancer Program are moderately associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Mie Kiszka; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year...

  13. Investigation of the criteria for involuntary admission to a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, A

    1988-01-01

    The case records of all patients admitted involuntarily to the psychiatric unit of a teaching general hospital between May 1, 1985, and Apr. 30, 1986, were examined to assess the criteria used for admission in relation to several patient characteristics. Of the 55 patients 42 were admitted under the terms of form 1 (application for psychiatric assessment) and 13 under the terms of form 3 (certificate of involuntary admission). All of the former patients and 70% of the latter were admitted under the criteria for dangerousness; however, one-third of these patients had failed to show any evidence of violent or suicidal behaviour. Most of the patients admitted because of their dangerousness had a nonpsychotic disorder, whereas 83% of those admitted because of lack of competence had a psychotic disorder. These findings are discussed in relation to the criteria for involuntary admission in the 1980 Mental Health Act of Ontario. The difficulties encountered in the admission process by physicians appear to be the result of a lack of clinical considerations and a predominant emphasis on dangerousness. PMID:3167735

  14. Ethnicity and dangerousness criteria for court ordered admission to a psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, D J; de Vries, S C; van Baars, A W B; Mulder, C L

    2010-02-01

    Black and minority ethnic (BME) populations are disproportionately detained in psychiatric hospitals. To examine the dangerousness criteria for compulsory court ordered admission to a psychiatric hospital in White and BME persons. We examined the psychiatric examinations for court ordered compulsory admissions in 506 White and 299 BME persons from October 2004 until January 2008 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The White and BME groups are compared using Chi-square tests and in case of significant differences with logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, mental disorders and socio-economic background. In BME persons, violence towards others and neglect of relatives were more often reasons to request court order admission as compared with Whites (39.8 vs. 25.3%, P mental disorders and socio-economic background [OR 1.56 (95% CI 1.12-2.18), P = 0.01, respectively; OR 3.08 (95% CI 1.31-7.26), P = 0.01]. The other reasons for a request of court order admission had a similar prevalence in both groups (suicide or self-harm, social decline, severe self-neglect, arousal of aggression of others, danger to the mental health of others, and the general safety of persons and goods). Violence towards others and neglect of relatives are more often a reason to request court ordered admission in BME than in White persons. BME patients are more often perceived as potentially dangerous to others.

  15. The Student Admission to Medicine (SAM) Program: First Steps toward the Paperless Processing of Medical School Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasym, P. H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The University of Calgary (Canada) medical school admissions process has been streamlined with the Student Admission to Medicine computer program, largely paperless, that creates a database from student applications. The database then converts grades to the university's standards and assists with administrative details, statistical analyses, and…

  16. Student characteristics, professional preferences, and admission to medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesternich, Iris

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians’ choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students’ attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (; whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector.Methods: We conducted two internet surveys in 2012 and 2014. In the first survey, the sample comprised 701 students and in the second, 474 students. In both surveys, we asked students for their regional preferences; in the 2014 survey, we additionally asked students for their first, second, and third preferences among a comprehensive set of specializations, including becoming a general practitioner. In both surveys, we asked students for basic demographic information (age and gender, their parents’ occupation, a measure of subjective income expectations, a measure of risk attitudes, and their high-school grade point average (, and First National Boards Examination grade (. In 2014, we additionally asked for waiting periods ( as well as for prior professional experience in the health-care sector.Results: We find that three factors increase the probability of having a preference for working in a rural area significantly, holding constant all other influences: Moreover, we find that those willing to work in the countryside have significantly more experience in the medical sector before admission to medical school.Discussion: Our results suggest that a change in the selection process for medical school may increase the supply of country doctors. Instead of focusing on the high-school grade point average, universities could even more intensely screen for study motivation

  17. The Medical School Admissions Process: A Review of the Literature 1955-1976. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuca, Janet Melei; And Others

    This document reviews the research on the medical school admissions process that has been completed during the past twenty years. The process is put into perspective by a historical overview chapter that traces trends in medical school admissions and highlights, where possible, relationships between the admissions process and institutional and…

  18. Student characteristics, professional preferences, and admission to medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesternich, Iris; Schumacher, Heiner; Winter, Joachim; Fischer, Martin R; Holzer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians' choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students' attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (Wartesemester); whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector. Methods: We conducted two internet surveys in 2012 and 2014. In the first survey, the sample comprised 701 students and in the second, 474 students. In both surveys, we asked students for their regional preferences; in the 2014 survey, we additionally asked students for their first, second, and third preferences among a comprehensive set of specializations, including becoming a general practitioner. In both surveys, we asked students for basic demographic information (age and gender), their parents' occupation, a measure of subjective income expectations, a measure of risk attitudes, and their high-school grade point average (Abiturnote), and First National Boards Examination grade (Physikum). In 2014, we additionally asked for waiting periods (Wartesemester) as well as for prior professional experience in the health-care sector. Results: We find that three factors increase the probability of having a preference for working in a rural area significantly, holding constant all other influences: having a medical doctor among the parents, having worse grades in the high-school grade point average, and being more risk averse. Moreover, we find that those willing to work in the countryside have significantly more experience in the medical sector before admission to medical school. Discussion: Our results suggest that a change in the selection process for medical school may increase the

  19. The Impact of College Admissions Policies on The Performance of High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Grau

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically evaluates the effects of college admissions policies on high school student performance. To this end, I build a model where high school students decide their level of effort and whether to take the college admissions test, taking into consideration how those decisions may affect their future university admission chances. Using Chilean data for the 2009 college admissions process, I structurally estimate the parameters of the model in order to study the implications of t...

  20. Admissions Criteria as Predictors of Academic Performance in a Three-Year Pharmacy Program at a Historically Black Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Jayesh R.; Purnell, Miriam; Lang, Lynn A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the ability of University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy’s admissions criteria to predict students’ academic performance in a 3-year pharmacy program and to analyze transferability to African-American students. Methods. Statistical analyses were conducted on retrospective data for 174 students. Didactic and experiential scores were used as measures of academic performance. Results. Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT), grade point average (GPA), interview, and observational scores combined with previous pharmacy experience and biochemistry coursework predicted the students' academic performance except second-year (P2) experiential performance. For African-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT writing subtests, while the experiential performance positively correlated with previous pharmacy experience and observational score. For nonAfrican-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT multiple-choice subtests, and experiential performance with interview score. The prerequisite GPA positively correlated with both of the student subgroups’ didactic performance. Conclusion. Both PCAT and GPA were predictors of didactic performance, especially in nonAfrican-Americans. Pharmacy experience and observational scores were predictors of experiential performance, especially in African-Americans. PMID:26941432

  1. Admissions Criteria as Predictors of Academic Performance in a Three-Year Pharmacy Program at a Historically Black Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Frederick R; Parmar, Jayesh R; Purnell, Miriam; Lang, Lynn A

    2016-02-25

    To determine the ability of University of Maryland Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy's admissions criteria to predict students' academic performance in a 3-year pharmacy program and to analyze transferability to African-American students. Statistical analyses were conducted on retrospective data for 174 students. Didactic and experiential scores were used as measures of academic performance. Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT), grade point average (GPA), interview, and observational scores combined with previous pharmacy experience and biochemistry coursework predicted the students' academic performance except second-year (P2) experiential performance. For African-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT writing subtests, while the experiential performance positively correlated with previous pharmacy experience and observational score. For nonAfrican-American students, didactic performance positively correlated with PCAT multiple-choice subtests, and experiential performance with interview score. The prerequisite GPA positively correlated with both of the student subgroups' didactic performance. Both PCAT and GPA were predictors of didactic performance, especially in nonAfrican-Americans. Pharmacy experience and observational scores were predictors of experiential performance, especially in African-Americans.

  2. Ability of admissions criteria to predict early academic performance among students of health science colleges at King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadlaq, Adel M; Alshammari, Osama F; Alsager, Saleh M; Neel, Khalid A Fouda; Mohamed, Ashry G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of admissions criteria at King Saud University (KSU), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to predict students' early academic performance at three health science colleges (medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy). A retrospective cohort study was conducted with data from the records of students enrolled in the three colleges from the 2008-09 to 2010-11 academic years. The admissions criteria-high school grade average (HSGA), aptitude test (APT) score, and achievement test (ACT) score-were the independent variables. The dependent variable was the average of students' first- and second-year grade point average (GPA). The results showed that the ACT was a better predictor of the students' early academic performance than the HSGA (β=0.368, β=0.254, respectively). No significant relationship was found between the APT and students' early academic performance (β=-0.019, p>0.01). The ACT was most predictive for pharmacy students (β=0.405), followed by dental students (β =0.392) and medical students (β=0.195). Overall, the current admissions criteria explained only 25.5% of the variance in the students' early academic performance. While the ACT and HSGA were found to be predictive of students' early academic performance in health colleges at KSU, the APT was not a strong predictor. Since the combined current admissions criteria for the health science colleges at KSU were weak predictors of the variance in early academic performance, it may be necessary to consider noncognitive evaluation methods during the admission process.

  3. Predictive value of the school-leaving grade and prognosis of different admission groups for academic performance and continuity in the medical course - a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, Guni; Resch, Franz; Duelli, Roman; Kadmon, Martina

    2014-01-01

    The school-leaving GPA and the time since completion of secondary education are the major criteria for admission to German medical schools. However, the predictive value of the school-leaving grade and the admission delay have not been thoroughly examined since the amendment of the Medical Licensing Regulations and the introduction of reformed curricula in 2002. Detailed information on the prognosis of the different admission groups is also missing. To examine the predictive values of the school-leaving grade and the age at enrolment for academic performance and continuity throughout the reformed medical course. The study includes the central admission groups "GPA-best" and "delayed admission" as well as the primary and secondary local admission groups of three consecutive cohorts. The relationship between the criteria academic performance and continuity and the predictors school-leaving GPA, enrolment age, and admission group affiliation were examined up to the beginning of the final clerkship year. The academic performance and the prolongation of the pre-clinical part of undergraduate training were significantly related to the school-leaving GPA. Conversely, the dropout rate was related to age at enrolment. The students of the GPA-best group and the primary local admission group performed best and had the lowest dropout rates. The students of the delayed admission group and secondary local admission group performed significantly worse. More than 20% of these students dropped out within the pre-clinical course, half of them due to poor academic performance. However, the academic performance of all of the admission groups was highly variable and only about 35% of the students of each group reached the final clerkship year within the regular time. The school-leaving grade and age appear to have different prognostic implications for academic performance and continuity. Both factors have consequences for the delayed admission group. The academic prognosis of the

  4. The Role of Socioeconomic Status in Medical School Admissions: Validation of a Socioeconomic Indicator for Use in Medical School Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbic, Douglas; Jones, David J; Case, Steven T

    2015-07-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) impacts educational opportunities and outcomes which explains, in part, why the majority of medical students come from the upper two quintiles of family income. A two-factor SES indicator based on parental education (E) and occupation (O) has recently been established by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). This study validates this two-factor indicator as applicable to the national pool of medical school applicants. The AAMC SES EO indicator classifies applicants into five ordered groups (EO-1 through EO-5) based on four aggregated categories of parental education and two aggregated categories of occupation. The EO indicator was applied to the 2012 American Medical College Application Service applicant pool. The authors examined the associations that the EO category had with six additional and independent indicators of socioeconomic (dis)advantage, as well as with demographic and educational characteristics and life experiences. The EO indicator could be applied to 89% of the 2012 applicants. The lower the EO category, the stronger the association with each of the six indicators of socioeconomic disadvantage. Other notable, but weaker, associations with the EO indicator were differences by age, race/ethnicity, performance on the Medical College Admission Test, community college attendance, and certain self-reported life experiences. The EO indicator provides a simple, intuitive, widely applicable, and valid means for identifying applicants from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. This affords admissions committees an additional factor to consider during the holistic review of applicants in order to further diversify the medical school class.

  5. Predictive Value of the School-leaving Grade and Prognosis of Different Admission Groups for Academic Performance and Continuity in the Medical Course – a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, Guni; Resch, Franz; Duelli, Roman; Kadmon, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The school-leaving GPA and the time since completion of secondary education are the major criteria for admission to German medical schools. However, the predictive value of the school-leaving grade and the admission delay have not been thoroughly examined since the amendment of the Medical Licensing Regulations and the introduction of reformed curricula in 2002. Detailed information on the prognosis of the different admission groups is also missing. Aim: To examine the predictive values of the school-leaving grade and the age at enrolment for academic performance and continuity throughout the reformed medical course. Methods: The study includes the central admission groups “GPA-best” and “delayed admission” as well as the primary and secondary local admission groups of three consecutive cohorts. The relationship between the criteria academic performance and continuity and the predictors school-leaving GPA, enrolment age, and admission group affiliation were examined up to the beginning of the final clerkship year. Results: The academic performance and the prolongation of the pre-clinical part of undergraduate training were significantly related to the school-leaving GPA. Conversely, the dropout rate was related to age at enrolment. The students of the GPA-best group and the primary local admission group performed best and had the lowest dropout rates. The students of the delayed admission group and secondary local admission group performed significantly worse. More than 20% of these students dropped out within the pre-clinical course, half of them due to poor academic performance. However, the academic performance of all of the admission groups was highly variable and only about 35% of the students of each group reached the final clerkship year within the regular time. Discussion: The school-leaving grade and age appear to have different prognostic implications for academic performance and continuity. Both factors have consequences for the

  6. Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent...... dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half...... years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Results  Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission...

  7. Criteria for admission of odontogenic infections at high risk of deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, N; Cloutier, L; Khaldoun, E; Bois, E; Chirat, M; Salvan, D

    2015-11-01

    Many patients with odontogenic infections are hospitalised because of the risk of deep neck space infection. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors allowing more reliable selection of patients requiring hospitalisation for both specialists and emergency physicians. This retrospective study was based on a cohort of 97 patients hospitalised for odontogenic infection in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery of Centre hospitalier Sud Francilien, Île-de-France, from January 2008 to June 2012. The majority of patients presented with dental abscess (66 patients; 68%). Nineteen patients (20%) presented with deep neck space infection. The frequency of deep neck space infection was significantly higher in patients with mandibular odontogenic infection (16/55 patients (29%) than in those with maxillary odontogenic infection (3/42 (7%); P ≤ 0.009). The incidence of deep neck space infection was significantly higher in patients with dental abscess (17/66, (26%) than in those without dental abscess (2/31 (6%); P ≤ 0.03). In addition to the well-known classical criteria (fever, neck swelling, dyspnoea, dysphagia, trismus, leukocytosis, elevated C reactive protein (CRP)), the criteria for admission for odontogenic infection should include mandibular odontogenic infection and/or the presence of dental abscess. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Increasing the admission rate to secondary school: The case of primary school student career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Anders; Jensen, Vibeke Myrup; Nielsen, Lisbeth Palmhøj

    Although several studies investigate the effects of school resources on student performance, these studies tend to focus more on intervention effect sizes than on their cost-effectiveness. Exploiting policy-induced variation in Denmark and using high-quality administrative data, we investigate...... the effects of a school intervention that introduces structured student career guidance in lower secondary school on upper secondary school admission. Disregarding the sunk-cost of implementation, the reform was cost-neutral. In a difference-in-difference framework we find that the reform increases admission...... to upper secondary school between 4.0-6.3 percentage points for immigrants, but shows at best small improvements for the native students....

  9. Extended criteria and predictors in college admission: Exploring the structure of study success and investigating the validity of domain knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLGA KUNINA

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The utility of aptitude tests and intelligence measures in the prediction of the success in college is one of the empirically best supported results in ability research. However, the structure of the criterion “study success” has not been appropriately investigated so far. Moreover, it remains unclear which aspect of intelligence – fluid intelligence or crystallized intelligence – has the major impact on the prediction. In three studies we have investigated the dimensionality of the criterion achievements as well as the relative contributions of competing ability predictors. In the first study, the dimensionality of college grades was explored in a sample of 629 alumni. A measurement model with two correlated latent factors distinguishing undergraduate college grades on the one hand from graduate college grades on the other hand had the best fit to the data. In the second study, a group of 179 graduate students completed a Psychology knowledge test and provided available college grades in undergraduate studies. A model separating a general latent factor for Psychology knowledge from a nested method factor for college grades, and a second nested factor for “experimental orientation” had the best fit to the data. In the third study the predictive power of domain specific knowledge tests in Mathematics, English, and Biology was investigated. A sample of 387 undergraduate students in this prospective study additionally completed a compilation of fluid intelligence tests. The results of this study indicate as expected that: a ability measures are incrementally predictive over school grades in predicting exam grades; and b that knowledge tests from relevant domains were incrementally predictive over fluid intelligence. The results of these studies suggest that criteria for college admission tests deserve and warrant more attention, and that domain specific ability indicators can contribute to the predictive validity of established

  10. A holistic review of the medical school admission process: examining correlates of academic underperformance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Terry D; Elam, Carol L

    2014-01-01

    Despite medical school admission committees' best efforts, a handful of seemingly capable students invariably struggle during their first year of study. Yet, even as entrance criteria continue to broaden beyond cognitive qualifications, attention inevitably reverts back to such factors when seeking to understand these phenomena. Using a host of applicant, admission, and post-admission variables, the purpose of this inductive study, then, was to identify a constellation of student characteristics that, taken collectively, would be predictive of students at-risk of underperforming during the first year of medical school. In it, we hypothesize that a wider range of factors than previously recognized could conceivably play roles in understanding why students experience academic problems early in the medical educational continuum. The study sample consisted of the five most recent matriculant cohorts from a large, southeastern medical school (n=537). Independent variables reflected: 1) the personal demographics of applicants (e.g., age, gender); 2) academic criteria (e.g., undergraduate grade point averages [GPA], medical college admission test); 3) selection processes (e.g., entrance track, interview scores, committee votes); and 4) other indicators of personality and professionalism (e.g., Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test™ emotional intelligence scores, NEO PI-R™ personality profiles, and appearances before the Professional Code Committee [PCC]). The dependent variable, first-year underperformance, was defined as ANY action (repeat, conditionally advance, or dismiss) by the college's Student Progress and Promotions Committee (SPPC) in response to predefined academic criteria. This study protocol was approved by the local medical institutional review board (IRB). Of the 537 students comprising the study sample, 61 (11.4%) met the specified criterion for academic underperformance. Significantly increased academic risks were identified among students

  11. A holistic review of the medical school admission process: examining correlates of academic underperformance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry D. Stratton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite medical school admission committees’ best efforts, a handful of seemingly capable students invariably struggle during their first year of study. Yet, even as entrance criteria continue to broaden beyond cognitive qualifications, attention inevitably reverts back to such factors when seeking to understand these phenomena. Using a host of applicant, admission, and post-admission variables, the purpose of this inductive study, then, was to identify a constellation of student characteristics that, taken collectively, would be predictive of students at-risk of underperforming during the first year of medical school. In it, we hypothesize that a wider range of factors than previously recognized could conceivably play roles in understanding why students experience academic problems early in the medical educational continuum. Methods: The study sample consisted of the five most recent matriculant cohorts from a large, southeastern medical school (n=537. Independent variables reflected: 1 the personal demographics of applicants (e.g., age, gender; 2 academic criteria (e.g., undergraduate grade point averages [GPA], medical college admission test; 3 selection processes (e.g., entrance track, interview scores, committee votes; and 4 other indicators of personality and professionalism (e.g., Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test™ emotional intelligence scores, NEO PI-R™ personality profiles, and appearances before the Professional Code Committee [PCC]. The dependent variable, first-year underperformance, was defined as ANY action (repeat, conditionally advance, or dismiss by the college's Student Progress and Promotions Committee (SPPC in response to predefined academic criteria. This study protocol was approved by the local medical institutional review board (IRB. Results: Of the 537 students comprising the study sample, 61 (11.4% met the specified criterion for academic underperformance. Significantly increased

  12. Components of an Evidence-Based Analytic Rubric for Use in Medical School Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Graham P; Coffman, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Attrition from medical school remains a serious cause of concern for the medical education community. Thus, there is a need to improve our ability to select only those candidates who will succeed at medical school from many highly qualified and motivated applicants. This can be achieved, in part, by reducing the reliance on cognitive factors and increasing the use of noncognitive character traits in high-stakes admissions decisions. Herein we describe an analytic rubric that combines research-derived predictors of medical school success to generate a composite score for use in admissions decisions. The analytic rubric as described herein represents a significant step toward evidenced-based admissions that will facilitate a more consistent and transparent qualitative evaluation of medical school applicants beyond their grades and Medical College Admissions Test scores and contribute to a redesigned and improved admissions process.

  13. Medical school dropout--testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Lotte; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Korsholm, Lars; Eika, Berit

    2011-11-01

    Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n=1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half took a composite non-grade-based admission test (Strategy 2). Educational as well as social predictor variables (doctor-parent, origin, parenthood, parents living together, parent on benefit, university-educated parents) were also examined. The outcome of interest was students' dropout status at 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission strategy, the type of qualifying examination and the priority given to the programme on the national application forms contributed significantly to the dropout model. Social variables did not predict dropout and neither did Strategy 2 admission test scores. Selection by admission testing appeared to have an independent, protective effect on dropout in this setting. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  14. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 2: survey of North American schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, G H; Spafford, M M; Bohr, J D

    2001-01-01

    A study of veterinary school admission interview practices across the USA and Canada was conducted in 1999. All 31 schools responded. INTERVIEW USE: Eighty-four percent of the veterinary schools interview applicants. Veterinary schools are more likely to interview resident than non-resident applicants (62% interviewed >or=49% of their resident applicants, while 77% interviewed interview weight in the selection process (mean weight is 28%). INTERVIEW PURPOSE AND CONTENT: The most common purposes for conducting a veterinary admission interview are to gather information, to measure non-cognitive/humanistic skills, and to clarify information on the written application (>or=77%). The five most common characteristics and skills the veterinary admission interview is intended to assess are communication skills, maturity, motivation for and interest in veterinary medicine, interpersonal skills, and knowledge of the veterinary profession (>or=92%). The least common characteristic or skill the veterinary admission interview is intended to assess is academic performance (23%). INTERVIEW FORMAT: Veterinary schools are most likely to offer one interview to a candidate (83%). A panel interview with between two and three interviewers is the predominant format employed (92%). The interview is of 20-45 minutes duration (88%), most commonly 30 minutes (50%). Interview questions most often address experiences in veterinary medicine, general background, and strengths and weaknesses (>or=85%). The level of interview structure is low to moderate (73%). The cold or blind interview (where interviewers are denied access to all or part of the written application) is employed by 50% of the interviewing veterinary schools. INTERVIEWERS: Interviewing veterinary schools assign interviewing to faculty veterinarians (100%). Some level of interviewer training is usually provided (87%); the most common mode of training is distribution of printed material (86%). SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS: The

  15. Predicting Freshman Grade Point Average From College Admissions Test Scores and State High School Test Scores

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Koretz; Carol Yu; Preeya P. Mbekeani; Meredith Langi; Tasmin Dhaliwal; David Braslow

    2016-01-01

    The current focus on assessing “college and career readiness” raises an empirical question: How do high school tests compare with college admissions tests in predicting performance in college? We explored this using data from the City University of New York and public colleges in Kentucky. These two systems differ in the choice of college admissions test, the stakes for students on the high school test, and demographics. We predicted freshman grade point average (FGPA) from high school GPA an...

  16. Do Admission Criteria for Teacher Education Institutions Matter? A Comparative Study on Beliefs of Student Teachers from Serbia and Slovenia about Inclusive Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecek, Mojca; Macura-Milovanovic, Suncica

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between admissions criteria, the preparation provided by teacher education programmes and student teachers' (STs) beliefs about inclusive education (IE) are rarely made explicit. The paucity of data regarding this relationship leads us to question whether teacher candidates' prior beliefs matter relative to admissions criteria or…

  17. "A chance to show yourself" - how do applicants approach medical school admission essays?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jonathan S; Lemay, Jean-Francois; Brownell, Keith; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Although essay questions are used in the admissions process in many medical schools, there has been little research on how applicants respond to essay questions. The purpose of this study was to explore how applicants to medical school approach essay questions used in the selection process. Qualitative analysis was conducted on 240 randomly selected essays written by individuals applying to a single Canadian medical school in 2007 using a modified grounded theory approach to develop a conceptual framework which was checked in interviews with applicants. Three core variables were identified: "balancing service and reward," "anticipating the physician role," and "readiness." We described the overall approach of applicants as "taking stock," writing about their journeys to the selection process, their experiences of the process itself, and about their anticipated future in medicine. Our findings suggest a disconnect between the approach of the applicants (to "show themselves" and be selected as individuals) and the stated intent of the process (to select applicants based on "objective" criteria). Our findings raise important questions about how applicants represent themselves when applying for medical school and suggest that it is important to understand the applicant's point of view when developing questions for selection processes.

  18. Correlation of pre-veterinary admissions criteria, intra-professional curriculum measures, AVMA-COE professional competency scores, and the NAVLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, James K; Rush, Bonnie R; White, Brad J; Wilkerson, Melinda J

    2014-01-01

    Data consisting of preadmission criteria scores, annual and final cumulative grade point averages (GPAs), grades from individual professional courses, American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education (AVMA-COE) Competency scores, annual class rank, and North American Veterinary Licensing Exam (NAVLE) scores were collected on all graduating DVM students at Kansas State University in 2009 and 2010. Associations among the collected data were compared by Pearson correlation. Pre-veterinary admissions criteria infrequently correlated with annual GPAs of Years 1-3, rarely correlated with the AVMA-COE Competencies, and never correlated with the annual GPA of Year 4. Low positive correlations occurred between the NAVLE and the Verbal Graduate Record Examination (GRE) (r=.214), Total GRE (r=.171), and the mean GPA of pre-professional science courses (SGPA) (r=.236). Annual GPAs strongly correlated with didactic course scores. Annual GPAs and final class rank strongly correlated (mean r=-.849), and both strongly correlated with the NAVLE score (NAVLE: GPAs mean r=.628, NAVLE: final class rank r=-.714). Annual GPAs at the end of Years 1-4 weakly correlated or did not correlate with the AVMA-COE Competencies. The AVMA-COE Competencies weakly correlated with scores earned in didactic courses of Years 1-3. AVMA-COE Competencies were internally consistent (mean r=.796) but only moderately correlated with performance on the NAVLE (mean r=.319). Low correlations between admissions criteria and outcomes indicate a need to reevaluate admission criteria as predictors of school success. If the NAVLE remains the primary discriminator for veterinary licensure (and the gateway to professional activity), then the AVMA-COE Competencies should be refined to better improve and reflect the NAVLE, or the NAVLE examination should change to reflect AVMA-COE Competencies.

  19. Does an emotional intelligence test correlate with traditional measures used to determine medical school admission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, John J; Moineau, Geneviève; Puddester, Derek; Wood, Timothy J; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2011-10-01

    As medical school admission committees are giving increased consideration to noncognitive measures, this study sought to determine how emotional intelligence (EI) scores relate to other traditional measures used in the admissions process. EI was measured using an ability-based test (Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test, or MSCEIT) in two consecutive cohorts of medical school applicants (2006 and 2007) qualifying for the admission interview. Pearson correlations between EI scores and traditional measures (i.e., weighted grade point average [wGPA], autobiographical sketch scores, and interview scores) were calculated. Of 659 applicants, 68% participated. MSCEIT scores did not correlate with traditional measures (r = -0.06 to 0.09, P > .05), with the exception of a small correlation with wGPA in the 2007 cohort (r = -0.13, P school admission measures suggests that EI evaluates a construct fundamentally different from traits captured in our admission process.

  20. The Independent, Private Counselor: What Admission Officers and Secondary School Counselors Think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Mary K.; Fuller, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the role of the independent college counselor and reports the results of research on the perceptions of 125 college admission officers and 210 secondary school counselors toward this type of practitioner. Results showed mixed reactions to aspects of the independent counselor's role and doubts about the independent admission counselor's…

  1. Beyond Correlations: Usefulness of High School GPA and Test Scores in Making College Admissions Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Correlational evidence suggests that high school GPA is better than admission test scores in predicting first-year college GPA, although test scores have incremental predictive validity. The usefulness of a selection variable in making admission decisions depends in part on its predictive validity, but also on institutions' selectivity and…

  2. Development of National Assessment Criteria for Green Schools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, the assessment criteria for green schools have become an obstacle to the rapid development of the green school initiative, mainly due to the cultural and social system in Mainland China. Because there are many district criteria which mainly focus on green schools construction and evaluation, it is necessary to ...

  3. Effective admissions practices to achieve greater student diversity in dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Shelia S; Grant-Mills, Donna

    2010-10-01

    In this chapter we describe the institutional and policy-level strategies that dental schools in the Pipeline, Profession, and Practice: Community-Based Dental Education program used to modify their admissions practices to increase the diversity of their student bodies. Schools developed and used clear statements recognizing the value of diversity. They incorporated recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings regarding educational diversity into their revised admissions practices; these rulings cited diversity as both a "compelling interest" and its use in only "narrowly tailored" circumstances. We make a case for admissions decisions based on a comprehensive evaluation that balances the quantitative and qualitative qualities of a candidate. It refutes the practice of overreliance on standardized tests by detailing the whole-file review process to measure merit and professional promise. Also described is a range of noncognitive variables (e.g., leadership, ability to sustain academic achievement with competing priorities, volunteerism, communication, social background, and disadvantaged status) that schools can take into consideration in admissions decisions. Admissions committees can tie this comprehensive review of candidates into the case for promoting cross-cultural understanding and enhanced competence to provide care to patients from diverse backgrounds. In addition, the chapter reviews the challenges schools face in developing admissions policies and procedures that reflect the university's mission for diversity. It addresses the importance of a diverse composition of the admissions committee. It also describes how tailored workshops and technical assistance for admissions committees can help schools improve their student diversity and how admissions committees can engage in a process of periodic review of their diversity objectives in relationship to the school's mission.

  4. Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors

    OpenAIRE

    O?Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Korsholm, Lars; Eika, Berit

    2011-01-01

    Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the stud...

  5. Noncognitive criteria for assessing students in North American medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G D; Frank, D; Franks, R D; Getto, C J

    1989-01-01

    In 1986 the authors mailed a one-page questionnaire to 135 North American medical schools requesting information about written expectations for students that contain noncognitive criteria. Eighty-eight questionnaires (65.2%) were returned, and 48 schools (54.5%) indicated they possessed written noncognitive criteria. Those schools having noncognitive criteria were asked to submit the criteria for review and were questioned about their reasons for establishing such criteria. Those schools not having noncognitive criteria were asked whether they perceived a need for such criteria and had plans for developing them. The study showed an increasing trend to create criteria that assist in administrative actions when problems arise. In the 31 sets of noncognitive criteria submitted for the study, the rank order of specific expectations was, from most to least frequently mentioned: honesty, professional behavior, dedication to learning, appearance, respect for law, respect for others, confidentiality, aid to others, substance abuse, and financial responsibility. The authors make recommendations for schools wishing to create noncognitive criteria and explain why they feel such criteria should receive the recognition and importance given to cognitive criteria.

  6. An Empirical Investigation of the MBA Admission Criteria for Nontraditional Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, M. Robert, Jr.; King, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    An off-campus MBA program involved 467 nontraditional students in individual assignments and 2 intensive weekend classes. Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores, undergraduate grade point average, and work experience were the best predictors of success in the program. For those admitted as exceptions, GMAT score and undergraduate…

  7. Should the MCAT exam be used for medical school admissions in Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskander, Antoine; Shandling, Maureen; Hanson, Mark D

    2013-05-01

    In light of the structural and content changes to the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) to be implemented in 2015 and the recent diversity- and social-accountability-based recommendations of the Future of Medical Education in Canada (FMEC) project, the authors review and reexamine the use of the MCAT exam in Canadian medical school admissions decisions.This Perspective article uses a point-counterpoint format to discuss three main advantages and disadvantages of using the MCAT exam in the medical school admissions process, from a Canadian perspective. The authors examine three questions regarding the FMEC recommendations and the revised MCAT exam: (1) Is the MCAT exam equal and useful in Canadian admissions? (2) Does the MCAT exam affect matriculant diversity? and (3) Is the MCAT exam a strong predictor of future performance? They present the most recent arguments and evidence for and against use of the MCAT exam, with the purpose of summarizing these different perspectives for readers.

  8. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit admission criteria for haemato-oncological patients: a basis for clinical guidelines implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piastra, Marco; Fognani, Giuliana; Franceschi, Alessia

    2011-06-16

    Recent advances in supportive care and progress in the development and use of chemotherapy have considerably improved the prognosis of many children with malignancy, thus the need for intensive care admission and management is increasing, reaching about 40% of patients throughout the disease course. Cancer remains a major death cause in children, though outcomes have considerably improved over the past decades. Prediction of outcome for children with cancer in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) obviously requires clinical guidelines, and these are not well defined, as well as admission criteria. Major determinants of negative outcomes remain severe sepsis/septic shock association and respiratory failure, deserving specific approach in children with cancer, particularly those receiving a bone marrow transplantation. A nationwide consensus should be achieved among pediatric intensivists and oncologists regarding the threshold clinical conditions requiring Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission as well as specific critical care protocols. As demonstrated for the critically ill non-oncologic child, it appears unreasonable that pediatric patients with malignancy can be admitted to an adult Intensive Care Unit ICU. On a national basis a pool of refecence institutions should be identified and early referral to an oncologic PICU is warranted.

  9. Analyzing the influence of admissions criteria and cultural norms on success in an international dental studies program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaya, Lisa E; Chambers, David W; King, Patricia A

    2008-03-01

    This study determines the extent to which admissions criteria and cultural norms predict the success of a foreign-trained dentist in a United States dental educational program. Correlation and regression tests were applied to an eleven-year period from 1994 to 2004 of retrospective admissions data for 144 International Dental Studies Program students. Five cultural norms were derived from the collective cultural dimensions of a scholarly work of validated multinational surveys by Geert Hofstede. These five cultural norms are Power Distance (degree of inequality between "haves" and "have-nots" in a culture); Individualism (support for independent or group behavior); Long-Term View (deferred gratification versus quick results/rewards); Masculinity (emphasis on performance/outcomes versus socialization); and Uncertainty Avoidance (ability to cope with an uncertain future). Hofstede's calculated country scores on these cultural dimensions applied to the students' countries of education and their influence on students' academic performance were assessed by correlation and regression analyses. Results showed that the TOEFL and National Board Part I examinations and the cultural norm of Long-Term View were the most positive predictors of grade point averages. The other four cultural norms studied were not predictors of success. Those who applied to the program more than once before being accepted did less well in the program, yet "less well" might have meant that they graduated with a 3.0 instead of a 3.5 GPA. Generally speaking, the more recent the graduated class, the higher the ending GPA has been. Admissions committees should determine if they want to invest the resources required to implement a multitude of admissions predictors to find the best of the qualified applicants.

  10. Criteria for Modern School Library Media Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. Div. of Library Development and Services.

    These guidelines and recommendations for library programs and resources focus on goals, programs, and services for state, district, and individual school levels. The Division of Library Development and Services in the State Department of Education develops all public and school library media programs, while the Office of School Media Services, a…

  11. Growth Rate Lags Again in Graduate Schools' International Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The number of foreign students admitted to graduate schools at American colleges and universities grew in 2008 for the fourth straight year, but the rate of increase over the previous year declined for the third consecutive year, according to survey results released by the Council of Graduate Schools. Based on previous years' data, this year's…

  12. Veterinary school admission interviews, part 3: strategies for increasing interview validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert E; van Walsum, Kimberly L; Spafford, Marlee M; Edwards, Janine C; Turnwald, Grant H

    2004-01-01

    The veterinary school admission interview is a widely used selection tool, yet concerns persist about its reliability, validity, and cost. Relative to medicine, optometry, and dentistry schools, veterinary schools have been more likely to conduct panel interviews and to fix the interview's weight in selection decisions, strategies that increase interview validity. This article provides strategies for further increasing the veterinary school interview's validity. Interview reliability and validity studies point to key strategies the veterinary school admissions committee can implement before the interview: (1) establishing the interview's purpose(s); (2) conducting a "job" analysis to identify desirable candidate skills, knowledge, and attributes; (3) developing a structured and panel interview where interviewers, if possible, are blind to other admission data; (4) training interviewers; (5) setting a reasonable interview schedule; and (6) determining methods for analyzing applicant data. During the interview, interviewers should proceed through a structured series of steps: (1) open the interview with a specified agenda; (2) probe for information using structured questions and anchored rating scales; (3) close the interview to allow for candidate questions; and (4) evaluate the interview data. After the interview, the admissions committee should (1) analyze the interview data within and across interviewers and (2) analyze the data across all selection tools in order to assign relative weights to the selection tools.

  13. Race-neutral admission approaches: Challenges and opportunities for medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinecke, Ann; Beaudreau, James; Bletzinger, Ruth B; Terrell, Charles

    2007-02-01

    In 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court's rulings in Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger affirmed the use of narrowly tailored, race-conscious admission programs by institutions of higher education that find that the benefits derived from diversity rise to a compelling interest. The rulings also required institutions that use race-conscious admission programs to explore whether the results of such programs could be met through race-neutral alternatives. In this article, the authors review relevant literature in the context of medical education and summarize the existing information about race-neutral alternatives and the challenges and opportunities in implementing them, with the goal of encouraging further research that will inform medical school admission policies. The authors argue that although undergraduate and graduate institutions across the nation are pursuing the goal of diversity within the guidelines set forth by the Court, there is too little known about how race-neutral alternatives to race-conscious admission policies can be effective in promoting diversity. They conclude that although certain approaches show promise, medical schools--as they continue to employ race-conscious admission policies to achieve the benefits of diversity--must take advantage of their compliance with the Court's decision to investigate whether race-neutral approaches can contribute to the diversity of medical school classes.

  14. Does emotional intelligence at medical school admission predict future academic performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Leddy, John J; Wood, Timothy J; Puddester, Derek; Moineau, Geneviève

    2014-04-01

    Medical school admissions committees are increasingly considering noncognitive measures like emotional intelligence (EI) in evaluating potential applicants. This study explored whether scores on an EI abilities test at admissions predicted future academic performance in medical school to determine whether EI could be used in making admissions decisions. The authors invited all University of Ottawa medical school applicants offered an interview in 2006 and 2007 to complete the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso EI Test (MSCEIT) at the time of their interview (105 and 101, respectively), then again at matriculation (120 and 106, respectively). To determine predictive validity, they correlated MSCEIT scores to scores on written examinations and objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) administered during the four-year program. They also correlated MSCEIT scores to the number of nominations for excellence in clinical performance and failures recorded over the four years. The authors found no significant correlations between MSCEIT scores and written examination scores or number of failures. The correlations between MSCEIT scores and total OSCE scores ranged from 0.01 to 0.35; only MSCEIT scores at matriculation and OSCE year 4 scores for the 2007 cohort were significantly correlated. Correlations between MSCEIT scores and clinical nominations were low (range 0.12-0.28); only the correlation between MSCEIT scores at matriculation and number of clinical nominations for the 2007 cohort were statistically significant. EI, as measured by an abilities test at admissions, does not appear to reliably predict future academic performance. Future studies should define the role of EI in admissions decisions.

