WorldWideScience

Sample records for schizophrenia spectrum disorders

  1. The Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia Disorders: Perspectives From the Spectrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siever, Larry J; Davis, Kenneth L

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This overview focuses on neurobiological abnormalities found in subjects with schizotypal personality disorder, the prototype of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and chronic schizophrenia...

  2. Self-disorders and the Schizophrenia Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Julie; Parnas, Josef

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Self-disorders (SD) have been described as a core feature of schizophrenia both in classical and recent psychopathological literature. However, the specificity of SD for the schizophrenia spectrum disorders has never been demonstrated in a diagnostically heterogeneous sample, nor has...... the concurrent validity of SD been examined. AIM: (1) To examine the specificity of Examination of Anomalous Self-Experiences (EASE) measured SD to the schizophrenia spectrum disorder in first contact inpatients, (2) to explore the internal consistency and factorial structure of the EASE, (3) to assess...... the concurrent validity of SD by exploring correlations between SD and the canonical psychopathological dimensions of schizophrenia, (4) to explore relations of SD to intelligence, sociodemographic, and extrinsic illness characteristics. METHODS: A total of 100 consecutive first admission patients underwent...

  3. Disordered Self in the Schizophrenia Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef; Henriksen, Mads Gram

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the phenomenological and empirical rediscovery of anomalous self-experience as a core feature of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and presents the current status of research in this field. Historically, a disordered self was considered to be a constitutive phenotype...

  4. Schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

    2013-01-01

    The DSM-5 list of diagnoses concerning schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders is expected to be revised and graduated from mild to severe. The proposed changes for the diagnosis of schizophrenia affect demands for characteristic symptoms, clarify relation to pervasive developmental...... disorders, and eliminate the classic subtypes of schizophrenia. A dimensional assessment will be measured on a 0-4 point scale. It is recommended that the concept of attenuated psychosis syndrome is further investigated. The propositions affecting characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia might increase...... stigmatization and pharmacological treatment on poor indication. The introduction of dimensional assessments may make schizophrenia subtyping redundant and has the potential to enrich clinical practice and bridge communication between child and adolescent and adult psychiatry. The most recent guidelines...

  5. Premorbid neurocognitive functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger Jelling; Mortensen, E.L.; Parnas, Josef

    2006-01-01

    A prospective study based on the U.S. National Collaborative Perinatal Project and using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) found lower test scores for the Coding subtest in preschizophrenic children than in their unaffected siblings. Using data on cognitive functioning...... in adolescence, the aim of the present prospective study was to examine whether low scores on Coding is associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The 12 subtests of the WISC were administered to 311 children and adolescents with a mean age of 15.1 years (range: 8 to 20 years...... was 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-1.00) (p = .022), and the risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorder decreased by 3% (95% CI 6 to 0%). The Coding deficit on the WISC may indicate deficits in perceptual motor speed or in working memory processing speed in young individuals who later develop schizophrenia, schizotypal...

  6. Premorbid neurocognitive functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Parnas, Josef

    2006-01-01

    in WISC IQ. Logistic regression analysis controlling for age at examination, gender, and social status yielded a significant, but relatively weak, association between low Coding test score and risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorder. For each unit increase in the Coding raw score, the adjusted odds ratio......A prospective study based on the U.S. National Collaborative Perinatal Project and using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) found lower test scores for the Coding subtest in preschizophrenic children than in their unaffected siblings. Using data on cognitive functioning...... in adolescence, the aim of the present prospective study was to examine whether low scores on Coding is associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The 12 subtests of the WISC were administered to 311 children and adolescents with a mean age of 15.1 years (range: 8 to 20 years...

  7. Self-disorders in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Julie; Nilsson, Lars Siersbæk; Sæbye, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    Self-disorders have been hypothesized to be an underlying and trait-like core feature of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and a certain degree of temporal stability of self-disorders would therefore be expected. The aim of the study was to examine the persistence of self-disorders measured...... by the Examination of Anomalous Self Experiences over a time span of 5 years. 48 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders were thoroughly assessed for psychopathology at baseline and 5 years later. Self-disorders were assessed by the Examination of Anomalous Self Experiences. The level of self-disorders...... was same at the two occasions for the full Examination of Anomalous Self Disorders and for four out of the five domains. For one domain, the level of self-disorders increased slightly from baseline to follow-up. The correlations between baseline and follow-up were moderate. 9 out of the 13 most...

  8. Minor physical anomalies and schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Ekstrøm, Morten; LaBrie, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors prospectively assessed the relationship between minor physical anomalies identified in childhood and adult psychiatric outcome. METHOD: In 1972, minor physical anomalies were measured in a group of 265 Danish children ages 11-13. The examination was part of a larger study...... investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242) of the original subjects, including 81 who were...... at high risk. RESULTS: Individuals with a high number of minor physical anomalies developed schizophrenia spectrum disorders significantly more often than they developed a no mental illness outcome. Further, individuals with a high number of minor physical anomalies tended to develop schizophrenia...

  9. Anomalies of Imagination and Disordered Self in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Andreas Christian Rosén; Parnas, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Vivid mental imagery occurs frequently in schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs). Overlapping phenomena, such as obsessions or ruminations, are also frequent in other psychiatric disorders, raising significant diagnostic challenges. Unfortunately, contemporary operational psychopathology lacks...... the epistemological and phenomenological framework to address such questions. Using the resources of phenomenology and philosophy of mind, we articulate the structure of imagination and describe its distinctive modifications in the SSDs. Drawing on pilot data with patients' self-descriptions, we present the notion...... of 'irreality' of the fantasy may become compromised. We articulate these anomalies of imagination as being entailed by the underlying generative disorder of schizophrenia, namely the disorder of minimal self (unstable ipseity or first-person perspective). We propose that pathology of imagination...

  10. Schizophrenia Spectrum and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study compared the differential severity of specific symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and child psychiatry outpatient referrals (controls). Each group was further subdivided into subgroups with and without co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).…

  11. Childhood laterality and adult schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Pestle, Sarah; Mednick, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Left or mixed-handedness, footedness, and eye dominance are thought to indicate abnormalities in lateralization related to schizophrenia. Increased left or mixed-dominance in schizophrenia suggests possible hemispheric abnormalities associated with the disorder. A related body of research suggests...... that some indications of lateralization abnormalities may be evident prior to the onset of schizophrenia, suggesting that disruptions in lateralization are inherent to the developmental course of the disorder. We attempted to replicate and extend upon findings indicating differences in lateralization...... between children who later developed a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 26) and those who did not develop a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 216), among a high-risk and control, longitudinal sample. The rate of left or mixed-footedness, eye dominance, and any anomalous lateralization...

  12. Minor physical anomalies and schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Ekstrøm, Morten; LaBrie, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    at high risk. RESULTS: Individuals with a high number of minor physical anomalies developed schizophrenia spectrum disorders significantly more often than they developed a no mental illness outcome. Further, individuals with a high number of minor physical anomalies tended to develop schizophrenia...... anomalies may provide important clues to understanding schizophrenia spectrum disorders from a neurodevelopmental perspective. Minor physical anomalies appear to signal stressors relevant to schizophrenia spectrum development, especially in those at genetic risk for schizophrenia.......OBJECTIVE: The authors prospectively assessed the relationship between minor physical anomalies identified in childhood and adult psychiatric outcome. METHOD: In 1972, minor physical anomalies were measured in a group of 265 Danish children ages 11-13. The examination was part of a larger study...

  13. Anomalies of Imagination and Disordered Self in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Andreas Rosén; Parnas, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Vivid mental imagery occurs frequently in schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs). Overlapping phenomena, such as obsessions or ruminations, are also frequent in other psychiatric disorders, raising significant diagnostic challenges. Unfortunately, contemporary operational psychopathology lacks the epistemological and phenomenological framework to address such questions. Using the resources of phenomenology and philosophy of mind, we articulate the structure of imagination and describe its distinctive modifications in the SSDs. Drawing on pilot data with patients' self-descriptions, we present the notion of perceptualized imagery. The anomalous imagery acquires spatialization, spatiotemporal constancy, explorability, autonomy and a sense of experiential distance between the subject and the image. As a quasi-perceptual, stable object, such imagery often evokes an intense affective response, whereas the normal sense of 'irreality' of the fantasy may become compromised. We articulate these anomalies of imagination as being entailed by the underlying generative disorder of schizophrenia, namely the disorder of minimal self (unstable ipseity or first-person perspective). We propose that pathology of imagination is an important psychopathological aspect of the schizophrenia spectrum, with significant relevance for early diagnosis and differential diagnosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Minor physical anomalies and schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Ekstrøm, Morten; LaBrie, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors prospectively assessed the relationship between minor physical anomalies identified in childhood and adult psychiatric outcome. METHOD: In 1972, minor physical anomalies were measured in a group of 265 Danish children ages 11-13. The examination was part of a larger study...... investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242) of the original subjects, including 81 who were...

  15. Children with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders: thought disorder and communication problems in a family interactional context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompson, M C; Asarnow, J R; Hamilton, E B; Newell, L E; Goldstein, M J

    1997-05-01

    Thought disorder and communication patterns during an interactional task were examined in families of children with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder), depressed children, and normal controls. Children with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders showed significantly more thought disorder than their normal peers; levels of thought disorder among depressed children fell between those observed in the other two groups but did not differ significantly from either of them. Similarly, mothers of children with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders showed more thought disorder than mothers of normal control children but did not differ from mothers of depressed children. Children with schizotypal personality disorder did not differ from children with schizophrenia. These findings demonstrate that the thought disorder present in childhood-onset schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorders is manifest in an important social context, the family.

  16. [Clinical characteristics of cannabis-induced schizophrenia spectrum disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkos, Zoltán; Fejes, Lilla; Inczédy-Farkas, Gabriella; Kassai-Farkas, Akos; Faludi, Gábor; Lazáry, Judit

    2011-09-01

    Marijuana (cannabis) is the most commonly abused drug by adolescents and young adults and also by people with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders. An increasing number of studies suggest that regular cannabis users can show psychotic episodes similar to schizophrenic disorders but it still unclear if cannabis induced psychotic disorder is a distinct entity requiring special therapy or regular cannabis use consequently leads to schizophrenia. Therefore, we retrospectively compared psychotic patients with and without cannabis use by clinical profile. Clinical data of 85 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder were analyzed retrospectively. Cannabis use was not reported by 43 persons (Cnbs0 subgroup) and 42 patients used regularly cannabis during at least 1 year (Cnbs1 subgroup). Clinical data were collected from electronic medical documentation of patients concerning anamnesis, family history, socio-demographic condition, symptoms and psychiatric state, acute and long-term therapies. Men were over-represented in the cannabis abuser group while mean age was lower among them compared to the Cnbs0 subgroup. Prevalence of suicidal attempts was increased in men without cannabis use. Patients without cannabis use spent more time in hospital and smoking was more frequent among them. Positive and negative symptoms and family history did not differ significantly between the two subgroups. Dosage, intensity and length of pharmacotherapy was different between the two subgroups. These results revealed that certain clinical aspects were different in case of cannabis-related schizophrenia spectrum disorder compared to schizophrenia.

  17. The incidence of schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders in Denmark in the period 2000-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhl, Johanne Olivia Gronne; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Thorup, Anne

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We aimed to examine changes over time in the incidence of broad and narrow schizophrenia spectrum disorders in Denmark from 2000 to 2012. METHODS: Patients were classified as incident schizophrenia if registered with a first time in- or outpatient contact with relevant diagnostic co...

  18. Brain Processing of proprioception and self-disorder in Schizophrenia spectrum patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse Marie

    12 first-admitted schizophrenia spectrum subjects (six with schizophrenia and six with schizotypal personality disorder: 7 females, one left-handed) Mean age: 27 years (STD 5,4)......12 first-admitted schizophrenia spectrum subjects (six with schizophrenia and six with schizotypal personality disorder: 7 females, one left-handed) Mean age: 27 years (STD 5,4)...

  19. Theory of mind impairment: a distinct trait-marker for schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, E; Yücel, M; Pantelis, C

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to critically review the literature in order to determine if Theory of Mind (ToM) impairment can be considered a trait-marker for schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder (BD). After a thorough literature search, we reviewed the empirical studies investigating ToM impairments in remitted schizophrenia patients, first episode patients, subjects at high-risk (HR) for psychosis and first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients. Studies investigating ToM impairment in other schizophrenia spectrum conditions, affective psychosis and BD were also reviewed. ToM abnormalities exist at onset and continue throughout the course of schizophrenia, persist into remission, and while less severe, are apparent in HR populations. Mentalizing impairments are also observed in other forms of psychotic illness and BD. Mentalizing impairment in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and BD might reflect underlying general cognitive deficits and residual symptom expression, rather than representing a specific trait-marker.

  20. Prevalence of Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in Average-IQ Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo Marín, Jorge; Rodríguez-Franco, Montserrat Alviani; Mahtani Chugani, Vinita; Magán Maganto, María; Díez Villoria, Emiliano; Canal Bedia, Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Since their separation as independent diagnostics, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) have been conceptualized as mutually exclusive disorders. Similarities between both disorders can lead to misdiagnosis, especially when it comes to average-IQ adults who were not identified during childhood. The aim of this…

  1. Suicide among women with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents five cases of suicide in women attending a schizophrenia clinic and demonstrates that, in the presence of psychosis, women can act impulsively and aggressively and can use lethal means to end their lives. If generalizations can be made from the stories of these five women, then multiple prior admissions, comorbid psychiatric and substance abuse diagnoses, lack of negative symptoms, full awareness of illness, and current crisis appear to constitute important risk variables. Female-specific factors associated with suicide in this sample were childhood sexual abuse, intimate partner abuse, and child loss. The author, who knew these five women very well over a long period of time, concludes that the deaths might have been prevented by critical interventions such as timely hospital admission, suicide screening prior to hospital discharge, safety check of the immediate environment, in-depth explanation of therapeutic decisions, and complete assessment of the personal meaning attached to recent events.

  2. Symptoms of Autism and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in Clinically Referred Youth with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Examined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) symptoms in a clinically referred, non-ASD sample (N = 1160; ages 6-18) with and without oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Mothers and teachers completed "DSM-IV"-referenced symptom checklists. Youth with ODD were subdivided into angry/irritable symptom (AIS) or…

  3. Childhood motor coordination and adult schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Sorensen, Holger J; Maeda, Justin

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined whether motor coordination difficulties assessed in childhood predict later adult schizophrenia spectrum outcomes. METHOD: A standardized childhood neurological examination was administered to a sample of 265 Danish children in 1972, when participants were 10......-13 years old. Adult diagnostic information was available for 244 members of the sample. Participants fell into three groups: children whose mothers or fathers had a psychiatric hospital diagnosis of schizophrenia (N=94); children who had at least one parent with a psychiatric record of hospitalization...... for a nonpsychotic disorder (N=84); and children with no parental records of psychiatric hospitalization (N=66). Psychiatric outcomes of the offspring were assessed through psychiatric interviews in 1992 when participants were 31-33 years of age, as well as through a scan of national psychiatric registers completed...

  4. Non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungdalh, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives The primary treatment for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders is antipsychotic medication. One of the many public health challenges in mental illness, is to identify contributing factors to non-adherence to pharmacological treatment. The objective...... of this study was to perform an updated systematic review of risk factors for non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia in a European and American context. Methods The study was a systematic literature review of studies that included at least two measurements of pharmacological adherence...... of illness, alcohol or drug abuse and unspecified younger age. Conclusions The findings in this systematic literature review are consistent with previous reviews on non-adherence and schizophrenia. It stresses the methodological challenges in psychiatric adherence research and establishes the need for more...

  5. Traumatic Stress Disorders and Risk of Subsequent Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder or Bipolar Disorder: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkels, Niels; Trabjerg, Betina; Arendt, Mikkel; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic stress disorders are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, there is a lack of prospective longitudinal studies investigating the risk of severe mental illness for people diagnosed with traumatic stress disorders. We aimed to assess if patients with acute stress reaction (ASR) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at increased risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorders or bipolar disorder. We performed a prospective cohort study covering the entire Danish population including information on inpatient and outpatient mental hospitals over 2 decades. Predictors were in- or outpatient diagnoses of ASR or PTSD. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% CIs of schizophrenia, schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and bipolar disorder. Persons with a traumatic stress disorder had a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia (IRR 3.80, CI 2.33-5.80), schizophrenia spectrum disorder (IRR 2.34, CI 1.46-3.53), and bipolar disorder (IRR 4.22, CI 2.25-7.13). Risks were highest in the first year after diagnosis of the traumatic stress disorder and remained significantly elevated after more than 5 years. Mental illness in a parent could not explain the association. Our findings support an association between diagnosed traumatic stress disorders and subsequent schizophrenia spectrum disorder or bipolar disorder. If replicated, this may increase clinical focus on patients with traumatic stress disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Predictors of poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quach, Phuong Le; Mors, Ole; Christensen, Torben Østergaard

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder.......This study sought to identify predictors for poor adherence to medication among patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder....

  7. Autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia: meta-analysis of the neural correlates of social cognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugranyes, Gisela; Kyriakopoulos, Marinos; Corrigall, Richard; Taylor, Eric; Frangou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Impaired social cognition is a cardinal feature of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Schizophrenia (SZ). However, the functional neuroanatomy of social cognition in either disorder remains unclear due to variability in primary literature...

  8. Attention in schizophrenia and Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence from P300

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, C.T.W.M.; Koolen, S.; Chwilla, D.J.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia show phenomenological overlap and have been proposed to share a common underlying pathogenesis. We investigate whether both psychopathological conditions can be conceptualized as disorders of attention. Participants and Methods: To

  9. Childhood laterality and adult schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Pestle, Sarah; Mednick, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Left or mixed-handedness, footedness, and eye dominance are thought to indicate abnormalities in lateralization related to schizophrenia. Increased left or mixed-dominance in schizophrenia suggests possible hemispheric abnormalities associated with the disorder. A related body of research suggest...

  10. Violence in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders: patterns of offending and victimisation

    OpenAIRE

    Short, Tamsin Bernice Renfree

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a rare but complex psychiatric disorder which can have adverse effects on cognition, emotion and behaviour. The relationship between schizophrenia and crime has been the subject of voluminous research over the past century, but remains the subject of clinical and academic debate. This research thesis sought to clarify the relationship between schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and criminal violence, taking into account the role of co-morbid substance use-disorders. This informa...

  11. Self‐Disorders as schizophrenia spectrum vulnerability phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raballo, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    the coherence of its symptoms as well as of its spectrum manifestations. However, the potential topicality of SDs for the delineation of phenotypic vulnerability traits, as well as for the construct validity of the concept of schizophrenia spectrum has remained relatively neglected. The current research project...... discriminative capacity with respect to non‐psychotic configurations of the Schizophrenia Spectrum, adopting Meehl’s schizotaxia‐schizotypy heuristic model (i.e. a diathesic model suitable to capture psychobehavioural phenotypic expressions of vulnerability below the threshold of clinically diagnosable...

  12. Perspective-taking deficits in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Lam, Cecilia W; Jiwatram, Tina

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examined data from a Danish prospective longitudinal project in attempt to address the state/trait controversy regarding theory of mind deficits in schizophrenia. Deficits in perspective-taking--a component of theory of mind--were investigated prospectively among children who...... developed schizophrenia spectrum disorders as adults in comparison to children who did not develop schizophrenia spectrum disorders. METHOD: A total of 265 high risk and control subjects were studied in 1972. At the time of initial assessment, the Role-Taking Task (RTT) was administered. Two hundred...... and forty-two of these children were evaluated in 1992 during follow-up examinations. Sixteen developed schizophrenia, 10 developed a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, 70 had outcomes of other psychopathology, and 146 did not develop a mental illness. RESULTS: Children who later developed schizophrenia...

  13. A longitudinal study of schizophrenia- and affective spectrum disorders in individuals diagnosed with a developmental language disorder as children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Hauschild, Karen-Marie

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and types of schizophrenia- and affective spectrum disorders were studied in 469 individuals with a developmental language disorder (DLD), assessed in the same clinic during a period of 10 years, and 2,345 controls from the general population. All participants were screened through....... 1.8%; P language disorder was significantly associated with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder diagnosis in the DPCR. There was no significant increase in affective spectrum...

  14. Neurocognitive Outcomes in the Treatment of Early-Onset Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Jean A.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Johnson, Jacqueline L.; Yakutis, Lauren; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Breiger, David; Sikich, Linmarie; Findling, Robert L.; McClellan, Jon; Hamer, Robert M.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess neurocognitive outcomes following antipsychotic intervention in youth enrolled in the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-funded Treatment of Early-Onset Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (TEOSS). Method: Neurocognitive functioning of youth (ages 8 to 19 years) with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder was evaluated…

  15. Looking at the Schizophrenia Spectrum Through the Prism of Self-disorders: An Empirical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raballo, Andrea; Sæbye, Ditte; Parnas, Josef

    2011-01-01

    spectrum has been explicitly acknowledged, mainly as a consequence of the increasing focus on early detection and prevention of psychosis. The current study tested the hypothesis of a specific aggregation of self-disorders (SDs, various anomalies of self-awareness) in schizophrenia-spectrum conditions......Nonpsychotic anomalies of subjective experience were emphasized in both classic literature and phenomenological psychiatry as essential clinical features of schizophrenia. However, only in recent years, their topicality with respect to the construct validity of the concept of the schizophrenia...... of the schizophrenia spectrum and suggest their incorporation to strengthen its construct validity, with potential benefit for both early detection and pathogenetic research....

  16. Perspective-taking deficits in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Lam, Cecilia W; Jiwatram, Tina

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examined data from a Danish prospective longitudinal project in attempt to address the state/trait controversy regarding theory of mind deficits in schizophrenia. Deficits in perspective-taking--a component of theory of mind--were investigated prospectively among children who......-psychotic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Deficits in perspective-taking among children who later developed schizophrenia spectrum disorders suggest that a facet of theory of mind is impaired prior to development of schizophrenia. Our findings lend support to the hypothesis that theory of mind deficits in schizophrenia...... are trait markers of the disorder....

  17. Reduced load-dependent default mode network deactivation across executive tasks in schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beathe Haatveit

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: These results support a general load-dependent DMN dysfunction in schizophrenia spectrum disorder across two demanding executive tasks that is not merely an epiphenomenon of cognitive dysfunction.

  18. A longitudinal study of schizophrenia- and affective spectrum disorders in individuals diagnosed with a developmental language disorder as children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik Birkebæk; Hauschild, K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence and types of schizophrenia- and affective spectrum disorders were studied in 469 individuals with a developmental language disorder (DLD), assessed in the same clinic during a period of 10 years, and 2,345 controls from the general population. All participants were screened through....... 1.8%; P language disorder was significantly associated with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder diagnosis in the DPCR. There was no significant increase in affective...

  19. Therapeutic alliance in early schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Ragnhild; Iversen, Valentina Cabral; Melle, Ingrid; Hestad, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Background The therapeutic alliance is related to better course and outcome of treatment in schizophrenia. This study explores predictors and characteristics of the therapeutic alliance in recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders including the agreement between patient and therapist alliance ratings. Methods Forty-two patients were assessed with demographic, neurocognitive, and clinical measures ...

  20. Premorbid self-disorders and lifetime diagnosis in the schizophrenia spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef; Carter, John; Frederiksen, Julie E Nordgaard

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The notion of a disordered self as a core disturbance of schizophrenia was proposed in many foundational texts. Recent studies, spurred by the development of the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE), seem to indicate that self-disorders are a specific manifestation of schizophrenia...... vulnerability. Follow-up studies of help-seeking, prodromal and first-admission patients have demonstrated the utility of self-disorders for predicting later schizophrenia-spectrum disturbance. We wished to extend these findings by gauging the predictive value of self-disorders in a premorbid, non...... assessment, we hypothesized that a proxy scale drawn from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) could distinguish those who later developed a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (N = 68) from those who remained healthy (N = 64). The Self-Disorder Scale comprised 32 items whose content suggested...

  1. The relevance of traumatic life events in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis-Bogár, Krisztina; Perczel Forintos, Dóra

    2014-09-30

    The central goal of this manuscript was to review literature about the interconnections of traumatic life events and symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum of the last 15 years. First of all, the stress-diathesis model and the traumagenic neurodevelopmental model are shortly presented. Psychological effects of traumas and specific psychotic symptoms in connection with traumatic events are discussed. The course of the disease in patients affected by previous traumas and possible mediating factors are also addressed. Studies of both clinical and community samples are cited. It was also our aim to review literature about the neurobiological and neurocognitive processes in people affected by schizophrenia and/or traumatic life events. The role of prefrontal and medial temporal regions are explored with a special emphasis on contextual memory and hippocampal functioning. Finally, the possible effects of exploring traumatic life events on the treatment of schizophrenia are discussed.

  2. Association of Schizophrenia Spectrum and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Symptoms in Children with ASD and Clinic Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examines relations between the severity of specific symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) and severity of the three defining symptom domains of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children with ASD (N = 147) and child psychiatry outpatient referrals (Controls; N = 339). Method: Participants were subdivided into four…

  3. Premorbid childhood ocular alignment abnormalities and adult schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Maeda, Justin A; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2005-01-01

    with no parental diagnoses (N=82). In 1992, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 242 of the original subjects. It was found that children who later developed a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder had significantly higher eye exam scale and strabismus scale scores compared to children who developed other...... offspring of parents with other non-psychotic disorder and no mental illness), although the results failed to reach statistical significance. Results from this study suggest a premorbid relation between ocular deficits and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders in childhood prior to onset of psychopathology...... in adulthood. Strabismus may serve as a premorbid marker for spectrum disorders and may have implications for the understanding of early aberrant neurological development related to later schizophrenia-spectrum disorders....

  4. Increased white matter metabolic rates in autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelman, Serge A; Buchsbaum, Monte S; Young, Derek S; Haznedar, M Mehmet; Hollander, Eric; Shihabuddin, Lina; Hazlett, Erin A; Bralet, Marie-Cecile

    2017-11-22

    Both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia are often characterized as disorders of white matter integrity. Multimodal investigations have reported elevated metabolic rates, cerebral perfusion and basal activity in various white matter regions in schizophrenia, but none of these functions has previously been studied in ASD. We used 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography to compare white matter metabolic rates in subjects with ASD (n = 25) to those with schizophrenia (n = 41) and healthy controls (n = 55) across a wide range of stereotaxically placed regions-of-interest. Both subjects with ASD and schizophrenia showed increased metabolic rates across the white matter regions assessed, including internal capsule, corpus callosum, and white matter in the frontal and temporal lobes. These increases were more pronounced, more widespread and more asymmetrical in subjects with ASD than in those with schizophrenia. The highest metabolic increases in both disorders were seen in the prefrontal white matter and anterior limb of the internal capsule. Compared to normal controls, differences in gray matter metabolism were less prominent and differences in adjacent white matter metabolism were more prominent in subjects with ASD than in those with schizophrenia. Autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia are associated with heightened metabolic activity throughout the white matter. Unlike in the gray matter, the vector of white matter metabolic abnormalities appears to be similar in ASD and schizophrenia, may reflect inefficient functional connectivity with compensatory hypermetabolism, and may be a common feature of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  5. Deficits in anticipatory but not consummatory pleasure in people with recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Jasmine; Minzenberg, Michael J; Carter, C S; Kring, Ann M

    2014-10-01

    The majority of studies examining self-reported anticipatory and consummatory pleasure in schizophrenia, as measured on the Temporal Experience of Pleasure Scale (TEPS), have been conducted on chronically ill people with the disorder. In this study, people with a recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis (first psychotic episode within one year of study participation) (n=88) and people without a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis (n=66) were administered the TEPS. People with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis reported significantly lower scores of anticipatory, but not consummatory, pleasure on the TEPS compared to the control group. TEPS anticipatory pleasure scores were also significantly, negatively correlated with negative symptoms, but neither TEPS anticipatory nor consummatory pleasure scores were significantly correlated with functioning measures. Our results replicate previous findings with chronically ill people with schizophrenia on the TEPS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Some new approaches for prevention of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in patients exposed to exogenous stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Dzeruzhinska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Environment factors affect to the clinical phenotype of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Aim. To develop recommendations for the prevention schizophrenia spectrum disorders considering the influence of environmental factors on the clinical pathomorphosis of the disease. Methods. It was conducted the psychopathological and psychodiagnostic survey of 186 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders with an assessment of clinical features and level of social functioning. It was identified factors that have the most significant pathological effects on the course of disorders on the basis of the received data: the using of a cannabinoid in a family history, mother`s infectious and somatic diseases during pregnancy, mother's using alcohol during pregnancy, consumption of alcohol in adolescent patients, fetal hypoxia or perinatal trauma of the patient at birth, problems with the group of primary support in the family of a child in childhood, maternal toxicosis, crisis relationships in the family, migration to different cultural environment. Results. Clinical pathomorphism of disorders of the spectrum of schizophrenia under the influence of environmental factors determines the features of psychotherapeutic interventions. In people with cannabinoids, it is important to eliminate the symptoms of anxiety through emotion-supportive measures, as well as to create a motivation to ask help in case of symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In a group with perinatal complications, the emphasis should be put on cognitive methods in order to correct mental disorders and overcome hypochondria. Early measures to form a positive attitude towards themselves and the environment, supporting family relationships, overcoming depressive symptoms, and developing social activity are targets of psychotherapeutic interventions in people with schizophrenic spectrum disorders and psychological traumatic events. Conclusion. Minimization of environmental

  7. Premorbid cannabis use is associated with more symptoms and poorer functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringen, P A; Nesvåg, R; Helle, S; Lagerberg, T V; Lange, E H; Løberg, E M; Agartz, I; Andreassen, O A; Melle, I

    2016-11-01

    Cannabis use disorder is associated with an earlier age at onset and a more severe outcome of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The role of cannabis use before the onset of illness (premorbid cannabis use) has not been fully investigated. We here examined how amount and type of premorbid cannabis use was associated with the later course of illness including current substance use, symptoms and level of functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorder. We used a naturalistic sample of patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia spectrum disorders with a comprehensive history of illness and substance use. Data on premorbid substance use was obtained from comprehensive self-report. The relationship to outcome was investigated using regression models that included current substance use and premorbid functioning. Pre-schizophrenia cannabis use was significantly associated with more severe psychotic symptoms and impaired functioning. Higher levels of premorbid cannabis use were associated with higher levels of current psychotic symptoms. These associations were independent of current substance use and premorbid functioning. Early use of cannabis (age cannabis use affects illness outcome in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and is associated with lower age at onset of psychosis. These findings of independent negative effects of premorbid cannabis use in schizophrenia suggest that a limitation of the general use of cannabis may have beneficial health effects.

  8. Exclusion of close linkage between the synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter locus and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persico, A.M.; Uhl, G.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Zhe Wu [Universitario Campus Bio-Medico, Rome (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    The principal brain synaptic vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) is responsible for the reuptake of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and histamine from the cytoplasm into synaptic vesicles, thus contributing to determination of the size of releasable neurotransmitter vesicular pools. Potential involvement of VMAT2 gene variants in the etiology of schizophrenia and related disorders was tested using polymorphic VMAT2 gene markers in 156 subjects from 16 multiplex pedigrees with schizophrenia, schizophreniform, schizoaffective, and schizotypal disorders and mood incongruent psychotic depression. Assuming genetic homogeneity, complete ({theta} = 0.0) linkage to the schizophrenia spectrum was excluded under both dominant and recessive models. Allelic variants at the VMAT2 locus do not appear to provide major genetic contributions to the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in these pedigrees. 16 refs.

  9. Schizophrenia spectrum disorders show reduced specificity and less positive events in mental time travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-jie Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mental time travel refers to the ability to recall past events and to imagine possible future events. Schizophrenia patients have problems in remembering specific personal experiences in the past and imagining what will happen in the future. This study aimed to examine episodic past and future thinking in schizophrenia spectrum disorders including schizophrenia patients and individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (SPD proneness who are at risk for developing schizophrenia. Thirty-two schizophrenia patients, 30 SPD proneness individuals, and 33 healthy controls participated in the study. The Sentence Completion for Events from the Past Test (SCEPT and the Sentence Completion for Events in the Future Test (SCEFT were used to measure past and future thinking abilities. Results showed that schizophrenia patients showed significantly reduced specificity in recalling past and imagining future events, they generated less proportion of specific and extended events compared to healthy controls. SPD proneness individuals only generated less extended events compared to healthy controls. The reduced specificity was mainly manifested in imagining future events. Both schizophrenia patients and SPD proneness individuals generated less positive events than controls. These results suggest that mental time travel impairments in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and have implications for understanding their cognitive and emotional deficits.

  10. Prevalence of Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in Average-IQ Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo Marín, Jorge; Alviani Rodríguez-Franco, Montserrat; Mahtani Chugani, Vinita; Magán Maganto, María; Díez Villoria, Emiliano; Canal Bedia, Ricardo

    2017-10-04

    Since their separation as independent diagnostics, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) have been conceptualized as mutually exclusive disorders. Similarities between both disorders can lead to misdiagnosis, especially when it comes to average-IQ adults who were not identified during childhood. The aim of this review was to examine the occurrence of SSD in average-IQ adults with ASD. Electronic and manual searches identified a total of 278 references, of which 10 were included in a meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of SSD in the total ASD sample was close to 6%, pointing to a high co-occurrence of the two conditions. Further research is needed to determine the factors that predispose members of this population to the emergence of psychotic disorders.

  11. Coping strategies and self-stigma in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubova, Michaela; Prasko, Jan; Hruby, Radovan; Latalova, Klara; Kamaradova, Dana; Marackova, Marketa; Slepecky, Milos; Gubova, Terezia

    2016-01-01

    Maladaptive coping strategies may adversely disturb the overall functioning of people with mental disorders. Also, self-stigma is considered a maladaptive psychosocial phenomenon that can affect many areas of patient life. It has a negative impact on self-image, and may lead to dysphoria, social isolation, reduced adherence, using of negative coping strategies, and lower quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between coping strategies and self-stigma among persons with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders. A total of 104 clinically stable outpatients with chronic schizophrenia-spectrum disorders were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic and clinical data were recorded. Patients were examined by psychiatrists with the Stress Coping Style Questionnaire, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale, and the Clinical Global Impression scale. Correlation and multiple-regression analyses were performed to discover contributing factors to self-stigma. Positive coping strategies were used by patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders to the same extent as in the healthy population. Negative coping strategies were overused by these patients. There were significant associations between self-stigma, severity of the disorder, and coping strategies in schizophrenia. The ability to use positive coping strategies was connected with lower self-stigma. Use of negative coping strategies predominantly increased the self-stigma of patients with schizophrenia. This study revealed a significant association among self-stigma, severity of the disorder, and coping strategies in individuals suffering from schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Thinking about coping strategies and self-stigma in practice may play a significant role in understanding people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, especially for mental health professionals.

  12. Cross-sensory gating in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder : EEG evidence for impaired brain connectivity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnee, Maurice J. C. M.; Oranje, Bob; van Engeland, Herman; Kahn, Rene S.; Kemner, Chantal

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia are both neurodevelopmental disorders that have extensively been associated with impairments in functional brain connectivity. Using a cross-sensory P50 suppression paradigm, this study investigated low-level audiovisual interactions on cortical EEG

  13. Predictors of remission and recovery in a first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder sample: 2-year follow-up of the OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone; Thorup, Anne; Øqhlenschlaeger, Johan

    2008-01-01

    To examine the frequency and predictors of good outcome for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD).......To examine the frequency and predictors of good outcome for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD)....

  14. Clinical Utility and Lifespan Profiling of Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Raymond C. K.; Xie, Weizhen; Geng, Fu-lei; Wang, Ya; Lui, Simon S. Y.; Wang, Chuan-yue; Yu, Xin; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Rosenthal, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSSs) bear the promise for early detection of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Nonetheless, the sensitivity and specificity of NSSs in the psychosis continuum remains a topic of controversy. It is also unknown how NSSs reveal neurodevelopmental abnormality in schizophrenia. We investigated the effect sizes of NSSs in differentiating individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from individuals with other psychiatric conditions and from covariate-matched healthy subjects. We also investigated the partitioned age-related variations of NSSs in both schizophrenia and healthy individuals. NSSs were assessed by the abridged version of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 3105 participants, consisting of healthy individuals (n =1577), unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (n = 155), individuals with schizotypal personality disorder (n = 256), schizophrenia patients (n = 738), and other psychiatric patients (n = 379). Exact matching and propensity score matching procedures were performed to control for covariates. Multiple regression was used to partition age-related variations. Individuals along the schizophrenia continuum showed elevated levels of NSSs, with moderate effect sizes, in contrast to other psychiatric patients who had minimal NSSs, as well as matched healthy controls. Furthermore, the age-and-NSS relationship in schizophrenia patients was represented by a flat but overall elevated pattern, in contrast to a U-shaped pattern in healthy individuals. In sum, NSSs capture a moderate portion of psychosis proneness with reasonable specificity. Lifespan profiling reveals an abnormal developmental trajectory of NSSs in schizophrenia patients, which supports the endophenotype hypothesis of NSSs by associating it with the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. PMID:26712863

  15. Comparison of psychopathological dimensions between major depressive disorder and schizophrenia spectrum disorders focusing on language, affectivity and motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinau, Sarah; Stegmayer, Katharina; Lang, Fabian U; Jäger, Markus; Strik, Werner; Walther, Sebastian

    2017-04-01

    This study tested whether patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorders would differ in three dimensions of psychopathology (language, affectivity and motor behavior) as assessed by the Bern Psychopathology Scale (BPS) in a cohort of 58 patients with MDD and 146 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The overall estimation of severity of each of the three dimensions was rated on a seven-point Likert scale from severely inhibited to severely disinhibited. Here, more than half of the patients endorsed ratings that showed normal or mildly (dis-)inhibited behavior. At group level more pronounced negative ratings of affect were seen in MDD. Group comparisons of the severity ratings on language or motor behavior yielded no differences between schizophrenia spectrum disorders and MDD. At the individuals' levels, extreme ratings in the language and motor dimensions were more frequent in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and in the affectivity dimension more frequent in MDD. Shared psychopathological features could be seen across diagnoses, supporting a dimensional approach to psychopathology in endogenous psychoses. However, the groups differ in the severity of affect ratings as well as in the distribution of language, affectivity and motor ratings with more variance among the group of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Predictors of Suicide Attempts in 3.322 Patients with Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Eunice Y.; Fink, Sabina; Duque, Laura M.; Kane, John M.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores risk factors for suicide attempts using the electronic health records of 3,322 patients with either schizophrenia spectrum disorders or affective disorders who underwent a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation at the Emergency Department at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center or the Hillside Evaluation Center at The Zucker Hillside Hospital from August 3rd 2011 to July 5th 2012. Multivariate regression analyses showed, after adjusting for sex, that previous suicidal attempts and financial or relationship losses were significantly associated with a current suicidal attempt. Additionally, higher odds of having a suicidal attempt were also found in those subjects with a diagnosis of an affective disorder, compared to a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis, and those patients in the children/adolescent group compared to those in the adult/elderly group. Our study results confirm and expand results from prior studies. Therefore, physicians should be alert for the presence of any or all of these factors upon evaluation of psychiatric patients, and if present, either psychiatric hospitalization or a close psychiatric follow up in collaboration with family and a therapist would be key in reducing the risk of potential suicidal behavior. PMID:26077849

  17. Coping strategies and self-stigma in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holubova M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michaela Holubova,1,2 Jan Prasko,1 Radovan Hruby,3 Klara Latalova,1 Dana Kamaradova,1 Marketa Marackova,1 Milos Slepecky,4 Terezia Gubova2 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacký University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic; 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic; 3Private Psychiatric Practice, Martin, Slovak Republic; 4Department of Psychology Sciences, Faculty of Social Science and Health Care, Constantine the Philosopher University, Nitra, Slovak Republic Background: Maladaptive coping strategies may adversely disturb the overall functioning of people with mental disorders. Also, self-stigma is considered a maladaptive psychosocial phenomenon that can affect many areas of patient life. It has a negative impact on self-image, and may lead to dysphoria, social isolation, reduced adherence, using of negative coping strategies, and lower quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between coping strategies and self-stigma among persons with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders.Subjects and methods: A total of 104 clinically stable outpatients with chronic schizophrenia-spectrum disorders were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic and clinical data were recorded. Patients were examined by psychiatrists with the Stress Coping Style Questionnaire, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale, and the Clinical Global Impression scale. Correlation and multiple-regression analyses were performed to discover contributing factors to self-stigma.Results: Positive coping strategies were used by patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders to the same extent as in the healthy population. Negative coping strategies were overused by these patients. There were significant associations between self-stigma, severity of the disorder, and coping strategies in schizophrenia. The ability to use positive coping

  18. Prevalence and classification of hallucinations in multiple sensory modalities in schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Anastasia; Hoek, Hans W.; Deen, Mathijs L.; Blom, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auditory hallucinations are experienced by 60-80% of all patients diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. However, in this patient group, the prevalence of hallucinations in multiple sensory modalities, i.e. multimodal hallucinations (MMHs), is unknown. Aims: To assess the

  19. Prevalence and classification of hallucinations in multiple sensory modalities in schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Anastasia; Hoek, Hans W.; Deen, Mathijs L.; Blom, Jan Dirk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Kahn, René S.; Meijer, Carin J.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk

    2016-01-01

    Background Auditory hallucinations are experienced by 60–80% of all patients diagnosed with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. However, in this patient group, the prevalence of hallucinations in multiple sensory modalities, i.e. multimodal hallucinations (MMHs), is unknown. Aims To assess the

  20. Behaviour Problems in Institutionalised People with Intellectual Disability and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, Ryan T.; Matson, Johnny L.; Rojahn, Johannes; Dixon, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although our understanding of dual diagnosis has improved, a deficit still exists in our knowledge of how schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) manifest themselves in individuals with intellectual disability (ID). In addition, little is known about the relationship between behaviour problems and psychopathology in this population.…

  1. Treatment of cannabis use disorders in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Fohlmann, Allan; Nordentoft, Merete

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cannabis use disorders (CUD) are prevalent among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), with a range of detrimental effects, e.g. reduced compliance to medication and psychosocial interventions, and increased level of psychotic-dimension symptoms. The aim of this study...... was to review literature on treatments of CUD in SSD-patients. METHODS: PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched. RESULTS: 41 articles were selected, 11 treating cannabis as a separate outcome. Contingency management was only effective while active...... together with other substance use disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Insufficient evidence exists on treating this form of dual-diagnosis patients. Studies grouping several types of substances as a single outcome may overlook differential effects. Future RCTs should investigate combinations of psychosocial...

  2. Reprint of "Treatment of cannabis use disorders in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders--a systematic review"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Fohlmann, Allan; Nordentoft, Merete

    2009-01-01

    Cannabis use disorders (CUD) are prevalent among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), with a range of detrimental effects, e.g. reduced compliance to medication and psychosocial interventions, and increased level of psychotic-dimension symptoms. The aim of this study was to review...

  3. Reprint of "Treatment of cannabis use disorders in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders--a systematic review"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Fohlmann, Allan; Nordentoft, Merete

    2009-01-01

    Cannabis use disorders (CUD) are prevalent among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD), with a range of detrimental effects, e.g. reduced compliance to medication and psychosocial interventions, and increased level of psychotic-dimension symptoms. The aim of this study was to review ...... literature on treatments of CUD in SSD-patients....

  4. Sleep Disturbances and Suicide Risk in an 8-Year Longitudinal Study of Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shirley Xin; Lam, Siu Ping; Zhang, Jihui; Yu, Mandy Wai Man; Chan, Joey Wing Yan; Chan, Cassandra Sheung Yan; Espie, Colin A; Freeman, Daniel; Mason, Oliver; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2016-06-01

    Disrupted sleep is one of the prominent but often overlooked presenting symptoms in the clinical course of psychotic disorders. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of sleep disturbances, particularly insomnia and nightmares, and their prospective associations with the risk of suicide attempts in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. A naturalistic longitudinal study was conducted in outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders recruited from the psychiatric outpatient clinic of a regional university-affiliated public hospital in Hong Kong. A detailed sleep questionnaire was completed by 388 patients at baseline in May-June 2006. Relevant clinical information was extracted from clinical case notes from June 2007-October 2014. Prevalence of frequent insomnia and frequent nightmares was 19% and 9%, respectively. Baseline frequent insomnia was significantly associated with an increased incidence of suicide attempts during the follow-up period (adjusted hazard ratio = 4.63, 95% confidence interval 1.40-15.36, P Sleep disturbances are common in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The association between sleep disturbances and suicidal risk underscores the need for enhanced clinical attention and intervention on sleep disturbances in patients with schizophrenia. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. Dissociation and social cognition in schizophrenia spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renard, Selwyn B.; Pijnenborg, Marieke; Lysaker, Paul H.

    While there is emerging evidence that dissociation is linked with trauma history and possibly symptoms in schizophrenia, it remains unclear whether dissociation represents a symptom dimensions in its own right in schizophrenia and as such is uniquely related to other features of illness. To explore

  6. Some new approaches for prevention of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in patients exposed to exogenous stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Dzeruzhinska

    2017-08-01

    Methods. It was conducted the psychopathological and psychodiagnostic survey  of 186 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders with an assessment of clinical features and level of social functioning. It was identified factors that have the most significant pathological effects on the course of disorders on the basis of the received data: the using of a cannabinoid in a family history, mother`s infectious and somatic diseases during pregnancy, mother's using alcohol during pregnancy, consumption of alcohol in adolescent patients, fetal hypoxia or perinatal trauma of the patient at birth, problems with the group of primary support in the family of a child in childhood, maternal toxicosis, crisis relationships in the family, migration to different cultural environment. Results. Clinical pathomorphism of disorders of the spectrum of schizophrenia under the influence of environment factors determines the features of psychotherapeutic interventions. In people with cannabinoids, it is important to eliminate the symptoms of anxiety through emotion-supportive measures, as well as to create a motivation to ask help in case of symptoms of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In a group with perinatal complications, the emphasis should be put on cognitive methods in order to correct mental disorders and overcome hypochondria. Early measures to form a positive attitude towards themselves and the environment, supporting family relationships, overcoming depressive symptoms, and developing social activity are targets of psychotherapeutic interventions in people with schizophrenic spectrum disorders and psychological traumatic events. Conclusion. Minimization of environmental factors influence in high risk individuals would postpone early manifestation, reduce disability in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, as evidenced by the statement of leading health experts.

  7. Cross-sensory gating in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder: EEG evidence for impaired brain connectivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnée, Maurice J C M; Oranje, Bob; van Engeland, Herman

    2009-01-01

    activation, which provides crucial information about functional integrity of connections between brain areas involved in cross-sensory processing in both disorders. Thirteen high functioning adult males with ASD, 13 high functioning adult males with schizophrenia, and 16 healthy adult males participated......Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia are both neurodevelopmental disorders that have extensively been associated with impairments in functional brain connectivity. Using a cross-sensory P50 suppression paradigm, this study investigated low-level audiovisual interactions on cortical EEG...... in the study. No differences in neither auditory nor cross-sensory P50 suppression were found between healthy controls and individuals with ASD. In schizophrenia, attenuated P50 responses to the first auditory stimulus indicated early auditory processing deficits. These results are in accordance...

  8. Premorbid childhood ocular alignment abnormalities and adult schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Maeda, Justin A; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2005-01-01

    . All children whose mothers or fathers had a psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia comprised the first group (N=90). Children who had at least one parent with a diagnosis other than schizophrenia comprised the first matched control group (N=93). The second control group consisted of children......This study examined the relation between childhood ocular alignment deficits and adult psychiatric outcomes among children at high-risk for schizophrenia and controls. A sample of 265 Danish children was administered a standardized eye exam assessing strabismus and related ocular alignment deficits...... with no parental diagnoses (N=82). In 1992, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 242 of the original subjects. It was found that children who later developed a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder had significantly higher eye exam scale and strabismus scale scores compared to children who developed other...

  9. Emotion Recognition Deficits in Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder: Findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Anthony C.; Reilly, James L.; Rubin, Leah H.; Daros, Alex R.; Gershon, Elliot S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Hill, S. Kristian; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Gur, Ruben C.; Sweeney, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Difficulty recognizing facial emotions is an important social-cognitive deficit associated with psychotic disorders. It also may reflect a familial risk for psychosis in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder. Objective The objectives of this study from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) consortium were to: 1) compare emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder with psychosis, 2) determine the familiality of emotion recognition deficits across these disorders, and 3) evaluate emotion recognition deficits in nonpsychotic relatives with and without elevated Cluster A and Cluster B personality disorder traits. Method Participants included probands with schizophrenia (n=297), schizoaffective disorder (depressed type, n=61; bipolar type, n=69), bipolar disorder with psychosis (n=248), their first-degree relatives (n=332, n=69, n=154, and n=286, respectively) and healthy controls (n=380). All participants completed the Penn Emotion Recognition Test, a standardized measure of facial emotion recognition assessing four basic emotions (happiness, sadness, anger and fear) and neutral expressions (no emotion). Results Compared to controls, emotion recognition deficits among probands increased progressively from bipolar disorder to schizoaffective disorder to schizophrenia. Proband and relative groups showed similar deficits perceiving angry and neutral faces, whereas deficits on fearful, happy and sad faces were primarily isolated to schizophrenia probands. Even non-psychotic relatives without elevated Cluster A or Cluster B personality disorder traits showed deficits on neutral and angry faces. Emotion recognition ability was moderately familial only in schizophrenia families. Conclusions Emotion recognition deficits are prominent but somewhat different across psychotic disorders. These deficits are reflected to a lesser extent in relatives, particularly on angry and

  10. Emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and psychotic bipolar disorder: Findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Anthony C; Reilly, James L; Rubin, Leah H; Daros, Alex R; Gershon, Elliot S; Tamminga, Carol A; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Hill, S Kristian; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Gur, Ruben C; Sweeney, John A

    2014-09-01

    Difficulty recognizing facial emotions is an important social-cognitive deficit associated with psychotic disorders. It also may reflect a familial risk for psychosis in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder. The objectives of this study from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) consortium were to: 1) compare emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder with psychosis, 2) determine the familiality of emotion recognition deficits across these disorders, and 3) evaluate emotion recognition deficits in nonpsychotic relatives with and without elevated Cluster A and Cluster B personality disorder traits. Participants included probands with schizophrenia (n=297), schizoaffective disorder (depressed type, n=61; bipolar type, n=69), bipolar disorder with psychosis (n=248), their first-degree relatives (n=332, n=69, n=154, and n=286, respectively) and healthy controls (n=380). All participants completed the Penn Emotion Recognition Test, a standardized measure of facial emotion recognition assessing four basic emotions (happiness, sadness, anger and fear) and neutral expressions (no emotion). Compared to controls, emotion recognition deficits among probands increased progressively from bipolar disorder to schizoaffective disorder to schizophrenia. Proband and relative groups showed similar deficits perceiving angry and neutral faces, whereas deficits on fearful, happy and sad faces were primarily isolated to schizophrenia probands. Even non-psychotic relatives without elevated Cluster A or Cluster B personality disorder traits showed deficits on neutral and angry faces. Emotion recognition ability was moderately familial only in schizophrenia families. Emotion recognition deficits are prominent but somewhat different across psychotic disorders. These deficits are reflected to a lesser extent in relatives, particularly on angry and neutral faces. Deficits were evident in non

  11. Factor structure of the Bern Psychopathology Scale in a sample of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Fabian U; Stierlin, Annabel S; Stegmayer, Katharina; Walther, Sebastian; Becker, Thomas; Jäger, Markus

    2015-10-01

    The Bern Psychopathology Scale (BPS) is based on a system-specific approach to classifying the psychopathological symptom pattern of schizophrenia. It consists of subscales for three domains (language, affect and motor behaviour) that are hypothesized to be related to specific brain circuits. The aim of the study was to examine the factor structure of the BPS in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. One hundred and forty-nine inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were recruited at the Department of Psychiatry II, Ulm University, Germany (n=100) and at the University Hospital of Psychiatry, Bern, Switzerland (n=49). Psychopathology was assessed with the BPS. The VARCLUS procedure of SAS(®) (a type of oblique component analysis) was used for statistical analysis. Six clusters were identified (inhibited language, inhibited motor behaviour, inhibited affect, disinhibited affect, disinhibited language/motor behaviour, inhibited language/motor behaviour) which explained 40.13% of the total variance of the data. A binary division of attributes into an inhibited and disinhibited cluster was appropriate, although an overlap was found between the language and motor behaviour domains. There was a clear distinction between qualitative and quantitative symptoms. The results argue for the validity of the BPS in identifying subsyndromes of schizophrenia spectrum disorders according to a dimensional approach. Future research should address the longitudinal assessment of dimensional psychopathological symptoms and elucidate the underlying neurobiological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostic agreement of schizophrenia spectrum disorders among chronic patients with functional psychoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K D; Frederiksen, J N; Parnas, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate whether diagnostic agreement across different diagnostic systems improves in a sample of chronic patients suffering from functional psychosis compared to first-admitted patients. SAMPLING AND METHODS: Among 353 patients with a history of functional psychosis, a subset...... of 100 individuals (35 women and 65 men) were randomly sampled and assessed using the Operational Criteria Checklist for Psychotic Illness and Affective Illness (OPCRIT). Based on the OPCRIT diagnoses the subjects suffering from schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders according to seven...... concordance to the St. Louis Criteria (SLC), research diagnostic criteria and Schneider's first rank symptoms (FRS) (0.32Elimination of the diagnostic impact of 'co...

  13. Association testing of copy number variants in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crespi Bernard J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia have been associated with an overlapping set of copy number variant loci, but the nature and degree of overlap in copy number variants (deletions compared to duplications between these two disorders remains unclear. Methods We systematically evaluated three lines of evidence: (1 the statistical bases for associations of autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia with a set of the primary CNVs thus far investigated, from previous studies; (2 data from case series studies on the occurrence of these CNVs in autism spectrum disorders, especially among children, and (3 data on the extent to which the CNVs were associated with intellectual disability and developmental, speech, or language delays. We also conducted new analyses of existing data on these CNVs in autism by pooling data from seven case control studies. Results Four of the CNVs considered, dup 1q21.1, dup 15q11-q13, del 16p11.2, and dup 22q11.21, showed clear statistical evidence as autism risk factors, whereas eight CNVs, del 1q21.1, del 3q29, del 15q11.2, del 15q13.3, dup 16p11.2, dup 16p13.1, del 17p12, and del 22q11.21, were strongly statistically supported as risk factors for schizophrenia. Three of the CNVs, dup 1q21.1, dup 16p11.2, and dup 16p13.1, exhibited statistical support as risk factors for both autism and schizophrenia, although for each of these CNVs statistical significance was nominal for tests involving one of the two disorders. For the CNVs that were statistically associated with schizophrenia but were not statistically associated with autism, a notable number of children with the CNVs have been diagnosed with autism or ASD; children with these CNVs also demonstrate a high incidence of intellectual disability and developmental, speech, or language delays. Conclusions These findings suggest that although CNV loci notably overlap between autism and schizophrenia, the degree of strongly statistically

  14. Context processing in schizotypal personality disorder: evidence of specificity of impairment to the schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Margaret M; Barch, Deanna M; Flory, Janine D; Harvey, Philip D; Siever, Larry J

    2008-05-01

    Working memory abnormalities, which are particularly pronounced on context processing tasks, appear relatively specific to schizophrenia spectrum illnesses compared with other psychotic disorders. However, the specificity of context processing deficits to schizotypal personality disorder (SPD), a prototype of schizophrenia, has not been studied. The authors administered 3 versions of the modified AX Continuous Performance Test and an N-back working memory test to 63 individuals with SPD and 25 with other personality disorders, as well as 42 healthy controls. For the AX Continuous Performance Test standard and degraded versions, there was a significant Trial Type x Delay x Group interaction, as SPDs made significantly more errors reflecting poor maintenance of context and fewer errors reflecting good maintenance of context. SPDs also demonstrated poor performance on the N-back, especially at the 2-back condition. Context processing errors and N-back accuracy scores were related to disorganization symptoms. These findings, which are quite similar to those previously reported in patients with schizophrenia, suggest that context processing deficits are specific to the schizophrenia spectrum and are not a reflection of overall psychopathology.

  15. Type and timing of childhood maltreatment and severity of shutdown dissociation in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schalinski, Inga; Teicher, Martin H

    2015-01-01

    .... Vulnerability to ongoing shutdown dissociation was assessed in 75 inpatients (46 M/29 F, M = 31 ± 10 years old) with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and related to number of traumatic events experienced or witnessed during childhood or adulthood...

  16. Antipsychotic treatment for children and adolescents with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Tarp, Simon; Glintborg, D

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Antipsychotic treatment in early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) lacks a rich evidence base, and efforts to rank different drugs concerning their efficacy have not proven any particular drug superior. In contrast to the literature regarding adult-onset schizophrenia (AOS), comparative...... for EOS to determine which compounds are efficacious, and to determine the relative efficacy and safety of these treatments when compared in a network meta-analysis. Unlike a contrast-based (standard) meta-analysis approach, an arm-based network meta-analysis enables statistical inference from combining...... perform data abstraction and assess risk of bias of eligible trials. We will conduct meta-analyses to establish the effect of all reported therapies on patient-relevant efficacy and safety outcomes when possible. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No formal ethical procedures regarding informed consent...

  17. Depersonalization in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, first-degree relatives and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Torres, Miguel Angel; Inchausti, Lucía; Aristegui, Maialen; Ibañez, Berta; Diez, Luis; Fernandez-Rivas, Aranzazu; Bustamante, Sonia; Haidar, Karim; Rodríguez-Zabaleta, Maier; Mingo, Argiñe

    2010-01-01

    Depersonalization occurs in healthy individuals and across a broad range of psychiatric patients. Data on depersonalization in persons linked to patients through genetics, environment or education are scarce. Due to their higher risk of developing psychosis, first-degree healthy relatives might show differences with the general population. This study examines depersonalization in patients with schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorders, their first-degree healthy relatives and normal controls. The Cambridge Depersonalization Scale was used to measure depersonalization in a sample of 147 clinically stable patients with schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorders, 73 first-degree relatives with no psychiatric history and 172 healthy controls. Mixed effect models were used to account for both the familial structure of the data and the effect of sociodemographic characteristics. Patients obtained higher scores than relatives and controls for frequency and duration of depersonalization experiences, number of items responded positively and total depersonalization, while first-degree relatives obtained lower scores than patients and controls for all these characteristics. First-degree relatives of patients reported fewer episodes of depersonalization, which were less intense and of shorter duration, than healthy controls. This finding might be related to a protection mechanism that keeps first-degree relatives away from near-psychotic experiences. The nature of such a mechanism remains to be discovered. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials for diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in adults. A blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouilenko, Irina; Humble, Mats B; Georgieva, Jeanette; Bejerot, Susanne

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the clinical utility of complex auditory brainstem response (c-ABR) and investigate if c-ABR is helpful in the diagnostic procedure. Thirty-one adult psychiatric patients, thoroughly diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (n=16), ADHD (n=8), or schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) (n=7) and 15 healthy controls (HC), were blindly assessed with SensoDetect BERA. This c-ABR correctly identified psychiatric diagnoses in 4 patients (13%) and provided partially correct diagnoses in 11 more patients. Of the 15 HC, 6 were misclassified as psychiatric patients. The Cohen´s kappa coefficient (κ) was substantial for HC (κ=0.67), fair for SSD (κ=0.37), slight for ADHD (κ=0.09) and without agreement in ASD (κ=-0.03). In conclusion, we found the c-ABR method unhelpful and unreliable as a tool in clinical diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Longitudinal associations between mismatch negativity and disability in early schizophrenia- and affective-spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manreena; Lagopoulos, Jim; Lee, Rico Sze Chun; Ward, Philip B; Naismith, Sharon L; Hickie, Ian B; Hermens, Daniel F

    2013-10-01

    Impaired mismatch negativity (MMN) is a robust finding in schizophrenia and, more recently, similar impairments have been reported in other psychotic- and affective-disorders (including at early stages of illness). Although cross-sectional studies have been numerous, there are few longitudinal studies that have explored the predictive value of this event-related potential in relation to clinical/functional outcomes. This study assessed changes in MMN (and the concomitant P3a) amplitude over time and aimed to determine the longitudinal relationship between MMN/P3a and functional outcomes in patients recruited during the early stage of a schizophrenia- or affective-spectrum disorder. Sixty young patients with schizophrenia- and affective-spectrum disorders and 30 healthy controls underwent clinical, neuropsychological and neurophysiological assessment at baseline. Thirty-one patients returned for clinical and neuropsychological follow-up 12-30months later, with 28 of these patients also repeating neurophysiological assessment. On both occasions, MMN/P3a was elicited using a two-tone passive auditory paradigm with duration deviants. Compared with controls, patients showed significantly impaired temporal MMN amplitudes and trend-level deficits in central MMN/P3a amplitudes at baseline. There were no significant differences for MMN measures between the diagnostic groups, whilst the schizophrenia-spectrum group showed reduced P3a amplitudes compared to those with affective-spectrum disorders. For those patients who returned for follow-up, reduced temporal MMN amplitude at baseline was significantly associated with greater levels of occupational disability, and showed trend-level associations with general and social disability at follow-up. Paired t-tests revealed that MMN amplitudes recorded at the central-midline site were significantly reduced in patients over time. Interestingly, those patients who did not return for follow-up showed reduced frontal MMN and fronto

  20. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Annie LK Yip School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients' needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have

  1. The role of schizotypy in the study of the etiology of schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Grant, Phillip; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2015-03-01

    Schizotypy provides a useful construct for understanding the development of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. As research on the epidemiology of psychotic symptoms and clinical risk for psychosis has expanded, conceptual challenges have emerged to comprehend the nature and borders of the space comprised between personality variation and psychosis. Schizotypy is considered in light of these more recent constructs. It is suggested that rather than being superseded by them due to their higher specificity and predictive power for transition to psychosis, schizotypy integrates them as it constitutes a dynamic continuum ranging from personality to psychosis. The advantages of schizotypy for studying schizophrenia etiology are discussed (eg, it facilitates a developmental approach and the identification of causal, resilience, and compensating factors and offers a multidimensional structure that captures etiological heterogeneity). An overview of putative genetic, biological, and psychosocial risk factors is presented, focusing on communalities and differences between schizotypy and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The found notable overlap supports etiological continuity, and, simultaneously, differential findings appear that are critical to understanding resilience to schizophrenia. For example, discrepant findings in genetic studies might be interpreted as suggestive of sets of independent genetic factors playing a differential role in schizotypy and schizophrenia: some would influence variation specifically on schizotypy dimensions (ie, high vs low schizotypy, thereby increasing proneness to psychosis), some would confer unspecific liability to disease by impacting neural properties and susceptibility to environmental factors (ie, high vs low resilience to disorder) and some might contribute to disease-specific characteristics. Finally, schizotypy's promise for studying gene-environment interactions is considered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  2. Predictors and longitudinal course of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, 10 years after baseline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, Sara; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Sørensen, Holger J.

    2016-01-01

    of illness is another matter of interest. METHODS: Participants from The Danish OPUS Trial, aged 18-45years, with a baseline ICD-10 schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis, were assessed on psychopathology, social and vocational functioning at baseline, and cognitive functioning 5 (N=298) and 10years (N=322) after......BACKGROUND: Identifying baseline predictors of the long-term course of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorders is important because of associations between cognitive functioning (CF) and functional outcome. Determining whether CF remains stable or change during the course...... premorbid achievement and later age of onset. Having finished high school and receiving early intervention treatment was associated with better CF. Age, growing up with both parents, number of family and friends, primary caregivers education, premorbid social function, negative symptoms, GAF (symptoms...

  3. Personality traits, interpersonal problems and therapeutic alliance in early schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Ragnhild; Melle, Ingrid; Iversen, Valentina Cabral; Hestad, Knut

    2013-11-01

    The quality of the therapeutic alliance is associated with engagement in- and thus important to the outcome of- treatment in schizophrenia. In non-psychotic disorders, general personality traits and individual patterns of interpersonal problems have been linked to the formation and quality of the therapeutic alliance. The role of these factors in relation to therapeutic alliance has not previously been explored in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. To investigate associations between personality traits, interpersonal problems and the quality of the therapeutic alliance in early schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Demographic and clinical characteristics including Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores were assessed in 42 patients. Personality traits and interpersonal problems were assessed with the NEO Five factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and the circumplex model of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64C). Therapeutic alliance was measured with the Working Alliance Inventory - short form (WAI-S). Patient WAI-S scores were predicted by IIP-64C Submissive/Hostile interpersonal problems, age and PANSS excitative symptoms. Therapist WAI-S scores were predicted by NEO-FFI Agreeableness and the PANSS insight item. Core traits of personality and dimensions of interpersonal problems are associated with both patients' and therapists' perceptions of the quality of the working alliance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Involvement of Neuroinflammation during Brain Development in Social Cognitive Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yutaka; Chiba, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Development of social cognition, a unique and high-order function, depends on brain maturation from childhood to adulthood in humans. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia have similar social cognitive deficits, although age of onset in each disorder is different. Pathogenesis of these disorders is complex and contains several features, including genetic risk factors, environmental risk factors, and sites of abnormalities in the brain. Although several hypotheses have been postulated, they seem to be insufficient to explain how brain alterations associated with symptoms in these disorders develop at distinct developmental stages. Development of ASD appears to be related to cerebellar dysfunction and subsequent thalamic hyperactivation in early childhood. By contrast, schizophrenia seems to be triggered by thalamic hyperactivation in late adolescence, whereas hippocampal aberration has been possibly initiated in childhood. One of the possible culprits is metal homeostasis disturbances that can induce dysfunction of blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. Thalamic hyperactivation is thought to be induced by microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and abnormalities of intracerebral environment. Consequently, it is likely that the thalamic hyperactivation triggers dysregulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for lower brain regions related to social cognition. In this review, we summarize the brain aberration in ASD and schizophrenia and provide a possible mechanism underlying social cognitive deficits in these disorders based on their distinct ages of onset. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Cannabis use and premorbid functioning as predictors of poorer neurocognition in schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringen, P Andreas; Melle, Ingrid; Berg, Akiah O; Agartz, Ingrid; Spigset, Olav; Simonsen, Carmen; Sundet, Kjetil; Andreassen, Ole A

    2013-01-01

    Evidence of associations between neurocognitive function and cannabis use in schizophrenia is inconclusive. However, direct measures of cannabis intake and premorbid function are rarely explored in this context. We investigated the relation between cannabis use, determined by its presence in urine, and neurocognitive functioning in schizophrenia controlling for the potential bias of premorbid functioning. Naturalistic study of 364 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder from catchment areas in Oslo, Norway. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between cannabis in urine and measures of neurocognitive functioning, with adjustment for confounders, including premorbid functioning. Cannabis was detected in the urine of 21 patients, who had significant dysfunction in several neurocognitive domains independent of a current diagnosis of cannabis abuse. However, level of premorbid functioning explained the associations for all measures. Differences in premorbid functioning may explain apparent differences in neurocognitive function between schizophrenia spectrum patients using cannabis or not. The findings suggest that illness-related traits present early in life can affect both later cannabis use and neurocognition, probably by complex mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Anger expression styles in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: associations with anxiety, paranoia, emotion recognition, and trauma history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Jamie M; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-12-01

    Heightened levels of anger and dysregulated expression of anger have been associated with poorer outcomes and treatment response for persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Less is known, however, about the psychological processes that determine the extent to which anger is expressed in a more versus less adaptive manner. To explore this issue, this study gathered reports of anger expression style in 88 persons with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder using the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory, Second Edition. The authors additionally assessed anxiety, suspiciousness, emotion recognition, self-esteem, and cumulative trauma history. Correlations and multiple regression analyses showed that outward anger control, that is, the suppression of anger, was predicted by lower levels of suspiciousness, poorer emotion recognition, and reduced anxiety. Participants who endorsed greater anxiety and had experienced more traumatic events reported a heightened tendency to express anger both inwardly and outwardly.

  7. Unique and Overlapping Symptoms in Schizophrenia Spectrum and Dissociative Disorders in Relation to Models of Psychopathology : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renard, Selwyn B.; Huntjens, Rafaele J. C.; Lysaker, Paul H.; Moskowitz, Andrew; Aleman, André; Pijnenborg, Gerdina H. M.

    Schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs) and dissociative disorders (DDs) are described in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and tenth edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) as 2

  8. Therapeutic alliance in early schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The therapeutic alliance is related to better course and outcome of treatment in schizophrenia. This study explores predictors and characteristics of the therapeutic alliance in recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders including the agreement between patient and therapist alliance ratings. Methods Forty-two patients were assessed with demographic, neurocognitive, and clinical measures including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The therapeutic alliance was measured with the Working Alliance Inventory - Short Form (WAI-S). Results Patient WAI-S total scores were predicted by age and PANSS excitative symptoms. Therapist WAI-S total scores were predicted by PANSS insight. Patient and therapist WAI-S total scores were moderately associated. Neurocognition was not associated with working alliance. Conclusion Working alliance is associated with specific demographic and symptom characteristics in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders. There is moderate agreement between patients and therapists on the total quality of their working alliance. Findings highlight aspects that may increase therapists’ specificity in the use of alliance-enhancing strategies. PMID:23656747

  9. Self-ordered pointing and visual conditional associative learning tasks in drug-free schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galluzzo Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence of a link between schizophrenia and a deficit of working memory, but this has been derived from tasks not specifically developed to probe working memory per se. Our aim was to investigate whether working memory deficits may be detected across different paradigms using the self-ordered pointing task (SOPT and the visual conditional associative learning task (VCALT in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and healthy controls. The current literature suggests deficits in schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients versus healthy controls but these studies frequently involved small samples, broad diagnostic criteria, inclusion of patients on antipsychotic medications, and were not controlled for symptom domains, severity of the disorder, etc. To overcome some of these limitations, we investigated the self-monitoring and conditional associative learning abilities of a numerically representative sample of healthy controls and a group of non-deteriorated, drug-free patients hospitalized for a schizophrenia spectrum disorder with florid, mainly positive psychotic symptoms. Methods Eighty-five patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 71 or schizophreniform disorder (n = 14 and 80 healthy controls entered the study. The clinical picture was dominated by positive symptoms. The healthy control group had a negative personal and family history of schizophrenia or mood disorder and satisfied all the inclusion and exclusion criteria other than variables related to schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Results Compared to controls, patients had worse performances on SOPT, VCALT and higher SOPT/VCALT ratios, not affected by demographic or clinical variables. ROC curves showed that SOPT, VCALT, and SOPT/VCALT ratio had good accuracy in discriminating patients from controls. The SOPT and VCALT scores were inter-correlated in controls but not in patients. Conclusion The

  10. Self-disorder and brain processing of proprioception in schizophrenia spectrum patients: a re-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnfred, Sidse M; Raballo, Andrea; Morup, Morten; Parnas, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Anomalies of self-awareness (self-disorders, SDs) are theorized to be basic to schizophrenia psychopathology. We have previously observed dysfunction of brain processing of proprioception in schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SZS). We hypothesized that SDs could be associated with abnormalities of early contralateral proprioceptive evoked oscillatory brain activity. We investigated the association between proprioceptive evoked potential components and SDs in a re-analysis of data from a subsample (n = 12) of SZS patients who had previously been observed with deviant proprioceptive evoked potentials and interviewed with the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience (EASE) scale. Higher EASE scores (i.e. increased SD) were associated with lower peak parietal gamma frequencies and higher peak beta amplitudes over frontal and parietal electrodes in the left hemisphere following right-hand proprioceptive stimulation. Disorders of self-awareness may be associated with dysfunction of early phases of somatosensory processing. The findings are potentially relevant to our understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, but further studies are needed. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders in Adults: Consequences for Primary Caregivers Compared to Schizophrenia and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grootscholten, Inge A C; van Wijngaarden, Bob; Kan, Cornelis C

    2018-01-08

    Primary caregivers experience consequences from being in close contact to a person with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study used the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire to explore the level of consequences of 104 caregivers involved with adults with High Functioning ASD (HF-ASD) and compared these with the consequences reported by caregivers of patients suffering from depression and schizophrenia. Caregivers involved with adults with an HF-ASD experience overall consequences comparable to those involved with patients with depression or schizophrenia. Worrying was the most reported consequence. More tension was experienced by the caregivers of ASD patients, especially by spouses. More care and attention for spouses of adults with an HF-ASD appears to be needed.

  12. Psychodynamic day treatment programme for patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: Dynamics and predictors of therapeutic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Ondrej; Bob, Petr; Pec, Jan; Hrubcova, Adela

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a psychodynamically based group psychotherapeutic programme might improve symptoms, social functions, or quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to investigate factors that might predict clinical improvement or dropouts from the programme. A quantitative prospective cohort study. We have investigated 81 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who participated in a 9-month psychodynamically based psychotherapeutic day programme. The patients were assessed at the beginning and end of the programme, and then at 1-year follow-up. The assessment included psychotic manifestations (HoNOS), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), demographic data, and daily doses of medication. 21 patients dropped out from the programme, and 46 patients succeeded in undergoing follow-up assessment. The psychotic manifestations (self-rating version of HoNOS) and quality of life measured with WHOQOL-BREF (domains of social relationships and environment) were significantly improved at the end of the programme and at follow-up. However, the manifestations on the version for external evaluators of HoNOS were improved only at follow-up. Years of psychiatric treatment, number of hospitalizations or suicide attempts, and experience of relationships with a partner were negatively related to clinical improvement, whereas symptom severity, current working, or study activities were related positively. The results show that a group psychodynamic programme may improve the clinical status and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This type of programme is more beneficial for patients with higher pre-treatment symptom severity and the presence of working or study activities. A psychodynamically based group programme improves the clinical status and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Data indicate that changes on the subjective level are detectable by the end of the

  13. Metacognition Is Necessary for the Emergence of Motivation in People With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders: A Necessary Condition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Lauren; Bonfils, Kelsey A; Firmin, Ruth L; Buck, Kelly D; Choi, Jimmy; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Popolo, Raffaele; Minor, Kyle S; Lysaker, Paul H

    2017-12-01

    Metacognition deficits are a putative cause of reduced motivation in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. However, it is unclear whether certain levels of metacognition are necessary for motivation to emerge. This study used a Necessary Condition Analysis to test whether metacognition was necessary for the presence of motivation and to identify the minimum level of metacognition necessary for high motivation to be possible in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (N = 175). Participants completed clinician-rated measures of metacognition and motivation. Necessary Condition Analysis revealed that metacognition is a necessary condition for motivation and that high levels of motivation were only possible, although not guaranteed, when at least a basic level of metacognition was present. The findings suggest that metacognition is a necessary building block for the development of motivation. Results suggest that targeting metacognition may be essential for improving motivation among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who do not meet this metacognition threshold.

  14. Physical Exercise Alleviates Health Defects, Symptoms, and Biomarkers in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Trevor; Kostrzewa, Richard M

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia spectrum disorders are characterized by symptom profiles consisting of positive and negative symptoms, cognitive impairment, and a plethora of genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic biomarkers. Assorted animal models of these disorders and clinical neurodevelopmental indicators have implicated neurodegeneration as an element in the underlying pathophysiology. Physical exercise or activity regimes--whether aerobic, resistance, or endurance--ameliorate regional brain and functional deficits not only in affected individuals but also in animal models of the disorder. Cognitive deficits, often linked to regional deficits, were alleviated by exercise, as were quality-of-life, independent of disorder staging and risk level. Apoptotic processes intricate to the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia were likewise attenuated by physical exercise. There is also evidence of manifest benefits endowed by physical exercise in preserving telomere length and integrity. Not least, exercise improves overall health and quality-of-life. The notion of scaffolding as the outcome of physical exercise implies the "buttressing" of regional network circuits, neurocognitive domains, anti-inflammatory defenses, maintenance of telomeric integrity, and neuro-reparative and regenerative processes.

  15. Distinctive Rorschach profiles of young adults with schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishimoto N

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Naoko Kishimoto,1 Kazuhiko Yamamuro,1 Junzo Iida,2 Toyosaku Ota,1 Shohei Tanaka,1 Masanori Kyo,3 Sohei Kimoto,1 Toshifumi Kishimoto1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Faculty of Nursing, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, 3Department of Psychiatry, Kyo Mental Clinic, Nara, Japan Objective: The differential diagnosis of schizophrenia (SZ versus autism spectrum disorder (ASD can be clinically challenging because accumulating evidence suggests both clinical and biological overlaps between them. The aim of this study was to compare Rorschach profiles between young adults with SZ and those with ASD.Methods: We evaluated quantitative tendencies on the Rorschach test among 20 patients diagnosed with SZ and 20 diagnosed with ASD. Both groups were matched for age, sex, and intelligence quotient.Results: We found significant differences in six response variables on the Rorschach comprehensive system. Those with SZ had significantly higher scores on D score, adjusted D score (Adj D, developmental quality code reflecting ordinary response (DQo, and form quality minus (FQ - than those with ASD. In contrast, those with SZ had significantly lower scores on the active and developmental quality code reflecting synthesized response (DQ+ subscales than those with ASD.Conclusion: The present findings reveal that individuals with SZ might have more stress tolerance, stronger perception distortions, and simpler and poorer recognition than those with ASD. We suggest that the Rorschach test might be a useful tool for differentiating between SZ and ASD. Keywords: autism spectrum disorder, perception, psychopathology, Rorschach test, schizophrenia

  16. Patterns and Correlates of Expressed Emotion, Perceived Criticism, and Rearing Style in First Admitted Early-Onset Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    von Polier, Georg G.; Meng, Heiner; Lambert, Martin; Strauss, Monika; Zarotti, Gianni; Karle, Michael; Dubois, Reinmar; Stark, Fritz-Michael; Neidhart, Sibylle; Zollinger, Ruedi; Bürgin, Dieter; Felder, Wilhelm; Resch, Franz; Koch, Eginhard; Schulte-Markwort, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patterns and correlates of family variables in 31 adolescents treated for their first episode of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (early-onset schizophrenia [EOS]). Expressed emotion, perceived criticism, and rearing style were assessed. Potential correlates were patient psychopathology, premorbid adjustment, illness duration, quality of life (QoL), sociodemographic variables, patient and caregiver "illness concept," and caregiver personality traits and su...

  17. Suspiciousness and low self-esteem as predictors of misattributions of anger in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaker, Paul Henry; Davis, Louanne Whitman; Tsai, Jack

    2009-04-30

    While it is widely recognized that many with schizophrenia have significant difficulties in correctly identifying the emotions of others, less is known about the causes and correlates of particular forms of misattribution, including mistakenly seeing anger in others. One possibility is that persons with high levels of suspiciousness and low levels of self-esteem are at risk to attribute their poor feelings about themselves to the malice of others. To explore this possibility, we identified 52 persons with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder who made significant numbers of errors on the Bell-Lysaker Emotional Recognition Test. We then performed a cluster analysis based on measures of suspiciousness from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and self-esteem from the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Schedule, and found the following four groups: a) High Suspiciousness/High Self-Esteem; b) Mild Suspiciousness/High Self-Esteem; c) High Suspiciousness/Low Self-Esteem; and d) Minimal Suspiciousness/Low Self-Esteem. Comparisons between groups revealed that as predicted the High Suspiciousness/Low Self-Esteem group made significantly more misattributions of anger than other groups, even when levels of depression were controlled for statistically. Implications for addressing the misattributions of anger in schizophrenia are discussed.

  18. Premorbid IQ and adult schizophrenia spectrum disorder: Verbal and Performance subtests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Schiffman, Jason

    2010-01-01

    comprised 244 high-risk or control children who were administered the WISC subtests at age 10 to 13 years in 1972. Adult psychiatric data were gathered from psychiatric interviews in 1992-93 and from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register in 2007. Thirty-two participants had developed SSD, 79 other......The present prospective high-risk study examined associations between childhood scores on five Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) subtests (vocabulary, similarities, block design, object assembly, and mazes) and later development of schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD). The sample...... who later develop SSD. The results for the OPD group support recent studies demonstrating that premorbid IQ deficits may characterize a wide range of psychiatric disorders....

  19. Co-morbid depressive disorder is associated with better neurocognitive performance in first episode schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herniman, Sarah E; Cotton, Sue M; Killackey, Eóin; Hester, Robert; Allott, Kelly A

    2018-01-03

    Both major depressive disorder (MDD) and first episode schizophrenia spectrum (FES) are associated with significant neurocognitive deficits. However, it remains unclear whether the neurocognitive deficits in individuals with FES are more severe if there is comorbid depressive disorder. The aim of this study was to compare the neurocognitive profiles between those with and without full-threshold depressive disorder in FES. This study involved secondary analysis of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of vocational intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis (N = 82; age range: 15-25 years). Those with full-threshold depressive disorder (n = 24) had significantly better information processing speed than those without full-threshold depressive disorder. Severity of depressive symptoms was also associated with better information processing speed. In additional to the cross-sectional design, limitations of this study include the absence of assessing insight as a potential mediator. After the first psychotic episode, it could be speculated that those with better information processing speed may be more likely to develop full-threshold depressive disorder, as their ability to efficiently process information may allow them to be more aware of their situations and environments, and consequently to have greater insight into the devastating consequences of FES. Such novel findings support the examination of full-threshold depressive disorder in relation to neurocognitive performance across illness phases in future work. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Overlapping and disease specific trait, response, and reflection impulsivity in adolescents with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, J. R.M.; Rydkjaer, J.; Fagerlund, B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are developmental disorders with shared clinical characteristics such as cognitive impairments and impulsivity. Impulsivity is a core feature of ADHD and an important factor in aggression, violence, and substance use...... in schizophrenia. Based on the hypothesis that schizophrenia and ADHD represent a continuum of neurodevelopmental impairments, the aim was to identify overlapping and disease specific forms of impulsivity. Methods: Adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age were assessed with the Schedule for Affective Disorders...... and Schizophrenia for School-aged Children – Present and Lifetime Version. Subjects with early-onset, first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders (EOS) (N = 29) or ADHD (N = 29) and healthy controls (N = 45) were compared on two performance measures (Information Sampling Task, Stop Signal Task) and a subjective...

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: Clinical and Biological Contributions to a Relation Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapopart, Judith; Chavez, Alex; Greenstein, Deanna; Addington, Anjene; Gogtay, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    Clinical, demographic, and brain development data on childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) and family, imaging and genetic data from studies of autism were reviewed. It is found that COS is preceded by and comorbid with autism/pervasive developmental disorder and schizophrenia in 30 to 50 percent of cases based on two large studies.

  2. Neuropsychological Profile in Early-Onset Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders: Measured With the MATRICS Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmén, Aina; Juuhl-Langseth, Monica; Thormodsen, Rune; Melle, Ingrid; Rund, Bjørn Rishovd

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Neurocognitive impairments have been documented in adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia (EOS). There is still inconsistency regarding an average profile, which could be due to the fact that each study uses different tests. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the “Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia” (MATRICS) battery is useful in detecting differences between the patient group and the healthy controls, and to describe the neuropsychological pattern in the EOS group. Method: Neuropsychological functioning was examined in 31 adolescents with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 67 healthy controls, using the MATRICS battery. Results: There were significant differences between the patients and the controls on every domain except for social cognition. Patients showed a generalized neurocognitive deficit of 0.8–1.8 SDs compared with controls, with verbal learning, working memory, and visual learning being the most affected areas. Conclusions: The MATRICS battery is sensitive in detecting differences between patients and controls in the adolescent population. However, we question the use of Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test in this age group. Results document a significant generalized deficit in adolescents with EOS. PMID:19223656

  3. Distinct profiles of social skill in adults with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kerrianne E; Pinkham, Amy E; Penn, David L; Kelsven, Skylar; Ludwig, Kelsey; Sasson, Noah J

    2017-05-01

    Overlapping social impairments in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Schizophrenia (SCZ) contributed to decades of diagnostic confusion that continues to this day in some clinical settings. The current study provides the first direct and detailed comparison of social behavior in the two disorders by identifying profiles of social skill in adults with ASD (n = 54), SCZ (n = 54), and typically developing (TD) controls (n = 56) during a real-world social interaction. ASD and SCZ groups exhibited poorer social skill, both overall and on most discrete abilities, relative to the TD group. Direct comparison of ASD to SCZ revealed distinct behavioral profiles, with ASD uniquely characterized by fewer interactive behaviors, and SCZ characterized by greater impaired gaze and flat/inappropriate affective responses. Additionally, IQ was associated with both overall social skill and many discrete social skills in SCZ, but was largely unrelated to social skill in ASD. These results indicate that overlapping social deficits in ASD and SCZ are comprised of both shared and distinct social skill impairments. The largest distinctions-reduced social reciprocity but better expressivity in ASD relative to SCZ, and a greater role of IQ in social skill for SCZ than ASD-highlight disorder-specific features that can improve etiological understanding, diagnostic differentiation, and treatment strategies. Autism Res 2017, 10: 878-887. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Overlapping and disease specific aspects of impulsivity in children and adolescents with schizophrenia spectrum disorders or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Rydkjær, Jacob; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    Objectives: To identify disease specific and overlapping aspects of impulsivity in children and adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders or ADHD. Methods: Motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task), reflection impulsivity (Information Sampling Task), and trait impulsivity (Barratt...... Impulsiveness Scale) are compared between three groups of children and adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age: patients with early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders (N=29), patients with ADHD (N=29), and healthy controls (N=45). Results: Preliminary results: Reflection impulsivity is significantly...... increased in patients with ADHD but not in early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients who perform non-significantly different from the healthy controls in the decreased win condition. Discussion: Reduced information sampling in children and adolescents with ADHD may reflect an inability to delay...

  5. A case-linkage study of crime victimisation in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders over a period of deinstitutionalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite high rates of self-reported crime victimisation, no study to date has compared official victimisation records of people with severe mental illness with a random community sample. Accordingly, this study sought to determine whether persons with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders have higher rates of recorded victimisation than the general population, and to explore whether there have been changes in rates of recorded victimisation over a period of deinstitutionalisation. Methods The schizophrenia-spectrum cases were drawn from a state-wide public mental health register, comprising all persons first diagnosed with a schizophrenic illness in five year cohorts between 1975 – 2005. The criminal histories of 4,168 persons diagnosed with schizophrenic-spectrum disorders were compared to those of a randomly selected community sample of 4,641 individuals. Results Compared to community controls, patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders were significantly more likely to have a record of violent (10.1% vs. 6.6%, odds ratio 1.4) and sexually violent victimisation (1.7% vs. 0.3%, odds ratio 2.77), but less likely to have an official record of victimisation overall (28.7% vs. 39.1%, odds ratio 0.5). Over the approximate period of deinstitutionalisation, the rate of recorded victimisation has more than doubled in schizophrenia-spectrum patients, but stayed relatively constant in the general community. Conclusions People with schizophrenic-spectrum disorders are particularly vulnerable to violent crime victimisation; although co-morbid substance misuse and criminality both heighten the chances of victimisation, they cannot fully account for the increased rates. Deinstitutionalisation may have, in part, contributed to an unintended consequence of increasing rates of victimisation amongst the seriously mentally ill. PMID:23425519

  6. Global brain connectivity alterations in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skåtun, Kristina C; Kaufmann, Tobias; Tønnesen, Siren; Biele, Guido; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Alnæs, Dag; Andreassen, Ole A; Westlye, Lars T

    2016-08-01

    The human brain is organized into functionally distinct modules of which interactions constitute the human functional connectome. Accumulating evidence has implicated perturbations in the patterns of brain connectivity across a range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders, but little is known about diagnostic specificity. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are severe mental disorders with partly overlapping symptomatology. Neuroimaging has demonstrated brain network disintegration in the pathophysiologies; however, to which degree the 2 diagnoses present with overlapping abnormalities remains unclear. We collected resting-state fMRI data from patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and from healthy controls. Aiming to characterize connectivity differences across 2 severe mental disorders, we derived global functional connectivity using eigenvector centrality mapping, which allows for regional inference of centrality or importance in the brain network. Seventy-one patients with schizophrenia, 43 with bipolar disorder and 196 healthy controls participated in our study. We found significant effects of diagnosis in 12 clusters, where pairwise comparisons showed decreased global connectivity in high-centrality clusters: sensory regions in patients with schizophrenia and subcortical regions in both patient groups. Increased connectivity occurred in frontal and parietal clusters in patients with schizophrenia, with intermediate effects in those with bipolar disorder. Patient groups differed in most cortical clusters, with the strongest effects in sensory regions. Methodological concerns of in-scanner motion and the use of full correlation measures may make analyses more vulnerable to noise. Our results show decreased eigenvector centrality of limbic structures in both patient groups and in sensory regions in patients with schizophrenia as well as increased centrality in frontal and parietal regions in both groups, with stronger effects in patients with

  7. Spatial-memory deficit in schizophrenia spectrum disorders under viewpoint-independent demands in the virtual courtyard task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Leanne K; Girard, Todd A; King, Jelena; King, Matthew J; Herdman, Katherine A; Christensen, Bruce K; King, John

    2013-01-01

    This study builds upon our previous work indicating that impaired hippocampal-dependent forms of memory are core to schizophrenia. Using a virtual-reality courtyard task, we presented participants with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD; n = 20) and a healthy community comparison group (n = 20) with objects to remember within a town square, followed by a recognition test of the location of objects from either the same viewpoint or a shifted viewpoint relative to initial presentation. The SSD group demonstrated a relative deficit under shifted- compared to same-view conditions. These findings provide further support for deficient hippocampal-dependent cognition in SSD.

  8. Pharmacological management of persistent hostility and aggression in persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoroff, Jeff; Coburn, Kerry; Reeve, Alya; Sampson, Shirlene; Shillcutt, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of aggressive behaviors is higher among persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs) than among persons without such disorders. This phenomenon represents a risk to the well-being of patients, their families, and society. The authors undertook a systematic review of the English language literature to determine the efficacy of neuropharmacological agents for the management of hostility and aggression among persons with SSDs. The search combined findings from the Medline, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases. Ninety-two full text articles were identified that reported relevant findings. The American Academy of Neurology criteria were used to determine levels of evidence. Paliperidone-extended release is probably effective for the management of hostility among inpatients with SSDs who have not been preselected for aggression (Level B). Clozapine is possibly more effective than haloperidol for the management of overt aggression and possibly more effective than chlorpromazine for the management of hostility among inpatients with SSDs who have not been preselected for aggression (Level C). Clozapine is also possibly more effective than olanzapine or haloperidol for reducing aggression among selected physically assaultive inpatients (Level C). Adjunctive propranolol, valproic acid, and famotidine are possibly effective for reducing some aspects of hostility or aggression among inpatients with SSDs (Level C). Paliperidone-extended release currently appears to be the agent for the management of hostility among inpatients with SSDs for which there is the strongest evidence of efficacy.

  9. Add-on Antidepressants in the Naturalistic Treatment of Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder - When, Who, and How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schennach, Rebecca; Obermeier, Michael; Seemüller, Florian; Jäger, Markus; Schmauss, Max; Laux, Gerd; Pfeiffer, Herbert; Naber, Dieter; Schmidt, Lutz G; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Heuser, Isabella; Maier, Wolfgang; Lemke, Matthias R; Rüther, Eckart; Klingberg, Stefan; Gastpar, Markus; Spellmann, Ilja; Musil, Richard; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antidepressant add-on treatment within the acute treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients. Antidepressant add-on was evaluated in 365 patients within a naturalistic multicenter study. Patients with/without antidepressant add-on were compared regarding clinical and treatment-related variables, response and remission, and remission of depressive and negative symptoms. The efficacy of antidepressant add-on treatment was furthermore analyzed applying marginal structure models. Twenty-three percent of the patients received antidepressant add-on for a mean duration of 50.28 (33.42) days. Patients with the diagnosis of a schizoaffective disorder, multiple illness episodes, and a longer duration of their illness as well as those with significantly fewer baseline positive symptoms, more negative and depressive symptoms, more side effects, and less subjective well-being were augmented with antidepressants. At discharge no significant effect of antidepressant add-on treatment was observed in terms of a 25% improvement (p=0.2623), a 50% improvement (p=0.3946), remission (p=0.0552), or remission of depressive (p=0.6336) and negative symptoms (p=0.8756). Also, when analyzing marginal structure models considering the diagnostic subgroups, no significant effect was found. Add-on with antidepressants is common. A final recommendation in terms of this strategy's efficacy cannot be given. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. The association between autism and schizophrenia spectrum disorders: A review of eight alternate models of co-occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Katharine; Lin, Ashleigh; Abu-Akel, Ahmad; Wood, Stephen J

    2015-08-01

    Although now believed to be two distinct disorders, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) share multiple phenotypic similarities and risk factors, and have been reported to co-occur at elevated rates. In this narrative review, we give a brief overview of the phenomenological, genetic, environmental, and imaging evidence for the overlap between ASD and SSD, highlighting similarities and areas of distinction. We examine eight possible alternate models of explanation for the association and comorbidity between the disorders, and set out a research agenda to test these models. Understanding how and why these disorders co-occur has important implications for diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis, as well as for developing fundamental aetiological models of the disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experiences, perspectives and priorities of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders regarding sleep disturbance and its treatment: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Sophie; Bee, Penny

    2017-05-02

    Sleep problems are very common in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and impact negatively on functioning and wellbeing. Research regarding interventions to improve sleep in this population has been lacking. Little is known regarding these patient's perspectives on sleep problems and their treatment, providing very little foundation on which to develop acceptable and patient-centred treatments. This study aims to explore perspectives and priorities of participants with schizophrenia spectrum disorders regarding sleep and sleep disturbance, and their perspectives on existing treatments. An Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) study was conducted; data were gathered through in depth interviews with 15 people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and varying degrees of self-reported sleep disturbance, each case was analysed individually before cross-case comparisons were made. Sleep maintenance and sleep quality were universally valued. Changes to sleep were interpreted as part of a perceived loss of normality relating to diagnosis. Participants differed in the extent of any hopes that sleep would improve. Sleep disturbances were linked to a reduced ability or opportunity to participate in valued activities, and were entangled with self-image due to a wish to be perceived as alert and in control. During difficult times, sleep could be seen as an escape. Concerns were expressed regarding the negative effects of using hypnotics or anti-psychotics to aid sleep, although typically antipsychotics were deemed more acceptable than hypnotics. Concerns regarding barriers to adherence and effectiveness of self-help approaches were common. Non-pharmacological interventions were noted to require a personalised whole-lifestyle approach. This is the first study to explore sleep perspectives in participants with established schizophrenia spectrum disorders, recruited from a population receiving usual care. Findings re-enforce the importance of considering sleep

  12. How Do People Experiencing Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders or Other Psychotic Disorders Use the Internet to Get Information on Their Mental Health? Literature Review and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Murielle; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane

    2017-01-03

    Studies show that the Internet has become an influential source of information for people experiencing serious psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia spectrum disorders or other psychotic disorders, among which the rate of Internet users is growing, with rates ranging from 33.3% to 79.5% given the country. Between 20.5% and 56.4% of these Internet users seek mental health information. Focusing on this population's Web searches about their mental health, this paper examines what type of content they look for and what could be the benefits and disadvantages of this navigation. We conducted a literature review through medical and psychological databases between 2000 and 2015 using the keywords "Internet," "Web," "virtual," "health information," "schizophrenia," "psychosis," "e-mental health," "e-support," and "telepsychiatry." People experiencing schizophrenia spectrum disorders or other psychotic disorders wish to find on the Internet trustful, nonstigmatizing information about their disease, flexibility, security standards, and positive peer-to-peer exchanges. E-mental health also appears to be desired by a substantial proportion of them. In this field, the current developments towards intervention and early prevention in the areas of depression and bipolar and anxiety disorders become more and more operational for schizophrenia spectrum disorders and other psychotic disorders as well. The many benefits of the Internet as a source of information and support, such as empowerment, enhancement of self-esteem, relief from peer information, better social interactions, and more available care, seem to outbalance the difficulties. In this paper, after discussing the challenges related to the various aspects of the emergence of the Internet into the life of people experiencing schizophrenia spectrum disorders or other psychotic disorders, we will suggest areas of future research and practical recommendations for this major transition.

  13. Autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia: meta-analysis of the neural correlates of social cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Sugranyes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Impaired social cognition is a cardinal feature of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD and Schizophrenia (SZ. However, the functional neuroanatomy of social cognition in either disorder remains unclear due to variability in primary literature. Additionally, it is not known whether deficits in ASD and SZ arise from similar or disease-specific disruption of the social cognition network. OBJECTIVE: To identify regions most robustly implicated in social cognition processing in SZ and ASD. DATA SOURCES: Systematic review of English language articles using MEDLINE (1995-2010 and reference lists. STUDY SELECTION: Studies were required to use fMRI to compare ASD or SZ subjects to a matched healthy control group, provide coordinates in standard stereotactic space, and employ standardized facial emotion recognition (FER or theory of mind (TOM paradigms. DATA EXTRACTION: Activation foci from studies meeting inclusion criteria (n = 33 were subjected to a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimation, and encompassed 146 subjects with ASD, 336 SZ patients and 492 healthy controls. RESULTS: Both SZ and ASD showed medial prefrontal hypoactivation, which was more pronounced in ASD, while ventrolateral prefrontal dysfunction was associated mostly with SZ. Amygdala hypoactivation was observed in SZ patients during FER and in ASD during more complex ToM tasks. Both disorders were associated with hypoactivation within the Superior Temporal Sulcus (STS during ToM tasks, but activation in these regions was increased in ASD during affect processing. Disease-specific differences were noted in somatosensory engagement, which was increased in SZ and decreased in ASD. Reduced thalamic activation was uniquely seen in SZ. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced frontolimbic and STS engagement emerged as a shared feature of social cognition deficits in SZ and ASD. However, there were disease- and stimulus-specific differences. These findings may aid future

  14. Lifetime cannabis use and cognition in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and their unaffected siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Basterra, Virginia; Rosa, Araceli; Fañanás, Lourdes; Zarzuela, Amalia; Ibáñez, Berta; Peralta, Víctor; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between cannabis and cognitive performance is controversial. While both acute administration and long-term cannabis use impair cognitive performance in healthy subjects, several studies have shown improved cognitive outcomes in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who use cannabis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between lifetime cannabis use, as assessed longitudinally over 10 years of follow-up in a sample of 42 patients and 35 of their unaffected siblings, and current cognitive performance. Forty-two healthy control subjects were assessed at follow-up with the same instruments. Stepwise linear regression revealed a negative effect of longitudinal cannabis use on performance in a social cognition task in the patient group. In the sibling group, lifetime cannabis use had a negative effect on processing speed and declarative memory performance. In the control group, cannabis use per se did not predict cognitive performance; however, when adding lifetime tobacco use to the model, we found a negative association between lifetime cannabis and tobacco use and processing speed and social cognition performance. Moreover, a lower IQ associated with current cannabis use predicted worse attentional performance in the control group. The differential pattern of associations between cannabis use and cognitive performance in patients compared with siblings and controls can be explained by the negative impact of illness on cognition.

  15. An Investigation of Reasoning by Analogy in Schizophrenia and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Krawczyk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Relational reasoning ability relies upon by both cognitive and social factors. We compared analogical reasoning performance in healthy controls (HC to performance in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD, and individuals with schizophrenia (SZ. The experimental task required participants to find correspondences between drawings of scenes. Participants were asked to infer which item within one scene best matched a relational item within the second scene. We varied relational complexity, presence of distraction, and type of objects in the analogies (living or non-living items. We hypothesized that the cognitive differences present in SZ would reduce relational inferences relative to ASD and HC. We also hypothesized that both SZ and ASD would show lower performance on living item problems relative to HC due to lower social function scores. Overall accuracy was higher for HC relative to SZ, consistent with prior research. Across groups, higher relational complexity reduced analogical responding, as did the presence of non-living items. Separate group analyses revealed that the ASD group was less accurate at making relational inferences in problems that involved mainly non-living items and when distractors were present. The SZ group showed differences in problem type similar to the ASD group. Additionally, we found significant correlations between social cognitive ability and analogical reasoning, particularly for the SZ group. These results indicate that differences in cognitive and social abilities impact the ability to infer analogical correspondences along with numbers of relational elements and types of objects present in the problems.

  16. Distinctive Rorschach profiles of young adults with schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Naoko; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Iida, Junzo; Ota, Toyosaku; Tanaka, Shohei; Kyo, Masanori; Kimoto, Sohei; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of schizophrenia (SZ) versus autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be clinically challenging because accumulating evidence suggests both clinical and biological overlaps between them. The aim of this study was to compare Rorschach profiles between young adults with SZ and those with ASD. We evaluated quantitative tendencies on the Rorschach test among 20 patients diagnosed with SZ and 20 diagnosed with ASD. Both groups were matched for age, sex, and intelligence quotient. We found significant differences in six response variables on the Rorschach comprehensive system. Those with SZ had significantly higher scores on D score, adjusted D score (Adj D), developmental quality code reflecting ordinary response (DQo), and form quality minus (FQ -) than those with ASD. In contrast, those with SZ had significantly lower scores on the active and developmental quality code reflecting synthesized response (DQ+) subscales than those with ASD. The present findings reveal that individuals with SZ might have more stress tolerance, stronger perception distortions, and simpler and poorer recognition than those with ASD. We suggest that the Rorschach test might be a useful tool for differentiating between SZ and ASD.

  17. Self-stigma in borderline personality disorder – cross-sectional comparison with schizophrenia spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grambal A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ales Grambal,1 Jan Prasko,1 Dana Kamaradova,1 Klara Latalova,1 Michaela Holubova,1,2 Marketa Marackova,1 Marie Ociskova,1 Milos Slepecky3 1Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Psychiatry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Social Science and Health Care, Department of Psychology Sciences, Constantine the Philosopher University, Nitra, Slovak Republic Introduction: Self-stigma arises from one’s acceptance of societal prejudices and is common in psychiatric patients. This investigation compares the self-stigma of a sample of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD, schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SCH, major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar affective disorder (BAD, and anxiety disorders (AD and explores of the self-stigma with the subjective and objective measures of the severity of the disorder and demographic factors. Methods: The total of 184 inpatients admitted to the psychotherapeutic department diagnosed with BPD, SCH, MDD, BAP, and AD were compared on the internalized stigma of mental illness (ISMI scale. The ISMI-total score was correlated with the subjective and objective evaluation of the disorder severity (clinical global impression, and clinical and demographic factors. Results: The self-stigma levels were statistically significantly different among the diagnostic groups (BPD 71.15±14.74; SCH 63.2±13.27; MDD 64.09±12.2; BAD 62.0±14.21; AD 57.62±15.85; one-way analysis of variance: F=8.698, df=183; P<0.005. However after applying the Bonferroni’s multiple comparison test, the only significant difference was between the BPD patients and the patients with AD (P<0.001. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the strongest factors connected with the higher level of self-stigma were being without partner, the number of hospitalization, and the severity of the disorder. Conclusion: The BPD patients

  18. Pergolide treatment of cognitive deficits associated with schizotypal personality disorder: continued evidence of the importance of the dopamine system in the schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Margaret M; Harvey, Philip D; Goodman, Marianne; Triebwasser, Joseph; New, Antonia; Koenigsberg, Harold W; Sprung, Larry J; Flory, Janine D; Siever, Larry J

    2010-05-01

    Cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia are also frequently found in individuals with other schizophrenia spectrum disorders, such as schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). Dopamine appears to be a particularly important modulator of cognitive processes such as those impaired in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we administered pergolide, a dopamine agonist targeting D(1) and D(2) receptors, to 25 participants with SPD and assessed the effect of pergolide treatment, as compared with placebo, on neuropsychological performance. We found that the pergolide group showed improvements in visual-spatial working memory, executive functioning, and verbal learning and memory. These results suggest that dopamine agonists may provide benefit for the cognitive abnormalities of schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  19. Pergolide Treatment of Cognitive Deficits Associated with Schizotypal Personality Disorder: Continued Evidence of the Importance of the Dopamine System in the Schizophrenia Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Margaret M; Harvey, Philip D; Goodman, Marianne; Triebwasser, Joseph; New, Antonia; Koenigsberg, Harold W; Sprung, Larry J; Flory, Janine D; Siever, Larry J

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia are also frequently found in individuals with other schizophrenia spectrum disorders, such as schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). Dopamine appears to be a particularly important modulator of cognitive processes such as those impaired in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, we administered pergolide, a dopamine agonist targeting D1 and D2 receptors, to 25 participants with SPD and assessed the effect of pergolide treatment, as compared with placebo, on neuropsychological performance. We found that the pergolide group showed improvements in visual-spatial working memory, executive functioning, and verbal learning and memory. These results suggest that dopamine agonists may provide benefit for the cognitive abnormalities of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:20130535

  20. Self-stigma in borderline personality disorder – cross-sectional comparison with schizophrenia spectrum disorder, major depressive disorder, and anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambal, Ales; Prasko, Jan; Kamaradova, Dana; Latalova, Klara; Holubova, Michaela; Marackova, Marketa; Ociskova, Marie; Slepecky, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Self-stigma arises from one’s acceptance of societal prejudices and is common in psychiatric patients. This investigation compares the self-stigma of a sample of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SCH), major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar affective disorder (BAD), and anxiety disorders (AD) and explores of the self-stigma with the subjective and objective measures of the severity of the disorder and demographic factors. Methods The total of 184 inpatients admitted to the psychotherapeutic department diagnosed with BPD, SCH, MDD, BAP, and AD were compared on the internalized stigma of mental illness (ISMI) scale. The ISMI-total score was correlated with the subjective and objective evaluation of the disorder severity (clinical global impression), and clinical and demographic factors. Results The self-stigma levels were statistically significantly different among the diagnostic groups (BPD 71.15±14.74; SCH 63.2±13.27; MDD 64.09±12.2; BAD 62.0±14.21; AD 57.62±15.85; one-way analysis of variance: F=8.698, df=183; Pstigma were being without partner, the number of hospitalization, and the severity of the disorder. Conclusion The BPD patients suffer from a higher level of self-stigma compared to patients with AD. In practice, it is necessary to address the reduction of self-stigma by using specific treatment strategies, such as cognitive therapy. PMID:27703362

  1. Correlates of adverse childhood events among adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Stanley D; Lu, Weili; Mueser, Kim T; Jankowski, Mary Kay; Cournos, Francine

    2007-02-01

    Multiple studies have found that childhood adversity is related to a range of poor mental health, substance abuse, poor physical health, and poor social functioning outcomes in the general population of adults. However, despite the high rates of childhood adversity in schizophrenia, the clinical correlates of these events have not been systematically evaluated. This study evaluated the relationship between adverse experiences in childhood and functional, clinical, and health outcomes among adults with schizophrenia. The authors surveyed 569 adults with schizophrenia regarding adverse childhood events (including physical abuse, sexual abuse, parental mental illnesses, loss of a parent, parental separation or divorce, witnessing domestic violence, and foster or kinship care). The relationships between cumulative exposure to these events and psychiatric, physical, and functional outcomes were evaluated. Increased exposure to adverse childhood events was strongly related to psychiatric problems (suicidal thinking, hospitalizations, distress, and posttraumatic stress disorder), substance abuse, physical health problems (HIV infection), medical service utilization (physician visits), and poor social functioning (homelessness or criminal justice involvement). The findings extend the results of research in the general population by suggesting that childhood adversity contributes to worse mental health, substance abuse, worse physical health, and poor functional outcomes in schizophrenia.

  2. Procedural learning in Parkinson's disease, specific language impairment, dyslexia, schizophrenia, developmental coordination disorder, and autism spectrum disorders: A second-order meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Gillian M; Lum, Jarrad A G

    2017-10-01

    The serial reaction time task (SRTT) has been used to study procedural learning in clinical populations. In this report, second-order meta-analysis was used to investigate whether disorder type moderates performance on the SRTT. Using this approach to quantitatively summarise past research, it was tested whether autism spectrum disorder, developmental coordination disorder, dyslexia, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and specific language impairment differentially affect procedural learning on the SRTT. The main analysis revealed disorder type moderated SRTT performance (p=0.010). This report demonstrates comparable levels of procedural learning impairment in developmental coordination disorder, dyslexia, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and specific language impairment. However, in autism, procedural learning is spared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patterns and correlates of expressed emotion, perceived criticism, and rearing style in first admitted early-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Polier, Georg G; Meng, Heiner; Lambert, Martin; Strauss, Monika; Zarotti, Gianni; Karle, Michael; Dubois, Reinmar; Stark, Fritz-Michael; Neidhart, Sibylle; Zollinger, Ruedi; Bürgin, Dieter; Felder, Wilhelm; Resch, Franz; Koch, Eginhard; Schulte-Markwort, Michael; Schimmelmann, Benno G

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patterns and correlates of family variables in 31 adolescents treated for their first episode of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (early-onset schizophrenia [EOS]). Expressed emotion, perceived criticism, and rearing style were assessed. Potential correlates were patient psychopathology, premorbid adjustment, illness duration, quality of life (QoL), sociodemographic variables, patient and caregiver "illness concept," and caregiver personality traits and support. Families were rated as critical more frequently by patients than raters (55% vs. 13%). Perceived criticism was associated with worse QoL in relationship with parents and peers. An adverse rearing style was associated with a negative illness concept in patients, particularly with less trust in their physician. Future research should examine perceived criticism as a predictor of relapse and indicator of adolescents with EOS who need extended support and treatment. Rearing style should be carefully observed because of its link with patients' illness concept and, potentially, to service engagement and medication adherence.