  15. Entrance Quotas and Admission to Medical Schools: A Sequential Probit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannings, Kathy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Explores whether 1987 entrance quotas used by a highly selective medical school (University of Montreal) were meritocratic or free from discrimination and arbitrary decisions. A sequential probit model shows that the performance variables as measured by the admissions committee only partially explain the committee's decisions. Many…

  16. Does Grade Inflation Affect the Credibility of Grades? Evidence from US Law School Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsurawat, Winai

    2009-01-01

    While the nature and causes of university grade inflation have been extensively studied, little empirical research on the consequence of this phenomenon is currently available. The present study uses data for 48 US law schools to analyze admission decisions in 1995, 2000, and 2007, a period during which university grade inflation appears to have…

  17. Admission Scores as a Predictor of Academic Success in the Fiji School of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeala, Christian C.; Swami, Niraj S.; Lal, Nilesh; Hussain, Shagufta

    2012-01-01

    Secondary education in Fiji ends with the Form 7 examination. Predictive validity for academic success of Form 7 scores which form the basis for admission into the Bachelor of Medicine Bachelor of Surgery programme of the Fiji School of Medicine was examined via a cohort of 129 students. Success rates for year 1 in 2008, 2009, and 2010 were 90.7…

  18. Short- and Long-Term Validity of High School GPA for Admission to Colleges outside the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hattami, Abdulghani

    2014-01-01

    High school GPA is the only admission criterion that is currently used by many colleges in Yemen to select their potential students. Its predictive validity was investigated to ensure the accuracy of the admission decisions in these colleges. The relationship between students' persistence in the 4 years of college and high school GPA was studied…

  19. Development of National Assessment Criteria for Green Schools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4carolinebell@gmail.com

    It has promoted both education reform and socially sustainable development. Recently, the assessment criteria for green schools ... sustainable development in society. There are, however, still many problems in the present green ..... Review the restaurants, classrooms, laboratories, garbage station, infirmary in the schools ...

  20. Medical school admission test: advantages for students whose parents are medical doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne; Görlich, Yvonne

    2015-04-23

    Admission candidates especially in medicine do not represent the socio-demographic proportions of the average population: children of parents with an academic background are highly overrepresented, and those with parents who are medical doctors represent quite a large and special group. At Göttingen University Medicine, a new admission procedure was established with the intention to broaden the base of applicants towards including candidates with previous medical training or lower final school grades. With a view to family background, we wished to know whether candidates differ in the test scores in our admission procedure. In February 2014 we asked all admission candidates of Göttingen University Medicine by questionnaire (nine closed, four open questions) about the academic background in their families, specifically, the medical background, school exam grades, and previous medical training as well as about how they prepared for the admission test. We also analysed data from admission scores of this group (semi-structured interview and four multiple mini-interviews). In addition to descriptive statistics, we used a Pearson correlation, means comparisons (t-test, analysis of variance), ANOVA, and a Scheffé test. In February 2014 nearly half of the applicants (44%) at Göttingen University Medicine had a medical background, most frequently, their parents were physicians. This rate is much higher than reported in the literature. Other socio-demographic baseline data did not differ from the percentages given in the literature. Of all applicants, 20% had previous medical training. The group of applicants with parents who were medical doctors did not show any advantage in either test-scoring (MMI and interview), their individual preparation for the admission test, or in receiving or accepting a place at medical school. Candidates with parents who were medical doctors had scored slightly lower in school exam grades. Our results suggest that there is a self

  1. Hospital admissions and school dropout: a retrospective cohort study of the 'selection hypothesis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heesch, Mirjam M J; Bosma, Hans; Traag, Tanja; Otten, Ferdy

    2012-08-01

    School dropout is an important predictor of poor health and of high relevance for public health (in accord with the 'causation hypothesis'). Rather than examining how dropout affects health, we set out to examine how poor health might affect school dropout (in accord with the 'selection hypothesis'). Hospital admissions are potentially indicative of more serious disease and might be expected to result in learning backlogs. Longitudinal data of the Dutch Secondary Education Pupil Cohort 1993 (VOCL'93) and the National Medical Registration (LMR) were combined. The study population consisted of 16,239 pupils who were followed from first grade at secondary school until they left fulltime education. Pupils were monitored regarding both their educational careers and their hospital admissions. Nine percent had a hospital admission and 10% became a school dropout. Hospital admissions were only predictive of later school dropout for pupils starting in the highest type of secondary education (pre-university education) [OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.05-2.26)], not for pupils with lower educational levels. Pre-university pupils who had been hospitalized for more than 9 days [OR 2.34 (95% CI 1.08-5.09)] or who were hospitalized more than three times [OR 4.20 (95% CI 1.75-10.04)] had particularly heightened odds of school dropout. Our findings further support the 'selection hypothesis' and confirm the relevance of dropout for public health. Public health workers and educational professionals should probably aim at intensified monitoring of children who have been hospitalized and simultaneously aim at improving accessibility to (higher quality) education in the hospital.

  2. Underrepresented students' perspectives on institutional climate during the application and admission process to nursing school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Giscombe, Cheryl L; Rowsey, Pamela Johnson; Kneipp, Shawn M; Owens, Clint W; Sheffield, Karen M; Galbraith, Kayoll V; Hammad, Sama; Fowler, Tamryn; Hodges, Eric A; Kowlowitz, Vicky; Alexander, G Rumay

    2015-05-01

    A growing body of literature has focused on issues related to recruitment and retention to enhance diversity in nursing. This study was designed to identify barriers and supports encountered by underrepresented students when applying to nursing school. Twenty-two underrepresented baccalaureate nursing students participated in two focus groups. Applied thematic analysis was used to organize the data and identify major themes. Students expressed the importance of having (a) navigators in the offices of admissions and student affairs to provide encouragement, support, and information during the application process; (b) tailored programming for underrepresented students; (c) financial aid guidance; (d) timely feedback about admissions decisions; (e) a clear and easily navigated Web site; and (f) negotiation and acculturation to know the right things to do and say during the application and admissions process. Findings provide direction for developing programming and collaborations to enhance the institutional climate for underrepresented nursing applicants. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(5):261-269.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Polemic: five proposals for a medical school admission policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, C

    2006-08-01

    Five proposals for admitting better applicants into medical school are discussed in this article: (1) An A level in a humanity or social science would be required, to supplement--not replace--the stringent science requirement. This would ensure that successful candidates would be better "primed" for the medical curriculum. (2) Extra points in the applicant's initial screening would be awarded for an A level in English literature. (3) There would be a minimum age of 23 for applicants, although a prior degree would not be required. This is to ensure that the applicants are mature enough to know themselves and the world better, to make a more informed and motivated choice of career, and to get more out of the humanities components of the curriculum. (4) A year's full-time experience in a healthcare or charity environment would be desirable. (5) Applicants would be given two lists of interview discussion topics to prepare: works of literature and topics in healthcare politics.

  4. Predicting Freshman Grade Point Average From College Admissions Test Scores and State High School Test Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Koretz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current focus on assessing “college and career readiness” raises an empirical question: How do high school tests compare with college admissions tests in predicting performance in college? We explored this using data from the City University of New York and public colleges in Kentucky. These two systems differ in the choice of college admissions test, the stakes for students on the high school test, and demographics. We predicted freshman grade point average (FGPA from high school GPA and both college admissions and high school tests in mathematics and English. In both systems, the choice of tests had only trivial effects on the aggregate prediction of FGPA. Adding either test to an equation that included the other had only trivial effects on prediction. Although the findings suggest that the choice of test might advantage or disadvantage different students, it had no substantial effect on the over- and underprediction of FGPA for students classified by race-ethnicity or poverty.

  5. Evaluating Higher Education Policy in Turkey: Assessment of the Admission Procedure to Architecture, Planning, and Engineering Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubukcu, Kemal Mert; Cubukcu, Ebru

    2009-01-01

    The admission procedure to higher education institutions in Turkey is based on the student's high school grades and Central University Entrance Examination (CUEE) score, with a much greater weight on the latter. However, whether the CUEE is an appropriate measure in the admission process to universities is still a much-debated question. This study…

  6. Development and Assessment of the Multiple Mini-Interview in a School of Pharmacy Admissions Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; Singer, David; Lewis, Margaret; Dinkins, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of the multiple mini-interview (MMI) within a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) admissions model. Methods. Demographic data and academic indicators were collected for all candidates who participated in Candidates’ Day (n=253), along with the score for each MMI station criteria (7 stations). A survey was administered to all candidates who completed the MMI, and another survey was administered to all interviewers to examine perceptions of the MMI. Results. Analyses suggest that MMI stations assessed different attributes as designed, with Cronbach alpha for each station ranging from 0.90 to 0.95. All correlations between MMI station scores and academic indicators were negligible. No significant differences in average station scores were found based on age, gender, or race. Conclusion. This study provides additional support for the use of the MMI as an admissions tool in pharmacy education. PMID:26089562

  7. Pre-Admission Grades and Student Performance: The Malaysian Medical School Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Basir; Suliman, Noor A.; Din, Salwa M.; Manan, Norhafizah A.

    2012-01-01

    Prior academic achievement is often considered the best predictor and therefore the preadmission criteria for highly competitive medical schools. Most studies that advocate this viewpoint analyzed cohorts based on results of a central examination taken by students who come from various pre-university setups and backgrounds. Far less is known about…

  8. The Relative Predictive Validity of ACT Scores and High School Grades in Making College Admission Decisions. Issues in College Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACT, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    Postsecondary institutions often consider students' high school grades and ACT scores when making admission decisions. This issue brief summarizes ACT research on the relative weights of ACT scores and high school grades for predicting college persistence as well as selected indicators of academic success in college. (Contains 1 table and 3…

  9. Evaluating the validity of an integrity-based situational judgement test for medical school admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Adrian; Rodgerson, Mark J; Dowell, Jon; Patterson, Fiona

    2015-09-02

    While the construct of integrity has emerged as a front-runner amongst the desirable attributes to select for in medical school admissions, it is less clear how best to assess this characteristic. A potential solution lies in the use of Situational Judgement Tests (SJTs) which have gained popularity due to robust psychometric evidence and potential for large-scale administration. This study aims to explore the psychometric properties of an SJT designed to measure the construct of integrity. Ten SJT scenarios, each with five response stems were developed from critical incident interviews with academic and clinical staff. 200 of 520 (38.5 %) Multiple Mini Interview candidates at Dundee Medical School participated in the study during the 2012-2013 admissions cycle. Participants were asked to rate the appropriateness of each SJT response on a 4-point likert scale as well as complete the HEXACO personality inventory and a face validity questionnaire. Pearson's correlations and descriptive statistics were used to examine the associations between SJT score, HEXACO personality traits, pre-admissions measures namely academic and United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) scores, as well as acceptability. Cronbach's alpha reliability for the SJT was .64. Statistically significant correlations ranging from .16 to .36 (.22 to .53 disattenuated) were observed between SJT score and the honesty-humility (integrity), conscientiousness, extraversion and agreeableness dimensions of the HEXACO inventory. A significant correlation of .32 (.47 disattenuated) was observed between SJT and MMI scores and no significant relationship with the UKCAT. Participant reactions to the SJTs were generally positive. Initial findings are encouraging regarding the psychometric robustness of an integrity-based SJT for medical student selection, with significant associations found between the SJTs, integrity, other desirable personality traits and the MMI. The SJTs showed little or no redundancy with

  10. [Academic performance in the 1st year and its relationship with admission variables in medical schools. Comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, R E

    1995-01-01

    Chilean universities employ a common admission scoring system for students, based on high school grades, mathematic and verbal academic aptitude tests, and specific biology and social sciences tests. Aiming to know the predictive values of these tests, the standardized scores obtained in the selection tests and academic performance of 1094 first year medical students, admitted in 1989 and 1990 to six universities, were analyzed. These students obtained high admission scores and their academic performance during the first year was low (mean grades ranged from 4.6 +/- 0.6 to 5.28 +/- 0.5 in different universities for a scale from 1 to 7). In all, except one university there was a correlation between admission scores and academic performance. Multiple regression analysis showed that admission scores explained a 13% of performance and that the parameters with better predictive value were high school grades, biology test and mathematics academic aptitude test. Verbal academic aptitude test did not have a predictive value.

  11. Assessment of personal qualities in relation to admission to medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Mary Ann; Bore, Miles; Millar, Keith; Jack, Rachael; Powis, David

    2005-03-01

    Recently there has been much scrutiny of the medical school admissions process by universities, the General Medical Council and the public. Improved objectivity, fairness and effectiveness of selection procedures are desirable. The ultimate outcome sought is the graduation of competent doctors who reflect the values of and are in tune with the communities they serve. Applicants to the Scottish medical schools sat a battery of psychometric tests to measure cognitive ability, personality traits and moral/ethical reasoning (Personal Qualities Assessment, PQA). Analysis determined the potential impact of the latter variables, and those of educational background and socioeconomic class (assessed by residential 'deprivation category'), upon success in gaining a place to study medicine. Cognitive ability did not vary significantly as a function of gender or educational background, although there was a trend for it to be lower in individuals from more deprived backgrounds. Women as a group were more empathic, with a greater communitarian orientation, than men. There was no significant difference between individuals attending independent and state-funded schools in respect of any of the qualities measured by the PQA. Applicants from deprived backgrounds and those attending state-funded schools would not be disadvantaged by an admissions process based on the PQA. The incorporation of an assessment tool such as the PQA may have positive implications for widening access and the objective selection of suitable medical students, resulting in the training of doctors who are more representative of the community at large. A longterm follow-up of the professional careers of those medical students who completed the PQA will be undertaken.

  12. How many schools adopt interviews during the student admission process across the health professions in the United States of America?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greer Glazer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Health profession schools use interviews during the admissions process to identify certain non-cognitive skills that are needed for success in diverse, inter-professional settings. This study aimed to assess the use of interviews during the student admissions process across health disciplines at schools in the United States of America in 2014. The type and frequency of non-cognitive skills assessed were also evaluated. Descriptive methods were used to analyze a sample of interview rubrics collected as part of a national survey on admissions in the health professions, which surveyed 228 schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and public health. Of the 228 schools, 130 used interviews. The most desirable non-cognitive skills from 34 schools were identified as follows: communication skills (30, motivation (22, readiness for the profession (17, service (12, and problem-solving (12. Ten schools reported using the multiple mini-interview format, which may indicate potential for expanding this practice. Disparities in the use of interviewing across health professions should be verified to help schools adopt interviews during student admissions processes.

  13. The Effect of Hidden Curriculum on the Criteria Parents Use to Select Schools and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahan, Hasan Hüseyin

    2014-01-01

    A framework of school and teacher qualities has been established by research. The need to identify families' school and teacher selection criteria, in particular, is the main motive behind the present study. It mainly aims to identify the criteria parents use when selecting schools and teachers, or the influence of hidden curriculum on school and…

  14. [Information Concerning Mean Test Scores for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT), and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) for the National Commission on Excellence in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Robert J.

    Data are provided to the National Commission on Excellence in Education on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examinations (GRE), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT), and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Statistics are provided on the following: yearly GMAT mean scores 1965-1966…

  15. Dropout rates in medical students at one school before and after the installation of admission tests in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibnegger, Gilbert; Caluba, Hans-Christian; Ithaler, Daniel; Manhal, Simone; Neges, Heide Maria; Smolle, Josef

    2011-08-01

    Admission to medical studies in Austria since academic year 2005-2006 has been regulated by admission tests. At the Medical University of Graz, an admission test focusing on secondary-school-level knowledge in natural sciences has been used for this purpose. The impact of this important change on dropout rates of female versus male students and older versus younger students is reported. All 2,860 students admitted to the human medicine diploma program at the Medical University of Graz from academic years 2002-2003 to 2008-2009 were included. Nonparametric and semiparametric survival analysis techniques were employed to compare cumulative probability of dropout between demographic groups. Cumulative probability of dropout was significantly reduced in students selected by active admission procedure versus those admitted openly (P dropout were higher for females (P dropout hazard is highest during the second year of study. The introduction of admission testing significantly decreased the cumulative probability for dropout. In openly admitted students a significantly higher risk for dropout was found in female students and in older students, whereas no such effects can be detected after admission testing. Future research should focus on the sex dependence, with the aim of improving success rates among female applicants on the admission tests.

  16. The perceptions and practices of selected high school teachers in special admission schools regarding writing across the curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca Hayward

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) measured the writing achievement of 55,000 American school children. The students performed at the basic or lower level. In 1988, "The Writing Report Card of the NAEP," and in 1996, the Pennsylvania Mathematics and Reading Assessment along with the Stanford 9 Exam concluded that students, of all racial/ethnic backgrounds, are unable to write well except in response to the simplest tasks. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions and practices of math, science, and social studies high school teachers in special admission schools regarding writing across the curriculum (WAC). Specifically, this study attempted to answer: (1) Do math, science, and social studies teachers differ in their perceptions and practices regarding student writing in their classrooms? (2) Are teacher characteristics related to the perceptions and practices of math, science, and social studies teachers regarding the need for student writing in their classrooms? The questions led to the following null hypotheses: (1) There is no significant difference among math, science, and social studies teachers regarding their perceptions and practices for student writing in their classrooms. (2) There is no significant relationship between the highest degree earned, the length of teaching experience, and the level of grades taught by math, science, and social studies teachers and their perceptions and practices regarding the need for student writing in their classrooms. A review of the literature since 1992 using ERIC and Dissertation Abstracts revealed that there were no studies concerned with the focus of this particular study. A cross sectional survey of School District of Philadelphia math, science, and social studies high school teachers in special admission schools was conducted. A questionnaire was developed to obtain the data. A panel of experts was selected to establish validity of the instrument. Thirty-two usable

  17. Admissions Policies and Risks to Equity and Educational Inclusion in the Context of School Reform in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Policy discourses in support of school reform in England have linked the objective of raising standards with that of tackling inequality. The assumption that a single policy strategy can tackle both objectives simultaneously is problematic. In this article, I examine issues of equity by studying admissions policy and practice. Drawing on a…

  18. A critical scoping review of the connections between social mission and medical school admissions: BEME Guide No. 47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Malhi, Rebecca; Bajaj, Sameer; Walker, Ian; Myhre, Douglas

    2017-11-26

    Despite a growing focus on the social accountability of medical schools, there has been no substantive review of admissions related to the social mission of medical schools. This paper reports on a critical scoping review of the connections between social mission and medical school admissions. Searches of seven bibliographic databases identified 1258 unique articles. After filtering for relevance, 71 articles were considered for final review. The results of the data extraction were synthesized using a combination of qualitative and quantitative techniques. Five reviewers conducted 149 data extractions from 71 papers. Social missions tended to focus either on access and equity issues for applicants from underrepresented populations or on the career choices of medical graduates and how they meet particular social needs. The connection between social missions and admissions was often implied but rarely considered or evaluated directly. There was a notable absence of empirical evidence, with calls for reform or program descriptions far outweighing the number of papers based on empirical findings. Despite the move to social missions in medical education, there remains little direct connection between missions and admissions and little evidence reflecting the efficacy or impacts of making this connection.

  19. Correlation Between Students' Dental Admission Test Scores and Performance on a Dental School's Competency Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Alexander M; Schuster, Gregory M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a statistically significant positive correlation between dental students' Dental Admission Test (DAT) scores, particularly on the Perceptual Ability Test (PAT), and their performance on a dental school's competency exam. Scores from the written and clinical competency exam administered in the fall quarter of the fourth year of the curriculum at Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona were compared to DAT scores of all 216 members of the graduating classes of 2012 and 2013. It was hypothesized that students who performed highly on one or more sections of the DAT would perform highly on the competency exam. Backward stepwise regression analyses were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the PAT scores were most strongly correlated with the competency exam scores and were a positive predictor for all three clinical sections of the exam (operative dentistry, periodontics, and endodontics). Positive predictors for the written portion of the exam were total DAT score for patient assessment and treatment planning and the DAT reading comprehension score for prosthodontics; there were no predictors for periodontics. The total variance explained by the results ranged from 4% to 15%. While statistically significant relationships were found between the students' PAT scores and clinical performance, DAT scores explained relatively little variance in the competency exam scores. According to these findings, neither the PAT nor any of the DAT components contributed to predicting these students' clinical performance.

  20. Do differentials in the support and advice available at UK schools and colleges influence candidate performance in the medical school admissions interview? A survey of direct school leaver applicants to a UK medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Paul; Waters, Catherine; Bristow, David

    2013-09-01

    To our knowledge, nothing is known about whether differentials in support and advice during preparation for the interview influence candidate performance and thereby contribute to bias in selection for medical school. To assess if differences in advice and support with preparation for the medical school admissions interview given type of school last attended influence interview score achieved by direct school leaver applicants to study on an undergraduate UK medical degree course. Confidential self-completed on-line questionnaire survey. Interview performance was positively related to whether a teacher, tutor or career advisors at the School or College last attended had advised a respondent to prepare for the interview, had advised about the various styles of medical interview used and the types of questions asked, and what resources were available to help in preparation. Respondents from Private/Independent schools were more likely than those from State schools to have received such advice and support. Differentials in access to advice on and support with preparation for the medical school interview may advantage some candidates over others. This inequity would likely be ameliorated by the provision of an authoritative and comprehensive guide to applying to medical school outlining admission requirements and the preparation strategy applicants should use in order to best meet those requirements. The guide could be disseminated to the Principals of all UK schools and colleges and freely available electronic versions signposted in medical school prospectuses and the course descriptor on the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service.

  1. Outcomes and lessons learned regarding the use of interviewing for baccalaureate nursing school admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce Splann

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the adoption, use, and outcomes of an admission interview process for selection into a large public baccalaureate nursing program between 2007 and 2011. This article reports the effects of implementation, including how interviews affected the grade point average of incoming students as well as student diversity, retention, and National Council Licensure Examination scores, over nine consecutive admission cycles. During the initial implementation cycles, reported satisfaction with the process was high; however, as implementation progressed, it became clear that the anticipated gains from the interview process related to ethnic and gender diversity were not being realized. Furthermore, implementation of the interview strategy created unforeseen difficulties. These two factors led to a decision to stop using this strategy for admission into the baccalaureate program. Lessons learned in the implementation of interviews as an admission criterion are included in the discussion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Graduate admissions essays write your way into the graduate school of your choice

    CERN Document Server

    Asher, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Based on thousands of interviews with successful grad students and graduate admissions officers, Graduate Admissions Essays deconstructs and demystifies the ever-challenging and seemingly more impersonal application process for getting into graduate and scholarship programs. The book presents 50 sample essays in a comprehensive range of subjects, detailed strategies that have proven successful for some of the most notoriously competitive graduate programs in the country, as well as sample letters of recommendation, essays for residencies and fellowships, and postgrad applications.

  3. Predictive value of the school-leaving grade and prognosis of different admission groups for academic performance and continuity in the medical course - a longitudinal study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kadmon, Guni; Resch, Franz; Duelli, Roman; Kadmon, Martina

    2014-01-01

    .... However, the predictive value of the school-leaving grade and the admission delay have not been thoroughly examined since the amendment of the Medical Licensing Regulations and the introduction...

  4. Development of National Assessment Criteria for Green Schools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4carolinebell@gmail.com

    The development of green schools promotes environmental awareness of students and ... and to undertake environmental education research. 7. Form a school ..... research course. Special topic course in environmental education. • School has a special topic course in EE based on the. General Outline of Environmental.

  5. Chinese Teachers' Evaluation Criteria as Reflected in Narrative Student Evaluations: Implications for Psychological Services in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Hong; Jones, Constance; Bruning, Roger

    2013-01-01

    To increase school psychologists' understanding of school contextual culture in China, this study used a qualitative research method to investigate 30 Chinese elementary school teachers' evaluation criteria as reflected in narrative student evaluations. In the study, 450 narrative student evaluations were coded and analysed. Overall, results…

  6. Reliability of a science admission test (HAM-Nat) at Hamburg medical school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissbach, Johanna; Klusmann, Dietrich; Hampe, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The University Hospital in Hamburg (UKE) started to develop a test of knowledge in natural sciences for admission to medical school in 2005 (Hamburger Auswahlverfahren für Medizinische Studiengänge, Naturwissenschaftsteil, HAM-Nat). This study is a step towards establishing the HAM-Nat. We are investigating parallel forms reliability, the effect of a crash course in chemistry on test results, and correlations of HAM-Nat test results with a test of scientific reasoning (similar to a subtest of the "Test for Medical Studies", TMS). Methods: 316 first-year students participated in the study in 2007. They completed different versions of the HAM-Nat test which consisted of items that had already been used (HN2006) and new items (HN2007). Four weeks later half of the participants were tested on the HN2007 version of the HAM-Nat again, while the other half completed the test of scientific reasoning. Within this four week interval students were offered a five day chemistry course. Results: Parallel forms reliability for four different test versions ranged from rtt=.53 to rtt=.67. The retest reliabilities of the HN2007 halves were rtt=.54 and rtt =.61. Correlations of the two HAM-Nat versions with the test of scientific reasoning were r=.34 und r=.21. The crash course in chemistry had no effect on HAM-Nat scores. Conclusions: The results suggest that further versions of the test of natural sciences will not easily conform to the standards of internal consistency, parallel-forms reliability and retest reliability. Much care has to be taken in order to assemble items which could be used interchangeably for the construction of new test versions. The test of scientific reasoning and the HAM-Nat are tapping different constructs. Participation in a chemistry course did not improve students’ achievement, probably because the content of the course was not coordinated with the test and many students lacked of motivation to do well in the second test. PMID:21866246

  7. Reliability of a science admission test (HAM-Nat) at Hamburg medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissbach, Johanna; Klusmann, Dietrich; Hampe, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The University Hospital in Hamburg (UKE) started to develop a test of knowledge in natural sciences for admission to medical school in 2005 (Hamburger Auswahlverfahren für Medizinische Studiengänge, Naturwissenschaftsteil, HAM-Nat). This study is a step towards establishing the HAM-Nat. We are investigating parallel forms reliability, the effect of a crash course in chemistry on test results, and correlations of HAM-Nat test results with a test of scientific reasoning (similar to a subtest of the "Test for Medical Studies", TMS). 316 first-year students participated in the study in 2007. They completed different versions of the HAM-Nat test which consisted of items that had already been used (HN2006) and new items (HN2007). Four weeks later half of the participants were tested on the HN2007 version of the HAM-Nat again, while the other half completed the test of scientific reasoning. Within this four week interval students were offered a five day chemistry course. Parallel forms reliability for four different test versions ranged from r(tt)=.53 to r(tt)=.67. The retest reliabilities of the HN2007 halves were r(tt)=.54 and r(tt )=.61. Correlations of the two HAM-Nat versions with the test of scientific reasoning were r=.34 und r=.21. The crash course in chemistry had no effect on HAM-Nat scores. The results suggest that further versions of the test of natural sciences will not easily conform to the standards of internal consistency, parallel-forms reliability and retest reliability. Much care has to be taken in order to assemble items which could be used interchangeably for the construction of new test versions. The test of scientific reasoning and the HAM-Nat are tapping different constructs. Participation in a chemistry course did not improve students' achievement, probably because the content of the course was not coordinated with the test and many students lacked of motivation to do well in the second test.

  8. A standardized crisis management model for self-harming and suicidal individuals with three or more diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder: The Brief Admission Skåne randomized controlled trial protocol (BASRCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljedahl, Sophie I; Helleman, Marjolein; Daukantaité, Daiva; Westrin, Åsa; Westling, Sofie

    2017-06-15

    Brief Admission is a crisis and risk management strategy in which self-harming and suicidal individuals with three or more diagnostic criteria of borderline personality disorder self-admit to hospital at times of increasing risk when other efforts to stay safe are failing. Standardized in the current randomized controlled trial, the intensity of Brief Admission Skåne is implemented in durations of three days, with a maximum frequency of three times a month. Brief Admission is integrated into existing treatment plans in advance of crises to prevent reliance on general psychiatric admissions for risk management, as these may be lengthy, unstructured, and of uncertain therapeutic value. The overall objective of the Brief Admission Skåne randomized controlled trial is to determine if Brief Admission can replace general psychiatric admission for self-harming and suicidal individuals with complex mental illness at times of escalating risk. Other objectives of the study are to evaluate whether Brief Admission increases daily functioning and enhances coping, reduces psychiatric symptoms including frequency and severity of self-harm and suicidal behaviours. A final objective is to determine if Brief Admission is an effective crisis management model for this population. Participants are randomized at an individual level to either Brief Admission Skåne plus Treatment as Usual or Treatment As Usual. Based on a priori power analyses, N = 124 participants will be recruited to the study. Data collection is in progress, and will continue until June 2018. All participant data are single-blinded and will be handled with intention-to-treat analysis. Based on the combined clinical experience of our international research group, the Brief Admission Skåne randomized controlled trial upon which the current protocol is based represents the first initiative to standardize, implement and evaluate Brief Admission amongst self-harming and suicidal individuals, including those with

  9. Talented High School Football Players’ Perception of Talent Identification Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vazjwar Matin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Talent identification (TID is a major part of top-level football. Even so, most studies of talented players are skewed towards exploring the work of coaches who are already dealing with pre-defined “talented performers” and not a broader range of players, such as high school students in sport specialisation programs (SSP and elite sport specialisation programs (ESSP. In this study, we explore which skills high school players find most important, how they assess their own skills compared to their schoolmates and which skills their school and club coaches find most important, comparing: girls and boys, an SSP and an ESSP school and players playing top-level versus low-level football. Included in this study were 111 high school football players (81 boys and 30 girls representing one SSP and one ESSP. The results showed that the players ranked mental and tactical skills as most important compared to the school and club coach who ranked, respectively, technical and physical, and tactical and technical skills as most important. Girls considered both tactical and physical skills significantly (<0.01 more important than boys. Players from SSP considered mental skills as significantly more important, while the ESSP players considered the tactical skills as significantly more important. Furthermore, the top-level players considered technical and mental skills as significantly more important. These results could indicate that gender, school type and playing level could affect the players’ perception of the most important skills in TID.

  10. Development and validation of sustainability criteria of administrative green schools in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiboudi, Hossein; Lahijanian, Akramolmolok; Shobeiri, Seyed Mohammad; Jozi, Seyed Ali; Azizinezhad, Reza

    2017-07-15

    Environmental responsibility in school has led to the emergence of a variety of criteria to administer green schools' contributions to sustainability. Sustainability criteria of administrative green schools need validity, reliability and norms. The aim of the current study was to develop and validate assessment criteria for green schools in Iran based on the role of academia. A national survey was conducted to obtain data on sustainability criteria initiatives for green schools and the Iranian profile was defined. An initial pool of 71 items was generated and after its first edition, 63 items were selected to comprise the sustainability criteria. Engineering-architectural and behavioral aspects of this sustainability criteria were evaluated through a sample of 1218 graduate students with environmental degrees from Iran's universities. Exploratory factor analysis using principal components and promax rotation method showed that these 9 criteria have simple structures and are consistent with the theoretical framework. The reliability coefficients of subscales ranged between 0.62 (participation) and 0.84 (building location and position). The study's survey of correlation coefficients between items and subscales illustrated that those coefficients varied between 0.24 and 0.68. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A predictive model for alternative admission to dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christersson, C; Bengmark, D; Bengtsson, H; Lindh, C; Rohlin, M

    2015-11-01

    To compare academic progress and performance of students admitted through two admission systems and to analyse the predictive power of different components in an alternative admission. The subjects were students admitted to the dental programme at Malmö University, Sweden. The grade admission group was admitted on grades from secondary school (n = 126) and the alternative admission group via an alternative admission procedure (n = 157). The alternative admission procedure consisted of the following components: problem-solving matrices, spatial capacity tested with folding and tin models, manual dexterity, capacity for empathy and interview. Comparisons were made for academic progress (dropouts from the programme and study rate) and academic performance (examinations failed and outcomes of a comprehensive clinical examination). Spearman correlation was calculated for each component of the alternative admission procedure and academic progress as well as academic performance. Multivariate analyses were also carried out. Compared to the grade admission group, the alternative admission group presented lower rate of dropouts (3% vs. 20%, P admission selection criteria, particularly emphatic capacity that predicts important student academic achievements. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Is social sciences and humanities (SSH) premedical education marginalized in the medical school admission process? A review and contextualization of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Justin N; Woods, Nicole; Hanson, Mark D

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the performance outcomes of medical students with social sciences and humanities (SSH) premedical education during and beyond medical school by reviewing the literature, and to contextualize this review within today's admission milieu. From May to July 2012, the lead author searched the PubMed, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases, and reference lists of relevant articles, for research that compared premedical SSH education with premedical sciences education and its influence on performance during and/or after medical school. The authors extracted representative themes and relevant empirical findings. They contextualized their findings within today's admission milieu. A total of 1,548 citations were identified with 20 papers included in the review. SSH premedical education is predominately an American experience. For medical students with SSH background, equivalent academic, clinical, and research performance compared with medical students with a premedical science background is reported, yet different patterns of competencies exist. Post-medical-school equivalent or improved clinical performance is associated with an SSH background. Medical students with SSH backgrounds were more likely to select primary care or psychiatry careers. SSH major/course concentration, not SSH course counts, is important for admission decision making. The impact of today's admission milieu decreases the value of an SSH premedical education. Medical students with SSH premedical education perform on par with peers yet may possess different patterns of competencies, research, and career interests. However, SSH premedical education likely will not attain a significant role in medical school admission processes.

  13. Diagnosis, admission, discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark

    2009-06-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus should be considered as the most likely pathogen in an infant or young child with a significant acute lower respiratory tract infection during the characteristic epidemic season. While the diagnosis of an RSV infection is relatively straight forward, the clinical diagnosis applied to the associate illness is far less clear cut. Criteria for assessment is based on clinical assessment of severity at examination and associated risk factors. Social factors may further influence the likelihood of admission. Guidelines are consistent in noting that there are no scoring systems or other tests that can reliably predict the need for supportive care or HDU admission. Criteria for the administration of oxygen vary. There are marked differences in the duration of hospitalisation for RSV admission between the USA, UK and Scandinavia. Longer length of admission is associated with significantly higher rates of nosicomial infection.

  14. [Study on Portuguese Medical Schools' Learning Conditions: A National Analysis on Student Satisfaction, Student-Tutor Ratios and Number of Admissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo Diogo, Pedro; Moreira, Afonso; Coimbra, Ana; Coelho Silva, Ana; Nixon Martins, Artur; Mendonça, Carlos; Carvalho, Constança; Almeida, Gonçalo; Almeida, Hugo; Garcia Moreira, Inês; Rodrigues, Marta; Goulão, Miguel; Vasconcelos, Rafael; Vicente, Rodrigo; Magano, Sara

    2016-05-01

    Experiences of clinical and nonclinical learning environments, as well as assessment and study environments influence student satisfaction with their medical schools. Student-tutor ratios may impact on their perception of clinical learning environments. The aim of this study was to analyze medical students' satisfaction and student-tutor ratios in relation to medical schools' number of admissions. A questionnaire was created, regarding learning, assessment and study environments in eight medical schools. 2037 students participated in this cross-sectional study. Cronbach' alpha (internal consistency) was calculated and principal component analysis was conducted. Pearson correlations and multiple comparisons were analyzed. Assessment environments showed the highest satisfaction scores and clinical learning environments the lowest scores. The national student-tutor ratio in clinical rotations is 7.53; there are significant differences among schools. Institutions with higher number of admissions showed the lowest scores of overall student satisfaction (r = -0.756; p learning environments (r = -0.826; p learning environments show the lowest satisfaction scores, which may expose the effect of high ratios in clinical rotations. Depending on the number of admissions, significant differences between medical schools were found. Quality of teaching-learning strategies and articulation with hospitals might also be important variables. Medical schools with more admissions might be more susceptible to lower scores of student satisfaction. High student-tutor ratios in clinical rotations may reduce the quality of learning experiences and inhibit the acquisition of competences.

  15. Understanding the management of people seeking voluntary psychiatric hospitalization who do not meet the criteria for inpatient admission: a qualitative study of mental health liaison nurses working in accident and emergency departments in the north of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Iain; McGowan, Linda

    2015-02-01

    Mental health liaison nurses assess people who self-present at accident and emergency departments seeking inpatient admission, however not all presentations meet the criteria for admission. Little is known about how liaison nurses manage this client group. This qualitative study explored how liaison nurses manage this client group. This study used the think aloud technique to recreate clinical scenarios of clients requesting admission who do not meet the criteria for such admission. Participants were then subsequently interviewed. Eighteen liaison nurses working in hospitals across the North of England participated. Data were analysed using framework analysis methods. Findings indicate that the liaison nurses use a variety of therapeutic skills and methods in managing this client group. Liaison nurses were found to 'sell' crisis and home-based treatment as an equivalent, or superior in quality, to hospital care. However, the existing evidence base does not fully support this assertion. Liaison nurses face numerous difficulties in this role. In the absence of any formalized training, liaison nurses rely on their own clinical knowledge and expertise. Implications for future service provision and further research are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How Medical School Applicant Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status Relate to Multiple Mini-Interview-Based Admissions Outcomes: Findings From One Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerant, Anthony; Fancher, Tonya; Fenton, Joshua J; Fiscella, Kevin; Sousa, Francis; Franks, Peter; Henderson, Mark

    2015-12-01

    To examine associations of medical school applicant underrepresented minority (URM) status and socioeconomic status (SES) with Multiple Mini-Interview (MMI) invitation and performance and acceptance recommendation. The authors conducted a correlational study of applicants submitting secondary applications to the University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, 2011-2013. URM applicants were black, Southeast Asian, Native American, Pacific Islander, and/or Hispanic. SES from eight application variables was modeled (0-1 score, higher score = lower SES). Regression analyses examined associations of URM status and SES with MMI invitation (yes/no), MMI score (mean of 10 station ratings, range 0-3), and admission committee recommendation (accept versus not), adjusting for age, sex, and academic performance. Of 7,964 secondary-application applicants, 19.7% were URM and 15.1% self-designated disadvantaged; 1,420 (17.8%) participated in the MMI and were evaluated for acceptance. URM status was not associated with MMI invitation (OR 1.14; 95% CI 0.98 to 1.33), MMI score (0.00-point difference, CI -0.08 to 0.08), or acceptance recommendation (OR 1.08; CI 0.69 to 1.68). Lower SES applicants were more likely to be invited to an MMI (OR 5.95; CI 4.76 to 7.44) and recommended for acceptance (OR 3.28; CI 1.79 to 6.00), but had lower MMI scores (-0.12 points, CI -0.23 to -0.01). MMI-based admissions did not disfavor URM applicants. Lower SES applicants had lower MMI scores but were more likely to be invited to an MMI and recommended for acceptance. Multischool collaborations should examine how MMI-based admissions affect URM and lower SES applicants.