  4. A randomized, controlled trial of Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) for outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David L; Combs, Dennis R; Willoughby, Michael; Mintz, Jim; Gibson, Clare; Rupp, Betty; Penn, David L

    2014-09-01

    In schizophrenia, the ability to adaptively infer the thoughts and feelings of others (i.e., social cognition) is strongly associated with community functioning. Researchers have designed psychosocial interventions to improve social cognition with the aim of improving downstream social functioning. Social Cognition and Interaction Training (SCIT) is one such intervention. Previous research on SCIT has been promising, but has consisted largely of smaller trials with insufficient experimental control. Randomized, controlled trial. The current article reports on a controlled trial of 66 adults with schizophrenia randomized to receive either SCIT (n = 33), delivered in weekly group sessions, or treatment as usual (n = 33) for 6 months. Participants completed assessments of social cognition, social functioning, neurocognition and symptoms at baseline, post-treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Primary analyses suggest that SCIT may improve social functioning, negative symptoms, and possibly hostile attributional bias. Post-hoc analyses suggest a dose-response effect. Findings are discussed in the context of continuing to refine and improve social cognitive interventions for schizophrenia. Social cognitive intervention is a feasible and promising approach to improving social functioning among individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Dose-response findings suggest that delivering social cognitive interventions with greater frequency may maximize their benefit to patients. Research on social cognitive interventions is still young and effects from well-controlled trials have been inconsistent. It is not yet clear which components of social cognitive training may be the key active ingredients. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Do the Traits of Autism-Spectrum Overlap with Those of Schizophrenia or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in the General Population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Akio; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Ashwin, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Social and communicative deficits, restricted interests and repetitive behaviors are diagnostic features of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The present study examined the relationship between autistic characteristics and schizophrenia-spectrum traits as well as between autistic characteristics and obsessive-compulsive traits in typically…

  6. Comparison of self-stigma and quality of life in patients with depressive disorders and schizophrenia spectrum disorders – a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holubova M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Michaela Holubova,1,2 Jan Prasko,1 Stanislav Matousek,1 Klara Latalova,1 Marketa Marackova,1 Kristyna Vrbova,1 Aleš Grambal,1 Milos Slepecky,3 Marta Zatkova3 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Liberec, Liberec, Czech Republic; 3Department of Psychology Sciences, Faculty of Social Science and Health Care, Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Nitra, Slovak Republic Background: The views of one’s self-stigma and quality of life (QoL in patients with schizophrenia and depressive disorders are significant subjective notions, both being proven to affect patient’s functioning in life. The objective of this study was to investigate the QoL and self-stigma in connection with demographic factors and compare the two groups of patients in terms of those variables. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, the outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and depressive disorders completed the Quality of Life Satisfaction and Enjoyment Questionnaire, the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale, and a demographic questionnaire during a routine psychiatric control. Furthermore, both patients and their psychiatrists evaluated the severity of the disorder by Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale. Results: The QoL of patients with depressive disorders or schizophrenia spectrum disorders did not significantly differ between the two groups. In both groups, unemployment was perceived to be a significant factor decreasing the QoL. Self-stigma was detected to be higher in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders than in patients with depressive disorders. A strong correlation was found between the two scales, meaning that those with higher levels of self-stigmatization were less prone to see their life as fulfilling and joyful. Conclusion: This study shows that the degree of the internalized stigma can be an

  7. Is It Normal to Be a Principal Mindreader? Revising Theories of Social Cognition on the Basis of Schizophrenia and High Functioning Autism-Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Stanghellini, Giovanni; Bertelli, Marco O.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia and high functioning autism-spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions that mainly impair social competence, while general intelligence (IQ) is spared. Both disorders have a strong ancillary role in theoretical research on social cognition. Recently the debate has started to be inflected by embodied and…

  8. Frontotemporal hypoactivity during a reality monitoring paradigm is associated with delusions in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Christian; Endestad, Tor; Sigvartsen, Niels Petter B; Server, Andres; Bolstad, Ingeborg; Johansson, Mikael; Andreassen, Ole A; Jensen, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    Impaired monitoring of internally generated information has been proposed to be one component in the development and maintenance of delusions. The present study investigated the neural correlates underlying the monitoring processes and whether they were associated with delusions. Twenty healthy controls and 19 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were administrated a reality monitoring paradigm during functional magnetic resonance imaging. During encoding participants were instructed to associate a statement with either a presented (viewed condition) or an imagined picture (imagined condition). During the monitoring session in the scanner, participants were presented with old and new statements and their task was to identify whether a given statement was associated with the viewed condition, imagined condition, or if it was new. Patients showed significantly reduced accuracy in the imagined condition with performance negatively associated with degree of delusions. This was accompanied with reduced activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and left hippocampus in the patient group. The severity of delusions was negatively correlated with the blood-oxygenation-level dependent response in the left hippocampus. The results suggest that weakened monitoring is associated with delusions in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and that this may be mediated by a frontotemporal dysfunction.

  9. Self-Stigma and Its Relationship with Victimization, Psychotic Symptoms and Self-Esteem among People with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M A Horsselenberg

    Full Text Available Self-stigma is highly prevalent in schizophrenia and can be seen as an important factor leading to low self-esteem. It is however unclear how psychological factors and actual adverse events contribute to self-stigma. This study empirically examines how symptom severity and the experience of being victimized affect both self-stigma and self-esteem.Persons with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (N = 102 were assessed with a battery of self-rating questionnaires and interviews. Structural equation modelling (SEM was subsequently applied to test the fit of three models: a model with symptoms and victimization as direct predictors of self-stigma and negative self-esteem, a model with an indirect effect for symptoms mediated by victimization and a third model with a direct effect for negative symptoms and an indirect effect for positive symptoms mediated by victimization.Results showed good model fit for the direct effects of both symptoms and victimization: both lead to an increase of self-stigma and subsequent negative self-esteem. Negative symptoms had a direct association with self-stigma, while the relationship between positive symptoms and self-stigma was mediated by victimization.Our findings suggest that symptoms and victimization may contribute to self-stigma, leading to negative self-esteem in individuals with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Especially for patients with positive symptoms victimization seems to be an important factor in developing self-stigma. Given the burden of self-stigma on patients and the constraining effects on societal participation and service use, interventions targeting victimization as well as self-stigma are needed.

  10. Self-Stigma and Its Relationship with Victimization, Psychotic Symptoms and Self-Esteem among People with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsselenberg, Ellen M A; van Busschbach, Jooske T; Aleman, Andre; Pijnenborg, Gerdine H M

    2016-01-01

    Self-stigma is highly prevalent in schizophrenia and can be seen as an important factor leading to low self-esteem. It is however unclear how psychological factors and actual adverse events contribute to self-stigma. This study empirically examines how symptom severity and the experience of being victimized affect both self-stigma and self-esteem. Persons with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (N = 102) were assessed with a battery of self-rating questionnaires and interviews. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was subsequently applied to test the fit of three models: a model with symptoms and victimization as direct predictors of self-stigma and negative self-esteem, a model with an indirect effect for symptoms mediated by victimization and a third model with a direct effect for negative symptoms and an indirect effect for positive symptoms mediated by victimization. Results showed good model fit for the direct effects of both symptoms and victimization: both lead to an increase of self-stigma and subsequent negative self-esteem. Negative symptoms had a direct association with self-stigma, while the relationship between positive symptoms and self-stigma was mediated by victimization. Our findings suggest that symptoms and victimization may contribute to self-stigma, leading to negative self-esteem in individuals with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Especially for patients with positive symptoms victimization seems to be an important factor in developing self-stigma. Given the burden of self-stigma on patients and the constraining effects on societal participation and service use, interventions targeting victimization as well as self-stigma are needed.

  11. Premorbid multivariate markers of neurodevelopmental instability in the prediction of adult schizophrenia-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golembo-Smith, Shana; Schiffman, Jason; Kline, Emily

    2012-01-01

    of 265 Danish children in 1972, when participants were 10-13years old. Parent psychiatric diagnoses were also obtained in order to evaluate the predictive strength of neurodevelopmental factors in combination with genetic risk. Adult diagnostic information was available for 244 members of the sample...... included minor physical anomalies (MPAs), coordination, ocular alignment, laterality, and IQ. Adult diagnoses were assessed through psychiatric interviews in 1992, as well as through a scan of the national psychiatric registry through 2007. Through a combination of multiple childhood predictors, the model...... correctly classified 73% (24 of 33) of the participants who eventually developed a schizophrenia-spectrum outcome in adulthood. Results suggest that, with replication, multivariate premorbid prediction could potentially be a useful complementary approach to identifying individuals at risk for developing...

  12. Schizophrenia as a self-disorder due to perceptual incoherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, L.; Sno, H. N.; Goedhart, S.; van der Stel, J.; Heering, H. D.; de Haan, L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the potential relationship between multisensory disintegration and self-disorders in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Sensory processing impairments affecting multisensory integration have been demonstrated in schizophrenia. From a developmental perspective

  13. The emerging role of microRNAs in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos eMellios

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs conserved throughout evolution whose perceived importance for brain development and maturation is increasingly being understood. Although a plethora of new discoveries have provided novel insights into miRNA-mediated molecular mechanisms that influence brain plasticity, their relevance for psychiatric diseases with known deficits in synaptic plasticity, such as schizophrenia and autism, has not been adequately explored. In this review we discuss the intersection between current and old knowledge on the role of miRNAs in brain plasticity and function with a focus in the potential involvement of brain expressed miRNAs in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Acute Antipsychotic Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Tarp, Simon; Glintborg, Dorte; Stenstrøm, Anne Dorte; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Correll, Christoph Ulrich; Christensen, Robin

    2017-03-01

    To determine the comparative efficacy and safety of antipsychotics for youth with early-onset schizophrenia using network meta-analytic methods combining direct and indirect trial data. The authors systematically searched MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, and clinicaltrials.gov and selected randomized controlled trials allocating youth with schizophrenia spectrum disorders to a (non-clozapine) antipsychotic versus placebo or another antipsychotic. Major efficacy outcomes were Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total and positive symptoms. Major safety outcomes were weight, plasma triglyceride levels, extrapyramidal symptoms, akathisia, and all-cause discontinuation. Sixteen additional outcomes were analyzed. A random-effects arm-based network meta-analysis was applied, and consistency was assessed by pairwise meta-analysis. Confidence in PANSS total estimates was assessed by applying the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Twelve 6- to 12-week trials (N = 2,158; 8-19 years old; 61% boys) involving 8 antipsychotics (aripiprazole, asenapine, paliperidone, risperidone, quetiapine, olanzapine, molindone, and ziprasidone) were analyzed. PANSS total symptom change was comparable among antipsychotics (low- to moderate-quality evidence), except ziprasidone (very low- to low-quality evidence), and all antipsychotics were superior to placebo (low- to high-quality evidence), except ziprasidone and asenapine (low- to moderate-quality evidence). PANSS positive changes and additional efficacy outcomes were comparable among antipsychotics. Weight gain was primarily associated with olanzapine; extrapyramidal symptoms and akathisia were associated with molindone; and prolactin increased with risperidone, paliperidone, and olanzapine. Serious adverse events, discontinuation of treatment, sedation, insomnia, or change in triglycerides did not differ among antipsychotics. This network meta-analysis showed comparable efficacy

  15. Predictors of aggression in 3.322 patients with affective disorders and schizophrenia spectrum disorders evaluated in an emergency department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Emily A; Duque, Laura M; Rachamallu, Vivekananda; Yuen, Eunice; Kane, John M; Gallego, Juan A

    2017-10-25

    The aim of this study is to determine odds of aggression and associated factors in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) and affective disorders who were evaluated in an emergency department setting. A retrospective study was conducted using de-identified data from electronic medical records from 3.322 patients who were evaluated at emergency psychiatric settings. Data extracted included demographic information, variables related to aggression towards people or property in the past 6months, and other factors that could potentially impact the risk of aggression, such as comorbid diagnoses, physical abuse and sexual abuse. Bivariate analyses and multivariate regression analyses were conducted to determine the variables significantly associated with aggression. An initial multivariate regression analysis showed that SSD had 3.1 times the odds of aggression, while bipolar disorder had 2.2 times the odds of aggression compared to unipolar depression. A second regression analysis including bipolar subtypes showed, using unipolar depression as the reference group, that bipolar disorder with a recent mixed episode had an odds ratio (OR) of 4.3, schizophrenia had an OR of 2.6 and bipolar disorder with a recent manic episode had an OR of 2.2. Generalized anxiety disorder was associated with lower odds in both regression analyses. As a whole, the SSD group had higher odds of aggression than the bipolar disorder group. However, after subdividing the groups, schizophrenia had higher odds of aggression than bipolar disorder with a recent manic episode and lower odds of aggression than bipolar disorder with a recent mixed episode. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gender differences in young adults with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders at baseline in the Danish OPUS study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia

    2007-01-01

    Gender differences in age at first onset, duration of untreated psychosis, psychopathology, social functioning, and self-esteem were investigated in a group of 578 young adults with a first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder. The mean age at first-onset of symptoms, age at first contact......, and duration of untreated psychosis were similar for men and women. Men had more severe negative symptoms, poorer premorbid functioning, and poorer social networks, whereas women had more severe hallucinations. More men than women were substance abusers, were unemployed, and lived alone. Women had poorer self-esteem...... functioning, which cannot be explained by older age of onset for women. Women make more suicide attempts and experience lower self-esteem in spite of better social functioning....

  17. Switching antipsychotics: Results of 16-month non-interventional, prospective, observational clinical research of inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bole Cvetka Bačar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to identify prescribing and switching patterns of antipsychotics in clinical practice. A 16-month, prospective study was conducted at the Psychiatric Hospital Idrija, Slovenia. Inpatients (N = 311 with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were observed. The causes for switching antipsychotics and switching strategies were analyzed. Analyzing a total of 3954 prescriptions, the collected data confirmed that treatment strategies in this psychiatric hospital are very complex. It was found that 37 percent of inpatients had at least one switch. Moreover, switches that included three or more antipsychotics were detected. The most common causes for switching antipsychotics were adverse reactions and inefficacy or lack of efficacy. Among switching options, abrupt switch was recorded several times. As some patients are receiving several antipsychotics at the same time, it is possible that unusual switching occurs in clinical practice. It seems that the choice of switching strategy is also affected by the cause and urgency for switching an antipsychotic.

  18. The "minimal self" in psychopathology: re-examining the self-disorders in the schizophrenia spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cermolacce, Michel René Joseph; Naudin, Jean; Parnas, Josef

    2007-01-01

    the feeling of mineness. Two clinical vignettes of patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia will be presented: the first one, illustrating early illness stages, and the second case, of chronic schizophrenia, symptomatically marked by persistent hallucinations. Through their analysis, we will discuss...

  19. Criminally violent victimisation in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: the relationship to symptoms and substance abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolan Mairead C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violent victimisation among people with major mental illness is well-documented but the risk factors for criminal violent victimisation are not well understood. Methods We examined the relationship between illness-related variables, indices of substance abuse and previous history of violence in a sample of 23 male criminally violently victimized and 69 non-criminally violently victimized male patients with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder that were resident in the community and in contact with public mental health services in Victoria Australia. Data on criminal victimisation was acquired from the police database. Results Demographic, a history of violence or illness-related variables did not distinguish between those had been the victim of a violent crime and those who had not. Our data indicated that drug abuse was a key factor in distinguishing between the groups, but the age of onset of substance abuse was not a significant factor. Scores on measures of drug abuse were modest predictors of criminal victimisation status in our Receiver Operator Characteristic analyses. Conclusion Overall, our findings suggest that substance abuse (particularly drug abuse is a key predictor of violent victimisation based on criminal statistics. The latter has implications for mental health professions involved in the care planning and community management of patients with major mental illness and work points to the importance of substance abuse treatment in the prevention of victimisation as well as violence perpetration.

  20. Functional MRI Evaluation of Multiple Neural Networks Underlying Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Thoma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI studies have identified a distributed set of brain activations to be associated with auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH. However, very little is known about how activated brain regions may be linked together into AVH-generating networks. Fifteen volunteers with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder pressed buttons to indicate on-set and off-set of AVH during fMRI scanning. When a general linear model (GLM was used to compare BOLD signals during periods in which subjects indicated that they were versus were not experiencing AVH (‘AVH-on’ versus ‘AVH-off’, it revealed AVH-related activity in bilateral inferior frontal and superior temporal regions; the right middle temporal gyrus; and the left insula, supramarginal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule and extra-nuclear white matter. In an effort to identify AVH-related networks, the raw data were also processed using independent component analyses (ICA. Four ICA components were spatially consistent with an a priori network framework based upon published meta-analyses of imaging correlates of AVH. Of these four components, only a network involving bilateral auditory cortices and posterior receptive language areas was significantly and positively correlated with the pattern of AVH-on versus AVH-off. The ICA also identified two additional networks (occipital-temporal and medial pre-frontal, not fully matching the meta-analysis framework, but nevertheless containing nodes reported as active in some studies of AVH. Both networks showed significant AVH-related profiles, but both were most active during AVH-off periods. Overall, the data suggest that AVH generation requires specific and selective activation of auditory cortical and posterior language regions, perhaps coupled to a release of indirect influence by occipital and medial frontal structures.

  1. Sex Differences in Antipsychotic Related Metabolic Functioning in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraal, A Zarina; Ward, Kristen M; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2017-05-15

    The adverse metabolic risks associated with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are well known, and likely contribute to the high rate of premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease in schizophrenia. Female schizophrenia patients appear to be diagnosed with metabolic diseases at higher rates than males, which may reflect disparate adverse responses to SGAs. However, the relationship between sex, metabolic risk, and drug use is less developed. We aimed to explore this relationship further by identifying rates of metabolic disease in community dwelling schizophrenia patients by sex and SGA risk. Schizophrenia participants (N = 287, 40.4% female) were included in this analysis. Oneway-ANOVA and Fisher's Exact Test were used to compare groups, as appropriate, and Cohen's d was employed to estimate the effect size of sex. In the group as a whole, the rate of metabolic syndrome was higher than previously reported, but did not differ by sex. For females, greater metabolic disturbances across all medication risk groups were seen in BMI and waist circumference (p metabolic disturbances was extremely low (metabolic dysfunction and future adverse cardiovascular outcomes, and warrant close monitoring by clinicians to prevent worsening of metabolic risk through proper monitoring and interventions.

  2. Effect of Liraglutide Treatment on Prediabetes and Overweight or Obesity in Clozapine- or Olanzapine-Treated Patients With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Julie R; Vedtofte, Louise; Jakobsen, Mathilde S L

    2017-01-01

    effects. Objectives: To determine the effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide added to clozapine or olanzapine treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Design, Setting, and Participants: This randomized clinical double-blind trial enrolled participants at 2 clinical sites...... in Denmark. Of 214 eligible participants with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, 103 were randomized to liraglutide or placebo. Participants received stable treatment with clozapine or olanzapine, were overweight or obese, and had prediabetes. Data were collected from May 1, 2013, through February 25, 2016...... weight decreased with liraglutide compared with placebo (-5.3 kg; 95% CI, -7.0 to -3.7 kg). Reductions in waist circumference (-4.1 cm; 95% CI, -6.0 to -2.3 cm), systolic blood pressure (-4.9 mm Hg; 95% CI, -9.5 to -0.3 mm Hg), visceral fat (-250.19 g; 95% CI, -459.9 to -40.5 g), and low...

  3. The "minimal self" in psychopathology: re-examining the self-disorders in the schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermolacce, Michel; Naudin, Jean; Parnas, Josef

    2007-09-01

    The notion of minimal, basic, pre-reflective or core self is currently debated in the philosophy of mind, cognitive sciences and developmental psychology. However, it is not clear which experiential features such a self is believed to possess. Studying the schizophrenic experience may help exploring the following aspects of the minimal self: the notion of perspective and first person perspective, the 'mineness' of the phenomenal field, the questions of transparency, embodiment of point of view, and the issues of agency and ownership, considered as different and less fundamental than the feeling of mineness. Two clinical vignettes of patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia will be presented: the first one, illustrating early illness stages, and the second case, of chronic schizophrenia, symptomatically marked by persistent hallucinations. Through their analysis, we will discuss the experiential dimensions of minimal self.

  4. Employment outcomes for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorder: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Viviana R; Gómez-Benito, Juana; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Rojo, J Emilio

    2017-05-08

    Access to employment plays a critical role in the recovery and functioning of people with schizophrenia. We have investigated the effectiveness of treatments to enhance employment outcomes for people with schizophrenia and evaluated the potential moderators of these outcomes. A literature search was conducted in CINAHL, Cochrane Databases, MEDLINE, ProQuest XML, PsycINFO, Scopus, and Web of Science. Grey literature databases, references lists of the retrieved articles and specialized journals in the field were also inspected. Job placement, job tenure and wages earned were tested. Risk ratios were extracted for job placement and standardized mean differences were calculated for job tenure and wages earned. Twenty-five randomized controlled trials published between 1986 and December 2015 were analyzed. Engaging in a vocational intervention increases the likelihood of obtaining a competitive job (risk ratio (RR) = 2.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.85-2.88) and has a positive impact on hours worked in any job (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.16-0.68). There was no evidence of intervention efficacy with regard to wages earned from competitive employment. Participation in rehabilitative vocational treatment is not sufficient to ensure work participation for people with schizophrenia. Comprehensive treatments are necessary to address functional deficits that hinder labor stability and job performance for people with schizophrenia. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(3):345-366. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  5. Predictors of smoking reduction outcomes in a sample of 287 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo-Jian; Lan, Tsuo-Hung

    2017-02-01

    Many studies have investigated whether a type of antipsychotics or type of adjuvant is associated with smoking reduction in patients with schizophrenia. However, there has been no study exploring a comprehensive range of factors related to smoking reduction in schizophrenia patients. We analyzed a dataset of 287 smoking patients with schizophrenia who participated in an 8-week open-label study with high- (n = 90) or low-dose nicotine dermal patches (n = 132) or bupropion (n = 65). A logistic regression model and a linear mixed model were used to explore factors associated with the outcomes of smoking cessation and reduction, i.e., the number of cigarettes smoked and the level of nicotine dependence. The total cessation rate was 6.3 % (18/287). There were no significant predictors of cessation. The time effect of reduction was significant during the program (p = 0.001). Type of antipsychotics (p = 0.018), readiness to quit (p = 0.014), baseline number of cigarettes smoked per day (p = 0.001), and nicotine dependence level (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with smoking reduction. Patients on first-generation antipsychotics (n = 129) or clozapine (n = 70) reduced their smoking more than those on non-clozapine second-generation antipsychotics (n = 74). Patients in the preparation stage (n = 97) or in the contemplation (n = 70) reduced their smoking more than those in the precontemplation stage (n = 120). The mechanisms of tobacco addiction need to be better understood for further development of effective cessation programs in patients with schizophrenia.

  6. Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in a Danish 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Cohort Compared to the Total Danish Population-A Nationwide Register Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangkilde, Anders; Olsen, Line; Hoeffding, Louise K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cross-sectional studies have shown associations between 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and schizophrenia. However, large-scale prospective studies have been lacking. We, therefore, conducted the first large-scale population based study on the risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia...... in persons identified with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. METHODS: Danish nationwide registers were linked to establish a cohort consisting of all Danish citizens born during 1955-2004 and the cohort was followed from January 1, 1994 until December 31, 2013. Data were analyzed using survival analyses...... and adjusted for calendar year, age, sex, and parental mental health history. RESULTS: A total of 156 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome were identified, out of which 6 individuals were diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders following identification with 22q11 deletion syndrome. Identified...

  7. Self-stigma and its relationship with insight, demoralization, and clinical outcome among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavelti, Marialuisa; Kvrgic, Sara; Beck, Eva-Marina; Rüsch, Nicolas; Vauth, Roland

    2012-07-01

    Paradoxically, insight is associated with positive outcomes, such as better treatment adherence and recovery, and negative outcomes, such as depression, hopelessness, low self-esteem, and quality of life. Self-stigma as a moderating variable can be decisive whether more insight leads to better or worse outcome. On the other hand, self-stigma can act as a mediator between insight and outcomes. We therefore examined self-stigma both as a moderator and a mediator. Insight, self-stigma, demoralization, symptoms, and functioning were assessed among 145 outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders using questionnaires and structured interviews. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the cross-sectional data. Results confirmed self-stigma as a moderator: The association of insight and demoralization was stronger as self-stigma increased. Self-stigma also partially mediated the positive relationship between insight and demoralization. Moreover, demoralization fully mediated the adverse associations of self-stigma with psychotic symptoms and global functioning. Given the decisive role of self-stigma regarding the detrimental consequences of insight, interventions should address self-stigma, particularly if psychoeducational or other interventions have increased insight. Therapeutic implications for changes of dysfunctional beliefs related to illness and self and change of self-concept in the context of recovery at the level of narrative identity are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Type and timing of childhood maltreatment and severity of shutdown dissociation in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Schalinski

    Full Text Available Dissociation, particularly the shutting down of sensory, motor and speech systems, has been proposed to emerge in susceptible individuals as a defensive response to traumatic stress. In contrast, other individuals show signs of hyperarousal to acute threat. A key question is whether exposure to particular types of stressful events during specific stages of development can program an individual to have a strong dissociative response to subsequent stressors. Vulnerability to ongoing shutdown dissociation was assessed in 75 inpatients (46 M/29 F, M = 31 ± 10 years old with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and related to number of traumatic events experienced or witnessed during childhood or adulthood. The Maltreatment and Abuse Chronology of Exposure (MACE scale was used to collect retrospective recall of exposure to ten types of maltreatment during each year of childhood. Severity of shutdown dissociation was related to number of childhood but not adult traumatic events. Random forest regression with conditional trees indicated that type and timing of childhood maltreatment could predictably account for 31% of the variance (p < 0.003 in shutdown dissociation, with peak vulnerability occurring at 13-14 years of age and with exposure to emotional neglect followed by various forms of emotional abuse. These findings suggest that there may be windows of vulnerability to the development of shutdown dissociation. Results support the hypothesis that experienced events are more important than witnessed events, but challenge the hypothesis that "life-threatening" events are a critical determinant.

  9. Linking social cognition with social interaction: Non-verbal expressivity, social competence and "mentalising" in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehmkämper Caroline

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has shown that patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD can be distinguished from controls on the basis of their non-verbal expression. For example, patients with SSD use facial expressions less than normals to invite and sustain social interaction. Here, we sought to examine whether non-verbal expressivity in patients corresponds with their impoverished social competence and neurocognition. Method Fifty patients with SSD were videotaped during interviews. Non-verbal expressivity was evaluated using the Ethological Coding System for Interviews (ECSI. Social competence was measured using the Social Behaviour Scale and psychopathology was rated using the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. Neurocognitive variables included measures of IQ, executive functioning, and two mentalising tasks, which tapped into the ability to appreciate mental states of story characters. Results Non-verbal expressivity was reduced in patients relative to controls. Lack of "prosocial" nonverbal signals was associated with poor social competence and, partially, with impaired understanding of others' minds, but not with non-social cognition or medication. Conclusion This is the first study to link deficits in non-verbal expressivity to levels of social skills and awareness of others' thoughts and intentions in patients with SSD.

  10. Schizophrenia: A Systemic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brian; Miller, Brian; García-Rizo, Clemente; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of schizophrenia that is most widely taught is that it is a disorder in which psychotic symptoms are the main problem, and a dysregulation of dopamine signaling is the main feature of pathophysiology. However, this concept limits clinical assessment, the treatments offered to patients, research, and the development of therapeutics. A more appropriate conceptual model is that: 1) schizophrenia is not a psychotic disorder, but a disorder of essentially every brain function in which psychosis is present; 2) it is not a brain disease, but a disorder with impairments throughout the body; 3) for many patients, neuropsychiatric problems other than psychosis contribute more to impairment in function and quality of life than does psychosis; and, 4) some conditions that are considered to be comorbid are integral parts of the illness. In conclusion, students, patients, and family members should be taught this model, along with its implications for assessment, research, and therapeutics. PMID:23518782

  11. Perceived empowerment in people with a dual diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorder and substance misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Katherine; Allott, Rory; Emsley, Richard; Ennion, Sarah; Barrowclough, Christine

    2014-03-01

    The aims of the present study were to validate a measure of empowerment in a British population of people with a dual diagnosis of schizophrenia and substance misuse and assess relationships between empowerment and other key outcomes. Patients participating in a large randomised control trial for Motivational Interviewing for Drug and Alcohol misuse in Schizophrenia or psychosis (MIDAS trial) completed measures of empowerment, symptoms, global functioning and substance use at baseline, 12- and 24-month follow-ups. A three factor model of empowerment: self-efficacy and control; power and anger; and activism provided the best fit of the data across all three time points. There was some evidence of associations between empowerment and both symptoms and global functioning, although these associations were not consistent across subscales. Changes in empowerment predicted changes in symptoms and functioning at follow-up. Empowerment is a broadly defined construct and its meaning may differ across different populations of people with severe and enduring mental health problems. Empowerment is a key component of recovery and should be assessed in treatments in addition to more traditional outcome measures of symptoms and functioning.

  12. A comparison of neuroimaging findings in childhood onset schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baribeau, Danielle A; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2013-12-20

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) are pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders associated with significant morbidity. Both conditions are thought to share an underlying genetic architecture. A comparison of neuroimaging findings across ASD and COS with a focus on altered neurodevelopmental trajectories can shed light on potential clinical biomarkers and may highlight an underlying etiopathogenesis. A comprehensive review of the medical literature was conducted to summarize neuroimaging data with respect to both conditions in terms of structural imaging (including volumetric analysis, cortical thickness and morphology, and region of interest studies), white matter analysis (include volumetric analysis and diffusion tensor imaging) and functional connectivity. In ASD, a pattern of early brain overgrowth in the first few years of life is followed by dysmaturation in adolescence. Functional analyses have suggested impaired long-range connectivity as well as increased local and/or subcortical connectivity in this condition. In COS, deficits in cerebral volume, cortical thickness, and white matter maturation seem most pronounced in childhood and adolescence, and may level off in adulthood. Deficits in local connectivity, with increased long-range connectivity have been proposed, in keeping with exaggerated cortical thinning. The neuroimaging literature supports a neurodevelopmental origin of both ASD and COS and provides evidence for dynamic changes in both conditions that vary across space and time in the developing brain. Looking forward, imaging studies which capture the early post natal period, which are longitudinal and prospective, and which maximize the signal to noise ratio across heterogeneous conditions will be required to translate research findings into a clinical environment.

  13. A comparison of neuroimaging findings in childhood onset schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Andrea Baribeau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD and childhood onset schizophrenia (COS are pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders associated with significant morbidity. Both conditions are thought to share an underlying genetic architecture. A comparison of neuroimaging findings across ASD and COS with a focus on altered neurodevelopmental trajectories can shed light on potential clinical biomarkers and may highlight an underlying etiopathogenesis. Methods: A comprehensive review of the medical literature was conducted to summarize neuroimaging data with respect to both conditions in terms of structural imaging (including volumetric analysis, cortical thickness and morphology, and region of interest studies, white matter analysis (include volumetric analysis and diffusion tensor imaging and functional connectivity. Results: In ASD, a pattern of early brain overgrowth in the first few years of life is followed by dysmaturation in adolescence. Functional analyses have suggested impaired long-range connectivity as well as increased local and/or subcortical connectivity in this condition. In COS, deficits in cerebral volume, cortical thickness, and white matter maturation seem most pronounced in childhood and adolescence, and may level off in adulthood. Deficits in local connectivity, with increased long-range connectivity have been proposed, in keeping with exaggerated cortical thinning.Conclusions: The neuroimaging literature supports a neurodevelopmental origin of both ASD and COS and provides evidence for dynamic changes in both conditions that vary across space and time in the developing brain. Looking forward, imaging studies which capture the early post natal period, which are longitudinal and prospective, and which maximize the signal to noise ratio across heterogeneous conditions will be required to translate research findings into a clinical environment.

  14. Connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, Maritta; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Hätönen, Heli; Koivunen, Marita; Pitkänen, Anneli; Athanasopoulou, Christina; Anttila, Minna

    2017-01-01

    Information and communication technologies have been developed for a variety of health care applications and user groups in the field of health care. This study examined the connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs). A cross-sectional survey design was used to study 311 adults with SSDs from the inpatient units of two psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The data collection lasted for 20 months and was done through patients' medical records and a self-reported, structured questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics. In total, 297 patients were included in this study (response rate =96%). More than half of them (n=156; 55%) had a computer and less than half of them (n=127; 44%) had the Internet at home. Of those who generally had access to computers and the Internet, more than one-fourth (n=85; 29%) used computers daily, and >30% (n=96; 33%) never accessed the Internet. In total, approximately one-fourth of them (n=134; 25%) learned to use computers, and less than one-third of them (n=143; 31%) were known to use the Internet by themselves. Older people (aged 45-65 years) and those with less years of education (primary school) tended not to use the computers and the Internet at all ( P computers and the Internet, and they mainly used the Internet to seek information. Social, occupational, and psychological functioning (which were evaluated with Global Assessment of Functioning) were not associated with access to and frequency of computer and the Internet use. The results support the use of computers and the Internet as part of clinical work in mental health care.

  15. Premorbid personality in schizophrenia spectrum: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Morten; Lykke Mortensen, Erik; Sørensen, Holger J

    2006-01-01

    of an Adjective Check List (ACL). In 1991-93, adult psychiatric status was assessed for 242 of these individuals, who were classified into three categories: schizophrenia spectrum (n=24), other psychiatric diagnoses (n=72) and healthy controls (n=145). Personality characteristics derived from the ACL were linked......, friendliness, cooperation, self-control and significantly higher on aggression. Non-significant trends indicated that this group displayed more deviant personality scores than psychiatric controls. Children who later develop schizophrenia spectrum disorder differed from normal controls with respect to a number......Schizophrenia has been linked with premorbid character anomalies since it was first described. However, few prospective studies of premorbid personality characteristics in schizophrenia and related disorders have been conducted. This study evaluates premorbid personality in children who developed...

  16. Effect of integrated treatment on the use of coercive measures in first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. A randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenschlæger, Johan; Nordentoft, Merete; Thorup, Anne

    2008-01-01

    of assertive community treatment, psycho-educational multi-family groups, and social skills training. Data on coercion were extracted from the register from the National Board of Health, and data on continuity from medical records. Even though the level of continuity seemed higher in integrated treatment......The effect of integrated treatment on the use of coercive measures in first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in Denmark is not known. A total of 328 patients were randomly assigned to integrated treatment (167 patients) or standard treatment (161 patients). Integrated treatment consisted...

  17. Connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Välimäki M

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Maritta Välimäki,1–3 Lauri Kuosmanen,1,4,5 Heli Hätönen,1 Marita Koivunen,1,6 Anneli Pitkänen,7 Christina Athanasopoulou,1 Minna Anttila1 1Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, Finland; 2Development Unit, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; 3School of Nursing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong, SAR, China; 4University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland; 5Social and Healthcare Department, City of Vantaa, Vantaa, Finland; 6Administrative Centre, Research and Development, Satakunta Hospital District, Pori, Finland; 7Administration Centre, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland Purpose: Information and communication technologies have been developed for a variety of health care applications and user groups in the field of health care. This study examined the connectivity to computers and the Internet among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs.Patients and methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to study 311 adults with SSDs from the inpatient units of two psychiatric hospitals in Finland. The data collection lasted for 20 months and was done through patients’ medical records and a self-reported, structured questionnaire. Data analysis included descriptive statistics.Results: In total, 297 patients were included in this study (response rate =96%. More than half of them (n=156; 55% had a computer and less than half of them (n=127; 44% had the Internet at home. Of those who generally had access to computers and the Internet, more than one-fourth (n=85; 29% used computers daily, and >30% (n=96; 33% never accessed the Internet. In total, approximately one-fourth of them (n=134; 25% learned to use computers, and less than one-third of them (n=143; 31% were known to use the Internet by themselves. Older people (aged 45–65 years and those with less years of education (primary school tended not to use the computers and the

  18. Neurocognition in Early-Onset Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Giuliano, Anthony J.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Breiger, David; Sikich, Linmarie; Frazier, Jean A.; Findling, Robert L.; McClellan, Jon; Hamer, Robert M.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined the neuropsychological functioning of youth enrolled in the NIMH funded trial, Treatment of Early-Onset Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (TEOSS). We compared the baseline neuropsychological functioning of youth with schizophrenia (SZ, n = 79) to those with schizoaffective disorder (SA, n = 40), and examined the relationship…

  19. Impact of social anxiety on social cognition and functioning in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Amélie M; Ouellet, Rosalie; Lavoie, Marie-Audrey; Vallières, Chantal; Jackson, Philip L; Roy, Marc-André

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia patients display important rates of comorbid social anxiety disorder (SAD) but few studies have directly examined how SAD affects the presentation of schizophrenia, notably social cognition deficits and functioning. To compare social cognition performance of schizophrenia patients who meet the diagnostic criteria for a comorbid SAD (SZ+) relative to patients without such comorbidity (SZ-) and to determine if the impact of social cognition performance on functioning is moderated by that comorbidity. Social cognition performance (emotion recognition, social knowledge, and mentalizing), a control non-social reasoning task, as well as clinical symptoms and functioning were assessed in 26 patients with comorbid SAD (SZ+), 29 SZ- and 84 healthy controls. Patient groups significantly differed from each other on social knowledge performance, but not in levels of symptoms or overall functioning. Relative to healthy controls, SZ+ were impaired uniquely on mentalizing, whereas SZ- showed a more encompassing social cognition deficit that included mentalizing, social knowledge and non-social reasoning impairments. Mentalizing was the best predictor of functioning across both patient groups. Importantly, non-social reasoning negatively influenced mentalizing and in turn functioning only in the SZ- group. The overall pattern of results indicates common mentalizing deficits in SZ+ and SZ-; however, these deficits appear linked to different underlying deficits and different pathways to functional impact in the two patient subgroups. This study highlights some distinctive characteristics of schizophrenia patients with comorbid SAD and signals a need for further investigations into the sources of the mentalizing and functioning impairments in SZ+ patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a person's life. ... be known as Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorders. It is called a "spectrum" disorder because people ...

  1. Cannabis use is associated with 3years earlier onset of schizophrenia spectrum disorder in a naturalistic, multi-site sample (N=1119).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Siri; Ringen, Petter Andreas; Melle, Ingrid; Larsen, Tor-Ketil; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Andreassen, Ole A; Kroken, Rune Andreas; Joa, Inge; Ten Velden Hegelstad, Wenche; Løberg, Else-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and substance use may have an earlier onset of illness compared to those without substance use. Most previous studies have, however, too small samples to control for confounding variables and the effect of specific types of substances. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between substance use and age at onset, in addition to the influence of possible confounders and specific substances, in a large and heterogeneous multisite sample of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The patients (N=1119) were recruited from catchment areas in Oslo, Stavanger and Bergen, Norway, diagnosed according to DSM-IV and screened for substance use history. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between substance use and age at onset of illness. Patients with substance use (n=627) had about 3years earlier age at onset (23.0years; SD 7.1) than the abstinent group (n=492; 25.9years; SD 9.7). Only cannabis use was statistically significantly related to earlier age at onset. Gender or family history of psychosis did not influence the results. Cannabis use is associated with 3years earlier onset of psychosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Metacognition in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: methods of assessment and associations with neurocognition, symptoms, cognitive style and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaker, Paul H; Leonhardt, Bethany L; Pijnenborg, Marieke; van Donkersgoed, Rozanne; de Jong, Steven; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in metacognitive capacity in schizophrenia can be conceptualized as existing along a spectrum from more discrete to more synthetic activities. While each represents an equally important focus of study, synthetic metacognitive activities may be more difficult to measure given they are more a matter of assessing complexity of thought rather than concrete accuracy; and therefore have received less attention. This review summarizes research on synthetic metacognition using a paradigm in which metacognitive capacity is rated within personal narratives. Results across the work reviewed here provides evidence that these deficits are detectable in patients with schizophrenia and that deficits are related to, but not reducible to, symptom severity and poorer neurocognitive function. Independent of symptoms and neurocognition, deficits in synthetic metacognition are related to a range of mental activities including reasoning style, learning potential and insight. These deficits may also play a role in long term outcome via their impact on the ability to function in work settings and to think about and sustain social connections.

  3. Identity Disturbance, Feelings of Emptiness, and the Boundaries of the Schizophrenia Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Maja; Parnas, Josef

    2018-01-01

    in schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder. Unfortunately, the diagnostic manuals offer limited insight into the nature of these criteria, including possible deviations and similarities with schizophrenia spectrum symptomatology. In this article, we attempt to clarify the concepts of identity......Historical and current research on borderline personality disorder reveal certain affinities with schizophrenia spectrum psychopathology. This is also the case for the borderline criteria of "identity disturbance" and "feelings of emptiness," which reflect symptomatology frequently found...

  4. Do motivation deficits in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders promote cannabis use? An investigation of behavioural response to natural rewards and drug cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Clifford M; Lepage, Martin; Malla, Ashok

    2014-03-30

    Deficits in incentive motivation are often present in both Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (SSD) and substance-use disorders. The current study aims to test whether the presence of such deficits confers vulnerability to cannabis use in individuals with SSD. SSD patients (n=35) and healthy controls (n=35) were each divided into a group with (n=20) and a group without (n=15) current cannabis use disorder. Subjects performed a behavioural task designed for schizophrenia patients in which they could seek exposure to pleasant and cannabis visual stimuli on the basis of internal representations of these stimuli. Intensity of cannabis use was assessed by self-report. SSD patients were significantly less likely than controls to exert effort to try to re-view pleasant stimuli but were not significantly less likely to work to avoid unpleasant stimuli. Lack of response to re-view pleasant stimuli significantly predicted higher subsequent cannabis self-administration in patients but not controls, after controlling for degree of prior exposure to cannabis. Deficits in incentive motivation may be an aspect of SSD which promotes cannabis use in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Connectivity of the anterior insula differentiates participants with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders from controls: a machine-learning study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolas, P; Melicher, T; Skoch, A; Matejka, M; Slovakova, A; Bakstein, E; Hajek, T; Spaniel, F

    2016-10-01

    Early diagnosis of schizophrenia could improve the outcomes and limit the negative effects of untreated illness. Although participants with schizophrenia show aberrant functional connectivity in brain networks, these between-group differences have a limited diagnostic utility. Novel methods of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses, such as machine learning (ML), may help bring neuroimaging from the bench to the bedside. Here, we used ML to differentiate participants with a first episode of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder (FES) from healthy controls based on resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC). We acquired resting-state functional MRI data from 63 patients with FES who were individually matched by age and sex to 63 healthy controls. We applied linear kernel support vector machines (SVM) to rsFC within the default mode network, the salience network and the central executive network. The SVM applied to the rsFC within the salience network distinguished the FES from the control participants with an accuracy of 73.0% (p = 0.001), specificity of 71.4% and sensitivity of 74.6%. The classification accuracy was not significantly affected by medication dose, or by the presence of psychotic symptoms. The functional connectivity within the default mode or the central executive networks did not yield classification accuracies above chance level. Seed-based functional connectivity maps can be utilized for diagnostic classification, even early in the course of schizophrenia. The classification was probably based on trait rather than state markers, as symptoms or medications were not significantly associated with classification accuracy. Our results support the role of the anterior insula/salience network in the pathophysiology of FES.

  6. Comparison of Visuospatial and Verbal Abilities in First Psychotic Episode of Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder: Impact on Global Functioning and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Mabel; Spaniel, Filip; Konradova, Lucie; Sedlakova, Katerina; Dvorska, Karolina; Prajsova, Jitka; Kratochvilova, Zuzana; Levcik, David; Vlcek, Kamil; Fajnerova, Iveta

    2015-01-01

    Deficit in visuospatial functions can influence both simple and complex daily life activities. Despite the fact that visuospatial deficit was reported in schizophrenia, research on visuospatial functions as an independent entity is limited. Our study aims to elucidate the impact of visuospatial deficit in comparison with verbal deficit on global functioning and quality of life in the first psychotic episode of schizophrenia spectrum disorder (FES). The significance of clinical symptoms and antipsychotic medication was also studied. Thirty-six FES patients and a matched group of healthy controls (HC group) were assessed with a neuropsychological battery focused on visuospatial (VIS) and verbal (VERB) functions. Using multiple regression analysis, we evaluated the cumulative effect of VERB and VIS functions, psychiatric symptoms (PANSS) and antipsychotic medication on global functioning (GAF) and quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) in the FES group. The FES group demonstrated significant impairment both in VIS and VERB cognitive abilities compared to the HC group. Antipsychotic medication did not significantly affect either VIS or VERB functioning. PANSS was not related to cognitive functioning, apart from the Trail Making Test B. In the FES group, the GAF score was significantly affected by the severity of positive symptoms and VERB functioning, explaining together 60% of GAF variability. The severity of negative and positive symptoms affected only the Physical health domain of WHOQOL-BREF. The degree of VERB deficit was associated with both Physical and Psychological health. Although we did not find any relation between VIS functioning, GAF, and WHOQOL-BREF, a paradoxical finding emerged in the Environment quality domain, where a worse quality of the environment was associated with better VIS functioning. Our results suggest that the deficit in VIS functions is an integral part of cognitive deficit in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, rather than a side effect of

  7. Intersubjectivity and Psychopathology in the Schizophrenia Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mads Gram; Nilsson, Lars Siersbæk

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies in phenomenological psychopathology emphasize the importance of intersubjectivity for our understanding of schizophrenia. Yet, the central role of the "we" in social experience and engagement is largely absent from this literature. Our study explores the relation between...... psychopathology and intersubjectivity in the schizophrenia spectrum through the prism of the "we." First, we explore the role of intersubjectivity in the current schizophrenia spectrum definitions and discuss the main contemporary research trends. Second, we recollect some of the classical accounts...... of schizophrenia, which offer a different perspective on the pervasive and often persistent intersubjective difficulties in these conditions. Third, capitalizing on recent advances in collective intentionality studies, we present and discuss a conceptual framework of the "we" and of how the "we" may be disrupted...

  8. [Dissociative identity disorder or schizophrenia?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschöke, S; Steinert, T

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of dissociative identity disorder in which Schneiderian first rank symptoms were present besides of various states of consciousness. Thus the diagnosis of schizophrenia had to be considered. Formally, the symptoms met ICD-10 criteria for schizophrenia. However, taking into account the lack of formal thought disorder and of negative symptoms as well as a typical history of severe and prolonged traumatisation, we did not diagnose a co-morbid schizophrenic disorder. There is good evidence for the existence of psychotic symptoms among patients with dissociative disorders. However, in clinical practice this differential diagnosis is rarely considered.

  9. Intrinsic Motivation as a Mediator of Relationships Between Symptoms and Functioning Among Individuals With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders in a Diverse Urban Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ann-Marie; Lee, Karen K.; Dinh, Tam Q.; Barrio, Concepción; Brekke, John S.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated intrinsic motivation as a mediator of the relationship between clinical symptoms and functioning. The mediation model was tested with a sample of 166 adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorders attending psychosocial rehabilitation programs in a diverse urban community. Ethnic minority status was examined as a moderator of the mediation model. Motivation was measured using items reflecting intrapsychic drive. Symptoms were assessed with the expanded Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and functioning with the Role Functioning Scale. Motivation was a significant mediator of the relationship between functioning and all symptom scores; fully mediating the relationship between functioning and negative, disorganized, and global symptoms, and partially mediating the relationship between positive symptoms and functioning. Motivation scores between ethnic minority and nonminority individuals differed significantly (p motivation on the symptoms-functioning relationship supports future work to translate findings into effective recovery-oriented services. PMID:20061866

  10. Predictors of remission and recovery in a first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder sample: 2-year follow-up of the OPUS trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lone; Thorup, Anne; Øqhlenschlaeger, Johan

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency and predictors of good outcome for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD). METHOD: We conducted a 2-year follow-up of a cohort of patients (n = 547) with first-episode SSD. We evaluated the patients on demographic variables, diagnosis......% remitted and 17% were considered fully recovered. Full recovery was associated with shorter DUP, better premorbid adjustment, fewer negative symptoms at baseline, no substance abuse at baseline, and adherence to medication and OPUS treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Several predictive factors were identified......, and focus should be on potentially malleable predictors of outcome, for example, reducing DUP and paying special attention to patients who are unlikely to achieve good outcome, for example, patients with a substance abuse problem and poor premorbid adjustment....

  11. Original research paper. Switching antipsychotics: Results of 16-month non-interventional, prospective, observational clinical research of inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Cvetka Bačar; Pišlar, Mitja; Šen, Metka; Tavčar, Rok; Mrhar, Aleš

    2017-03-01

    The study aims to identify prescribing and switching patterns of antipsychotics in clinical practice. A 16-month, prospective study was conducted at the Psychiatric Hospital Idrija, Slovenia. Inpatients (N = 311) with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were observed. The causes for switching antipsychotics and switching strategies were analyzed. Analyzing a total of 3954 prescriptions, the collected data confirmed that treatment strategies in this psychiatric hospital are very complex. It was found that 37 percent of inpatients had at least one switch. Moreover, switches that included three or more antipsychotics were detected. The most common causes for switching antipsychotics were adverse reactions and inefficacy or lack of efficacy. Among switching options, abrupt switch was recorded several times. As some patients are receiving several antipsychotics at the same time, it is possible that unusual switching occurs in clinical practice. It seems that the choice of switching strategy is also affected by the cause and urgency for switching an antipsychotic.

  12. MMN/P3a deficits in first episode psychosis: comparing schizophrenia-spectrum and affective-spectrum subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manreena; Battisti, Robert A; Ward, Philip B; Ahmed, Arnab; Hickie, Ian B; Hermens, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    Reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a amplitudes are neurophysiological biomarkers for schizophrenia that index deviance detection and the orienting response, respectively. First-episode psychosis (FEP) patients show reduced amplitudes of the 'MMN/P3a complex', but it is unclear whether this occurs across the FEP spectrum. Fifty-three young people (17-36 years) were assessed: 17 FEP affective-spectrum (bipolar disorder with psychotic features and major depressive disorder with psychotic features), 18 FEP schizophrenia-spectrum (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophreniform disorder), and 18 healthy controls. MMN/P3a was acquired during a two-tone, auditory paradigm with 8% duration deviants. Clinical, psychosocial and neuropsychological assessments were also undertaken. FEP schizophrenia- and FEP affective-spectrum showed significantly reduced fronto-central MMN and central P3a amplitudes compared to controls. FEP subgroups also showed significantly poorer cognitive and psychosocial functioning. The combined FEP sample showed significant correlations between fronto-central MMN amplitudes and cognitive measures. FEP schizophrenia-spectrum and FEP affective-spectrum were similarly impaired in two biomarkers for schizophrenia. FEP subgroups showed impairments in fronto-central MMN consistent with chronic patients. Similarly, both subgroups showed reductions in P3a; although the affective subgroup showed an 'intermediate' frontal response. These findings suggest that FEP patients with both affective and schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses share common neurobiological disturbances in deviance detection/orienting processes in the early phase of illness. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. [Differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of dissociative disorders includes many psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorders (especially bipolar II disorder), depressive disorder (especially atypical depression), epilepsy, Asperger syndrome, and borderline personality disorder. The theme of this paper is the differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia. Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in schizophrenia are common in dissociative disorders, especially in dissociative identity disorder (DID). Many DID patients have been misdiagnosed as schizophrenics and treated with neuroleptics. We compared and examined Schneiderian symptoms of schizophrenia and those of dissociative disorders from a structural viewpoint. In dissociative disorders, delusional perception and somatic passivity are not seen. "Lateness" and "Precedence of the Other" originated from the concept of "Pattern Reversal" (H. Yasunaga)" is characteristic of schizophrenia. It is important to check these basic structure of schizophrenia in subjective experiences in differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia.

  14. [Schizophrenia-like personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslow, T; Arolt, V

    2009-03-01

    According to DSM-IV the cluster A personality disorders include paranoid, schizoid, and schizotypal personality disorders. There exists a phenomenological similarity between the experience and behaviour of the so-called odd or eccentric personality disorders and the symptoms of schizophrenia. Evidence of common etiological factors is still the best for the schizotypal personality disorder. The cluster A personality disorders are among the less common personality disorders with a high co-occurrence. Present findings about the neurobiological substrate of the schizotypal personality disorder are discussed also taking neuropsychological results into consideration. A central prerequisite of psychotherapeutic and pharmacological treatment of cluster A personality disorders is a strong therapeutic patient relationship.

  15. Toward understanding the insight paradox: internalized stigma moderates the association between insight and social functioning, hope, and self-esteem among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaker, Paul H; Roe, David; Yanos, Philip T

    2007-01-01

    Research has paradoxically linked awareness of illness to both better function outcomes and lesser hope and self-esteem. One possible explanation for these findings is that acceptance of having schizophrenia may impact outcomes differently depending on the meanings the person attaches to this acceptance, particularly whether he or she accepts stigmatizing beliefs about mental illness. To explore this possibility we performed a cluster analysis of 75 persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders based on single measures of insight using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, internalized stigma using the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale, and compared groups on concurrent assessments of hope and self-esteem. Three groups were produced by the cluster analyses: low in sight/mild stigma (n = 23), high insight/minimal stigma (n = 25), and high insight/moderate stigma (n = 27). As predicted, analysis of variance-comparing groups revealed that the high insight/moderate stigma group had significantly the lowest levels of hope on the Beck Hopelessness Scale and self-esteem using the Multidimensional Self-esteem Inventory. As predicted, the high insight/minimal stigma group also had significantly less impaired social function than the other groups. Implications for assisting persons to come to cope with awareness of illness and stigma are discussed.

  16. Stigma moderates the associations of insight with depressed mood, low self-esteem, and low quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staring, A B P; Van der Gaag, M; Van den Berge, M; Duivenvoorden, H J; Mulder, C L

    2009-12-01

    Good insight into illness in patients with schizophrenia is related not only to medication compliance and high service engagement, but also to depression, low self-esteem, and low quality of life. The detrimental effects of insight pose a problem for treatment. To investigate whether the negative associations of good insight are moderated by perceived stigma. Respondents were 114 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. We used Analyses of Variance (ANOVA) and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) to test moderation. Good insight was associated with high service engagement and high compliance. Also, good insight was associated with depressed mood, low quality of life, and negative self-esteem. This association was strong when stigma was high and weak when stigma was low. SEM showed that the constrained model performed significantly worse than the unconstrained model, in which detrimental associations of insight were free to vary across stigma groups (chi(2)=19.082; df=3; p<.001). Our results suggest that the associations of insight with depression, low quality of life, and negative self-esteem are moderated by stigma. Patients with good insight who do not perceive much stigmatization seem to be best off across various outcome parameters. Those with poor insight have problems with service engagement and medication compliance. Patients with good insight accompanied by stigmatizing beliefs have the highest risk of experiencing low quality of life, negative self-esteem, and depressed mood. A clinical implication is that when it is attempted to increase insight, perceived stigma should also be addressed.

  17. Selective deficit in spatial memory strategies contrast to intact response strategies in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders tested in a virtual navigation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Leanne K; Girard, Todd A; Konishi, Kyoko; King, Matthew; Herdman, Katherine A; King, Jelena; Christensen, Bruce; Bohbot, Veronique D

    2013-11-01

    Spatial memory is impaired among persons with schizophrenia (SCZ). However, different strategies may be used to solve most spatial memory and navigation tasks. This study investigated the hypothesis that participants with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) would demonstrate differential impairment during acquisition and retrieval of target locations when using a hippocampal-dependent spatial strategy, but not a response strategy, which is more associated with caudate function. Healthy control (CON) and SSD participants were tested using the 4-on-8 virtual maze (4/8VM), a virtual navigation task designed to differentiate between participants' use of spatial and response strategies. Consistent with our predictions, SSD participants demonstrated a differential deficit such that those who navigated using a spatial strategy made more errors and took longer to locate targets. In contrast, SSD participants who spontaneously used a response strategy performed as well as CON participants. The differential pattern of spatial-memory impairment in SSD provides only indirect support for underlying hippocampal dysfunction. These findings emphasize the importance of considering individual strategies when investigating SSD-related memory and navigation performance. Future cognitive intervention protocols may harness SSD participants' intact ability to navigate using a response strategy and/or train the deficient ability to navigate using a spatial strategy to improve navigation and memory abilities in participants with SSD. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Caregiver burden in recent-onset schizophrenia and spectrum disorders : The influence of symptoms and personality traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthaus, JED; Dingemans, PMAJ; Schene, AH; Linszen, DH; Wiersma, D; Van den Bosch, RJ; Cahn, W; Hijman, R

    Earlier studies that used two symptom dimensions indicate that the caregiver burden for patients with schizophrenia is significantly determined by their negative symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between symptom severity in recent-onset schizophrenia and caregiver

  19. Caregiver burden in recent-onset schizophrenia and spectrum disorders: The influence of symptoms and personality traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthaus, Jiska E. D.; Dingemans, Peter M. A. J.; Schene, Aart H.; Linszen, Donald H.; Wiersma, Durk; van den Bosch, Robbert J.; Cahn, Wiepke; Hijman, Ron

    2002-01-01

    Earlier studies that used two symptom dimensions indicate that the caregiver burden for patients with schizophrenia is significantly determined by their negative symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between symptom severity in recent-onset schizophrenia and caregiver

  20. Aspects of Theory of Mind that attenuate the relationship between persecutory delusions and social functioning in schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, Peter L; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Popolo, Raffaele; Lysaker, Paul H

    2017-09-01

    Despite the apparent relevance of persecutory delusions to social relationships, evidence linking these beliefs to social functioning has been inconsistent. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that theory of mind moderates the relationship between persecutory delusions and social functioning. 88 adults with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were assessed concurrently for social functioning, severity of persecutory delusions, and two components of theory of mind: mental state decoding and mental state reasoning. Mental state decoding was assessed using the Eyes Test, mental state reasoning using the Hinting Task, and social functioning assessed with the Social Functioning Scale. Moderation effects were evaluated using linear models and the Johnson-Neyman procedure. Mental state reasoning was found to moderate the relationship between persecutory delusions and social functioning, controlling for overall psychopathology. For participants with reasoning scores in the bottom 78th percentile, persecutory delusions showed a significant negative relationship with social functioning. However, for those participants with mental state reasoning scores in the top 22nd percentile, more severe persecutory delusions were not significantly associated with worse social functioning. Mental state decoding was not a statistically significant moderator. Generalizability is limited as participants were generally men in later phases of illness. Mental state reasoning abilities may buffer the impact of persecutory delusions on social functioning, possibly by helping individuals avoid applying global beliefs of persecution to specific individuals or by allowing for the correction of paranoid inferences. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Are schizophrenia, autistic, and obsessive spectrum disorders dissociable on the basis of neuroimaging morphological findings?: A voxel-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauda, Franco; Costa, Tommaso; Nani, Andrea; Fava, Luciano; Palermo, Sara; Bianco, Francesca; Duca, Sergio; Tatu, Karina; Keller, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    Schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SCZD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder (OCSD) are considered as three separate psychiatric conditions with, supposedly, different brain alterations patterns. From a neuroimaging perspective, this meta-analytic study aimed to address whether this nosographical differentiation is actually supported by different brain patterns of gray matter (GM) or white matter (WM) morphological alterations. We explored two possibilities: (a) to find out whether GM alterations are specific for SCZD, ASD, and OCSD; and (b) to associate the identified brain alteration patterns with cognitive dysfunctions by means of an analysis of lesion decoding. Our analysis reveals that these psychiatric spectra do not present clear distinctive patterns of alterations; rather, they all tend to be distributed in two alteration clusters. Cluster 1, which is more specific for SCZD, includes the anterior insular, anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and frontopolar areas, which are parts of the cognitive control system. Cluster 2, which is more specific for OCSD, presents occipital, temporal, and parietal alteration patterns with the involvement of sensorimotor, premotor, visual, and lingual areas, thus forming a network that is more associated with the auditory-visual, auditory, premotor visual somatic functions. In turn, ASD appears to be uniformly distributed in the two clusters. The three spectra share a significant set of alterations. Our new approach promises to provide insight into the understanding of psychiatric conditions under the aspect of a common neurobiological substrate, possibly related to neuroinflammation during brain development. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1079-1095. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley

  2. Effect of Liraglutide Treatment on Prediabetes and Overweight or Obesity in Clozapine- or Olanzapine-Treated Patients With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Julie R; Vedtofte, Louise; Jakobsen, Mathilde S L; Jespersen, Hans R; Jakobsen, Michelle I; Svensson, Camilla K; Koyuncu, Kamuran; Schjerning, Ole; Oturai, Peter S; Kjaer, Andreas; Nielsen, Jimmi; Holst, Jens J; Ekstrøm, Claus T; Correll, Christoph U; Vilsbøll, Tina; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2017-07-01

    Compared with the general population, patients with schizophrenia have a 2- to 3-fold higher mortality rate primarily caused by cardiovascular disease. Previous interventions designed to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and cardiometabolic disturbances reported limited effects. To determine the effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide added to clozapine or olanzapine treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This randomized clinical double-blind trial enrolled participants at 2 clinical sites in Denmark. Of 214 eligible participants with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder, 103 were randomized to liraglutide or placebo. Participants received stable treatment with clozapine or olanzapine, were overweight or obese, and had prediabetes. Data were collected from May 1, 2013, through February 25, 2016. Treatment for 16 weeks with once-daily subcutaneous injection of liraglutide or placebo. Trial drug therapy was titrated during the first 2 weeks of the study. The primary end point was change in glucose tolerance estimated by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test result. Secondary end points included change in body weight and cardiometabolic parameters. Of the 103 patients undergoing randomization (60 men [58.3%] and 43 women [41.7%]), 97 were included in the efficacy analysis, with a mean (SD) age of 42.5 (10.5) years and mean (SD) body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of 33.8 (5.9). The liraglutide and placebo groups had comparable characteristics (mean [SD] age, 42.1 [10.7] vs 43.0 [10.5] years; 30 men in each group; mean [SD] body mass index, 33.7 [5.1] vs 33.9 [6.6]). A total of 96 randomized participants (93.2%) completed the trial. Glucose tolerance improved in the liraglutide group compared with the placebo group (P < .001). Altogether, 30 liraglutide-treated participants (63.8%) developed normal glucose tolerance compared with 8 placebo-treated participants (16.0%) (P

  3. Recovery assessment scale: Examining the factor structure of the German version (RAS-G) in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavelti, M; Wirtz, M; Corrigan, P; Vauth, R

    2017-03-01

    The recovery framework has found its way into local and national mental health services and policies around the world, especially in English speaking countries. To promote this process, it is necessary to assess personal recovery validly and reliably. The Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS) is the most established measure in recovery research. The aim of the current study is to examine the factor structure of the German version of the RAS (RAS-G). One hundred and fifty-six German-speaking clients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder from a community mental health service completed the RAS-G plus measures of recovery attitudes, self-stigma, psychotic symptoms, depression, and functioning. A confirmatory factor analysis of the original 24-item RAS version was conducted to examine its factor structure, followed by reliability and validity testing of the extracted factors. The CFA yielded five factors capturing 14 items which showed a substantial overlap with the original subscales Personal Confidence and Hope, Goal and Success Orientation, Willingness to Ask for Help, Reliance on Others, and No Domination by Symptoms. The factors demonstrated mean to excellent reliability (0.59-0.89) and satisfactory criterial validity by positive correlations with measures of recovery attitudes and functioning, and negative correlations with measures of self-stigma, and psychotic and depressive symptoms. The study results are discussed in the light of other studies examining the factor structure of the RAS. Overall, they support the use of the RAS-G as a means to promote recovery oriented services, policies, and research in German-speaking countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuropsychological profile in patients with schizotypal personality disorder or schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mié; Sumiyoshi, Tomiki; Kato, Kanade; Yoneyama, Eiichi; Kurachi, Masayoshi

    2004-04-01

    Neuropsychological impairments have been consistently reported in patients with schizophrenia. As little is known whether subjects with schizotypal personality disorder exhibit neurocognitive dysfunction similar to that in schizophrenia, we assessed the neuropsychological profile of 15 subjects with schizotypal personality disorder and compared it with that for 15 patients with schizophrenia and for 15 psychiatrically normal volunteers. All participants were administered a standard neuropsychological battery assessing language ability, spatial ability, visuomotor function, verbal memory, visual memory, auditory attention, visual attention, and executive function. Performance on most of the cognitive domains was impaired in patients with schizotypal personality disorder but less than patients with schizophrenia. Specifically, impairment in verbal memory and visuomotor ability in patients with schizotypal personality disorder and patients with schizophrenia were comparable, while patients with schizophrenia performed worse on the test of executive function than did patients with schizotypal personality disorder. As a whole, cognitive deficits in patients with schizotypal personality disorder were qualitatively similar to, but quantitatively milder than, those for patients with schizophrenia. The results suggest that cognitive abilities related to frontotemporal lobe function are disturbed across these schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  5. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part II: psychosocial interventions and patient-focused perspectives in psychiatric care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Sau Fong Leung, Frederick KK Yeung, Wai Kit Wong School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: Schizophrenia is a disabling psychiatric illness associated with disruptions in cognition, emotion, and psychosocial and occupational functioning. Increasing evidence shows that psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia, as an adjunct to medications or usual psychiatric care, can reduce psychotic symptoms and relapse and improve patients' long-term outcomes such as recovery, remission, and illness progression. This critical review of the literature was conducted to identify the common approaches to psychosocial interventions for people with schizophrenia. Treatment planning and outcomes were also explored and discussed to better understand the effects of these interventions in terms of person-focused perspectives such as their perceived quality of life and satisfaction and their acceptability and adherence to treatments or services received. We searched major healthcare databases such as EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PsycLIT and identified relevant literature in English from these databases. Their reference lists were screened, and studies were selected if they met the criteria of using a randomized controlled trial or systematic review design, giving a clear description of the interventions used, and having a study sample of people primarily diagnosed with schizophrenia. Five main approaches to psychosocial intervention had been used for the treatment of schizophrenia: cognitive therapy (cognitive behavioral and cognitive remediation therapy, psychoeducation, family intervention, social skills training, and assertive community treatment. Most of these five approaches applied to people with schizophrenia have demonstrated satisfactory levels of short- to medium-term clinical efficacy in terms of symptom control or reduction, level of

  6. Exploration of somatosensory P50 gating in schizophrenia spectrum patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse M.; Chen, Andrew C. N.

    2004-01-01

    Originally, the hypothesis of a sensory gating defect in schizophrenia evolved from studies of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP), although the idea has primarily been pursued in the auditory modality. Gating is the relative attenuation of amplitude following the second stimulus in a stimulus...... pair. Recently, SEP P50 gating was seen when recording the SEP P50 in a paradigm similar to the one used for auditory P50 gating. Hypothetically, abnormality of somatosensory information processing could be related to anhedonia, which is considered a core feature of schizophrenia. Twelve unmedicated......, male, schizophrenia spectrum patients (seven schizophrenic and five schizotypal personality disorder patients) and 14 age-matched healthy men participated in recordings of pair-wise presented auditory and median nerve stimuli. The patients had smaller amplitudes of the SEP P50 at the first stimulus...

  7. Self-Stigma and Its Relationship with Victimization, Psychotic Symptoms and Self-Esteem among People with Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsselenberg, Ellen M. A.; van Busschbach, Jooske T.; Aleman, Andre; Pijnenborg, Gerdine H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Self-stigma is highly prevalent in schizophrenia and can be seen as an important factor leading to low self-esteem. It is however unclear how psychological factors and actual adverse events contribute to self-stigma. This study empirically examines how symptom severity and the experience

  8. Cognitive-behavioural therapy for persistent and recurrent psychosis in people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder : Cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, M.; Stant, A.D.; Wolters, Kerstin; Buskens, E.; Wiersma, D.

    Background Evidence on cost-effectiveness is important to make well-informed decisions regarding care delivery. Aims To determine the balance between costs and health outcomes of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in people with schizophrenia who have

  9. Schizophrenia spectrum disorders in later life: prevalence and distribution of age at onset and sex in a Dutch catchment area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, P.D.; de Haan, L.; Comijs, H.C.; Stek, M.L.; Smeets-Janssen, M.M.J.; Weeda, M.R.; Eikelenboom, P.; Smit, J.H.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of schizophrenia in later life is affected by both outflow of early onset patients, due to recovery and excess mortality, and inflow of patients with a later age at onset, making it likely that characteristics of older patients differ markedly from younger patients. We

  10. Internet use, eHealth literacy and attitudes toward computer/internet among people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: a cross-sectional study in two distant European regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasopoulou, Christina; Välimäki, Maritta; Koutra, Katerina; Löttyniemi, Eliisa; Bertsias, Antonios; Basta, Maria; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Lionis, Christos

    2017-09-20

    Individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders use the Internet for general and health-related purposes. Their ability to find, understand, and apply the health information they acquire online in order to make appropriate health decisions - known as eHealth literacy - has never been investigated. The European agenda strives to limit health inequalities and enhance mental health literacy. Nevertheless, each European member state varies in levels of Internet use and online health information-seeking. This study aimed to examine computer/Internet use for general and health-related purposes, eHealth literacy, and attitudes toward computer/Internet among adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from two distant European regions. Data were collected from mental health services of psychiatric clinics in Finland (FI) and Greece (GR). A total of 229 patients (FI = 128, GR = 101) participated in the questionnaire survey. The data analysis included evaluation of frequencies and group comparisons with multiple linear and logistic regression models. The majority of Finnish participants were current Internet users (FI = 111, 87%, vs. GR = 33, 33%, P computers/Internet, mostly due to their perception that they do not need it. In both countries, more than half of Internet users used the Internet for health-related purposes (FI = 61, 55%, vs. GR = 20, 61%). The eHealth literacy of Internet users (previous and current Internet users) was found significantly higher in the Finnish group (FI: Mean = 27.05, SD 5.36; GR: Mean = 23.15, SD = 7.23, P literacy and Interest. The Finnish group of Internet users scored higher in eHealth literacy, while the Greek group of never Internet users had a higher Interest in computer/Internet. eHealth literacy is either moderate (Finnish group) or low (Greek group). Thus, exposure to ICT and eHealth skills training are needed for this population. Recommendations to improve the eHealth literacy and access to health information

  11. The Metacognition Assessment Scale (MAS-A): Results of a pilot study applying a German translation to individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröcker, Anna-Lena; Bayer, Samuel; Stuke, Frauke; Giemsa, Patrick; Heinz, Andreas; Bermpohl, Felix; Lysaker, Paul H; Montag, Christiane

    2017-09-01

    Metacognition, the capacity 'to think about thinking' and thus to reflect and to master interpersonal problems on a mentalistic basis, is often impaired among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and has been suggested as a potential treatment target. However, little is known about the reliability of its measurement and links with related phenomena. The aim of this study was to validate a German translation of the Metacognition Assessment Scale (MAS-A) as a measure to assess metacognition from free narratives of patients' personally relevant episodes and relationships. MAS-A was applied to narratives of 22 individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders together with self-ratings and behavioural tests of metacognitive and related functions such as mentalizing and emotional awareness. Multi-level modelling allowed to calculate inter-rater reliability (IRR) and inter-rater agreement (IRA) and to include test results as level-2 predictors of the aggregated scorings on the MAS-A subscales in order to explore convergent validity. After considering neurocognition and symptom scores as further predictors, aggregated scorings were correlated with psychosocial functioning. There were high IRRs and IRAs all over the ratings. None of the related measures accounted for variance in MAS-A scorings, indicating the existence of separable, non-overlapping constructs. Verbal memory and positive symptoms were significant predictors for MAS-A subscales. MAS-A, but no other measure, displayed significant associations with psychosocial functioning. MAS-A is a reliable expert rating to assess metacognition from patients' free narratives. Considering the link to psychosocial functioning, MAS-A appears to be a promising tool for the evaluation of metacognition. MAS-A is a reliable tool to evaluate metacognitive function from narratives about emotionally relevant topics and meaningful relationships. Metacognition appears separate from neighbouring constructs such as mentalizing

  12. Deinstitutionalization revisited: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of hospital-based rehabilitation versus specialized assertive intervention (OPUS) versus standard treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Øhlenschlæger, Johan; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard

    2010-01-01

    in a special part of the Copenhagen OPUS trial and randomized to either the specialized assertive intervention program (OPUS), standard treatment or hospital-based rehabilitation. RESULTS: It was a stable pattern that patients randomized to hospital-based rehabilitation spent more days in psychiatric wards...... on use of institutional care of different intensive interventions for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder on use of psychiatric bed days and days in supported housing.MethodA total of 94 severely ill patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders were included...... and in supported housing throughout the 5-year follow-up period compared with the two other groups. Patients in OPUS treatment spent significantly fewer days in psychiatric wards and supported housing in the first 3 years compared with patients in hospital-based rehabilitation. Due to attrition and small sample...

  13. Autism spectrum disorder - childhood disintegrative disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the larger developmental disorder category of autism spectrum disorder . ... American Psychiatric Association. Autism spectrum disorder. ... ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing: 2013;50-59. ...

  14. Autism spectrum disorder - Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of the larger developmental disorder category of autism spectrum disorder . ... American Psychiatric Association. Autism spectrum disorder. ... VA: American Psychiatric Publishing: 2013;50-59. Raviola GJ, ...

  15. Do reward-processing deficits in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders promote cannabis use? An investigation of physiological response to natural rewards and drug cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Clifford M; Brodeur, Mathieu B; Lepage, Martin; Malla, Ashok

    2014-09-01

    Dysfunctional reward processing is present in individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) and may confer vulnerability to addiction. Our objective was to identify a deficit in patients with SSD on response to rewarding stimuli and determine whether this deficit predicts cannabis use. We divided a group of patients with SSD and nonpsychotic controls into cannabis users and nonusers. Response to emotional and cannabis-associated visual stimuli was assessed using self-report, event-related potentials (using the late positive potential [LPP]), facial electromyography and skin-conductance response. Our sample comprised 35 patients with SSD and 35 nonpsychotic controls. Compared with controls, the patients with SSD showed blunted LPP response to pleasant stimuli (p = 0.003). Across measures, cannabis-using controls showed greater response to pleasant stimuli than to cannabis stimuli whereas cannabis-using patients showed little bias toward pleasant stimuli. Reduced LPP response to pleasant stimuli was predictive of more frequent subsequent cannabis use (β = -0.24, p = 0.034). It is not clear if the deficit associated with cannabis use is specific to rewarding stimuli or nonspecific to any kind of emotionally salient stimuli. The LPP captures a reward-processing deficit in patients with SSD and shows potential as a biomarker for identifying patients at risk of heavy cannabis use.

  16. Do reward-processing deficits in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders promote cannabis use? An investigation of physiological response to natural rewards and drug cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Clifford M.; Brodeur, Mathieu B.; Lepage, Martin; Malla, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysfunctional reward processing is present in individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) and may confer vulnerability to addiction. Our objective was to identify a deficit in patients with SSD on response to rewarding stimuli and determine whether this deficit predicts cannabis use. Methods We divided a group of patients with SSD and nonpsychotic controls into cannabis users and nonusers. Response to emotional and cannabis-associated visual stimuli was assessed using self-report, event-related potentials (using the late positive potential [LPP]), facial electromyography and skin-conductance response. Results Our sample comprised 35 patients with SSD and 35 nonpsychotic controls. Compared with controls, the patients with SSD showed blunted LPP response to pleasant stimuli (p = 0.003). Across measures, cannabis-using controls showed greater response to pleasant stimuli than to cannabis stimuli whereas cannabis-using patients showed little bias toward pleasant stimuli. Reduced LPP response to pleasant stimuli was predictive of more frequent subsequent cannabis use (β = −0.24, p = 0.034). Limitations It is not clear if the deficit associated with cannabis use is specific to rewarding stimuli or nonspecific to any kind of emotionally salient stimuli. Conclusion The LPP captures a reward-processing deficit in patients with SSD and shows potential as a biomarker for identifying patients at risk of heavy cannabis use. PMID:24913137

  17. Splitting in schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pec, Ondrej; Bob, Petr; Raboch, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    .... A purpose of this study is to examine relationships between psychological process of splitting and disturbed cognitive and affective functions in schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder (BPD...

  18. Prevalence of comorbid anxiety disorders in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic and treatment hierarchical reductionisms have resulted in an oversight of anxiety syndromes in schizophrenia. Aim: The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of different anxiety disorders in schizophrenia patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on inpatients of a tertiary care psychiatric hospital using a prospective, purposive sampling technique. The study consisted of 93 schizophrenia patients and a similar number of normal controls. The schizophrenia patients and controls were evaluated for psychopathology and the presence of anxiety disorder. Results: The prevalence of anxiety disorder was significantly higher in schizophrenia patients (45.16% compared to controls (16.12%. Further, the prevalence of panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD was significantly higher in schizophrenia patients. No significant correlation was observed between anxiety disorder scores and psychopathology scores. Conclusions: The prevalence of comorbid anxiety disorders (panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and OCD in schizophrenia is significantly higher in the general population. The onset of anxiety disorder commonly precedes the onset of schizophrenia.

  19. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol can harm your baby at any stage during a pregnancy. That includes the earliest stages, before ... can cause a group of conditions called fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Children who are born with ...

  20. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disability that ... interview about being fathers of sons who have autism. Watch more Autism videos COMMUNITY REPORT The Community ...

  1. Modification of an Internet-based patient education program for adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorder to suit adolescents with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Anna; Anttila, Minna; Välimäki, Maritta

    2016-01-01

    The overall goal of this study was to produce a user-friendly and high quality Internet-based patient education program for adolescents with psychosis. To achieve this, we ascertained the adolescents' and health care professionals' needs and expectations of patient education using Internet and the improvement proposals for an existing MentalNet program originally developed for adults with schizophrenia. The research process was conducted in two phases. First, adolescents' and healthcare professionals' needs for patient education and Internet were ascertained by interviewing adolescents and in two educational sessions with staff members (Phase I). Second, the preliminary evaluation of the Internet-based patient education program MentalNet was gathered from adolescents by an iterative process (see cyclic, recurring, repeating method), in one educational session with staff members and a questionnaire via email from other health care professionals (Phase II). The needs and expectations of adolescents and health care professionals were related to the content, usability, design and realization of Internet-based patient education. Based on the information obtained the MentalNet program was modified to satisfy adolescents' needs. The usefulness and effectiveness of the program will require scrutiny in future studies.

  2. Violence in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volavka, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Although most psychiatric patients are not violent, serious mental illness is associated with increased risk of violent behavior. Most of the evidence available pertains to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. MEDLINE data base was searched for articles published between 1966 and November 2012 using the combination of key words 'schizophrenia' or 'bipolar disorder' with 'aggression' or 'violence'. For the treatment searches, generic names were used in combination with key words 'schizophrenia' or 'bipolar disorder' and 'aggression' No language constraint was applied. Only articles dealing with adults were included. The lists of references were searched manually to find additional articles. There were statistically significant increases of risk of violence in schizophrenia and in bipolar disorder in comparison with general population. The evidence suggests that the risk of violence is greater in bipolar disorder than in schizophrenia. Most of the violence in bipolar disorder occurs during the manic phase. The risk of violence in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is increased by comorbid substance use disorder. Violence among adults with schizophrenia may follow at least two distinct pathways-one associated with antisocial conduct, and another associated with the acute psychopathology of schizophrenia. Clozapine is the most effective treatment of aggressive behavior in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests that olanzapine may be the second line of treatment. Treatment adherence is of key importance. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment of aggression in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are increasingly important. Cognitive behavioral approaches appear to be effective in cases where pharmacotherapy alone does not suffice. Violent behavior of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is a public health problem. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches should be used to treat not only violent behavior, but also contributing comorbidities such

  3. Psychosocial Acute Treatment in Early-Episode Schizophrenia Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews evidence on the treatment of early episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders that contradicts, in some cases, the American Psychiatric Association's generic recommendation of antipsychotic medication treatment for at least a year. Method: Evidence on lack of diagnostic validity, absence of demonstrated long-term…

  4. Auditory processing in autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlaskamp, Chantal; Oranje, Bob; Madsen, Gitte Falcher

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often show changes in (automatic) auditory processing. Electrophysiology provides a method to study auditory processing, by investigating event-related potentials such as mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a-amplitude. However, findings on MMN in autism...... a hyper-responsivity at the attentional level. In addition, as similar MMN deficits are found in schizophrenia, these MMN results may explain some of the frequently reported increased risk of children with ASD to develop schizophrenia later in life. Autism Res 2017, 10: 1857–1865....

  5. A dimensional comparison between delusional disorder, schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Negro, José E; Ibanez-Casas, Inmaculada; de Portugal, Enrique; Ochoa, Susana; Dolz, Montserrat; Haro, Josep M; Ruiz-Veguilla, Miguel; de Dios Luna Del Castillo, Juan; Cervilla, Jorge A

    2015-12-01

    Since the early description of paranoia, the nosology of delusional disorder has always been controversial. The old idea of unitary psychosis has now gained some renewed value from the dimensional continuum model of psychotic symptoms. 1. To study the psychopathological dimensions of the psychosis spectrum; 2. to explore the association between psychotic dimensions and categorical diagnoses; 3. to compare the different psychotic disorders from a psychopathological and functional point of view. This is an observational study utilizing a sample of some 550 patients with a psychotic disorder. 373 participants had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 137 had delusional disorder and 40 with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder. The PANSS was used to elicit psychopathology and global functioning was ascertained using the GAF measure. Both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of the PANSS items were performed to extract psychopathological dimensions. Associations between diagnostic categories and dimensions were subsequently studied using ANOVA tests. 5 dimensions - manic, negative symptoms, depression, positive symptoms and cognitive - emerged. The model explained 57.27% of the total variance. The dimensional model was useful to explained differences and similarities between all three psychosis spectrum categories. The potential clinical usefulness of this dimensional model within and between clinical psychosis spectrum categories is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS (ASD)

    OpenAIRE

    Middha Akanksha; Kataria Sahil; Sandhu Premjeet; Kapoor Bhawna

    2011-01-01

    Autism or Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is a serious neurological disorder affecting communication skills, social interactions, adaptability in an individual, and also causes dramatic changes in behavioral patterns. This condition typically lasts throughout one’s lifetime and affects both, children as well as adults. Research has shown a tenfold increase in autism cases over the past decade and still rising at an alarming pace. The origins of autism are not known even to modern science. Aut...

  7. Covariation between motor signs and negative symptoms in drug-naive subjects with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders before and after antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Victor; de Jalón, Elena García; Campos, María S; Cuesta, Manuel J

    2017-08-29

    Objective To examine the covariation between negative symptoms and motor signs in a broad sample of drug-naïve subjects with schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses before and after inception of antipsychotic medication. One-hundred and eighty-nine antipsychotic-naïve subjects with DSM-IV schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses were assessed for negative symptoms including affective flattening, alogia, avolition/apathy and anhedonia/associality, and motor signs including catatonia, parkinsonism and dyskinesia. We examined the association between negative and motor features at baseline, 4-weeks after inception of antipsychotic treatment and that of their mean change over the treatment period, such as their trajectories and treatment response pattern. At the drug-naïve state, motor signs were strongly related to affective flattening and alogia (p0.01). Although to a different extent, motor and negative features showed drug-responsive, drug-worsening, of drug-unchanged patterns of response to antipsychotic medication. The main predictors of negative and motor features in treated subjects were their corresponding baseline ratings (p<0.001). Negative and motor features are differentiated, but to some extent, overlapping domains that are meaningfully influenced by antipsychotic medication. At the drug-naïve state, motor signs and the diminished expression domain of negative symptoms may share underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E. Rosenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a national online registry to examine variation in cumulative prevalence of community diagnosis of psychiatric comorbidity in 4343 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Adjusted multivariate logistic regression models compared influence of individual, family, and geographic factors on cumulative prevalence of parent-reported anxiety disorder, depression, bipolar disorder, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder or attention deficit disorder. Adjusted odds of community-assigned lifetime psychiatric comorbidity were significantly higher with each additional year of life, with increasing autism severity, and with Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder—not otherwise specified compared with autistic disorder. Overall, in this largest study of parent-reported community diagnoses of psychiatric comorbidity, gender, autistic regression, autism severity, and type of ASD all emerged as significant factors correlating with cumulative prevalence. These findings could suggest both underlying trends in actual comorbidity as well as variation in community interpretation and application of comorbid diagnoses in ASD.

  9. Thalamic morphology in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Wang, Lei; Cronenwett, Will; Mamah, Daniel; Barch, Deanna M; Csernansky, John G

    2011-03-01

    Biomarkers are needed that can distinguish between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder to inform the ongoing debate over the diagnostic boundary between these two disorders. Neuromorphometric abnormalities of the thalamus have been reported in individuals with schizophrenia and linked to core features of the disorder, but have not been similarly investigated in individuals with schizoaffective disorder. In this study, we examine whether individuals with schizoaffective disorder have a pattern of thalamic deformation that is similar or different to the pattern found in individuals with schizophrenia. T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were collected from individuals with schizophrenia (n = 47), individuals with schizoaffective disorder (n = 15), and controls (n = 42). Large-deformation, high-dimensional brain mapping was used to obtain three-dimensional surfaces of the thalamus. Multiple analyses of variance were used to test for group differences in volume and measures of surface shape. Individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder have similar thalamic volumes. Thalamic surface shape deformation associated with schizophrenia suggests selective involvement of the anterior and posterior thalamus, while deformations in mediodorsal and ventrolateral regions were observed in both groups. Schizoaffective disorder had distinct deformations in medial and lateral thalamic regions. Abnormalities distinct to schizoaffective disorder suggest involvement of the central and ventroposterior medial thalamus which may be involved in mood circuitry, dorsolateral nucleus which is involved in recall processing, and the lateral geniculate nucleus which is involved in visual processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-04-02

    This podcast discusses autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a developmental disability that causes problems with social, communication, and behavioral skills. CDC estimates that one in 68 children has been identified as having ASD.  Created: 4/2/2014 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD).   Date Released: 4/2/2014.

  11. Paranoid schizophrenia versus schizoaffective disorder: Neuropsychological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leposavić Ljubica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neuropsychological aspects of paranoid schizophrenia have still not been examined enough. These disorders are usually not studied separately, but are included in the studies about schizophrenic patients with positive symptoms. Despite the fact that schizophrenia represents a heterogeneous group of mental disorders, usually it is not separated from schizoaffective disorder in neuropsychological researches. Objective. The essence of this research is to evaluate cognitive functioning of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder by applying neuropsychological tests. Methods. The research included 91 subjects, right handed, from 30 to 53 years old, who were classified into three groups: inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia in remission (n=31, inpatients with schizoaffective disorder in remission (n=30 and healthy subjects (n=30. Results. Both groups of patients showed poorer achievements than healthy subjects in most of the applied tests. Patients with schizoaffective disorder showed global loss of intellectual efficiency, executive dysfunction and compromised visual-construction organization. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed partial loss of intellectual efficiency with verbal IQ and executive functions preserved. Conclusion. In the remission phase, patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed cognitive disorders in moderate degree, but when it comes to patients with schizoaffective disorder, more massive cognitive deficits were registered.

  12. Paranoid Schizophrenia versus Schizoaffective Disorder: Neuropsychological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leposavić, Ljubica; Leposavić, Ivana; Šaula-Marojević, Bijana; Gavrilović, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological aspects of paranoid schizophrenia have still not been examined enough.These disorders are usually not studied separately, but are included in the studies about schizophrenic patients with positive symptoms. Despite the fact that schizophrenia represents a heterogeneous group of mental disorders, usually it is not separated from schizoaffective disorder in neuropsychological researches. The essence of this research is to evaluate cognitive functioning of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder by applying neuropsychological tests. The research included 91 subjects, right handed, from 30 to 53 years old, who were classified into three groups: inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia in remission (n=31), inpatients with schizoaffective disorder in remission (n=30) and healthy subjects (n=30). Both groups of patients showed poorer achievements than healthy subjects in most of the applied tests. Patients with schizoaffective disorder showed global loss of intellectual efficiency, executive dysfunction and compromised visual-construction organization. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed partial loss of intellectual efficiency with verbal IQ and executive functions preserved. In the remission phase, patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed cognitive disorders in moderate degree, but when it comes to patients with schizoaffective disorder, more massive cognitive, deficits were registered.

  13. Schizophrenia-Spectrum Psychoses in People With and Without Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouras, N.; Martin, G.; Leese, M.; Vanstraelen, M.; Holt, G.; Thomas, C.; Hindler, C.; Boardman, J.

    2004-01-01

    Although there is an increased risk of schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses (SSP) in people with intellectual disability (ID), there is a paucity of research evidence into clinical presentation of the disorder in comparison with research into SSP in people without ID. Aims The aims of the study were to compare clinical, functional, and social factors…

  14. Childhood adversity and cognitive function in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and healthy controls: evidence for an association between neglect and social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, S; Asmal, L; Chiliza, B; Olivier, M R; Phahladira, L; Scheffler, F; Seedat, S; Marder, S R; Green, M F; Emsley, R

    2017-12-22

    Childhood adversity is associated with cognitive impairments in schizophrenia. However, findings to date are inconsistent and little is known about the relationship between social cognition and childhood trauma. We investigated the relationship between childhood abuse and neglect and cognitive function in patients with a first-episode of schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder (n = 56) and matched healthy controls (n = 52). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study assessing this relationship in patients and controls exposed to similarly high levels of trauma. Pearson correlational coefficients were used to assess correlations between Childhood Trauma Questionnaire abuse and neglect scores and cognition. For the MCCB domains displaying significant (p childhood neglect remained a significant predictor of impairment in social cognition in both patients and controls. Neglect was also a significant predictor of poorer verbal learning in patients and of attention/vigilance in controls. However, childhood abuse did not significantly predict cognitive impairments in either patients or controls. These findings are cross sectional and do not infer causality. Nonetheless, they indicate that associations between one type of childhood adversity (i.e. neglect) and social cognition are present and are not illness-specific.

  15. Phonetic Measures of Reduced Tongue Movement Correlate with Negative Symptom Severity in Hospitalized Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Michael A.; Lunden, S.L. Anya; Cristofaro, Sarah L.; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Bailey, C. Thomas; Broussard, Beth; Fogarty, Robert; Johnson, Stephanie; Zhang, Shayi; Compton, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aprosody, or flattened speech intonation, is a recognized negative symptom of schizophrenia, though it has rarely been studied from a linguistic/phonological perspective. To bring the latest advances in computational linguistics to the phenomenology of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, a clinical first-episode psychosis research team joined with a phonetics/computational linguistics team to conduct a preliminary, proof-of-concept study. Methods Video recordings from a semi-structured clinical research interview were available from 47 first-episode psychosis patients. Audio tracks of the video recordings were extracted, and after review of quality, 25 recordings were available for phonetic analysis. These files were de-noised and a trained phonologist extracted a 1-minute sample of each patient’s speech. WaveSurfer 1.8.5 was used to create, from each speech sample, a file of formant values (F0, F1, F2, where F0 is the fundamental frequency and F1 and F2 are resonance bands indicating the moment-by-moment shape of the oral cavity). Variability in these phonetic indices was correlated with severity of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom scores using Pearson correlations. Results A measure of variability of tongue front-to-back position—the standard deviation of F2—was statistically significantly correlated with the severity of negative symptoms (r=−0.446, p=0.03). Conclusion This study demonstrates a statistically significant and meaningful correlation between negative symptom severity and phonetically measured reductions in tongue movements during speech in a sample of first-episode patients just initiating treatment. Further studies of negative symptoms, applying computational linguistics methods, are warranted. PMID:23102940

  16. Stoppage in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønborg, Therese Koops; Hansen, Stefan Nygaard; Nielsen, Svend V

    2015-01-01

    of bias in sibling recurrence risk estimation. This study investigated whether stoppage occurs in Danish families with a firstborn child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, and if stoppage was differential. We found that stoppage occurs moderately in Danish families affected by autism spectrum...... disorders, and that stoppage is differential. However, differential stoppage is a minor source of estimation bias in Danish sibling recurrence risk studies of autism spectrum disorders....

  17. Gender Identity Disorder and Schizophrenia: Neurodevelopmental Disorders with Common Causal Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Philip Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender identity disorder (GID, recently renamed gender dysphoria (GD, is a rare condition characterized by an incongruity between gender identity and biological sex. Clinical evidence suggests that schizophrenia occurs in patients with GID at rates higher than in the general population and that patients with GID may have schizophrenia-like personality traits. Conversely, patients with schizophrenia may experience alterations in gender identity and gender role perception. Neurobiological research, including brain imaging and studies of finger length ratio and handedness, suggests that both these disorders are associated with altered cerebral sexual dimorphism and changes in cerebral lateralization. Various mechanisms, such as Toxoplasma infection, reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, early childhood adversity, and links with autism spectrum disorders, may account for some of this overlap. The implications of this association for further research are discussed.

  18. Gender Identity Disorder and Schizophrenia: Neurodevelopmental Disorders with Common Causal Mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID), recently renamed gender dysphoria (GD), is a rare condition characterized by an incongruity between gender identity and biological sex. Clinical evidence suggests that schizophrenia occurs in patients with GID at rates higher than in the general population and that patients with GID may have schizophrenia-like personality traits. Conversely, patients with schizophrenia may experience alterations in gender identity and gender role perception. Neurobiological research, including brain imaging and studies of finger length ratio and handedness, suggests that both these disorders are associated with altered cerebral sexual dimorphism and changes in cerebral lateralization. Various mechanisms, such as Toxoplasma infection, reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), early childhood adversity, and links with autism spectrum disorders, may account for some of this overlap. The implications of this association for further research are discussed. PMID:25548672

  19. Gender identity disorder and schizophrenia: neurodevelopmental disorders with common causal mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID), recently renamed gender dysphoria (GD), is a rare condition characterized by an incongruity between gender identity and biological sex. Clinical evidence suggests that schizophrenia occurs in patients with GID at rates higher than in the general population and that patients with GID may have schizophrenia-like personality traits. Conversely, patients with schizophrenia may experience alterations in gender identity and gender role perception. Neurobiological research, including brain imaging and studies of finger length ratio and handedness, suggests that both these disorders are associated with altered cerebral sexual dimorphism and changes in cerebral lateralization. Various mechanisms, such as Toxoplasma infection, reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), early childhood adversity, and links with autism spectrum disorders, may account for some of this overlap. The implications of this association for further research are discussed.

  20. Efficacy for Psychopathology and Body Weight and Safety of Topiramate-Antipsychotic Cotreatment in Patients With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders: Results From a Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U; Maayan, Lawrence; Kane, John; Hert, Marc De; Cohen, Dan

    2016-06-01

    To meta-analyze the efficacy and tolerability of topiramate-antipsychotic cotreatment in schizophrenia. PubMed/MEDLINE database were searched until September 5, 2015, using the keywords topiramate AND antipsych* OR neurolept* OR specific antipsychotic names. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of topiramate-antipsychotic cotreatment versus placebo and ongoing antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were included. Two evaluators extracted data. Standardized mean difference (SMD), weighted mean difference (WMD), and risk ratio (RR) ± 95% CIs were calculated. In 8 RCTs, lasting a mean ± SD of 13.6 ± 4.9 weeks, 439 patients were randomized to topiramate (100-400 mg/d) versus placebo (trials = 7) or ongoing antipsychotic treatment (trial = 1). Topiramate outperformed the comparator regarding total psychopathology (trials = 6, n = 269, SMD = -0.57 [95% CI, -1.01 to -0.14], P = .01), positive symptoms (trials = 4, n = 190, SMD = -0.56 [95% CI, -1.0 to -0.11], P = .01), negative symptoms (trials = 4, n = 190, SMD = -0.62 [95% CI, -1.13 to -0.10], P = .02) general psychopathology (trials = 3, n = 179, SMD = -0.69 [95% CI, -1.27 to -0.11], P = .02), body weight (trials = 7, n = 327, WMD = -3.14 kg [95% CI, -5.55 to -0.73], P = .01), and body mass index (BMI) (trials = 4, n = 198, WMD = -1.80 [95% CI, -2.77 to -0.84], P = .0003). Topiramate's efficacy for total psychopathology and weight reduction effects were not mediated/moderated by trial duration, topiramate dose, sex, age, inpatient status, baseline Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, or baseline BMI. Conversely, clozapine-topiramate cotreatment moderated greater efficacy, but less weight loss, compared to topiramate-nonclozapine antipsychotic combinations. All-cause discontinuation was similar between topiramate and control groups (trials = 7, RR = 1.24 [95% CI, 0.76 to 2.02], P = .39). Topiramate trended only toward more paresthesia than placebo (trials = 4, RR = 2.03 [95 % CI, 0

  1. Impaired Context Processing is Attributable to Global Neuropsychological Impairment in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, James L; Hill, S Kristian; Gold, James M; Keefe, Richard S E; Clementz, Brett A; Gershon, Elliot; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Pearlson, Godfrey; Tamminga, Carol A; Sweeney, John A

    2017-03-01

    Context processing may reflect a specific cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Whether impaired context processing is observed across psychotic disorders or among relatives of affected individuals, and whether it is a deficit that is independent from the generalized neuropsychological deficits seen in psychotic disorders, are less established. Schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar probands (n = 660), their first-degree relatives (n = 741), and healthy individuals (n = 308) studied by the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes consortium performed an expectancy task requiring use of contextual information to overcome a pre-potent response. Sensitivity for target detection and false alarm rates on trials requiring inhibition or goal maintenance were measured. Proband groups and relatives with psychosis spectrum personality traits demonstrated reduced target sensitivity and elevated false alarm rates. False alarm rate was higher under inhibition vs goal maintenance conditions although this difference was attenuated in schizophrenia and schizoaffective proband groups. After accounting for global neuropsychological impairment, as reflected by the composite score from the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia neuropsychological battery, deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar proband groups were no longer significant. Performance measures were moderately familial. Reduced target detection, but not a specific deficit in context processing, is observed across psychotic disorders. Impairments in both goal maintenance and response inhibition appear to contribute comparably to deficits in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, whereas greater difficulty with response inhibition underlies deficits in bipolar disorder. Yet, these deficits are not independent from the generalized neurocognitive impairment observed in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder.

  2. Autism Spectrum Disorder - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Autism Spectrum Disorder URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Autism Spectrum Disorder - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  3. Brain Age in Early Stages of Bipolar Disorders or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Tomas; Franke, Katja; Kolenic, Marian; Capkova, Jana; Matejka, Martin; Propper, Lukas; Uher, Rudolf; Stopkova, Pavla; Novak, Tomas; Paus, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Spaniel, Filip; Alda, Martin

    2017-12-20

    The greater presence of neurodevelopmental antecedants may differentiate schizophrenia from bipolar disorders (BD). Machine learning/pattern recognition allows us to estimate the biological age of the brain from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans (MRI). The discrepancy between brain and chronological age could contribute to early detection and differentiation of BD and schizophrenia. We estimated brain age in 2 studies focusing on early stages of schizophrenia or BD. In the first study, we recruited 43 participants with first episode of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (FES) and 43 controls. In the second study, we included 96 offspring of bipolar parents (48 unaffected, 48 affected) and 60 controls. We used relevance vector regression trained on an independent sample of 504 controls to estimate the brain age of study participants from structural MRI. We calculated the brain-age gap estimate (BrainAGE) score by subtracting the chronological age from the brain age. Participants with FES had higher BrainAGE scores than controls (F(1, 83) = 8.79, corrected P = .008, Cohen's d = 0.64). Their brain age was on average 2.64 ± 4.15 years greater than their chronological age (matched t(42) = 4.36, P < .001). In contrast, participants at risk or in the early stages of BD showed comparable BrainAGE scores to controls (F(2,149) = 1.04, corrected P = .70, η2 = 0.01) and comparable brain and chronological age. Early stages of schizophrenia, but not early stages of BD, were associated with advanced BrainAGE scores. Participants with FES showed neurostructural alterations, which made their brains appear 2.64 years older than their chronological age. BrainAGE scores could aid in early differential diagnosis between BD and schizophrenia.

  4. The schizophrenias as disorders of self consciousness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-12-29

    Dec 29, 2004 ... The schizophrenias as disorders of self consciousness. Sean Exner Baumann. Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, ..... Darwins' dangerous idea. Evolution and the meaning of life. Penguin, 1995. 13. Libet B. How does conscious experience arise? The neural time fac- tor.

  5. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet F; Smith, Vincent C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol can damage the developing fetus and is the leading preventable cause of birth defects and intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities. In 1973, fetal alcohol syndrome was first described as a specific cluster of birth defects resulting from alcohol exposure in utero. Subsequently, research unequivocally revealed that prenatal alcohol exposure causes a broad range of adverse developmental effects. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is the general term that encompasses the range of adverse effects associated with prenatal alcohol exposure. The diagnostic criteria for fetal alcohol syndrome are specific, and comprehensive efforts are ongoing to establish definitive criteria for diagnosing the other FASDs. A large and growing body of research has led to evidence-based FASD education of professionals and the public, broader prevention initiatives, and recommended treatment approaches based on the following premises:▪ Alcohol-related birth defects and developmental disabilities are completely preventable when pregnant women abstain from alcohol use.▪ Neurocognitive and behavioral problems resulting from prenatal alcohol exposure are lifelong.▪ Early recognition, diagnosis, and therapy for any condition along the FASD continuum can result in improved outcomes.▪ During pregnancy:◦no amount of alcohol intake should be considered safe;◦there is no safe trimester to drink alcohol;◦all forms of alcohol, such as beer, wine, and liquor, pose similar risk; and◦binge drinking poses dose-related risk to the developing fetus. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  6. Hyperglycemia and diabetes in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, D; Stolk, RP; Grobbee, DE; Gispen-De Wied, CC

    OBJECTIVE - Pharmacoepidemiological studies have shown an increased prevalence of diabetes in patients with schizophrenia. To address this issue, we decided to assess glucose metabolism in a population of patients With schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Oral

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... only after another family member has been diagnosed. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Fragile X Syndrome Fragile X ... known single gene cause of ASD What Is Autism Spectrum Disorder? Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a ...

  8. Anomalous subjective experience among first-admitted schizophrenia spectrum patients: empirical investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef; Handest, Peter; Jansson, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    Our research group has for several years conducted philosophically informed, phenomenological-empirical studies of morbid alterations of conscious experience (subjectivity) in schizophrenia (Sz) and its spectrum of disorders. Some of these experiential alterations constitute, in our view, the vul......Our research group has for several years conducted philosophically informed, phenomenological-empirical studies of morbid alterations of conscious experience (subjectivity) in schizophrenia (Sz) and its spectrum of disorders. Some of these experiential alterations constitute, in our view......, the vulnerability markers to Sz--indicators that are intrinsic to this disorder and which were historically considered as constituting the phenotypic anchor of the very concept and the diagnostic validity of Sz spectrum disorders. In a more pragmatic clinical context, these indicators, considered here as symptoms......, with special emphasis on the experiences of perplexity, disorders of self-awareness, perceptual disorders and anomalous bodily experiences. The a priori scales derived from the item pool of a slightly modified OPCRIT and BSABS were used for analyses. Sz and schizotypal disorder scored equally on the subjective...

  9. Body Dysmorphic Disorder : An Unusual Presentation of Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Amul; Sharma, Himanshu; Thakker, Yogesh

    2004-01-01

    Although body dysmorphic disorder is a psychiatric disorder in its own right, rarely it can be a variant of a variety of psychiatric syndromes like schizophrenia, mood disorders, OCD etc. Following is an unusual case report of a female patient who presented with body dysmorphic disorder later diagnosed as having schizophrenia.

  10. A validation of wrist actigraphy against polysomnography in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Sleep disturbances are frequent in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Actigraphy has been established as a generally reliable method to examine these disturbances across varying time spans, but the validity against polysomnography (PSG) is not well investigated...... for this population. We validated wrist-worn actigraphy against PSG in a population of chronic, medicated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From a clinical trial, we derived data from 37 patients with schizophrenia and five patients with bipolar disorder who were examined with one...... for the number of awakenings, and low or zero for the other examined sleep variables. These findings were reproduced in the subgroup analyses that compared men and women, as well as patients with bipolar versus schizophrenia spectrum disorders. When excluding patients with extensive periods of wakefulness after...

  11. Dissociation in schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pec O

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ondrej Pec,1,2 Petr Bob,1,3 Jiri Raboch1 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research of Traumatic Stress, Department of Psychiatry, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, 2Psychotherapeutic and Psychosomatic Clinic ESET, Prague, 3Central European Institute of Technology, Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic Background: Dissociation likely plays a key role in schizophrenia and borderline personality disorder (BPD, although empirical studies that compare specific manifestations of these symptoms in schizophrenia and BPD are rare. In this context, the purpose of this study was to compare the occurrence of dissociative and other psychopathological symptoms in these disorders, and to assess the possible influence of antipsychotic medication on the dissociative symptoms. Methods: We assessed 31 patients with schizophrenia and 36 patients with BPD. Dissociative symptoms were measured by the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES, symptoms related to stress and traumatic experiences were assessed using the Trauma Symptom Checklist-40 (TSC-40, and other psychopathological symptoms were measured with the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS. We also assessed actual daily doses of antipsychotic medication in chlorpromazine equivalents in all participants. Results: The results show that symptoms of traumatic stress measured by the TSC-40 had significantly higher scores in the BPD group. The data also show that dissociative symptoms (DES were significantly correlated with symptoms of traumatic stress (TSC-40 and with symptoms assessed by the HoNOS. Remarkably significant correlations were found between levels of antipsychotic medication and the DES and between antipsychotic medication and the depersonalization/derealization component of the DES in BPD patients. Conclusion: The results support an important role of dissociative processes in schizophrenia and BPD and suggest a significant relationship between manifestations

  12. Treatment patterns for schizoaffective disorder and schizophrenia among Medicaid patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Mark; Marcus, Steven C; Wan, George J

    2009-02-01

    This study compared background characteristics, pharmacologic treatment, and service use of adults treated for schizoaffective disorder and adults treated for schizophrenia. Medicaid claims data from two states were analyzed with a focus on adults treated for schizoaffective disorder or schizophrenia. Patient groups were compared regarding demographic characteristics, pharmacologic treatment, and health service use during 180 days before and after a claim for either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A larger proportion of patients were treated for schizophrenia (N=38,760; 70.1%) than for schizoaffective disorder (N=16,570; 29.9%). During the 180 days before the index diagnosis claim, significantly more patients with schizoaffective disorder than those with schizophrenia were treated for depressive disorder (19.6% versus 11.4%, pdisorder (14.8% versus 5.8%, pdisorder (11.8% versus 9.7%, pdisorder (6.9% versus 5.3%, pschizoaffective disorder, 87.3%; schizophrenia, 87.0%), although patients with schizoaffective disorder were significantly more likely than patients with schizophrenia to receive antidepressants (61.7% versus 44.0%, pschizoaffective disorder were also significantly more likely than patients with schizophrenia to receive psychotherapy (23.4% versus 13.0%, pSchizoaffective disorder is commonly diagnosed among Medicaid beneficiaries. These patients often receive complex pharmacologic regimens, and many also receive treatment for mood disorders. Differences in service use patterns between schizoaffective disorder and schizophrenia argue for separate consideration of their health care needs.

  13. Basic Self-Disturbances beyond Schizophrenia: Discrepancies and Affinities in Panic Disorder - An Empirical Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Luís; Carmenates, Sergio; Costa, Cristina; Linhares, Ludgero; Stanghellini, Giovanni; Figueira, Maria Luísa; Sass, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Anomalous self-experiences (ASEs), presumably involving alterations in "core" or "minimal self," have been studied as manifest in schizophrenia and its spectrum, in contrast with mood disorder and personality disorder samples. This is the first study to examine ASEs in panic disorder (PD), beginning the exploration of these disturbances of subjectivity in anxiety disorders. We aimed to clarify what might, or might not, be specific to the schizophrenia spectrum domain - which, in turn, could be useful for developing pathogenetic models for various disorders. 47 hospital outpatients with PD and no other medical and psychiatric comorbidity and 47 healthy control (HC) subjects were assessed with the Examination of Anomalous Self Experiences (EASE) and Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS). All our PD patients had overall ASE and EASE scores significantly higher than our HCs (mean ± SD 17.94 ± 11.88 vs. HC 1.00 ± 1.81), approaching levels found in previous schizophrenia spectrum samples. The distribution of particular EASE items and subitems in the PD sample was heterogeneous, varying from rare (schizophrenia spectrum: 29 items) to being present in >50% of subjects ("affinities" with schizophrenia spectrum: 7 items). EASE and CDS scores were highly correlated (r = 0.756, 95% CI 0.665-0.840). PD patients scored higher on items suggesting common forms of derealization and depersonalization, perhaps suggesting "secondary" and defensive psychological processes, while lacking indicators of more profound ipseity disturbance. Our study supports the basic-self-disturbance model of schizophrenia, while suggesting the possibility of transnosological "schizophrenia-like phenomena," which might require careful phenomenological exploration to be distinguished from those of true psychotic or schizophrenic conditions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Family Process - Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Slides for a talk about family process and the importance of parenting dimensions in adolescent development. The slides list findings to date, and propose research into the influence of family on outcomes for those diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

  15. Stigma moderates the associations of insight with depressed mood, low self-esteem, and low quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staring, A.B.P.; van der Gaag, M.; van den Berge, M.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Mulder, C.L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Good insight into illness in patients with schizophrenia is related not only to medication compliance and high service engagement, but also to depression, low self-esteem, and low quality of life. The detrimental effects of insight pose a problem for treatment. Aim To investigate

  16. Integrative proteomic analysis of the NMDA NR1 knockdown mouse model reveals effects on central and peripheral pathways associated with schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Wesseling (Hendrik); P.C. Guest (Paul); C.-M. Lee (Chi-Ming); E.H.F. Wong (Erik); H. Rahmoune (Hassan); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Over the last decade, the transgenic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) NR1-knockdown mouse (NR1neo-/-) has been investigated as a glutamate hypofunction model for schizophrenia. Recent research has now revealed that the model also recapitulates cognitive and negative

  17. Intellectual functioning and the long-term course of schizophrenia-spectrum illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Jessica; Parnas, J; Urfer-Parnas, A

    2010-01-01

    with the schizophrenia spectrum. The effect of spectrum illness on intellectual and educational performance was also evaluated. The sample consisted of 311 Danish participants: 99 at low risk, 155 at high risk, and 57 at super-high risk for schizophrenia. Participants were given intellectual [Weschler's Intelligence...... with an evident family history of schizophrenia....