  17. The predictive validity of grade point average scores in a partial lottery medical school admission system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Reinders, Jan J.; Agsteribbe, Jessica; van Rossum, Herman J. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE To ascertain whether the grade point average (GPA) of school-leaving examinations is related to study success, career development and scientific performance. The problem of restriction of range was expected to be partially reduced due to the use of a national lottery system weighted in

  18. Selection and study performance : comparing three admission processes within one medical school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schripsema, Nienke R.; van Trigt, Anke M.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-01-01

    ObjectivesThis study was conducted to: (i) analyse whether students admitted to one medical school based on top pre-university grades, a voluntary multifaceted selection process, or lottery, respectively, differed in study performance; (ii) examine whether students who were accepted in the

  19. Does one medical school's admission policy help a rural state "grow their own" physicians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Philip B; Cossman, Jeralynn S

    2012-09-01

    The University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMC) has been the only medical school in the state since its inception in 1955 (until the 2008 establishment of the William Carey College of Osteopathic Medicine, yet to graduate its first class). Recruiting out-of-state physicians is difficult in Mississippi, and stakeholders frequently talk of "growing our own" physicians, especially challenging with a single public medical school. This study investigates: (1) the proportion of a recent (1990-1999) cohort of UMC graduates practicing in Mississippi, (2) the proportion of all practicing Mississippi physicians who are UMC grads, (3) whether UMC graduates are more likely to practice in rural, small towns, or geographically isolated areas than other physicians, and (4) whether UMC graduates are more likely to recommend Mississippi as a practice location to new medical school graduates. Using Mississippi Board of Medical Licensure data (2009) and Mississippi Medical Doctors survey data (2007-2008), we employ GIS, logistic regression, and multinomial logistic regression models. We also use qualitative methods to examine interviews from purposefully sampled minority and/or female Mississippi physicians from the Mississippi Medical Doctors survey. Approximately 56% of UMC 1990-1999 cohort grads are practicing in Mississippi. Moreover, UMC graduates--of any year--constitute about 58% of Mississippi's practicing physicians. UMC graduates are not more likely to practice in rural, small towns, or geographically isolated areas in Mississippi than physicians who graduated elsewhere. Controlling for other factors, UMC grads are not more likely to recommend practicing in Mississippi than physicians trained elsewhere. Health educators and policy makers should consider broadening UMC's enrollment policies, and greater emphasis should be placed on recruiting physicians.

  20. Effectiveness of selection in medical school admissions: evaluation of the outcomes among freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsman, Robert L; van der Ende, Josje S J; Oort, Frans J; Michels, Robert P J; Casteelen, Gerty; Griffioen, Francisca M M

    2007-04-01

    In 2000 our medical school introduced a selection procedure (SP) for 10% of the otherwise randomly selected (RS) applicants. Students with excellent high school grade point averages (GPAs) were allowed direct access (DA) to our medical school. The selection procedure focused on medical comprehension, social and ethical understanding of health care, and communication and interpersonal skills. Objectives We aimed to establish how SP students compared with RS and DA students on motivation, academic achievement, study behaviour and extracurricular activities, and how these variables were interrelated within these groups. In 2003, all Year 1 and 2 students were given a questionnaire on motivation, study behaviour and extra-curricular activities. Primary year GPAs were obtained from our administration department. Student groups were compared using descriptive statistics. The interrelationship between outcomes was tested using structural equation modelling. The questionnaire was returned by 418 students (76%). Selection procedure students were significantly more highly motivated (59.4) than RS students (56.6) and DA students (52.1). This was not reflected in academic achievement (6.7), which was highest among DA students (7.2). Selection procedure students carried out more extra-curricular activities, often health care-related, and displayed more study behaviour. Academic achievement could not be explained by motivation and study behaviour but motivation affected study behaviour and health care-related extra-curricular activities. The more profound commitment of selected students to health care is not primarily reflected in academic achievement but in motivation, extra-curricular activities and study behaviour. Follow-up research including all pre-clinical and clinical years should demonstrate the stability of these characteristics and their effects on graduates' post-qualification clinical performance as practising doctors.

  1. The Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS)--number and type of positive criteria predict interventions and outcomes in acute surgical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, James A; Gravante, Gianpiero; Butler, Nicholas A; Sorge, Roberto; Sayers, Rob D; Bown, Matt J

    2010-11-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a syndrome that reflects the widespread activation of inflammatory pathways. The goal of this study was to find whether the presence or absence of SIRS on emergency surgical admissions is related to the subsequent clinical outcome in terms of in-hospital interventions, length of stay, and mortality. The presence of SIRS at admission, final diagnosis of the underlying disease, treatments, and clinical outcomes were prospectively recorded for 1 month. Comparisons of interventions and outcomes were performed between SIRS+ vs. SIRS- patients. In patients with SIRS, the contribution of each positive criterion was evaluated with regards to mortality. A total of 179 patients were recruited. The prevalence of SIRS at admission was 35.2%. SIRS+ patients required less diagnostic procedures compared with SIRS- (28.6% vs. 34.5%) but had more therapeutic interventions (39.7% vs. 16.4%), surgical interventions (33.3% vs. 3.4%), intensive treatments (11.1% vs. 0.9%; p interventions, intensive treatments, and fatal outcomes compared with the others. Of importance the most influent factor was the respiratory rate followed by the white cell count and the heart rate/temperature. Patients with SIRS at admission apparently receive more interventions, have longer length of stay, and increased mortality than those patients without SIRS. These findings require separate validation in a larger cohort study.

  2. Good to Great: Do Award Winning Schools Meet Successful School Criteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searcey, Chad J.; Snodgrass, Jason T.; Copple, William Bryan, II

    2010-01-01

    Since the inception of the No Child Left Behind Act, school accountability has increased dramatically. The federal government has taken a much more active role in public education than it did prior to NCLB becoming law. Schools across the United States are working diligently to meet increased accountability standards. As schools and districts meet…

  3. The Usefulness of Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, and Shock Index or Adjusted Shock Index Criteria in Predicting Combined Mortality and/or ICU Admission Compared to CURB-65 in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtain, James P.; Sankaran, Prasanna; Kamath, Ajay V.; Myint, Phyo K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The study aims to assess the usefulness of age-independent criteria CURSI and temperature adjusted CURSI (CURASI) compared to CURB-65 in predicting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) mortality. The criteria, CRSI and CRASI, were adapted for use in primary care and compared to CRB-65. Methods. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively identified cohort of community-acquired pneumonia inpatients was conducted. Outcomes were (1) mortality and (2) mortality and/or ICU admission within six weeks. Results. 95 patients (median age = 61 years) were included. All three criteria had similar sensitivity in predicting mortality alone, with CURB-65 having slightly higher specificity. When predicting mortality and/or intensive care admission, CURSI/CURASI showed higher sensitivity and slightly lower specificity. CRSI and CRASI had higher sensitivity and lower specificity when compared with CRB-65 for predicting both primary and secondary outcomes. Results for both analyses had P values >0.05. Conclusions. In a cohort of younger patients CURSI and adjusted CURSI perform at least as well as CURB-65, with a similar trend for CRSI and adjusted CRSI compared to CRB-65. Further studies are needed in different age groups and in primary and secondary care settings. PMID:24024203

  4. The Usefulness of Confusion, Urea, Respiratory Rate, and Shock Index or Adjusted Shock Index Criteria in Predicting Combined Mortality and/or ICU Admission Compared to CURB-65 in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Curtain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. The study aims to assess the usefulness of age-independent criteria CURSI and temperature adjusted CURSI (CURASI compared to CURB-65 in predicting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP mortality. The criteria, CRSI and CRASI, were adapted for use in primary care and compared to CRB-65. Methods. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively identified cohort of community-acquired pneumonia inpatients was conducted. Outcomes were (1 mortality and (2 mortality and/or ICU admission within six weeks. Results. 95 patients (median age = 61 years were included. All three criteria had similar sensitivity in predicting mortality alone, with CURB-65 having slightly higher specificity. When predicting mortality and/or intensive care admission, CURSI/CURASI showed higher sensitivity and slightly lower specificity. CRSI and CRASI had higher sensitivity and lower specificity when compared with CRB-65 for predicting both primary and secondary outcomes. Results for both analyses had P values >0.05. Conclusions. In a cohort of younger patients CURSI and adjusted CURSI perform at least as well as CURB-65, with a similar trend for CRSI and adjusted CRSI compared to CRB-65. Further studies are needed in different age groups and in primary and secondary care settings.

  5. Gender Might Be Factor for Student Admission in Two Brazilian Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Henrique Beraldi

    Full Text Available This is a secondary data-based study conducted to investigate whether gender is related to acceptance. Two Brazilian Medical Schools, Universities A and B, were studied. Their entrance exams (EE were analysed and the number of candidates who took the EE was compared to the number of students admitted to the MS according to gender, in the period between 1995 and 2009. The same data from MS in the United States in 2011 was also evaluated. There was an increase in the percentage of female applicants but it did not correspond to the percentage of admitted students of the same gender. There was a trend of selecting men. At A, 39.3% of the applicants and 47% of the admitted students were men (OR = 1.37; CI95% = 1.24 – 1.51. In B, men represented 39.3% of the applicants and 65.4% of the admitted students (OR = 2.93; CI 95% = 2.76 – 3.11. This was not seen in US MS. The analysis of the EE suggests that the greater selection of men could be a product of EE format.

  6. A predictive model to identify hospitalized cancer patients at risk for 30-day mortality based on admission criteria via the electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchandran, Kavitha J; Shega, Joseph W; Von Roenn, Jamie; Schumacher, Mark; Szmuilowicz, Eytan; Rademaker, Alfred; Weitner, Bing Bing; Loftus, Pooja D; Chu, Isabella M; Weitzman, Sigmund

    2013-06-01

    This study sought to develop a predictive model for 30-day mortality in hospitalized cancer patients, by using admission information available through the electronic medical record. Observational cohort study of 3062 patients admitted to the oncology service from August 1, 2008, to July 31, 2009. Matched numbers of patients were in the derivation and validation cohorts (1531 patients). Data were obtained on day 1 of admission and included demographic information, vital signs, and laboratory data. Survival data were obtained from the Social Security Death Index. The 30-day mortality rate of the derivation and validation samples were 9.5% and 9.7% respectively. Significant predictive variables in the multivariate analysis included age (P < .0001), assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs; P = .022), admission type (elective/emergency) (P = .059), oxygen use (P < .0001), and vital signs abnormalities including pulse oximetry (P = .0004), temperature (P = .017), and heart rate (P = .0002). A logistic regression model was developed to predict death within 30 days: Score = 18.2897 + 0.6013*(admit type) + 0.4518*(ADL) + 0.0325*(admit age) - 0.1458*(temperature) + 0.019*(heart rate) - 0.0983*(pulse oximetry) - 0.0123 (systolic blood pressure) + 0.8615*(O2 use). The largest sum of sensitivity (63%) and specificity (78%) was at -2.09 (area under the curve = -0.789). A total of 25.32% (100 of 395) of patients with a score above -2.09 died, whereas 4.31% (49 of 1136) of patients below -2.09 died. Sensitivity and positive predictive value in the derivation and validation samples compared favorably. Clinical factors available via the electronic medical record within 24 hours of hospital admission can be used to identify cancer patients at risk for 30-day mortality. These patients would benefit from discussion of preferences for care at the end of life. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  7. School buildings and indoor air quality: diagnostic procedures and criteria for intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Lucarelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The research - referred in this report - comes from a doctoral thesis entitled Indoor air quality control. Intervention criteria for environmental and technological restoration of school buildings; research that has shown the actual relationship between the degradation of school buildings, the levels of indoor air pollution and the effects on the health of the occupants. This study path is subsequently directed to the analysis of unavoidable dependencies that exist between the aspects of the healthiness of the indoor air and the energy performance of buildings in order to provide, through the use of a diagnostic protocol, useful information for the definition of redevelopment interventions.

  8. The interview in the admission process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J C; Johnson, E K; Molidor, J B

    1990-03-01

    Significant demographic, legal, and educational developments during the last ten years have led medical schools to review critically their selection procedures. A critical component of this review is the selection interview, since it is an integral part of most admission processes; however, some question its value. Interviews serve four purposes: information gathering, decision making, verification of application data, and recruitment. The first and last of these merit special attention. The interview enables an admission committee to gather information about a candidate that would be difficult or impossible to obtain by any other means yet is readily evaluated in an interview. Given the recent decline in numbers of applicants to and interest in medical school, many schools are paying closer attention to the interview as a powerful recruiting tool. Interviews can be unstructured, semistructured, or structured. Structuring involves analyzing what makes a medical student successful, standardizing the questions for all applicants, providing sample answers for evaluating responses, and using panel interviews (several interviewers simultaneously with one applicant). Reliability and validity of results increase with the degree of structuring. Studies of interviewers show that they are often biased in terms of the rating tendencies (for instance, leniency or severity) and in terms of an applicant's sex, race, appearance, similarity to the interviewer, and contrast to other applicants). Training interviewers may reduce such bias. Admission committees should weigh the purposes of interviewing differently for various types of candidates, develop structured or semistructured interviews focusing on nonacademic criteria, and train the interviewers.

  9. Optimal Admission to Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaek, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses admission decisions when students from different high school tracks apply for admission to university programmes. I derive a criterion that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes the graduation rates of the university programmes. The paper contains an empirical analysis that documents the relevance of theory and illustrates…

  10. Fairness and Undergraduate Admission: A Qualitative Exploration of Admissions Choices at the University of Oxford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdars, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The article investigates unequal admissions patterns at the University of Oxford. Statistical work shows differences in admission rates by social class, ethnicity, gender, qualification status and secondary schooling. In-depth interviews with admissions tutors, college and university officials and observations of eight admissions meetings provide…

  11. Nerd Harassment and Grade Inflation: Are College Admissions Policies Partly Responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, John H.

    Many, but not all, of the admissions selection criteria favored by U.S. colleges and universities unwittingly create incentives for educational dysfunctional behavior by secondary students, teachers and administrators, and by voters in school budget referenda. These include nerd harassment, peer cultures that denigrate achievement, various efforts…

  12. Evaluation of a School Building in Turkey According to the Basic Sustainable Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, H. D.

    2017-08-01

    In Turkey, as well as many other developing countries, the significance of sustainable education buildings has only recently become recognized and the issue of sustainability issue has not been sufficiently involved in laws and regulations. In this study, first of all architectural sustainability with basic design criteria has been explained. After that selected type primary school project in Turkey has been evaluated according to the sustainable design criteria. Type project of school buildings significantly limits the sustainability performance expected from buildings. It is clear that type projects shorten the planning time as they include a designing process that is independent of settlement and they are repeated in various places with different characteristics, indeed. On the other hand; abundance of disadvantages such as the overlook of the natural physical and structural properties of the location mostly restricts the sustainable design of the building. For sustainable buildings, several factors such as the environment, land, climate, insolation, direction etc. shall be taken into consideration at the beginning stage. Therefore; implementation of type projects can be deemed to be inappropriate for sustainability.

  13. Policies Governing Admission to Jordanian Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massadeh, Nassar

    2012-01-01

    This paper intends to discuss the policy of admission to Jordanian public universities. This admission rules are variable and open to almost 100% of the graduates from secondary schools. This might refer to the historical events and economic conditions that the country has gone through since its establishment. Furthermore, the admission policy is…

  14. Admission tests for medical education

    OpenAIRE

    O?Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Hartvigsen, Jan; Eika, Berit

    2012-01-01

    This state of the art article explores what is known from the international and Danish literature on admission criteria as predictors of success in medical education. Previous academic performance is the best known predictor of medical students' grades. Poorer entry qualifications, broadly defined, are associated with dropout in medical education. Admission interviews may have a small additive explanatory effect on medical students' grades, but the effect on dropout has barely been investigat...

  15. Selection to Ensure Study Success: Looking for Multiple Criteria in the Case of a European Master of Science Program in Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastre, Greet; Gijselaers, Wim H.; Segers, Mien

    2008-01-01

    The authors report relations between entrance criteria and study success in a program for a master of science in business. Based on the admission criteria broadly used in European business schools and the findings of prior research, the present authors measured eight criteria for study success in the master's degree program. The authors applied…

  16. Exploring social media and admissions decision-making – friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Law

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the ever-increasing use of social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter little is known about its use in medical school admissions. This qualitative study explores whether and how social media (SM is used in undergraduate admissions in Canada, and the attitudes of admissions personnel towards such use. Methods: Phone interviews were conducted with admissions deans and nominated admissions personnel. A qualitative descriptive analysis was performed using iterative coding and comparing, and grouping data into themes. Results: Personnel from 15 of 17 Canadian medical schools participated. A sizeable proportion had, at some point, examined social media (SM profiles to acquire information on applicants. Participants did not report using it explicitly to screen all applicants (primary use; however, several did admit to looking at SM to follow up on preliminary indications of misbehaviour (secondary use. Participants articulated concerns, such as validity and equity, about using SM in admissions. Despite no schools having existing policy, participants expressed openness to future use.   Conclusions: While some of the 15 schools had used SM to acquire information on applicants, criteria for formulating judgments were obscure, and participants expressed significant apprehension, based on concerns for fairness and validity. Findings suggest participant ambivalence and ongoing risks associated with “hidden” selection practices.

  17. Exploring social media and admissions decision-making - friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Marcus; Mylopoulos, Maria; Veinot, Paula; Miller, Daniel; Hanson, Mark D

    2016-10-01

    Despite the ever-increasing use of social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) little is known about its use in medical school admissions. This qualitative study explores whether and how social media (SM) is used in undergraduate admissions in Canada, and the attitudes of admissions personnel towards such use. Phone interviews were conducted with admissions deans and nominated admissions personnel. A qualitative descriptive analysis was performed using iterative coding and comparing, and grouping data into themes. Personnel from 15 of 17 Canadian medical schools participated. A sizeable proportion had, at some point, examined social media (SM) profiles to acquire information on applicants. Participants did not report using it explicitly to screen all applicants (primary use); however, several did admit to looking at SM to follow up on preliminary indications of misbehaviour (secondary use). Participants articulated concerns, such as validity and equity, about using SM in admissions. Despite no schools having existing policy, participants expressed openness to future use. While some of the 15 schools had used SM to acquire information on applicants, criteria for formulating judgments were obscure, and participants expressed significant apprehension, based on concerns for fairness and validity. Findings suggest participant ambivalence and ongoing risks associated with "hidden" selection practices.

  18. Adherence to Referral Criteria at Admission and Patient Management at a Specialized Burns Centre: The Case of the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissin, Constance; Hasselberg, Marie; Kronblad, Emil; Kim, So-Mang; Wallis, Lee; Rode, Heinz; Laflamme, Lucie

    2017-07-06

    Referral guidelines for burn care are meant to assist in decision-making as regards patient transfer and admissions to specialized units. Little is known, however, concerning how closely they are followed and whether they are linked to patient care. This is the object of the current study, focused on the paediatric burns centre of the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. All patients admitted to the centre during the winters of 2011-2015 (n = 1165) were included. The patient files were scrutinized to clarify whether the referral criteria in place were identified (seven in total) and to compile data on patient and injury characteristics. A case was defined as adherent to the criteria when at least one criterion was fulfilled and adherence was expressed as a percentage with 95% confidence intervals, for all years aggregated as well as by year and by patient or injury characteristics. The association between adherence to any individual criterion and hospital care (surgery or longer length of stay) was measured using logistic regressions. The overall adherence was 93.4% (100% among children under 2 years of age and 86% among the others) and it did not vary remarkably over time. The two criteria of "injury sustained at a specific anatomical site" (85.2%) and "young age" (51.9%) were those most often identified. Children aged 2 years or older were more likely to undergo surgery or to stay longer than those of young age (although a referral criterion) and so were those with higher injury severity (a referral criterion). In this specialized paediatric burns centre, children are admitted mainly according to the guidelines. However, given the high prevalence of paediatric burns in the region and the limited resources at the burns centre, adherence to the guidelines need to be further studied at all healthcare levels in the province.

  19. Adherence to Referral Criteria at Admission and Patient Management at a Specialized Burns Centre: The Case of the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Boissin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Referral guidelines for burn care are meant to assist in decision-making as regards patient transfer and admissions to specialized units. Little is known, however, concerning how closely they are followed and whether they are linked to patient care. This is the object of the current study, focused on the paediatric burns centre of the Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa. All patients admitted to the centre during the winters of 2011–2015 (n = 1165 were included. The patient files were scrutinized to clarify whether the referral criteria in place were identified (seven in total and to compile data on patient and injury characteristics. A case was defined as adherent to the criteria when at least one criterion was fulfilled and adherence was expressed as a percentage with 95% confidence intervals, for all years aggregated as well as by year and by patient or injury characteristics. The association between adherence to any individual criterion and hospital care (surgery or longer length of stay was measured using logistic regressions. The overall adherence was 93.4% (100% among children under 2 years of age and 86% among the others and it did not vary remarkably over time. The two criteria of “injury sustained at a specific anatomical site” (85.2% and “young age” (51.9% were those most often identified. Children aged 2 years or older were more likely to undergo surgery or to stay longer than those of young age (although a referral criterion and so were those with higher injury severity (a referral criterion. In this specialized paediatric burns centre, children are admitted mainly according to the guidelines. However, given the high prevalence of paediatric burns in the region and the limited resources at the burns centre, adherence to the guidelines need to be further studied at all healthcare levels in the province.

  20. Referral criteria for school scoliosis screening: assessment and recommendations based on a large longitudinally followed cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C F; Fong, Daniel Y T; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Cheng, Jack C Y; Ng, Bobby K W; Lam, T P; Mak, K H; Yip, Paul S F; Luk, Keith D K

    2010-12-01

    This study was a retrospective cohort study. To examine the criteria recommended in the literature for the school-based scoliosis screening program in Hong Kong. School-based screening for scoliosis has been a controversy. Objectors to the policy were concerned about the high over-referral and false-positive rates. Recommendations were then made for improvement, but the feasibility of these recommendations has not been studied. The cohort consisted of students in Grade 5 in 1995/1996 or 1996/1997 who underwent scoliosis screening in Hong Kong. Participants who had an angle of trunk rotation (ATR) ≥15°, 2 or more moiré lines, or presented significant clinical signs were referred for radiography. Screening histories and radiography records before the age of 19 years were extracted. The accuracy measures for different combinations of screening tests were examined. There were 115,178 students in the cohort, of which 3228 (2.8%) were referred for radiography. Among the 1406 students who displayed a curve ≥20° during screening, 257 (18.3%) were boys and 336 (23.9%) were identified as 16 years or older, ruling out the suggestion of screening only 10-year-old girls. The sensitivity and positive predictive value for the current referral criteria were 88.1% and 43.6%, respectively. The sensitivity would drop substantially if the use of moiré topography (39.8%) or clinical signs (55.5%) were discarded. With the inclusion of these 2 tests, the clinical effectiveness measures were robust to the cutoff for ATR, unless it was set below 10°. Selectively screening only premenarche girls was not feasible, as this screen would have missed a significant proportion of children with significant curvature. No refinement of the current protocol was necessary, although boys could be screened beginning at 12 years of age. The tandem use of ATR, moiré topography, and clinical signs was recommended for future studies.

  1. Association of MCAT scores obtained with standard vs extra administration time with medical school admission, medical student performance, and time to graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searcy, Cynthia A; Dowd, Keith W; Hughes, Michael G; Baldwin, Sean; Pigg, Trey

    2015-06-09

    Individuals with documented disabilities may receive accommodations on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Whether such accommodations are associated with MCAT scores, medical school admission, and medical school performance is unclear. To determine the comparability of MCAT scores obtained with standard vs extra administration time with respect to likelihood of acceptance to medical school and future medical student performance. Retrospective cohort study of applicants to US medical schools for the 2011-2013 entering classes who reported MCAT scores obtained with standard time (n = 133,962) vs extra time (n = 435), and of students who matriculated in US medical schools from 2000-2004 who reported MCAT scores obtained with standard time (n = 76,262) vs extra time (n = 449). Standard or extra administration time during MCAT. Primary outcome measures were acceptance rates at US medical schools and graduation rates within 4 or 5 years after matriculation. Secondary outcome measures were pass rates on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step examinations and graduation rates within 6 to 8 years after matriculation. Acceptance rates were not significantly different for applicants who had MCAT scores obtained with standard vs extra time (44.5% [59,585/133,962] vs 43.9% [191/435]; difference, 0.6% [95% CI, -4.1 to 5.3]). Students who tested with extra time passed the Step examinations on first attempt at significantly lower rates (Step 1, 82.1% [344/419] vs 94.0% [70,188/74,668]; difference, 11.9% [95% CI, 9.6% to 14.2%]; Step 2 CK, 85.5% [349/408] vs 95.4% [70,476/73,866]; difference, 9.9% [95% CI, 7.8% to 11.9%]; Step 2 CS, 92.0% [288/313] vs 97.0% [60,039/61,882]; difference, 5.0% [95% CI, 3.1% to 6.9%]). They also graduated from medical school at significantly lower rates at different times (4 years, 67.2% [285/424] vs 86.1% [60,547/70,305]; difference, 18.9% [95% CI, 15.6% to 22.2%]; 5 years, 81.6% [346/424] vs 94.4% [66

  2. Critérios para admissão de pacientes na unidade de terapia intensiva e mortalidade Criteria for patient admissiwwon in the intensive care unit and mortality rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Maria Horta Caldeira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar os critérios utilizados na prática clínica, no processo de triagem de pacientes para admissão em UTI. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte prospectivo, em hospital terciário. Foram comparados quatro grupos diferentes de pacientes em relação à necessidade para admissão na UTI e divididos em prioridades 1, 2, 3 e 4, ou seja, prioridade 1 mais necessária até prioridade 4, menos necessária. RESULTADOS: Incluiu-se 359 pacientes, idade 66 (53,2-75,0 anos. APACHE II foi 23 (18-30. Obtevese 70,4% de vagas cedidas na UTI. A idade foi maior nos pacientes para os quais foram recusadas vagas em UTI 66,2±16,1 vs 61,9±15,2 anos (p= 0,02 e a prioridade 1 apresentou mais vagas cedidas 39,1% vs 23,8% vagas recusadas (p=0,01, o contrário ocorreu com prioridades 3 e 4. Pacientes com prioridades 3 e 4 apresentaram maiores idade, escores prognósticos e mais disfunções orgânicas, assim como maiores taxas de recusas. Ocorreram altas mortalidades destes grupos na UTI, 86,7% vs 31,3% no grupo de prioridades 1 e 2 (pOBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate criteria used in clinical practice, for screening of patients for ICU admission. METHODS: Cohort prospective study in a tertiary hospital. Four groups were compared in relation to ICU admission by ranking priorities into groups 1, 2, 3 and 4; highest priority 1, lowest priority 4. RESULTS: Enrolled were 359 patients, 66 (53.2-75.0 years old. APACHE II was 23 (18-30. The ICU made available 70.4% of beds. Patients who were refused beds in the ICU were older, 66.2±16.1 versus 61.9±15.2 years of age (p= 0.02 and the priority 1 group had less refusal of beds, which means, 39.1% versus 23.8% had beds refused (p=0.01. The opposite occurred with priorities 3 and 4. Patients in priority 3 and 4 showed older ages, score system and more organ dysfunctions as well as more refusals of beds. ICU mortality rates were higher for priority groups 3 and 4 when compared to 1 and

  3. Mathematics Admission Test Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ideon Erge

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2014, there have been admission tests in mathematics for applicants to the Estonian University of Life Sciences for Geodesy, Land Management and Real Estate Planning; Civil Engineering; Hydraulic Engineering and Water Pollution Control; Engineering and Technetronics curricula. According to admission criteria, the test must be taken by students who have not passed the specific mathematics course state exam or when the score was less than 20 points. The admission test may also be taken by those who wish to improve their state exam score. In 2016, there were 126 such applicants of whom 63 took the test. In 2015, the numbers were 129 and 89 and in 2014 150 and 47 accordingly. The test was scored on scale of 100. The arithmetic average of the score was 30.6 points in 2016, 29.03 in 2015 and 18.84 in 2014. The test was considered to be passed with 1 point in 2014 and 20 points in 2015 and 2016. We analyzed test results and gave examples of problems which were solved exceptionally well or not at all.

  4. Project 2011 and the Preparation of Black and Latino Students for Admission to Specialized High Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebanks, Mercedes E.; Toldson, Ivory A.; Richards, Soyini; Lemmons, Brianna P.

    2012-01-01

    Public elite and specialized high schools in New York City have a very low enrollment of Black and Latino students. Project 2011 is an intensive preparatory instructional program to improve acceptance rates for Black and Latino children to the eight specialized public high schools in New York City. Initiated and funded by District 17 and 18 of the…

  5. EVALUATION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SKILLS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN TURKEY ACCORDING TO INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAM CRITERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Yücel Çetin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, evaluation criteria for the teaching of language and literature used in Turkey and in the world was discussed; language and literature skills of Turkish students who came to the final stage of the secondary education were evaluated according to International Baccalaureate Diploma Program -IBDP- Turkish A1 course criteria. Related literature was examined in order to determine national and international criteria used in teaching of language and literature. 43 participant study group which were taken from 4th grade of high schools was created to evaluate written and oral expression skills of students gained from Turkish language and literature according to international criteria. The working group has been obtained to provide the maximum variety sample. Two written and one oral exam questions in accordance with Turkish A1 course evaluating criteria were asked to the study group, answers papers were evaluated by three expert by using document analysis technique of qualitative research method. According to the research results, it has been observed that teachers do not use common criteria in evaluating language and literature teaching. 12th grade students’ language and expression skills are between 5-6 from 10 points according to international criteria; however language and expression skills of girl students are better than boy students and oral expression skills of students are better than written skills in general according to international criteria. Also, it has been found that students make their comments without relying on literary works.

  6. Progress of medical students after open admission or admission based on knowledge tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reibnegger, Gilbert; Caluba, Hans-Christian; Ithaler, Daniel; Manhal, Simone; Neges, Heide Maria; Smolle, Josef

    2010-02-01

    Although admission to university in Austria is generally open for applicants who have successfully completed secondary school, in some areas of study, including human medicine and dentistry, the selection of students by additional criteria has become legally possible as a result of a decision by the European Court in 2005. We studied the impact of this important change on the temporal pattern of medical students' progress through the study programme. All 2532 regular students admitted to the diploma programme in human medicine at the Medical University of Graz during the academic years 2002/03-2007/08 were included in the analysis. Non-parametric and semi-parametric survival analysis techniques were employed to compare the time required to complete the first two study semesters (first part of the curriculum) before and after the implementation of admission tests. Temporal patterns of dropout before this goal was achieved were also investigated. Sex, age and nationality of students were assessed as potential confounding variables. The cumulative probability of study success was dramatically better in selected students versus those who were admitted openly (P students completed the first two study semesters within the scheduled time of 1 year, this percentage rose to 75.6-91.9% for those selected by admission tests. Similarly, the cumulative probability for dropping out of study was also significantly lower in selected students (P student nationality, age and sex were also identified as partly significant, albeit weak, predictors. The analysis convincingly demonstrates that, by contrast with open admission, performance-based selection of medical students significantly raises the probability of successful study progress. Additionally, the proportion of dropouts is significantly reduced. Thus, admission tests save considerable costs, in terms of both student time and public resources.

  7. The Health Professions Admission Test (HPAT) score and leaving certificate results can independently predict academic performance in medical school: do we need both tests?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Halpenny, D

    2010-11-01

    A recent study raised concerns regarding the ability of the health professions admission test (HPAT) Ireland to improve the selection process in Irish medical schools. We aimed to establish whether performance in a mock HPAT correlated with academic success in medicine. A modified HPAT examination and a questionnaire were administered to a group of doctors and medical students. There was a significant correlation between HPAT score and college results (r2: 0.314, P = 0.018, Spearman Rank) and between leaving cert score and college results (r2: 0.306, P = 0.049, Spearman Rank). There was no correlation between leaving cert points score and HPAT score. There was no difference in HPAT score across a number of other variables including gender, age and medical speciality. Our results suggest that both the HPAT Ireland and the leaving certificate examination could act as independent predictors of academic achievement in medicine.

  8. Nonimmigrant Admissions - Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  9. Does School Admission by Zoning Affect Educational Inequality? A Study of Family Background Effect in Estonia, Finland, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Põder, Kaire; Lauri, Triin; Veski, Andre

    2017-01-01

    We indicate the size of family background effects in Sweden, Finland, and Estonia--countries that differ in both the rhetoric and extensiveness of the system-level school choice policies. Family background effect is defined as the dependence of student achievement on family background characteristics, such as parental education, income, and social…

  10. Do personality traits assessed on medical school admission predict exit performance? A UK-wide longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, R K; Dowell, J; Ayansina, D; Cleland, J A

    2017-05-01

    Traditional methods of assessing personality traits in medical school selection have been heavily criticised. To address this at the point of selection, "non-cognitive" tests were included in the UK Clinical Aptitude Test, the most widely-used aptitude test in UK medical education (UKCAT: http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/ ). We examined the predictive validity of these non-cognitive traits with performance during and on exit from medical school. We sampled all students graduating in 2013 from the 30 UKCAT consortium medical schools. Analysis included: candidate demographics, UKCAT non-cognitive scores, medical school performance data-the Educational Performance Measure (EPM) and national exit situational judgement test (SJT) outcomes. We examined the relationships between these variables and SJT and EPM scores. Multilevel modelling was used to assess the relationships adjusting for confounders. The 3343 students who had taken the UKCAT non-cognitive tests and had both EPM and SJT data were entered into the analysis. There were four types of non-cognitive test: (1) libertariancommunitarian, (2) NACE-narcissism, aloofness, confidence and empathy, (3) MEARS-self-esteem, optimism, control, self-discipline, emotional-nondefensiveness (END) and faking, (4) an abridged version of 1 and 2 combined. Multilevel regression showed that, after correcting for demographic factors, END predicted SJT and EPM decile. Aloofness and empathy in NACE were predictive of SJT score. This is the first large-scale study examining the relationship between performance on non-cognitive selection tests and medical school exit assessments. The predictive validity of these tests was limited, and the relationships revealed do not fit neatly with theoretical expectations. This study does not support their use in selection.

  11. Clinical communication skills learning outcomes among first year medical students are consistent irrespective of participation in an interview for admission to medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Mavourneen; Wilkinson, David; Fitzgerald, Jennifer; Eley, Diann; Connor, Jason

    2014-07-01

    Although contentious most medical schools interview potential students to assess personal abilities such as communication. To investigate any differences in clinical communication skills (CCS) between first year students admitted to UQ medical school with or without an admissions interview. A retrospective analysis of 1495 student assessment scores obtained after structured communication skills training (CCS) between 2007 and 2010. The average assessment score was 3.76 ([95% CI, 3.73-3.78]) and adjusting for student characteristics, showed no main effect for interview (p = 0.89). The strongest predictor of scores was gender with females achieving significantly higher scores (3.91 [95% CI, 3.54-4.28] vs. 3.76 [95% CI, 3.39-4.13]; p ≤ 0.001). Data show no differences in post-training assessment measures between students who were interviewed during selection or not. Further research about the quality and retention of communications skills after training is warranted.

  12. Optimal Admission to Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten

    This paper constructs higher education admission rules that maximise graduation rates and thus increase the skill level of the work force. An application shows that students with a low level in mathematics in secondary school ought to find it easier to be admitted to an economics programme than...... to law or psychology programmes, even though economics is the most difficult programme from which to graduate without a strong background in mathematics. Indirect gains from optimal admission include the potential of making whole cohorts of students more able to graduate with a higher education degree....

  13. The Parent Role in College Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses techniques secondary school counselors can use to help parents understand and negotiate the college admissions process, including encouraging parental self-assessment; assisting parents to assess student; giving parents special tips; and maintaining open and ethical communication. (ABL)

  14. Dimensionality and predictive validity of the HAM-Nat, a test of natural sciences for medical school admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hissbach Johanna C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge in natural sciences generally predicts study performance in the first two years of the medical curriculum. In order to reduce delay and dropout in the preclinical years, Hamburg Medical School decided to develop a natural science test (HAM-Nat for student selection. In the present study, two different approaches to scale construction are presented: a unidimensional scale and a scale composed of three subject specific dimensions. Their psychometric properties and relations to academic success are compared. Methods 334 first year medical students of the 2006 cohort responded to 52 multiple choice items from biology, physics, and chemistry. For the construction of scales we generated two random subsamples, one for development and one for validation. In the development sample, unidimensional item sets were extracted from the item pool by means of weighted least squares (WLS factor analysis, and subsequently fitted to the Rasch model. In the validation sample, the scales were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis and, again, Rasch modelling. The outcome measure was academic success after two years. Results Although the correlational structure within the item set is weak, a unidimensional scale could be fitted to the Rasch model. However, psychometric properties of this scale deteriorated in the validation sample. A model with three highly correlated subject specific factors performed better. All summary scales predicted academic success with an odds ratio of about 2.0. Prediction was independent of high school grades and there was a slight tendency for prediction to be better in females than in males. Conclusions A model separating biology, physics, and chemistry into different Rasch scales seems to be more suitable for item bank development than a unidimensional model, even when these scales are highly correlated and enter into a global score. When such a combination scale is used to select the upper quartile of

  15. Dimensionality and predictive validity of the HAM-Nat, a test of natural sciences for medical school admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissbach, Johanna C; Klusmann, Dietrich; Hampe, Wolfgang

    2011-10-14

    Knowledge in natural sciences generally predicts study performance in the first two years of the medical curriculum. In order to reduce delay and dropout in the preclinical years, Hamburg Medical School decided to develop a natural science test (HAM-Nat) for student selection. In the present study, two different approaches to scale construction are presented: a unidimensional scale and a scale composed of three subject specific dimensions. Their psychometric properties and relations to academic success are compared. 334 first year medical students of the 2006 cohort responded to 52 multiple choice items from biology, physics, and chemistry. For the construction of scales we generated two random subsamples, one for development and one for validation. In the development sample, unidimensional item sets were extracted from the item pool by means of weighted least squares (WLS) factor analysis, and subsequently fitted to the Rasch model. In the validation sample, the scales were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis and, again, Rasch modelling. The outcome measure was academic success after two years. Although the correlational structure within the item set is weak, a unidimensional scale could be fitted to the Rasch model. However, psychometric properties of this scale deteriorated in the validation sample. A model with three highly correlated subject specific factors performed better. All summary scales predicted academic success with an odds ratio of about 2.0. Prediction was independent of high school grades and there was a slight tendency for prediction to be better in females than in males. A model separating biology, physics, and chemistry into different Rasch scales seems to be more suitable for item bank development than a unidimensional model, even when these scales are highly correlated and enter into a global score. When such a combination scale is used to select the upper quartile of applicants, the proportion of successful completion of the curriculum

  16. Are MSW Admissions Models Working? An analysis of MSW Admissions Models as Predictors of Student Success

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Vliek; Kieran Fogarty; Robert Wertkin

    2016-01-01

    Admissions models facilitate the selection of MSW candidates who are both academically prepared for graduate study and professionally suited to social work, characteristics often referred to as fit-to-the-profession. This study attempted to identify the relationship between the criteria used in the admissions model of a medium-sized MSW program and student success in the program. Specific criteria and the associated measurement tools within the model were evaluated in relation to student succ...