  18. Informing DSM-5: biological boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cosgrove, Victoria E; Suppes, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) opted to retain existing diagnostic boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia...

  19. Minor physical anomalies in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder and the neurodevelopmental continuum of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akabaliev, Valentin Hristov; Sivkov, Stefan Todorov; Mantarkov, Mladen Yordanov

    2014-09-01

    Minor physical anomalies (MPAs) have been investigated by numerous studies in patients with schizophrenia in support of the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of the disorder, but have rarely been examined in patients with bipolar disorder or in direct comparisons between the two conditions. The main objective of the present study was to compare the prevalence of MPAs in psychiatrically healthy controls, patients with bipolar I disorder, and patients with schizophrenia. A slightly modified version of the Waldrop Physical Anomaly Scale was used to assess MPAs in psychiatrically healthy controls (n = 103), patients with bipolar I disorder (n = 61), and patients with schizophrenia (n = 128). In five out of six topographic regions (mouth, feet, head, eyes, and ears) there was a pattern of lowest regional MPA scores in controls, intermediate in bipolar I disorder, and highest in schizophrenia. The cephalofacial composite score and the total MPA score showed the same pattern, with all between-group differences being statistically significant. Seven individual MPAs in the discriminant analysis model contributed independently to the prediction of the triple-dependent status of 'psychiatrically healthy control, bipolar I disorder patient, schizophrenia patient': high/arched palate, fine electric hair, large gap between first and second toes, third toe ≥ second toe, epicanthus, malformed ears, and furrowed tongue. Our findings support the existence of a continuum of neurodevelopmental adversity within the clinical spectrum of psychosis, with bipolar I disorder occupying an intermediate position between psychiatric health and schizophrenia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Deafness and Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay; Rhodes, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    An orientation to autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), also known as autism, is provided, and the specific syndrome of autism and deafness is addressed. The two conditions have in common a major problem: communication. Case histories are provided, the development of treatment for autism is discussed, and the separate disorders that make up ASD are…

  1. Anhedonia in prolonged schizophrenia spectrum patients with relatively lower vs. higher levels of depression disorders: associations with deficits in social cognition and metacognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Kelly D; McLeod, Hamish J; Gumley, Andrew; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Buck, Benjamin E; Minor, Kyle S; James, Alison V; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-10-01

    This study has sought to explore whether there are at least two subtypes of anhedonia in schizophrenia: one closely linked with depression and another that occurs in the absence of depression which is related to a general paucity of internal experience. Participants were 163 adults with schizophrenia who completed assessments of depression, anhedonia, executive functioning, positive and negative symptoms, social cognition and metacognition. A cluster analysis based on participants' depression and anhedonia symptom scores produced three groups: High Depression/High Anhedonia (n=52), Low Depression/Low Anhedonia (n=52), and Low Depression/High Anhedonia (n=59). An ANCOVA and post hoc comparisons controlling for positive and negative symptoms found that the Low Depression/High Anhedonia group had poorer metacognition and social cognition than other groups. These findings point to the possibility of a subtype of anhedonia in schizophrenia, one occurring in the relative lesser levels of depression, and tied to deficits in the ability to think about oneself and others. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Autism Spectrum Disorders in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Salmanian, Maryam; AKHONDZADEH, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Mohammadi MR, Salmanian M, Akhondzadeh Sh. Autism Spectrum Disorders in Iran. Iranian Journal of Child Neurology2011;5(4):1-9.ObjectiveAutistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, and PDD-Not Otherwise Specified are subsets of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), which are characterized by impairments in social communication and stereotyped behavior. This article reviews the prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of ASDs in Iran.Materials & MethodsWe searched PubMe...

  3. Cycloid psychoses in the psychosis spectrum: evidence for biochemical differences with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Kerkhof NW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nora WA van de Kerkhof,1,2 Durk Fekkes,2,3 Frank MMA van der Heijden,1 Witte JG Hoogendijk,2 Gerald Stöber,4 Jos IM Egger,1,5,6 Willem MA Verhoeven1,2 1Vincent van Gogh Institute for Psychiatry, Centre of Excellence for Neuropsychiatry, Venray, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Clinical Chemistry, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 4Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; 5Behavioural Science Institute, 6Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Abstract: Cycloid psychoses (CP differ from schizophrenia regarding symptom profile, course, and prognosis and over many decades they were thought to be a separate entity within the psychosis spectrum. As to schizophrenia, research into the pathophysiology has focused on dopamine, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glutamate signaling in which, concerning the latter, the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor plays a crucial role. The present study aims to determine whether CP can biochemically be delineated from schizophrenia. Eighty patients referred for psychotic disorders were assessed with the Comprehensive Assessment of Symptoms and History, and (both at inclusion and after 6 weeks of antipsychotic treatment with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Clinical Global Impression. From 58 completers, 33 patients were diagnosed with schizophrenia and ten with CP according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, and Leonhard criteria, respectively. Fifteen patients were diagnosed with other disorders within the psychosis spectrum. At both time points, blood levels of the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and amino acids related to glutamate neurotransmission were measured and compared with a matched control sample. Patients with CP showed a significantly

  4. Genetic Relationships Between Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizoaffective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardno, Alastair G.

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial evidence for partial overlap of genetic influences on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with family, twin, and adoption studies showing a genetic correlation between the disorders of around 0.6. Results of genome-wide association studies are consistent with commonly occurring genetic risk variants, contributing to both the shared and nonshared aspects, while studies of large, rare chromosomal structural variants, particularly copy number variants, show a stronger influence on schizophrenia than bipolar disorder to date. Schizoaffective disorder has been less investigated but shows substantial familial overlap with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A twin analysis is consistent with genetic influences on schizoaffective episodes being entirely shared with genetic influences on schizophrenic and manic episodes, while association studies suggest the possibility of some relatively specific genetic influences on broadly defined schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype. Further insights into genetic relationships between these disorders are expected as studies continue to increase in sample size and in technical and analytical sophistication, information on phenotypes beyond clinical diagnoses are increasingly incorporated, and approaches such as next-generation sequencing identify additional types of genetic risk variant. PMID:24567502

  5. Genetic relationships between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardno, Alastair G; Owen, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial evidence for partial overlap of genetic influences on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with family, twin, and adoption studies showing a genetic correlation between the disorders of around 0.6. Results of genome-wide association studies are consistent with commonly occurring genetic risk variants, contributing to both the shared and nonshared aspects, while studies of large, rare chromosomal structural variants, particularly copy number variants, show a stronger influence on schizophrenia than bipolar disorder to date. Schizoaffective disorder has been less investigated but shows substantial familial overlap with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A twin analysis is consistent with genetic influences on schizoaffective episodes being entirely shared with genetic influences on schizophrenic and manic episodes, while association studies suggest the possibility of some relatively specific genetic influences on broadly defined schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype. Further insights into genetic relationships between these disorders are expected as studies continue to increase in sample size and in technical and analytical sophistication, information on phenotypes beyond clinical diagnoses are increasingly incorporated, and approaches such as next-generation sequencing identify additional types of genetic risk variant.

  6. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to language, movement and coordination, and other brain functions), and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS, or "atypical" autism, which included some, but not all, of the ...

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the category. These were autistic disorder ("classic" autism), Asperger syndrome (which usually involved milder symptoms, mostly related ... all, of the features of classic autism or Asperger syndrome). 2 Health care providers no longer use ...

  8. Population and Service Characteristics of Youth with Schizophrenia-Spectrum Diagnoses in the Hawaii System of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Jason; Daleiden, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Population and service characteristics were compared for youth (age 0-18 years) with and without schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, who received public mental health services in Hawaii's comprehensive system of care between July 1, 2000 and June 30, 2001. Methods: Electronic records of youth with a diagnosis in the…

  9. Meta-analysis of GWAS of over 16,000 individuals with autism spectrum disorder highlights a novel locus at 10q24.32 and a significant overlap with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anney, Richard J.L.; Ripke, Stephan; Anttila, Verneri

    2017-01-01

    and CUEDC2 previously reported to be associated with social skills in an independent population cohort. We also observe overlap with regions previously implicated in schizophrenia which was further supported by a strong genetic correlation between these disorders (Rg = 0.23; P = 9 × 10-6). We further...

  10. Channelopathy Pathogenesis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina eSchmunk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole- genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders, and animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects.

  11. Trajectories of premorbid childhood and adolescent functioning in schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses: A first-episode study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Leslie E.; Tarbox, Sarah I.; Olino, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of social and behavioral problems preceding the onset of schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses is consistent with a neurodevelopmental model of these disorders. Here we predict that individuals with a first episode of schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses will evidence one of three patterns of premorbid adjustment: an early deficit, a deteriorating pattern, or adequate or good social adjustment. Participants were 164 (38% female; 31% black) individuals ages 15–50 with a first episode of schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses. Premorbid adjustment was assessed using the Cannon-Spoor Premorbid Adjustment Scale. We compared the fit of a series of growth mixture models to examine premorbid adjustment trajectories, and found the following 3-class model provided the best fit with: a “stable-poor” adjustment class (54%), a “stable-good” adjustment class (39%), and a “deteriorating” adjustment class (7%). Relative to the “stable-good” class, the “stable-poor” class experienced worse negative symptoms at 1-year follow-up, particularly in the social amotivation domain. This represents the first known growth mixture modeling study to examine premorbid functioning patterns in first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses. Given that the stable-poor adjustment pattern was most prevalent, detection of social and academic maladjustment as early as childhood may help identify people at increased risk for schizophrenia-spectrum psychoses, potentially increasing feasibility of early interventions. PMID:25829134

  12. Schizophrenia comorbid with panic disorder: Evidence for distinct cognitive profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Rapp, Erica Kirsten; White-Ajmani, Mandi Lynn; Antonius, Daniel; Goetz, Raymond Richard; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill Martine; Savitz, Adam Jonathan; Malaspina, Dolores; Kahn, Jeffrey Paul

    2012-01-01

    Patients with comorbid schizophrenia and panic symptoms share a distinct clinical presentation and biological characteristics, prompting some to propose panic psychosis as a separate subtype of schizophrenia. Less is known about these patients’ neuropsychological profiles, knowledge of which may facilitate target-specific treatments and research into the etiopathophysiology for such cases. A total of 255 schizophrenia patients with panic disorder (n=39), non-panic anxiety disorder (n=51), or ...

  13. SNAP25 is associated with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingzhong; Wang, Yanlin; Ji, Weidong; Zhou, Guoquan; He, Kuanjun; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jianhua; Li, Wenjin; Wen, Zujia; Shen, Jiawei; Qiang, Yu; Ji, Jue; Wang, Yujiong; Shi, Yongyong; Yi, Qizhong; Wang, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25) is a member of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) protein complex, which plays essential roles in the modulation of different voltage-gated calcium channels and neurotransmitter release. Many previous studies have reported the SNAP25 gene to be significantly associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recently, shared genetic variants have been demonstrated in 5 major psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorders, and ADHD. However, no compelling, convincing evidence has suggested an association between SNAP25 and schizophrenia or major depressive disorder. Thus, we investigated the association between SNAP25 and both schizophrenia and major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population. We performed a large-scale case-control study to test the association between SNAP25 and 2 major mental disorders, schizophrenia (DSM-IV criteria) and major depressive disorder (DSM-IV criteria), in the Han Chinese population. Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 1,330 schizophrenia patients, 1,045 major depressive disorder patients, and 1,520 healthy controls of Han Chinese origin. Two SNPs, rs3787283 and rs3746544, were found to be associated with both schizophrenia (rs3746544, adjusted P = .00257) and major depressive disorder (rs3746544, adjusted P = .0485; rs3787283, adjusted P = .00387) in this study. The AG haplotype consisting of rs3787283 and rs3746544 was also significantly associated with both schizophrenia and major depressive disorder (schizophrenia: adjusted P = .0126; major depressive disorder: adjusted P = .000580). Additionally, we carried out a meta-analysis of the current data and published association results and further confirmed the association between rs3746544 and schizophrenia (Pmeta = .002, ORmeta = 1.213 [95% CI, 1.077-1.367]). Our results

  14. Social function in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder: Associations with personality, symptoms and neurocognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysaker Paul H

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has indicated that stable individual differences in personality exist among persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorders predating illness onset that are linked to symptoms and self appraised quality of life. Less is known about how closely individual differences in personality are uniquely related to levels of social relationships, a domain of dysfunction in schizophrenia more often linked in the literature with symptoms and neurocognitive deficits. This study tested the hypothesis that trait levels of personality as defined using the five-factor model of personality would be linked to social function in schizophrenia. Methods A self-report measure of the five factor model of personality was gathered along with ratings of social function, symptoms and assessments of neurocognition for 65 participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results Univariate correlations and stepwise multiple regression indicated that frequency of social interaction was predicted by higher levels of the trait of Agreeableness, fewer negative symptoms, better verbal memory and at the trend level, lesser Neuroticism (R2 = .42, p 2 = .67, p Conclusions Taken together, the findings of this study suggest that person-centered variables such as personality, may account for some of the broad differences seen in outcome in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, including social outcomes. One interpretation of the results of this study is that differences in personality combine with symptoms and neurocognitive deficits to affect how persons with schizophrenia are able to form and sustain social connections with others.

  15. Rates and Predictors of Conversion to Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder Following Substance-Induced Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzer, Marie Stefanie Kejser; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2017-11-28

    The authors investigated the rates of conversion to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder after a substance-induced psychosis, as well as risk factors for conversion. All patient information was extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Psychiatric Central Research Register. The study population included all persons who received a diagnosis of substance-induced psychosis between 1994 and 2014 (N=6,788); patients were followed until first occurrence of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder or until death, emigration, or August 2014. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to obtain cumulative probabilities for the conversion from a substance-induced psychosis to schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios for all covariates. Overall, 32.2% (95% CI=29.7-34.9) of patients with a substance-induced psychosis converted to either bipolar or schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The highest conversion rate was found for cannabis-induced psychosis, with 47.4% (95% CI=42.7-52.3) converting to either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Young age was associated with a higher risk of converting to schizophrenia. Self-harm after a substance-induced psychosis was significantly linked to a higher risk of converting to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Half the cases of conversion to schizophrenia occurred within 3.1 years after a substance-induced psychosis, and half the cases of conversion to bipolar disorder occurred within 4.4 years. Substance-induced psychosis is strongly associated with the development of severe mental illness, and a long follow-up period is needed to identify the majority of cases.

  16. The importance of early anti-social behaviour among men with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in a specialist forensic psychiatry hospital unit in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Liselotte; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Elsass, Peter

    2010-01-01

    People with a major mental disorder are at increased risk of committing crimes, especially violent crimes, compared with the general population. Sub-groups have been identified based on age of onset of anti-social or violent behaviour. Mentally disordered offenders with early onset anti-social be...

  17. Risk of Schizophrenia Increases After All Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibing, Cecilie Frejstrup; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Earlier smaller studies have shown associations between child and adolescent psychiatric disorders and schizophrenia. Particularly, attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder and autism have been linked with schizophrenia. However, large-scale prospective studies have been lacking. We......, therefore, conducted the first large-scale study on the association between a broad spectrum of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders and the risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia. Methods: Danish nationwide registers were linked to establish a cohort consisting of all persons born during 1990......-2000 and the cohort was followed until December 31, 2012. Data were analyzed using survival analyses and adjusted for calendar year, age, and sex. Results: A total of 25138 individuals with child and adolescent psychiatric disorders were identified, out of which 1232 individuals were subsequently diagnosed...

  18. Neurofeedback in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtmann, Martin; Steiner, Sabina; Hohmann, Sarah; Poustka, Luise; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bolte, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To review current studies on the effectiveness of neurofeedback as a method of treatment of the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Method: Studies were selected based on searches in PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, ERIC, and CINAHL using combinations of the following keywords: "Neurofeedback" OR "EEG Biofeedback" OR "Neurotherapy"…

  19. Vision in autism spectrum disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simmons, David R; Robertson, Ashley E; McKay, Lawrie S; Toal, Erin; McAleer, Phil; Pollick, Frank E

    2009-01-01

    ... these two diagnostic groups have come to be known as Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), although there is ongoing controversy about how distinct they really are (see Volkmar, State, & Klin, 2009 ). A second controversy concerns whether or not the prevalence of ASDs (about 1% in western countries) is increasing ( Charles, Carpenter, Jenner, &...

  20. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epigenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafodatskaya, Daria; Chung, Brian; Szatmari, Peter; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Current research suggests that the causes of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are multifactorial and include both genetic and environmental factors. Several lines of evidence suggest that epigenetics also plays an important role in ASD etiology and that it might, in fact, integrate genetic and environmental influences to dysregulate…

  1. The importance of early anti-social behaviour among men with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder in a specialist forensic psychiatry hospital unit in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Liselotte; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Elsass, Peter

    2010-01-01

    People with a major mental disorder are at increased risk of committing crimes, especially violent crimes, compared with the general population. Sub-groups have been identified based on age of onset of anti-social or violent behaviour. Mentally disordered offenders with early onset anti-social...... behaviour tend to have a lifelong pattern of it, but in a clinical setting, are they easily identifiable as a distinct sub-group?...

  2. VRK2 gene expression in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesli, Martin; Wirgenes, Katrine Verena; Hughes, Timothy; Bettella, Francesco; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Hoseth, Eva S; Nerhus, Mari; Lagerberg, Trine V; Steen, Nils E; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid; Dieset, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2016-08-01

    Common variants in the Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, but the relevance of its encoded protein VRK2 in the disorder remains unclear. To identify potential differences in VRK2 gene expression levels between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychosis not otherwise specified (PNOS) and healthy controls. VRK2 mRNA level was measured in whole blood in 652 individuals (schizophrenia, n = 201; bipolar disorder, n = 167; PNOS, n = 61; healthy controls, n = 223), and compared across diagnostic categories and subcategories. Additionally, we analysed for association between 1566 VRK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms and mRNA levels. We found lower VRK2 mRNA levels in schizophrenia compared with healthy controls (Pdisorder (Pdisorder (P = 0.00026). Expression quantitative trait loci in close proximity to the transcription start site of the short isoforms of the VRK2 gene were identified. Altered VRK2 gene expression seems specific for schizophrenia and PNOS, which is in accordance with findings from genome-wide association studies. These results suggest that reduced VRK2 mRNA levels are involved in the underlying mechanisms in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  3. Familial liability to schizophrenia and mood disorders and cognitive impairment in psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Manuel J; Zarzuela, Amalia; Sánchez-Torres, Ana M; Lorente-Omeñaca, Ruth; Moreno-Izco, Lucía; Sanjuán, Julio; Peralta, Victor

    2015-06-30

    Schizophrenia and other psychoses are complex disorders with high rates of cognitive impairment and a considerable degree of genetic and environmental influence on its etiology. Whether cognitive impairment is related to dimensional scores of familial liability is still matter of debate. We conducted a cross-sectional study including 169 patients with psychotic disorders and 26 healthy controls. Attention, memory and executive functions were assessed, and familial loading scores for schizophrenia and mood disorders were calculated. The relationships between familial liability and neuropsychological performance were examined with Spearman׳s correlation coefficients. In addition, patients were classified into three groups by family loading tertiles, and comparisons were performed between the patients in the top and bottom tertiles. Low familial loading scores for schizophrenia showed a significant association with poor executive functioning and delayed visual memory. And these results were also achieved when the subset of psychotic patients in the two extreme tertiles of family loadings of schizophrenia and mood disorders were compared. Low familial liability to schizophrenia seems to be a contributing factor for the severity of cognitive impairment in patients with a broad putative schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anomalous subjective experiences in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, Jinyoung

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare anomalous subjective experiences in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression, in order to elucidate differences in subjective experiences and examine their potential clinical correlates in schizophrenia and mood disorders. The subjective experiences of 78 outpatients with schizophrenia (n=32), bipolar disorder (n=24) and unipolar depression (n=22), and 32 healthy controls were comprehensively assessed using the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ). The FCQ total score was significantly higher in the schizophrenia and depression groups than in the healthy control group. There were no significant differences in the FCQ total or subscale scores among the schizophrenia, unipolar depression, and bipolar disorder groups. In the schizophrenia group, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative factor score was a significant negative predictor of the severity of subjective experiences assessed by the FCQ total score. Disruption of subjective experiences in patients with unipolar depression was associated with greater severity of depressive symptoms and younger age. In the bipolar disorder group, women reported more disruptions in subjective experience. Anomalous subjective experiences measured by the FCQ are not specific to schizophrenia, and the severity of these experiences in unipolar depression is substantially high. The finding of a dissimilar pattern of predictors of subjective experiences across different diagnostic groups suggests the complexity and variety of factors contributing to anomalous subjective experiences in schizophrenia and mood disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolato, Beatrice; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Köhler, Cristiano A

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). A neurocognitive profile characterized by widespread cognitive deficits across multiple domains in the context of substantial intellectual impairment, which appears to antedate illness onset, is a replicated...... studies. Meta-analytic techniques may offer an opportunity to synthesize findings and to control for potential sources of heterogeneity. Here, we performed a systematic review of meta-analyses of neuropsychological findings in SZ and BD. While there is no conclusive evidence for progressive cognitive...... deterioration in either SZ or BD, some findings point to more severe cognitive deficits in patients with early illness onset across both disorders. A compromised pattern of cognitive functioning in individuals at familiar and/or clinical risk to psychosis as well as in first-degree relatives of BD patients...

  6. Role of 108 schizophrenia-associated loci in modulating psychopathological dimensions in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Chiara; Serretti, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) identified 108 loci associated with schizophrenia, but their role in modulating specific psychopathological dimensions of the disease is unknown. This study investigated which symptom dimensions may be affected by these loci in schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Positive, negative and depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, cognition, violent behaviors, quality of life, and early onset were investigated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using the clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness (CATIE) and systematic treatment enhancement program for bipolar disorder (STEP-BD) studies. Individual loci were investigated, then genes within 50 Kbp from polymorphisms with p schizophrenia-associated variant (rs75059851) may modulate negative symptoms. Multi-locus models may provide interesting insights about the biological mechanisms that mediate psychopathological dimensions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Related Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Q: Do vaccines cause autism spectrum disorder (ASD)? A: Many studies that have ... whether there is a relationship between vaccines and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To date, the studies continue ...

  8. Shared intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: neuroanatomical features of subtypes distinguished by executive dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Alana M.; Quidé, Yann; Laurens, Kristin R.; O’Reilly, Nicole; Rowland, Jesseca E.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Green, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shared genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be associated with common neuroanatomical features. In view of the evidence for working memory dysfunction as a candidate intermediate phenotype for both disorders, we explored neuroanatomical distinctions between subtypes defined according to working memory (n-back task) performance. Methods We analyzed T1-weighted MRI scans for patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder, bipolar-I disorder (BD-I) and healthy controls. The VBM8 toolbox was used to assess differences in grey and white matter volume across traditional diagnostic groups (schizophrenia v. BD-I). Subsequently, groups were defined as “executively spared” (ES) based on the achievement of greater than 50% accuracy in the 2-back task performance (comparable to performance in the control group) or “executively deficit” (ED) based on the achievement of less than 50% accuracy. Results Our study included 40 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, 30 patients with BD-I and 34 controls. Both the schizophrenia and BD-I groups showed grey matter volume reductions relative to the control group, but not relative to each other. The ED subtype (n = 32 [10 BD-I, 22 schizophrenia]) showed grey matter volume reductions in the bilateral superior and medial frontal gyri, right inferior opercular gyri and hippocampus relative to controls. The ES subtype (n = 38 [20 BD-I, 18 schizophrenia]) showed grey matter volume reductions in the right precuneus and left superior and medial orbital frontal gyri relative to controls. The ED subtype showed grey matter volume reduction in the right inferior frontal and precentral gyri relative to the ES subtype. There were no significant differences in white matter volume in any group comparisons. Limitations This analysis was limited by small sample sizes. Further, insufficient numbers were available to assess a control-deficit comparison group. We were unable to assess the effects of mood

  9. A study of hippocampal shape anomaly in schizophrenia and in families multiply affected by schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Department of Neuroradiology, Kings Healthcare NHS Trust, King' s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, SE5 9RS, London (United Kingdom); Ng, V. [Department of Neuroimaging, Maudsley Hospital, London (United Kingdom); McDonald, C.; Schulze, K.; Morgan, K.; Dazzan, P.; Murray, R.M. [Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Hippocampal shape anomaly (HSA), characterised by a rounded hippocampus, has been documented in congenital malformations and epileptic patients. Subtle structural hippocampal abnormalities have been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia. We tested the hypothesis that HSA is more frequent in schizophrenia, particularly in patients from families multiply affected by schizophrenia, and that HSA is transmitted within these families. We also aimed to define the anatomical features of the hippocampus and other cerebral structures in the HSA spectrum and to determine the prevalence of HSA in a control group. We reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging of a large number of subjects with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, many of who came from multiply affected families, relatives of the affected probands, and controls. Quantitative measures of hippocampal shape and position and other qualitative anatomical measures were performed (including depth of dominant sulcus cortical cap, angle of dominant sulcus and hippocampal fissure, bulk of collateral white matter, prominence of temporal horn lateral recess and blurring of internal hippocampal architecture) on subjects with HSA. A spectrum of mild, moderate and severe HSA was defined. The prevalence of HSA was, 7.8% for the controls (n=218), 9.3% for all schizophrenic subjects (n=151) and 12.3% for familial schizophrenic subjects (n=57). There was a greater prevalence of moderate or severe forms of HSA in familial schizophrenics than controls. However, there was no increase in the prevalence of HSA in the unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenic patients or in patients with familial bipolar disorder. HSA was rarely transmitted in families. HSA was frequently associated with a deep, vertical collateral/occipito-temporal sulcus and a steep hippocampal fissure. Our data raise the possibility that HSA is linked to disturbances of certain neurodevelopmental genes associated with schizophrenia. However, the lack of

  10. Race and Hospital Diagnoses of Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Overdiagnosis or misdiagnosis of schizophrenia among African American clients is a longstanding and critical disparity in mental health services. Overdiagnosis of schizophrenia is detrimental because it increases the potential for treatment with the wrong medications. Inadequate assessment of mood disorders, co-occurring substance abuse, and…

  11. Eating Disorders in Schizophrenia: Implications for Research and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loas, Gwenole

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Despite evidence from case series, the comorbidity of eating disorders (EDs) with schizophrenia is poorly understood. This review aimed to assess the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of EDs in schizophrenia patients and to examine whether the management of EDs can be improved. Methods. A qualitative review of the published literature was performed using the following terms: “schizophrenia” in association with “eating disorders,” “anorexia nervosa,” “bulimia nervosa,” “binge eating disorder,” or “night eating syndrome.” Results. According to our literature review, there is a high prevalence of comorbidity between schizophrenia and EDs. EDs may occur together with or independent of psychotic symptoms in these patients. Binge eating disorders and night eating syndromes are frequently found in patients with schizophrenia, with a prevalence of approximately 10%. Anorexia nervosa seems to affect between 1 and 4% of schizophrenia patients. Psychopathological and neurobiological mechanisms, including effects of antipsychotic drugs, should be more extensively explored. Conclusions. The comorbidity of EDs in schizophrenia remains relatively unexplored. The clearest message of this review is the importance of screening for and assessment of comorbid EDs in schizophrenia patients. The management of EDs in schizophrenia requires a multidisciplinary approach to attain maximized health outcomes. For clinical practice, we propose some recommendations regarding patient-centered care. PMID:25485152

  12. Eating Disorders in Schizophrenia: Implications for Research and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Kouidrat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Despite evidence from case series, the comorbidity of eating disorders (EDs with schizophrenia is poorly understood. This review aimed to assess the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of EDs in schizophrenia patients and to examine whether the management of EDs can be improved. Methods. A qualitative review of the published literature was performed using the following terms: “schizophrenia” in association with “eating disorders,” “anorexia nervosa,” “bulimia nervosa,” “binge eating disorder,” or “night eating syndrome.” Results. According to our literature review, there is a high prevalence of comorbidity between schizophrenia and EDs. EDs may occur together with or independent of psychotic symptoms in these patients. Binge eating disorders and night eating syndromes are frequently found in patients with schizophrenia, with a prevalence of approximately 10%. Anorexia nervosa seems to affect between 1 and 4% of schizophrenia patients. Psychopathological and neurobiological mechanisms, including effects of antipsychotic drugs, should be more extensively explored. Conclusions. The comorbidity of EDs in schizophrenia remains relatively unexplored. The clearest message of this review is the importance of screening for and assessment of comorbid EDs in schizophrenia patients. The management of EDs in schizophrenia requires a multidisciplinary approach to attain maximized health outcomes. For clinical practice, we propose some recommendations regarding patient-centered care.

  13. Cognitive Discernible Factors between Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stip, Emmanuel; Sepehry, Amir Ali; Prouteau, Antoniette; Briand, Catherine; Nicole, Luc; Lalonde, Pierre; Lesage, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia (SZ) and schizoaffective disorders (SA) are associated with cognitive deficits. Generally, a schizoaffective diagnosis is associated with better prognosis on the level of social integration. It is also well established that cognition is an important factor for good social outcome in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that,…

  14. Effect of a Telephone Intervention Upon Self-Reported Medication Adherence and Self-Efficacy in Outpatients With Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders (SSDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Lora Humphrey; Smith, Kathlene; Phillips, Chad

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effect of weekly telephone intervention upon self-reported medication adherence, medication adherence self efficacy, and symptom levels in 140 stable outpatients with SSDs for three months. To our knowledge, this is the first study examining medication adherence self efficacy in persons with SSDs. Study measures were administered in a private office by trained study staff immediately following the granting of informed consent, and again after three months. Participants ranged in age from 19-71 years with an average age of 46.1 years (SD 12.9). A majority were males (n = 80, 57.1%) with schizoaffective disorder (n = 94, 67.1%). Symptoms were lower and self-reported medication adherence was higher in experimental participant after three months, but differences were not statistically significant. Medication adherence self efficacy was essentially unchanged over the three month follow up period. This study extends the literature on adherence in SSDs by describing a clinic-based sample of stable outpatients, and is the first investigation to measure medication adherence self efficacy in this group. Our next project will examine the effectiveness of TIPS upon objectively measured medication adherence in this group over 6 months of follow up.

  15. Schizophrenia comorbid with panic disorder: evidence for distinct cognitive profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Erica Kirsten; White-Ajmani, Mandi Lynn; Antonius, Daniel; Goetz, Raymond Richard; Harkavy-Friedman, Jill Martine; Savitz, Adam Jonathan; Malaspina, Dolores; Kahn, Jeffrey Paul

    2012-05-30

    Patients with comorbid schizophrenia and panic symptoms share a distinct clinical presentation and biological characteristics, prompting some to propose panic psychosis as a separate subtype of schizophrenia. Less is known about these patients' neuropsychological profiles, knowledge of which may facilitate target-specific treatments and research into the etiopathophysiology for such cases. A total of 255 schizophrenia patients with panic disorder (n=39), non-panic anxiety disorder (n=51), or no anxiety disorder (n=165) were assessed with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Trail Making Test, the Controlled Oral Word Association Test, the Animal Naming subtest of the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination, and the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Patients with panic disorder demonstrated a higher verbal IQ and better problem solving, set switching, delayed recall, attention, and verbal fluency as compared to schizophrenia patients without comorbid anxiety. The schizophrenia-panic group reported a higher level of dysthymia on stable medication. Our findings suggest that patients with schizophrenia and comorbid panic disorder exhibit distinct cognitive functioning when compared to other schizophrenia patients. These data offer further support for a definable panic-psychosis subtype and suggest new etiological pathways for future research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pineal gland volume in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fındıklı, Ebru; Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Gökçe, Mustafa; Fındıklı, Hüseyin Avni; Altun, Hatice; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-06-01

    The majority of patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders have disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythm. Melatonin, which is secreted by the human pineal gland, plays an important role in sleep and circadian rhythm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare pineal gland volumes in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. We retrospectively evaluated the pineal gland volumes of 80 cases, including 16 cases of unipolar depression, 17 cases of bipolar disorder, 17 cases of schizophrenia, and 30 controls. The total pineal gland volume of all cases was measured via magnetic resonance images, and the total mean pineal volume of each group was compared. The mean pineal volumes of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, and the controls were 83.55±10.11 mm(3), 93.62±11.00 mm(3), 95.19±11.61 mm(3) and 99.73±12.03 mm(3), respectively. The mean pineal gland volume of the patients with schizophrenia was significantly smaller than those of the other groups. Our data show that patients with schizophrenia have smaller pineal gland volumes, and this deviation in pineal gland morphology is not seen in those with mood disorders. We hypothesize that volumetric changes in the pineal gland of patients with schizophrenia may be involved in the pathophysiology of this illness.

  17. Dissociation and psychosis in dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laddis, Andreas; Dell, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Dissociative symptoms, first-rank symptoms of schizophrenia, and delusions were assessed in 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 dissociative identity disorder (DID) patients with the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID). Schizophrenia patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV Axis I Disorders; DID patients were diagnosed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised. DID patients obtained significantly (a) higher dissociation scores; (b) higher passive-influence scores (first-rank symptoms); and (c) higher scores on scales that measure child voices, angry voices, persecutory voices, voices arguing, and voices commenting. Schizophrenia patients obtained significantly higher delusion scores than did DID patients. What is odd is that the dissociation scores of schizophrenia patients were unrelated to their reports of childhood maltreatment. Multiple regression analyses indicated that 81% of the variance in DID patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Ego-Alien Experiences Scale, whereas 92% of the variance in schizophrenia patients' dissociation scores was predicted by the MID's Voices Scale. We propose that schizophrenia patients' responses to the MID do not index the same pathology as do the responses of DID patients. We argue that neither phenomenological definitions of dissociation nor the current generation of dissociation instruments (which are uniformly phenomenological in nature) can distinguish between the dissociative phenomena of DID and what we suspect are just the dissociation-like phenomena of schizophrenia.

  18. Schizoaffective disorder merges schizophrenia and bipolar disorders as one disease--there is no schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Charles Ray; Hurwitz, Nathaniel

    2007-07-01

    Schizoaffective disorder was named as a compromise diagnosis in 1933, and remains popular as judged by its place in the International Classification of Diseases and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, its frequent use in clinical practice, and its extensive discussion in the literature. Some, however, have questioned the validity of schizoaffective disorder as separate from psychotic mood disorder. We examined the literature to assess the rationale for the continuation of schizoaffective disorder as a legitimate diagnostic category. The diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder depends on the disease specificity of the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia; however, the psychotic symptoms for schizophrenia, traditionally held as specific, can be accounted for by psychotic bipolar. Further, the interrater reliability for diagnosing schizoaffective disorder is very low. A recent and expanding body of comparative evidence from a wide range of clinical and basic science studies, especially genetic, reveals multiple similarities between schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar. Schizoaffective disorder unifies schizophrenia and bipolar, blurring the zones of rarity between them and suggesting that schizoaffective disorder is not a separate, 'bona-fide' disease. Patients diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder likely suffer from a psychotic mood disorder. The diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder, which can result in substandard treatment, should be eliminated from the diagnostic nomenclature.

  19. Schizophrenia, depression, and sleep disorders: Their traditional oriental medicine equivalents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bosch, M.P.C; Rover, P. de; Staudte, H; Lim, S; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den

    2015-01-01

    .... In this study, the different Traditional Oriental Medicine (TOM) diagnostic patterns in patients with a Western diagnosis of schizophrenia, depression, or sleep disorders are described from a literature and a clinical perspective...

  20. Schizophrenia and sleep disorders: links, risks, and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaskie RE

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Kaskie,1 Bianca Graziano,2 Fabio Ferrarelli1 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Health Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy Abstract: Schizophrenia is a major psychiatric disorder that has a massive, long-lasting negative impact on the patients as well as society. While positive symptoms (i.e., delusions and hallucinations, negative symptoms (i.e., anhedonia, social withdrawal, and cognitive impairments are traditionally considered the most prominent features of this disorder, the role of sleep and sleep disturbances has gained increasing prominence in clinical practice. Indeed, the vast majority of patients with schizophrenia report sleep abnormalities, which tend to precede illness onset and can predict an acute exacerbation of psychotic symptoms. Furthermore, schizophrenia patients often have a comorbid sleep disorder, including insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, or periodic limb movement disorder. Despite accumulating data, the links between sleep disorders and schizophrenia have not been thoroughly examined, in part because they are difficult to disentangle, as numerous factors contribute to their comorbidity, including medication status. Additionally, sleep disorders are often not the primary focus of clinicians treating this population, despite studies suggesting that comorbid sleep disorders carry their own unique risks, including worsening of psychotic symptoms and poorer quality of life. There is also limited information about effective management strategies for schizophrenia patients affected by significant sleep disturbances and/or sleep disorders. To begin addressing these issues, the present review will systematically examine the literature on sleep disorders and schizophrenia, focusing on studies related to 1 links between distinct sleep disorders and schizophrenia; 2 risks unique to patients with a comorbid sleep disorder

  1. PINEAL GLAND VOLUME IN SCHIZOPHRENIA AND MOOD DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Fındıklı, Ebru; Fatih Inci, Mehmet; Gökçe, Mustafa; Avni Fındıklı, Hüseyin; ALTUN, Hatice; Fatih Karaaslan, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Background: The majority of patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders have disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythm. Melatonin, which is secreted by the human pineal gland, plays an important role in sleep and circadian rhythm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare pineal gland volumes in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Subjects and methods: We retrospectively evaluated the pineal gland volumes of 80 cases, including 16 cases of unipolar de...

  2. Suicide in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, Sami; Fahed, Mario; Khoury, Elias; Mishara, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on suicide in patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) as well as risk factors and comorbidities of persons with ASD who have attempted suicide. Research was conducted by searching PubMed and Psychinfo for articles. Suicide in ASD is largely understudied. Although suicide is common in clinical samples, we have little knowledge of suicide in persons with ASD in the general population. Comorbidity, particularly with depression and other affective disorders or schizoid disorders and psychotic symptoms, is often reported, so it is difficult to determine if suicidality is associated with ASD or the comorbid disorder. Clinical samples suggest that suicide occurs more frequently in high functioning autism. Physical and sexual abuse, bullying, and changes in routine are precipitating events associated with suicide risk. Persons with ASD present risk factors inherent to their diagnosis (deficit in expression of feelings and thoughts), along with risk factors pertaining to the general population (abuse, depression, anxiety, etc.). The inability of persons with Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) to express emotions and thoughts makes the diagnosis of suicidal ideation difficult and demands important adjustments to traditional psychotherapeutic interventions. More research is needed to determine the incidence of suicidal behaviors in persons with ASD, to identify risk and protective factors, as well as to assess the effectiveness of prevention strategies and interventions.

  3. Overlapping and disease specific aspects of impulsivety in children and adolescents with schiozphrenia spectrum disorders or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jens Richardt Møllegaard; Rydkjær, Jacob; Fagerlund, Birgitte

    Background and aim: Dimensions of impulsivity have been observed in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia patients. The purpose is to identify disease specific and overlapping aspects of impulsivity in children and adolescents with ADHD or early-onset schizophrenia......-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorders (N-29), patients with ADHD (N=29), and healthy controls (N=45). Results: preliminary results: Compared to healthy controls, reflection impulsivity is significantly increased in patients with ADHD in a condition with a confluct between reward and certainty. Early......-onset schizophrenia spectrum disorder patients appear to perform differently from the healthy controls and the schizphrenia spectrum disorder patients, although not signivicantly (p = .163). Conclusion: Reduced information sampling in children and adolescents with ADHD may reflect an inability to delay their decision...

  4. Socioeconomic status and beliefs about depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von dem Knesebeck, Olaf; Mnich, Eva; Daubmann, Anne; Wegscheider, Karl; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Lambert, Martin; Karow, Anne; Härter, Martin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    The association between socioeconomic status (SES) and knowledge/belief about depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders will be analysed. Data stem from a telephone survey in two large German cities (Hamburg and Munich, n = 2,014, response rate 51 %). Written vignettes with typical signs and symptoms suggestive of a depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders were presented to the respondents. Respondents were then asked about knowledge/belief about causes, symptoms, prevalence and treatment using a standardised questionnaire. Education, occupational position and income were used as SES indicators. Results of mixed hierarchal logistic regression analyses show that individuals with a low SES know less about symptoms and prevalences of depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders. Moreover, people with a high SES are more likely to consider medication as effective in case of depression and schizophrenia, but are less likely to believe that activities such as sports or relaxation are an effective measure to treat the three mental disorders under study. Respondents with a high SES are less likely to believe that a weak will is a possible cause of depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders. We found large similarities in the associations between SES and beliefs across the three mental disorders. Finally, associations of beliefs about mental disorders with education are stronger and more consistent than with income and occupational position. Results indicate an inequality in mental health literacy and underline that information campaigns on causes, symptoms, prevalence and treatment of mental disorders should consider information needs of people with a low SES.

  5. Early stage vision in schizophrenia and schizotypal personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Brian F; Bismark, Andrew; Hetrick, William P; Bodkins, Misty; Vohs, Jenifer L; Shekhar, Anantha

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies of visual perception have reported deficits in contrast sensitivity and dot motion discrimination in schizophrenia. We tested whether these deficits also appear in schizotypal personality disorder (SPD). SPD appears to be genetically and symptomatically related to schizophrenia, but without the marked psychosocial impairment associated with psychotic disorders. The present study investigated contrast sensitivity for moving and static gratings, form discrimination and dot motion discrimination in 24 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (SZ), 16 individuals with SPD, and 40 control subjects. SZ, but not SPD subjects, showed impairments on tests of contrast sensitivity for static and moving gratings, form discrimination in noise, and dot motion discrimination. Visual performance did not differ between medicated SZ patients and patients withdrawn from medication. These results confirm early stage visual deficits in schizophrenia regardless of medication status. SPD subjects, in contrast, show intact early stage visual processing despite the presence of marked schizotypal symptoms.

  6. Dissociative identity disorder and schizophrenia: differential diagnosis and theoretical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Brad; Park, Jane

    2008-06-01

    Schizophrenia and dissociative identity disorder (DID) are typically thought of as unrelated syndromes--a genetically based psychotic disorder versus a trauma-based dissociative disorder--and are categorized as such by the DSM-IV. However, substantial data exist to document the elevated occurrence of psychotic symptoms in DID; awareness of these features is necessary to prevent diagnostic confusion. Recent research has also pointed out that schizophrenia and DID overlap not only in psychotic symptoms but also in terms of traumatic antecedents, leading to a number of suggestions for revision of our clinical, theoretical, and nosologic understanding of the relationship between these two disorders.

  7. Neurophysiological distinction between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Mathalon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizoaffective disorder (SA is distinguished from schizophrenia (SZ based on the presence of prominent mood symptoms over the illness course. Despite this clinical distinction, SA and SZ patients are often combined in research studies, in part because data supporting a distinct pathophysiological boundary between the disorders are lacking. Indeed, few studies have addressed whether neurobiological abnormalities associated with SZ, such as the widely replicated reduction and delay of the P300 event-related potential (ERP, are also present in SA. Scalp EEG was acquired from patients with DSM-IV SA (n=15 or SZ (n=22, as well as healthy controls (HC; n=22 to assess the P300 elicited by infrequent target (15% and task-irrelevant distractor (15% stimuli in separate auditory and visual “oddball” tasks. P300 amplitude was reduced and delayed in SZ, relative to HC, consistent with prior studies. These SZ abnormalities did not interact with stimulus type (target vs. task-irrelevant distractor or modality (auditory vs. visual. Across sensory modality and stimulus type, SA patients exhibited normal P300 amplitudes (significantly larger than SZ patients and indistinguishable from HC. However, P300 latency and reaction time were both equivalently delayed in SZ and SA patients, relative to HC. P300 differences between SA and SZ patients could not be accounted for by variation in symptom severity, socio-economic status, education, or illness duration. Although both groups show similar deficits in processing speed, SA patients do not exhibit the P300 amplitude deficits evident in SZ, consistent with an underlying pathophysiological boundary between these disorders.

  8. Neurophysiological Distinction between Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathalon, Daniel H.; Hoffman, Ralph E.; Watson, Todd D.; Miller, Ryan M.; Roach, Brian J.; Ford, Judith M.

    2009-01-01

    Schizoaffective disorder (SA) is distinguished from schizophrenia (SZ) based on the presence of prominent mood symptoms over the illness course. Despite this clinical distinction, SA and SZ patients are often combined in research studies, in part because data supporting a distinct pathophysiological boundary between the disorders are lacking. Indeed, few studies have addressed whether neurobiological abnormalities associated with SZ, such as the widely replicated reduction and delay of the P300 event-related potential (ERP), are also present in SA. Scalp EEG was acquired from patients with DSM-IV SA (n = 15) or SZ (n = 22), as well as healthy controls (HC; n = 22) to assess the P300 elicited by infrequent target (15%) and task-irrelevant distractor (15%) stimuli in separate auditory and visual ”oddball” tasks. P300 amplitude was reduced and delayed in SZ, relative to HC, consistent with prior studies. These SZ abnormalities did not interact with stimulus type (target vs. task-irrelevant distractor) or modality (auditory vs. visual). Across sensory modality and stimulus type, SA patients exhibited normal P300 amplitudes (significantly larger than SZ patients and indistinguishable from HC). However, P300 latency and reaction time were both equivalently delayed in SZ and SA patients, relative to HC. P300 differences between SA and SZ patients could not be accounted for by variation in symptom severity, socio-economic status, education, or illness duration. Although both groups show similar deficits in processing speed, SA patients do not exhibit the P300 amplitude deficits evident in SZ, consistent with an underlying pathophysiological boundary between these disorders. PMID:20140266

  9. Formal Thought Disorder and language impairment in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Radanovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatric illness in which disorders of thought content are a prominent feature. The disruption of normal flow of thought, or “Formal Thought Disorder” (FTD, has been traditionally assessed through the content and form of patients’ speech, and speech abnormalities in schizophrenia were considered as a by-product of the disruption in conceptual structures and associative processes related to psychosis. This view has been changed due to increasing evidence that language per se is impaired in schizophrenia, especially its semantic, discursive, and pragmatic aspects. Schizophrenia is currently considered by some authors as a “language related human specific disease” or “logopathy”, and the neuroanatomical and genetic correlates of the language impairment in these patients are under investigation. Such efforts may lead to a better understanding about the pathophysiology of this devastating mental disease. We present some current concepts related to FTD as opposed to primary neurolinguistic abnormalities in schizophrenia.

  10. Cannabis abuse is associated with decision-making impairment among first-episode patients with schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, I; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J M; Pelayo-Terán, J M; Pérez-Iglesias, R; González-Blanch, C; Ramírez-Bonilla, M; Martínez-García, O; Vázquez-Barquero, J L; Crespo-Facorro, B

    2008-09-01

    Cannabis use appears to be a risk factor for schizophrenia. Moreover, cannabis abusers show impaired decision-making capacities, linked to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Although there is substantial evidence that first-episode schizophrenia patients show impairments in cognitive tasks associated with the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), it is not clear whether decision making is impaired at schizophrenia onset. In this study, we examined the association between antecedents of cannabis abuse and cognitive impairment in cognitive tasks associated with the DLPFC and the OFC in a sample of first-episode patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. One hundred and thirty-two patients experiencing their first episode of a schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis were assessed with a cognitive battery including DLPFC-related tasks [backward digits, verbal fluency (FAS) and the Trail Making Test (TMT)] and an OFC-related task [the Iowa Gambling Task (GT)]. Performance on these tasks was compared between patients who had and had not abused cannabis before their psychosis onset. No differences were observed between the two groups on the performance of any of the DLPFC-related tasks. However, patients who had abused cannabis before their psychosis onset showed a poorer total performance on the gambling task and a lower improvement on the performance of the task compared to no-abusers. Pre-psychotic cannabis abuse is associated with decision-making impairment, but not working memory and executive function impairment, among first-episode patients with a schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis. Further studies are needed to examine the direction of causality of this impairment; that is, does the impairment make the patients abuse cannabis, or does cannabis abuse cause the impairment?

  11. Multianalyte markers of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Faith; Schroeder, Jennifer; Stallings, Cassie; Origoni, Andrea; Bahn, Sabine; Yolken, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have identified altered molecular profiles in blood samples from individuals with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder using multianalyte immunoassay platforms but there has been little comparison of the two groups in the same investigation. A total of 337 participants including 146 with schizophrenia, 79 with bipolar disorder, and 112 non-psychiatric controls had a blood sample drawn from which 166 analytes were measured. The initial dataset was split; classification models were developed in a training dataset and their performance evaluated in a test dataset. Principal component analysis was used to generate factor scores that were then compared between the groups. In a training set, a total of 7 independent factors were generated using 29 markers that were both normally distributed and significantly associated with diagnosis. Many of these analytes are components of the immune system and involved in the inflammatory response to infectious agents and foreign antigens. Two of the seven principal component scores discriminated between individuals with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder; additional factors distinguished individuals with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from control individuals, while two factors were not significantly different between any of the diagnostic groups. In a test dataset, the schizophrenia vs. control Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis shows an overall accuracy of 77% for schizophrenia vs. bipolar disorder, 84% for schizophrenia vs. controls, and 72% for bipolar disorder vs. An increased understanding of the role of altered pathways in serious psychiatric disorders may lead to novel methods for disease diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB.

  13. Craving in patients with schizophrenia and cannabis use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Thomas; Becker, Theresa; Thiel, Maria Chantal; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2013-11-01

    Cannabis use is widespread among patients with schizophrenia despite its negative impact on the course of the disease. Craving is a considerable predictor for relapse in people with substance use disorders. Our investigation aimed to gain insight into the intensity and dimensions of cravings in patients with schizophrenia and cannabis use disorders (CUDs), compared with otherwise healthy people with CUDs (control subjects). We examined 51 patients with schizophrenia and CUDs and 51 control subjects by means of the Cannabis-Craving Screening questionnaire. We found greater overall intensity of craving and greater relief craving in patients with schizophrenia and CUDs. Reward craving was greater in the CUDs group. Relief craving was associated with symptoms of schizophrenia in patients with schizophrenia and CUDs. Our findings are in line with the view that aspects of self-medication or affect regulation may account (at least in part) for cannabis use in people with schizophrenia. A better understanding of the dimensions of craving may help to improve targeted therapeutic interventions that aim to reduce drug consumption in this difficult-to-treat patient group.

  14. Bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia overlap: a new comorbidity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Agerbo, Esben; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker

    2009-10-01

    Growing evidence of an etiologic overlap between schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder has become increasingly difficult to disregard. We investigated the magnitude of the overlap between the clinical diagnoses of bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia over a 35-year period based on the entire Danish population. We established a register-based prospective cohort study of more than 2.5 million persons born in Denmark after 1954. Risks for the 3 psychiatric disorders were estimated by survival analysis using the Aalen-Johansen method. Cohort members were followed from 1970 to 2006. We introduced a new comorbidity index measuring the magnitude of the overlap between the 3 disorders. Overall, 12,734 patients were admitted with schizophrenia, 4,205 with bipolar disorder, and 1,881 with schizoaffective disorder. A female bipolar patient's risk of also being admitted with a schizoaffective disorder by the age of 45 years was approximately 103 times higher than that of a woman at the same age in the general population. Thus, we defined the comorbidity index between schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder at age 45 years to be 103. At age 45 years, the index between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder was 80 and between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder was 20. Similar large comorbidity indexes were found for men. A large comorbidity index between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder was found, as well as a large index between bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder. But, more surprisingly, it was clear that a substantial comorbidity index between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia was present. This study supports the existence of an overlap between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia and thus challenges the strict categorical approach used in both DSM-IV and ICD-10 classification systems. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  15. Genetic liability for schizophrenia predicts risk of immune disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, Sven; Kahn, René S.; de Witte, Lot D.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Derks, Eske M.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients and their parents have an increased risk of immune disorders compared to population controls and their parents. This may be explained by genetic overlap in the pathogenesis of both types of disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic overlap between

  16. Genetic liability for schizophrenia predicts risk of immune disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stringer, Sven; Kahn, René S; de Witte, Lot D; Ophoff, Roel A; Derks, Eske M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia patients and their parents have an increased risk of immune disorders compared to population controls and their parents. This may be explained by genetic overlap in the pathogenesis of both types of disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic overlap

  17. Neurological soft signs discriminating mood disorders from first episode schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, MPM; Liddle, PF; Burgerhof, JGM; Knegtering, R; Bosch, RJ

    Objective: To investigate the specificity of neurological soft signs (NSS) for first episode schizophrenia compared with mood disorders. Method: We assessed NSS in a sample of 60 healthy controls, 191 first episode psychosis patients and 81 mood disorder patients. We used a principle component

  18. Perisylvian GABA levels in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atagün, Murat İlhan; Şıkoğlu, Elif Muazzez; Soykan, Çağlar; Serdar Süleyman, Can; Ulusoy-Kaymak, Semra; Çayköylü, Ali; Algın, Oktay; Phillips, Mary Louise; Öngür, Dost; Moore, Constance Mary

    2017-01-10

    The aim of this study is to measure GABA levels of perisylvian cortices in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Patients with schizophrenia (n=25), bipolar I disorder (BD-I; n=28) and bipolar II disorder (BD-II; n=20) were compared with healthy controls (n=30). 1H-MRS data was acquired using a Siemens 3T whole body scanner to quantify right and left perisylvian structures' (including superior temporal lobes) GABA levels. Right perisylvian GABA values differed significantly between groups [χ2=9.62, df: 3, p=0.022]. GABA levels were significantly higher in the schizophrenia group compared with the healthy control group (p=0.002). Furthermore, Chlorpromazine equivalent doses of antipsychotics correlated with right hemisphere GABA levels (r2=0.68, p=0.006, n=33). GABA levels are elevated in the right hemisphere in patients with schizophrenia in comparison to bipolar disorder and healthy controls. The balance between excitatory and inhibitory controls over the cortical circuits may have direct relationship with GABAergic functions in auditory cortices. In addition, GABA levels may be altered by brain regions of interest, psychotropic medications, and clinical stage in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intrinsic motivation and learning in a schizophrenia spectrum sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jimmy; Medalia, Alice

    2010-05-01

    A motivation is a telling hallmark of negative symptomatology in schizophrenia, and it impacts nearly every facet of behavior, including inclination to attempt the difficult cognitive tasks involved in cognitive remediation therapy. Experiences of external reward, reinforcement, and hedonic anticipatory enjoyment are diminished in psychosis, so therapeutics which instead target intrinsic motivation for cognitive tasks may enhance task engagement, and subsequently, remediation outcome. We examined whether outpatients could attain benefits from an intrinsically motivating instructional approach which (a) presents learning materials in a meaningful game-like context, (b) personalizes elements of the learning materials into themes of high interest value, and (c) offers choices so patients can increase their control over the learning process. We directly compared one learning method that incorporated the motivational paradigm into an arithmetic learning program against another method that carefully manipulated out the motivational variables in the same learning program. Fifty-seven subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were randomly assigned to one of the two learning programs for 10 thirty-minute sessions while an intent-to-treat convenience subsample (n=15) was used to account for practice effect. Outcome measures were arithmetic learning, attention, motivation, self competency, and symptom severity. Results showed the motivational group (a) acquired more arithmetic skill, (b) possessed greater intrinsic motivation for the task, (c) reported greater feelings of self competency post-treatment, and (d) demonstrated better post-test attention. Interestingly, baseline perception of self competency was a significant predictor of post-test arithmetic scores. Results demonstrated that incorporating intrinsically motivating instructional techniques into a difficult cognitive task promoted greater learning of the material, higher levels of intrinsic

  20. Sensing the Worst: Neurophenomenological Perspectives on Neutral Stimuli Misperception in Schizophrenia Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa Sestito

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available While investigating social cognitive impairments in schizophrenia, prominent evidence has been found that patients with schizophrenia show a tendency to misclassify neutral stimuli as negatively valenced. Within this population, patients presenting delusions are more prone to this phenomenon. In a previous study, Schizophrenia spectrum (SzSp patients rated positive, negative and neutral stimuli that were multimodally presented, while assessed with a checklist exploring anomalous subjective experiences and evaluated for positive and negative symptomatology. In the present work, we aimed to further explore the relationship between neutral stimuli misperception, anomalous experiences and positive/negative symptoms in SzSp patients. To this end, we adopted a dimensional approach by reconstructing from available data: (1 four a priori scales representing essential dimensions of SzSp experiential pathology following Parnas et al. (2005; and (2 five clinically meaningful factors to describe illness severity derived by Toomey et al. (1997. Results showed that although overall patients correctly recognized the target emotions, those who misinterpreted neutral auditory cues as negatively valenced also presented higher scores in Perplexity (PY, Bizarre Delusions (BD and Disorganization (Di dimensions. Moreover, a positive association between BD and both PY and Self-Disorder (SD dimensions emerged, suggesting that psychotic symptoms may be directly linked to patients’ subjectivity. In an attempt to comprehensively capture the multilayered neutral stimuli misperception phenomenon in SzSp, we aimed at bridging phenomenology and neurobiology by connecting the levels of molecular neurochemistry (i.e., altered dopaminergic neurotransmission, system neuroscience (aberrant salience of perceptual details and psychopathology (the chain involving hyper-reflexivity, self-disorders and the emergence of delusions.

  1. Sensing the Worst: Neurophenomenological Perspectives on Neutral Stimuli Misperception in Schizophrenia Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestito, Mariateresa; Parnas, Josef; Maggini, Carlo; Gallese, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    While investigating social cognitive impairments in schizophrenia, prominent evidence has been found that patients with schizophrenia show a tendency to misclassify neutral stimuli as negatively valenced. Within this population, patients presenting delusions are more prone to this phenomenon. In a previous study, Schizophrenia spectrum (SzSp) patients rated positive, negative and neutral stimuli that were multimodally presented, while assessed with a checklist exploring anomalous subjective experiences and evaluated for positive and negative symptomatology. In the present work, we aimed to further explore the relationship between neutral stimuli misperception, anomalous experiences and positive/negative symptoms in SzSp patients. To this end, we adopted a dimensional approach by reconstructing from available data: (1) four a priori scales representing essential dimensions of SzSp experiential pathology following Parnas et al. (2005); and (2) five clinically meaningful factors to describe illness severity derived by Toomey et al. (1997). Results showed that although overall patients correctly recognized the target emotions, those who misinterpreted neutral auditory cues as negatively valenced also presented higher scores in Perplexity (PY), Bizarre Delusions (BD) and Disorganization (Di) dimensions. Moreover, a positive association between BD and both PY and Self-Disorder (SD) dimensions emerged, suggesting that psychotic symptoms may be directly linked to patients' subjectivity. In an attempt to comprehensively capture the multilayered neutral stimuli misperception phenomenon in SzSp, we aimed at bridging phenomenology and neurobiology by connecting the levels of molecular neurochemistry (i.e., altered dopaminergic neurotransmission), system neuroscience (aberrant salience of perceptual details) and psychopathology (the chain involving hyper-reflexivity, self-disorders and the emergence of delusions).

  2. Developing Undergraduate Coursework in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Tracy Loye; Dimitriou, Francine; Turko, Kristine; McPartland, James

    2014-01-01

    With rates of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) continuing to rise alongside improvements in early identification and treatment, service providers are in great demand. Providing undergraduate students with opportunities for education and applied experiences with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can help fill a valuable niche in the autism community.…

  3. Parental Origin of Interstitial Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 in Schizophrenia and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isles, Anthony R; Ingason, Andrés; Lowther, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Duplications at 15q11.2-q13.3 overlapping the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region have been associated with developmental delay (DD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia (SZ). Due to presence of imprinted genes within the region, the parental origin of these duplications m...

  4. Sense of humor disorders in patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikolopov, Sergey N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an empirical study of sense of humor disorders in patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. Several parameters of analysis are distinguished: humor recognition, humor preferences and the level of laughing activity. It is showed that patients with schizophrenia are characterized by inability to recognize humor. As soon as patients with schizotypal disorder do recognize humor, this may be used as a diagnostic criterion in clinical practice. Sense of humor in patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders acquires peculiarities which are defined here as preferences of certain cognitive mechanisms and topics of jokes.

  5. Mitochondrial variants in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi Rollins

    Full Text Available Mitochondria provide most of the energy for brain cells by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial abnormalities and deficiencies in oxidative phosphorylation have been reported in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD, and major depressive disorder (MDD in transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies. Several mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence have been reported in SZ and BD patients.Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC from a cohort of 77 SZ, BD, and MDD subjects and age-matched controls (C was studied for mtDNA sequence variations and heteroplasmy levels using Affymetrix mtDNA resequencing arrays. Heteroplasmy levels by microarray were compared to levels obtained with SNaPshot and allele specific real-time PCR. This study examined the association between brain pH and mtDNA alleles. The microarray resequencing of mtDNA was 100% concordant with conventional sequencing results for 103 mtDNA variants. The rate of synonymous base pair substitutions in the coding regions of the mtDNA genome was 22% higher (p = 0.0017 in DLPFC of individuals with SZ compared to controls. The association of brain pH and super haplogroup (U, K, UK was significant (p = 0.004 and independent of postmortem interval time.Focusing on haplogroup and individual susceptibility factors in psychiatric disorders by considering mtDNA variants may lead to innovative treatments to improve mitochondrial health and brain function.

  6. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...... disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism...

  7. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  8. Distinct facial processing in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Cataldo, Andrea; Norton, Daniel J; Ongur, Dost

    2011-01-01

    Although schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders have both similar and differing clinical features, it is not well understood whether similar or differing pathophysiological processes mediate patients’ cognitive functions. Using psychophysical methods, this study compared the performances of schizophrenia (SZ) patients, patients with schizoaffective disorder (SA), and a healthy control group in two face-related cognitive tasks: emotion discrimination, which tested perception of facial affect, and identity discrimination, which tested perception of non-affective facial features. Compared to healthy controls, SZ patients, but not SA patients, exhibited deficient performance in both fear and happiness discrimination, as well as identity discrimination. SZ patients, but not SA patients, also showed impaired performance in a theory-of-mind task for which emotional expressions are identified based upon the eye regions of face images. This pattern of results suggests distinct processing of face information in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders. PMID:21868199

  9. Autistic-Like Traits in Adult Patients with Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Junko; Kamio, Yoko; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Ota, Miho; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hori, Hiroaki; Nagashima, Anna; Takei, Reiko; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65). Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the importance of

  10. Autistic-like traits in adult patients with mood disorders and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Matsuo

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder often co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. Although a high prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms has been identified in the pediatric psychiatric population of normal intelligence, there are no reports from adult psychiatric population. This study examined whether there is a greater prevalence of autistic-like traits/symptoms in patients with adult-onset psychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia, and whether such an association is independent of symptom severity. The subjects were 290 adults of normal intelligence between 25 and 59 years of age (MDD, n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia, n=44; healthy controls, n=65. Autistic-like traits/symptoms were measured using the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults. Symptom severity was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and/or the Young Mania Rating Scale. Almost half of the clinical subjects, except those with remitted MDD, exhibited autistic-like traits/symptoms at levels typical for sub-threshold or threshold autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, the proportion of psychiatric patients that demonstrated high autistic-like traits/symptoms was significantly greater than that of healthy controls, and not different between that of remitted or unremitted subjects with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. On the other hand, remitted subjects with MDD did not differ from healthy controls with regard to the prevalence or degree of high autistic-like traits/symptoms. A substantial proportion of adults with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed high autistic-like traits/symptoms independent of symptom severity, suggesting a shared pathophysiology among autism spectrum disorder and these psychiatric disorders. Conversely, autistic-like traits among subjects with MDD were associated with the depressive symptom severity. These findings suggest the

  11. Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorders in Adults : the Use of Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) Module 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A.; Meffert, Harma; Hein, Simone; Huizinga, Petra; Ketelaars, Cees; Pijnenborg, Marieke; Bartels, Arnold; Minderaa, Ruud; Keysers, Christian; de Bildt, Annelies

    Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) module 4 was investigated in an independent sample of high-functioning adult males with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to three specific diagnostic groups: schizophrenia, psychopathy, and typical development. ADOS module 4 proves to be a

  12. Diagnosing Autism Spectrum Disorders in Adults: The Use of Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) Module 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A.; Meffert, Harma; Hein, Simone; Huizinga, Petra; Ketelaars, Cees; Pijnenborg, Marieke; Bartels, Arnold; Minderaa, Ruud; Keysers, Christian; de Bildt, Annelies

    2011-01-01

    Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) module 4 was investigated in an independent sample of high-functioning adult males with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to three specific diagnostic groups: schizophrenia, psychopathy, and typical development. ADOS module 4 proves to be a reliable instrument with good predictive value. It…

  13. Core of schizophrenia: estrangement, dementia or neurocognitive disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urfer-Parnas, Annick; Mortensen, Erik L; Parnas, Josef

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature frequently represents schizophrenia as a deteriorating neurocognitive process similar to organic degenerative dementia. METHODS: This study addresses the following questions: (1) Did the classic authors equate degenerative dementia with schizophrenia? (2) Is ther......BACKGROUND: The recent literature frequently represents schizophrenia as a deteriorating neurocognitive process similar to organic degenerative dementia. METHODS: This study addresses the following questions: (1) Did the classic authors equate degenerative dementia with schizophrenia? (2......), manifest in self-relation (self-disorders) and in the relation to the world (lack of natural evidence) and to others (eccentricity, solipsism and isolation). CONCLUSION: It is suggested that the neurodevelopmental model should integrate interactions between emerging psychological structures and genetic...

  14. [Differential diagnosis between Schizotypal Personality Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorders: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünver, Buket; Öner, Özgür; Yurtbaşı, Pınar

    2015-01-01

    Schizotypal personality disorder is characterized by social and interpersonal deficits marked by discomfort with, and reduced capacity for, close relationships as well as by cognitive or perceptual distortions and eccentricities of behavior. Inappropriate or constricted affect, reduced capacity for relationships, lack of close friends and reduced capacity for social life are the symptoms that overlap both schizotypal personality disorder and autism spectrum disorders. The making of differential diagnosis may be difficult since several symptoms are similar between these disorders. In this study, we discussed the differential diagnosis issues on the basis of an adolescent case. Odd appearance, magical thoughts, reference thoughts suggests Schizotypal Personality Disorder whereas lack of eye contact at 2 years old, a preference to be isolated and play alone and referral to a child psychiatrist at 4 years old suggest Autism Spectrum Disorders. Based on the results of psychological assessment, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) profile is compatible with autistic children's profiles. Based on Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire, the patient's anxiety, lack of close friends, constricted affect symptoms which take place in the category of interpersonal schizotypy seems to overlap with lack of communication of Autism Spectrum Disorders. This case report indicates that, separation of autism and schizophrenia, a very important historical breakthrough in autism research, may be blurred in cases with less typical clinical pictures representing autistic and schizophrenic "spectrum" diagnosis.

  15. Self-disorder and subjective dimensions of suicidality in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skodlar, Borut; Parnas, Josef

    2009-01-01

    We studied 25 schizophrenia patients using the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience phenomenological interview framework. In a previous study, this sample was qualitatively interviewed concerning subjective reasons for suicidal ideation. We hypothesized that 2 main identified reasons...... for suicidality, that is, sense of solitude and inferiority feelings, would be associated with disturbances measured by the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience scale, that is, disorders of self-awareness and self-presence. The hypothesis was empirically supported. The results shed some additional light...... on suicidality in schizophrenia: it appears to be partly motivated by a disordered sense of self. These findings, if replicated, may have considerable therapeutic and preventive implications....

  16. Self-disorder and subjective dimensions of suicidality in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skodlar, Borut; Parnas, Josef

    2010-01-01

    We studied 25 schizophrenia patients using the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience phenomenological interview framework. In a previous study, this sample was qualitatively interviewed concerning subjective reasons for suicidal ideation. We hypothesized that 2 main identified reasons...... for suicidality, that is, sense of solitude and inferiority feelings, would be associated with disturbances measured by the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience scale, that is, disorders of self-awareness and self-presence. The hypothesis was empirically supported. The results shed some additional light...... on suicidality in schizophrenia: it appears to be partly motivated by a disordered sense of self. These findings, if replicated, may have considerable therapeutic and preventive implications....

  17. Are self-stigma, quality of life, and clinical data interrelated in schizophrenia spectrum patients? A cross-sectional outpatient study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holubova M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Michaela Holubova, Jan Prasko, Klara Latalova, Marie Ociskova, Aleš Grambal, Dana Kamaradova, Kristyna Vrbova, Radovan Hruby Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc, University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic Background: Current research attention has been moving toward the needs of patients and their consequences for the quality of life (QoL. Self-stigma is a maladaptive psychosocial phenomenon disturbing the QoL in a substantial number of psychiatric patients. In our study, we examined the relationship between demographic data, the severity of symptoms, self-stigma, and QoL in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder.Methods: Probands who met International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria for schizophrenia spectrum disorder (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or delusional disorder were recruited in the study. We studied the correlations between the QoL measured by the QoL Satisfaction and Enjoyment Questionnaire, self-stigma assessed by the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness, and severity of the disorder measured by the objective and subjective Clinical Global Impression severity scales in this cross-sectional study.Results: A total of 109 psychotic patients and 91 healthy controls participated in the study. Compared with the control group, there was a lower QoL and a higher score of self-stigmatization in psychotic patients. We found the correlation between an overall rating of self-stigmatization, duration of disorder, and QoL. The level of self-stigmatization correlated positively with total symptom severity score and negatively with the QoL. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the overall rating of objective symptom severity and the score of self-stigma were significantly associated with the QoL.Conclusion: Our study suggests a negative impact of self-stigma level on the QoL in patients suffering from schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Keywords: quality

  18. Mortality in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Clinical and serological predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Faith; Origoni, Andrea; Schroeder, Jennifer; Schweinfurth, Lucy A B; Stallings, Cassie; Savage, Christina L G; Katsafanas, Emily; Banis, Maria; Khushalani, Sunil; Yolken, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder have a reduced life expectancy due largely to death from natural causes. The reasons for this increased mortality have not been completely defined. We prospectively assessed a cohort of persons with schizophrenia and one with bipolar disorder with a clinical evaluation and a blood sample from which immune and infectious disease markers were measured. Mortality was determined with data from the National Death Index following a period of up to 14years. We examined the role of demographic, clinical, and serological factors on mortality in bivariate and multivariate models. A total of 43/710 (6.1%) persons with schizophrenia and 12/406 (3.0%) with bipolar disorder died of natural causes. In the schizophrenia group, mortality was predicted by the following variables in a multivariate model: cigarette smoking (RR=6.93, 95% CI 1.59, 30.1, p=0.0099); autoimmune disorder (RR=8.08, 95% CI 2.50, 26.1, p=0.00047); gastrointestinal disorder (GI) (RR=3.53, 95% CI 1.43, 8.69 p=0.0061); and reduced maternal education (RR=0.84, 95% CI 0.72, 0.97), p=0.018. The combination of smoking and an autoimmune disorder yielded an unadjusted relative risk of 18.1 for mortality, and the combination of smoking and a GI disorder an unadjusted relative risk of 9.45, compared with individuals with neither risk factor. In the bipolar disorder group, significant bivariate predictors of mortality included lower cognitive score (RR=0.95, p=.0085) and the presence of type 1 or 2 diabetes (RR=3.90, p=.026). Given the extraordinary high risk of death due to smoking in schizophrenia, smoking cessation remains an urgent priority. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Prefrontal gyrification in psychotic bipolar I disorder vs. schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic, Igor; Maitra, Raka; Dietzek, Maren; Langbein, Kerstin; Smesny, Stefan; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia share phenotypic and genotypic features, but might differ in aspects of abnormal neurodevelopmental trajectories. We studied gyrification, a marker of early developmental pathology, in high-resolution MRI scans of 34 patients with schizophrenia, 17 euthymic bipolar I disorder patients with previous psychotic symptoms, and 34 matched healthy controls in order to test the hypothesis of overlapping and diverging prefrontal gyrification abnormalities. We applied a novel, validated method for measuring local gyrification in each vertex point of the reconstructed cortical surface. Psychotic bipolar I patients had higher gyrification in dorsal anterior and infragenual cingulate cortex compared to either schizophrenia or healthy controls, while schizophrenia patients had higher gyrification than controls in anterior medial (BA 10) and orbitofrontal areas, altogether indicating disease-specific alterations in the prefrontal cortex. Our findings indicate gyrification changes in a specific subgroup of bipolar I disorder to affect an area relevant to emotion regulation, and distinct from changes seen in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cognitive functioning and insight in schizophrenia and in schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birindelli, Nadia; Montemagni, Cristiana; Crivelli, Barbara; Bava, Irene; Mancini, Irene; Rocca, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cognitive functioning and insight of illness in two groups of patients during their stable phases, one with schizophrenia and one with schizoaffective disorder. We recruited 104 consecutive outpatients, 64 with schizophrenia, 40 with schizoaffective disorder, in the period between July 2010 and July 2011. They all fulfilled formal Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental disorders (DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Psychiatric assessment included the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Severity (CGI-S), the Positive and Negative Sindrome Scale (PANSS), the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Insight of illness was evaluated using SUMD. Neuropsychological assessment included Winsconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), Stroop Test and Trail Making Test (TMT). Differences between the groups were tested using Chi-square test for categorical variables and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables. All variables significantly different between the two groups of subjects were subsequently analysed using a logistic regression with a backward stepwise procedure using diagnosis (schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder) as dependent variable. After backward selection of variables, four variables predicted a schizoaffective disorder diagnosis: marital status, a higher number of admission, better attentive functions and awareness of specific signs or symptoms of disease. The prediction model accounted for 55% of the variance of schizoaffective disorder diagnosis. With replication, our findings would allow higher diagnostic accuracy and have an impact on clinical decision making, in light of an amelioration of vocational functioning.

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Autism Spectrum Disorders What Are Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)? Past Issues / Winter 2013 Table of Contents Fast Facts Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are a group of developmental ...

  2. Prevalence of temporomandibular disorder signs in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, O; Alatas, G; Kurt, E

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) signs in a group of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia. Three hundred thirty-nine patients with schizophrenia were examined and compared with 107 age-matched and gender-matched control subjects. TMD signs were evaluated according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria to assess temporomandibular joint pain to palpation, limitation of maximum mouth opening, alteration of mouth opening pathway (deviation/deflection) and temporomandibular joint noises. In addition, tooth wear was recorded for the assessment of bruxism. The prevalence of any TMD signs was observed higher (P = 0.001) in the patients with schizophrenia (284/339, 83.7%) than in the controls (72/107, 67.3%). The prevalence of more than one TMD sign was also significantly higher (P = 0.03) in the patients with schizophrenia (131/339, 38.6%) than in the controls (29/107, 27.1%). Significant differences between the two groups were apparent for joint pain on palpation (P = 0.006), deflection (P = 0.006) and joint sounds (P = 0.002). Severe tooth wear was evident in 39.2% of the patients with schizophrenia compared with 21.2% in the control group (P = 0.001). The finding of the present study showed that, compared to control population, chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia seem to be more prone to the development of TMD signs and severe tooth wear and bruxism.

  3. Dissecting psychiatric spectrum disorders by generative embedding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay H. Brodersen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This proof-of-concept study examines the feasibility of defining subgroups in psychiatric spectrum disorders by generative embedding, using dynamical system models which infer neuronal circuit mechanisms from neuroimaging data. To this end, we re-analysed an fMRI dataset of 41 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and 42 healthy controls performing a numerical n-back working-memory task. In our generative-embedding approach, we used parameter estimates from a dynamic causal model (DCM of a visual–parietal–prefrontal network to define a model-based feature space for the subsequent application of supervised and unsupervised learning techniques. First, using a linear support vector machine for classification, we were able to predict individual diagnostic labels significantly more accurately (78% from DCM-based effective connectivity estimates than from functional connectivity between (62% or local activity within the same regions (55%. Second, an unsupervised approach based on variational Bayesian Gaussian mixture modelling provided evidence for two clusters which mapped onto patients and controls with nearly the same accuracy (71% as the supervised approach. Finally, when restricting the analysis only to the patients, Gaussian mixture modelling suggested the existence of three patient subgroups, each of which was characterised by a different architecture of the visual–parietal–prefrontal working-memory network. Critically, even though this analysis did not have access to information about the patients' clinical symptoms, the three neurophysiologically defined subgroups mapped onto three clinically distinct subgroups, distinguished by significant differences in negative symptom severity, as assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS. In summary, this study provides a concrete example of how psychiatric spectrum diseases may be split into subgroups that are defined in terms of neurophysiological mechanisms specified by a

  4. Psychotherapy for Anxiety in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-30

    Autism Spectrum Disorders; Autism; Asperger's Syndrome; Pervasive Developmental Disability - Not Otherwise Specified; Obsessive-compulsive Disorder; Social Phobia; Generalized Anxiety Disorder; Specific Phobia; Separation Anxiety Disorder

  5. A Follow-up Study of Early Onset Psychosis: Comparison between Outcome Diagnoses of Schizophrenia, Mood Disorders, and Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Jon M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 95 youths previously diagnosed with psychotic disorders found that at follow-up, 24 had a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 9 with psychotic mood disorders, 5 with personality disorders, and 1 with schizo-affective disorder. The study confirmed findings regarding early onset schizophrenia and psychotic mood disorders and emphasized the…

  6. Neurocognition and social skill in older persons with schizophrenia and major mood disorders: An analysis of gender and diagnosis effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T.; Pratt, Sarah I.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Forester, Brent; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Cather, Corinne

    2010-01-01

    Effective social interactions necessary for getting affiliative and instrumental needs met require the smooth integration of social skills, including verbal, non-verbal, and paralinguistic behaviors. Schizophrenia is characterized by prominent impairments in social and role functioning, and research on younger individuals with the illness has shown that social skills deficits are both common and distinguish the disease from other psychiatric disorders. However, less research has focused on diagnostic differences and correlates of social skills in older persons with schizophrenia. To address this question, we examined diagnostic and gender differences in social skills in a community-dwelling sample of 183 people older than age 50 with severe mental illness, and the relationships between social skills and neurocognitive functioning, symptoms, and social contact. Individuals with schizophrenia had worse social skills than those with bipolar disorder or major depression, with people with schizoaffective disorder in between. Social contact and cognitive functioning, especially executive functions and verbal fluency, were strongly predictive of social skills in people with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, but not those with mood disorder. Other than blunted affect, symptoms were not predictive of social skills in either the schizophrenia spectrum or the mood disorder group. Older age was associated with worse social skills in both groups, whereas female gender was related to better skills in the mood disorder group, but not the schizophrenia group. The findings suggest that poor social skills, which are related to the cognitive impairment associated with the illness, are a fundamental feature of schizophrenia that persists from the onset of the illness into older age. PMID:21113403

  7. Accuracy of self-reported medical problems in patients with alcohol dependence and co-occurring schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Zsuzsa Szombathyne; Dimmock, Jacqueline A; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Chauhan, Sumerendra Vir Singh; Abdul-Malak, Ynesse; Middleton, Frank A; Batki, Steven L

    2011-11-01

    Schizophrenia and alcohol dependence (AD) are both major risk factors for a variety of medical problems, yet little is known about the medical status of patients in whom both conditions coexist. The objectives of this study are to assess accuracy of self-reported medical problems and to compare the accuracy reports in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and co-occurring AD compared to patients with AD only and to controls. Our hypothesis was that medical problems are under-reported in patients with co-occurring disorders, possibly due to the combination of alcohol use and symptoms of schizophrenia. Self-reported medical diagnoses were recorded and compared to medical records obtained from all area hospitals in 42 patients with schizophrenia and AD, 44 patients with schizoaffective disorder and AD, 41 patients with AD only, and 15 control subjects. Patients underwent medical history, physical examination, and review of medical records. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and co-occurring AD underreported their medical problems significantly more than patients with AD only and controls. Accuracy of self report was significantly lower in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders plus co-occurring alcohol dependence than in AD alone or in controls. The most commonly underreported diagnoses included coronary artery disease, chronic renal failure, seizure disorder, hyperlipidemia, asthma and hypertension. In order to detect potentially unreported medical conditions in patients with co-occurring schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and alcohol dependence, the use of targeted screening questionnaires is recommended in addition to physical examination and thorough review of medical records. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurocognition and social skill in older persons with schizophrenia and major mood disorders: An analysis of gender and diagnosis effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T; Pratt, Sarah I; Bartels, Stephen J; Forester, Brent; Wolfe, Rosemarie; Cather, Corinne

    2010-05-01

    Effective social interactions necessary for getting affiliative and instrumental needs met require the smooth integration of social skills, including verbal, non-verbal, and paralinguistic behaviors. Schizophrenia is characterized by prominent impairments in social and role functioning, and research on younger individuals with the illness has shown that social skills deficits are both common and distinguish the disease from other psychiatric disorders. However, less research has focused on diagnostic differences and correlates of social skills in older persons with schizophrenia. To address this question, we examined diagnostic and gender differences in social skills in a community-dwelling sample of 183 people older than age 50 with severe mental illness, and the relationships between social skills and neurocognitive functioning, symptoms, and social contact.Individuals with schizophrenia had worse social skills than those with bipolar disorder or major depression, with people with schizoaffective disorder in between. Social contact and cognitive functioning, especially executive functions and verbal fluency, were strongly predictive of social skills in people with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, but not those with mood disorder. Other than blunted affect, symptoms were not predictive of social skills in either the schizophrenia spectrum or the mood disorder group. Older age was associated with worse social skills in both groups, whereas female gender was related to better skills in the mood disorder group, but not the schizophrenia group. The findings suggest that poor social skills, which are related to the cognitive impairment associated with the illness, are a fundamental feature of schizophrenia that persists from the onset of the illness into older age.

  9. Intellectual functioning and the long-term course of schizophrenia-spectrum illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Jessica; Parnas, J; Urfer-Parnas, A

    2010-01-01

    in the light of strong predictive relationships existing between genetic risk, diagnosis and functional outcomes. The pattern of predictive relationships suggests that overall cognitive functioning may play less of a role in schizophrenia-spectrum pathology than is widely believed, at least among populations......BACKGROUND: Recent neurodevelopmental models of schizophrenia, together with substantial evidence of neurocognitive dysfunction among people with schizophrenia, have led to a widespread view that general cognitive deficits are a central aspect of schizophrenic pathology. However, the temporal...... relationships between intellectual functioning and schizophrenia-spectrum illness remain unclear.MethodLongitudinal data from the Copenhagen High-Risk Project (CHRP) were used to evaluate the importance of intellectual functioning in the prediction of diagnostic and functional outcomes associated...

  10. The schizophrenias as disorders of self consciousness | Baumann ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differences in the value accorded to the self across cultures, and the variations in outcome corresponding with these differences, are proposed as evidence and indicate a need for a paradigm shift in the philosophy of treatment of the disorder. Key words: Schizophrenia, Treatment, Delusions, Self consciousness, Culture

  11. Cognitive impairment in late life schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Paul D.; Schouws, Sigfried; Stek, Max; de Haan, Lieuwe; Smit, Jan; Eikelenboom, Piet; Beekman, Aartjan; Comijs, Hannie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence in younger populations suggests quantitative but not categorical differences in cognitive impairments between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. It is uncertain whether a similar distinction applies to patients in later life. We compared the cognitive abilities of older, community-living

  12. Schizophrenia, depression, and sleep disorders: Their traditional oriental medicine equivalents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Rover, P. de; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders can be described and treated from both a Western (allopathic) and an Eastern perspective, which should be taken into account when conducting research. Patients with schizophrenia or depression are likely to be undergoing Western treatment when they are referred to an

  13. IMMUNE AND NEUROIMMUNE ALTERATIONS IN MOOD DISORDERS AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drexhage, Roosmarijn C.; Weigelt, Karin; van Beveren, Nico; Cohen, Dan; Versnell, Marjan A.; Nolen, Willem A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.; Guest, PC; Bahn, S

    2011-01-01

    A large number of publications over the past 20 years have indicated that immune system function is altered in schizophrenia and mood disorder patients. This chapter reviews the evidence, which suggests that a proinflammatory state of the cytokine network induces psychopathologic symptoms and may be

  14. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... About CDC.gov . FASD Homepage Facts Secondary Conditions Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Questions & Answers Quiz Interventions Alcohol ...

  15. Premature mortality in autism spectrum disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirvikoski, Tatja; Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor; Boman, Marcus; Larsson, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Bölte, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Mortality has been suggested to be increased in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To examine both all-cause and cause-specific mortality in ASD, as well as investigate moderating role of gender and intellectual ability. Odds ratios (ORs...

  16. Brain structural changes in schizoaffective disorder compared to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, B L; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Madre, M; Radua, J; Monte, G; Alonso-Lana, S; Landin-Romero, R; Moreno-Alcázar, A; Bonnin, C M; Sarró, S; Ortiz-Gil, J; Gomar, J J; Moro, N; Fernandez-Corcuera, P; Goikolea, J M; Blanch, J; Salvador, R; Vieta, E; McKenna, P J; Pomarol-Clotet, E

    2016-01-01

    Brain structural changes in schizoaffective disorder, and how far they resemble those seen in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, have only been studied to a limited extent. Forty-five patients meeting DSM-IV and RDC criteria for schizoaffective disorder, groups of patients with 45 matched schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and 45 matched healthy controls were examined using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Analyses comparing each patient group with the healthy control subjects found that the patients with schizoaffective disorder and the patients with schizophrenia showed widespread and overlapping areas of significant volume reduction, but the patients with bipolar disorder did not. A subsequent analysis compared the combined group of patients with the controls followed by extraction of clusters. In regions where the patients differed significantly from the controls, no significant differences in mean volume between patients with schizoaffective disorder and patients with schizophrenia in any of five regions of volume reduction were found, but mean volumes in the patients with bipolar disorder were significantly smaller in three of five. The findings provide evidence that, in terms of structural gray matter brain abnormality, schizoaffective disorder resembles schizophrenia more than bipolar disorder. © 2015 The Authors. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Dissociative Disorders Among Chinese Inpatients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A.; Keyes, Benjamin B.; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, TianHong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study consisted of 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria for Mental Disorders, Version 3 (CCMD-3). All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation, the Dissociative Experiences...

  18. Clinical Genetic Aspects of ASD Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    G. Bradley Schaefer

    2016-01-01

    Early presumptions opined that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was related to the rearing of these children by emotionally-distant mothers. Advances in the 1960s and 1970s clearly demonstrated the biologic basis of autism with a high heritability. Recent advances have demonstrated that specific etiologic factors in autism spectrum disorders can be identified in 30%?40% of cases. Based on early reports newer, emerging genomic technologies are likely to increase this diagnostic yield to over 50%...

  19. Schizophrenia and hallucinogen persisting perception disorder: A clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Ran, Shaul; Feingold, Daniel; Rudinski, Dmitri; Katz, Stefan; Arturo, Lerner G

    2015-04-01

    We compared characteristics of schizophrenia patients with prior LSD use who developed hallucinogen persisting perception disorder (SCH+HPPD) with those who did not (SCH-HPPD). Data were collected for 37 subjects in the SCH+HPPD group and 43 subjects in the SCH-HPPD group. Socio-demographics and positive symptom scores were similar between groups. Individuals in the SCHIZO+HPPD group scored lower on general psychopathology and negative symptoms scores. Individuals with schizophrenia and HPPD present with less severe psychopathology, despite persistent perceptual disturbances. Our findings highlight the importance of further research into this subset of patients. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  20. Genetic Aspects of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Insights from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati eBanerjee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that display a triad of core behavioral deficits including restricted interests, often accompanied by repetitive behavior, deficits in language and communication, and an inability to engage in reciprocal social interactions. ASD is among the most heritable disorders but is not a simple disorder with a singular pathology and has a rather complex etiology. It is interesting to note that perturbations in synaptic growth, development and stability underlie a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including ASD, schizophrenia, epilepsy and intellectual disability. Biological characterization of an increasing repertoire of synaptic mutants in various model organisms indicates synaptic dysfunction as causal in the pathophysiology of ASD. Our understanding of the genes and genetic pathways that contribute towards the formation, stabilization and maintenance of functional synapses coupled with an in-depth phenotypic analysis of the cellular and behavioral characteristics is therefore essential to unraveling the pathogenesis of these disorders. In this review, we discuss the genetic aspects of ASD emphasizing on the well conserved set of genes and genetic pathways implicated in this disorder, many of which contribute to synapse assembly and maintenance across species. We also review how fundamental research using animal models is providing key insights into the various facets of human ASD.

  1. Genetic aspects of autism spectrum disorders: insights from animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Swati; Riordan, Maeveen; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that display a triad of core behavioral deficits including restricted interests, often accompanied by repetitive behavior, deficits in language and communication, and an inability to engage in reciprocal social interactions. ASD is among the most heritable disorders but is not a simple disorder with a singular pathology and has a rather complex etiology. It is interesting to note that perturbations in synaptic growth, development, and stability underlie a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including ASD, schizophrenia, epilepsy, and intellectual disability. Biological characterization of an increasing repertoire of synaptic mutants in various model organisms indicates synaptic dysfunction as causal in the pathophysiology of ASD. Our understanding of the genes and genetic pathways that contribute toward the formation, stabilization, and maintenance of functional synapses coupled with an in-depth phenotypic analysis of the cellular and behavioral characteristics is therefore essential to unraveling the pathogenesis of these disorders. In this review, we discuss the genetic aspects of ASD emphasizing on the well conserved set of genes and genetic pathways implicated in this disorder, many of which contribute to synapse assembly and maintenance across species. We also review how fundamental research using animal models is providing key insights into the various facets of human ASD.

  2. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Tobias; Baldessarini, Ross J; Franklin, Jeremy; Baethge, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    Information on basic demographic and clinical characteristics of schizoaffective disorder is sparse and subject to sampling bias and low diagnostic reliability. In the present study we aimed to: (i) estimate the demographic and clinical descriptors in schizoaffective disorder patients and (ii) compare the findings with those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. To minimize sampling bias and low reliability, we systematically reviewed studies that simultaneously compared schizoaffective, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder patients. We estimated demographic, clinical, and psychometric characteristics based on weighted pooling, and compared disorders by meta-analysis. We also estimated whether schizoaffective disorder is closer to schizophrenia or to bipolar disorder. We identified 50 studies that included 18312 patients. Most characteristics of the 2684 schizoaffective disorder patients fell between those of 4814 diagnosed with bipolar disorder and 10814 with schizophrenia. However, the schizoaffective group had the highest proportion of women (52%), had the youngest age at illness onset (23.3 ± 3.8 years), and had the highest standardized ratings of psychosis and depression. Differences in pooled parameters between schizoaffective versus schizophrenia and versus bipolar disorder subjects were similar. Values for patients with schizoaffective disorders mostly were intermediate between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, the majority of studies showed schizoaffective patients to be more like schizophrenia than bipolar disorder patients in seven out of nine demographic and clinical categories as well as in five out of eight psychometric measures. These results remained similar when we restricted the analyses to studies with psychotic bipolar disorder patients only or to studies using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IIIR and DSM-IV only. The present study provided estimates of important characteristics of schizoaffective

  3. Social cognition and functional capacity in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas S; Sutton, Griffin P; Allen, Daniel N

    2014-12-15

    Social cognition is a functionally relevant predictor of capacity in schizophrenia (SZ), though research concerning its value for bipolar disorder (BD) is limited. The current investigation examined the relationship between two social cognitive factors and functional capacity in bipolar disorder. This study included 48 individuals with bipolar disorder (24 with psychotic features) and 30 patients with schizophrenia. Multiple regression controlling for estimated IQ scores was used to assess the predictive value of social cognitive factors on the UCSD Performance-Based Functional Skills Assessment (UPSA). Results found that for the bipolar with psychosis and schizophrenia groups, the social/emotion processing factor predicted the UPSA. The theory of mind factor only predicted the UPSA for the schizophrenia group.. Findings support the clinical utility of evaluating emotion processing in individuals with a history of psychosis. For BD, theory of mind may be better explained by a generalized cognitive deficit. In contrast, social/emotion processing may be linked to distinct neurobiological processes associated with psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Are oxidative stress markers useful to distinguish schizoaffective disorder from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Feridun; Virit, Osman; Alpak, Gokay; Unal, Ahmet; Bulut, Mahmut; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Altindag, Abdurrahman; Celik, Hakim; Savas, Haluk A

    2014-04-01

    Schizoaffective disorder is a disease with both affective and psychotic symptoms. In this study, we aimed to compare oxidative metabolism markers of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenic patients. Furthermore, we also aimed to investigate whether schizoaffective disorder could be differentiated from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in terms of oxidative metabolism. Total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured in the blood samples that were collected from schizoaffective patients (n = 30), bipolar disorder patients (n = 30) and schizophrenic patients (n = 30). Oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated by dividing TOS by TAS. TOS and OSI were found to be higher in patients with schizoaffective disorder compared with those in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. TAS was not significantly different between the groups. Schizoaffective disorder was found to be different from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in terms of oxidative parameters. This result may indicate that schizoaffective disorder could differ from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in terms of biochemical parameters. Increased TOS levels observed in schizoaffective disorder may suggest poor clinical course and may be an indicator of poor prognosis.

  5. Autism Spectrum Disorder: Primary Care Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchack, Kristian E; Thomas, Craig A

    2016-12-15

    Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by difficulty with social communication and restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interest, or activities. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., created an umbrella diagnosis that includes several previously separate conditions: autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified. There is insufficient evidence to recommend screening for autism spectrum disorder in children 18 to 30 months of age in whom the disorder is not suspected; however, there is a growing body of evidence that early intensive behavioral intervention based on applied behavior analysis improves cognitive ability, language, and adaptive skills. Therefore, early identification of autism spectrum disorder is important, and experts recommend the use of a validated screening tool at 18- and 24-month well-child visits. Medications can be used as adjunctive treatment for maladaptive behaviors and comorbid psychiatric conditions, but there is no single medical therapy that is effective for all symptoms of autism spectrum disorder. Prognosis is heavily affected by the severity of diagnosis and the presence of intellectual disability. Children with optimal outcomes receive earlier, more intensive behavioral interventions and less pharmacologic treatment.

  6. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients' adherence to music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Niels; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine; Sørensen, Torben Egelund; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2012-12-01

    Music therapy is used in psychiatric treatment of severe psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia, depression and personality disorder. To investigate adherence and predictors for adherence to music therapy treatment in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or personality disorder. Demographic, psychiatric and therapeutic data were collected for 27 patients receiving music therapy treatment over a 1-year observation period and a 1-year follow-up period. Predictors for adherence to music therapeutic treatment were determined by means of regression analysis. Drop-out from treatment was low (11.5%) and none of the variables significantly predicted adherence. Lack of significance may be because of type 2 error. Patients with severe mental disorder may adhere to music therapy treatment.

  7. Bipolar disorder and self-stigma: A comparison with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karidi, M V; Vassilopoulou, D; Savvidou, E; Vitoratou, S; Maillis, A; Rabavilas, A; Stefanis, C N

    2015-09-15

    Even though numerous studies have focused on the effects of self-stigma on patients with schizophrenia, little is known about self-stigma of patients with bipolar disorder (BD). In this study, a self-administered scale of self-stigmatising attitudes of patients with BD and schizophrenia was used to explore these attitudes, examine the potential differences between the two groups and study the factors that influence stigma within groups. Self-stigma of 120 patients with schizophrenia and BD was assessed with the Self-stigma Questionnaire (SSQ) and the Stigma Inventory for Mental Illness (SIMI). Presence of clinical symptoms, overall functioning and level of self-esteem were also evaluated. Self-stigma is present in both groups but differs in its intensity. Patients with BD experience self-stigma in a lesser degree without affecting their social life or overall functioning. Patients with schizophrenia adopt more intense self-stigmatising attitudes leading to social exclusion and lower level of overall functioning. The results are limited by the small sample size, whereas the inclusion of other questionnaires would broaden our insight to self-stigma. Self-stigma has a direct effect on overall functioning of patients with BD and schizophrenia tampering the clinical outcome of therapeutic interventions. Therefore, it should be incorporated in every treatment plan and be addressed as a clinical symptom of the mental illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gestational Age and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atladóttir, H Ó; Schendel, D.E.; Henriksen, T B

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a serious neurodevelopmental disorder. Several previous studies have identified pre-term birth as a risk factor for ASD but none has studied whether the association between gestational age and ASD has changed over time. This is a Danish population-based follow...

  9. SPECTRUM OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDERS IN A NATIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-12-12

    Dec 12, 2000 ... and tertiary referral centre for cardiovascular disorders in. Ghana, and receives referrals from all over the country. In this communication, the spectrum of cardiovascular disorders seen at the NCTC, is presented. MATERIALS AND METHODS. In this prospective study, 708 consecutive subjects with.

  10. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrix, Linda W.; Velenovsky, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, or ANSD, can be a confusing diagnosis to physicians, clinicians, those diagnosed, and parents of children diagnosed with the condition. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an understanding of the disorder, the limitations in current tools to determine site(s) of lesion, and…

  11. Immune dysregulation in autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briceno Noriega, D.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common and severe neuro-developmental disorder in early childhood which is defined by social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotypic behaviours. The aetiology of ASD remains poorly understood. Susceptibility to development of ASD has significant

  12. Schizophrenia and Metacognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Stephen F.; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete

    2014-01-01

    tested for relationships between course of illness and levels of specific metacognitions in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. A large cohort of people with first episode psychosis (n = 578) recruited as part the OPUS trial (1998–2000) were tested. Information about course of illness (remitted, episodic...... beliefs may also impact on positive symptoms and course of illness within schizophrenia....

  13. Glutamatergic postsynaptic density protein dysfunctions in synaptic plasticity and dendritic spines morphology: relevance to schizophrenia and other behavioral disorders pathophysiology, and implications for novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Latte, Gianmarco; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice

    2014-02-01

    Emerging researches point to a relevant role of postsynaptic density (PSD) proteins, such as PSD-95, Homer, Shank, and DISC-1, in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. The PSD is a thickness, detectable at electronic microscopy, localized at the postsynaptic membrane of glutamatergic synapses, and made by scaffolding proteins, receptors, and effector proteins; it is considered a structural and functional crossroad where multiple neurotransmitter systems converge, including the dopaminergic, serotonergic, and glutamatergic ones, which are all implicated in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Decreased PSD-95 protein levels have been reported in postmortem brains of schizophrenia patients. Variants of Homer1, a key PSD protein for glutamate signaling, have been associated with schizophrenia symptoms severity and therapeutic response. Mutations in Shank gene have been recognized in autism spectrum disorder patients, as well as reported to be associated to behaviors reminiscent of schizophrenia symptoms when expressed in genetically engineered mice. Here, we provide a critical appraisal of PSD proteins role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. Then, we discuss how antipsychotics may affect PSD proteins in brain regions relevant to psychosis pathophysiology, possibly by controlling synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine rearrangements through the modulation of glutamate-related targets. We finally provide a framework that may explain how PSD proteins might be useful candidates to develop new therapeutic approaches for schizophrenia and related disorders in which there is a need for new biological treatments, especially against some symptom domains, such as negative symptoms, that are poorly affected by current antipsychotics.

  14. Autism spectrum disorders in propionic acidemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Bâtie, Caroline Dejean; Barbier, Valérie; Roda, Célina; Brassier, Anaïs; Arnoux, Jean-Baptiste; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Guemann, Anne-Sophie; Pontoizeau, Clément; Gobin, Stéphanie; Habarou, Florence; Lacaille, Florence; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Canouï, Pierre; Ottolenghi, Chris; De Lonlay, Pascale; Ouss, Lisa

    2017-08-30

    Propionic acidemia is the result of a deficiency in propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Chronic neurologic and cognitive complications frequently occur, but the psychiatric evolution of the disorder is not well documented. We conducted a pedopsychiatric evaluation of 19 children, adolescents and young adults, aged between 2 and 25 years, using ADI-R, CARS-T, as well as ADOS when autism spectrum disorder was suspected. Previous psychometric examinations were also taken into consideration. Thirteen patients had an IQ propionic acidemia. These patients should undergo in-depth psychiatric evaluation and be screened for autism spectrum disorder. Further studies are needed to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  15. Serum concentrations of mood stabilizers are associated with memory, but not other cognitive domains in psychosis spectrum disorders; explorative analyses in a naturalistic setting

    OpenAIRE

    Steen, Nils E; Aas, Monica; Simonsen, Carmen; Dieset, Ingrid; Tesli, Martin; Nerhus, Mari; Gardsjord, Erlend; Mørch, Ragni; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid; Vaskinn, Anja; Spigset, Olav; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mood stabilizers like lithium and anticonvulsants are used in bipolar and related psychotic disorders. There is a lack of knowledge of the relationship of these medications and cognition in the psychosis spectrum. We studied the association between serum concentration of mood stabilizers and cognitive performance in a well-characterized sample of bipolar and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Methods ...

  16. Cognitive function in childhood and early adulthood and hospital admission for schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in Danish men born in 1953

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Lawlor, Debbie A; Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the influence of cognitive function and change in cognitive function during adolescence on schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in adulthood and explores possible mechanisms for any associations. METHOD: A cohort of 6923 men born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1953, who had...... completed assessments of cognitive performance (measured by a total test score that combines verbal, arithmetic and spatial functions) at ages 12 and 18, were followed from 1972 until 2002. Psychiatric outcomes (hospital admissions for schizophrenia and bipolar disorders) were obtained from the Danish...... Psychiatric Register. RESULTS: During the follow-up period 133 of the men had a discharge diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Cognitive function measured at both ages 12 and 18 years was inversely associated with these disorders (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) per SD of cognitive...

  17. Interactions Between Variation in Candidate Genes and Environmental Factors in the Etiology of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Stramecki, Filip; Gawęda, Łukasz; Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Frydecka, Dorota

    2017-08-18

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) are complex and multidimensional disorders with high heritability rates. The contribution of genetic factors to the etiology of these disorders is increasingly being recognized as the action of multiple risk variants with small effect sizes, which might explain only a minor part of susceptibility. On the other site, numerous environmental factors have been found to play an important role in their causality. Therefore, in recent years, several studies focused on gene × environment interactions that are believed to bridge the gap between genetic underpinnings and environmental insults. In this article, we performed a systematic review of studies investigating gene × environment interactions in BD and schizophrenia spectrum phenotypes. In the majority of studies from this field, interacting effects of variation in genes encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP5) have been explored. Almost consistently, these studies revealed that polymorphisms in COMT, BDNF, and FKBP5 genes might interact with early life stress and cannabis abuse or dependence, influencing various outcomes of schizophrenia spectrum disorders and BD. Other interactions still require further replication in larger clinical and non-clinical samples. In addition, future studies should address the direction of causality and potential mechanisms of the relationship between gene × environment interactions and various categories of outcomes in schizophrenia and BD.

  18. Persons with schizophrenia migrate towards urban areas due to the development of their disorder or its prodromata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have identified urban-rural differences in the occurrence of schizophrenia. Though unknown, the underlying causes responsible for these differences have been hypothesized to include urban-rural differences in toxic exposures, diet, infections, stress, or an artifact due to selective migration. Freeman hypothesized that persons with schizophrenia migrate towards larger cities due to development of their disorder or its prodromata. Based on this, the reason for the high frequency of schizophrenia in urban areas is not that those affected have lived in environmentally unfavorable areas, but that people with schizophrenia selectively migrate towards urban areas due to disease onset. No population-based studies accessed the extent and potential impact of this artifact of selective migration. Utilizing a population-based sample of the Danish population, it was investigated if persons with schizophrenia more often migrated towards larger cities due to disease onset. The impact of selective migration on the urban-rural differences was quantified comparing a prospective and a retrospective study. Compared to healthy controls, persons with schizophrenia spectrum disorder migrate to a higher degree of urbanization due to disease onset (OR=1.18 (1.14-1.23)). However, the bias in urban-rural effect sizes due to this artifact of selective migration was limited. Persons with schizophrenia drift towards urban areas as a consequence of the disorder or its prodromata, but this drift has only limited impact on the urban-rural differences. Therefore, prospective and retrospective studies are both informative on the unknown underlying factor or factors responsible for the urban-rural differences in schizophrenia risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thought and language disorders in very early onset schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Pantano

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thought and language disorders are main features of adults with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders however studies on such abnormalities are scant in young patients with very early onset psychosis (VEOS. The aim of the present study is to assess the relationship between language and thought disorders in patients with very early onset schizophrenia (SCZ, schizoaffective disorders (SCA and bipolar disorders (BD. Method Forty-one patients (18 SCZ, 16 BD, and 7 SCA with mean age less than 15 years old were assessed through a series of neurocognitive and psycholinguistic tests, including the Thought, Language and Communication Scale (TLC. Results SCZ group performed worse in all tests as well as the TLC, followed by SCA and BD groups respectively. Thought disorders were related to deficits in executive functioning and semantic processing, and the metaphors’ test was the best predictor of TLC functioning. Discussion TD in SCZ, SCA and BD are one of the most important features in patients with VEOS and that the evaluation of metaphor comprehension can be an important instrument in the early detection of this disorder.

  20. Schizophrenia as a Disorder of Social Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Gayle Wible

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is reviewed for the existence of a core system for moment-to-moment social communication that is based on the perception of dynamic gestures and other social perceptual processes in the temporal-parietal occipital junction (TPJ, including the posterior superior temporal sulcus (PSTS and surrounding regions. Overactivation of these regions may produce the schizophrenic syndrome. The TPJ plays a key role in the perception and production of dynamic social, emotional, and attentional gestures for the self and others. These include dynamic gestures of the body, face, and eyes as well as audiovisual speech and prosody. Many negative symptoms are characterized by deficits in responding within these domains. Several properties of this system have been discovered through single neuron recording, brain stimulation, neuroimaging, and the study of neurological impairment. These properties map onto the schizophrenic syndrome. The representation of dynamic gestures is multimodal (auditory, visual, and tactile, matching the predominant hallucinatory categories in schizophrenia. Inherent in the perceptual signal of gesture representation is a computation of intention, agency, and anticipation or expectancy (for the self and others. The neurons are also tuned or biased to rapidly detect threat-related emotions. I review preliminary evidence that overactivation of this system can result in schizophrenia.

  1. Semantics, pragmatics, and formal thought disorders in people with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salavera C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Salavera, Miguel Puyuelo, José L Antoñanzas, Pilar TeruelUniversidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, SpainBackground: The aim of this study was to analyze how formal thought disorders (FTD affect semantics and pragmatics in patients with schizophrenia.Methods: The sample comprised subjects with schizophrenia (n = 102 who met the criteria for the disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition Text Revision. In the research process, the following scales were used: Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS for psychopathology measurements; the Scale for the Assessment of Thought, Language, and Communication (TLC for FTD, Word Accentuation Test (WAT, System for the Behavioral Evaluation of Social Skills (SECHS, the pragmatics section of the Objective Criteria Language Battery (BLOC-SR and the verbal sections of the Wechsler Adults Intelligence Scale (WAIS III, for assessment of semantics and pragmatics.Results: The results in the semantics and pragmatics sections were inferior to the average values obtained in the general population. Our data demonstrated that the more serious the FTD, the worse the performances in the Verbal-WAIS tests (particularly in its vocabulary, similarities, and comprehension sections, SECHS, and BLOC-SR, indicating that FTD affects semantics and pragmatics, although the results of the WAT indicated good premorbid language skills.Conclusion: The principal conclusion we can draw from this study is the evidence that in schizophrenia the superior level of language structure seems to be compromised, and that this level is related to semantics and pragmatics; when there is an alteration in this level, symptoms of FTD appear, with a wide-ranging relationship between both language and FTD. The second conclusion is that the subject’s language is affected by the disorder and rules out the possibility of a previous verbal impairment.Keywords: schizophrenia, formal thought disorder

  2. Compare of Executive Function in Bipolar I Disorder and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza khodaei-Ardakani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is evidence for differential executive function in Bipolar I Disorder (BID and schizophrenia that may tend different cognitive deficits and abnormalities. The objective of this sudsy was to compare the executive function of BID and schizophrenic patients. Materials & Methods: We studied 50 patients with BID, and 50 with schizophrenia participants in outpatients' clinic of Rouzbeh hospital. All participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST the Persian version. The participants were mach in three basic variables which had most contributions in cognitive conditions in patients. They were Age, educational status and period of illness. Results: The two patient groups had compared performance on the WCST in compared with general population (P<0/05. In the WCST, schizophrenic patients showed impairment executive function than BID patients (P<0/05. Conclusion: findings indicated that schizophrenic patients had more dysfunctions executive function than the Bipolar disorder I patients. Although, both disorders may show impairment in executive function, but the dysfunction in schizophrenia greater than Bipolar I Disorder patients.

  3. Contextual social cognition impairments in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Sandra; Herrera, Eduar; Villarin, Lilian; Theil, Donna; Gonzalez-Gadea, María Luz; Gomez, Pedro; Mosquera, Marcela; Huepe, David; Strejilevich, Sergio; Vigliecca, Nora Silvana; Matthäus, Franziska; Decety, Jean; Manes, Facundo; Ibañez, Agustín M

    2013-01-01

    The ability to integrate contextual information with social cues to generate social meaning is a key aspect of social cognition. It is widely accepted that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders have deficits in social cognition; however, previous studies on these disorders did not use tasks that replicate everyday situations. This study evaluates the performance of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders on social cognition tasks (emotional processing, empathy, and social norms knowledge) that incorporate different levels of contextual dependence and involvement of real-life scenarios. Furthermore, we explored the association between social cognition measures, clinical symptoms and executive functions. Using a logistic regression analysis, we explored whether the involvement of more basic skills in emotional processing predicted performance on empathy tasks. The results showed that both patient groups exhibited deficits in social cognition tasks with greater context sensitivity and involvement of real-life scenarios. These deficits were more severe in schizophrenic than in bipolar patients. Patients did not differ from controls in tasks involving explicit knowledge. Moreover, schizophrenic patients' depression levels were negatively correlated with performance on empathy tasks. Overall performance on emotion recognition predicted performance on intentionality attribution during the more ambiguous situations of the empathy task. These results suggest that social cognition deficits could be related to a general impairment in the capacity to implicitly integrate contextual cues. Important implications for the assessment and treatment of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, as well as for neurocognitive models of these pathologies are discussed.