  17. Investigating approaches to diversity in a national survey of physics doctoral degree programs: The graduate admissions landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Potvin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Graduate admissions play a critical gatekeeping role in the physics community not only because they select students who are allowed to begin their graduate studies, but also because they influence how students perceive graduate school, and in some cases whether or not they will even choose to apply. In conjunction with the APS Bridge Program, we conducted a national survey of graduate directors (and related faculty of physics Ph.D. programs in the United States to explore graduate admissions practices. Our focus was on criteria used in determining admissions, mechanisms through which graduate applicants are handled, and how student representation considerations are incorporated into admissions (if at all. We report here on existing graduate admission practices in physics departments and highlight some critical issues for understanding barriers for diversifying graduate physics, including the use of GRE scores (and the relative importance placed on them. We find that the use of a minimum GRE score for admission, a practice in opposition to recommendations made by the tests designers, is reported to be used in many departments (more than one in three. We also find letters of recommendation to be highly valued in admissions decisions. Our data describe various initiatives at the institutional or individual level to increase gender diversity in admissions. A sizable number of departments also express a latent demand for greater numbers of students from traditionally marginalized racial or ethnic groups, but simultaneously report a lack of such applicants.

  18. Cutting costs of multiple mini-interviews – changes in reliability and efficiency of the Hamburg medical school admission test between two applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) are a valuable tool in medical school selection due to their broad acceptance and promising psychometric properties. With respect to the high expenses associated with this procedure, the discussion about its feasibility should be extended to cost-effectiveness issues. Methods Following a pilot test of MMIs for medical school admission at Hamburg University in 2009 (HAM-Int), we took several actions to improve reliability and to reduce costs of the subsequent procedure in 2010. For both years, we assessed overall and inter-rater reliabilities based on multilevel analyses. Moreover, we provide a detailed specification of costs, as well as an extrapolation of the interrelation of costs, reliability, and the setup of the procedure. Results The overall reliability of the initial 2009 HAM-Int procedure with twelve stations and an average of 2.33 raters per station was ICC=0.75. Following the improvement actions, in 2010 the ICC remained stable at 0.76, despite the reduction of the process to nine stations and 2.17 raters per station. Moreover, costs were cut down from $915 to $495 per candidate. With the 2010 modalities, we could have reached an ICC of 0.80 with 16 single rater stations ($570 per candidate). Conclusions With respect to reliability and cost-efficiency, it is generally worthwhile to invest in scoring, rater training and scenario development. Moreover, it is more beneficial to increase the number of stations instead of raters within stations. However, if we want to achieve more than 80 % reliability, a minor improvement is paid with skyrocketing costs. PMID:24645665

  19. Holistic Review in Medical School Admissions and Selection: A Strategic, Mission-Driven Response to Shifting Societal Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Sarah S; Addams, Amy N; Young, Geoffrey H

    2016-11-01

    Medical schools and residency programs have always sought excellence in the areas of education, research, and clinical care. However, these pursuits are not accomplished within a vacuum-rather, they are continually and necessarily influenced by social, cultural, political, legal, and economic forces. Persistent demographic inequalities coupled with rapidly evolving biomedical research and a complex legal landscape heighten our collective awareness and emphasize the continued need to consider medicine's social contract when selecting, educating, and developing physicians and physician-scientists.Selection-who gains access to a medical education and to a career as a physician, researcher, and/or faculty member-is as much art as science. Quantitative assessments of applicants yield valuable information but fail to convey the full story of an applicant and the paths they have taken. Human judgment and evidence-based practice remain critical parts of implementing selection processes that yield the desired outcomes. Holistic review, in promoting the use of strategically designed, evidence-driven, mission-based, diversity-aware processes, provides a conceptual and practical framework for marrying the art with the science without sacrificing the unique value that each brings.In this Commentary, the authors situate medical student selection as both responsive to and informed by broader social context, health and health care needs, educational research and evidence, and state and federal law and policy. They propose that holistic review is a strategic, mission-driven, evidence-based process that recognizes diversity as critical to excellence, offers a flexible framework for selecting future physicians, and facilitates achieving institutional mission and addressing societal needs.

  20. Guidelines for developing admission and discharge policies for the pediatric intensive care unit. Pediatric Section Task Force on Admission and Discharge Criteria, Society of Critical Care Medicine in conjunction with the American College of Critical Care Medicine and the Committee on Hospital Care of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    These guidelines were developed to provide a reference for preparing policies on admission and discharge for pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). They represent a consensus opinion of physicians, nurses, and allied health care professionals. By using this document as a framework for developing multidisciplinary admission and discharge policies, utilization of pediatric intensive care units can be optimized and patients can receive the level of care appropriate for their condition.

  1. A Study on the Evaluation of Science Projects of Primary School Students Based on Scientific Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Sema Nur; Ozer, Dilek Zeren; Ozkan, Muhlis

    2013-01-01

    This study re-evaluated 454 science projects that were prepared by primary school students between 2007 and 2011 within the scope of Science Projects Event for Primary School Students. Also, submitted to TUBITAK BIDEB Bursa regional science board by MNE regional work groups in accordance with scientific research methods and techniques, including…

  2. Rationalization and Student/School Personhood in U.S. College Admissions: The Rise of Test-Optional Policies, 1987 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Jared

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the rise of "test-optional" college admissions policies since the 1990s. I argue that the rationalization of college admissions policies after World War II contributed to the rise of "meritocratic" stratification (in policy) and standardized tests, like the SAT, but it also led to the expansion and…

  3. Relationship of academic success of medical students with motivation and pre-admission grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luqman, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    To determine predictive validity of pre-admission scores of medical students, evaluate correlation between level of motivation and later on academic success in a medical college. Analytical study. Foundation University Medical College, Islamabad, from June to August 2011. A non-probability convenience sampling of students of 1st to final year MBBS classes was done after obtaining informed consent. These students filled out 'Strength of Motivation for Medical School' (SMMS) questionnaire. The data of pre-admission grades of these students along with academic success in college according to examination results in different years were collected. The correlation between the pre-admission grades and score of SMMS questionnaire with their academic success in medical college was found by applying Pearson co-efficient of correlation in order to determine the predictive validity. Only 46% students revealed strong motivation. A significant, moderate correlation was found between preadmission scores and academic success in 1st year modular examination (0.52) which became weaker in various professional examinations in higher classes. However, no significant correlation was observed between motivation and academic success of medical students in college. Selecting medical students by pre-admission scores or motivation level alone may not be desirable. A combination of measures of cognitive ability criteria (FSc/pre-admission test scores) and non-cognitive skills (personality traits) is recommended to be employed with the use of right tools for selection of students in medical schools.

  4. Seeking the Admission Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucido, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of seminal publications in college admission, the first piece that comes to mind is B. Alden Thresher's "College Admissions in the Public Interest" (1966). Thresher's work, relevant to this day, is credited with being the foundational document of the admission profession. McDonough and Robertson's 1995 study, commissioned by NACAC,…

  5. Differential Predictive Validity of High School GPA and College Entrance Test Scores for University Students in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hattami, Abdulghani Ali Dawod

    2012-01-01

    High school grade point average and college entrance test scores are two admission criteria that are currently used by most colleges in Yemen to select their prospective students. Given their widespread use, it is important to investigate their predictive validity to ensure the accuracy of the admission decisions in these institutions. This study…

  6. Nutrient intakes among children and adolescents eating usual pizza products in school lunch compared with pizza meeting HealthierUS School Challenge criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, In Young; Marquart, Len; Reicks, Marla

    2014-05-01

    Pizza is a popular food that can contribute to high intakes of saturated fat and sodium among children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to compare daily nutrient intakes when a pizza product meeting the US Department of Agriculture's criteria for competitive food entrées under the HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) was substituted for usual pizza products consumed during foodservice-prepared school lunch. The study used National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2008) dietary recall data from a cross-sectional sample of US children and adolescents (age 5 to 18 years, n=337) who ate pizza during school lunch on 1 day of dietary recall. Daily nutrient intakes based on the consumption of usual pizza products for school lunch (pre-modeled) were compared with intakes modeled by substituting nutrient values from an HUSSC whole-grain pizza product (post-modeled). Paired t tests were used to make the comparison. Post-modeled intakes were lower in daily energy, carbohydrate, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium compared with pre-modeled intakes among children and adolescents (Pschool lunch, indicating that it could be an effective approach to improve the nutritional quality of school lunch programs. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ethnic and social disparities in performance on medical school selection criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Stegers-Jager (Karen); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); S.M. Lucieer (Susanna); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractContext: Medical schools in Western societies seek measures to increase the diversity of their student bodies with respect to ethnicity and social background. Currently, little is known about the effects of different selection procedures on student diversity. Objectives: This prospective

  8. Extended School Year Services: A Review of Eligibility Criteria and Program Appropriateness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etscheidt, Susan

    2002-01-01

    This article reviewed eligibility factors for extended school year services (ESYS) for students with disabilities. Fifty-seven ESYS cases were evaluated for factors used in decisions concerning eligibility and program appropriateness. Eligibility factors included: regression-recoupment, student progress, critical development period, and…

  9. Criteria for Centralized Warehousing Procedures in Public School Districts. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Ralph A.; Thomson, Leland A.

    This survey of opinions of architects, certified public accountants, and educators (who have written concerning, shown leadership in, or have specialized knowledge about warehousing) covers the planning, organizing, material handling, and paper processing of presently operated school district central warehouses. All recommendations concerning…

  10. 77 FR 44475 - Final Definitions, Requirements, and Selection Criteria; Charter Schools Program (CSP)-Charter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... academic achievement, staff, and parents; (3) Expanding the number of high-quality charter schools... teamwork; boost academic excellence; and provide students and their parents with a range of effective... commenter cited the recent movie ``Bully,'' which documented the effects of bullying, and stated that...

  11. Association between child maltreatment and constipation: a school-based survey using Rome III criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajindrajith, Shaman; Devanarayana, Niranga M.; Lakmini, Chamila; Subasinghe, Vindya; de Silva, D. G. Harendra; Benninga, Marc A.

    2014-01-01

    Child abuse leads to multiple physical and psychosomatic sequelae. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between child abuse and constipation among schoolchildren. Children 13 to 18 years of age were selected from 4 semiurban schools in Gampaha District, Sri Lanka. A

  12. Grading Standards, Student Ability and Errors in College Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Jarle; Tjelta, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Grades are important for admission of students in most higher education programs. Analyzing admission and student performance data at a major Norwegian business school, we find that the grading practice of teachers at regional colleges sending students to the school is affected by the average performance of the students being graded. Teachers at…

  13. A President Views Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the changing role of admissions officers which corresponds to the declining student enrollment rate. Looks at changes in higher education over the past 15 years, and considers such issues as marketing, consumerism, and integrity as they relate to college admissions. (WAS)

  14. Technology in International Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In a relatively short time, technology applications have become an essential feature of the admissions business. They make the jobs of international admissions professionals easier in many ways, allowing for more robust communication with applicants and counselors, a streamlined application process, and quicker access to information about…

  15. Evaluating the impact of the ADEA Admissions Committee Workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Shelia S; Wells, Anne; Brunson, W David; Sinkford, Jeanne C; Valachovic, Richard W

    2011-05-01

    Drawing on the interconnection of workforce diversity and oral health access, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) is leading a novel approach to improve student body diversity in U.S. dental schools through an admissions committee development program. With funding provided by the Pipeline, Profession, and Practice: Community-Based Dental Education program and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, ten dental directors/deans of admissions from a cross-section of U.S. dental schools were selected through a competitive application process to participate in a Train-the-Trainers Admissions Committee Workshop. After completing intensive training that was built on legally sound admissions practices, these new trainers copresented ADEA Admissions Committee Workshops in two-member teams at six U.S. dental schools. This report summarizes the evaluation of both the train-the-trainers workshop and six workshops held in summer 2009. Also summarized are post-workshop outcomes relative to structural diversity at the participating schools.

  16. Indeterminate EMU admissions: does repeating the admission help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkou, Srijana; Grade, Madeline; Hoerth, Matthew T; Noe, Katherine H; Sirven, Joseph I; Drazkowski, Joseph F

    2011-04-01

    Epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) admissions during 2007-2009 at Mayo Clinic Hospital Arizona were reviewed. Of the 106 indeterminate admissions, 13 (12%) went on to have a second admission. During the second admission, 8 (62%) were diagnosed. Five patients went on to have a third or fourth admission, with none of them receiving a diagnosis. Nineteen (18%) patients had ambulatory EEG monitoring after an indeterminate admission, with only one (5%) receiving a diagnosis after ambulatory EEG monitoring. Even in patients who were initially indeterminate, medication management changed 37% of the time. Admission to the EMU was helpful for spell classification, with 80% of the patients receiving a diagnosis after the first admission. Based on this study, a second admission should be considered if no diagnosis is reached after the first admission. If no diagnosis is made after the second EMU admission, subsequent admissions are unlikely to produce a definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Publication Criteria and Recommended Areas of Improvement within School Psychology Journals as Reported by Editors, Journal Board Members, and Manuscript Authors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Craig A.; Floyd, Randy G.; Fuhrmann, Melanie J.; Martinez, Rebecca S.

    2011-01-01

    Two online surveys were completed by editors, associate editors, editorial board members, and members or fellows of the Division 16 of the American Psychological Association. These surveys targeted (a) the criteria for a manuscript to be published in school psychology journals, and (b) the components of the peer-review process that should be…

  18. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  19. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  20. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  1. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  2. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  3. Nonimmigrant Admissions - Fiscal Year 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  4. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  5. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  6. Nonimmigrant Admission: Fiscal Year 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  7. Nonimmigrant Admissions: Fiscal Year 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Nonimmigrants are foreign nationals granted temporary admission into the United States. The major purposes for which nonimmigrant admission may be authorized include...

  8. The Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS in High School Students in Rasht in 2009 According to NIH Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Asgharnia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder inwomen associated with many reproductive, endocrine, metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions.This study aimed to determine the prevalence of PCOS among high school students in Rasht.Materials and Methods: In a cross–sectional study, 1850 students were selected by a multi-stage clustersampling from all high schools in Rasht. The inclusion criteria were: age 17-18 years, menarche from10-16 years, normal prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH values, no history of anatomicalmalformation, no use of medication or hair-removal techniques, and a history of oligo- or amenorrhea.PCOS was diagnosed if both menstrual dysfunction and clinical hyperandrogenism were detected.Results: Mean age of subjects was 17.2 ± 0.7 years and the age of menarche was 12.8 ± 0.9 years. Ofall students, 378 (20.4% had oligomenorrhea and PCOS was diagnosed in 210 (11.34 % accordingto the National Institute of Health (NIH definition. PCOS subjects, mean body mass index (BMI,waist circumference, and waist/hip (W/H ratio were 21.1 ± 3.6, 73.4 ± 8.0 cm and 0.77 ± 0.05,respectively. A family history of diabetes mellitus type 2 was reported in 24.7% of subjects.Conclusion: The prevalence of PCOS in this study was similar to the international estimatesof 10-20% in Caucasians. A long-term follow-up is needed to compare the accuracy of clinicaldetermination of the disease versus diagnosis based on hormonal and/or sonographic assessments.

  9. Gender Differences in School Success: What Are the Roles of Students' Intelligence, Personality and Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinath, Birgit; Eckert, Christine; Steinmayr, Ricarda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Education is a key variable for reaching individually and socially desired outcomes. Specifically, school grades are important admission criteria for higher education and job positions. Nowadays, in countries committed to equal opportunities, girls obtain better school grades than boys, but the reasons why girls outperform boys are not…

  10. The Progression of the College Admissions Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In his sixteen years in college admissions, the author has evolved in his work, role, and mission. He began as an eager recruiter, excited to help high school students get into college; now he is a seasoned director committed to college access. As he reflects on his career, a five-stage progression merges: "learn," "execute," "lead," "contribute,"…

  11. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school ...

  12. Modeling Preferential Admissions at Elite Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Sally; Hewitt, Gordon; Kelly, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a model that simulates the effects of varying preferential admissions policies on the academic profile of a set of 35 small liberal arts colleges. An underlying assumption is that all schools in the set use the same ratio of preferential to non-preferential admissions. The model predicts that even drastic changes…

  13. Evaluating the Predictive Validity of Graduate Management Admission Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, Stephen G.; Talento-Miller, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    Admissions data and first-year grade point average (GPA) data from 11 graduate management schools were analyzed to evaluate the predictive validity of Graduate Management Admission Test[R] (GMAT[R]) scores and the extent to which predictive validity held across sex and race/ethnicity. The results indicated GMAT verbal and quantitative scores had…

  14. The Admission Index as a Predictor of Freshman GPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Everard

    The Admission Index, created from high school counselor ratings of academic promise and motivation, is recommended to admission officers and college counselors as a variable as good or better than those traditionally used from the cognitive domain. This index was found not only to be substantially valid and consistent as an achievement motivation…

  15. ESD Implementation at the School Organisation Level, Part 1--Investigating the Quality Criteria Guiding School Leaders' Work at Recognized ESD Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogren, Anna; Gericke, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    Research on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) implementation tends to focus primarily on student and teacher outcomes, and there have been few studies on leadership practices at the school organisation level that provide information on how quality in education contributes to ESD implementation. To address this issue, we conducted an…

  16. Admissions Decision-Making Models: How U.S. Institutions of Higher Education Select Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Gretchen W.

    2003-01-01

    This report represents the third phase in the College Board Admissions Models Project. The first two phases of the project are summarized in two monographs: "Toward a Taxonomy of the Admissions Decision-Making Process" (1999) identifies nine different philosophical approaches to admissions and related selection criteria; and "Best…

  17. Using Minimum Acceptable GRE Scores for Graduate Admissions Suppresses Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Casey

    2014-01-01

    I will present data showing that significant performance disparities on the GRE general test exist based on the test taker's race and gender [1]. Because of the belief that high GRE scores qualify one for graduate studies, the diversity issues faced by STEM fields may originate, at least in part, in misuse of the GRE scores by graduate admissions committees. I will quantitatively demonstrate this by showing that the combination of a hard cut-off and the different score distributions leads to the systematic underrepresentation of certain groups. I will present data from USF’s PhD program that shows a lack of correlation between GRE scores and research ability; similar null results are emerging from numerous other programs. I will then discuss how assessing non-cognitive competencies in the selection process may lead to a more enlightened search for the next generation of scientists. [1] C. W. Miller, "Admissions Criteria and Diversity in Graduate School", APS News Vol 22, Issue 2, The Back Page (2013) http://www.aps.org/publications/apsnews/201302/backpage.cfm

  18. Predictive validity of pre-admission assessments on medical student performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaliz, Al-Awwab; Kaadan, Samy; Dabbagh, M Marwan; Barakat, Abdulaziz; Shareef, Mohammad Abrar; Al-Tannir, Mohamad; Obeidat, Akef; Mohamed, Ayman

    2017-11-24

    To examine the predictive validity of pre-admission variables on students' performance in a medical school in Saudi Arabia. In this retrospective study, we collected admission and college performance data for 737 students in preclinical and clinical years. Data included high school scores and other standardized test scores, such as those of the National Achievement Test and the General Aptitude Test. Additionally, we included the scores of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exams. Those datasets were then compared with college performance indicators, namely the cumulative Grade Point Average (cGPA) and progress test, using multivariate linear regression analysis. In preclinical years, both the National Achievement Test (p=0.04, B=0.08) and TOEFL (p=0.017, B=0.01) scores were positive predictors of cGPA, whereas the General Aptitude Test (p=0.048, B=-0.05) negatively predicted cGPA. Moreover, none of the pre-admission variables were predictive of progress test performance in the same group. On the other hand, none of the pre-admission variables were predictive of cGPA in clinical years. Overall, cGPA strongly predict-ed students' progress test performance (p<0.001 and B=19.02). Only the National Achievement Test and TOEFL significantly predicted performance in preclinical years. However, these variables do not predict progress test performance, meaning that they do not predict the functional knowledge reflected in the progress test. We report various strengths and deficiencies in the current medical college admission criteria, and call for employing more sensitive and valid ones that predict student performance and functional knowledge, especially in the clinical years.

  19. Critérios de admissão e continuidade de cuidados em centros de atenção psicossocial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ Criterios de admisión y continuidad de cuidados en centros de atención psicosocial, Rio de Janeiro, Sureste de Brasil Criteria for admission and continuity of health care in psychosocial healthcare services, City of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tavares Cavalcanti

    2009-08-01

    ón psicosocial del municipio de Rio de Janeiro (Sureste de Brasil en 2006. Fueron sorteados 15 casos encaminados entre los pacientes admitidos para tratamiento en los seis meses anteriores al inicio de la investigación. Los criterios señalados por el equipo para la admisión del paciente para tratamiento o encaminamiento fueron analizados a partir de un itinerario estructurado. El análisis de la continuidad de cuidados se basó en investigación en prontuario, informaciones del equipo y de los propios pacientes y/o familiares seis meses posteriores a la absorción o encaminamiento del paciente. RESULTADOS: Los pacientes admitidos presentaban diagnóstico de psicosis (esquizofrenia, historia de internaciones previas, funcionamiento social pobre y red de apoyo pequeño y los pacientes encaminados presentaban trastornos ansiosos y depresivos, buena adhesión al tratamiento ambulatorio, buen funcionamiento social y presencia de red social. Con relación a la continuidad de cuidados, ocho pacientes en 27 tuvieron destino desconocido. Con relación a los encaminamientos, de los 13 pacientes encaminados a ambulatorios de la red, siete permanecieron en tratamiento, dos retornaron a los CAPS y cuatro tuvieron destino desconocido. CONCLUSIONES: Los centros admiten pacientes que se encajan en la definición de un trastorno mental severo y persistente. La continuidad de cuidado fue señalada como problema, probablemente debido a la dificultad de acompañar los pacientes en la comunidad.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the criteria used by teams for admission, referral and continuity of care among patients of the Centros de Atenção Psicossocial (CAPS - Psychosocial Care Centers. METHODS: A qualitative study with participatory evaluation was conducted in three psychosocial healthcare services of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil, in 2006. A total of 15 admitted cases and 15 referred cases were selected among the patients admitted for treatment during the six months that preceded the

  20. Predicting MBA Student Success and Streamlining the Admissions Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Within this study the author examines factors commonly employed as master of business administration applicant evaluation criteria to see if these criteria are important in determining an applicant's potential for success. The findings indicate that the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is not a significant predictor of student success…

  1. Strategies to be adopted in Higher Education Institutions to Enhance Admission Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Sreeramana Aithal

    2015-01-01

    To face global and local competition and to enhance admission demand for sustainability, Srinivas Institute of Management Studies (SIMS) has adopted several innovative strategies and this paper consists of such strategies adopted for improving the quality, and attract more students admission to its courses. These strategies include institutional objectives and core values, choice of courses, publicity strategy, criteria adopted for admission, institutional review, admission policy, catering s...

  2. Hospital admissions following childhood accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, D; Tal, Y; Winter, S T; Jaffe, M

    1982-09-01

    This study comprises 260 children aged less than or equal to 13 yr hospitalized following accidents during a 9-mo period for a total of 923 hospital days. The ratio of boys to girls was 1.8:1. There were 21 road accidents and 104 accidents in the home; 75.4% of the accidents took place after school hours. Half of the admissions were for head trauma; 96 injuries were serious; and 78 patients required general anesthesia. In 67 families, there had been at least one previous childhood accident requiring hospitalization of the cohort child or sibling; factors in this group may have been the child's temperament or tension in the home.

  3. Marking the Difference: An Investigation of the Criteria Used for Assessing Undergraduate Dissertations in a Business School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Len; Clewes, Debbie

    2000-01-01

    Using a structured group discussion and questionnaire, the criteria used by faculty at a British university when grading undergraduate dissertations was investigated. Common ground and differences in criteria were identified. Issues included the tension between individual teacher freedom and institutional demands, and staff development…

  4. Adaptive Admissions Process for Effective and Fair Graduate Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Judith; von Davier, Alina; Heinimann, Hans Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Graduate admission has become a critical process for quality assurance in tertiary education. Hitherto, most research has investigated the validity of admissions instruments. However, surprisingly little work has been conducted on the overall organization of admission, which often remains "informal, ad hoc, and lacking in…

  5. The performance of students with and without disability on the 11th grade university admission test

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Padilla-Muñoz, Andrea; Rodríguez, Viviana; Castro, Sergio; Reveiz, Yamile; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Comparing standardized university admission scores between students with and without disability within the same school and also comparing the performance of students with hearing, visual and physical disability...

  6. Modeling College Graduation GPA Considering Equity in Admissions: Evidence from the University of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Díaz, Horacio; García, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Over concerns about private school students' advantages in standardized tests, beginning in 1995-96 the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) implemented a new admissions formula that reduced the weight they previously had in the General Admissions Index (GAI), on which its admissions decisions are based. This study seeks to determine the possible…

  7. Gatekeepers or Marketers: Reclaiming the Educational Role of Chief Admission Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Patricia; Robertson, Larry

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. college admission environment has changed enormously over the last three decades. What have those changes meant for the profession of college admission officers? In this paper, the authors will describe the enormous changes that have taken place in high schools, colleges, and the entrepreneurial admission sector. They will describe how…

  8. The Value of SAT Scores and High School Grades in the Selection of Honors Program Candidates from the Perspective of Honors Students and Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Michael J.; Nigro, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Admission to honors programs is competitive and typically relies heavily on the applicant's high school grades and SAT scores. Research shows that of the two criteria, the stronger predictor of performance in an honors curriculum is the high school record, which would imply that grades should receive the greater emphasis. We surveyed current…

  9. [How medical students perform academically by admission types?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Keumho; Hur, Yera; Kim, Ji-Ha

    2013-09-01

    Despite the importance of selecting students whom are capable for medical education and to become a good doctor, not enough studies have been done in the category. This study focused on analysing the medical students' academic performance (grade point average, GPA) differences, flunk and dropout rates by admission types. From 2004 to 2010, we gathered 369 Konyang University College of Medicine's students admission data and analyzed the differences between admission method and academic achievement, differences in failure and dropout rates. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), ordinary least square, and logistic regression were used. The rolling students showed higher academic achievement from year 1 to 3 than regular students (p admission type variable as control variable in multiple regression model similar results were shown. But unlike the results of ANOVA, GPA differences by admission types were shown not only in lower academic years but also in year 6 (p admission types, regular admission type students showed higher drop out rate than the rolling ones which demonstrates admission types gives significant effect on flunk or dropout rates in medical students (p admissions type students tend to show lower flunk rate and dropout rates and perform better academically. This implies selecting students primarily by Korean College Scholastic Ability Test does not guarantee their academic success in medical education. Thus we suggest a more in-depth comprehensive method of selecting students that are appropriate to individual medical school's educational goal.

  10. Medicatiescreening met Beers-criteria en STOPP/START-criteria bij de ouedere patient: associatie tussen potentieel ongewenst geneesmiddelengebruik en geneesmiddelgerelateerde ziekenhuisopnamen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, CAK; Vermeulen Windsant - van der Tweel, AMA; Egberts, ACG; Van Den Bemt, Patricia M L A; Leendertse, AJ; Hermens, W.Th.; van Marum, R.J.; Derijks, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Medication screening using Beers and stopp/start criteria for elderly patients: association between potentially inappropriate medication and medication-related hospital admissions OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of medication-related hospital admissions associated with inappropriate medication use

  11. 34 CFR 600.55 - Additional criteria for determining whether a foreign graduate medical school is eligible to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... training program for foreign medical students that has been approved by all medical licensing boards and... on the exams; or (ii) The school's clinical training program was approved by a State as of January 1... graduate medical school is eligible to apply to participate in the FFEL programs. 600.55 Section 600.55...

  12. America's Best Graduate Schools, 1997. Exclusive Rankings: The Latest Word on Admissions, Entrance Tests, and Job Prospects, Plus a Directory of Law, Business, Medical, Osteopathic Medical, and Engineering Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfin, Mel, Ed.

    This career planning guide to graduate school education in the United States ranks graduate study programs and offers prospective students guidance. In articles about schools, students, life on campus, fields of study, and job prospects the guide tries to present a comprehensive view of what the best graduate schools today offer their students.…

  13. 從學校本位評量省思臺灣擴大免試入學方案 A Reflection of School-Based Assessment on the Extended Open Admission Program in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    宋曜廷Yao-Ting Sung

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available 教育部推動的擴大高中職及五專免試入學實施方案,在作法與理念上和澳洲與香港所執行的學校本位評量有雷同之處。兩者都是以學生為學習主體、提供其適性與優質之教育機會;同樣需仰賴教師之專業素養,以提高教學與學習品質;此外,皆採計在校成績作為入學申請依據,弱化高風險測驗之角色。因此,國外所執行利用學校本位評量作為入學與考試制度的變革方案之利弊得失,可以作為臺灣的改革參考。本研究目的在於融合校本評量之施行理念與作法,歸納出教育主管機關之政策規劃、教師之信念與專業、社會之態度與支持,以及執行期程和程序等四個可能影響校本評量實施成效之因素,針對現行免試入學方案提出具體建議,期能作為該方案全面實施前,相關政策調整之參考依據。 The program of extended open admission to senior high school, senior vocational school, and five-year junior college, promoted by the Ministry of Education, is similar to school-based assessment implemented in Australia and Hong Kong. The learners of both programs are students, and the two programs share the same goal of providing adaptive and high quality educational opportunities. Both programs count on teachers’ professional capability to enhance teaching and learning quality. Moreover, they both adopt the GPA as the main application source in order to weaken the role of high-stake exams. Therefore, the experience of employing school-based assessment in other countries can serve as references for the educational reform in Taiwan. The goal of this study is to integrate four concepts of implementation of school-based assessment: policy planning of education authorities, teacher’s beliefs and profession, attitudes and support of the society, and processes/procedures, in order to make a suggestion to the current open admission program and to

  14. Success in the University Admission Process in Germany: Regional Provenance Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sebastian; Dwenger, Nadja

    2009-01-01

    School education in Germany is under the responsibility of the federal states and as a consequence average grades differ widely across regions. Since school leavers apply nationwide for admission to university, regional provenance may thus matter a lot for the success probability in the admission process. Using a comprehensive dataset of the…

  15. Medical school selection criteria as predictors of medical student empathy: a cross-sectional study of medical students, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Moran, Joseph; Corcoran, Paul; O'Flynn, Siun; O'Tuathaigh, Colm; O'Sullivan, Aoife M

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether performance in any of the Health Professions Admissions Test (HPAT) sections, most specifically the interpersonal understanding section, correlates with self-reported empathy levels in medical students. The study was conducted in University College Cork, Ireland. 290 students participated in the study. Matching HPAT scores were available for 263 students. All male and female undergraduate students were invited to participate. Postgraduate and international students were excluded. Primary measures: HPAT-Ireland and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSE) scores were compared including subsection analysis. Secondary measures: comparisons were made between groups such as gender and year of programme. A total of 290 students participated. Males scored significantly higher than females for total HPAT-Ireland (U=7329, z=-2.04, p0.05). There was no effect of programme year on JSE scores (all p>0.05). The introduction of the HPAT-Ireland test was partly designed to identify students with strong interpersonal skills. A significant finding of this study is that JSE values did not correlate with HPAT-Ireland scores. This study suggests no clear link between scores on a selection test, the HPAT-Ireland, which is designed to assess several skill domains including interpersonal skills, and scores on a psychometric measure of empathy, at any point during medical education. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Medical school selection criteria as predictors of medical student empathy: a cross-sectional study of medical students, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Sullivan, Donnchadh M; Moran, Joseph; Corcoran, Paul; O’Flynn, Siun; O’Tuathaigh, Colm; O’Sullivan, Aoife M

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether performance in any of the Health Professions Admissions Test (HPAT) sections, most specifically the interpersonal understanding section, correlates with self-reported empathy levels in medical students. Setting The study was conducted in University College Cork, Ireland. Participants 290 students participated in the study. Matching HPAT scores were available for 263 students. All male and female undergraduate students were invited to participate. Postgraduate and international students were excluded. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary measures: HPAT-Ireland and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSE) scores were compared including subsection analysis. Secondary measures: comparisons were made between groups such as gender and year of programme. Results A total of 290 students participated. Males scored significantly higher than females for total HPAT-Ireland (U=7329, z=−2.04, pIreland section 1 (U=5382, z=−5.21, pIreland section 2 (U=5844, z=−4.46, pIreland measures (all p>0.05). There was no effect of programme year on JSE scores (all p>0.05). Conclusion The introduction of the HPAT-Ireland test was partly designed to identify students with strong interpersonal skills. A significant finding of this study is that JSE values did not correlate with HPAT-Ireland scores. This study suggests no clear link between scores on a selection test, the HPAT-Ireland, which is designed to assess several skill domains including interpersonal skills, and scores on a psychometric measure of empathy, at any point during medical education. PMID:28765129

  17. General Practitioners and Involuntary Admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Britta; Lomborg, Kirsten; Engberg, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    in involuntary admissions. Setting: General practice, Aarhus, Denmark. Method: One focus group interview and six individual interviews were conducted with 13 Danish GPs, who had recently sectioned one of their own patients. Results: GPs experienced stress and found the admission procedure time consuming...

  18. Optimal admission to higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    that documents the relevance of theory and illustrates how to apply optimal admission procedures. Indirect gains from optimal admission procedures include the potential for increasing entire cohorts of students' probability of graduating with a higher education degree, thereby increasing the skill level...

  19. Ethnic Diversity in Clinical Psychology: Recruitment and Admission Practices among Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Dunbar, Rocio; Stanton, Annette L.

    1999-01-01

    Examines graduate recruitment and admissions processes for ethnic minority students in clinical psychology by surveying graduate admissions directors. Reports that 98% of programs reported efforts to recruit minority applicants with 82% using flexible criteria when evaluating applicants; directors identified community characteristics, financial…

  20. BSW Program Admission Policies: Is There Empirical Support for What We Do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, James P.; Carter, Irene M.; Leslie, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Social work admission criteria are used to ensure student academic competence, identify personal characteristics associated with success in social work education and practice, predict success in class and field work, and promote diversity of the student body. However, evidence that supports the effectiveness of these admission policies is…

  1. Predicting National Dental Hygiene Board Examination success based on specific admission factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Lynn D

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there are specific admissions criteria that are significantly correlated with a student's National Board Dental Hygiene Examination (NBDHE) total score and case-based score. Specifically, the study examined the relation between an individual's reading acuity and their scores on the NBDHE. Because of the competitive nature of most dental hygiene admissions, selecting those applicants who are more likely to be successful in the academic program and pass the NBDHE is critical. Total NBDHE scores and case-based scores of 214 students attending Western Kentucky University's Program of Dental Hygiene between 2002 and 2010 were examined to determine if significant correlations existed. Specific factors examined were each student's total NBDHE score, as well as the score on the case-based section of the examination, age, microbiology lecture grade, microbiology lab grade, anatomy and physiology grade, college GPA, English grade, psychology grade, composite ACT score and subcomponent scores of the ACT (math, reading, English and science). Results revealed that the strongest predictors of total NBDHE scores were the score on the reading portion of the ACT (r=0.715, r2=0.511, p=0.01) and the grades in Microbiology lecture (r=0.644, r2=0.414, p=0.01). Results revealed that the strongest predictors of scores on the case-based portion of the NBDHE were students' scores on the reading portion of the ACT (r=0.673, r2=0.452, p=0.01) and the microbiology lecture grade (r = .637, r2 = .405, p = 0.01). Traditionally, schools have looked at specific science-based pre-requisite courses as a means of determining admission to schools of dental hygiene. Findings from this study suggest that a broader approach may need to be taken, specifically as it concerns a student's reading aptitude.

  2. Admissibility of logical inference rules

    CERN Document Server

    Rybakov, VV

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the fundamental theoretical results concerning inference rules in deductive formal systems. Primary attention is focused on: admissible or permissible inference rules the derivability of the admissible inference rules the structural completeness of logics the bases for admissible and valid inference rules. There is particular emphasis on propositional non-standard logics (primary, superintuitionistic and modal logics) but general logical consequence relations and classical first-order theories are also considered. The book is basically self-contained and

  3. A latent class analysis of pathological-gambling criteria among high school students: associations with gambling, risk and health/functioning characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Grace; Tsai, Jack; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Cavallo, Dana A; Hoff, Rani A; Steinberg, Marvin A; Rugle, Loreen; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-01-01

    To identify subtypes of adolescent gamblers based on the 10 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria for pathological gambling and the 9 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition criteria for gambling disorder and to examine associations between identified subtypes with gambling, other risk behaviors, and health/functioning characteristics. Using cross-sectional survey data from 10 high schools in Connecticut (N = 3901), we conducted latent class analysis to classify adolescents who reported past-year gambling into gambling groups on the basis of items from the Massachusetts Gambling Screen. Adolescents also completed questions assessing demographic information, substance use (cigarette, marijuana, alcohol, and other drugs), gambling behaviors (relating to gambling formats, locations, motivations, and urges), and health/functioning characteristics (eg, extracurricular activities, mood, aggression, and body mass index). The optimal solution consisted of 4 classes that we termed low-risk gambling (86.4%), at-risk chasing gambling (7.6%), at-risk negative consequences gambling (3.7%), and problem gambling (PrG) (2.3%). At-risk and PrG classes were associated with greater negative functioning and more gambling behaviors. Different patterns of associations between at-risk and PrG classes were also identified. Adolescent gambling classifies into 4 classes, which are differentially associated with demographic, gambling patterns, risk behaviors, and health/functioning characteristics. Early identification and interventions for adolescent gamblers should be sensitive to the heterogeneity of gambling subtypes.

  4. A Latent Class Analysis of Pathological-Gambling Criteria Among High School Students: Associations With Gambling, Risk and Health/Functioning Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Grace; Tsai, Jack; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Cavallo, Dana A.; Hoff, Rani A.; Steinberg, Marvin A.; Rugle, Loreen; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify subtypes of adolescent gamblers based on the 10 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria for pathological gambling and the 9 Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition criteria for gambling disorder and to examine associations between identified subtypes with gambling, other risk behaviors, and health/functioning characteristics. Methods Using cross-sectional survey data from 10 high schools in Connecticut (N = 3901), we conducted latent class analysis to classify adolescents who reported past-year gambling into gambling groups on the basis of items from the Massachusetts Gambling Screen. Adolescents also completed questions assessing demographic information, substance use (cigarette, marijuana, alcohol, and other drugs), gambling behaviors (relating to gambling formats, locations, motivations, and urges), and health/functioning characteristics (eg, extracurricular activities, mood, aggression, and body mass index). Results The optimal solution consisted of 4 classes that we termed low-risk gambling (86.4%), at-risk chasing gambling (7.6%), at-risk negative consequences gambling (3.7%), and problem gambling (PrG) (2.3%). At-risk and PrG classes were associated with greater negative functioning and more gambling behaviors. Different patterns of associations between at-risk and PrG classes were also identified. Conclusions Adolescent gambling classifies into 4 classes, which are differentially associated with demographic, gambling patterns, risk behaviors, and health/functioning characteristics. Early identification and interventions for adolescent gamblers should be sensitive to the heterogeneity of gambling subtypes. PMID:25275877

  5. Towards an understanding of graduate admissions practices in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Geoff; Chari, Deepa

    2017-01-01

    The APS bridge program works to improve the participation of students from traditionally under-represented groups in graduate physics. Related to this, we have undertaken research to improve our understanding of graduate admissions practices from the point of view of both students and faculty. Previously, we collected data on admission practices from over 75% of PhD-granting physics departments in the U.S., which highlighted the role of various criteria (including the GRE) in the admissions decisions faculty make, and identified the efforts (or lack thereof) made to recruit students from traditionally under-represented backgrounds. Currently, we are conducting a parallel study of upper division undergraduate physics majors to investigate their post-graduation career intentions, their perceptions of graduate admissions and perceived barriers to admissions, and to understand how undergraduate experiences influence students' career interests. Lastly, we are also studying, in depth, students who have been connected to physics bridge programs, to understand post-admission experiences and the enculturation process in physics departments. In this talk, we report on the collective results of these research efforts to date. NSF Award # 1143070.