  4. Interview Investigation of Insecure Attachment Styles as Mediators between Poor Childhood Care and Schizophrenia-Spectrum Phenomenology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Sheinbaum

    Full Text Available Insecure attachment styles have received theoretical attention and some initial empirical support as mediators between childhood adverse experiences and psychotic phenomena; however, further specificity needs investigating. The present interview study aimed to examine (i whether two forms of poor childhood care, namely parental antipathy and role reversal, were associated with subclinical positive and negative symptoms and schizophrenia-spectrum personality disorder (PD traits, and (ii whether such associations were mediated by specific insecure attachment styles.A total of 214 nonclinical young adults were interviewed for subclinical symptoms (Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States, schizophrenia-spectrum PDs (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders, poor childhood care (Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Interview, and attachment style (Attachment Style Interview. Participants also completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and all the analyses were conducted partialling out the effects of depressive symptoms.Both parental antipathy and role reversal were associated with subclinical positive symptoms and with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits. Role reversal was also associated with subclinical negative symptoms. Angry-dismissive attachment mediated associations between antipathy and subclinical positive symptoms and both angry-dismissive and enmeshed attachment mediated associations of antipathy with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits. Enmeshed attachment mediated associations of role reversal with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits.Attachment theory can inform lifespan models of how adverse developmental environments may increase the risk for psychosis. Insecure attachment provides a promising mechanism for understanding the development of schizophrenia-spectrum phenomenology and may offer a useful target for prophylactic intervention.

  5. Interview Investigation of Insecure Attachment Styles as Mediators between Poor Childhood Care and Schizophrenia-Spectrum Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinbaum, Tamara; Bifulco, Antonia; Ballespí, Sergi; Mitjavila, Mercè; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus

    2015-01-01

    Background Insecure attachment styles have received theoretical attention and some initial empirical support as mediators between childhood adverse experiences and psychotic phenomena; however, further specificity needs investigating. The present interview study aimed to examine (i) whether two forms of poor childhood care, namely parental antipathy and role reversal, were associated with subclinical positive and negative symptoms and schizophrenia-spectrum personality disorder (PD) traits, and (ii) whether such associations were mediated by specific insecure attachment styles. Method A total of 214 nonclinical young adults were interviewed for subclinical symptoms (Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States), schizophrenia-spectrum PDs (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders), poor childhood care (Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Interview), and attachment style (Attachment Style Interview). Participants also completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and all the analyses were conducted partialling out the effects of depressive symptoms. Results Both parental antipathy and role reversal were associated with subclinical positive symptoms and with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits. Role reversal was also associated with subclinical negative symptoms. Angry-dismissive attachment mediated associations between antipathy and subclinical positive symptoms and both angry-dismissive and enmeshed attachment mediated associations of antipathy with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits. Enmeshed attachment mediated associations of role reversal with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits. Conclusions Attachment theory can inform lifespan models of how adverse developmental environments may increase the risk for psychosis. Insecure attachment provides a promising mechanism for understanding the development of schizophrenia-spectrum phenomenology and may offer a useful target for prophylactic intervention. PMID:26247601

  6. [Autism spectrum disorder. Contemporary experimental researches review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschekina, E A; Strelets, V B

    2014-01-01

    Autism, like schizophrenia, are heterogeneous diseases, which are directed by both genetic factors and external influences in the early stages of development. Knowledge about the similarities and differences of these disorders can help early diagnosis and treatment. Patients with autism have specific cognitive difficulties in social relations. They are characterized by impairment of social interaction, communication and behavioral flexibility. The severity of the delay the development of autistic children, clinical and psychological indicators is correlated with an increase in the high frequency of spontaneous EEG activity. Cognitive task in autistic children, unlike normal persons, does not lead to a significant restructuring of high-frequency EEG activity, which may be a violation of the reaction mechanism to external stimuli and behavioral disorders. Abnormality in high-frequency components of EEG reactivity on cognitive task, the perception of human faces and visual illusions as well as the inadequate system of mirror neurons, can be considered common mechanisms underlying disorders of autism and schizophrenia. These general mechanisms may be considered as related to violation of the inhibition-exitation balance, controlled via GABA-transmission and NMDA-receptors. A multidimensional study of patterns of disontogenesis in autism, in addition to detailing the clinical picture of disease and rehabilitation activities, allows us to clear the fundamental understanding of the brain.

  7. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder. Part I: A Comparison of Parenting Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Shelley L.; Coons, Kelly D.; Hayes, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a long history of research on parents of children with disabilities, but to the authors' knowledge, no study has compared the stress of parents of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) to parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Method: Twenty-five parents of children with ASD and 25 parents of…

  8. Handedness in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Tracey A; Kamps, Jodi; Foundas, Anne L

    2016-04-01

    The left hemisphere is usually predominant in manual skills and language, suggesting a link between hand dominance and language. Studies of autism spectrum disorder show atypical handedness; however, few have examined language-handedness associations. Handedness, assessed by task performance, and standardized receptive and expressive language tests were completed in 110 autism spectrum disorder children (96 boys; M age = 8.3 years, SD = 3.8) and 45 typically developing children (37 boys; M age = 8.6 years, SD = 4.3), 3 to 17 years of age. The autism spectrum disorder group had a lower handedness score (was less strongly lateralized) than the control group. In the autism spectrum disorder group, there was a small effect of handedness on language; right-handers had better language than non-right-handers. Results suggest poorer language prognosis may be associated with left- or mixed-handedness in autism spectrum disorder. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Substance use disorders in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depressive illness: a registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvåg, Ragnar; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Bakken, Inger Johanne; Høye, Anne; Ystrom, Eivind; Surén, Pål; Reneflot, Anne; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2015-08-01

    To compare the prevalence and pattern of comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) between patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depressive illness. Data on presence of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and non-alcohol drug use disorder (DUD) were retrieved from the Norwegian Patient Register for individuals born between 1950 and 1989 who in the period 2009-2013 were diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or depressive illness according to the 10th version of the WHO International Classification of Diseases. The prevalence of AUD only, DUD only, or both was compared between men and women across age and diagnostic groups. The prevalence of SUD was 25.1 % in schizophrenia (AUD: 4.6 %, DUD: 15.6 %, AUD and DUD: 4.9 %), 20.1 % in bipolar disorder (AUD: 8.1 %, DUD: 7.6 %, AUD and DUD: 4.4 %), and 10.9 % in depressive illness (AUD: 4.4 %, DUD: 4.3 %, AUD and DUD: 2.2 %). Middle-aged men with bipolar disorder had the highest prevalence of AUD (19.1 %) and young men with schizophrenia had the highest prevalence of DUD (29.6 %). Of the specific DUDs, all but sedative use disorder were more prevalent in schizophrenia than the other groups. Cannabis and stimulant use disorder was found among 8.8 and 8.9 %, respectively, of the men with schizophrenia. The alarmingly high prevalence of DUD among young patients with severe mental disorders should encourage preventive efforts to reduce illicit drug use in the adolescent population.

  10. Genetic association between NRG1 and schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder in Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zujia; Chen, Jianhua; Khan, Raja Amjad Waheed; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Li, Wenjin; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder are three major psychiatric disorders affecting around 0.66%, 3.3%, and 1.5% of the Han Chinese population respectively. Several genetic linkage analyses and genome wide association studies identified NRG1 as a susceptibility gene of schizophrenia, which was validated by its role in neurodevelopment, glutamate, and other neurotransmitter receptor expression regulation. To further investigate whether NRG1 is a shared risk gene for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder as well as schizophrenia, we performed an association study among 1,248 schizophrenia cases, 1,056 major depression cases, 1,344 bipolar disorder cases, and 1,248 controls. Totally 15 tag SNPs were genotyped and analyzed, and no population stratification was found in our sample set. Among the sites, rs4236710 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.015) and rs4512342 (Pallele  = 0.03, Pgenotye  = 0.045 after correction) were associated with schizophrenia, and rs2919375 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.004) was associated with major depressive disorder. The haplotype rs4512342-rs6982890 showed association with schizophrenia (P = 0.03 for haplotype "TC" after correction), and haplotype rs4531002-rs11989919 proved to be a shared risk factor for both major depressive disorder ("CC": corrected P = 0.009) and bipolar disorder ("CT": corrected P = 0.003). Our results confirmed that NRG1 was a shared common susceptibility gene for major mental disorders in Han Chinese population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Childhood disintegrative disorder misdiagnosed as childhood-onset schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Sanjiv Sawant

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD is a rare pervasive developmental disorder, which is often misdiagnosed as schizophrenia, probably due to the resultant severe social impairment and withdrawn behaviour with stereotypys that could be mistaken for psychosis. We report a case of CDD that was misdiagnosed by a psychiatrist as childhood-onset schizophrenia and treated with high doses of antipsychotics. The patient did not show any improvement. This highlights ethical issues that arise from treatment modalities, with polypharmacy being the biggest culprit, and also points to the need to continue medical education at the level of primary health services and among practising rural doctors where tertiary centres with child guidance facilities and a multidisciplinary team are not available.

  12. Schizophrenia, Depression, and Sleep Disorders: Their Traditional Oriental Medicine Equivalents

    OpenAIRE

    Bosch, Peggy; de Rover, Peter; Staudte, Heike; Lim,Sabina; van den Noort, Maurits

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders can be described and treated from both a Western (allopathic) and an Eastern perspective, which should be taken into account when conducting research. Patients with schizophrenia or depression are likely to be undergoing Western treatment when they are referred to an acupuncturist for (add-on) treatment, and knowledge of both types of treatments is necessary to integrate them successfully. In this study, the different Traditional Oriental Medicine (TOM) diagnostic patter...

  13. The kynurenine pathway in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Sophie; Schwieler, Lilly; Imbeault, Sophie; Engberg, Göran

    2017-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation generates several neuroactive compounds. Of those, kynurenic acid is an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist. The kynurenic acid hypothesis of schizophrenia is built upon the fact that kynurenic acid blocks glutamate receptors and is elevated in schizophrenia. Kynurenic acid tightly controls glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission and elevated brain levels appear related to psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairments. Contributing to enhanced production of kynurenic acid, the expression and enzyme activity of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) are reduced in schizophrenia and in bipolar patients with a history of psychosis. The kynurenine pathway is also critically regulated by cytokines, and, indeed, the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 are elevated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and stimulate the production of kynurenic acid. One physiological mechanism controlling the activity of the kynurenine pathway originates from the protein sorting nexin 7 (SNX7). This glial signaling pathway initiates a caspase-8-driven activation of IL-1β that induces tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase 2 (TDO2), an enzyme in the kynurenine pathway. A recent study shows that a genetic variation resulting in decreased expression of SNX7 is linked to increased central levels of kynurenic acid and ultimately to psychosis and cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder. Experimental studies highlight the detrimental effects of increased synthesis of kynurenic acid during sensitive periods of early brain development. Furthermore, experimental studies strongly support inhibition of kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) II as a novel target and a valuable pharmacological strategy in the treatment of psychosis and for improving cognitive performance relevant for schizophrenia. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'. Copyright

  14. Informing DSM-5: biological boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Victoria E; Suppes, Trisha

    2013-05-14

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) opted to retain existing diagnostic boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia. The debate preceding this decision focused on understanding the biologic basis of these major mental illnesses. Evidence from genetics, neuroscience, and pharmacotherapeutics informed the DSM-5 development process. The following discussion will emphasize some of the key factors at the forefront of the debate. Family studies suggest a clear genetic link between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia. However, large-scale genome-wide association studies have not been successful in identifying susceptibility genes that make substantial etiological contributions. Boundaries between psychotic disorders are not further clarified by looking at brain morphology. The fact that symptoms of bipolar I disorder, but not schizophrenia, are often responsive to medications such as lithium and other anticonvulsants must be interpreted within a larger framework of biological research. For DSM-5, existing nosological boundaries between bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia were retained and schizoaffective disorder preserved as an independent diagnosis since the biological data are not yet compelling enough to justify a move to a more neurodevelopmentally continuous model of psychosis.

  15. Childhood dyspraxia predicts adult-onset nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Mittal, Vijay; Kline, Emily

    2015-01-01

    examination performed with children (aged 10-13) at genetic high risk of schizophrenia and controls, several measures of dyspraxia were used to create a scale composed of face/head dyspraxia, oral articulation, ideomotor dyspraxia (clumsiness), and dressing dyspraxia (n = 244). Multinomial logistic regression...... abnormalities spanning functionally distinct brain networks) specifically predict adult nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders are consistent with a theory of abnormal connectivity, and they highlight a marked early-stage vulnerability in the pathophysiology of nonaffective-psychosis-spectrum disorders....

  16. Obsessive-compulsive Disorder: A Spectrum or Prodrome of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Research findings in recent times are highly suggestive of an interface between obsessivecompulsive disorder (OCD) and schizophrenia, a relationship which is yet to be fully understood. Aim: To report a case of OCD in a 14 year old Niger ian boy who developed schizophrenia 6 years after. Method: A 14 year ...

  17. Schizophrenia modifying the expression of gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltieri, Danilo Antonio; De Andrade, Arthur Guerra

    2009-04-01

    According to the Brazilian Federal Medical Association, transsexualism is recognized as a gender identity disorder if a long-term diagnostic therapeutic process has demonstrated that the transposition of gender roles is irreversible, and if only hormonal and surgical procedures are appropriate to relieve the stress associated with the gender identity. Although such treatment will only be initiated with caution and after a long phase of intense diagnostic screening, the differentiation between pure identity disorders and transsexual feelings secondary to an ongoing psychopathologic process, such as schizophrenia, can be arduous for many health professionals. To report a case of a female patient with schizophrenia and transsexualism and the risks of a potential diagnostic confusion. A 19-year-old black woman, with an 8-year history of undifferentiated schizophrenia and intense gender dysphoria, was referred for sex reassignment surgery evaluation in the Ambulatory for the Treatment of Sexual Disorders of the ABC Medical School. After a more adequate antipsychotic treatment, her masculine behavior has persisted, but her desire to change her own genital organs has decreased. A better acceptance of the multiplicity of possible genders should neither contribute to inadequate interpretations of the signs and symptoms of our patients nor facilitate dangerous clinical or surgical recommendations.

  18. [Autism spectrum disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Irma; Mattila, Marja-Leena; Loukusa, Soile; Kielinen, Marko

    2012-01-01

    Childhood autism, Asperger's syndrome and atypical autism together make up autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with a prevalence of 0.6-0.7%. These disorders are defined by qualitative impairments in social interaction, qualitative abnormalities in communication, and by restricted, stereotyped, repetitive patterns of behaviour, interests and activities. Many children or adolescents with ASDs have sensory abnormalities, neurological disorders and additional disabilities of vision, hearing or ambulation. Psychiatric co-morbidity is common. Diagnostics and rehabilitation are implemented in multi-professional collaboration. Early recognition makes up the basis for early intervention that improves the prognosis. Screening of these disorders in well-baby clinics is being developed.

  19. Two new scales of formal thought disorder in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Alvaro; McKenna, Peter J; Berrios, German E

    2008-01-15

    Information provided by patients and respective carers may help to understand formal thought disorder (FTD) in schizophrenia. Two scales, one for patients (FTD-patient) and one for carers (FTD-carer), were constructed to assess pragmatics, cognitive, paralinguistic, and non-verbal aspects of communication. In the first scale the patients themselves assess their verbal communication; in the second scale the carer assesses the speech of the respective patient. Both scales exhibited internal reliability and evidence of good test-retest reliability. Higher total scores on both scales (FTD-patient and FTD-carer) were significantly associated with positive FTD, but not with negative FTD. Principal component analysis of the scales yielded a multidimensional structure. It is suggested that FTD in schizophrenia may be associated with a range of deficits (e.g. pragmatics, lexical activation, working memory, sustained attention). These scales, in conjunction with the clinician's assessment, can provide a more comprehensive picture of FTD in schizophrenia, revealing its dimensions and making it possible to establish associations between symptoms of FTD and neuropsychological, neurophysiologic, and neuroimaging data. In addition, they provide service users' and carers' perspectives for the assessment of communication in schizophrenia.

  20. Nosology, epidemiology and genetics of schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuang, M.T.; Simpson, J.C. (Harvard Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Brockton, MA (US))

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 25 selections. Some of the titles are: The genetics of schizophrenia: An overview; The genetics of schizo-affective disorder and the schizophrenia spectrum; Mathematical models of genetic transmission; and Genetic studies of biochemical, pathophysiological and pharmacological factors in schizophrenia.

  1. The relationship of antisocial personality disorder and history of conduct disorder with crime incidence in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Maghsoodloo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Commission of crime and hostility and their forensic consequences in a patient with schizophrenia can worsen the patient′s condition and disturb his family, society, and even the psychiatrist. Based on previous research, patients with schizophrenia are at a higher risk for crime. It is not clear whether this is due to the nature of schizophrenia, comorbidity of antisocial personality disorder, or the history of conduct disorder in childhood. In this study, we investigated this hypothesis. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 30 criminal and 30 non-criminal patients with schizophrenia, who had been referred by the court to the Forensic Medicine Center of Isfahan, were evaluated for antisocial personality disorder, history of conduct disorder, and psychopathy checklist-revise (PCL-R score. Results: Frequency distribution of antisocial personality disorder (73.3%, history of conduct disorder in childhood (86.7%, and score of PCL-R ≥25 (indicating high probability of hostility in patients (40% were significantly higher in criminal patients than in non-criminals (10%, 30% and 0%, respectively; P < 0.001. Conclusions: More prevalence of antisocial personality disorder, history of conduct disorder, and high score of PCL-R (≥25 in criminal schizophrenic patients may indicate that in order to control the hostility and for prevention of crime, besides treating acute symptoms of psychosis, patients might receive treatment and rehabilitation for comorbidities too.

  2. The relationship of antisocial personality disorder and history of conduct disorder with crime incidence in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoodloo, Safa; Ghodousi, Arash; Karimzadeh, Taghi

    2012-06-01

    Commission of crime and hostility and their forensic consequences in a patient with schizophrenia can worsen the patient's condition and disturb his family, society, and even the psychiatrist. Based on previous research, patients with schizophrenia are at a higher risk for crime. It is not clear whether this is due to the nature of schizophrenia, comorbidity of antisocial personality disorder, or the history of conduct disorder in childhood. In this study, we investigated this hypothesis. In this case-control study, 30 criminal and 30 non-criminal patients with schizophrenia, who had been referred by the court to the Forensic Medicine Center of Isfahan, were evaluated for antisocial personality disorder, history of conduct disorder, and psychopathy checklist-revise (PCL-R) score. Frequency distribution of antisocial personality disorder (73.3%), history of conduct disorder in childhood (86.7%), and score of PCL-R ≥25 (indicating high probability of hostility) in patients (40%) were significantly higher in criminal patients than in non-criminals (10%, 30% and 0%, respectively; P antisocial personality disorder, history of conduct disorder, and high score of PCL-R (≥25) in criminal schizophrenic patients may indicate that in order to control the hostility and for prevention of crime, besides treating acute symptoms of psychosis, patients might receive treatment and rehabilitation for comorbidities too.

  3. Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Arab Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Mostafa; Raddad, Dahoud; El-Mehesh, Fatima; Bakr, Ashraf; Sallam, Khalid; Amin, Tarek

    2012-01-01

    The objective of our study is to estimate the prevalence of comorbid psychiatric disorders in a sample of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) recruited from three Arab countries. We also examine the relationship between comorbidity and children's cognitive functioning and gender. Children who received a diagnosis of ASD (n = 60) from a…

  4. Comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Brenna B.; White, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety symptoms are common among cognitively unimpaired youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Few studies have investigated the co-occurrence of social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adults with ASD, although identification may aid access to effective treatments and inform our scientific efforts to parse heterogeneity. In this preliminary…

  5. Are Individuals with Schizophrenia or Schizotypy More Creative? Evidence from Multiple Tests of Creative Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Xu, Xiaobo; Wang, Qing; Healey, Grace; Su, Liang; Pang, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia and schizotypy have been often associated with above average creativity; however, empirical studies on the relationship between schizophrenia spectrum disorders and enhanced creativity generated inconsistent results. This research investigates if the association between schizophrenia spectrum disorders and creative potential levels…

  6. ANANKASTIK PERSONALITY DISORDER IN SCHIZOPHRENIA PARANOID PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damarnegara ..

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anankastik personality disorder is a health problem that can disturb the activities of person and can accompany a variety of other mental health problems. The patient in thiscase is a patient with an anankastik or obsessive compulsive personality disorder withthe axis I diagnoses is Paranoid Schizophrenia and was given haloperidol 2x5mg, buthave not done psychotherapy because the patient has not been cooperative. Theprognosis is dependent on patient compliance in taking medication and controls for thesetting of the dose, and the support of her family. 

  7. The Genetic Basis of Thought Disorder and Language and Communication Disturbances in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Deborah L; Coleman, Michael J; Sung, Heejong; Ji, Fei; Matthysse, Steven; Mendell, Nancy R; Titone, Debra

    2010-05-01

    Thought disorder as well as language and communication disturbances are associated with schizophrenia and are over-represented in clinically unaffected relatives of schizophrenics. All three kinds of dysfunction involve some element of deviant verbalizations, most notably, semantic anomalies. Of particular importance, thought disorder characterized primarily by deviant verbalizations has a higher recurrence in relatives of schizophrenic patients than schizophrenia itself. These findings suggest that deviant verbalizations may be more penetrant expressions of schizophrenia susceptibility genes than schizophrenia. This paper reviews the evidence documenting the presence of thought, language and communication disorders in schizophrenic patients and in their first-degree relatives. This familial aggregation potentially implicates genetic factors in the etiology of thought disorder, language anomalies, and communication disturbances in schizophrenia families. We also present two examples of ways in which thought, language and communication disorders can enrich genetic studies, including those involving schizophrenia.

  8. Evidence for Distinguishable Treatment Costs among Paranoid Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Hirjak

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia spectrum disorders result in enormous individual suffering and financial burden on patients and on society. In Germany, there are about 1,000,000 individuals suffering from schizophrenia (SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SAD, a combination of psychotic and affective symptoms. Given the heterogeneous nature of these syndromes, one may assume that there is a difference in treatment costs among patients with paranoid SZ and SAD. However, the current the national system of cost accounting in psychiatry and psychosomatics in Germany assesses all schizophrenia spectrum disorders within one category.The study comprised a retrospective audit of data from 118 patients diagnosed with paranoid SZ (F20.0 and 71 patients with SAD (F25. We used the mean total costs as well as partial cost, i.e., mean costs for medication products, mean personal costs and mean infrastructure costs from each patient for the statistical analysis. We tested for differences in the four variables between SZ and SAD patients using ANCOVA and confirmed the results with bootstrapping.SAD patients had a longer duration of stay than patients with SZ (p = .02. Mean total costs were significantly higher for SAD patients (p = .023. Further, we found a significant difference in mean personnel costs (p = .02 between patients with SZ and SAD. However, we found no significant differences in mean pharmaceutical costs (p = .12 but a marginal difference of mean infrastructure costs (p = .05 between SZ and SAD. We found neither a common decrease of costs over time nor a differential decrease in SZ and SAD.We found evidence for a difference of case related costs of inpatient treatments for paranoid SZ and SAD. The differences in mean total costs seem to be primarily related to the mean personnel costs in patients with paranoid SZ and SAD rather than mean pharmaceutical costs, possibly due to higher personnel effort and infrastructure.

  9. Brain imaging of affective disorders and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, H; Yamada, K; Iseki, E; Kosaka, K; Okoshi, T

    1998-12-01

    We review recent findings in human brain imaging, for example, which brain areas are used during perception of colors, moving objects, human faces, facial expressions, sadness and happiness etc. One study used fluorine-18-labeled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with unipolar depression and bipolar depression, and found hypometabolism in the left anterolateral prefrontal cortex. Another study reported increased regional cerebral blood flow in the amygdala in familial pure depressive disease. Using 11C-glucose PET, we reported that the glutamic acid pool was reduced in cortical areas of the brain in patients with major depression. We also found that the thalamic and cingulate areas were hyperactive in drug-naive (never medicated) acute schizophrenics, while the associative frontal, parietal, temporal gyri were hypoactive in drug-naive chronic schizophrenics. Brain biochemical disturbances of schizophrenic patients involved glutamic acid, N-acetyl aspartic acid, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin which are important chemical substances in the working brain. The areas of the thalamus and the cingulate which become hyperactive in acute schizophrenic patients are important brain areas for perception and communication. The association areas of the cortex which become disturbed in chronic schizophrenia are essential brain areas in human creativity (language, concepts, formation of cultures and societies) and exist only in human beings.

  10. The correlates of comorbid antisocial personality disorder in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Paul; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2004-01-01

    More than 15 years ago, findings from the Epidemiological Catchment Area Study indicated that antisocial personality disorder (APD) is more prevalent among persons with schizophrenia than in the general population. The present study analyzed data from a multisite investigation to examine the correlates of APD among 232 men with schizophrenic disorders, three-quarters of whom had committed at least one crime. Comparisons of the men with and without APD revealed no differences in the course or symptomatology of schizophrenia. By contrast, multivariate models confirmed strong associations of comorbid APD with substance abuse, attention/concentration problems, and poor academic performance in childhood; and in adulthood with alcohol abuse or dependence and deficient affective experience (a personality style indexed by lack of remorse or guilt, shallow affect, lack of empathy, and failure to accept responsibility for one's own actions). At first admission, men with schizophrenia and APD presented a long history of antisocial behavior that included nonviolent offending and substance misuse, and an emotional dysfunction that is thought to increase the risk of violence toward others. Specific treatments and management strategies are indicated.

  11. A Comprehensive Book on Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the book is to serve for clinical, practical, basic and scholarly practices. In twentyfive chapters it covers the most important topics related to Autism Spectrum Disorders in the efficient way and aims to be useful for health professionals in training or clinicians seeking an update. Different people with autism can have very different…

  12. Interleukin-18 modulation in autism spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Businaro, R.; Corsi, M.; Azzara, G.; Di Raimo, T.; Laviola, G.; Romano, E.; Ricci, L.; Maccarrone, M.; Aronica, E.; Fuso, A.; Ricci, S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disease which affects 1 in 88 children. Its etiology remains basically unknown, but it is apparent that neuroinflammation is involved in disease development. Great attention has been focused on pro-inflammatory cytokines, and several

  13. Gaze Direction Detection in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgeot d'Arc, Baudouin; Delorme, Richard; Zalla, Tiziana; Lefebvre, Aline; Amsellem, Frédérique; Moukawane, Sanaa; Letellier, Laurence; Leboyer, Marion; Mouren, Marie-Christine; Ramus, Franck

    2017-01-01

    Detecting where our partners direct their gaze is an important aspect of social interaction. An atypical gaze processing has been reported in autism. However, it remains controversial whether children and adults with autism spectrum disorder interpret indirect gaze direction with typical accuracy. This study investigated whether the detection of…

  14. "Everyday Memory" Impairments in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Catherine R. G.; Happe, Francesca; Pickles, Andrew; Marsden, Anita J. S.; Tregay, Jenifer; Baird, Gillian; Simonoff, Emily; Charman, Tony

    2011-01-01

    "Everyday memory" is conceptualised as memory within the context of day-to-day life and, despite its functional relevance, has been little studied in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the first study of its kind, 94 adolescents with an ASD and 55 without an ASD completed measures of everyday memory from the Rivermead…

  15. Deaf Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Christen A.; Brice, Patrick J.; Lam, Kay H.; Hotto, Sue A.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies investigating the prevalence of autism have increased in recent years, within the United States and abroad. However, statistics as to how many of those children may also have a comorbid hearing loss is lacking. The prevalence of school-administrator reported diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (clinical diagnosis…

  16. Bullying Among Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers-Schrooten, Inge; Scholte, Ron H.J.; Didden, Robert; Leaf, Justin B.

    2017-01-01

    Students with disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are particularly vulnerable to be involved in bullying compared to their peers without ASD. Studies have found that students with ASD are at higher risk to be involved in bullying as a bully (i.e., perpetrator of bullying), a victim

  17. Korean Culture and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang-Yi, Christina D.; Grinker, Roy R.; Mandell, David S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on early child development among Koreans, with a focus on autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The literature review of 951 abstracts in English, 101 abstracts in Korean and 27 full articles published from 1994 to 2011 was performed to understand the presentation of and response to ASD in Korean culture. Based on…

  18. Time Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Gregory L.; Happe, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Duration judgment has not been comprehensively examined in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), despite reports of perceptual idiosyncrasies in these individuals. Time estimation, production, and reproduction were tested in 25 individuals with ASD and 25 controls matched group-wise on age and IQ. Individuals with ASD performed comparably to matched…

  19. Traumatic Childhood Events and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Connor Morrow; Newschaffer, Craig J.; Berkowitz, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic childhood events are associated with a wide range of negative physical, psychological and adaptive outcomes over the life course and are one of the few identifiable causes of psychiatric illness. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may be at increased risk for both encountering traumatic events and developing traumatic sequelae;…

  20. Neuroimaging and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Andria L.; Crocker, Nicole; Mattson, Sarah N.; Riley, Edward P.

    2009-01-01

    The detrimental effects of prenatal alcohol exposure on the developing brain include structural brain anomalies as well as cognitive and behavioral deficits. Initial neuroimaging studies of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed previous autopsy reports of overall reduction in brain volume and…

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Implications for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echaniz, Crystal; Cronin, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews characteristics of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), possible causes of ASD, current demographic information, the effects on the individual with ASD and the family, as well as diversity and multicultural issues related to autism. Additionally, the paper provides pertinent information about students with ASD for both general…

  2. Preserved Proactive Interference in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Joana C.; Duarte, Elsa; Pinho, Sandra; Filipe, Carlos N.; Marques, J. Frederico

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate further the functioning and structuring of the semantic system in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We analyzed the performance of 19 high-functioning young adults with ASD and a group of 20 age-, verbal IQ- and education-matched individuals with the Proactive Interference (PI) Paradigm to evaluate semantic…

  3. Olfactory dysfunction in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.J.; Zhao, N.; Fu, Y.; Zhang, D.Q.; Wang, J.; Qin, W.; Zhang, N.N.N.; Wood, K.; Liu, Y.; Yu, C.S.; Shi, F.D.; Yang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Few data were available for the understanding of olfactory function in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs). The aims of our study were to investigate the incidence of olfactory dysfunction and characterize olfactory structures, using MRI, in patients with NMOSDs. Olfactory function was

  4. Fundamental Movement Skills and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Kerri L.; Reid, Greg

    2010-01-01

    Delays and deficits may both contribute to atypical development of movement skills by children with ASD. Fundamental movement skills of 25 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (ages 9-12 years) were compared to three typically developing groups using the "Test of Gross Motor Development" ("TGMD-2"). The group matched on chronological age…

  5. Picture Exchange Communication System for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological disorder that manifests itself within an individual through cognitive, social, and academic deficits. As is true for all spectrum disorders, each individual may experience a range of deficits with varying severity. Many students with autism spectrum disorder experience difficulty in some area of…

  6. Dissociative disorders among Chinese inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A; Keyes, Benjamin B; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study were 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria of Mental Disorders, Version 3. All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation (the Dissociative Experiences Scale), and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. A total of 96 randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview (the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or who did not complete the self-report dissociation measure. A total of 28 patients (15.3%, after weighting of the data) received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 patients (0.53%, after weighting). Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% vs. 22.1%), but the 2 groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China.

  7. Neuroimaging Endophenotypes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rajneesh; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that has a strong genetic basis, and is heterogeneous in its etiopathogenesis and clinical presentation. Neuroimaging studies, in concert with neuropathological and clinical research, have been instrumental in delineating trajectories of development in children with ASD. Structural neuroimaging has revealed ASD to be a disorder with general and regional brain enlargement, especially in the frontotemporal cortices, while functional neuroimaging studies have highlighted diminished connectivity, especially between frontal-posterior regions. The diverse and specific neuroimaging findings may represent potential neuroendophenotypes, and may offer opportunities to further understand the etiopathogenesis of ASD, predict treatment response and lead to the development of new therapies. PMID:26234701

  8. Counting Sheep: Sleep Disorders in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Shoshana

    2016-01-01

    This article will discuss the prevalence and types of sleep disorders experienced by children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the risk factors for the development of sleep disorders among children with ASDs, the impact of sleep disorders on children with ASDs, and the role of the primary care provider (PCP) in diagnosing and treating sleep disorders among children with ASDs. Review of published literature on the topic. Children with ASDs are at risk for the development of chronic sleep disorders, which can have a negative impact on behavior. Both behavioral and pharmacological interventions exist for the treatment of sleep disorders among children with ASDs, with supplemental melatonin being the most widely studied and proven treatment. PCPs will care for children with ASDs. Therefore, it is vital for PCPs to be knowledgeable about this topic and to promptly assess for and manage sleep disorders among children with ASDs. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Multidimensional assessment of impulsivity in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder: testing for shared endophenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortgang, R G; Hultman, C M; van Erp, T G M; Cannon, T D

    2016-05-01

    Impulsivity is associated with bipolar disorder as a clinical feature during and between manic episodes and is considered a potential endophenotype for the disorder. Schizophrenia and major depressive disorder share substantial genetic overlap with bipolar disorder, and these two disorders have also been associated with elevations in impulsivity. However, little is known about the degree of overlap among these disorders in discrete subfacets of impulsivity and whether any overlap is purely phenotypic or due to shared genetic diathesis. We focused on five subfacets of impulsivity: self-reported attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity, self-reported sensation seeking, and a behavioral measure of motor inhibition (stop signal reaction time; SSRT). We examined these facets within and across disorder proband and co-twin groups, modeled heritability, and tested for endophenotypic patterning in a sample of twin pairs recruited from the Swedish Twin Registry (N = 420). We found evidence of moderate to high levels of heritability for all five subfacets. All three proband groups and their unaffected co-twins showed elevations on attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity. Schizophrenia probands (but not their co-twins) showed significantly lower sensation seeking, and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder probands (but not in their co-twins) had significantly longer SSRTs, compared with healthy controls and the other groups. Attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity emerged as potential shared endophenotypes for the three disorders, whereas sensation seeking and SSRT were associated with phenotypic affection but not genetic loading for these disorders.

  10. Borderline personality disorder and mood spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal, Carmen; Ruiz Moreno, Modesto A; Rando, Miguel A; Benvenuti, Antonella; Cassano, Giovanni B

    2008-06-30

    Several lines of evidence have raised the question of whether Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is an independent disease entity or it might be better conceptualized as belonging to the spectrum of mood disorders. This study explores a wide array of lifetime mood features (mood, cognitions, energy, and rhythmicity and vegetative functions) in patients with BP and mood disorders. The sample consisted of 25 BPD patients who did not meet the criteria for bipolar disorders, 16 bipolar disorders patients who did not meet the criteria for BPD, 19 unipolar patients who did not meet the criteria for BPD, and 30 non-clinical subjects. Clinical diagnoses were determined by administering the structured clinical interviews for DSM-IV disorders. The Mood Spectrum Self-Report (MOODS-SR) was used for measuring lifetime mood phenomenology. Clinical subjects displayed higher mean scores than normal subjects in all domains of the MOODS-SR, and BPD patients displayed higher scores than unipolar patients in the Mood and Cognition depressive subdomains. Differences between patients with BP and bipolar disorders on MOODS psychopathology did not attain statistical significance for any (sub)domain considered. The results of this study are consistent with previous findings suggesting the importance of mood dysregulations in patients with BPD.

  11. Contextual Social Cognition Impairments in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarin, Lilian; Theil, Donna; Gonzalez-Gadea, María Luz; Gomez, Pedro; Mosquera, Marcela; Huepe, David; Strejilevich, Sergio; Vigliecca, Nora Silvana; Matthäus, Franziska; Decety, Jean; Manes, Facundo; Ibañez, Agustín M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to integrate contextual information with social cues to generate social meaning is a key aspect of social cognition. It is widely accepted that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders have deficits in social cognition; however, previous studies on these disorders did not use tasks that replicate everyday situations. Methodology/Principal Findings This study evaluates the performance of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders on social cognition tasks (emotional processing, empathy, and social norms knowledge) that incorporate different levels of contextual dependence and involvement of real-life scenarios. Furthermore, we explored the association between social cognition measures, clinical symptoms and executive functions. Using a logistic regression analysis, we explored whether the involvement of more basic skills in emotional processing predicted performance on empathy tasks. The results showed that both patient groups exhibited deficits in social cognition tasks with greater context sensitivity and involvement of real-life scenarios. These deficits were more severe in schizophrenic than in bipolar patients. Patients did not differ from controls in tasks involving explicit knowledge. Moreover, schizophrenic patients’ depression levels were negatively correlated with performance on empathy tasks. Conclusions/Significance Overall performance on emotion recognition predicted performance on intentionality attribution during the more ambiguous situations of the empathy task. These results suggest that social cognition deficits could be related to a general impairment in the capacity to implicitly integrate contextual cues. Important implications for the assessment and treatment of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, as well as for neurocognitive models of these pathologies are discussed. PMID:23520477

  12. Semantics, pragmatics, and formal thought disorders in people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavera, Carlos; Puyuelo, Miguel; Antoñanzas, José L; Teruel, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze how formal thought disorders (FTD) affect semantics and pragmatics in patients with schizophrenia. The sample comprised subjects with schizophrenia (n = 102) who met the criteria for the disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition Text Revision. In the research process, the following scales were used: Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) for psychopathology measurements; the Scale for the Assessment of Thought, Language, and Communication (TLC) for FTD, Word Accentuation Test (WAT), System for the Behavioral Evaluation of Social Skills (SECHS), the pragmatics section of the Objective Criteria Language Battery (BLOC-SR) and the verbal sections of the Wechsler Adults Intelligence Scale (WAIS) III, for assessment of semantics and pragmatics. The results in the semantics and pragmatics sections were inferior to the average values obtained in the general population. Our data demonstrated that the more serious the FTD, the worse the performances in the Verbal-WAIS tests (particularly in its vocabulary, similarities, and comprehension sections), SECHS, and BLOC-SR, indicating that FTD affects semantics and pragmatics, although the results of the WAT indicated good premorbid language skills. The principal conclusion we can draw from this study is the evidence that in schizophrenia the superior level of language structure seems to be compromised, and that this level is related to semantics and pragmatics; when there is an alteration in this level, symptoms of FTD appear, with a wide-ranging relationship between both language and FTD. The second conclusion is that the subject's language is affected by the disorder and rules out the possibility of a previous verbal impairment.

  13. Contextual social cognition impairments in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Baez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to integrate contextual information with social cues to generate social meaning is a key aspect of social cognition. It is widely accepted that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders have deficits in social cognition; however, previous studies on these disorders did not use tasks that replicate everyday situations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study evaluates the performance of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders on social cognition tasks (emotional processing, empathy, and social norms knowledge that incorporate different levels of contextual dependence and involvement of real-life scenarios. Furthermore, we explored the association between social cognition measures, clinical symptoms and executive functions. Using a logistic regression analysis, we explored whether the involvement of more basic skills in emotional processing predicted performance on empathy tasks. The results showed that both patient groups exhibited deficits in social cognition tasks with greater context sensitivity and involvement of real-life scenarios. These deficits were more severe in schizophrenic than in bipolar patients. Patients did not differ from controls in tasks involving explicit knowledge. Moreover, schizophrenic patients' depression levels were negatively correlated with performance on empathy tasks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall performance on emotion recognition predicted performance on intentionality attribution during the more ambiguous situations of the empathy task. These results suggest that social cognition deficits could be related to a general impairment in the capacity to implicitly integrate contextual cues. Important implications for the assessment and treatment of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, as well as for neurocognitive models of these pathologies are discussed.

  14. [The activity of complement system in children with autistic spectrum disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremnykh, E G; Karpova, N S; Factor, M I; Shushpanova, O V; Simashkova, N V; Brusov, O S

    To evaluate the state of complement system (CS) activity in children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and children with schizophrenia on the basis of development and implementation of a new method of CS determination. A study included 249 patients, aged from 3 to 14 years. The control group consisted of 279 age-matched children. The authors developed a method for integral evaluation of CS activity based on the changes in the death of free swimming ciliata Tetrahymena pyriformis measured with the apparatus BioLat (Moscow, Russia). The integral CS activity (T50) was estimated as the time of death of 50% of ciliata in the blood serum (serum concentration was 5%). A comparative analysis of CS activity showed statistical differences in median T50 values between patients and controls (pautism group and children schizophrenia group were identified (p<0.005). The CS activity was lower in patients with ASD compared to children with schizophrenia.

  15. Dissociative Disorders Among Chinese Inpatients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junhan; Ross, Colin A.; Keyes, Benjamin B.; Li, Ying; Dai, Yunfei; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Lanlan; Fan, Qing; Xiao, Zeping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of dissociative disorders in a sample of Chinese psychiatric inpatients. Participants in the study consisted of 569 consecutively admitted inpatients at Shanghai Mental Health Center, China, of whom 84.9% had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia based on the Chinese Classification and Diagnostic Criteria for Mental Disorders, Version 3 (CCMD-3). All participants completed a self-report measure of dissociation, the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) and none had a prior diagnosis of a dissociative disorder. Ninety-six randomly selected participants were interviewed with a structured interview, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS) and a clinical interview. These 96 patients did not differ significantly from the 473 patients who were not interviewed on any demographic measures or on the self-report measure dissociation. A total of 28 (15.3%, after weighting of the data) patients received a clinical diagnosis of a dissociative disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria. Dissociative identity disorder was diagnosed in 2 (0.53%, after weighting) patients. Compared to the patients without a dissociative disorder, patients with dissociative disorders were significantly more likely to report childhood abuse (57.1% versus 22.1%), but the two groups did not differ significantly on any demographic measures. Dissociative disorders were readily identified in an inpatient psychiatric population in China. PMID:20603768

  16. Spectrum of mast cell activation disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petra, Anastasia I; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Stewart, Julia M; Conti, Pio; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2014-06-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation disorders present with multiple symptoms including flushing, pruritus, hypotension, gastrointestinal complaints, irritability, headaches, concentration/memory loss and neuropsychiatric issues. These disorders are classified as: cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis with a c-kit mutation and clonal MC activation disorder, allergies, urticarias and inflammatory disorders and mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), idiopathic urticaria and angioedema. MCs are activated by IgE, but also by cytokines, environmental, food, infectious, drug and stress triggers, leading to secretion of multiple mediators. The symptom profile and comorbidities associated with these disorders, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, are confusing. We propose the use of the term 'spectrum' and highlight the main symptoms, useful diagnostic tests and treatment approaches.

  17. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, T H; Børglum, A D; Mors, O

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 22q may harbor risk genes for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder from the Faroe...

  18. Assessing neural tuning for object perception in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with multivariate pattern analysis of fMRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Reavis

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The results show for the first time MVPA can be used successfully to classify individual perceptual stimuli in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, the results do not provide evidence of abnormal neural tuning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  19. Increased timing variability in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Bolbecker

    Full Text Available Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that impaired time perception and the neural circuitry underlying internal timing mechanisms may contribute to severe psychiatric disorders, including psychotic and mood disorders. The degree to which alterations in temporal perceptions reflect deficits that exist across psychosis-related phenotypes and the extent to which mood symptoms contribute to these deficits is currently unknown. In addition, compared to schizophrenia, where timing deficits have been more extensively investigated, sub-second timing has been studied relatively infrequently in bipolar disorder. The present study compared sub-second duration estimates of schizophrenia (SZ, schizoaffective disorder (SA, non-psychotic bipolar disorder (BDNP, bipolar disorder with psychotic features (BDP, and healthy non-psychiatric controls (HC on a well-established time perception task using sub-second durations. Participants included 66 SZ, 37 BDNP, 34 BDP, 31 SA, and 73 HC who participated in a temporal bisection task that required temporal judgements about auditory durations ranging from 300 to 600 milliseconds. Timing variability was significantly higher in SZ, BDP, and BDNP groups compared to healthy controls. The bisection point did not differ across groups. These findings suggest that both psychotic and mood symptoms may be associated with disruptions in internal timing mechanisms. Yet unexpected findings emerged. Specifically, the BDNP group had significantly increased variability compared to controls, but the SA group did not. In addition, these deficits appeared to exist independent of current symptom status. The absence of between group differences in bisection point suggests that increased variability in the SZ and bipolar disorder groups are due to alterations in perceptual timing in the sub-second range, possibly mediated by the cerebellum, rather than cognitive deficits.

  20. Feasibility and Efficacy of Prolonged Exposure for PTSD among Individuals with a Psychotic Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk L. Grubaugh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Few empirical studies have examined the feasibility of trauma-focused treatment among individuals with schizophrenia. This lack of research is important given the substantial overlap of trauma exposure and subsequent PTSD with psychotic spectrum disorders, and the potential for PTSD to complicate the course and prognosis of schizophrenia and other variants of severe mental illness.Method: As part of a larger study, 14 veterans with a psychotic spectrum disorder were enrolled to receive prolonged exposure (PE for PTSD within a single arm open trial study design. Patient reactions and responses to PE were examined using feasibility indices such as attrition, survey reactions, and treatment expectancy; pre and post-changes in PTSD severity and diagnostic status; and thematic interviews conducted post-intervention.Results: Quantitative and qualitative data indicate that implementation of PE is feasible, subjectively well-tolerated, and may result in clinically significant reductions in PTSD symptoms in patients with psychotic spectrum disorders.Conclusion: Consistent with treatment outcome data in clinical populations with a broader range of severe mental illnesses, the current results support the use of PTSD exposure-based interventions, such as PE, for individuals with psychotic spectrum disorders.

  1. A genetic deconstruction of neurocognitive traits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla P D Fernandes

    Full Text Available Impairments in cognitive functions are common in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Cognitive traits have been proposed as useful for understanding the biological and genetic mechanisms implicated in cognitive function in healthy individuals and in the dysfunction observed in psychiatric disorders.Sets of genes associated with a range of cognitive functions often impaired in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were generated from a genome-wide association study (GWAS on a sample comprising 670 healthy Norwegian adults who were phenotyped for a broad battery of cognitive tests. These gene sets were then tested for enrichment of association in GWASs of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The GWAS data was derived from three independent single-centre schizophrenia samples, three independent single-centre bipolar disorder samples, and the multi-centre schizophrenia and bipolar disorder samples from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium.The strongest enrichments were observed for visuospatial attention and verbal abilities sets in bipolar disorder. Delayed verbal memory was also enriched in one sample of bipolar disorder. For schizophrenia, the strongest evidence of enrichment was observed for the sets of genes associated with performance in a colour-word interference test and for sets associated with memory learning slope.Our results are consistent with the increasing evidence that cognitive functions share genetic factors with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Our data provides evidence that genetic studies using polygenic and pleiotropic models can be used to link specific cognitive functions with psychiatric disorders.

  2. Smooth pursuit deficits in schizophrenia, affective disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencer, R; Trillenberg, P; Trillenberg-Krecker, K; Junghanns, K; Kordon, A; Broocks, A; Hohagen, F; Heide, W; Arolt, V

    2004-04-01

    In schizophrenia, affective disorders, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) dysfunction of frontal neuronal circuits has been suggested. Such impairments imply corresponding oculomotor deficits. Eye movement response to foveofugal and foveopetal step-ramp stimuli was recorded within the same study design in patients with schizophrenia (N= 16), affective disorder (N= 15), and OCD (N= 18) and compared with controls (N=23) using infra-red reflection oculography. In the foveofugal task steady-state velocity was lower in all patient groups compared with controls. Post-saccadic eye velocity was also decreased in patients with schizophrenia and affective disorder. In the foveopetal stimulus steady-state velocity was reduced in schizophrenic patients, only. Changes of saccadic latencies or position errors were not found in any of the patient groups. Also, pursuit latency was unchanged and initial eye acceleration was not decreased. Unaltered saccadic parameters indicate intact motion perception in cortical visual area V5. Therefore, the observed deficit of pursuit maintenance implies a dysfunction of frontal networks in all patient groups including the pursuit region of the frontal eye field (FEF). In patients with schizophrenia and affective disorder reduced post-saccadic pursuit initiation may indicate an impaired interaction between the pursuit and the saccadic system.

  3. Schizophrenia and comorbid cannabis use disorders: Brain structure, function and the effect of antipsychotic medications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of the studies described in this thesis was to increase our understanding of schizophrenia, co-morbid cannabis use disorders and the effects of different antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia and a comorbid cannabis use disorder. Therefore we studied the clinical

  4. Overlapping and Segregating Structural Brain Abnormalities in Twins With Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; van Baal, G. Caroline M.; Schnack, Hugo G.; Brans, Rachel G. H.; van der Schot, Astrid C.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Lepage, Claude; Collins, D. Louis; Evans, Alan C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Nolen, Willem; Kahn, Rene S.

    Context: The nosologic dichotomy between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) as formulated by Kraepelin is currently being questioned, stimulated by the finding that schizophrenia and BD partly share a common genetic origin. Although both disorders are characterized by changes in brain

  5. Suicidal Behavior in Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder: Examining the Role of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkavy-Friedman, Jill M.; Nelson, Elizabeth A.; Venarde, David F.; Mann, J. John

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between depression and suicidal behavior among individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder can aid assessment and treatment. In this study, 86 individuals with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder were assessed for past and current suicidal behavior, depression, hopelessness, and reasons for…

  6. Acupuncture treatment of a male patient suffering from long-term schizophrenia and sleep disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Staudte, H.; Yeo, S.; Lee, S.H.; Lim, S.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of chronic schizophrenia and co-morbid sleep disorders. Methods: A 42-year-old German male outpatient, suffering from long-term schizophrenia and sleep disorders, entered the study. Acupuncture was used as a

  7. Acupuncture in the treatment of a female patient suffering from chronic schizophrenia and sleep disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Lim, S.; Yeo, S.; Lee, S.H.; Staudte, H.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den

    2016-01-01

    Background. The use of acupuncture in the treatment of sleep disorders in patients with chronic schizophrenia is investigated. Case Presentation. We report the case of a 44-year-old female outpatient of German origin who had been suffering from long-term schizophrenia and sleep disorders. The

  8. Cortical morphology of adolescents with bipolar disorder and with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Joost; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Inmaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence points to overlapping decreases in cortical thickness and gyrification in the frontal lobe of patients with adult-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychotic symptoms, but it is not clear if these findings generalize to patients with a disease onset during adolescence and what may be the mechanisms underlying a decrease in gyrification. This study analyzed cortical morphology using surface-based morphometry in 92 subjects (age range 11-18 years, 52 healthy controls and 40 adolescents with early-onset first-episode psychosis diagnosed with schizophrenia (n=20) or bipolar disorder with psychotic symptoms (n=20) based on a two year clinical follow up). Average lobar cortical thickness, surface area, gyrification index (GI) and sulcal width were compared between groups, and the relationship between the GI and sulcal width was assessed in the patient group. Both patients groups showed decreased cortical thickness and increased sulcal width in the frontal cortex when compared to healthy controls. The schizophrenia subgroup also had increased sulcal width in all other lobes. In the frontal cortex of the combined patient group sulcal width was negatively correlated (r=-0.58, pschizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychotic symptoms there is cortical thinning, decreased GI and increased sulcal width of the frontal cortex present at the time of the first psychotic episode. Decreased frontal GI is associated with the widening of the frontal sulci which may reduce sulcal surface area. These results suggest that abnormal growth (or more pronounced shrinkage during adolescence) of the frontal cortex represents a shared endophenotype for psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenomenology and neurobiology of self disorder in schizophrenia: Primary factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Juan P; Sass, Louis A

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous syndrome, varying between persons and over course of illness. In this and a companion article, we argue that comprehension of this condition or set of conditions may require combining a phenomenological perspective emphasizing disorders of basic-self experience ("ipseity disturbance") with a multidimensional appreciation of possible neurobiological correlates--both primary and secondary. Previous attempts to link phenomenology and neurobiology generally focus on a single neurocognitive factor. We consider diverse aspects of schizophrenia in light of a diverse, albeit interacting, set of neurocognitive abnormalities, examining both synchronic (structural) interdependence and diachronic (temporal) succession. In this article we focus on the primary or foundational role of early perceptual and motoric disturbances that affect perceptual organization and especially intermodal or multisensory perceptual integration (“perceptual dys-integration”). These disturbances are discussed in terms of their implications for three interconnected aspects of selfhood in schizophrenia, primary forms of: disrupted "hold" or "grip" on the world, hyperreflexivity, diminished self-presence (self-affection). Disturbances of organization or integration imply forms of perceptual incoherence or diminished cognitive coordination. The effect is to disrupt one's ability to apprehend the world in holistic, vital, or contextually grounded fashion, or to fully identify with or experience the unity of one's own body or thinking--thereby generating an early and profound (albeit often subtle) disruption or diminishment of basic or core self and of the sense of existing in a coherent world. We discuss interrelationships or possible complementarities between these three aspects, and consider their relevance for a neurodevelopmental account of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Substance use disorders among adolescents with bipolar spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Strober, Michael A; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Goldstein, Tina R; Leonard, Henrietta; Hunt, Jeffrey; Gill, Mary Kay; Iyengar, Satish; Grimm, Colleen; Yang, Mei; Ryan, Neal D; Keller, Martin B

    2008-06-01

    We set out to examine the prevalence and correlates of substance use disorders (SUD) in a large sample of adolescents with bipolar disorder (BP). Subjects were 249 adolescents ages 12 to 17 years old who fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I disorder [(BPI), n = 154], or bipolar II disorder [(BPII), n = 25], or operationalized criteria for BP not otherwise specified [(BP NOS), n = 70], via the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children (K-SADS). As part of the multi-site Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth study, demographic, clinical, and family history variables were measured via intake clinical interview with the subject and a parent/guardian. The lifetime prevalence of SUD among adolescents with BP was 16% (40/249). Results from univariate analyses indicated that subjects with, as compared to without, SUD were significantly less likely to be living with both biological parents, and that there was significantly greater lifetime prevalence of physical abuse, sexual abuse, suicide attempts, conduct disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder among subjects with SUD. Subjects with SUD reported significantly greater 12-month prevalence of trouble with police, and females with SUD reported significantly greater 12-month prevalence of pregnancy and abortion. Significant predictors of SUD in a logistic regression model included living with both biological parents (lower prevalence), conduct disorder and suicide attempts (increased prevalence). In logistic regression analyses controlling for demographic differences and conduct disorder, SUD remained significantly associated with trouble with police, whereas the association of SUD with pregnancy and abortion was reduced to a statistical trend. The prevalence of SUD was not significantly different among child- versus adolescent-onset BP subjects. SUD among adolescents with BP is associated with profound hazards including suicide attempts, trouble with police, and teenage pregnancy and

  11. Clinical Overlap and Psychiatric Comorbidity in Autism Spectrum Disorder in Adulthood: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Picoito

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is an early neurodevelopmental disorder that accompanies the individual throughout life. There is a significant clinical overlap of ASD with other psychiatric disorders including personality disorders, psychotic disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. Additionally, the presence of high rates of psychiatric comorbidity, often with atypical presentations, delays the ASD diagnosis and makes it more difficult to manage. Aims: To illustrate the complexity of ASD diagnosis and approach in adults. Methods: Report of a clinical case and review of the literature. Results and Conclusion: This paper presents the case of a 46-year-old patient, with ASD, with a long history of interpersonal difficulties and psychiatric symptomatology. Over the years, different diagnoses have been made, particularly schizoid and schizotypal personality disorders, psychosis not otherwise specified and paranoid schizophrenia, which led to poor adherence to treatment, and prevented a full understanding of the patient’s clinical presentation and lifelong struggles.