  6. Qualitative Variables in Medical School Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaghie, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Ten qualitative categories associated with excellence in medical education and practice are identified: character and integrity; breadth of knowledge; leadership; geographic preferences; gender, race, and religious preference; work habits and motivation to study; personality and attitude; personal orientation toward service; altruism; and personal…

  7. What should we be selecting for? A systematic approach for determining which personal characteristics to assess for during admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Peter; Hecker, Kent; Sabatini, Susan

    2012-11-05

    Admission committees are responsible for creating fair, defensible, reliable, and valid processes that assess those attributes considered important for professional success. There is evidence for the continuing use of academic ability as a selection criterion for health professional schools; however, there is little evidence for the reliability and validity of measures currently in place to assess personal characteristics. The Ontario Veterinary College (OVC) initiated a review of its admissions criteria in order to implement an evidence-based method to determine which characteristics veterinary stakeholders consider important to assess for admission. Eleven characteristics were identified by the OVC Admissions Committee and a survey was sent to all licensed veterinarians in Ontario (n=4,068), OVC students (n=450), and OVC faculty, interns and residents (n=192). A paired comparison method was used to identify the relative rank order of the characteristics, and multivariate analysis of variance with post hoc analyses was used to determine between group differences in the returned survey data. Surveys were returned from 1,312 participants (27.86% response rate; female 59.70%). The relative rank of the characteristics was reasonably consistent among participant groups, with ethical behaviour, sound judgment, communication, and critical and creative thinking being ranked as the top four. However, the importance of certain characteristics like communication and empathy were perceived differently by groups. For instance, females scored communication (F(1, 1289) = 20.24, p leadership (F(1, 1289) = 10.28, p = .001, d = 0.18), and sound judgment (F(1, 1289) = 13.56, p < .001, d = 0.21) significantly higher than females. The data from the paired comparison method provide convergent evidence for the characteristics participant groups identify as most important in determining who should be admitted to a veterinary program. The between group analyses provides important

  8. The effects of Montessori education: evidence from admission lotteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, N.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of Montessori education, even though many students in many countries are educated in Montessori classrooms. This study investigates the causal effects of Montessori secondary education by exploiting admission lotteries in Dutch Montessori schools. The results

  9. Integrative Review of Admission Factors Related to Associate Degree Nursing Program Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jeanette M

    2017-02-01

    High attrition in associate degree nursing (ADN) programs contributes to the nursing shortage and causes hardship for students, families, faculty, colleges, and taxpayers. The purpose of this integrative literature review is to identify admission criteria related to ADN program success to inform evidence-based admission policies and reduce attrition. Integrative review methodology, suggested by Whittemore and Knafl, was used. A systematic search of existing professional literature was conducted using five databases and key word searches. The final sample included 26 documents that were analyzed and synthesized with the matrix method. Five categories of admission criteria and factors related to success in ADN programs were revealed from the analysis of findings: academic aptitude, demographic factors, psychological hardiness, specialty skills and experience, and socioeconomic support. ADN programs with a goal of decreasing attrition may want to implement admission selection guidelines that consider applicant criteria and attributes across all five dimensions. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(2):85-93.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. The Use of Social Networking to Increase Yield: Applying Persistence Theory to the Graduate Admissions Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell W.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study explored the connection between the use of a private social networking website during the graduate admissions process at a law school in the southeastern United States and the decision to matriculate or withdraw from the program. A theoretical model of persistence over time within the graduate admissions process was…

  11. Grade Inflation and University Admissions in Ontario: Separating Fact from Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Francois R.; Meaghan, Diane E.

    1995-01-01

    Ontario university admission data for 1983-93 were analyzed for evidence of high school grade inflation and grade-enhancement practices in response to increased competition for university admission. Results show only a moderate increase in entering grades, and suggest that grade inflation must be distinguished from changes reflecting demographic…

  12. Test Takers' Attitudes and Beliefs about the Graduate Management Admission Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Lawrence J.; Wilder, Gita Z.; Bridgeman, Brent

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess test takers' attitudes and beliefs about an admissions test used extensively in graduate schools of business in the United States, the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), and the relationships of these attitudes and beliefs to test performance. A set of attitude and belief items was administered by…

  13. The Graduate Management Admission Test: Technical Report on Test Development and Score Interpretation for GMAT Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, William B.

    This report provides information on test development, test administration, and score interpretation for the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). The GMAT, first administered in 1954, provides objective measures of an applicant's abilities for use in admissions decisions by graduate management schools. It is currently composed of five…

  14. When Race Disappears: College Admissions Policy Discourse in the State of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle; Sulè, V. Thandi; Maramba, Dina C.

    2014-01-01

    What happens to race in public discussions about "race-neutral" college admissions policies? This article shows how race disappeared from elite political debate during hearings on Texas Senate Bill 175 (2009), the Top Ten Percent Plan (the Plan), which guaranteed college admissions to high school graduates from the top 10% of their…

  15. Profiles of children with Down syndrome who meet screening criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD): a comparison with children diagnosed with ASD attending specialist schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, G; Howlin, P; Salomone, E; Moss, J; Charman, T

    2017-01-01

    Recent research suggests that around 16% to 18% of children with Down syndrome (DS) also meet diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, there are indications that profiles of autism symptoms in this group may vary from those typically described in children with ASD. Rates of autism symptoms and emotional and behavioural problems among children with DS who screened positive for ASD on the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) (n = 183) were compared with a group of children with clinical diagnoses of ASD (n = 189) attending specialist schools in the UK. Groups were matched for age and approximate language level (use of phrase speech). Profiles of autistic symptoms in the two groups were generally similar, but children with DS meeting ASD cut-off on the SCQ tended to show fewer problems in reciprocal social interaction than those in the ASD group. They also showed slightly lower rates of emotional and peer-related problems. The results mostly confirm findings from a previous study in which the original validation sample for the SCQ was used as a comparison group. Findings suggest that children with DS who meet screening criteria for ASD show similar profiles of communication and repetitive behaviours to those typically described in autism. However, they tend to have relatively milder social difficulties. It is important that clinicians are aware of this difference if children with DS and ASD are to be correctly diagnosed and eligible for specialist intervention and education services. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. College Admissions Policies for the 1970's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    The papers included in this collection are (1) "Problems and Issues Confronting the Admissions Community" by Clyde Vroman; (2) "Frozen Assumptions in Admissions" by B. Alden Thresher; (3) "The Effect of Federal Programs on Admissions Policies" by John F. Morse; (4) "State Plans for Higher Education and Their Influence on Admissions" by Charles W.…

  17. Puberty menorrhagia requiring inpatient admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, A H; Devi, L; Goel, P; Saha, P K

    2010-01-01

    Puberty menorrhagia is a significant health problem in adolescent age group and severe cases may require admission and blood transfusion. Aim of this study was to evaluate the causes, associated complications and management of puberty menorrhagia. Hospital records of all patients of puberty menorrhagia requiring admission were analyzed for etiology, duration since menarche, duration of bleeding, investigation profile and management. There were 18 patients of puberty menorrhagia requiring hospital admission. Etiology was anovulatory bleeding in 11 patients, bleeding disorders in five which included idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura in three and one each with Von-Willebrand disease and leukemia. Two patients had hypothyroidism as the cause. Fourteen patients presented with severe anaemia and required blood transfusion. All except one responded to oral hormonal therapy. Puberty menorrhagia can be associated with severe complications and requiring blood transfusion. Although most common cause is anovulation but bleeding disorder, other medical condition and other organic causes must be ruled out in any patient of Puberty menorrhagia.

  18. Relationship of academic success of medical students with motivation and pre-admission grades

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luqman, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    .... These students filled out 'Strength of Motivation for Medical School' (SMMS) questionnaire. The data of pre-admission grades of these students along with academic success in college according to examination results in different years were collected...

  19. Predicting Performance during Clinical Years from the New Medical College Admission Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroline, Jan D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The results of a predictive validity study of the new Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) using criteria from the clinical years of undergraduate medical education are discussed. The criteria included course grades and faculty ratings of clerks in internal medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. (Author/MLW)

  20. An Examination of Performance of First Year Students at an Ontario University: An Admission Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Lorraine G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    McMaster University students' high school and freshman grades were compared in an examination of the possible effects of grade inflation, variability of grades between secondary schools, and appropriateness of some courses for university admission. With some qualification, high school grades remain generally reliable predictors of university…

  1. Open Admissions: Before the Deluge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Theodore M.

    Institutions of higher education will have to change themselves radically if they are seriously interested in instituting open admissions policies, and one of the biggest obstacles to creating a learning environment conducive to a new kind of student will be overcoming institutional pride in its own elitism. Students have traditionally entered the…

  2. SIP Controlled Admission and Preemption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babiarz, J.; Chan, K.; Karagiannis, Georgios; Eardley, P

    2006-01-01

    This framework defines a method of providing Explicit Congestion Control to real-time inelastic traffic like voice and video through the use of session admission control and preemption mechanisms. This approach uses the Pre-Congestion Notification Marking (PCN) [1] mechanism. PCN marking is deployed

  3. Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admission haematological abnormalities and postoperative outcomes in neonates with acute surgical conditions in Alexandria, Egypt. HL Wella, SMM Farahat. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals ...

  4. Undergraduate Programme: Admissions for 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2013-02-01

    Feb 1, 2013 ... Undergraduate Programme: Admissions for 2013. The Indian Institute of Science, a leading institution of higher learning with a strong tradition of research, offers a four-year Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Programme which is designed as a balanced blend of core science and interdisciplinary topics to serve as ...

  5. Admission Conditions and Graduates' Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Fernando; Portela, Miguel; Sa, Carla

    2009-01-01

    In a context of increasing competition for students, admission conditions have been used as an instrument in a strategy of differentiation. Such a strategy is guided by short-run concerns, that is, the immediate need to attract more students. This article takes a longer term view, by examining graduates' employability. The authors find that…

  6. Value Criteria for School Furniture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Making furniture decisions can involve many factors, and they vary from institution to institution. For fixtures, furnishings and equipment, comparing initial cost with the cost of ownership over a life cycle can be more challenging. It may be the functionality of the furnishings that provides the greatest return on investment. In this article,…

  7. Efficacy versus Equity: What Happens When States Tinker With College Admissions in a Race-Blind Era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sandra E.; Cortes, Kalena E.; Lincove, Jane Arnold

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the efficacy and equity of college admissions criteria by estimating the effect of multiple measures of college readiness on college performance in the context of race-blind automatic admissions policies. We take advantage of a unique institutional feature of the Texas higher education system to control for selection into…

  8. Admission, management and outcomes of acute pancreatitis in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Peter S; Mittal, Anhubav; Brown, Lisa; McArthur, Colin; Phillips, Anthony J R; Petrov, Max; Windsor, John A

    2017-12-01

    A review of the management of acute pancreatitis (AP) at a tertiary intensive care unit (ICU) in Auckland, New Zealand, was published in 2004. This paper aims to update this series and identify changes in admission criteria, management and outcomes. A retrospective review of patients admitted to the Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland City Hospital, with AP from 2003 to 2014 was undertaken and data compared with the previous study (1988-2001). Eighty-four patients (male 53, mean ± SD age = 56.9 ± 15 years) with 85 admissions to ICU from 2003 to 2014 were compared with 112 patients in the previous study. Maori were over-represented. Median duration of symptoms prior to admission to ICU decreased from 7 to 3 days. The proportion of total AP patients admitted to ICU halved and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score on admission decreased from mean 19.9 ± 8.2 SD to 15.4 ± 7.3 (P < 0.001). Two thirds of patients had persistent organ failure. The use of enteral feeding doubled from 46/112 (41%) to 71/85 (84%) (P < 0.001). The use of primary percutaneous drainage increased from 14/112 (13%) to 24/85 (28%) (P = 0.007). Rate of necrosectomy was similar (36/112 (32%) versus 20/85 (24%), P = 0.205), although minimally invasive necrosectomy was introduced. Overall hospital mortality decreased by 29% (P = 0.198). There have been changes to the admission criteria and management in line with evolving guidelines and, overall, outcomes have improved. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. Factors affecting track selection by veterinary professional students admitted to the school of veterinary medicine at the University of California, Davis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Boudreaux, Karen A; Ilkiw, Jan E

    2010-01-01

    Factors affecting track selection before admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California, Davis, and factors affecting change of tracks after the first two years of the curriculum were investigated by means of a survey of the 118 students of the graduating class of 2009. The student's background experience before admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine and other personal reasons were significant factors affecting small-animal and mixed-animal track choices. The student's background experience before admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine was the only significant factor for choosing the zoological track. The most significant factor for students to change their track from the mixed or zoological track to the small-animal track was background experience before admission to the School of Veterinary Medicine. Anticipated increased employment opportunities after graduation was the most significant factor for students to change their track from the mixed- or small-animal track to the zoological track. Other personal reasons was the significant variable for students to change their track from small-animal or zoological to mixed-animal track. Thus, to increase the number of students interested in tracks with lower enrollment, exposure of potential applicants to experience relevant to that track before admission and Admissions Committee selection criteria are likely to increase the odds of students' choosing that track.

  10. The Evolution of College Admission Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    The development of college admissions requirements during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was basically the story of the admission policies and practices at Harvard College. Candidates for admission were examined on their ability to read and translate Latin and Greek, and a careful check was made of their character and background. With…

  11. Correlation of the Health Sciences Reasoning Test with student admission variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Wendy C; Persky, Adam; Blalock, Susan J

    2013-08-12

    To assess the association between scores on the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) and pharmacy student admission variables. During the student admissions process, cognitive data, including undergraduate grade point average and Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) scores, were collected from matriculating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students. Between 2007 and 2009, the HSRT was administered to 329 first-year PharmD students. Correlations between HSRT scores and cognitive data, previous degree, and gender were examined. After controlling for other predictors, 3 variables were significantly associated with HSRT scores: percentile rank on the reading comprehension (padmission criteria.

  12. The extent and cost of potentially avoidable admissions in hospital inpatients with palliative care needs: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; O'Callaghan, Anne; Laking, George; Frey, Rosemary; Raphael, Deborah; Snow, Barry; Gott, Merryn

    2015-09-01

    More than 90% of people spend time in hospital in the last year of life and, in many developed countries, hospitals are the setting in which most people will die. Previous research indicates that a proportion of these hospital admissions could have been avoided. The objective of this study was to establish the extent and cost of potentially avoidable hospital admissions among patients with palliative care needs. A prospective survey of hospital inpatients was undertaken to identify patients who met clinical criteria indicating palliative care need. Case notes were reviewed by two expert palliative care clinicians to determine if the hospital admission was potentially avoidable. An analysis of the cost of potentially avoidable admissions compared to all other admissions for those patients identified as being in the last year of life was carried out using the statistical analysis software R V.2.15.1. Logistic regression was performed using the logit (log of OR) link. The binary outcome of the logistic regression model was a potentially avoidable admission. Of the 99 patients who met the criteria for palliative care need, 22 were deemed to have experienced a potentially avoidable admission. Those living in a residential aged care facility were more at risk of experiencing such admissions. The mean total cost of hospital care for those with palliative care needs was lower for those whose admission was deemed potentially avoidable. A significant proportion of patients with palliative care needs experience a potentially avoidable admission. Although these admissions are relatively short compared to those whose admissions are unavoidable, any hospital admission impacts on the experiences of patients and families and may contribute to unnecessary hospital expenditure. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Reliabilität des Hamburger Auswahlverfahrens für Medizinische Studiengänge, Naturwissenschaftsteil (HAM-Nat [Reliability of a science admission test (HAM-Nat at Hamburg medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hissbach, Johanna

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The University Hospital in Hamburg (UKE started to develop a test of knowledge in natural sciences for admission to medical school in 2005 (Hamburger Auswahlverfahren für Medizinische Studiengänge, Naturwissenschaftsteil, HAM-Nat. This study is a step towards establishing the HAM-Nat. We are investigating Methods: 316 first-year students participated in the study in 2007. They completed different versions of the HAM-Nat test which consisted of items that had already been used (HN2006 and new items (HN2007. Four weeks later half of the participants were tested on the HN2007 version of the HAM-Nat again, while the other half completed the test of scientific reasoning. Within this four week interval students were offered a five day chemistry course.Results: Parallel forms reliability for four different test versions ranged from r=.53 to r=.67. The retest reliabilities of the HN2007 halves were r=.54 and r=.61. Correlations of the two HAM-Nat versions with the test of scientific reasoning were r=.34 und r=.21. The crash course in chemistry had no effect on HAM-Nat scores.Conclusions: The results suggest that further versions of the test of natural sciences will not easily conform to the standards of internal consistency, parallel-forms reliability and retest reliability. Much care has to be taken in order to assemble items which could be used interchangeably for the construction of new test versions. The test of scientific reasoning and the HAM-Nat are tapping different constructs. Participation in a chemistry course did not improve students’ achievement, probably because the content of the course was not coordinated with the test and many students lacked of motivation to do well in the second test.[german] Ziele: Die Universität Hamburg hat im Jahr 2005 begonnen, einen Naturwissenschaftstest zur Auswahl von Studienbewerbern zu entwickeln (Hamburger Auswahlverfahren für Medizinische Studiengänge, Naturwissenschaftsteil

  14. Admission Test and Pregnancy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Akhavan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The admission test (AT has been carried out for many years, but there are still debates about the prognostic value of the test. Therefore, we aimed to examine the value of the AT in predicting the adverse outcome in neonates. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 425 pregnant women with normal vaginal delivery were studied between2009 and 2014at Vali-e-Asr Hospital. Based on the results, the women were divided into 2groups of normal and abnormal ATs. All the patients were followed up until the birth of their baby, when the status of mother and neonate was determined. The main outcomes of the study were cesarean rate, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU admission, fetus demise, neonatal acidosis, and Apgar score. The independent t-test, chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. The data were analyzed using SPSS (version 17. Results: Of 425 pregnant women studied, 142 (33.4% had abnormal ATs with a mean age of 29 (±4.5 years. Multivariate analysis showed that an abnormal AT was able to predict the incidence of cesarean section, intrauterine growth restriction, turned cord, and Apgar<7, but it could not predict neonatal death and hypoxia. Conclusion: The AT was shown to be a useful screening test with risk factors such as oligohydramnios, bloody amniotic fluid, meconium amniotic fluid, intrauterine growth restriction, and turned cord. Additionally, the test was also able to predict NICU admission and the need for cesarean section, but it could not predict the occurrence of neonatal death.

  15. Relating weather types to asthma-related hospital admissions in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cameron C; Sheridan, Scott C; Lin, Shao

    2012-12-01

    Many previous studies have looked into the relationship between asthma and individual weather variables, but comparatively few have looked at this relationship using holistic weather types (WTs). Utilizing the Spatial Synoptic Classification, this research considers up to 6 days of lag time while investigating the asthma-to-WT relationship in two age groups (under 18 and 18 and over) throughout New York State. Results indicate that a cold and dry WT in autumn corresponds to increased asthma admissions and spike days in admissions in New York City (NYC) for the school-aged population, while hot and dry WTs in summer correspond to spike days in asthma admissions in both age groups. However, results vary considerably for other regions, seasons and WTs, and spike day analysis yields clearer results than the analysis of total anomalous admissions. When stratified by multiple regions and age groups, the sample size of daily asthma admissions is a limiting factor outside of NYC.

  16. Association between the Medical College Admission Test scores and Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honors Society membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Jacqueline L; Jackson, J Brooks

    2017-01-01

    Medical schools worldwide are faced with the challenge of selecting from among many qualified applicants. One factor that might help admissions committees identify future exceptional medical students is scores on standardized entrance exams. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between scores on the most commonly used standardized medical school entrance exam in the USA, the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), and election to the US medical honors society, Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA). MCAT scores and AOA membership data were analyzed for all the students pursuing Doctor of Medicine degrees at the University of Minnesota Medical School and who graduated between 2012-2016 (n=1,309). An independent-samples t-test found a significant difference (t=6.132, pmedical school was significantly associated with higher MCAT scores. Admissions committees should carefully consider the role of standardized entrance exam scores, in the context of a holistic review, when selecting for exceptional medical students.

  17. Predicting outcome on admission and post-admission for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure using classification and regression tree models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Lynn Speiser

    Full Text Available Assessing prognosis for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (APAP-ALF patients often presents significant challenges. King's College (KCC has been validated on hospital admission, but little has been published on later phases of illness. We aimed to improve determinations of prognosis both at the time of and following admission for APAP-ALF using Classification and Regression Tree (CART models.CART models were applied to US ALFSG registry data to predict 21-day death or liver transplant early (on admission and post-admission (days 3-7 for 803 APAP-ALF patients enrolled 01/1998-09/2013. Accuracy in prediction of outcome (AC, sensitivity (SN, specificity (SP, and area under receiver-operating curve (AUROC were compared between 3 models: KCC (INR, creatinine, coma grade, pH, CART analysis using only KCC variables (KCC-CART and a CART model using new variables (NEW-CART.Traditional KCC yielded 69% AC, 90% SP, 27% SN, and 0.58 AUROC on admission, with similar performance post-admission. KCC-CART at admission offered predictive 66% AC, 65% SP, 67% SN, and 0.74 AUROC. Post-admission, KCC-CART had predictive 82% AC, 86% SP, 46% SN and 0.81 AUROC. NEW-CART models using MELD (Model for end stage liver disease, lactate and mechanical ventilation on admission yielded predictive 72% AC, 71% SP, 77% SN and AUROC 0.79. For later stages, NEW-CART (MELD, lactate, coma grade offered predictive AC 86%, SP 91%, SN 46%, AUROC 0.73.CARTs offer simple prognostic models for APAP-ALF patients, which have higher AUROC and SN than KCC, with similar AC and negligibly worse SP. Admission and post-admission predictions were developed.• Prognostication in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (APAP-ALF is challenging beyond admission • Little has been published regarding the use of King's College Criteria (KCC beyond admission and KCC has shown limited sensitivity in subsequent studies • Classification and Regression Tree (CART methodology allows the

  18. Predicting outcome on admission and post-admission for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure using classification and regression tree models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Jaime Lynn; Lee, William M; Karvellas, Constantine J

    2015-01-01

    Assessing prognosis for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (APAP-ALF) patients often presents significant challenges. King's College (KCC) has been validated on hospital admission, but little has been published on later phases of illness. We aimed to improve determinations of prognosis both at the time of and following admission for APAP-ALF using Classification and Regression Tree (CART) models. CART models were applied to US ALFSG registry data to predict 21-day death or liver transplant early (on admission) and post-admission (days 3-7) for 803 APAP-ALF patients enrolled 01/1998-09/2013. Accuracy in prediction of outcome (AC), sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), and area under receiver-operating curve (AUROC) were compared between 3 models: KCC (INR, creatinine, coma grade, pH), CART analysis using only KCC variables (KCC-CART) and a CART model using new variables (NEW-CART). Traditional KCC yielded 69% AC, 90% SP, 27% SN, and 0.58 AUROC on admission, with similar performance post-admission. KCC-CART at admission offered predictive 66% AC, 65% SP, 67% SN, and 0.74 AUROC. Post-admission, KCC-CART had predictive 82% AC, 86% SP, 46% SN and 0.81 AUROC. NEW-CART models using MELD (Model for end stage liver disease), lactate and mechanical ventilation on admission yielded predictive 72% AC, 71% SP, 77% SN and AUROC 0.79. For later stages, NEW-CART (MELD, lactate, coma grade) offered predictive AC 86%, SP 91%, SN 46%, AUROC 0.73. CARTs offer simple prognostic models for APAP-ALF patients, which have higher AUROC and SN than KCC, with similar AC and negligibly worse SP. Admission and post-admission predictions were developed. • Prognostication in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure (APAP-ALF) is challenging beyond admission • Little has been published regarding the use of King's College Criteria (KCC) beyond admission and KCC has shown limited sensitivity in subsequent studies • Classification and Regression Tree (CART) methodology allows the

  19. The Admissions Process: An Approach to Selecting Learning Disabled Students at the Most Selective Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaywitz, Sally E.; Shaw, Robert

    1988-01-01

    This article offers guidelines for identifying gifted/learning-disabled high school students who would survive and thrive in the most competitive college environments. It strongly encourages the development of more informed admissions processes, not only at the undergraduate level but at the graduate and professional school levels as well.…

  20. Is the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act Really Beneficial to the Poorer Children in India? An Analysis with Special Reference to the Admission of Poorer Children in Public Unaided Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvalath, Reena

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed to examine whether the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act can achieve its major objective of ensuring education for all children in India. Indian parents like to enter their wards into private schools because they believe that the standard of education in the public schools is poor. The act strengthens this…

  1. Policy Analysis: An Analysis of Institutional Admissions and State Policies in Higher Education as They Impact Undocumented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Arcadio J., III

    2013-01-01

    The term residency and definition of that term is the driving force that acts as the foundation of many, if not all, state funded college and university admissions policies. With over 65,000 undocumented students graduating from American high schools every year, it is essential that state colleges and universities look at their admissions policies…

  2. "City Blood Is No Better than Country Blood": The Populist Movement and Admissions Policies at Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelber, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on historical admissions policies and offers a more nuanced and more substantial treatment of the relationship between Populism and higher education. Prior accounts of admissions in the late nineteenth century have sensibly focused upon the tension between secondary school leaders who were mindful of their multiple…

  3. Considering Practical Uses of Advanced Placement® Information in College Admission. Research Note 2014-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Emily J.; Marini, Jessica; Mattern, Krista D.

    2014-01-01

    The Study evaluated the predictive validity of various operationalizations of AP® Exam and course information that could be used to make college admission decisions. The incremental validity of different AP variables, above and beyond traditional admission measures such as SAT® and high school grade point average (HSGPA), in predicting first-year…

  4. An Analysis of the Effect of Quantitative and Qualitative Admissions Factors in Determining Student Performance at the U.S. Naval Academy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phillips, Barton

    2004-01-01

    .... The Candidate Multiple (CM) is the quantitative input to the admissions process derived from a statistics-based scoring model anchored in proven high school performance measures such as the SAT and high school GPA...

  5. Smoke-free legislation reduces hospital admissions for childhood lower respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So Lun; Wong, Wilfred Hing Sang; Lau, Yu Lung

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies showed reduction of hospital admissions for asthma after implementation of comprehensive smoke-free legislation. We aimed to evaluate the impact of comprehensive smoke-free legislation implemented in Hong Kong in 2007 on hospital admissions for childhood lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). We obtained data on 75 870 hospital admissions for LRTI among children ≤18 years of age between January 2004 and December 2012 from all Hospital Authority hospitals. Using a negative binomial regression model, we assessed the impact of smoke-free legislation on admission counts. After legislation implementation, there was an immediate effect with a change in the admission count of -33.5% (95% CI -36.4% to -30.5%), and a change in time trend to -13.9% per year (95% CI -16.0% to -11.7%). Overall, the legislation was associated with a net 47.4% reduction in admission counts in the first year. We estimated that the legislation was associated with a reduction of 13 635 admissions in the first 6 years after implementation. The immediate reduction and change in time trend was more apparent among school-age than preschool children. Implementation of comprehensive smoke-free legislation was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for childhood LRTI. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Improving patient care with shorter hospital admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, K J; Tewari, R; Nordin, A J

    2009-08-01

    Prolonged hospital admissions frequently overshadow the experience of gynaecological cancer patients. In East Kent, we identified obstacles in the inpatient journey through the hospital by performing a patient pathway mapping audit of admissions in May/June 2006 and 2007. We achieved substantial reductions in the length of stay for major gynaecological oncology surgery. The number of the lead consultant's patients with a total duration of admission of no more than 5 days increased from one of 28 in Q1 2006 (3.6%), to 17 of 28 (60.7%) in Q4 2007. Identified problems prolonging the length of stay included admission the day before surgery, prolonged use of i.v. antibiotics and late referrals to social services. Early discharge planning involving staff and patients as active participants has the greatest impact on reduction of duration of hospital admission. A reduction in duration of hospital admissions is associated with an increase in the rate of readmissions.

  7. What should we be selecting for? A systematic approach for determining which personal characteristics to assess for during admissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conlon Peter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Admission committees are responsible for creating fair, defensible, reliable, and valid processes that assess those attributes considered important for professional success. There is evidence for the continuing use of academic ability as a selection criterion for health professional schools; however, there is little evidence for the reliability and validity of measures currently in place to assess personal characteristics. The Ontario Veterinary College (OVC initiated a review of its admissions criteria in order to implement an evidence-based method to determine which characteristics veterinary stakeholders consider important to assess for admission. Methods Eleven characteristics were identified by the OVC Admissions Committee and a survey was sent to all licensed veterinarians in Ontario (n=4,068, OVC students (n=450, and OVC faculty, interns and residents (n=192. A paired comparison method was used to identify the relative rank order of the characteristics, and multivariate analysis of variance with post hoc analyses was used to determine between group differences in the returned survey data. Results Surveys were returned from 1,312 participants (27.86% response rate; female 59.70%. The relative rank of the characteristics was reasonably consistent among participant groups, with ethical behaviour, sound judgment, communication, and critical and creative thinking being ranked as the top four. However, the importance of certain characteristics like communication and empathy were perceived differently by groups. For instance, females scored communication (F(1, 1289 = 20.24, p d = .26 and empathy (F(1, 1289 = 55.41, p d = 0.42 significantly higher than males, while males scored knowledge of profession (F(1, 1289 = 12.81, p d = 0.20, leadership (F(1, 1289 = 10.28, p = .001, d = 0.18, and sound judgment (F(1, 1289 = 13.56, p d = 0.21 significantly higher than females. Conclusions The data from the paired comparison method

  8. EAMJ Nov. Admission.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-11

    Nov 11, 2008 ... Kenya, Academic Model for Prevention and Treatment of HIV, Eldoret, Kenya, Indiana University School of Medicine, .... results, progress notes and laboratory and radiological ... depression, dementia, paraparesis/plegia,.

  9. Graduate admissions in clinical neuropsychology: the importance of undergraduate training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazsia, Bryan T; Stavnezer, Amy Jo; Reeves, Jonathan W

    2013-11-01

    Discussions of and recommendations for the training of clinical neuropsychologists exist at the doctoral, internship, and post-doctoral level. With few exceptions, the literature on undergraduate preparations in clinical neuropsychology is sparse and lacks empirical evidence. In the present study, graduate-level faculty and current trainees completed surveys about graduate school preparations. Faculty expectations of minimum and ideal undergraduate training were highest for research methods, statistics, and assessment. Preferences for "goodness of fit" also emerged as important admissions factors. These results offer evidence for desirable undergraduate preparations for advanced study in clinical neuropsychology. Although undergraduate training in psychology is intentionally broad, results from this study suggest that students who desire advanced study in clinical neuropsychology need to tailor their experiences to be competitive in the application process. The findings have implications for prospective graduate students, faculty who train and mentor undergraduates, and faculty who serve on admissions committees.

  10. [Comprehensive Assessment of Psychiatric Residents: An Addition to the Program Admission Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, E Jaramillo G; Elena, Martín C

    2012-01-01

    The training of medical specialists is a long and complex process. Its purpose is to guarantee the society that they are the right professionals to meet the health needs of the population. The first step to ensure this objective is the admission process. In psychiatry this process, monitoring resident students and the criteria for each one are different in each country. Admission in Colombia is a heterogeneous process, not standardized, which varies greatly from one university to another, even between private and public universities. At the National University of Colombia, the admissions process is handled by the Admissions Office and includes: a written test for which you must obtain a minimum score, a resume rating and an interview. The Teaching Committee and the Department of Psychiatry considered the admission procedure in general to be good, but in need of refinement. Due to the experience of some teachers and given the current rules, a "comprehensive assessment" for master and doctoral students was required and in 1996 it was decided that this method of assessment for admission to a specialization in Psychiatry would serve to complement the admission process. The article describes the experience of the process and its outcomes, strengths and weaknesses. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting early academic success: HESI Admissions Assessment Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, Parry J; Willson, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Student retention is a major challenge for undergraduate nursing programs, with the highest attrition occurring in the first year of the nursing curriculum. Admission criteria have been studied extensively but usually as related to end-of-program outcomes such as National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses success. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between HESI Admission Assessment (A(2)) scores and academic performance in the 2 first-semester nursing courses of an associate degree program, Nursing-1 and Nursing-2. Findings indicated that the composite A(2) scores were strongly correlated with both Nursing-1 and Nursing-2 final course grades. Of the scores on the 4 component A(2) exams completed by the sample students (basic math skills, reading comprehension, vocabulary/general knowledge, and grammar), vocabulary/general knowledge scores had the strongest relationship to final course grades in both nursing courses. The authors concluded that A(2) scores facilitated evidence-based admission decisions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Profiles of Children with down Syndrome Who Meet Screening Criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): A Comparison with Children Diagnosed with ASD Attending Specialist Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, G.; Howlin, P.; Salomone, E.; Moss, J.; Charman, T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent research suggests that around 16% to 18% of children with Down syndrome (DS) also meet diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, there are indications that profiles of autism symptoms in this group may vary from those typically described in children with ASD. Method: Rates of autism symptoms and emotional…

  13. Implementing a nationwide criteria-based emergency medical dispatch system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel S; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Sørensen, Jan Nørtved

    2013-01-01

    A criteria-based nationwide Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) system was recently implemented in Denmark. We described the system and studied its ability to triage patients according to the severity of their condition by analysing hospital admission and case-fatality risks.......A criteria-based nationwide Emergency Medical Dispatch (EMD) system was recently implemented in Denmark. We described the system and studied its ability to triage patients according to the severity of their condition by analysing hospital admission and case-fatality risks....

  14. Decline in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives. The purpose of this report is to describe the changing trends in adolescent treatment admissions for methamphetamine in Cape Town, and to discuss possible implications. Method. Data were collected on admissions for drug abuse treatment through a regular monitoring system involving drug ...

  15. Profile in Action: Linking Admission and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    A profile-oriented retention strategy embraces the admission process as a powerful lever in improving retention and completion rates and recognizes that the student profile can be shaped by changes in admission policies or priorities--even within the current market position of the institution. In addition, the student body can be oriented toward…

  16. Children's Hospital Admissions and Mother's Menstruation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Katharina

    1970-01-01

    Of 100 children's emergency admissions to hospital nearly half (49%) were admitted during the mother's paramenstruum. There was a statistically significant association between the mother's menstruation and the child's admission both for accidents and for illnesses. The eldest child in the family appeared to be most affected. PMID:5440570

  17. 46 CFR 502.156 - Evidence admissible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evidence admissible. 502.156 Section 502.156 Shipping...; Presiding Officers; Evidence § 502.156 Evidence admissible. In any proceeding under the rules in this part, all evidence which is relevant, material, reliable and probative, and not unduly repetitious or...

  18. 17 CFR 201.320 - Evidence: Admissibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence: Admissibility. 201... PRACTICE Rules of Practice Rules Regarding Hearings § 201.320 Evidence: Admissibility. The Commission or the hearing officer may receive relevant evidence and shall exclude all evidence that is irrelevant...

  19. 46 CFR 201.136 - Evidence admissible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evidence admissible. 201.136 Section 201.136 Shipping... PROCEDURE Evidence (Rule 14) § 201.136 Evidence admissible. In any proceeding under the regulations in this part all evidence which is relevant, material, reliable and probative, and not unduly repetitious or...

  20. 38 CFR 17.365 - Admission priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission priorities. 17.365 Section 17.365 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.365 Admission priorities. Appropriate provisions of § 17...

  1. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-04

    Dec 4, 2015 ... therefore assessed the perception and attitude of Nigerian doctors working in the ICU about inappropriate admissions and request for ... In addition, each of the 4 possible actions in the setting of a full ICU was graded from 0 ... Key words: Intensive care, patient admission, perception, resource allocation.

  2. Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inappropriate involuntary admissions to psychiatric hospitals. P L van der Merwe, A Allan, M M Allan. Abstract. Background. In order to preserve scarce resources, treabnent in tertiary psychiatric hospitals should be restricted to those whose treatment needs make admission to such hospitals essential. However, anecdotal ...

  3. 22 CFR 146.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion for admission, or in making any offer of... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admission. 146.300 Section 146.300 Foreign... relating to marital or parental status. In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion...

  4. 22 CFR 229.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion for admission, or in making any... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admission. 229.300 Section 229.300 Foreign... relating to marital or parental status. In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion...

  5. 15 CFR 8a.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... prohibitions. (1) In determining whether a person satisfies any policy or criterion for admission, or in making... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 8a.300 Section 8a.300 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN...

  6. Mudanças nas concepções do professor do ensino fundamental em relação à inclusão após a entrada de alunos com deficiência em sua classe Changes in elementary school teachers' conceptions regarding inclusion after the admission of disabled students in their classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Húngaro Monteiro

    2008-04-01

    the school term after the admission of disabled students in the classroom? Thus, this study aimed to identify the existence of changes in regular education teachers' conceptions in relation to inclusion. Five regular school teachers who had at least one disabled student in the classroom, in three schools in the interior of the state of São Paulo, participated in the study. The data were collected throughout one school year using three procedures: non-structured interviews; follow-up information collected every two months in a content notebook and semi-structured interviews, at the end of the year. The data were treated by the enunciation analysis technique. From this analysis, classes and subclasses were established and evaluated by judges to verify the analysis' conformity. The results showed changes in conceptions in the subclasses: expectation regarding the disabled student's inclusion in regular school, experience regarding inclusion, student's profile to be registered in the regular school; learning pace of the disabled student in the regular classroom, learning assessment of the disabled student, difficulties in dealing with diversity, difficulty in dealing with discipline/behavior of the disabled student and difficulty in teaching the disabled student. It was concluded that the admission of disabled students in the regular school in itself did not guarantee changes in the teachers' conceptions.

  7. Exploring and explaining involuntary care: The relationship between psychiatric admission status, gender and other demographic and clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Aoife; Agada, Emmanuel; Emechebe, Afam; Anamdi, Chike; Ng, Xiao Ting; Duffy, Richard; Kelly, Brendan D

    2016-01-01

    Involuntary admission and treatment are features of psychiatric care in many countries, but the relationship between involuntary status and gender (among other factors) is not clear. We examined demographic and diagnostic factors associated with involuntary admission in a general adult psychiatry service in a deprived area of Dublin's north inner-city over a 7-year period (2008 to 2014 inclusive). Over this period, there were 1099 admissions, yielding an annual admission rate of 504.8 admissions per 100,000 population per year. When adjusted for deprivation, this rate (387.7) was lower than the national rate (413.9). Consistent with other inner-city areas in Dublin, 14.1% of admissions were involuntary, yielding an involuntary admission rate of 71.2 per 100,000 population per year (deprivation-adjusted rate: 54.8), which is higher than the national rate (39.4). After controlling for age, occupation, marital status and diagnosis, the only independent predictors of admission status were place of origin (pnational differences are likely related to differing legal traditions and different criteria for involuntary admission, possibly related to varying emphases placed on "dangerousness" as a mandatory criterion for involuntary hospitalization. This merits further, cross-national study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Motor vehicle intrusion alone does not predict trauma center admission or use of trauma center resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Derek; Cone, David C; Vaca, Federico E

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published its Guidelines for Field Triage of Injured Patients in 2009. These CDC guidelines define criteria for the triage of trauma patients to trauma centers, and include physiologic, anatomic, and high-risk mechanism-of-injury criteria. One of the mechanism criteria used for motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) is intrusion >12 inches at the occupant site or >18 inches at any site. Objective. We hypothesized that motor vehicle intrusion, as the sole criterion for transport to a trauma center, is neither sensitive nor specific for predicting which patients will utilize trauma center resources. This was a retrospective, observational study of a cohort of MVC victims transported to a single trauma center. The authors extracted MVC characteristics, patient demographics, and final diagnoses from emergency medical services (EMS) and emergency department (ED) charts. Two outcomes were examined: admission to the trauma center for a traumatic injury and use of trauma center resources, defined as in-hospital death, admission to an intensive care unit, operative intervention of any type, spinal injury, or intracranial hemorrhage. During the 18-month study period, 608 patients met the inclusion criteria in our study; 36 patients met the trauma center triage criteria based solely on intrusion. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of intrusion were 38.9%, 92.8%, and 25.5%, respectively, for trauma center admission, and 58.3%, 91.9%, and 12.7%, respectively, for trauma center resource utilization. We conducted one post hoc adjustment to modify intrusion to entrapment. This change greatly increased the PPV of the CDC guidelines for both trauma center admissions and trauma center utilization, without any reduction in sensitivity. Motor vehicle intrusion alone is a poor predictor of the need for trauma center admission or trauma center resource utilization. A modest change to the CDC guidelines from

  9. The Predictive Validity of using Admissions Testing and Multiple Mini-interviews in Undergraduate University Admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makransky, Guido; Havmose, Philip S.; Vang, Maria

    2017-01-01

    year of study, compared to the grade-based admissions procedure. Finally, students admitted through the MMI and the admissions test scored significantly higher on academic learning self-efficacy and critical thinking compared to students selected by grades. The implications for higher education......The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of a two-step admissions procedure that included a cognitive ability test followed by multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) used to assess non-cognitive skills, compared to grade-based admissions relative to subsequent drop-out rates......-significant lower drop-out rates after the second year of study for the admission procedure that included the assessment of non-cognitive skills though the MMI and the admissions test. Furthermore, this admission procedure resulted in a significant lower risk of failing the final exam after the first and second...

  10. Length of stay of COPD hospital admissions between 2006 and 2010: a retrospective longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harries TH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Timothy H Harries,1 Hannah V Thornton,2 Siobhan Crichton,1 Peter Schofield,1 Alexander Gilkes,1 Patrick T White1 1King’s College London, King’s Health Partners, Division of Health and Social Care Research, London, UK; 2University of Bristol, Centre for Academic Primary Care, NIHR School for Primary Care Research, School of Social and Community Medicine, Canynge Hall, Bristol, UK Background: Hospitalizations for COPD are associated with poor patient prognosis. Length of stay (LOS of COPD admissions in a large urban area and patient and hospital factors associated with it are described. Methods: Retrospective longitudinal study. All COPD patients registered with London general practitioners and admitted as an emergency with COPD (2006–2010, not having been admitted with COPD in the preceding 12 months were included. Association of patient and hospital characteristics with mean LOS of COPD admissions was assessed. Association between hospital and LOS was determined by negative binomial regression. Results: The total number of admissions was 38,504, from 22,462 patients. The mean LOS for first admissions fell by 0.8 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.7–1.5 from 8.2 to 7.0 days between 2006 and 2010. Seventy-nine percent of first admissions were ≤10 days, with a mean LOS of 3.7 days (2009–2010. The mean LOS of successive COPD admissions of the same patients was the same or less throughout the study period. The interval between successive admissions fell from a mean of 357 days between the first and second admission to a mean of 19 days after eight admissions. Age accounted for 2.3% of the variance in LOS. Socioeconomic deprivation did not predict LOS. Fewer discharges happened at the weekend (1,893/day than on weekdays (5,218/day. The mean LOS varied between hospitals, from 4.9 days (95% CI: 3.8–5.9 to 9.5 days (95% CI: 8.6–10.3 when adjusting for clustering, age, sex, and socioeconomic deprivation.Conclusion: The fall in LOS of

  11. The Medical School Retention Game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout.1 Recently Urlings-Strop et al. found the relative risk of dropout to be 2.6 times lower for ‘selected students’ than for ‘lottery admitted controls’.2 The main aim of our study was to evaluate...... the predictive validity of admission testing versus grade-based admission on dropout. METHOD This prospective cohort study followed 6 cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at University of Southern Denmark (USD) in 2002-2007 (N=1544). Half the students were admitted based on highest prior....... The outcome of interest was students’ dropout status 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. RESULTS Quota 2 (admission tested) students had a lower relative risk of dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission compared to quota 1 students...

  12. The Recruitment Organization of the Business Schools in Italian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnitskiy Maksim V.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at studying the practice of Italian universities in the sphere of organizing recruitment at business schools. The article considers specifics of Italian business schools, which consist of their wide division by specialization and of flexible approaches to attracting students. The basic criteria for admission and training in Italian business schools have been generalized. Recommendations for Ukraine have been elaborated in view of the following needs: involving in the teaching process the practitioners, known in the world for their efficiency in the business sphere; balancing the price for providing educational services, developing flexible payment schedules, and setting up a discount system as well as scholarship programs for students with high learning results; revising curricula in line with the requirements of modern business environment; providing employment and career statistics for business school graduates; systematically improving the quality of education and concentrating on the efficiency indicators of a program for students, etc.

  13. A multicentre prospective evaluation of alcohol-related admissions to intensive care units in Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Ceri; Pugh, Richard; Battle, Ceri

    2017-08-01

    We conducted a prospective multicentre study in 13 Welsh intensive care units to assess what proportion of intensive care admissions relate to alcohol, and how outcomes among these patients compare with non-alcohol related admissions. Data were prospectively collected for one month between June and July 2015. Every intensive care admission was screened for alcohol associations based on ICD-10 criteria, using a pre-designed pro-forma. Follow-up data were collected at 60 days using a pre-existing database (WardWatcher; Critical Care Audit Ltd, England). Outcomes included: lengths of mechanical ventilation, intensive care units and hospital stay; intensive care units and hospital mortality. Alcohol contributed directly to 10% of all ICU admissions and to 11% of unplanned admissions. These patients were younger (52 vs. 66, p = 0.0011), more likely to be male (68% vs. 52%, p = 0.014) and had more prolonged ventilation (p = 0.019) There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to length of stay or mortality. Alcohol contributes to a significant proportion of ICU admissions in Wales, a Western European country with a relatively low number of ICU beds per capita. Strategies to address this impact should be explored.

  14. What is the evidence for the management of patients along the pathway from the emergency department to acute admission to reduce unplanned attendance and admission? An evidence synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credé, Sarah H; O'Keeffe, Colin; Mason, Suzanne; Sutton, Anthea; Howe, Emma; Croft, Susan J; Whiteside, Mike

    2017-05-16

    Globally, the rate of emergency hospital admissions is increasing. However, little evidence exists to inform the development of interventions to reduce unplanned Emergency Department (ED) attendances and hospital admissions. The objective of this evidence synthesis was to review the evidence for interventions, conducted during the patient's journey through the ED or acute care setting, to manage people with an exacerbation of a medical condition to reduce unplanned emergency hospital attendance and admissions. A rapid evidence synthesis, using a systematic literature search, was undertaken in the electronic data bases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science, for the years 2000-2014. Evidence included in this review was restricted to Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) and observational studies (with a control arm) reported in peer-reviewed journals. Studies evaluating interventions for patients with an acute exacerbation of a medical condition in the ED or acute care setting which reported at least one outcome related to ED attendance or unplanned admission were included. Thirty papers met our inclusion criteria: 19 intervention studies (14 RCTs) and 11 controlled observational studies. Sixteen studies were set in the ED and 14 were conducted in an acute setting. Two studies (one RCT), set in the ED were effective in reducing ED attendance and hospital admission. Both of these interventions were initiated in the ED and included a post-discharge community component. Paradoxically 3 ED initiated interventions showed an increase in ED re-attendance. Six studies (1 RCT) set in acute care settings were effective in reducing: hospital admission, ED re-attendance or re-admission (two in an observation ward, one in an ED assessment unit and three in which the intervention was conducted within 72 h of admission). There is no clear evidence that specific interventions along the patient journey from ED arrival to 72 h after admission benefit ED

  15. Evaluating Dependence Criteria for Caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Striley, Catherine L.W.; Griffiths, Roland R.; Cottler, Linda B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Although caffeine is the most widely used mood-altering drug in the world, few studies have operationalized and characterized Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV) substance dependence criteria applied to caffeine. Methods: As a part of a nosological study of substance use disorders funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, we assessed caffeine use and dependence symptoms among high school and college students, drug treatment patients, and pain clinic patients who re...

  16. Call Admission Control in Mobile Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sanchita

    2013-01-01

    Call Admission Control (CAC) and Dynamic Channel Assignments (DCA) are important decision-making problems in mobile cellular communication systems. Current research in mobile communication considers them as two independent problems, although the former greatly depends on the resulting free channels obtained as the outcome of the latter. This book provides a solution to the CAC problem, considering DCA as an integral part of decision-making for call admission. Further, current technical resources ignore movement issues of mobile stations and fluctuation in network load (incoming calls) in the control strategy used for call admission. In addition, the present techniques on call admission offers solution globally for the entire network, instead of considering the cells independently.      CAC here has been formulated by two alternative approaches. The first approach aimed at handling the uncertainty in the CAC problem by employing fuzzy comparators.  The second approach is concerned with formulation of CAC ...

  17. Marketing in Admissions: The Information System Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, O. Douglas; Timmerman, Ed

    1982-01-01

    A marketing information system approach for college admissions is outlined that includes objectives, information needs and sources, a data collection format, and information evaluation. Coordination with other institutional information systems is recommended. (MSE)

  18. IISc Undergraduate Programme: Admissions for 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 2. IISc Undergraduate Programme: Admissions for 2013. Information and Announcements Volume 18 Issue 2 February 2013 pp 200-200. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Drug related hospital admissions. Results from an intervention program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, J.; Harvald, B.; Worm, J.

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, drug education, hospital admission, adverse drug reactions, drug utilisation, intervention......Farmakologi, drug education, hospital admission, adverse drug reactions, drug utilisation, intervention...

  20. The Validity of the Graduate Management Admissions Test for Non-U.S. Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koys, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the author examined the validity of the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) for non-U.S. students (N = 75) through a predictive validation procedure in which applicants were given the predictor test but the test results were not used to admit students. The author's business school admitted students to three overseas MBA…

  1. Supply and Demand in the Higher Education Market: College Admission and College Choice. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Michael; Kumar, Amal

    2015-01-01

    The nation's most selective colleges are often the centerpiece of the discussion surrounding college choice, and trends in college selectivity are relayed through stories of plunging admission rates at a few high-profile postsecondary institutions and anecdotes of model high school students unable to secure seats at these colleges. Such stories…

  2. To what extent does the Health Professions Admission Test-Ireland predict performance in early undergraduate tests of communication and clinical skills? An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Maureen E; Regan, Daniel; Dunne, Fidelma; Henn, Patrick; Newell, John; O'Flynn, Siun

    2013-05-10

    Internationally, tests of general mental ability are used in the selection of medical students. Examples include the Medical College Admission Test, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test. The most widely used measure of their efficacy is predictive validity.A new tool, the Health Professions Admission Test- Ireland (HPAT-Ireland), was introduced in 2009. Traditionally, selection to Irish undergraduate medical schools relied on academic achievement. Since 2009, Irish and EU applicants are selected on a combination of their secondary school academic record (measured predominately by the Leaving Certificate Examination) and HPAT-Ireland score. This is the first study to report on the predictive validity of the HPAT-Ireland for early undergraduate assessments of communication and clinical skills. Students enrolled at two Irish medical schools in 2009 were followed up for two years. Data collected were gender, HPAT-Ireland total and subsection scores; Leaving Certificate Examination plus HPAT-Ireland combined score, Year 1 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores (Total score, communication and clinical subtest scores), Year 1 Multiple Choice Questions and Year 2 OSCE and subset scores. We report descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and Multiple linear regression models. Data were available for 312 students. In Year 1 none of the selection criteria were significantly related to student OSCE performance. The Leaving Certificate Examination and Leaving Certificate plus HPAT-Ireland combined scores correlated with MCQ marks.In Year 2 a series of significant correlations emerged between the HPAT-Ireland and subsections thereof with OSCE Communication Z-scores; OSCE Clinical Z-scores; and Total OSCE Z-scores. However on multiple regression only the relationship between Total OSCE Score and the Total HPAT-Ireland score remained significant; albeit the predictive power was modest. We found

  3. To what extent does the Health Professions Admission Test-Ireland predict performance in early undergraduate tests of communication and clinical skills? – An observational cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Internationally, tests of general mental ability are used in the selection of medical students. Examples include the Medical College Admission Test, Undergraduate Medicine and Health Sciences Admission Test and the UK Clinical Aptitude Test. The most widely used measure of their efficacy is predictive validity. A new tool, the Health Professions Admission Test- Ireland (HPAT-Ireland), was introduced in 2009. Traditionally, selection to Irish undergraduate medical schools relied on academic achievement. Since 2009, Irish and EU applicants are selected on a combination of their secondary school academic record (measured predominately by the Leaving Certificate Examination) and HPAT-Ireland score. This is the first study to report on the predictive validity of the HPAT-Ireland for early undergraduate assessments of communication and clinical skills. Method Students enrolled at two Irish medical schools in 2009 were followed up for two years. Data collected were gender, HPAT-Ireland total and subsection scores; Leaving Certificate Examination plus HPAT-Ireland combined score, Year 1 Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) scores (Total score, communication and clinical subtest scores), Year 1 Multiple Choice Questions and Year 2 OSCE and subset scores. We report descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation coefficients and Multiple linear regression models. Results Data were available for 312 students. In Year 1 none of the selection criteria were significantly related to student OSCE performance. The Leaving Certificate Examination and Leaving Certificate plus HPAT-Ireland combined scores correlated with MCQ marks. In Year 2 a series of significant correlations emerged between the HPAT-Ireland and subsections thereof with OSCE Communication Z-scores; OSCE Clinical Z-scores; and Total OSCE Z-scores. However on multiple regression only the relationship between Total OSCE Score and the Total HPAT-Ireland score remained significant; albeit the

  4. A school-based study with Rome III criteria on the prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders in Chinese college and university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan-Yan; Chen, Fei-Xue; Yu, Yan-Bo; Du, Chao; Qi, Qing-Qing; Liu, Han; Li, Yan-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders, including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation are very common worldwide. This research aims to estimate the prevalence and associated factors involved in functional gastrointestinal disorders in Chinese college and university students using the Rome III criteria. A total of 5000 students from Shandong University in China were asked in January-May 2012 to complete questionnaires, including the Rome III questionnaire, hospital anxiety and depression scale, and negative life events scale. Based on the 4638 students who completed the questionnaire, the prevalence of functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation in college and university students of North China worked out to be 9.25%, 8.34% and 5.45% respectively. They were more frequent in female students. The factors of anxiety (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.16, P=0.002college and university students of North China. Psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression provide significant risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome patients.

  5. A school-based study with Rome III criteria on the prevalence of functional gastrointestinal disorders in Chinese college and university students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Yan Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional gastrointestinal disorders, including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation are very common worldwide. OBJECTIVE: This research aims to estimate the prevalence and associated factors involved in functional gastrointestinal disorders in Chinese college and university students using the Rome III criteria. METHODS: A total of 5000 students from Shandong University in China were asked in January-May 2012 to complete questionnaires, including the Rome III questionnaire, hospital anxiety and depression scale, and negative life events scale. RESULTS: Based on the 4638 students who completed the questionnaire, the prevalence of functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation in college and university students of North China worked out to be 9.25%, 8.34% and 5.45% respectively. They were more frequent in female students. The factors of anxiety (OR 1.07; 95% CI 0.99 to 1.16, P=0.002<0.05 and depression (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.15 to 1.05, P=0.045<0.05 indicated a high risk of causing irritable bowel syndrome. CONCLUSION: Functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation were common in college and university students of North China. Psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression provide significant risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome patients.

  6. How Admission Policy Shapes College Access: Evidence from Two Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentsch, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation illustrates how admission policies shape access to postsecondary education. Evidence comes from two sectors, each with a distinct type of admission system: highly selective institutions that practice holistic admission (chapters 2 and 3) and less selective public four-year colleges that use admission thresholds (chapter 4). The…

  7. 45 CFR 84.42 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 84.42 Section 84.42... Education § 84.42 Admissions and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped persons may not, on the basis of handicap, be denied admission or be subjected to discrimination in admission or recruitment by...

  8. 45 CFR 605.42 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 605.42 Section 605.42... Postsecondary Education § 605.42 Admissions and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped persons may not... recruitment by a recipient to which this subpart applies. (b) Admissions. In administering its admission...

  9. 15 CFR 8b.20 - Admission and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission and recruitment. 8b.20... Secondary Education § 8b.20 Admission and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped may not, on the basis of handicap, be denied admission or be subjected to discrimination in admission or recruitment by...

  10. 22 CFR 217.42 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 217.42 Section 217... Admissions and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped persons may not, on the basis of handicap, be denied admission or be subjected to discrimination in admission or recruitment by a recipient to which...

  11. 34 CFR 104.42 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 104.42 Section 104.42... ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 104.42 Admissions and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped... admission or recruitment by a recipient to which this subpart applies. (b) Admissions. In administering its...

  12. Seasonal and recurrent intensive care unit admissions for acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In some seasonally admitted patients, non-season- al admission occurred before, between or after seasonal admissions; these admissions were not included in the analysis of seasonal admissions_ Patients admitted to the ICD with acute severe asthma more than once, but in an apparently random, non-seasonal manner, ...

  13. Hospital Admission Patterns in Children with CAH: Admission Rates and Adrenal Crises Decline with Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Louise Rushworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine patterns of hospitalisation for acute medical conditions in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH. Design. A retrospective study of hospitalisation using administrative data. Setting. All hospitals in NSW, Australia. Patients. All patients admitted with CAH and a random sample of admissions in patients aged 0 to 18 years without adrenal insufficiency (AI. Main Outcome Measures. Admissions and comorbidities by age and sex. Results. Of 573 admissions for medical problems in CAH children, 286 (49.9% were in males, and 236 (41.2% had a principal diagnosis of CAH or had an adrenal crisis (AC. 37 (6.5% ACs were recorded. An infection was found in 43.5% (n=249 of the CAH patient admissions and 51.7% (n=1613 of the non-AI group, p<0.001. Children aged up to one year had the highest number of admissions (n=149 and six ACs (four in males. There were 21 ACs recorded for children aged 1–5 years. Older CAH children had fewer admissions and fewer ACs. No in-hospital deaths were recorded. Conclusions. Admission for medical problems in CAH children declines with age. An AC was recorded in 6.5% of the admissions, with the majority of ACs occurring in the 1 to 5 years age group and there were no deaths.

  14. The Predictive Validity of Using Admissions Testing and Multiple Mini-Interviews in Undergraduate University Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makransky, Guido; Havmose, Philip; Vang, Maria Louison; Andersen, Tonny Elmose; Nielsen, Tine

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of a two-step admissions procedure that included a cognitive ability test followed by multiple mini-interviews (MMIs) used to assess non-cognitive skills, compared to grade-based admissions relative to subsequent drop-out rates and academic achievement after one and two years of study.…

  15. Admission to women's crisis houses or to psychiatric wards: women's pathways to admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Louise M; Rigon, Elena; Cole, Laura; Lawlor, Caroline; Johnson, Sonia

    2008-12-01

    This study compared the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics and pathways to admission for women admitted to women's crisis houses and to psychiatric hospitals. A women's crisis house is a residential mental health crisis facility for women who would otherwise be considered for voluntary hospital admission. A survey of all 388 female admissions to women's crisis houses and psychiatric hospitals in four boroughs of London during a 12-week period in 2006 was conducted with questionnaires administered to key workers involved in the admissions. Pathways to admission were significantly less complex for women admitted to the crisis houses (fewer preadmission contacts with police, emergency departments, and other services). Women admitted to psychiatric wards were more likely to require supervision or observation. A multivariate analysis of data for the 245 voluntary admissions indicated that women admitted to women's crisis houses were significantly less likely to have a care coordinator (odds ratio [OR]=.528) or to have gone to an accident and emergency department (OR=.214) before admission. No other differences were found between the two groups. Pathways to admission were somewhat different for women admitted to women's crisis houses, but few clinical or sociodemographic differences were found between the two groups. Women's crisis houses may be a viable alternative to traditional wards for voluntary patients not needing intensive supervision and observation. Research should examine whether women's crisis houses are as effective as traditional inpatient services in treating women with acute psychiatric problems.

  16. Causes of Hospital Admissions in Domus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov Benthien, Kirstine; Nordly, Mie; von Heymann-Horan, Annika

    2018-01-01

    CONTEXT: Avoidable hospital admissions are important negative indicators of quality of end-of-life care. Specialized palliative care (SPC) may support patients remaining at home. OBJECTIVES: Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate if SPC at home could prevent hospital admissions...... in patients with incurable cancer. METHODS: These are secondary results of Domus: a randomized controlled trial of accelerated transition to SPC with psychological intervention at home (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01885637). Participants were patients with incurable cancer and limited antineoplastic treatment...... options and their caregivers. They were included from the Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, between 2013 and 2016. The control group received usual care. Outcomes were hospital admissions, causes thereof, and patient and caregiver perceptions of place of care (home, hospital, etc...

  17. The therapeutic relationship after psychiatric admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2014-03-01

    The therapeutic relationship is one of the most central and important factors in the treatment of mental health disorders. A better therapeutic relationship is associated with service engagement, medication adherence, and satisfaction with services. This study aimed to compare the demographic and clinical factors associated with the therapeutic relationship in voluntarily and involuntarily admitted psychiatric service users. We found that individuals who had been admitted involuntarily, who had a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, and who reported higher levels of perceived pressures on admission were more likely to have a poorer therapeutic relationship with their consultant psychiatrist. Greater levels of insight and treatment satisfaction, together with higher levels of procedural justice experienced on admission, were associated with a better therapeutic relationship. We found that the level of perceived coercion on admission was not related to the therapeutic relationship. Targeted interventions to improve the therapeutic relationship, particularly for involuntarily admitted service users, are discussed.

  18. Increased admissions for diabetes mellitus after burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Janine M; Randall, Sean M; Fear, Mark W; Boyd, James H; O'Halloran, Emily; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M

    2016-12-01

    Currently, limited long-term data on hyperglycaemia and insulin sensitivity in burn patients are available and the data that do exist are primarily related to paediatric severe burns. The aim of this study was to assess if burn is associated with increased post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus. A population-based longitudinal study using linked hospital morbidity and death data from Western Australia was undertaken of all persons hospitalized for a first burn (n=30,997) in 1980-2012 and a frequency matched non-injury comparison cohort, randomly selected from Western Australia's birth registrations and electoral roll (n=123,399). Crude admission rates and summed length of stay for diabetes mellitus were calculated. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling were used to generate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and hazard ratios (HR), respectively. After adjustment for socio-demographic factors and pre-existing health status, the burn cohort had 2.21 times (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.36-1.56) as many admissions and almost three times the number of days in hospital with a diabetes mellitus diagnosis (IRR, 95% CI: 2.94, 2.12-4.09) than the uninjured cohort. Admission rates were significantly elevated for those burned during childhood (diabetes mellitus in the burn cohort provide evidence that burns have longer term effects on blood glucose and insulin regulation after wound healing. The first five years after burn discharge appears to be a critical period with significantly elevated incident admissions for diabetes mellitus during this time. Results would suggest prolonged clinical management after discharge and or wound healing to minimise post-burn admissions for diabetes mellitus is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. Advanced Disease, Diuretic Use, and Marital Status Predict Hospital Admissions in an Ambulatory Cirrhosis Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kara B.; Campbell, Emily J.; Chi, Heng; Zheng, Hui; King, Lindsay Y.; Wu, Ying; DeLemos, Andrew; Hurairah, Abu; Corey, Kathleen; Richter, James M.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Hospital admissions in cirrhotic patients are a source of significant health care expenditure. Most studies to date have focused on readmissions in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. We sought to describe predictors of hospital admissions in an ambulatory cirrhosis cohort consisting of both compensated and decompensated patients to identify patients who could benefit from intensified outpatient chronic disease management. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 395 cirrhotic patients followed at an academic medical center liver clinic. Inclusion criteria were documented cirrhosis and longitudinal care at our center during 2006–2008. Patients were followed until December 2011, death, or liver transplantation. The primary outcomes were non-elective cirrhosis-related hospital admissions within one year and time to admission. The secondary outcome was two-year cirrhosis-related mortality. The study was approved by the Partners Human Research Committee (protocol 2012P001912). Results Seventy-eight patients (19.7%) had at least one cirrhosis-related hospital admission within one year. The following were significant predictors in the multivariable model: Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score ≥ 15 (OR 2.22, 95% CI [1.21–4.07], p=0.01), diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (3.64 [1.42–9.35], 0.007), diuretic use (2.27 [1.23–4.17], 0.008), at least one cirrhosis-related admission during the baseline year (2.17 [1.21–3.89], 0.01), and being unmarried (1.92 [1.10–3.35], 0.02). Conclusions Advanced disease, diuretic use, and marital status were associated with cirrhosis-related hospital admissions in patients followed at an academic medical center liver clinic. Our findings suggest that patients with inadequately or overzealously treated ascites, as well as those with limited social supports, could benefit from intensified outpatient management. PMID:23990035

  20. Necessity of admission to improve the hearing-recovery rate in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jae; Heo, Kyung Wook; Jeon, Pil Hyun; Lee, Jae Jun; Lee, Jun Ho

    2017-11-13

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic potential of admission of a patient for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). Retrospective clinical study. We conducted a retrospective study of 301 patients with ISSNHL. The patients were divided into a study (57 patients at out-patients department (OPD) based treatment, using systemic steroids and intra-tympanic (IT) steroid injection) and a control groups (301 patients at admission, using systemic steroids and IT steroid injection). We compared the success rate (15 dB cut off), Siegel's criteria and hearing gain decibels between two groups. The overall recovery rate of the OPD based treatment group (29.8%) was poor than that of the admission group (52.9%) (p = .002). The odd ratio of OPD based treatment factor was 2.035 when the OPD based treatment and poor prognostic factors were analyzed at logistic regression test (Duration of delayed treatment, 1.073; average hearing loss level, 0.972) (p = .041). Admission must be strongly recommended when the patients with ISSNHL asked about the necessity of admission. We hypothesized that resting, getting out of their social stress, and relief of anxiety might be helpful to their hearing recoveries.

  1. Dehydration is an independent predictor of discharge outcome and admission cost in acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C-H; Lin, S-C; Lin, J-R; Yang, J-T; Chang, Y-J; Chang, C-H; Chang, T-Y; Huang, K-L; Ryu, S-J; Lee, T-H

    2014-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the influence of admission dehydration on the discharge outcome in acute ischaemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Between January 2009 and December 2011, 4311 ischaemic and 1371 hemorrhagic stroke patients from the stroke registry of Chang Gung healthcare system were analyzed. The eligible patients were identified according to inclusion/exclusion criteria. In total, 2570 acute ischaemic and 573 acute hemorrhagic stroke patients were finally recruited. According to the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) to creatinine (Cr) ratio (BUN/Cr), these patients were divided into dehydrated (BUN/Cr ≥ 15) and non-dehydrated (BUN/Cr dehydration had higher infection rates (P = 0.006), worse discharge BI (62.8 ± 37.4 vs. 73.4 ± 32.4, P dehydration. However, acute hemorrhagic stroke with or without admission dehydration showd no difference in admission costs (P = 0.618) and discharge outcomes (BI, P = 0.058; mRS, P = 0.058). Admission dehydration is associated with worse discharge outcomes and higher admission costs in acute ischaemic stroke but not in hemorrhagic stroke. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  2. Admission Control Techniques for UMTS System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kejik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS is one of the 3rd generation (3G cell phone technologies. The capacity of UMTS is interference limited. Radio resources management (RRM functions are therefore used. They are responsible for supplying optimum coverage, ensuring efficient use of physical resources, and providing the maximum planned capacity. This paper deals with admission control techniques for UMTS. An own UMTS simulation program and several versions of proposed admission control algorithms are presented in this paper. These algorithms are based on fuzzy logic and genetic algorithms. The performance of algorithms is verified via simulations.

  3. The role of socioeconomic status in SAT-grade relationships and in college admissions decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Paul R; Kuncel, Nathan R; Beatty, Adam S; Rigdon, Jana L; Shen, Winny; Kiger, Thomas B

    2012-09-01

    This article examines the role of socioeconomic status (SES) in the relationships among college admissions-test scores, secondary school grades, and subsequent academic performance. Scores on the SAT (a test widely used in the admissions process in the United States), secondary school grades, college grades, and SES measures from 143,606 students at 110 colleges and universities were examined, and results of these analyses were compared with results obtained using a 41-school data set including scores from the prior version of the SAT and using University of California data from prior research on the role of SES. In all the data sets, the SAT showed incremental validity over secondary school grades in predicting subsequent academic performance, and this incremental relationship was not substantially affected by controlling for SES. The SES of enrolled students was very similar to that of specific schools' applicant pools, which suggests that the barrier to college for low-SES students in the United States is a lower rate of entering the college admissions process, rather than exclusion on the part of colleges.

  4. Pupil Selection Segments Urban Comprehensive Schooling in Finland: Composition of School Classes in Pupils' School Performance, Gender, and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Anna-Kaisa; Seppänen, Piia

    2017-01-01

    The Finnish comprehensive school system is regularly referred to as a uniform and "no-tracking". In this article, we show with novel urban case data in Finland that school performance differed significantly between schools, most strikingly between school classes, and was connected to the school's selectiveness in pupil admission. A…

  5. Predicting Academic Success Using Admission Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Soen, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted at a tertiary education institution in Israel, following two previous studies, was designed to deal again with a question that is a topic of debate in Israel and worldwide: Is there justification for the approach that considers restrictive university admission policies an efficient tool for predicting students' success at the…

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Hyperglycaemic emergency admissions to a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-18

    Sep 18, 2007 ... estimated at R4 630 (adjusted for inflation),13 while diabetic hyperglycaemic emergencies admitted to USA hospitals in. 2003 cost US$6 500 - 13 000 per patient.18,19 It could be argued that we have overestimated the cost of hyperglycaemic emergency admissions, since our patients were admitted to a.

  7. Seasonal variations in hospital admissions for mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medici, Clara Reece; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bipolar disorder is characterized by a seasonal pattern with emerging evidence that weather conditions may trigger symptoms. Thus, our aims were to investigate if year-to-year variations in admissions with mania correlated with year-to-year variations in key meteorological variables, ...

  8. 14 CFR 1253.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 1253.300 Section 1253.300 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN... basis of pregnancy, childbirth, termination of pregnancy, or recovery therefrom, or establish or follow...

  9. 28 CFR 68.21 - Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... BEFORE ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES IN CASES INVOLVING ALLEGATIONS OF UNLAWFUL EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS, UNFAIR IMMIGRATION-RELATED EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES, AND DOCUMENT FRAUD § 68.21 Admissions. (a) A party may serve upon... time as the Administrative Law Judge may allow, the party to whom the request is directed serves on the...

  10. Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inappropriate Intensive Care Unit admissions: Nigerian doctors' perception and attitude. ... In addition, each of the 4 possible actions in the setting of a full ICU was graded from 0 (least likely) to 5 (most likely). The result was analyzed as appropriate. Results: Sixty‑four doctors participated in the survey. Inappropriate ...

  11. 24 CFR 3.300 - Admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admission. 3.300 Section 3.300 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  12. 24 CFR 3.220 - Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admissions. 3.220 Section 3.220 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  13. PREP: Outreach to Online Learners through Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupton, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Librarians have collaborated with academic departments within their institutions for decades now, working with professors and administrators to bring information literacy skills to students. The librarians at National American University decided to extend this collaboration to a non-academic unit, the admissions department of the university. The…

  14. Admission levels of serum Gc-globulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiødt, F V; Bondesen, S; Petersen, I

    1996-01-01

    Gc-globulin scavenges actin released from necrotic hepatocytes to the extracellular space. In 77 patients with fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) (excluding patients treated with liver transplantation), admission levels of serum Gc-globulin and degree of complexing with monomeric actin (complex rati...

  15. COLLEGE ADMISSIONS AND THE PUBLIC INTEREST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    THRESHER, B. ALDEN

    VIEWING COLLEGE ADMISSIONS AS A SOCIAL PROCESS, THE AUTHOR FOCUSES ON THE INTERACTION BETWEEN THE SUPPLY OF STUDENTS COMING FROM THE GENERAL POPULATION AND THE DEMAND FOR STUDENTS BY COLLEGES. ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION IS TREATED AS A GENERAL PROBLEM ON THREE LEVELS. LEVEL ONE, THE VIEWPOINT OF THE INDIVIDUAL STUDENT, IS CONCERNED WITH GUIDANCE…

  16. What Should University Admissions Tests Predict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemler, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    University admissions tests should predict an applicant's ability to succeed in college, but how should this success be defined and measured? The status quo has been to use 1st-year grade point average (FYGPA) as the key indicator of college success, but a review of documents such as university mission statements reveals that universities expect…

  17. Admissions 2015 Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2015-02-02

    Feb 2, 2015 ... The Indian Institute of Science, a leading Institution of higher learning with a strong tradition of research, invites applications for admission to its Four-Year Bachelor of Science (Research). Programme. Candidates who have completed their II PUC/12th Standard in 2014 and those who are expecting to ...

  18. Admission Characteristics, Diagnoses And Outcomes Of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine admissions diagnosis and outcomes of HIV-infected patients attending AMPATH ambulatory HIV-care clinics. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Academic Model for Prevention and Treatment of HIV/ AIDS (AMPATH) ambulatory HIV-care clinic in western Kenya. Results: Between January ...

  19. A Nonlinear Goal Programming Model for University Admission Capacity Planning with Modified Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Ali El-Quliti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a nonlinear Goal Programming Model (GPM for solving the problem of admission capacity planning in academic universities. Many factors of university admission capacity planning have been taken into consideration among which are number of admitted students in the past years, total population in the country, number of graduates from secondary schools, desired ratios of specific specialties, faculty-to-students ratio, and the past number of graduates. The proposed model is general and has been tested at King Abdulaziz University (KAU in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, where the work aims to achieve the key objectives of a five-year development plan in addition to a 25-year future plan (AAFAQ for universities education in the Kingdom. Based on the results of this test, the proposed GPM with a modified differential evolution algorithm has approved an ability to solve general admission capacity planning problem in terms of high quality, rapid convergence speed, efficiency, and robustness.

  20. Evaluating Dependence Criteria for Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striley, Catherine L W; Griffiths, Roland R; Cottler, Linda B

    2011-12-01

    Background: Although caffeine is the most widely used mood-altering drug in the world, few studies have operationalized and characterized Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV) substance dependence criteria applied to caffeine. Methods: As a part of a nosological study of substance use disorders funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, we assessed caffeine use and dependence symptoms among high school and college students, drug treatment patients, and pain clinic patients who reported caffeine use in the last 7 days and also reported use of alcohol, nicotine, or illicit drugs within the past year (n=167). Results: Thirty-five percent met the criteria for dependence when all seven of the adopted DSM dependence criteria were used. Rates of endorsement of several of the most applicable diagnostic criteria were as follows: 26% withdrawal, 23% desire to cut down or control use, and 44% continued use despite harm. In addition, 34% endorsed craving, 26% said they needed caffeine to function, and 10% indicated that they talked to a physician or counselor about problems experienced with caffeine. There was a trend towards increased caffeine dependence among those dependent on nicotine or alcohol. Within a subgroup that had used caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine in the past year, 28% fulfilled criteria for caffeine dependence compared to 50% for alcohol and 80% for nicotine. Conclusion: The present study adds to a growing literature suggesting the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of the caffeine dependence diagnosis. Recognition of caffeine dependence in the DSM-V may be clinically useful.

  1. The new Medical College Admission Test: Implications for teaching psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Karen; Lewis, Richard S; Satterfield, Jason; Hong, Barry A

    2016-01-01

    This year's applicants to medical school took a newly revised version of the Medical College Admission Test. Unlike applicants in the past, they were asked to demonstrate their knowledge and use of concepts commonly taught in introductory psychology courses. The new Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior Test asked applicants to demonstrate the ways in which psychological, social, and biological factors influence perceptions and reactions to the world; behavior and behavior change; what people think about themselves and others; the cultural and social differences that influence well-being; and the relationships among social stratification, access to resources, and well-being. Building from the classic biopsychosocial model, this article provides the rationale for testing psychology concepts in application to medical school. It describes the concepts and skills that the new exam tests and shows how they lay the foundation for learning in medical school about the behavioral and sociocultural determinants of health. This article discusses the implications of these changes for undergraduate psychology faculty and psychology curricula as well as their importance to the profession of psychology at large. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. The New Medical College Admission Test: Implications for Teaching Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Karen; Satterfield, Jason; Lewis, Richard S.; Hong, Barry A.

    2017-01-01

    This year’s applicants to medical school took a newly revised version of the Medical College Admission Test. Unlike applicants in the past, they were asked to demonstrate their knowledge and use of concepts commonly taught in introductory psychology courses. The new Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior Test asked applicants to demonstrate the ways in which psychological, social, and biological factors influence perceptions and reactions to the world; behavior and behavior change; what people think about themselves and others; the cultural and social differences that influence well-being; and the relationships among social stratification, access to resources, and well-being. Building from the classic biopsychosocial model, this article provides the rationale for testing psychology concepts in application to medical school. It describes the concepts and skills that the new exam tests and shows how they lay the foundation for learning in medical school about the behavioral and sociocultural determinants of health. This article discusses the implications of these changes for undergraduate psychology faculty and psychology curricula as well as their importance to the profession of psychology at large. PMID:26866988

  3. Implementing competency based admissions at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrigan, Noreen; Akabas, Myles H; Betzler, Thomas F; Castaldi, Maria; Kelly, Mary S; Levy, Adam S; Reichgott, Michael J; Ruberman, Louise; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2016-01-01

    The Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Einstein) was founded in 1955 during an era of limited access to medical school for women, racial minorities, and many religious and ethnic groups. Located in the Bronx, NY, Einstein seeks to educate physicians in an environment of state-of-the-art scientific inquiry while simultaneously fulfilling a deep commitment to serve its community by providing the highest quality clinical care. A founding principle of Einstein, the basis upon which Professor Einstein agreed to allow the use of his name, was that admission to the student body would be based entirely on merit. To accomplish this, Einstein has long used a 'holistic' approach to the evaluation of its applicants, actively seeking a diverse student body. More recently, in order to improve its ability to identify students with the potential to be outstanding physicians, who will both advance medical knowledge and serve the pressing health needs of a diverse community, the Committee on Admissions reexamined and restructured the requirements for admission. These have now been categorized as four 'Admissions Competencies' that an applicant must demonstrate. They include: 1) cocurricular activities and relevant experiences; 2) communication skills; 3) personal and professional development; and 4) knowledge. The purpose of this article is to describe the process that resulted in the introduction and implementation of this competency based approach to the admission process.

  4. Imperfect physician assistant and physical therapist admissions processes in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    We compared and contrasted physician assistant and physical therapy profession admissions processes based on the similar number of accredited programs in the United States and the co-existence of many programs in the same school of health professions, because both professions conduct similar centralized application procedures administered by the same organization. Many studies are critical of the fallibility and inadequate scientific rigor of the high-stakes nature of health professions admissions decisions, yet typical admission processes remain very similar. Cognitive variables, most notably undergraduate grade point averages, have been shown to be the best predictors of academic achievement in the health professions. The variability of non-cognitive attributes assessed and the methods used to measure them have come under increasing scrutiny in the literature. The variance in health professions students’ performance in the classroom and on certifying examinations remains unexplained, and cognitive considerations vary considerably between and among programs that describe them. One uncertainty resulting from this review is whether or not desired candidate attributes highly sought after by individual programs are more student-centered or graduate-centered. Based on the findings from the literature, we suggest that student success in the classroom versus the clinic is based on a different set of variables. Given the range of positions and general lack of reliability and validity in studies of non-cognitive admissions attributes, we think that health professions admissions processes remain imperfect works in progress. PMID:24810020

  5. Imperfect physician assistant and physical therapist admissions processes in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Eugene Jones

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We compared and contrasted physician assistant and physical therapy profession admissions processes based on the similar number of accredited programs in the United States and the co-existence of many programs in the same school of health professions, because both professions conduct similar centralized application procedures administered by the same organization. Many studies are critical of the fallibility and inadequate scientific rigor of the high-stakes nature of health professions admissions decisions, yet typical admission processes remain very similar. Cognitive variables, most notably undergraduate grade point averages, have been shown to be the best predictors of academic achievement in the health professions. The variability of non-cognitive attributes assessed and the methods used to measure them have come under increasing scrutiny in the literature. The variance in health professions students’ performance in the classroom and on certifying examinations remains unexplained, and cognitive considerations vary considerably between and among programs that describe them. One uncertainty resulting from this review is whether or not desired candidate attributes highly sought after by individual programs are more student-centered or graduate-centered. Based on the findings from the literature, we suggest that student success in the classroom versus the clinic is based on a different set of variables. Given the range of positions and general lack of reliability and validity in studies of non-cognitive admissions attributes, we think that health professions admissions processes remain imperfect works in progress.

  6. STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions): application to acutely ill elderly patients and comparison with Beers' criteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gallagher, Paul

    2012-02-03

    Introduction: STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons\\' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) is a new, systems-defined medicine review tool. We compared the performance of STOPP to that of established Beers\\' criteria in detecting potentially inappropriate medicines (PIMs) and related adverse drug events (ADEs) in older patients presenting for hospital admission. METHODS: we prospectively studied 715 consecutive acute admissions to a university teaching hospital. Diagnoses, reason for admission and concurrent medications were recorded. STOPP and Beers\\' criteria were applied. PIMs with clear causal connection or contribution to the principal reason for admission were determined. RESULTS: median patient age (interquartile range) was 77 (72-82) years. Median number of prescription medicines was 6 (range 0-21). STOPP identified 336 PIMs affecting 247 patients (35%), of whom one-third (n = 82) presented with an associated ADE. Beers\\' criteria identified 226 PIMs affecting 177 patients (25%), of whom 43 presented with an associated ADE. STOPP-related PIMs contributed to 11.5% of all admissions. Beers\\' criteria-related PIMs contributed to significantly fewer admissions (6%). CONCLUSION: STOPP criteria identified a significantly higher proportion of patients requiring hospitalisation as a result of PIM-related adverse events than Beers\\' criteria. This finding has significant implications for hospital geriatric practice.

  7. EFFICACY OF ADMISSION CARDIOTOCOGRAPHY (ADMISSION T EST) TO PREDICT OBSTETRIC OUTCOME

    OpenAIRE

    Dwarakanath; Lakshmikantha; Chaitra

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of admission test on perin atal outcome and levels of obstetric interventions. METHODS: Prospective study on 200 pregnant women at admission by cardiotocography and assess th e perinatal outcome and obstetric interventions. RESULTS: Incidence of reactive trace was 69%, suspicious 24% and ominous 7%. Out of 200 cases 159(80%) had vaginal delivery, 28( 14%) had LSCS and 13(6%) had instrumental delivery. ...

  8. Time patterns in mortality after an emergency medical admission; relationship to weekday or weekend admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Richard; Cournane, Sean; Byrne, Declan; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Silke, Bernard

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to detail the time profile and frequency distribution of mortality following an emergency admission and to compare these for weekday and weekend admissions. We profiled in-hospital deaths following emergency medical admission between 2002 and 2014. We determined the frequency distribution, time pattern, causality and influence of day of admission on mortality out to 120days. We utilized a multivariable regression model (logistic for in-hospital mortality and truncated Poisson for count data) to adjust for major predictor variables. There were 82,368 admissions in 44,628 patients with 4587 in-hospital deaths. The 30-day in-hospital mortality declined from 8.2% in 2002 to 3.7% in 2014. The mortality pattern showed an exponential decay over time; the time to death was best described by the three-parameter Weibull model. The calculated time to death for the 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th centiles were 0.5, 1.2, 3.8, 11.1, 26.3 and 49.3days. Acute Illness Severity Score, Chronic Disabling Disease Score, Charlson Co-Morbidity Index and Sepsis status were associated with mortality. The risk of death was initially high, lower by day 3, and showed a cumulative increase over time. The mortality pattern was very similar between a weekday or weekend admission; however, the risk of death was greater at all time points between 0 and 120days for patients admitted at a weekend OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.15). We have demonstrated the pattern of mortality following an emergency admission. The underlying pattern is similar between weekday and weekend admissions. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page contains links to Technical Documents pertaining to Biological Water Quality Criteria, including, technical assistance documents for states, tribes and territories, program overviews, and case studies.

  10. Admission Systems and Student Mobility: A Proposal for an EU-Wide Registry for University Admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Hoareau McGrath

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Europe’s higher education systems are struggling to respond to the established mass demand for higher education, especially given the proportional decline in available resources per student and, more generally the demand for an ever longer education and reduction of the population of working age due to demographic decline. In addition, growing student mobility puts pressure on admission systems to set up relevant procedures for applicants who wish to enter a country. Admission systems to higher education constitute one key element in the mitigation of these challenges. Admissions can regulate student flows, and play a key role in guaranteeing the acquisition of skills in higher education by matching student profiles to their desired courses of study. This article puts European admission systems in perspective. The issue of regulation of student mobility is topical, given the broader and salient discussion on migration flows in Europe. The article uses international comparisons with systems such as the US, Australia and Japan, to provide a critical overview of the role of admission systems in an often overlooked but yet fundamental part of the European Higher Education Area, namely student mobility. The paper also argues for the creation of an information-sharing EU registry on admissions practices for mobile students.

  11. Relationship of medical students' admission interview scores to their dean's letter ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F R; Regan-Smith, M; Tivnan, T

    1992-12-01

    The authors examined the relationship between the admission interview scores for 62 students in the 1986 entering class at Dartmouth Medical School and the students' dean's letter ratings given four years later; they found the relationship to be significant (V = .372, p = .014) and the interview scores to be better independent predictors of the ratings than were total Medical College Admission Test scores or science grade-point averages. Among the 17 students receiving "strong" admission interview scores, 53% received dean's letter ratings in the top one-third and 47% received ratings in the lower two-thirds. Of those 34 who received "medium" interview scores, 68% received ratings in the lower two-thirds; all 11 students who received "weak" interview scores received ratings in the lower two-thirds. The authors suggest (1) that admission interview scores help schools to identify more clearly those applicants most likely to become strong, competitive performers in residency and (2) that the significant relationship between interview scores and dean's letter ratings indicates a need to discover what qualities the interview actually measures and to consider the methods by which interviewers are trained, rather than to forsake the interview.

  12. The Independent School Admissions Director as Tim Wakefield's Catcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachow, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Bob Uecker, the Milwaukee Brewers' quipping radio broadcaster, makes his brief and lackluster career as a major league catcher the subject of much of his humor. About catching the knuckleball, Uecker famously said, "I always thought the knuckleball was the easiest pitch to catch." Of course, there is an even better way to catch a knuckleball, and…

  13. Assuring Fairness in the Medical School Admission Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, Ronald J.; Shores, Jay H.

    1981-01-01

    The reliability and difficulty level of faculty interviewing of applicants to the Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine are assessed. An index is proposed for classifying interviewers, along with a point system for assuring fairness in assigning interviewers. Tabular data are included. (MSE)

  14. Potential Implications of Changes in ChalleNGe Admission Criteria: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Longitudinal Studies.” Psychological Bulletin 132 (1): 1-25. [45] Wigfield, Allan , Jacquelynne S. Eccles, and Paul R. Pintrich. 1996. “Development...and Deborah J. Anderson . 1999. “A Three-way Error Components Analysis of Educational Productivity.” Education Economics 7 (3): 199-208. [58] Steele

  15. Potential Implications of Changes in ChalleNGe Admission Criteria: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202- 4302. Respondents should...Life. Edited by James J. Heckman, John Eric Humphries , and Tim Kautz. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. [14] Heckman, James, Rodrigo Pinto, and

  16. Pediatric Intensive Care Unit admission criteria for haematooncological patients: a basis for clinical guidelines implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Franceschi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer remains a major death cause in children, though outcomes have considerably improved over the past decades (1-3. Outcomes for children diagnosed with cancer have changed since ’70 from 80% mortality to 80% survival (2; while children with solid tumors 5-year survival has been reported as 67%, cure rates for childhood leukemia now approach 90% [4-5. Moreover, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT indications are still expanding for both malignant and non-malignant diseases.

  17. [Our experience in the poly-traumatized pediatric patient with criteria for admission to the ICU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja Aguayo, E; Delgado Alvira, R; Elías Pollina, J; Sainz Samitier, A; González Esgueda, A; Esteban Ibarz, J A

    2010-04-01

    To present our experience with severe pediatric trauma. The pediatric trauma is the leading cause of death in children under 2 years. We achieved a retrospective study from 78 pediatric patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (UCI) for multiple trauma between 2000 and 2008. Age, sex, season, location, mechanism, Glasgow and ITP, type of injuries, complications, days of hospitalization and deaths were reviewed. It was performed descriptive and analytical study using the SPSS 15.0 and chi square and Pearson correlation were applied. The mean age of patients was of 8.5 +/- 4.2 years with 70% boys. Most accidents occurred in summer (37%) and the most common site was the road (47%). There was 15% of mortality, which the 75% occurred in the first 24 hours. There is an association between abdominal trauma and type of mechanism (p UCI there was a weak association but significant and negative (p UCI. Both ITP as Glasgow score are good indicators of severity and if their values decrease, the hospital stay in UCI and the mortality increase.

  18. Most central nervous system tumours in children are diagnosed with little delay after admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løhmann, Ditte Juel Adolfsen; Sørensen, Preben; Jørgensen, Jesper; Rosthøj, Steen

    2014-08-01

    Children with central nervous system (CNS) tumours often have a long symptom interval before diagnosis. We investigated delays in diagnosis and surgical management after the first admission with tumour-related symptoms. This study reviewed the medical records of 46 consecutive children with a CNS tumour admitted to a paediatric department. Clinical findings at the time of the first admission, duration of symptoms, time to radiological diagnosis and time to initial surgical procedures were recorded. The series comprised 26 supratentorial, 19 fossa posterior and one spinal tumour with equal numbers of high-grade and low-grade tumours. Headache, vomiting and lethargy were the most frequent symptoms, and pre-admission delay depended on tumour grade as well as location. Six cases had been diagnosed prior to admission; of the 40 undiagnosed cases, 32 (80%) were scanned within four days, but in four cases (10%) diagnosis was delayed for more than a week. Resection was performed within four days of diagnosis in 68% of children with resectable tumours (21/31). Initial surgical management of tumours causing hydrocephalus was completed within four days of diagnosis in 83% (20/24). Delay in diagnosis and surgical management after the primary admission with symptoms caused by a tumour may influence the outcome negatively. In this review from a small centre, the majority of the cases were diagnosed and managed surgically within four days of admission and diagnosis, respectively. Criteria for good performance, i.e. accepted standards for time to diagnosis and intervention, need to be specified. Not relevant. Not relevant.

  19. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed.

  20. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1993)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  1. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  2. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  3. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  4. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1997)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  5. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1994)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  6. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  7. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2000)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  8. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  9. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  10. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  11. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  12. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  13. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  14. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  15. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  16. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  17. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  18. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-1996)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  19. Admission Hyperglycemia and Clinical Outcome in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Susanna M.; Hiltunen, Sini; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Peters, Guusje M.; Silvis, Suzanne M.; Haapaniemi, Elena; Kruyt, Nyika D.; Putaala, Jukka; Coutinho, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Admission hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcome in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Admission hyperglycemia has not been investigated in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis. Methods-Consecutive adult patients with cerebral venous thrombosis were included

  20. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  1. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  2. Treatment Episode Data Set: Admissions (TEDS-A-2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Treatment Episode Data Set -- Admissions (TEDS-A) is a national census data system of annual admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. TEDS-A provides...

  3. Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions May 9, 2013 Teenage pregnancy is a serious public ... to treatment entry TEDS_121 THE TEDS REPORT: Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions May ...

  4. Dual Criteria Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Steffen; Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    2014-01-01

    The most popular models of decision making use a single criterion to evaluate projects or lotteries. However, decision makers may actually consider multiple criteria when evaluating projects. We consider a dual criteria model from psychology. This model integrates the familiar tradeoffs between...

  5. Bernoulli measure of complex admissible kneading sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin, Henk; Schleicher, Dierk

    2012-01-01

    Iterated quadratic polynomials give rise to a rich collection of different dynamical systems that are parametrized by a simple complex parameter $c$. The different dynamical features are encoded by the \\emph{kneading sequence} which is an infinite sequence over $\\{0,\\1\\}$. Not every such sequence actually occurs in complex dynamics. The set of admissible kneading sequences was described by Milnor and Thurston for real quadratic polynomials, and by the authors in the complex case. We prove tha...

  6. When Are Chiasms Admissible as Evidence?

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Boyd F.; Edwards, W. F.

    2010-01-01

    Since John Welch’s discovery of chiasmus in the Book of Mormon in 1967, many critics have attempted to show how chiasmus appears in just about every type of literature, from Dr. Seuss to Strangite scripture. This article discusses the authors’ statistical admissibility tests to verify whether a chiasmus in a work shows strong evidence of intentionality by the original author. Their results indicate that certain passages in the Old Testament and in the Book of Mormon show deliberate chias...

  7. How Effective Are Military Academy Admission Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-22

    Academy (USMA), and the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA) provide undergraduate education and training for stu- dents who will become commissioned officers...Academy’s (USMA’s) whole candidate score (WCS)—a composite of academic score, physical aptitude exam score, and community leadership score— has a...ically, physically, and medically qualified. Many applicants who were not offered admission had higher WCSs than applicants who were. It is unclear

  8. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  9. Green Supplier Selection Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Izabela Ewa; Banaeian, Narges; Golinska, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    Green supplier selection (GSS) criteria arise from an organization inclination to respond to any existing trends in environmental issues related to business management and processes, so GSS is integrating environmental thinking into conventional supplier selection. This research is designed...... to determine prevalent general and environmental supplier selection criteria and develop a framework which can help decision makers to determine and prioritize suitable green supplier selection criteria (general and environmental). In this research we considered several parameters (evaluation objectives......) to establish suitable criteria for GSS such as their production type, requirements, policy and objectives instead of applying common criteria. At first a comprehensive and deep review on prevalent and green supplier selection literatures performed. Then several evaluation objectives defined to assess the green...

  10. Perceived coercion in voluntary hospital admission.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2014-01-30

    The legal status of service users admitted to psychiatric wards is not synonymous with the level of coercion that they can perceive during the admission. This study aimed to identify and describe the proportion of individuals who were admitted voluntarily but experienced levels of perceived coercion comparable to those admitted involuntarily. Individuals admitted voluntarily and involuntarily to three psychiatric hospitals were interviewed using the MacArthur Admission Experience Interview and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnoses. One hundered sixty-one individuals were interviewed and 22% of the voluntarily admitted service users had levels of perceived coercion similar to that of the majority of involuntarily admitted service users. Voluntarily admitted service users who experienced high levels of perceived coercion were more likely to have more severe psychotic symptoms, have experienced more negative pressures and less procedural justices on admission. Individuals brought to hospital under mental health legislation but who subsequently agreed to be admitted voluntarily and those treated on a secure ward also reported higher levels of perceived coercion. It needs to be ensured that if any service user, whether voluntary or involuntary, experiences treatment pressures or coercion that there is sufficient oversight of the practice, to ensure that individual\\'s rights are respected.

  11. The Opinions of High School Principals about Their Schools' Reputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Ali; Orcan, Asli

    2015-01-01

    With a notice that was issued by the Ministry of National Education, all the public high schools were gradually converted into Anatolian High School as of 2010. The aim of this research is to determine the criteria of school reputation of Anatolian High schools and how and to what extent the criteria changed after the notice was issued.…

  12. Social deprivation and hospital admission rates, length of stay and readmissions in emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, Seán; Byrne, Declan; Conway, Richard; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Coveney, Seamus; Silke, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following an emergency medical admission. How deprivation relates to the admission or readmission incidence rates, episode length of stay (LOS) and ancillary resource utilization is less clear. All emergency medical admissions (66,861 episodes in 36,214 patients) between 2002 and 2013, categorized by quintile of Irish National Deprivation Index were assessed against admission or readmission incidence rates (/1000 local population by electoral division), LOS and utilization of five ancillary services. Univariate and multi-variable risk estimates (odds ratios (OR) or incidence rate ratios (IRR)) were calculated, using truncated Poisson regression. The deprivation index quintile was strongly correlated with the emergency medical admission rate with IRR (as compared with quintile 1) as follows: Q2 1.99 (95% CI: 1.96, 2.01), Q3 3.45 (95% CI: 3.41, 3.49), Q4 3.27 (95% CI: 3.23, 3.31) and Q5 4.29 (95% CI: 4.23, 4.35). LOS was not influenced by deprivation status; although increasing deprivation resulted in increased utilization of social services (OR 1.04: 95% CI: 1.03, 1.06), with a lower requirement for occupational therapy (OR 0.94: 95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) and speech/language services (OR 0.83: 95% CI: 0.80, 0.86). There was a rather decreased use of ancillary services with increasing deprivation; however, the readmission rate was strongly predicted by deprivation status. Deprivation status strongly influenced the admission and readmission rates for medical patients admitted as emergencies; however, ancillary resource utilization was not increased. Deprivation index will increase demand on hospital resources due to the aggregate effect on both admission and readmission incidence rates. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Process of Admission as a Means of Predicting Academic Performance in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aída Cortés Flores

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this investigation was to find out the predictive validity of the admission process regarding academic performance during the first year towards a degree in a private university in Mexico City. The grades derived from the National Examination for Admission into Higher Education (EXANI II, the general average grades from Senior High school and the points obtained through a questionnaire on social problems (DIT were considered as variables for predicting performance. Two hundred and forty male and female students, registered in Psychology, took part in this investigation. Their average age was 20 years old. The results showed that the highest grades obtained in the EXANI II were in the areas of numericand verbal reasoning followed by Spanish. Likewise, it was found that the number of points obtained in the EXANI II, the average high school grades and the students’ moral development made it possible to predict academic performance for the first year of their career.

  14. Early Admissions at Selective Colleges. NBER Working Paper No. 14844

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Christopher; Levin, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Early admissions is widely used by selective colleges and universities. We identify some basic facts about early admissions policies, including the admissions advantage enjoyed by early applicants and patterns in application behavior, and propose a game-theoretic model that matches these facts. The key feature of the model is that colleges want to…

  15. Pattern of non-communicable diseases among medical admissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical admissions due to non-communicable diseases were carefully selected and analyzed. There were 1853 cases of various non-communicable diseases out of a total medical admission of 3294 constituting 56.2% of total medical admissions. Diseases of the cardiovascular, endocrine and renal systems were the most ...

  16. 19 CFR 210.31 - Requests for admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requests for admission. 210.31 Section 210.31... TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Discovery and Compulsory Process § 210.31 Requests for admission. (a) Form, content, and service of request for admission. Any party may serve on any other party a written...

  17. 49 CFR 209.6 - Requests for admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests for admission. 209.6 Section 209.6..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General § 209.6 Requests for admission... written requests for the admission of the genuineness of any relevant documents identified within the...

  18. Open Admissions at The City University of New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Benjamin

    This paper presents the history of the open admissions policy at The City University of New York (CUNY). Discussed are: (1) the founding of the University and its early admission policies; (2) the demand for and implementation of the open admission policy, which means a probable freshman class of 36,000 in the fall of 1971, with an increase of…

  19. Increase in hospital admissions for acute childhood asthma in Cape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These were compared with total admissions for non-surgical causes and lower respiratory tract illness as well as those for bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Asthma admissions showed a sharp upward trend from 1978 to 1984, a slower rise through 1987 and a levelling off since. The profile of hospital admissions for respiratory ...

  20. Pursuing Equity in and through Teacher Education Program Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Ruth A.; Broad, Kathryn; Gallagher-Mackay, Kelly; Sher, Yael; Escayg, Kerry-Ann; McGrath, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This case study investigated equity in teacher education admissions. Through document analysis and structured interviews with ten past or current members of the admissions committee in a large initial teacher education program in Ontario, we developed an understanding of equity in teacher education admissions as encompassing two foci: equity in…

  1. 49 CFR 1114.3 - Admissibility of business records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissibility of business records. 1114.3 Section... § 1114.3 Admissibility of business records. Any writing or record, whether in the form of an entry in a... be admissible as evidence thereof if it appears that it was made in the regular course of business...

  2. 38 CFR 18.442 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recruitment. 18.442 Section 18.442 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Postsecondary Education § 18.442 Admissions and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped persons may not... recruitment by a recipient. (b) Admission. In administering its admission policies, a recipient; (1) May not...

  3. 45 CFR 1170.42 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 1170.42 Section 1170... FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES Postsecondary Education § 1170.42 Admissions and recruitment. (a... subjected to discrimination in admission or recruitment by a recipient to which this subpart applies. (b...

  4. 22 CFR 142.42 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 142.42 Section 142... and recruitment. (a) General. Qualified handicapped persons may not, on the basis of handicap, be denied admission or be subjected to discrimination in admission or recruitment by a recipient to which...

  5. 7 CFR 15b.30 - Admissions and recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admissions and recruitment. 15b.30 Section 15b.30... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 15b.30 Admissions and recruitment... be subjected to discrimination in admission or recruitment by a recipient to which this subpart...

  6. Audit of Unbooked Post- Anaesthesia Admissions To Intensive Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine whether unbooked admissions were predictable, or whether there were any preventable anaesthetic factors responsible for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Materials and Methods: The admissions to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu for the period ...

  7. The Pattern and Outcome of Newborn Admissions in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study analyzes the demographic data, causes of admissions and deaths in 641 newborn admissions from January 2005 to December 2009, as a pointer to the prevailing causes of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. The leading causes of admissions were LBW (23.3%), Infections (28.5%) and Neonatal ...

  8. Exploring unplanned ICU admissions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlayen, Annemie; Verelst, Sandra; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Schrooten, Ward; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Nerée

    2011-01-01

    Adverse events are unintended patient injuries or complications that arise from healthcare management resulting in death, disability or prolonged hospital stay. Adverse events that require critical care are a considerable financial burden to the healthcare system. Medical record review seems to be a reliable method for detecting adverse events. To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the estimates of the incidence and preventability of adverse events that necessitate intensive care admission; to determine the type and consequences (patient harm, mortality, length of ICU stay and direct medical costs) of these adverse events. MEDLINE (from 1966 to present), EMBASE (from 1974 to present) and CENTRAL (version 1-2010) were searched for studies reporting on unplanned admissions to intensive care units (ICUs). Databases of reports, conference proceedings, grey literature, ongoing research, relevant patient safety organizations and two journals were searched for additional studies. Reference lists of retrieved papers were searched and authors were contacted in an attempt to find any further published or unpublished work. Only quantitative studies that used chart review for the detection of adverse events requiring intensive care admission were considered for eligibility. Studies that were published in the English, Dutch, German, French or Spanish language were included. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. 28 studies in the English language and one study in French were included. Of these, two were considered duplicate publications and therefore 27 studies were reviewed. Meta-analysis of the data was not appropriate due to statistical heterogeneity between studies; therefore, results are presented in a descriptive way. Studies were categorized according to the population and the providers of care. 1) The majority of the included studies investigated unplanned intensive care admissions after

  9. Universality, correlations, and rankings in the Brazilian universities national admission examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Roberto; Lamb, Luis C.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the scores obtained by students who have taken the ENEM examination, The Brazilian High School National Examination which is used in the admission process at Brazilian universities. The average high schools scores from different disciplines are compared through the Pearson correlation coefficient. The results show a very large correlation between the performance in the different school subjects. Even though the students' scores in the ENEM form a Gaussian due to the standardization, we show that the high schools' scores form a bimodal distribution that cannot be used to evaluate and compare students performance over time. We also show that this high schools distribution reflects the correlation between school performance and the economic level (based on the average family income) of the students. The ENEM scores are compared with a Brazilian non standardized exam, the entrance examination from the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The analysis of the performance of the same individuals in both tests shows that the two tests not only select different abilities, but also lead to the admission of different sets of individuals. Our results indicate that standardized tests might be an interesting tool to compare performance of individuals over the years, but not of institutions.

  10. Affirmative Action in College Admission Decisions and the Distribution of Human Capital

    OpenAIRE

    David Welsch

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model consisting of a large number of students who differ by race and by the stock of human capital of their parents. Students choose effort levels in high school and college. College attendance is dependent on the student’s decision to attend college and the college’s decision to accept the student. Colleges in this paper enact admission policies that are not colorblind. The computational experiments reveal that under affirmative action, some minority students who were ...

  11. Mood changes in the course of preparation for the Brazilian university admission exam - a longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Aurélio Monteiro Peluso; Carine Savalli; Mariana Cúri; Clarice Gorenstein; Laura Helena Andrade

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Academic examinations are an important source of stress for students. This study is intended to assess senior high school students' mood changes during the preparation for a very important academic examination, the Brazilian university admission examination. METHOD: Positive and Negative Affect Schedule - Expanded Form was used to assess the students three times in the course of the months preceding the examination. RESULTS: ANOVA for repeated measures showed that Negative Affect i...

  12. qSOFA, SIRS and NEWS for predicting inhospital mortality and ICU admission in emergency admissions treated as sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulden, Robert; Hoyle, Marie-Claire; Monis, Jessie; Railton, Darran; Riley, Victoria; Martin, Paul; Martina, Reynaldo; Nsutebu, Emmanuel

    2018-02-21

    The third international consensus definition for sepsis recommended use of a new prognostic tool, the quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA), based on its ability to predict inhospital mortality and prolonged intensive care unit (ICU) stay in patients with suspected infection. While several studies have compared the prognostic accuracy of qSOFA to the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria in suspected sepsis, few have compared qSOFA and SIRS to the widely used National Early Warning Score (NEWS). This was a retrospective cohort study carried out in a UK tertiary centre. The study population comprised emergency admissions in whom sepsis was suspected and treated. The accuracy for predicting inhospital mortality and ICU admission was calculated and compared for qSOFA, SIRS and NEWS. Among 1818 patients, 53 were admitted to ICU (3%) and 265 died in hospital (15%). For predicting inhospital mortality, the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for NEWS (0.65, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.68) was similar to qSOFA (0.62, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.66) (test for difference, P=0.18) and superior to SIRS (PNEWS≥5 (74%, 95% CI 68% to 79%) was similar to SIRS≥2 (80%, 95% CI 74% to 84%) and higher than qSOFA≥2 (37%, 95% CI 31% to 43%). The specificity of NEWS≥5 (43%, 95% CI 41% to 46%) was higher than SIRS≥2 (21%, 95% CI 19% to 23%) and lower than qSOFA≥2 (79%, 95% CI 77% to 81%). The negative predictive value was 88% (86%-90%) for qSOFA, 86% (82%-89%) for SIRS and 91% (88%-93%) for NEWS. Results were similar for the secondary outcome of ICU admission. NEWS has equivalent or superior value for most test characteristics relative to SIRS and qSOFA, calling into question the rationale of adopting qSOFA in institutions where NEWS is already in use. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  13. Academic Achievement, Perceived Stress, Admission Data, and Sociodemographic Background Among Therapy Students in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Tamar; Einstein, Ofira

    2017-01-01

    Academic achievement (AA) is of great importance in the academic world. The aims of this study were to: 1) identify contributors to AA of physical therapy (PT) students; 2) evaluate students' perceived stress (PS); and 3) identify contributors to PS. A cross-sectional study involving three undergraduate PT classes in a single academic year was performed 1 week prior to final examinations. Current grade point average (GPA) and admission data were collected from administrative records. Additional data, collected using an online questionnaire, included the Perceived Stress Scale 10 (PSS), Scale for Assessing Academic Stress (SAAS), and selected sociodemographic variables. Regression analysis identified contributors to AA and to PS. Records of 153 students and questionnaires of 118 students were included in the study. Combined grades from psychometric tests and matriculation exams at admission, low PS, absence due to military reserve service during the academic year, and participation in the second and third years of the PT program accounted for a modest variance (31.1% ) in students' GPA. The low contribution of admission criteria to GPA suggests that there is no justification for raising the level of the present criteria.

  14. Fire protection design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  15. Information Management of a Structured Admissions Interview Process in a Medical College with an Apple II System

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Robert; Fedorko, Steve; Nicholson, Nigel

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a structured interview process for medical school admissions supported by an Apple II computer system which provides feedback to interviewers and the College admissions committee. Presented are the rationale for the system, the preliminary results of analysis of some of the interview data, and a brief description of the computer program and output. The present data show that the structured interview yields very high interrater reliability coefficients, is acceptable to the medical school faculty, and results in quantitative data useful in the admission process. The system continues in development at this time, a second year of data will be shortly available, and further refinements are being made to the computer program to enhance its utilization and exportability.

  16. Exploring factors influencing patient request for epidural analgesia on admission to labor and delivery in a predominantly Latino population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orejuela, Francisco J; Garcia, Tiffany; Green, Charles; Kilpatrick, Charlie; Guzman, Sara; Blackwell, Sean

    2012-04-01

    Ethnic disparities in labor pain management exist. Our purpose is to identify patients' attitudes and beliefs about epidural analgesia in order to develop a culturally competent educational intervention. A prospective observational study was conducted in patients admitted for vaginal delivery between July 1st-31st, 2009. Inclusion criteria were: singleton, term, cephalic, normal fetal heart tracing and no contraindications for epidural. Patients were surveyed regarding their wishes for analgesia, and their reasons for declining epidural. The obstetrics physician performed pain management counseling as is usually done. Patients were asked again about their choice for analgesia. Likert scale questionnaires were used. Wilcoxon signed ranked test was used for categorical variables. Logistic regression was performed to look for predictors of epidural request. Fifty patients were interviewed. Average age was (27.9 ± 6.7), gestational age (39.3 ± 1.3), and a median parity of 2 (range 0-6). 72% declined epidural upon admission, and 61% after counseling (P = 0.14). Most common reasons for declined epidural were 'women should cope with labor pain' (57%), 'fear of back pain' (54%) and 'family/friends advise against epidural' (36%). Acculturation was assessed by years living in the US (10 ± 6.3), preferred language (Spanish 80%) and ethnic self-identification (Hispanic 98%). 38% were high school graduates. In multivariate logistic regression, graduation from high school was the only variable associated to request for epidural in labor (OR 4.94, 95% CI 1.6-15.1). Educational level is associated to requesting an epidural in labor. Knowledge of patients' fears and expectations is essential to develop adequate counseling interventions.

  17. Multimodal freight investment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Literature was reviewed on multi-modal investment criteria for freight projects, examining measures and techniques for quantifying project benefits and costs, as well as ways to describe the economic importance of freight transportation. : A limited ...

  18. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  19. Water Quality Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA develops water quality criteria based on the latest scientific knowledge to protect human health and aquatic life. This information serves as guidance to states and tribes in adopting water quality standards.

  20. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  1. Professional perspectives on systemic barriers to admission avoidance: learning from a system dynamics study of older people's admission pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Bronagh; Lattimer, Valerie; Wintrup, Julie; Brailsford, Sally

    2015-06-01

    There is debate worldwide about the best way to manage increased healthcare demand within ageing populations, particularly rising rates of unplanned and avoidable hospital admissions. To understand health and social care professionals' perspectives on barriers to admission avoidance throughout the admissions journey, in particular: the causes of avoidable admissions in older people; drivers of admission and barriers to use of admission avoidance strategies; and improvements to reduce unnecessary admissions. A qualitative framework analysis of interview data from a System dynamics (SD) modelling study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty health and social care professionals with experience of older people's admissions. The interviews were used to build understanding of factors facilitating or hindering admission avoidance across the admissions system. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Three overarching themes emerged: understanding the needs of the patient group; understanding the whole system; and systemwide access to expertise in care of older people. There were diverse views on the underlying reasons for avoidable admissions and recognition of the need for whole-system approaches to service redesign. Participants recommended system redesign that recognises the specific needs of older people, but there was no consensus on underlying patient needs or specific service developments. Access to expertise in management of older and frailer patients was seen as a barrier to admission avoidance throughout the system. Providing access to expertise and leadership in care of frail older people across the admissions system presents a challenge for service managers and nurse educators but is seen as a prerequisite for effective admission avoidance. System redesign to meet the needs of frail older people requires agreement on causes of avoidable admission and underlying patient needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Origins of Race-Conscious Affirmative Action in Undergraduate Admissions: A Comparative Analysis of Institutional Change in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulberg, Lisa M.; Chen, Anthony S.

    2014-01-01

    What explains the rise of race-conscious affirmative action policies in undergraduate admissions? The dominant theory posits that adoption of such policies was precipitated by urban and campus unrest in the North during the late 1960s. Based on primary research in a sample of 17 selective schools, we find limited support for the dominant theory.…

  3. Predicting Different Grades in Different Ways for Selective Admission: Disentangling the First-Year Grade Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenman, Sebastiaan C.; Bakker, Wieger E.; van Tartwijk, Jan W. F.

    2016-01-01

    The first-year grade point average (FYGPA) is the predominant measure of student success in most studies on university admission. Previous cognitive achievements measured with high school grades or standardized tests have been found to be the strongest predictors of FYGPA. For this reason, standardized tests measuring cognitive achievement are…

  4. Predicting different grades in different ways for selective admission : Disentangling the first-year grade point average

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenman, Sebastiaan C.; Bakker, Wieger E.; van Tartwijk, Jan W F

    2016-01-01

    The first-year grade point average (FYGPA) is the predominant measure of student success in most studies on university admission. Previous cognitive achievements measured with high school grades or standardized tests have been found to be the strongest predictors of FYGPA. For this reason,

  5. Psychometric Properties of the Multiple Mini-Interview Used for Medical Admissions: Findings from Generalizability and Rasch Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, Stefanie S.; Luu, King; Klinger, Don A.

    2014-01-01

    The multiple mini-interview (MMI) has become an increasingly popular admissions method for selecting prospective students into professional programs (e.g., medical school). The MMI uses a series of short, labour intensive simulation stations and scenario interviews to more effectively assess applicants' non-cognitive qualities such as…

  6. The Relationship between Scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test and the Test of English as a Foreign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald E.

    In addition to scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), which are required of applicants to a substantial number of graduate management schools, foreign candidates may also be required to submit scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) as an indication of English language proficiency. The present study provides…

  7. How Useful Are Traditional Admission Measures in Predicting Graduation within Four Years? Research Report 2013-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D.; Patterson, Brian F.; Wyatt, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that traditional admission measures--SAT® scores and high school grade point average (HSGPA)--are valid predictors of early college performance such as first-year grades; however, their usefulness to predict later college outcomes has been questioned, especially for the SAT. This study builds on previous research…

  8. [Triage in acute medical admission units.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars; Hallas, Peter

    2010-01-01

    the intern on call at the medical departments of all Danish hospitals listed on sundhed.dk. RESULTS: We received 87 answers from 60 individual MAUs covered by a total of 83 interns on call. The MAUs had a median of eight beds and 14 admissions a day. An intern was on call 24 hours a day at 95% of the MAUs......% answered that selected groups of patients were routinely assessed by a senior physician. CONCLUSION: None of the Danish MAUs uses a validated triage tool to prioritize acutely admitted medical patients. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-May-31...

  9. Admissible stresses in thermal sprayed coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watremez, M. [Valenciennes Univ. (France). Groupe Genie Mecanique; LAMAC, Univ. de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambresis, C.R.I.T.T.Z.I., MAUBEUGE (France); Renaux, T.; Guerin, J.D.; Bricout, J.P. [Valenciennes Univ. (France). Groupe Genie Mecanique

    2002-07-01

    Friction materials of current railway brake discs have to support more and more frictional and thermomechanical stresses. It has been shown that some specified couple of materials, composed of a plasma sprayed disc coupled with sintered ceramic pads, leads to good behaviour in high speed train braking simulation. It's now to show coatings' reliability and reproductibility as well as limits of such solutions. To that objective, present work consists in testing coatings adhesion or cohesion. Numerical models have been developed to show that the coating's failure energy is representative of admissible stresses state in coatings. Some results are then discussed. (orig.)

  10. Predictors of nursing home admission for persons with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Joseph E; Yu, Fang; Krichbaum, Kathleen; Wyman, Jean F

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify factors that consistently predict nursing home admission (NHA) in persons with dementia. Studies published in English were retrieved by searching the MEDLINE (1966-2006), PSYCINFO (1950-2006), CINAHL (1982-2006), and Digital Dissertations (1950-2006) databases. Bibliographies of retrieved studies were also searched. Information on study characteristics and empirical results were extracted using a standardized protocol. Of 782 relevant studies identified 80 were selected for review based upon eligibility criteria. The most consistent predictors of NHA in persons with dementia included severity of cognitive impairment, Alzheimer disease diagnosis, basic activity of daily living dependencies, behavioral symptoms, and depression. Caregivers who indicated greater emotional stress, a desire to institutionalize the care recipient, and feelings of being "trapped" in care responsibilities were more likely to admit persons with dementia to nursing homes. Demographic variables, incontinence, and service use did not consistently predict NHA. Several results seemed to challenge conventional assumptions of what precipitates NHA among persons with dementia. Caregiver stressors in conjunction with care recipient characteristics are important to consider when assessing NHA risk. The findings emphasize the need to construct more complex models of institutionalization when designing risk measures to target interventions.

  11. Does hospital admission provide an opportunity for improving pharmacotherapy among elderly inpatients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Oliveira de Melo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The purpose of the work was to assess the incidence of potential drug interactions (pDDI, major pDDI, and the use of potentially inappropriate medication (PIM at hospital admission, during hospitalization, and at discharge to evaluate whether hospital admission provides an opportunity for improving pharmacotherapy in elderly patients at a University hospital that has a clinical pharmacist. A prospective cohort study was carried out using data from the medical records of patients admitted to an internal medicine ward. All admissions and prescriptions were monitored between March and August 2006. Micromedex(r DrugReax(r and Beers Criteria 2015 were used to identify pDDI, major pDDI, and PIMs, respectively. A comparison of admission and discharge prescriptions showed the following: an increase in the proportion of patients using antithrombotic agents (76 versus 144; p<0.001, lipid modifying agents (58 versus 81; p=0.024, drugs for acid-related disorders (99 versus 152; p<0.001, and particularly omeprazole (61 versus 87; p=0.015; a decrease in the number of patients prescribed psycholeptics (73 versus 32; p<0.001 and diazepam (54 versus 13; p<0.001; and a decrease in the proportion of patients exposed to polypharmacy (16.1% versus 10.1%; p=0.025, at least one pDDI (44.5% versus 32.8%; p=0.002, major pDDI (19.9% versus 12.2%; p=0.010 or PIM (85.8% versus 51.9%; p<0.001. The conclusion is that admission to a hospital ward that has a clinical pharmacist was associated with a reduction in the number of patients exposed to polypharmacy, pDDI, major pDDI, and the use of PIMs among elderly inpatients.

  12. Admission uric acid levels and length of expectant management in preterm preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urato, A C; Bond, B; Craigo, S D; Norwitz, E R; Paulus, J K; Strohsnitter, W C

    2012-10-01

    Uric acid is known to be elevated in preeclampsia. We sought to determine if uric acid levels on admission correlate with the length of expectant management in preterm patients with preeclampsia. A retrospective chart review was conducted on singleton preeclamptic pregnancies delivered between 24 0/7 and 37 0/7 weeks' gestation at Tufts Medical Center between January 2005 and December 2007. Patients with a multiple gestation and those transferred or discharged before delivery were excluded. Data regarding signs and symptoms of preeclampsia, laboratory values, pregnancy complications and outcome were abstracted from the medical records. Correlation between admission uric acid level and days of expectant management was assessed. The relative risk (RR) was used to estimate the effect of uric acid levels on expectant management length >7 days. Mantel-Haenszel χ(2) values were used to construct 95% confidence intervals (CIs) around the RR. Four hundred seventy-one charts were reviewed. Of these, 190 met inclusion criteria. In all, 55 patients (28.9%) were managed expectantly for >1 week. Admission uric acid level correlated with days of expectant management (Pmanagement for >1 week among women with low uric acid level (7.0; 95% CI: 3.34 to 14.68). Women with medium uric acid levels at admission also had a higher likelihood of prolonging pregnancy relative to women with high uric acid levels (RR: 2.81; 95% CI: 1.32 to 5.96) (P-value for trend management in preterm patients with preeclampsia. Pregnancy prolongation for >1 week is significantly more likely in patients with low and medium uric acid levels at the time of admission. Uric acid levels may be helpful in assessing disease severity and counseling preeclamptic patients regarding likelihood of extended expectant management.

  13. Recent Changes in UC Admissions Policies. Parent/Student Guide = Unos cambios recientes en los reglamentos de ingreso de la universidad de California. Guia de padres/estudiantes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EdSource, Inc., Palo Alto, CA.

    This parent/student guide describes recent changes in admissions policies at the University of California (UC). Traditionally, UC admitted the top 12.5% of high school graduating seniors, but beginning in 2001, the top 4% of students in the graduating class of every high school are eligible if they have completed 11 specific "a-f"…

  14. Psychological implications of admission to critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, Natalie

    Admission to critical care can have far-reaching psychological effects because of the distinct environment. Critical care services are being re-shaped to address long-term sequelae, including post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. The long-term consequences of critical illness not only cost the individual, but also have implications for society, such as diminished areas of health-related quality-of-life in sleep, reduced ability to return to work and enjoy recreational activities (Audit Commission, 1999; Hayes et al, 2000). The debate around the phenomenon of intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome is discussed with reference to current thinking. After critical care, patients may experience amnesia, continued hallucinations or flashbacks, anxiety, depression, and dreams and nightmares. Nursing care for patients while in the critical care environment can have a positive effect on psychological well-being. Facilitating communication, explaining care and rationalizing interventions, ensuring patients are oriented as to time and place, reassuring patients about transfer, providing patients,where possible, with information about critical care before admission and considering anxiolytic use, are all practices that have a beneficial effect on patient care. Follow-up services can help patients come to terms with their experiences of critical illness and provide the opportunity for them to access further intervention if desired. Working towards providing optimal psychological care will have a positive effect on patients' psychological recovery and may also help physical recuperation after critical care.

  15. [Medication reconciliation: From admission to primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, E; Mendizabal, A; Ariz, C; Mitxelena, I; Pérez, A; Igea, V

    2016-06-01

    To implement a medication reconciliation circuit of inter-level, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach in an integrated health organization. To measure the discrepancies detected in each of the steps studied. A prospective intervention study of one-year duration. The medication is reconciled at admission to the hospital, at discharge and when the patient goes to his Primary Care physician. The number and type of discrepancies detected each time the medication is reconciled are collected and resolved, as well as the total number of drugs before and after each reconciliation process quantified. Between November 1, 2013 and October 31, 2014 the medication had been reconciled to 77 patients, 63% male, mean age 69,5 years. Mean admission discrepancy per patient was 7,85, 3,67 at discharge and 2,19 at Primary Care. This program of medication reconciliation, in addition to detect and resolve discrepancies, has been a starting point for establishing new channels of communication between the different health professionals who have participated in the program and disseminate the safety culture within the organization. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Students Selection for University Course Admission at the Joint Admissions Board (Kenya) Using Trained Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabwoba, Franklin; Mwakondo, Fullgence M.

    2011-01-01

    Every year, the Joint Admission Board (JAB) is tasked to determine those students who are expected to join various Kenyan public universities under the government sponsorship scheme. This exercise is usually extensive because of the large number of qualified students compared to the very limited number of slots at various institutions and the…

  17. Admission Math Level and Student Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the study performance data for three cohorts of students for the course in Economics at the Business Diploma (herafter HD) study program at Copenhagen Business School. Out main findings are 1) that students with the lowest level of math from high school are performing worse...

  18. Lasers, the Price of Admission in 2045

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    33–40. Cullen , Timothy M. “Lethality, Legality, and Reality: Non-Lethal Weapons for Offensive Air Support.” Master’s thesis, School of Advanced...School, 2009. Kopp, Carlo . “High Energy Laser Air Defence Weapons.” Defence Today, 2008, 40–42. Koski, Olivia. “Eight Laser Weapon Systems to Zap Planes

  19. Spirometry for patients in hospital and one month after admission with an acute exacerbation of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Harry; Kenealy, Timothy; Adair, Jacqui; Robinson, Elizabeth; Sheridan, Nicolette

    2011-01-01

    Aim To assess whether spirometry done in hospital during an admission for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is clinically useful for long-term management. Methods Patients admitted to hospital with a clinical diagnosis of AECOPD had spirometry post-bronchodilator at discharge and approximately 4 weeks later. Results Spirometry was achieved in less than half of those considered to have AECOPD. Of 49 patients who had spirometry on both occasions, 41 met the GOLD criteria for COPD at discharge and 39 of these met the criteria at 1 month. For the 41, spirometry was not statistically different between discharge and 1 month but often crossed arbitrary boundaries for classification of severity based on FEV1. The eight who did not meet GOLD criteria at discharge were either misclassified due to comorbidities that reduce FVC, or they did not have COPD as a cause of their hospital admission. Conclusion Spirometry done in hospital at the time of AECOP is useful in patients with a high pre-test probability of moderate-to-severe COPD. Small changes in spirometry at 1 month could place them up or down one grade of severity. Spirometry at discharge may be useful to detect those who warrant further investigation. PMID:22069364

  20. Lung donor selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, John; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Cantu, Edward; van Berkel, Victor

    2014-08-01

    The criteria that define acceptable physiologic and social parameters for lung donation have remained constant since their empiric determination in the 1980s. These criteria include a donor age between 25-40, a arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/FiO2 ratio greater than 350, no smoking history, a clear chest X-ray, clean bronchoscopy, and a minimal ischemic time. Due to the paucity of organ donors, and the increasing number of patients requiring lung transplant, finding a donor that meets all of these criteria is quite rare. As such, many transplants have been performed where the donor does not meet these stringent criteria. Over the last decade, numerous reports have been published examining the effects of individual acceptance criteria on lung transplant survival and graft function. These studies suggest that there is little impact of the historical criteria on either short or long term outcomes. For age, donors should be within 18 to 64 years old. Gender may relay benefit to all female recipients especially in male to female transplants, although results are mixed in these studies. Race matched donor/recipients have improved outcomes and African American donors convey worse prognosis. Smoking donors may decrease recipient survival post transplant, but provide a life saving opportunity for recipients that may otherwise remain on the transplant waiting list. No specific gram stain or bronchoscopic findings are reflected in recipient outcomes. Chest radiographs are a poor indicator of lung donor function and should not adversely affect organ usage aside for concerns over malignancy. Ischemic time greater than six hours has no documented adverse effects on recipient mortality and should not limit donor retrieval distances. Brain dead donors and deceased donors have equivalent prognosis. Initial PaO2/FiO2 ratios less than 300 should not dissuade donor organ usage, although recruitment techniques should be implemented with intent to transplant.

  1. Robustness - acceptance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzuto, Enrico; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Kroon, Inger B.

    2010-01-01

    This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen in conjunc......This factsheet describes the general framework on the bases of which acceptance criteria for requirements on the robustness of structures can be set. Such framework is based on the more general concept of risk-based assessment of engineering systems. The present factsheet is to be seen...

  2. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care through psycho-education and crisis focused monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Barbara; Salize, Hans Joachim; Dressing, Harald; Rüsch, Nicolas; Schönenberger, Thekla; Bühlmann, Monika; Bleiker, Marco; Lengler, Silke; Korinth, Lena; Rössler, Wulf

    2012-09-05

    The high number of involuntary placements of people with mental disorders in Switzerland and other European countries constitutes a major public health issue. In view of the ethical and personal relevance of compulsory admission for the patients concerned and given the far-reaching effects in terms of health care costs, innovative interventions to improve the current situation are much needed. A number of promising approaches to prevent involuntary placements have been proposed that target continuity of care by increasing self-management skills of patients. However, the effectiveness of such interventions in terms of more robust criteria (e.g., admission rates) has not been sufficiently analysed in larger study samples. The current study aims to evaluate an intervention programme for patients at high risk of compulsory admission to psychiatric hospitals. Effectiveness will be assessed in terms of a reduced number of psychiatric hospitalisations and days of inpatient care in connection with involuntary psychiatric admissions as well as in terms of cost-containment in inpatient mental health care. The intervention furthermore intends to reduce the degree of patients' perceived coercion and to increase patient satisfaction, their quality of life and empowerment. This paper describes the design of a randomised controlled intervention study conducted currently at four psychiatric hospitals in the Canton of Zurich. The intervention programme consists of individualised psycho-education focusing on behaviours prior to and during illness-related crisis, the distribution of a crisis card and, after inpatient admission, a 24-month preventive monitoring of individual risk factors for compulsory re-admission to hospital. All measures are provided by a mental health care worker who maintains permanent contact to the patient over the course of the study. In order to prove its effectiveness the intervention programme will be compared with standard care procedures (control group

  3. Can we safely decrease intensive care unit admissions for children with high grade isolated solid organ injuries? Using the shock index, pediatric age-adjusted and hematocrit to modify APSA admission guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuthnot, Mary; Armstrong, Lindsey Bendure; Mooney, David P

    2017-06-01

    In 2000, the American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA) disseminated consensus practice guidelines for the management of blunt liver and splenic injury which included intensive care unit (ICU) admission for children with grade IV injuries. We sought to determine if we could better predict which children with isolated solid organ injuries (SOI) underwent an ICU-level intervention, thus necessitating ICU admission. Children with isolated liver, spleen, or kidney injuries admitted to the ICU from November 2003 to August 2015 were identified in our trauma registry, and data were extracted from the medical record. ICU-level interventions were defined as transfusion, vasopressor use, intubation, and operative/procedural intervention. Shock index and pediatric age-adjusted (SIPA) was calculated for all patients. The sensitivity and negative predictive values (NPV) were determined. 133 children met inclusion criteria. 19 (14.3%) required ICU-level intervention, and 114 (85.1%) did not. 95% (n=18) of the intervention group had either an elevated SIPA or a hematocrit <30% on admission compared to 22% (n=25) of patients in the no intervention group. Sensitivity was 95%, and NPV was 99%. Limiting ICU admission in children with isolated SOI to those with an elevated SIPA or hematocrit <30% would reduce the ICU admission rate by two-thirds while maintaining patient safety. Diagnostic study. III. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Quality of life before surgical ICU admission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros Henrique

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Examining the quality of life (QOL of patients before ICU admission will allow outcome variables to be compared and analyzed in relation to it. The objective of this study was to analyze QOL of patients before admission to a surgical ICU and to study its relationship to outcome and to the baseline characteristics of the patients. Methods: All adult patients consecutively admitted to the surgical ICU between November 2004 and April 2005, who underwent non-cardiac surgery, were enrolled in this observational and prospective study. The following patient characteristics were recorded: age, gender, body mass index, ASA physical status, type and magnitude of surgical procedure, length of stay (LOS, in ICU and in hospital, mortality, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS, history of co-morbidities and quality of life survey score (QOLSS. The relationships between QOLSS and ICU variables and outcome were evaluated. The relationship between the total QOLSS and each variable or outcome was assessed by multiple linear regression. Results: One hundred eighty seven patients completed the study. The preadmission QOLSS of the patients studied was 4.43 ± 4.90; 28% of patients had a normal quality of life (0 points, 38% had between 1 and 5 points (considered mild deterioration, 21% had between 6 and 10 points (moderate deterioration, 10% had between 11 and 15 points (considered major deterioration and 3% had more than 15 points (severe limitation of quality of life. A worse preadmission QOLSS was associated with higher SAPS II scores, with older patients (age> 65 years and with ASA physical status (ASA III/IV. Total QOLSS was significantly worse in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities and in patients more severely ill at ICU admission. Patients who died in the ICU and in hospital had worse QOLSS scores compared to those who survived. However, no statistical differences in QOLSS were found in relation to longer ICU stays

  5. HIV/AIDS and admission to intensive care units: A comparison of India, Brazil and South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantharuben Naidoo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In resource-constrained settings and in the context of HIV-infected patients requiring intensive care, value-laden decisions by critical care specialists are often made in the absence of explicit policies and guidelines. These are often based on individual practitioners’ knowledge and experience, which may be subject to bias. We reviewed published information on legislation and practices related to intensive care unit (ICU admission in India, Brazil and South Africa, to assess access to critical care services in the context of HIV. Each of these countries has legal instruments in place to provide their citizens with health services, but they differ in their provision of ICU care for HIV-infected persons. In Brazil, some ICUs have no admission criteria, and this decision vests solely on the ‘availability, and the knowledge and the experience’ of the most experienced ICU specialist at the institution. India has few regulatory mechanisms to ensure ICU care for critically ill patients including HIV-infected persons. SA has made concerted efforts towards non-discriminatory criteria for ICU admissions and, despite the shortage of ICU beds, HIV-infected patients have relatively greater access to this level of care than in other developing countries in Africa, such as Botswana. Policymakers and clinicians should devise explicit policy frameworks to govern ICU admissions in the context of HIV status. S Afr J HIV Med 2013;14(1:15-16. DOI:10.7196/SAJHIVMED.887

  6. HIV/AIDS and admission to intensive care units: A comparison of India, Brazil and South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantharuben Naidoo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In resource-constrained settings and in the context of HIV-infected patients requiring intensive care, value-laden decisions by critical care specialists are often made in the absence of explicit policies and guidelines. These are often based on individual practitioners’ knowledge and experience, which may be subject to bias. We reviewed published information on legislation and practices related to intensive care unit (ICU admission in India, Brazil and South Africa, to assess access to critical care services in the context of HIV. Each of these countries has legal instruments in place to provide their citizens with health services, but they differ in their provision of ICU care for HIV-infected persons. In Brazil, some ICUs have no admission criteria, and this decision vests solely on the ‘availability, and the knowledge and the experience’ of the most experienced ICU specialist at the institution. India has few regulatory mechanisms to ensure ICU care for critically ill patients including HIV-infected persons. SA has made concerted efforts towards non-discriminatory criteria for ICU admissions and, despite the shortage of ICU beds, HIV-infected patients have relatively greater access to this level of care than in other developing countries in Africa, such as Botswana. Policymakers and clinicians should devise explicit policy frameworks to govern ICU admissions in the context of HIV status. S Afr J HIV Med 2013;14(1:15-16. DOI:10.7196/SAJHIVMED.887

  7. Emergency department orthopedics observation unit as an alternative to admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Amy A; Jones, Jaime; Weiss, Steven J; Silva, Otono

    2014-10-01

    Inclusion of select orthopedic problems in the orthopedics observation unit (OOU) may reduce hospital admissions. Our system allows OOU status for 24 hours, but the effect on admissions is unknown. Our primary hypothesis was that we could predict which OOU patients required admission based on the presence of uncontrolled pain. Data were prospectively collected for all OOU patients in this prospective observational study, including data on extremity cellulitis, fractures, and spine injuries awaiting brace placement.The primary outcome variable was admission to the hospital versus discharge home. The a priori hypotheses were that patients with more persistent or worsening pain would require admission more often and that the OOU would result in fewer patients needing a costlier inpatient admission to the hospital. An a priori power analysis showed adequate power of 80% to detect a difference between admitted and discharged patients. Data were prospectively collected from August 2011 to August 2012 for 199 consecutive OOU patients, 62% of whom were men. Diagnoses included infection (cellulitis or abscess of extremity) in 76%, fracture in 15% and other in 9% of the patients. Sixty-two patients (31%) were admitted and 7 patients (4%) made return visits for the same problem within a 30-day period. No significant relations existed between any of the independent variables and admission on bivariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression found no significant predictors of hospital admission. Logistic regression was not performed on 30-day returns because of the low event rate (4%). An OOU prevented 138 of 199 (69%) patients from being admitted to a hospital. There were no significant predictors of which patients would require admission. Pain was not a predictor of need for admission. The lack of significant predictors is important in suggesting that without the ability to predict which patients require admission, a system using an OOU can reduce admissions by more than

  8. Recurrent Admissions for Diabetic Foot Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang CL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot complications are a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Patients who undergo recurrent admissions for the same diabetic foot problems represent a difficult subgroup to treat. From July 2007 to June 2008, there were 38 such patients who were admitted recurrently. Eighteen patients (47% were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgical treatment. Eighteen patients (47% received treatment as necessary but were still readmitted for recurrent infection at the same wound site. Assessment of patients’ compliance to outpatient treatment was found to be generally lacking. As a significant proportion were re-admitted because of previous refusal of surgery, a trained counselor may be suitable in counselling patients for debridement or amputation surgery.

  9. Kinematically Admissible Failure Mechanisms for Plane Trusses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosowska, Joanna; Obara, Paulina; Turant, Jan

    2017-10-01

    The reliability models of statically indeterminate steel trusses are analysed in this paper. The plane trusses are considered. For analysed structures types of reliability model are determined. Identification of system reliability is based on studies on the transformation from the safe structural system into the geometrically variable system (mechanism). These researches intended to determine the kinematically admissible failure mechanisms which contain minimal critical sets of elements. For analysed truss the formula setting out the number of mechanisms for any number of repeatable sections is determined. To identify the mechanism, spectral analysis of the linear stiffness matrix is used. This stage of the study, in conjunction with consideration of static loads, allows to determine the minimum critical set of rods corresponding to the most probable scenario of the structural damage. For these analysis the computer program based on the finite element method has been created within the Mathematica environment.

  10. Characteristics of hospital admissions for pneumonia in HIV-positive individuals in Winnipeg, Manitoba: a cross-sectional retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gaalen, S; Duff, Michael; Arroyave, Luisa F; Rueda, Zulma Vanessa; Kasper, Ken; Keynan, Y

    2018-02-01

    Lung infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality, even in the current antiretroviral therapy era. Pneumonia is the most common cause of admission in HIV-positive individuals in our centre as reported in a previously published study. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to further characterize these admissions, with respect to index of disease severity at presentation, organisms identified, and investigations pursued including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). There were 123 unique patients accounting for a total of 209 admissions from 2005 to 2015. An organism was isolated in only 33% of all admissions (68/209). The most common organism was Pneumocystis jirovecii with a frequency of 29% of all admissions. Eighty-seven percent of presentations were mild, and 13% were moderate by CURB-65 criteria. A total of 39 BALs were performed, of which 27 yielded an organism (69%). Considering the burden of disease, low diagnostic yield of the current diagnostic strategy and increased morbidity and mortality caused by pneumonia in HIV-positive individuals, further methods are needed to more accurately target therapy. The preponderance of mild disease in this study suggests that better diagnostic tests may identify individuals that can be candidates for outpatient therapy.

  11. Admission C-reactive protein does not predict functional outcomes in patients with strokes in a subacute rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadi, Meheroz H; Coar, Patricia L; Lukin, Meredith; Lesser, Martin; Blass, John P

    2008-09-01

    Because serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels correlate with the extent of inflammatory reactions, including acute strokes, we tested whether serum CRP levels on admission to a stroke rehabilitation unit help to predict functional outcome at discharge. We measured serum CRP level within 72 hrs of admission to an inpatient stroke rehabilitation unit in 102 successive patients transferred to rehabilitation within 4 wks following stroke and who met inclusion criteria. Patients with normal levels of serum CRP (< or =9.9 mg/dl) on admission to our rehabilitation service were more likely to be discharged home rather than to an institution (66% vs. 44%, P < 0.03). These patients with normal serum CRP had higher absolute values for total functional independence measures and functional independence measures motor scores on admission, as well as on discharge (i.e., less disability). They also had fewer infections or other medical complications. However, the absolute magnitude of improvement (DeltaFIM) and length of stay were similar in the normal and elevated CRP groups. Multivariable logistic regression model did not show serum CRP level on admission to predict rehabilitation functional outcomes. Serum CRP level does not predict functional outcome at discharge on inpatient rehabilitation for stroke.

  12. The admissibility of behavioral science evidence in the courtroom: the translation of legal to scientific concepts and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, David; Grimm, Paul W; Ahern, David C; Sokolik, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the Daubert case, courtroom rules and guides regulating the admissibility of scientific evidence have undergone major revisions over the past 10 to 15 years. We review these changes and current legal rules and guides, in particular their impact on the admission of behavioral sciences evidence and testimony. We examine commonly intended meanings, conceptualizations, and language use relating to science and the admission of evidence within the legal system and their relation to more familiar terms and concepts within the behavioral sciences, identifying points of continuity and discontinuity. We then review illustrative legal cases involving challenges to the admission of psychological and psychiatric evidence and their implications for mental health professionals. Finally, we offer a framework for conceptualizing and prioritizing key legal criteria for determining admissibility and appraising standing on these factors within the mental health field. Increased mutual understanding between psychology and law should further enhance productive interfaces between the disciplines and add to the many instances in which the proper use of science in the courtroom has facilitated fair resolution of legal conflicts.

  13. Factors Associated with the Time of Admission among Notified Dengue Fever Cases in Region VIII Philippines from 2008 to 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Echavez Abello

    2016-10-01

    on the late admission among tertiary, public hospitals and non-epidemic period with reference to the quality of care, patient volume, out of pocket expense, and accessibility We recommend the consistent use of the 2009 WHO Dengue guidelines in order to standardize the admission criteria and time across hospitals.

  14. Stable admission rate for acute asthma in Danish children since 1977

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevelsted, Astrid; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Bisgaard, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is consistently reported to have increased in recent decades in most westernized countries, but it is unknown if this increase is similar across severities. We aimed to study the time-trend of acute hospital admission and readmission for asthma of school-aged children in the recent...... 35 years in Denmark. We analyzed time-trends in the national incidence rate of hospitalization for acute severe asthma in children aged 5-15 in Denmark during the 35-year period 1977-2012 in the Danish national registry. Only in-patient admissions with a principal diagnosis of asthma (ICD-8: 493...... per thousand children at risk and a per-year incidence rate ratio 0.999 [95 % CI 0.997-1.001]. The rate of any readmission decreased from approximately 20 per thousand children in the eighties to less than 10 in the early nineties before stabilizing at around 10 per thousand children from mid...

  15. Association between scores in high school, aptitude and achievement exams and early performance in health science college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Alwan Ibrahim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study was carried out to assess the correlation between admi-ssion criteria to health science colleges, namely, final high school grade and Saudi National Apti-tude and Achievement exams, and early academic performance in these colleges. The study inclu-ded 91 male students studying in the two-year pre-professional program at the King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Records of these students were used to extract relevant information and their academic performance (based on the grade point average achieved at the end of the first semester of the pre-professional program, which were analytically studied. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to assess the associa-tions between the different scores. SPSS statistical program (version 12.0 was used for data ana-lyses. We found a strong correlation between the academic performance and the Achievement Exam, Aptitude Exam and high school final grade, with Pearson Correlation Coefficients of 0.96, 0.93, 0.87, respectively. The Saudi National Achievement Exam showed the most significant correla-tion. Our results indicate that academic performance showed good correlation with the admission criteria used, namely final high school grade, Saudi National Aptitude and Achievement Exams.

  16. Assisted admissions? A national survey of general practitioner experience of involuntary admissions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, M

    2011-10-01

    The 2001 Mental Health Act introduced in 2006, changed how a patient is admitted involuntarily to a psychiatric unit. This paper reports on a national survey of general practitioners\\' experience implementing the Act. Five hundred and sixty eight (568) GPs completed the survey. Twenty five percent (25%) of respondants had not used it. When used, twenty four percent (24%) report that it takes seven hours or more to complete an admission. Fifty percent (50%) of respondents are confident to complete the necessary paperwork. Overall GPs are dissatisfied with arrangements for transport of patients (mean Likert score 3.5), primarily due to the time delay. GPs believe this places risk on the patient, family and GP. Only thirty-three percent (33%) of respondents feel that the Mental Health Act has improved the patient, GP and family experience of involuntary admission.

  17. Clinical Predictors of Hospital Admission in Children Aged 0-24 Months with Acute Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nucksheeba Aziz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Bronchiolitis is a significant cause of acute morbidity in children less than 2 years old and some children with bronchiolitis are admitted to the hospital. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To identify clinical predictors of hospital admission in children aged 0-24 months with acute bronchiolitis.   METHODS: All children in the age group of 0-24 months presenting with acute bronchiolitis to a dedicated pediatric emergency department of GB pant cantonment children hospital, Govt Medical College Srinagar,   from April 2012-March 2013 were included in the study, provided they met the inclusion criteria. Non-parametric numerical variables were analyzed using Mann Whitney u test. Chi square was used to analyzecategorical variables, p value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: 763(552(72.3% male, mean age 8.52+/- 3.59 months children (0-24months presented with acute bronchiolitis during the study period. 435(313 (72% male, mean age 6.69+/-3.8 monthspatients were admitted to the hospital. The eight best predictors of admission (age, respiratory rate, heart rate, oxygen saturation, fever, grunt, dehydration and duration of symptoms were determined. CONCLUSION:This study has identified clinical predictors of admission in children aged 0-24 months with acute bronchiolitis. This information can be used as a guide in deciding whether to admit a child with bronchiolitis.

  18. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...... the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions....

  19. Diagnostic criteria of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Rémi W

    2007-03-01

    In the past two decades there has been a tremendous effort among clinicians and searchers to improve the diagnostic criteria of the dementias on the basis of the differential neurological and neuropsychological profiles. This was an obligatory requirement for clinical trials and the development of treatments. Over the years it became rapidly evident that the cohorts of patients in studies had some degree of heterogeneity, making it difficult to interpret the results of some studies, particularly in the vascular dementias and the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) group. For example, many sub-types of the vascular group were included in clinical trials, such as the cortical strokes, the lacunar states and the diffuse white matter disease cases, and some of the patients might have had also mixed pathology. In addition, the standard DSM IV criteria for dementia no longer represent our present knowledge of the clinical profile of some of the dementias such as vascular dementia (VaD) and fronto-temporal dementia where the memory impairment is not necessarily the first requirement. To improve the validity of clinical trials and eventually help developing more appropriate treatments, we revised the present diagnostic criteria and made recommendations for some changes in the context of the 2nd Canadian Conference on the Development of Antidementia Therapies, held in 2004 and reviewed in the light of the recent literature as of early 2006. It is expected that in the near future, these dementia criteria for clinical trials will have to be revised again in order to include specific subtypes of the dementias as well as biomarkers, structural and functional imaging.

  20. Clinical Application of the Quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment Score at Intensive Care Unit Admission in Patients with Bacteremia: A Single-Center Experience of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Jung Na

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background We evaluated the clinical usefulness of the quick Sepsis-Related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA score (based on the 2016 definition of sepsis at intensive care unit admission in Korean patients with bacteremia. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 236 patients between March 2011 and February 2016. In addition to the qSOFA, the Modified Early Warning score (MEWS and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS criteria were calculated. Results The patients’ median age was 69 years, and 61.0% were male. Of the patients, 127 (53.8% had a qSOFA score ≥2 points. They had significantly higher rates of septic shock, thrombocytopenia, and hyperlactatemia, and increased requirements for ventilator care, neuromuscular blocking agents, vasopressors, and hemodialysis within 72 hours after intensive care unit admission. They also had a significantly higher 28-day mortality rate. When analyzed using common thresholds (MEWS ≥5 and ≥2 SIRS criteria, patients with a MEWS ≥5 had the same results as those with a qSOFA score ≥2 (P < 0.05. However, patients with ≥2 SIRS criteria showed no significant differences. Conclusions Our results show that a qSOFA score ≥2 at admission is a useful screening tool for predicting disease severity and medical resource usage within 72 hours after admission, and for predicting 28-day mortality rates in patients with bacteremia. In addition, qSOFA scores may be more useful than SIRS criteria in terms of prognostic utility.

  1. Incidence and consequence of acute kidney injury in unselected emergency admissions to a large acute UK hospital trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challiner, Rachael; Ritchie, James P; Fullwood, Catherine; Loughnan, Paul; Hutchison, Alastair J

    2014-05-29

    AKI is common among hospital in-patients and places a huge financial burden on the UK National Health Service, causing increased length of hospital stay and use of critical care services, with increased requirement for complex interventions including dialysis. This may account for up to 0.6% of the total Health Service budget. To investigate the incidence and consequences of AKI, all unselected emergency admissions to a large acute UK single centre University Teaching Hospital over two separate 7 day periods were reviewed. A retrospective audit of 745 case records was undertaken (54.6% male) including laboratory data post-discharge or death, with classification of AKI by RIFLE, AKIN and AKIB criteria. Participants were included whether admitted via their general practitioners, the emergency department, or as tertiary specialty transfers. Outcome measures were presence or absence of AKI recorded using each of the three AKI criteria, length of hospital stay (LOS), admission to, and LOS in critical care, and mortality. The most severe grade of AKI only, at any time during the admission, was recorded to prevent double counting. Renal outcome was determined by requirement for renal replacement therapy (RRT), and whether those receiving RRT remained dialysis dependent or not. AKI incidence was 25.4% overall. With approximately one third present on admission and two thirds developing post admission. The AKI group had LOS almost three times higher than the non AKI group (10 vs 4 days). Requirement for critical care beds was 8.1% in the AKI group compared to 1.7% in non AKI group. Overall mortality was 5.5%, with the AKI group at 11.4% versus 3.3% in the non AKI group. AKI in acute unselected hospital admissions is more common than existing literature suggests, affecting 25% of unselected admissions. In many this is relatively mild and may resolve spontaneously, but is associated with increased LOS, likelihood of admission to critical care, and risk of death. If targeted

  2. Preterm Admissions in a Special Care Baby Unit: The Nnewi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ugochukwu EF, Ezechukwu CC, Agbata CC, Ezumba I. Preterm Admissions in a. Special Care Baby Unit: The Nnewi Experience. Nigerian Journal of Paediatrics. 2002;29:75. A review of all preterm admissions into the Special Care Bay Unit' of the. Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, over a ...

  3. Preterm Admissions in a Special Care Baby Unit: The Nnewi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review of all preterm admissions into the Special Care Bay Unit of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi, over a period of 29 months (May 1998 October 2000) was carried out. Out of a total of 699 neonatal admissions, 133 (19 percent) were preterms with gestational ages ranging from 24 to ...

  4. Correlation of Admission Blood Pressures with 30-Day Outcome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a lot of controversy on the prognostic value of admission blood pressures in acute ischaemic stroke, but in Nigeria, there is no information on this. Objective: The objective of this study was to correlate the effect of blood pressures measured on admission with 30-day mortality and neurological handicap ...

  5. A Survey of International Practice in University Admissions Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Daniel; Coates, Hamish; Friedman, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how admissions tests are used in different higher education systems around the world. This is a relatively new area of research, despite the fact that admissions processes are a key component of university practices and given the ever increasing globalisation of higher education. This paper shows that aptitude and achievement…

  6. Patterns and Outcomes of Diabetic Admissions in a Tertiary Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing globally. It also constitutes one of the common indications for admission into the medical wards of most hospitals. This study is aimed at examining diabetes –related admission and outcomes in a tertiary hospital located in a semi –urban community in Delta state, ...

  7. 4 CFR 25.3 - Admission to the GAO building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission to the GAO building. 25.3 Section 25.3 Accounts GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES CONDUCT IN THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.3 Admission to the GAO building. A person may be admitted to the GAO Building...

  8. Patterns Of Morbidity Requiring Admission Into The Children's Ward ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patterns Of Morbidity Requiring Admission Into The Children's Ward Of Abia State University Teaching Hospital Aba. ... A call is therefore being made for better health education campaign to reduce these preventable causes for admission. Families should be enlightened on ways to prevent home accidents by way of ...

  9. Pattern of psychiatric inpatient admission in Ibadan: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Such audit of psychiatric services is not a popular research venture in Nigeria. Objectives: The study aims to describe the pattern of old psychiatric admissions in a tertiary health facility and the socio-cultural and environmental factors that may influence the pattern. Methods: Data on monthly admissions over a 5-year period ...

  10. Pattern and Outcome of Admissions in the Children's Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A five-year review of the pattern and outcome of paediatric admissions in the Children Emergency Room (CHER) of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu, showed a total of 10,267 admissions, a discharge rate of 50.4 percent, a transfer-out rate of 44.3 percent, and a mortality of 5.1 percent.

  11. Nitrogen dioxide increases cardiorespiratory admissions in Torrelavega (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Javier; Salas, Ana; Prieto-Salceda, Dolores; Chinchon-Bengoechea, Veronica; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to analyze relationships between levels of air pollutants and emergency admissions for cardiorespiratory disease. Admission data from January 1, 1992, to December 31, 1995, were obtained from the Marques de Valdecilla University Hospital Admission Service; meteorological data (rainfall, temperatures wind speed, wind direction) were obtained from the National Meteorology Institute in Santander. Pollutant data on sulfur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), total suspended particles (TSP), nitrogen oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were provided by the secretary of environment for the Cantabrian Regional Government. Rate ratios were estimated for each pollutant by Poisson regression; they were adjusted for meteorological variables. It was found that elevated NO2 increased by 20 percent the risk of having an admission for cardiorespiratory diseases; this effect was mainly due to respiratory diseases (rate ratio = 1.7, p pollutant model, elevated particulates and nitrogen monoxide were also related to admissions, but this effect disappeared when a five-pollutant model was used (p = .21 and p = 0.36, respectively. SO2 and SH2 did not show any relationship with admissions. Thus, nitrogen dioxide was the only pollutant the authors found to be related to emergency admissions for cardiorespiratory diseases. It is difficult to generalize from these results because of the small number of daily admissions and the variability in pollutant levels; therefore, more studies are necessary to improve knowledge about the relationship between air pollution and health in small towns.

  12. Evaluation of the Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Hamish; Friedman, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports findings from the first national Australian study of the predictive validity of the Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT). Background on tertiary admissions procedures in Australia is presented, followed by information on STAT and the research methods. The results affirm that STAT, through the provision of baseline and…

  13. Admissions: The Higher Education Sector's Plans for Change. Policy Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2008

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in student numbers and political concern to ensure fair access to higher education, universities have been reviewing their admissions processes in order to improve their transparency, efficiency and effectiveness. The process contains relatively discrete activities--applications and admissions--in which both the applicants and…

  14. Using Social Media "Smartly" in the Admissions Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Teresa Valerio; Tipton, Stacia

    2010-01-01

    Admissions officers around the country are hearing consistent calls to enhance their social media presence. Whether the pressure is from administrators, influential alumni, or peers across institutions, social media are touted as the next big thing in admissions marketing. But are social media strategies truly "strategic," or are they merely…

  15. Intensive care admissions of patients following surgery | Osinaike ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... study was to evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) admissions from the operating theatre, characterize the patient population and to determine those pre-operative, intra-operative and immediate postoperative risk factors that predict unplanned intensive care admission. Methods: The ICU treatment sheet, nursing records and ...

  16. Increase in childhood asthma admissions in an urbanising population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. In South Africa, rapid urbanisation has increased the risk of childhood asthma. This report reviews the pattern of asthma admissions to the Paediatric Department of Ga-Rankuwa Hospital, South Africa, from 1986 to 1996. Design. Inpatient admission data were reviewed for 1986- 1996. A detailed analysis of the ...

  17. 38 CFR 17.366 - Authorization of emergency admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization of emergency admissions. 17.366 Section 17.366 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Grants to the Republic of the Philippines § 17.366 Authorization of emergency admissions...

  18. Hospital admission interviews are time-consuming with several interruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghazanfar, Misbah N; Honoré, Per Gustaf Hartvig; Nielsen, Trine R H

    2012-01-01

    The admission interview is an important procedure to reduce medication errors. Studies indicate that physicians do not spend much time on the interview and that the major obstacles are lack of time and heavy workload. The aim of this study was to measure the time physicians spend on admission...... interviews and to describe factors that affect time consumption....

  19. Medical Admissions and Outcomes at Saint Paul's Hospital, Addis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-04-01

    Background: Globally, trends of medical admission have been changing. This study was carried out to assess the current trend of medical admissions and outcomes in Ethiopia. Methods: Retrospective review of 840 records of patients admitted to medical ward of Saint Paul hospital during April 1, 2012-March 31, 2013 was ...

  20. 29 CFR 458.71 - Procedure upon admission of facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure upon admission of facts. 458.71 Section 458.71... facts. The admission of all the material allegations of fact in the complaint shall constitute a waiver... his recommended decision and order in which he shall adopt as his proposed findings of fact the...