  12. A genetic deconstruction of neurocognitive traits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.D. Fernandes (Carla P.); A. Christoforou (Andrea); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); K.M. Ersland (Kari); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); M. Mattheisen (Manuel); A.J. Lundervold (Astri); I. Reinvang (Ivar); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); M. Rietschel (Marcella); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); T.M. Werge (Thomas); S. Cichon (Sven); T. Espeseth (Thomas); O.A. Andreassen (Ole); V.M. Steen (Vidar); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impairments in cognitive functions are common in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Cognitive traits have been proposed as useful for understanding the biological and genetic mechanisms implicated in cognitive function

  13. Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schizophrenia is a serious brain illness. People who have it may hear voices that aren't there. ... job or take care of themselves. Symptoms of schizophrenia usually start between ages 16 and 30. Men ...

  14. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Amplified Pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, Ciaran

    2015-05-01

    Among the core features of ASD, altered sensitivities in all modalities have been accorded increasing importance. Heightened sensitivity to pain and unusual expressions of and reaction to pain have not hitherto been widely recognised as a presenting feature of ASD in general paediatrics. Failure to recognise ASD as a common cause of pain can lead to late diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, distress, and further disability. Two cases are presented which illustrate the late presentation of Autism Spectrum Disorder (Asperger\\'s Syndrome subtype) with chronic unusual pain. Conclusion. Pain in autism can be atypical in its experience and expression and for this reason may go unrecognised by physicians treating chronic pain disorders.

  15. [A Danish fetal alcohol spectrum disorders definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccia, Marcella; Vikre-Jørgensen, Jennifer; Rausgaard, Nete Lundager Klokker

    2017-08-07

    The Danish Paediatric Society presents the first Danish definition of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in a new guideline. FASD is an umbrella term for conditions caused by prenatal alcohol exposure. To varying degrees, fetal alcohol damages manifest as physical defects, characteristic facial features and poor growth, as well as behavioural and cognitive disorders. It requires both somatic and psychological evaluation to identify these damages. Early diagnosis and identification of problems are important for prognosis as professional care has a positive preventive effect on comorbidities.

  16. Multisensory Temporal Integration in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Ryan A.; Siemann, Justin K.; Schneider, Brittany C.; Eberly, Haley E.; Woynaroski, Tiffany G.; Camarata, Stephen M.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    The new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) include sensory disturbances in addition to the well-established language, communication, and social deficits. One sensory disturbance seen in ASD is an impaired ability to integrate multisensory information into a unified percept. This may arise from an underlying impairment in which individuals with ASD have difficulty perceiving the temporal relationship between cross-modal inputs, an important cue for multisensory inte...

  17. Assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in women with schizophrenia or related psychotic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Ninna H; Assens, Maria; Hougaard, Charlotte O

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence rate of women with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or related psychotic disorder in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and to study these women's fertility treatment outcome in comparison to women with no psychotic disorders.......To determine the prevalence rate of women with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or related psychotic disorder in assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment and to study these women's fertility treatment outcome in comparison to women with no psychotic disorders....

  18. Polygenic dissection of diagnosis and clinical dimensions of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fanous, Ayman H.; Ripke, Stephan; McQuillin, Andrew; Amdur, Richard L.; Gejman, Pablo V.; O’Donovan, Michael C; Andreassen, Ole A; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hultman, Christina M.; Kelsoe, John R; Jamain, Stephane; Landén, Mikael; Leboyer, Marion; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are two often severe disorders with high heritabilities. Recent studies have demonstrated a large overlap of genetic risk loci between these disorders but diagnostic and molecular distinctions still remain. Here, we perform a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 19 779 bipolar disorder (BP) and schizophrenia (SCZ) cases versus 19 423 controls, in addition to a direct comparison GWAS of 7129 SCZ cases versus 9252 BP cases. In our case...

  19. Supporting university students with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ashleigh; Goldstein, Jody; Murphy, Deirdra; Trietsch, Rhoda; Keeves, Jacqueline; Mendes, Eva; Queenan, Alexa

    2018-01-01

    Increasing numbers of students with autism spectrum disorder are entering higher education. Their success can be jeopardized by organizational, social/emotional, and academic challenges if appropriate supports are not in place. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group model for university students with autism spectrum disorder in improving psychological and functional outcomes. A curriculum guided the weekly discussions and consisted of topics such as time and stress management, managing group work, and social communication. Efficacy was assessed through pre- and post self-report measures focused on self-esteem, loneliness, anxiety, and depression. Functional changes in academic and social skills were examined through qualitative analysis of focus groups. Findings from the self-report measures indicated significant reductions in feelings of loneliness and general anxiety, and a significant increase in self-esteem at the end of the program compared to the beginning. Five prominent themes were identified in the focus-group analysis and reflected how the program had positively impacted participants' skills and coping: executive functioning; goal setting; academics and resources; stress and anxiety; and social. Given the cost effectiveness of "in-house" interventions and the potential for improving academic outcomes and retention of students with autism spectrum disorder, further research examining similar program models is warranted.

  20. Delusional disorders--are they simply paranoid schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneros, Andreas; Pillmann, Frank; Wustmann, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    This article tries to give an answer to the question of whether International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) delusional disorder (DD) is simply paranoid schizophrenia (PS). Because ICD-10 PDD and DSM-IV DD are identical, we use DD as a synonym. A prospective and longitudinal study compared all inpatients with DD treated at the Halle-Wittenberg university hospital during a 14-year period with a previously investigated selected cohort of patients with PS. Sociodemographic data, symptomatology, course, and outcome parameters were examined using standardized instruments. The duration of the follow-up period in patients with DD was 10.8 years and for the PS patients 12.9 years. Significant differences between DD and PS were found: DD patients are, in comparison to patients with PS, significantly older at onset. Less of their first-degree relatives have mental disorders. They less frequently come from a broken home situation. First-rank symptoms, relevant negative symptoms, and primary hallucinations did not occur in patients with DD. Patients with DD were less frequently hospitalized, and the duration of their hospitalization was shorter. Their outcome is much better regarding employment, early retirement due to the disorder, and psychopharmacological medication. They more often had stable heterosexual partnerships and were autarkic. They had lower scores in the Disability Assessment Scale and in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The diagnosis of DD is very stable over time. The findings of this study support the assumption that DDs are a separate entity and only exceptionally can be a prodrome of schizophrenia.

  1. Pattern of neural responses to verbal fluency shows diagnostic specificity for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walshe Muriel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairments in executive function and language processing are characteristic of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Their functional neuroanatomy demonstrate features that are shared as well as specific to each disorder. Determining the distinct pattern of neural responses in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may provide biomarkers for their diagnoses. Methods 104 participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scans while performing a phonological verbal fluency task. Subjects were 32 patients with schizophrenia in remission, 32 patients with bipolar disorder in an euthymic state, and 40 healthy volunteers. Neural responses to verbal fluency were examined in each group, and the diagnostic potential of the pattern of the neural responses was assessed with machine learning analysis. Results During the verbal fluency task, both patient groups showed increased activation in the anterior cingulate, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right putamen as compared to healthy controls, as well as reduced deactivation of precuneus and posterior cingulate. The magnitude of activation was greatest in patients with schizophrenia, followed by patients with bipolar disorder and then healthy individuals. Additional recruitment in the right inferior frontal and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortices was observed in schizophrenia relative to both bipolar disorder and healthy subjects. The pattern of neural responses correctly identified individual patients with schizophrenia with an accuracy of 92%, and those with bipolar disorder with an accuracy of 79% in which mis-classification was typically of bipolar subjects as healthy controls. Conclusions In summary, both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with altered function in prefrontal, striatal and default mode networks, but the magnitude of this dysfunction is particularly marked in schizophrenia. The pattern of response to verbal fluency is highly

  2. Study of Attention Deficit in Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Kafi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Attention deficit has significant effect on the life of patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the attention deficit in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In the present post-hoc study, 132 patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were selected via non-randomized sampling at Shafa Hospital (Rasht, Iran and then divided into four equal groups: chronic schizophrenia patients, first-episode patients, chronic bipolar patients, and first-episode bipolar patients. Thirty-three healthy individuals were selected as the control group. Subjects were evaluated by Stroop color-word test. The gathered Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: Attention deficit among chronic schizophrenics and patients suffering from bipolar disease was higher than the control group (p <1. Chronic schizophrenic patients compared with schizophrenia bipolar disease and first round schizophrenia showed more attention deficit. There was no significant difference among the first bipolar disease and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, as well as the first round schizophrenia (p<0.05. Conclusion: Attention deficit is more severe in schizophrenic patients than bipolar disorder, and chronicity is more effective in schizophrenic patients. Key words: Attention, Schizophrenia, Chronicity

  3. Infection and inflammation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Teppei; Matsuda, Taro; Hayes, Lindsay N; Yang, Shuojia; Rodriguez, Katrina; Severance, Emily G; Yolken, Robert H; Sawa, Akira; Eaton, William W

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between exposure to infectious agents and inflammation markers in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BP), and controls without a psychiatric disorder. We measured plasma levels of antibodies and innate immune markers and correlated them with clinical symptoms and cognitive function. In both SZ and BP, we found an increase in soluble CD14, and in BP an increase in C-reactive protein, IgM class antibodies against cytomegalovirus (CMV), and IgG class antibodies against herpes simplex virus 2. Furthermore in BP, we observed a negative relationship between IgG antibodies against CMV and scores for cognitive function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Sleep in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwaljit; Zimmerman, Andrew W

    2015-06-01

    Sleep problems are common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Sleep problems in these disorders may not only worsen daytime behaviors and core symptoms of ASD and ADHD but also contribute to parental stress levels. Therefore, the presence of sleep problems in ASD and ADHD requires prompt attention and management. This article is presented in 2 sections, one each for ASD and ADHD. First, a detailed literature review about the burden and prevalence of different types of sleep disorders is presented, followed by the pathophysiology and etiology of the sleep problems and evaluation and management of sleep disorders in ASD and ADHD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Autistic spectrum disorders 2: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alice; Cork, Christine; Chowdhury, Uttom

    2006-04-01

    As many as six in every 1000 children may be affected by an autistic spectrum disorder. The previous article of this two-part series discussed the distinction between autism, Asperger's syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder, and examined the assessment process. This article looks at potential differential diagnoses that must be considered, as well as conditions associated with autism. Many theories about the causes of autism have been suggested, including the MMR vaccine. Recent research has suggested that there is no link between the vaccine and autism. There is no cure for autism, but intervention and management techniques should be aimed at educating parents and carers about the disorder and behavioural interventions to aid the child's skills development.

  6. [Autism Spectrum Disorder and DSM-5: Spectrum or Cluster?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienle, Xaver; Freiberger, Verena; Greulich, Heide; Blank, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Within the new DSM-5, the currently differentiated subgroups of "Autistic Disorder" (299.0), "Asperger's Disorder" (299.80) and "Pervasive Developmental Disorder" (299.80) are replaced by the more general "Autism Spectrum Disorder". With regard to a patient-oriented and expedient advising therapy planning, however, the issue of an empirically reproducible and clinically feasible differentiation into subgroups must still be raised. Based on two Autism-rating-scales (ASDS and FSK), an exploratory two-step cluster analysis was conducted with N=103 children (age: 5-18) seen in our social-pediatric health care centre to examine potentially autistic symptoms. In the two-cluster solution of both rating scales, mainly the problems in social communication grouped the children into a cluster "with communication problems" (51 % and 41 %), and a cluster "without communication problems". Within the three-cluster solution of the ASDS, sensory hypersensitivity, cleaving to routines and social-communicative problems generated an "autistic" subgroup (22%). The children of the second cluster ("communication problems", 35%) were only described by social-communicative problems, and the third group did not show any problems (38%). In the three-cluster solution of the FSK, the "autistic cluster" of the two-cluster solution differentiated in a subgroup with mainly social-communicative problems (cluster 1) and a second subgroup described by restrictive, repetitive behavior. The different cluster solutions will be discussed with a view to the new DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, for following studies a further specification of some of the ASDS and FSK items could be helpful.

  7. [Molecular Biology on the Mechanisms of Autism Spectrum Disorder for Clinical Psychiatrists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinodan, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    While, in general, a certain number of clinical psychiatrists might not be familiar with molecular biology, the mechanisms of mental illnesses have been uncovered by molecular biology for decades. Among mental illnesses, even biological psychiatrists and neuroscientists have paid less attention to the biological treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) than Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia since ASD has been regarded as a developmental disorder that was seemingly untreatable. However, multifaceted methods of molecular biology have revealed the mechanisms that would lead to the medication of ASD. In this article, how molecular biology dissects the pathobiology of ASD is described in order to announce the possibilities of biological treatment for clinical psychiatrists.

  8. Schizophrenia and Bipolar Affective Disorder: a Dimensional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Demet Sağlam; Arslan, Filiz Civil; Özkorumak, Evrim; Tiryaki, Ahmet

    2017-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SCH) and bipolar affective disorder (BAD) are currently classified separately according to the DSM (The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and ICD (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems) standardized diagnostic guidelines. However, the validity of this categorical approach is controversial because psychotic symptoms may be observed in both diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and social characteristics in a sample group consisting of patients diagnosed with SCH or BAD to help demonstrate the basic difficulty in the current classification of SCH and BAD as two etiologically distinct diseases. The study sample group consisted of 102 patients diagnosed with SCH and 92 patients diagnosed with BAD. All of the participants were evaluated by Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition with regard to beginning symptoms of the disease, the symptoms and signs of active disease period within total disease duration, continuining residual symptoms in intermediate period. The patients were administered the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Social Functioning Scale. The SCH and BAD groups in this study were statistically similar in terms of sex, length of education, age at disease onset, attempted suicide, quality of life and social functioning. Our study findings indicated that the course of disease in patients with BAD-1, in which psychotic features predominate and which exhibits a recurring course, shares various characteristics with SCH. It can be concluded that further phenomenological and neurobiological evaluations are required for intermediate cases with similiar clinical characteristics with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  9. Diagnostic specificity of poor premorbid adjustment: comparison of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and mood disorder with psychotic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbox, Sarah I; Brown, Leslie H; Haas, Gretchen L

    2012-10-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have significant deficits in premorbid social and academic adjustment compared to individuals with non-psychotic diagnoses. However, it is unclear how severity and developmental trajectory of premorbid maladjustment compare across psychotic disorders. This study examined the association between premorbid functioning (in childhood, early adolescence, and late adolescence) and psychotic disorder diagnosis in a first-episode sample of 105 individuals: schizophrenia (n=68), schizoaffective disorder (n=22), and mood disorder with psychotic features (n=15). Social and academic maladjustment was assessed using the Cannon-Spoor Premorbid Adjustment Scale. Worse social functioning in late adolescence was associated with higher odds of schizophrenia compared to odds of either schizoaffective disorder or mood disorder with psychotic features, independently of child and early adolescent maladjustment. Greater social dysfunction in childhood was associated with higher odds of schizoaffective disorder compared to odds of schizophrenia. Premorbid decline in academic adjustment was observed for all groups, but did not predict diagnosis at any stage of development. Results suggest that social functioning is disrupted in the premorbid phase of both schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, but remains fairly stable in mood disorders with psychotic features. Disparities in the onset and time course of social dysfunction suggest important developmental differences between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Auditory processing in autism spectrum disorder: Mismatch negativity deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskamp, Chantal; Oranje, Bob; Madsen, Gitte Falcher; Møllegaard Jepsen, Jens Richardt; Durston, Sarah; Cantio, Cathriona; Glenthøj, Birte; Bilenberg, Niels

    2017-06-22

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often show changes in (automatic) auditory processing. Electrophysiology provides a method to study auditory processing, by investigating event-related potentials such as mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a-amplitude. However, findings on MMN in autism are highly inconsistent, partly due to small sample sizes in the studies and differences in MMN paradigms. Therefore, in the current study, MMN and P3a amplitude were assessed in a relatively large sample of children with ASD, using a more extensive MMN paradigm and compared with that of typically developing children (TDC). Thirty-five children (aged 8-12 years) with ASD and 38 age and gender matched TDC were assessed with a MMN paradigm with three types of deviants, i.e., frequency, duration and a combination of these two. MMN elicited by duration and frequency-duration deviants was significantly reduced in the ASD group. P3a-amplitude elicited by duration deviants was significantly increased in the ASD group. Reduced MMN in children with ASD suggests that children with ASD may be less responsive to environmentally deviant stimuli at an early (sensory) level. P3a-amplitude was increased in ASD, implying a hyper-responsivity at the attentional level. In addition, as similar MMN deficits are found in schizophrenia, these MMN results may explain some of the frequently reported increased risk of children with ASD to develop schizophrenia later in life. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Abnormal early brain responses during visual search are evident in schizophrenia but not bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMeerten, Nicolaas J; Dubke, Rachel E; Stanwyck, John J; Kang, Seung Suk; Sponheim, Scott R

    2016-01-01

    People with schizophrenia show deficits in processing visual stimuli but neural abnormalities underlying the deficits are unclear and it is unknown whether such functional brain abnormalities are present in other severe mental disorders or in individuals who carry genetic liability for schizophrenia. To better characterize brain responses underlying visual search deficits and test their specificity to schizophrenia we gathered behavioral and electrophysiological responses during visual search (i.e., Span of Apprehension [SOA] task) from 38 people with schizophrenia, 31 people with bipolar disorder, 58 biological relatives of people with schizophrenia, 37 biological relatives of people with bipolar disorder, and 65 non-psychiatric control participants. Through subtracting neural responses associated with purely sensory aspects of the stimuli we found that people with schizophrenia exhibited reduced early posterior task-related neural responses (i.e., Span Endogenous Negativity [SEN]) while other groups showed normative responses. People with schizophrenia exhibited longer reaction times than controls during visual search but nearly identical accuracy. Those individuals with schizophrenia who had larger SENs performed more efficiently (i.e., shorter reaction times) on the SOA task suggesting that modulation of early visual cortical responses facilitated their visual search. People with schizophrenia also exhibited a diminished P300 response compared to other groups. Unaffected first-degree relatives of people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed an amplified N1 response over posterior brain regions in comparison to other groups. Diminished early posterior brain responses are associated with impaired visual search in schizophrenia and appear to be specifically associated with the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Effects of cannabis use on age at onset in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Jendricko, Tihana; Franic, Tomislav; Vidovic, Domagoj; De Vriendt, Nele; Sweers, Kim; Peuskens, Joseph; van Winkel, Ruud

    2011-03-01

    Cannabis use may decrease age at onset in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, given the evidence for substantial phenotypic and genetic overlap between both disorders. 766 patients, aged 16 to 65 years, were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) for substance abuse/use. 676 subjects were diagnosed with schizophrenia and 90 subjects with bipolar disorder. The influence of cannabis use on age at onset in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder was examined using regression analysis. Cannabis and other substance use was more frequent in patients with schizophrenia compared to the bipolar group. Both cannabis use and a schizophrenia diagnosis predicted earlier age at onset. There was a significant interaction between cannabis use and diagnosis, cannabis having a greater effect in bipolar patients. Age at onset in users of cannabis was comparable in both diagnostic groups whereas bipolar non-users were significantly older than schizophrenia non-users at onset. Cannabis use may decrease age at onset in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients and reduce the effect of diagnosis. This is consistent with the view that cannabis use may unmask a pre-existing genetic liability that is partly shared between patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 polymorphisms on suicidal behavior and substance abuse disorder among patients with schizophrenia: a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobylecki, C.J.; Hansen, T.; Timm, S.

    2008-01-01

    Suicidal behavior and substance abuse are frequent phenomena among patients with schizophrenia and may be attributable in part to antipsychotic treatment failure. Individuals who carry functional variants of the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes, shown to cause altered drug metabolism of psychoactive drugs......, are at risk of toxic accumulation or rapid elimination of these drugs, leading to treatment failure. We tested whether substance abuse disorder and suicidal behavior were associated with the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genotypes among patients with schizophrenia. Three hundred sixty-two patients with schizophrenia...... spectrum disorders (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision) were genotyped for functional CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 polymorphisms. Based on available medical records and clinical interviews, their suicidal behavior and substance abuse disorder were evaluated. No significant associations between...

  14. The impact of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 polymorphisms on suicidal behavior and substance abuse disorder among patients with schizophrenia: a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobylecki, Camilla J; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Timm, Sally

    2008-01-01

    , are at risk of toxic accumulation or rapid elimination of these drugs, leading to treatment failure. We tested whether substance abuse disorder and suicidal behavior were associated with the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genotypes among patients with schizophrenia. Three hundred sixty-two patients with schizophrenia......Suicidal behavior and substance abuse are frequent phenomena among patients with schizophrenia and may be attributable in part to antipsychotic treatment failure. Individuals who carry functional variants of the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes, shown to cause altered drug metabolism of psychoactive drugs...... spectrum disorders (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision) were genotyped for functional CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 polymorphisms. Based on available medical records and clinical interviews, their suicidal behavior and substance abuse disorder were evaluated. No significant associations between...

  15. Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Other Anxiety Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lochner, Christine; Stein, Dan J

    2010-01-01

    Background: There has been debate about whether obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) should be classified as one of the anxiety disorders, or should rather be categorized with obsessive-compulsive spectrum conditions...

  16. Cognition in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder: impairments that are more similar than different

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoso, A.; Carter, C. S.; Gold, J.M.; MacDonald, A.W.; Ragland, J.D.; Silverstein, S.M.; Strauss, M. E.; Barch, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognition is increasingly being recognized as an important aspect of psychotic disorders and a key contributor to functional outcome. In the past, comparative studies have been performed in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder with regard to cognitive performance, but the results have been mixed and the cognitive measures used have not always assessed the cognitive deficits found to be specific to psychosis. A set of optimized cognitive paradigms designed by the Cognitive Neuroscience Test Reliability and Clinical Applications for Schizophrenia (CNTRACS) Consortium to assess deficits specific to schizophrenia was used to measure cognition in a large group of individuals with schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder. Method A total of 519 participants (188 with schizophrenia, 63 with schizo-affective disorder and 268 controls) were administered three cognitive paradigms assessing the domains of goal maintenance in working memory, relational encoding and retrieval in episodic memory and visual integration. Results Across the three domains, the results showed no major quantitative differences between patient groups, with both groups uniformly performing worse than healthy subjects. Conclusions The findings of this study suggests that, with regard to deficits in cognition, considered a major aspect of psychotic disorder, schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder do not demonstrate major significant distinctions. These results have important implications for our understanding of the nosological structure of major psychopathology, providing evidence consistent with the hypothesis that there is no natural distinction between cognitive functioning in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorder. PMID:23522057

  17. Utahns' understanding of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Judith Markham; Christensen, Keith M

    2013-01-01

    The general public has numerous misconceptions and a lack of awareness and understanding regarding some of the prevalence, characteristics, and treatments of autism. As a result, education and awareness activities to increase the general public's understanding and awareness of autism are important. This study was conducted throughout Utah to inform public education and awareness efforts being planned as part of Utah's State Plan for Improving Outcomes for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Development Disorders. The purpose of this study was to identify public awareness and knowledge of ASD in Utah, such as the public's understanding of the prevalence, characteristics, and treatments of autism, as well as the sources of this information. To identify public perceptions and attitudes of autism spectrum disorder, 1001 Utah residents 18 years of age or older were surveyed using a 32-question statewide random-digit dialed telephone survey. The percentages of responses for 15 of the 20 autism-related questions are presented by ethnicity (Hispanic or Latino), education level, and income level. The study indicates that autism education efforts need to address the least understood aspects of autism; the causes of autism, how autism is diagnosed, and how autism is treated. Radio or TV outlets are more effective, particularly so with Hispanic or Latinos and populations with less education. Medical professionals are also an important resource for families with direct autism-related needs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A genetic deconstruction of neurocognitive traits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Carla P. D.; Andrea Christoforou; Sudheer Giddaluru; Ersland, Kari M.; Srdjan Djurovic; Manuel Mattheisen; Lundervold, Astri J.; Ivar Reinvang; Nöthen, Markus M.; Marcella Rietschel; Ophoff, Roel A.; Albert Hofman; André G Uitterlinden; Thomas Werge; Sven Cichon

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impairments in cognitive functions are common in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Cognitive traits have been proposed as useful for understanding the biological and genetic mechanisms implicated in cognitive function in healthy individuals and in the dysfunction observed in psychiatric disorders. Methods: Sets of genes associated with a range of cognitive functions often impaired in schizophrenia and bipolar dis...

  19. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  20. [Autobiographical memory and self-disorders in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, F; Potheegadoo, J; Allé, M C; Coutelle, R; Danion, J-M

    2017-02-01

    Disorders of self in schizophrenia have been considered as the core feature of the illness since its early clinical description. However, until recently, the understanding of these disorders referred mostly to philosophical considerations. The aim of this work is to examine how the various aspects of autobiographical memory deficits may be considered as possible cognitive mechanisms accounting for self-disorders in patients. We performed a theoretical review of the literature on autobiographical memory studies in schizophrenia. Our approach of cognitive psychopathology was grounded in the model of the Self-Memory System put forward by Conway (2005), which posits reciprocal relationships between autobiographical memory and the self. This model stresses the distinction between the working-self and the autobiographical memory knowledge base. The latter contains all autobiographical information stored in our life and is organized according to the specificity of this information. The role of the working-self is to maintain the coherence of the self and to control the access to autobiographical memories and corresponding memory details. The working-self supports an experiential or phenomenological dimension of the self, especially when a highly detailed autobiographical memory is retrieved, and a past event is re-experienced by the rememberer. The working-self also entails a conceptual part, the conceptual self, which contains self-knowledge and self-images. Our review showed that autobiographical memories of patients with schizophrenia are less specific and contain fewer phenomenological details than those of healthy participants. Patients also have difficulty assessing the subjective temporal distance of past events, and their ability to re-experience unique past personal events is affected as shown by a reduced conscious recollection and a smaller frequency of Field visual perspective during recall of autobiographical memories. This global alteration of all

  1. Language and communication in autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinogradova K.N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article is a review of English_language literature on the topic of development of language and communication in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD. It is shown that language in ASD often differs from the one in typical development, particularly in terms of pragmatics, unusual intonation and echolalia, and difficulties in speech perception and comprehension may also be present. Nevertheless, it should be noted that the results of many studies in this area are controversial due to a variety of reasons and it is hardly possible to reach agreement on many questions in this area.

  2. [Pragmatics in autism spectrum disorder: recent developments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissine, Mikhail; Clin, Elise; de Villiers, Jessica

    2016-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by primary pragmatic difficulties, out of step with verbal and non-verbal developmental level. This selective survey paper addresses three recent domains of research on pragmatic functions in autism. First, we provide an up-to-date discussion of how lack of sensitivity to social cues impacts early acquisition of words. Second, we review recent findings on the comprehension of non-literal language, pointing to a more refined clinical reality. Third, we describe recent developments in the study of conversation skills in autism. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  3. Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many people with schizophrenia. Behavioral techniques, such as social skills training, can help the person function better in social and work situations. Job training and relationship-building ...

  4. The impact of substance use disorders on the course of schizophrenia - a 15 year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse M.; Hesse, Morten; Lykke, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    Background This follow-up study compared patients with schizophrenia with co-occurring substance use disorder to patients with schizophrenia and no substance use disorder. Aims To investigate the prognostic significance of the effects of substance use disorders on the course of schizophrenia...... disorders have a substantial impact on the hospitalization rates of patients with schizophrenia, as well as on life expectancy. Patients with co-morbid substance abuse are more likely to be admitted for treatment during a given year although they have briefer contact with treatment. Keywords: Schizophrenia...

  5. Cessation of cannabis use by patients with recent-onset schizophrenia and related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Nienke; de Haan, Lieuwe; van den Berg, Sake; de Gier, Martin; Becker, Hiske; Linzen, Don H.

    2008-01-01

    Cannabis abuse has been found to be a component risk factor for the onset and poor outcome during the early course of schizophrenia and related disorders. Cannabis use has become a target for prevention and treatment of schizophrenia patients. Therefore, knowledge of factors that influence

  6. Clinical manifestations of self-disorders and the Gestalt of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mads Gram; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    evaluation, including the EASE scale (Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience), 2 schizophrenia patients were selected for detailed psychopathological presentation and discussion. The vignettes provide prototypical examples of what has been termed self-disorders in schizophrenia, ie, pervasive and enduring...

  7. More Pronounced Deficits in Facial Emotion Recognition for Schizophrenia than Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goghari, Vina M; Sponheim, Scott R

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are typically separated in diagnostic systems. Behavioural, cognitive, and brain abnormalities associated with each disorder nonetheless overlap. We evaluated the diagnostic specificity of facial emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to determine whether select aspects of emotion recognition differed for the two disorders. The investigation used an experimental task that included the same facial images in an emotion recognition condition and an age recognition condition (to control for processes associated with general face recognition) in 27 schizophrenia patients, 16 bipolar I patients, and 30 controls. Schizophrenia and bipolar patients exhibited both shared and distinct aspects of facial emotion recognition deficits. Schizophrenia patients had deficits in recognizing angry facial expressions compared to healthy controls and bipolar patients. Compared to control participants, both schizophrenia and bipolar patients were more likely to mislabel facial expressions of anger as fear. Given that schizophrenia patients exhibited a deficit in emotion recognition for angry faces, which did not appear due to generalized perceptual and cognitive dysfunction, improving recognition of threat-related expression may be an important intervention target to improve social functioning in schizophrenia. PMID:23218816

  8. Does Operational Diagnosis of Schizophrenia Significantly Impact Intellectual Deficits in Psychotic Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, H.; Shioiri, T.; Itoh, M.; Sato, Y.; Shichiri, K.; Someya, T.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that, as a group, patients with schizophrenia have intellectual deficits that may precede the manifestation of psychotic symptoms; however, how successfully intelligence tests are able to discriminate schizophrenia from other psychotic disorders has yet to be investigated in detail. Methods: Using Wechsler Adult…

  9. Gender identity and autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Klingensmith, Katherine; Volkmar, Fred R

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we briefly summarize much of the existing literature on gender-related concerns and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), drawing attention to critical shortcomings in our current understanding and potential clinical implications. Some authors have concluded that gender identity disorder (GID), or gender dysphoria (GD), is more common in individuals with ASD, providing a range of potential explanations. However, existing literature is quantitatively limited, and our capacity to draw conclusions is further complicated by conceptual challenges regarding how gender identity is best understood. Discourses that emphasize gender as a component of identity formation are gaining prominence and seem particularly salient when applied to ASD. Individuals with ASD should enjoy equal rights with regard to treatment for gender dysphoria. Clinicians may be able to assist individuals in understanding this aspect of their identity by broadening the social frame and facilitating an exploration of gender roles.

  10. [Genetic bases of autism spectrum disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Kastory-Bronowska, Monika; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are an etiologically and clinically heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders affecting approximately 0.6-1% of the general population. ASDs are characterized by deficits in social communication, impaired language development, and stereotyped repetitive behaviour. The impact of genetic factors in ASDs has been confirmed in the past few years. Numerous studies have shown that among patients with ASDs, approximately 10% have DNA copy number variation and 10-20% point mutations. Most of the deficiencies identified in individuals with ASDs relate to genes encoding proteins involved mainly in the development of neurons and their synapses functioning in various signaling pathways. Due to the large heterogeneity of identified changes in the genome of individuals with ASDs, the newest techniques enabling analysis of the entire genome in one study (microarrays, next-generation sequencing) are the methods of choice in the diagnostics of this pathology.

  11. Serologic Markers of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramova, T V; Kaysheva, Anna L; Ivanov, Y D; Pleshakova, T O; Iourov, I Y; Vorsanova, S G; Yurov, Y B; Schetkin, A A; Archakov, A I

    2017-08-01

    According to WHO data, about 67 million people worldwide are affected by autism, and this number grows by 14% annually. Among the possible causes of autism are genetic modifications, organic lesions of the central nervous system, metabolic disorders, influence of viral and bacterial infections, chemical influence to the mother's body during pregnancy, etc. The conducted research shows that research papers published until today do not name any potential protein markers that meet the requirements of the basic parameters for evaluating the efficiency of disease diagnostics, in particular high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Conducting proteomic research on a big scale in order to detect serologic markers of protein nature associated with development of autism spectrum disorders seems to be highly relevant.

  12. Injuries among children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anjali; Spencer, Donna; Yang, Wenya; Kelly, Jonathan P; Newschaffer, Craig J; Johnson, Jonathan; Marshall, Jaclyn; Azocar, Francisca; Tabb, Loni Philip; Dennen, Taylor

    2014-01-01

    We compared risk of injury among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to those without ASD, adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. We used claims data from 2001 to 2009 from a commercial health plan in the United States. A validated ASD case identification algorithm identified 33,565 children (ages 0-20 years) with ASD and 138,876 children without. Counting process models tested the association between ASD status and injury episodes with separate regressions run for children during different age periods. Unadjusted results demonstrated that children with ASD had a 12% greater injury risk than children without ASD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.119; P deficit disorders. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The Gut Microbiota and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Han

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI symptoms are a common comorbidity in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Many studies have shown alterations in the composition of the fecal flora and metabolic products of the gut microbiome in patients with ASD. The gut microbiota influences brain development and behaviors through the neuroendocrine, neuroimmune and autonomic nervous systems. In addition, an abnormal gut microbiota is associated with several diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, ASD and mood disorders. Here, we review the bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract (brain-gut axis and the role of the gut microbiota in the central nervous system (CNS and ASD. Microbiome-mediated therapies might be a safe and effective treatment for ASD.

  14. Epigenetic regulation in Autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sraboni Chaudhury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by an impaired social communication skill and often results in repetitive, stereotyped behavior which is observed in children during the first few years of life. Other characteristic of this disorder includes language disabilities, difficulties in sensory integration, lack of reciprocal interactions and in some cases, cognitive delays. One percentage of the general population is affected by ASD and is four times more common in boys than girls. There are hundreds of genes, which has been identified to be associated with ASD etiology. However it remains difficult to comprehend our understanding in defining the genetic architecture necessary for complete exposition of its pathophysiology. Seeing the complexity of the disease, it is important to adopt a multidisciplinary approach which should not only focus on the “genetics” of autism but also on epigenetics, transcriptomics, immune system disruption and environmental factors that could all impact the pathogenesis of the disease. As environmental factors also play a key role in regulating the trigger of ASD, the role of chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation has started to emerge. Such epigenetic modifications directly link molecular regulatory pathways and environmental factors, which might be able to explain some aspects of complex disorders like ASD. The present review will focus on the role of epigenetic regulation in defining the underlying cause for ASD

  15. Can Psychological, Social and Demographical Factors Predict Clinical Characteristics Symptomatology of Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Joanna; Kapelski, Pawel; Łabędzka, Magdalena; Skibinska, Maria; Zaremba, Dorota; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Hauser, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia (SCH) is a complex, psychiatric disorder affecting 1 % of population. Its clinical phenotype is heterogeneous with delusions, hallucinations, depression, disorganized behaviour and negative symptoms. Bipolar affective disorder (BD) refers to periodic changes in mood and activity from depression to mania. It affects 0.5-1.5 % of population. Two types of disorder (type I and type II) are distinguished by severity of mania episodes. In our analysis, we aimed to check if clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions occurrence in BD and SCH cases. We included total sample of 443 bipolar and 439 schizophrenia patients. Diagnosis was based on DSM-IV criteria using Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We applied regression models to analyse associations between clinical and demographical traits from OPCRIT and symptom dimensions. We used previously computed dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder as quantitative traits for regression models. Male gender seemed protective factor for depression dimension in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder sample. Presence of definite psychosocial stressor prior disease seemed risk factor for depressive and suicidal domain in BD and SCH. OPCRIT items describing premorbid functioning seemed related with depression, positive and disorganised dimensions in schizophrenia and psychotic in BD. We proved clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We also saw relation between clinical dimensions and course of disorder and impairment during disorder.

  16. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. Results: In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Conclusion: Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  17. Childhood adversity and conduct disorder: A developmental pathway to violence in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Clare; Harris, Stephanie; Fahy, Thomas; Murphy, Declan; Picchioni, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Both childhood adversity and conduct disorder are over-represented among adult patients with schizophrenia and have been proposed as significant factors that may increase the risk of violence. It is not known how childhood adversity and conduct disorder might interact to contribute towards an increased risk of violence in schizophrenia. This study aimed to explore the relationships between childhood adversity, conduct disorder and violence among men with schizophrenia. 54 male patients with schizophrenia from a range of inpatient and outpatient mental health services were assessed for exposure to a variety of childhood adversities, conduct disorder before the age of 15 and later violent behaviour in adulthood. Exposure to domestic violence during childhood was associated with an increased propensity to violence in adulthood. Symptoms of conduct disorder were associated both with cumulative exposure to childhood adversities and with later propensity to violence. The cumulative number of childhood adversities was associated with adult propensity to violence. This association was significantly attenuated by inclusion of conduct disorder in the model. This is the first study to demonstrate an association between childhood exposure to domestic violence and later violent behaviour in schizophrenia. Conduct disorder may mediate the association between cumulative childhood adversities and adult propensity to violence, indicating an indirect pathway. These results indicate a complex interplay between childhood adversity, conduct disorder and later violent behaviour in schizophrenia, and suggest that there may be shared aetiological risk factors on a common developmental pathway to violence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The rationale for early intervention in schizophrenia and related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Jeppesen, Pia; Petersen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To examine the rationale and evidence supporting an early intervention approach in schizophrenia. Methods: A selective literature review was conducted. Results: During the onset of schizophrenia, there is often a significant delay between the emergence of psychotic symptoms and the ......Abstract Aim: To examine the rationale and evidence supporting an early intervention approach in schizophrenia. Methods: A selective literature review was conducted. Results: During the onset of schizophrenia, there is often a significant delay between the emergence of psychotic symptoms...

  19. Autistic spectrum disorders as functional disconnection syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Robert; Leisman, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    We outline the basis of how functional disconnection with reduced activity and coherence in the right hemisphere would explain all of the symptoms of autistic spectrum disorder as well as the observed increases in sympathetic activation. If the problem of autistic spectrum disorder is primarily one of desynchronization and ineffective interhemispheric communication, then the best way to address the symptoms is to improve coordination between areas of the brain. To do that the best approach would include multimodal therapeusis that would include a combination of somatosensory, cognitive, behavioral, and biochemical interventions all directed at improving overall health, reducing inflammation and increasing right hemisphere activity to the level that it becomes temporally coherent with the left hemisphere. We hypothesize that the unilateral increased hemispheric stimulation has the effect of increasing the temporal oscillations within the thalamocortical pathways bringing it closer to the oscillation rate of the adequately functioning hemisphere. We propose that increasing the baseline oscillation speed of one entire hemisphere will enhance the coordination and coherence between the two hemispheres allowing for enhanced motor and cognitive binding.

  20. Clinical Genetic Aspects of ASD Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bradley Schaefer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Early presumptions opined that autism spectrum disorder (ASD was related to the rearing of these children by emotionally-distant mothers. Advances in the 1960s and 1970s clearly demonstrated the biologic basis of autism with a high heritability. Recent advances have demonstrated that specific etiologic factors in autism spectrum disorders can be identified in 30%–40% of cases. Based on early reports newer, emerging genomic technologies are likely to increase this diagnostic yield to over 50%. To date these investigations have focused on etiologic factors that are largely mono-factorial. The currently undiagnosed causes of ASDs will likely be found to have causes that are more complex. Epigenetic, multiple interacting loci, and four dimensional causes (with timing as a variable are likely to be associated with the currently unidentifiable cases. Today, the “Why” is more important than ever. Understanding the causes of ASDs help inform families of important issues such as recurrence risk, prognosis, natural history, and predicting associated co-morbid medical conditions. In the current era of emerging efforts in “personalized medicine”, identifying an etiology will be critical in identifying endo-phenotypic groups and individual variations that will allow for tailored treatment for persons with ASD.

  1. Social cognition in schizophrenia in comparison to bipolar disorder: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Emre; Pantelis, Christos

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common characteristic of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BP). While these deficits are more severe in schizophrenia, there is a significant overlap between conditions. However, it was hypothesized that social cognitive deficits might be more specific to schizophrenia. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing facial emotion recognition and theory of mind (ToM) abilities in schizophrenia and BP. 26 studies comparing 1301 patients with schizophrenia and 1075 with BP were included. Schizophrenia patients significantly underperformed compared with BP patients in both facial emotion recognition (d=0.39) and ToM (d=0.57). Neurocognitive deficits significantly contributed to schizophrenia-BP group differences for ToM. However, between-group differences for social cognition were not statistically more severe than neurocognition. Social cognitive impairment is more severe in schizophrenia in comparison to BP. However, between-group differences are modest and are comparable to other neurocognitive differences between schizophrenia and BP. There is significant overlap in social cognitive performance deficits observed in both schizophrenia and BP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Schizophrenia spectrum participants have reduced visual contrast sensitivity to chromatic (red/green and luminance (light/dark stimuli: new insights into information processing, visual channel function and antipsychotic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Suzanne Cadenhead

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals with schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses have deficient visual information processing as assessed by a variety of paradigms including visual backward masking, motion perception and visual contrast sensitivity (VCS. In the present study, the VCS paradigm was used to investigate potential differences in magnocellular (M versus parvocellular (P channel function that might account for the observed information processing deficits of schizophrenia spectrum patients. Specifically, VCS for near threshold luminance (black/white stimuli is known to be governed primarily by the M channel, while VCS for near threshold chromatic (red/green stimuli is governed by the P channel. Methods: VCS for luminance and chromatic stimuli (counterphase-reversing sinusoidal gratings, 1.22 c/deg, 8.3 Hz was assessed in 53 patients with schizophrenia (including 5 off antipsychotic medication, 22 individuals diagnosed with schizotypal personality disorder and 53 healthy comparison subjects. Results: Schizophrenia spectrum groups demonstrated reduced VCS in both conditions relative to normals, and there was no significant group by condition interaction effect. Post-hoc analyses suggest that it was the patients with schizophrenia on antipsychotic medication as well as SPD participants who accounted for the deficits in the luminance condition. Conclusions: These results demonstrate visual information processing deficits in schizophrenia spectrum populations but do not support the notion of selective abnormalities in the function of subcortical channels as suggested by previous studies. Further work is needed in a longitudinal design to further assess VCS as a vulnerability marker for psychosis as well as the effect of antipsychotic agents on performance in schizophrenia spectrum populations.

  3. Fractionation of Social Brain Circuits in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Simmons, W. Kyle; Milbury, Lydia A.; Wallace, Gregory L.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are developmental disorders characterized by impairments in social and communication abilities and repetitive behaviours. Converging neuroscientific evidence has suggested that the neuropathology of autism spectrum disorders is widely distributed, involving impaired connectivity throughout the brain. Here, we evaluate the…

  4. Complex mismatch negativity to tone pair deviants in long-term schizophrenia and in the first-episode schizophrenia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Dean F; McCathern, Alexis G; Coffman, Brian A; Murphy, Timothy K; Haigh, Sarah M

    2018-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential to stimulus change. MMN to infrequent deviant tones that differs in a simple physical parameter from repetitive standard tones is reduced in patients with long-term schizophrenia (Sz; d=~1). However, this simple MMN is not uniformly reduced at the first-episode of schizophrenia-spectrum psychosis (FESz; d<0.1 for pitch; <0.4 for duration). Deviant stimuli that violate pattern rules also evoke MMN. This complex MMN is evoked by deviations in the relation of sounds to each other. The simplest pattern involves tone pairs. Although the pitch of first tone in the pair varies, the second tone's pitch always follows a rule (e.g., always 3 semitones higher). We measured complex MMN to deviant tone pairs that descended in pitch among standard tone pairs that ascended in pitch, never before examined in Sz or in FESz. Experiment 1 showed significant reductions in complex MMN in 20 Sz compared to 22 matched controls. Experiment 2 replicated smaller complex MMN in a shorter protocol in 24 Sz compared to 21 matched controls, but showed no significant complex MMN reduction in 21 FESz compared to 21 matched controls. Although reduced in Sz, indicating deficits in generation of a simple acoustic pattern rule, the tone pair complex MMN was within normal limits in FESz. This suggests that more complex perceptual pattern analysis processes are, at least partially, still intact at the first break. Future work will determine at what point of pattern complexity subtle auditory perception pathophysiology will be revealed in FESz. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased mortality among patients admitted with major psychiatric disorders: a register-based study comparing mortality in unipolar depressive disorder, bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    disorder has never been examined in a population-based study. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine and compare mortality rates after admission with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, unipolar depressive disorder, or bipolar affective disorder and to examine the impact of family history......: Unipolar depressive disorder, bipolar affective disorder, and schizoaffective disorder were associated with the same pattern of excess mortality. Schizophrenia had a lower mortality from unnatural causes of death and a higher mortality from natural causes compared to the 3 other disorders. Family history......CONTEXT: Persons suffering from severe mental disorder have an excess mortality compared to persons with no mental disorder. However, the magnitude of the excess mortality differs from one mental disorder to another, and the impact on mortality if a first-degree family member suffers from a mental...

  6. Coping strategies in schizoaffective disorder and schizophrenia: Differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingrone, Cinzia; Montemagni, Cristiana; Sandei, Luisa; Bava, Irene; Mancini, Irene; Cardillo, Simona; Rocca, Paola

    2016-10-30

    Aims of the current study were to explore differences in coping between 58 patients with schizoaffective disorder (SAD) and 89 with schizophrenia (SZ) and to identify factors associated with coping in both disorders. The demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with SAD and with SZ were compared using ANOVA and χ(2). Pearson's correlations were calculated between coping styles and socio-demographic and clinical variables in each group. The significant ones were subsequently analyzed using multiple regressions. Patients with SAD used emotion oriented coping more frequently than patients 2016with SZ. In patients with SAD, self-esteem contributed to task-oriented; avolition-anhedonia (AA) to emotion-oriented; duration of illness and years of education to distraction; AA to social diversion. In patients with SZ, AA, the mental component summary score of the Short Form - 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and self-esteem contributed to emotion oriented coping; the mental component summary score of SF-36 to distraction; AA to social diversion. Our results suggest that patients with SAD and SZ use diverse coping strategies. A greater attention must be given to the presence of self-esteem and AA in individuals with both disorders. These factors are potentially modifiable from specific therapeutic interventions, which can produce effects on coping strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative neuropsychiatry: white matter abnormalities in children and adolescents with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T; Langen, C; Schmidt, M; Hough, M; James, A

    2015-02-01

    There is considerable evidence that white matter abnormalities play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of major psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Few studies, however, have compared white matter abnormalities early in the course of the illness. A total of 102 children and adolescents participated in the study, including 43 with early-onset schizophrenia, 13 with early-onset bipolar affective disorder, 17 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 29 healthy controls. Diffusion tensor imaging scans were obtained on all children and the images were assessed for the presence of non-spatially overlapping regions of white matter differences, a novel algorithm known as the pothole approach. Patients with early-onset schizophrenia and early-onset bipolar affective disorder had a significantly greater number of white matter potholes compared to controls, but the total number of potholes did not differ between the two groups. The volumes of the potholes were significantly larger in patients with early-onset bipolar affective disorder compared to the early-onset schizophrenia group. Children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder showed no differences in the total number of white matter potholes compared to controls. White matter abnormalities in early-onset schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder are more global in nature, whereas children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder do not show widespread differences in FA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypothesis: grandiosity and guilt cause paranoia; paranoid schizophrenia is a psychotic mood disorder; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Charles Raymond

    2008-11-01

    Delusional paranoia has been associated with severe mental illness for over a century. Kraepelin introduced a disorder called "paranoid depression," but "paranoid" became linked to schizophrenia, not to mood disorders. Paranoid remains the most common subtype of schizophrenia, but some of these cases, as Kraepelin initially implied, may be unrecognized psychotic mood disorders, so the relationship of paranoid schizophrenia to psychotic bipolar disorder warrants reevaluation. To address whether paranoia associates more with schizophrenia or mood disorders, a selected literature is reviewed and 11 cases are summarized. Comparative clinical and recent molecular genetic data find phenotypic and genotypic commonalities between patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder lending support to the idea that paranoid schizophrenia could be the same disorder as psychotic bipolar disorder. A selected clinical literature finds no symptom, course, or characteristic traditionally considered diagnostic of schizophrenia that cannot be accounted for by psychotic bipolar disorder patients. For example, it is hypothesized here that 2 common mood-based symptoms, grandiosity and guilt, may underlie functional paranoia. Mania explains paranoia when there are grandiose delusions that one's possessions are so valuable that others will kill for them. Similarly, depression explains paranoia when delusional guilt convinces patients that they deserve punishment. In both cases, fear becomes the overwhelming emotion but patient and physician focus on the paranoia rather than on underlying mood symptoms can cause misdiagnoses. This study uses a clinical, case-based, hypothesis generation approach that warrants follow-up with a larger representative sample of psychotic patients followed prospectively to determine the degree to which the clinical course observed herein is typical of all such patients. Differential diagnoses, nomenclature, and treatment implications are

  9. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in schizoaffective disorder: comparison of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycı, Demet; Ozdel, Osman; Sözeri-Varma, Gülfizar; Kıroğlu, Yılmaz; Tümkaya, Selim

    2012-04-27

    The aim of this study was to compare schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia based on (1)H-MRS metabolite values in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and executive functions. The subjects comprised 15 patients with bipolar disorder type I (BD), 15 with schizophrenia (SCH), 15 with schizoaffective disorder (SAD) and 15 healthy controls. We performed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) bilaterally. Levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho) and creatine-containing compounds (Cr) were measured in the DLPFC using (1)H-MRS. We administered the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the Stroop Test (ST) to evaluate executive functions. The SAD, BD and SCH patients had lower levels of NAA than the control group. The SAD and BD patients had low levels of Cho compared to the control group. The left DLPFC Cr levels in all of the patient groups and the right DLPFC Cr levels in the BD and SAD groups were lower than in the control group. The levels of NAA Cho and Cr were not related to executive functions and attention performance. Cr level were related to attention processes, only in SCH. Our results indicate that NAA levels are reduced in schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, but the reduction in the levels of NAA is not a distinctive feature among these three illnesses. Schizoaffective and bipolar disorders have similar features related to the levels of compounds containing Cho and Cr. This similarity may be related to these illnesses both having an affective basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced expression of G protein-coupled receptor kinases in schizophrenia but not in schizoaffective disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, ER; Ahmed, MR; Gurevich, VV; Benovic, JL; Gurevich, EV

    2011-01-01

    Alterations of multiple G protein-mediated signaling pathways are detected in schizophrenia. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) and arrestins terminate signaling by G protein-coupled receptors exerting powerful influence on receptor functions. Modifications of arrestin and/or GRKs expression may contribute to schizophrenia pathology. Cortical expression of arrestins and GRKs was measured postmortem in control and subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Additionally, arrestin/GRK expression was determined in elderly patients with schizophrenia and age-matched control. Patients with schizophrenia, but not schizoaffective disorder, displayed reduced concentration of arrestin and GRK mRNAs and GRK3 protein. Arrestins and GRK significantly decreased with age. In elderly patients, GRK6 was reduced, with other GRKs and arrestins unchanged. Reduced cortical concentration of GRKs in schizophrenia (resembling that in aging) may result in altered G protein-dependent signaling, thus contributing to prefrontal deficits in schizophrenia. The data suggest distinct molecular mechanisms underlying schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. PMID:21784156

  11. Reduced heart rate variability in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, D S; Westlye, L T; Kaufmann, T; Rustan, Ø G; Brandt, C L; Haatveit, B; Steen, N E; Andreassen, O A

    2016-01-01

    Despite current diagnostic systems distinguishing schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) as separate diseases, emerging evidence suggests they share a number of clinical and epidemiological features, such as increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. It is not well understood if poor cardiac autonomic nervous system regulation, which can be indexed non-invasively by the calculation of heart rate variability (HRV), contributes to these common CVD risk factors in both diseases. We calculated HRV in 47 patients with SZ, 33 patients with BD and 212 healthy controls. Measures of symptom severity were also collected from the patient groups. Heart rate variability was significantly reduced in both these disorders in comparison with the healthy participants; however, there were no HRV differences between disorders. Importantly, these reductions were independent of the medication, age or body mass index effects. There was also preliminary evidence that patients with reduced HRV had increased overall and negative psychosis symptom severity regardless of SZ or BD diagnosis. We suggest that HRV may provide a possible biomarker of CVD risk and symptom severity in severe mental illness. Thus, our results highlight the importance of cardiometabolic screening across SZ and bipolar spectrum disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Caregivers consequences of care among patients with eating disorders, depression or schizophrenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martín, Josune; Padierna, Angel; van Wijngaarden, Bob; Aguirre, Urko; Anton, Ane; Muñoz, Pedro; Quintana, José M

    2015-01-01

    .... The objective of this study was to compare caregiver consequences in eating disorders (ED) with caregiver consequences in depression and schizophrenia, assessed with the same instrument, the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ...

  13. Clozapine and obsessions in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, L.; Linszen, D. H.; Gorsira, R.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The increase or emergence of obsessions was compared in young patients with recent-onset schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders taking clozapine and other antipsychotic drugs. METHOD: We conducted a retrospective cohort study. Subjects were 121 consecutively admitted patients

  14. Diagnostic specificity of poor premorbid adjustment: Comparison of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and mood disorder with psychotic features

    OpenAIRE

    Tarbox, Sarah I.; Brown, Leslie H.; Haas, Gretchen L.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have significant deficits in premorbid social and academic adjustment compared to individuals with non-psychotic diagnoses. However, it is unclear how severity and developmental trajectory of premorbid maladjustment compare across psychotic disorders. This study examined the association between premorbid functioning (in childhood, early adolescence, and late adolescence) and psychotic disorder diagnosis in a first-episode sample of 105 individuals: schizophrenia...

  15. PROSPECTS OF DIAGNOSTICS OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    O. G. Novoselova; G. A. Karkashadze; N. V. Zhurkova; O.I. Maslova

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of a problem of autism spectrum disorder in children and the modern view on etiology and pathogenesis of these states are revealed in the article. Autism classification according to the International classification of diseases of the 10th revision adopted in Russia and important changes of a new classifier of the American psychiatric association concerning autism spectrum disorders are considered. The difficulties connected with diagnostics of autism spectrum disorders in childr...

  16. Specifies of teaching swimming to children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Baštová, Miroslava

    2017-01-01

    Title: Specifics of teaching swimming to children with autism spectrum disorder. Objectives: Creation and implementation of the concept of preparatory and basic swimming lessons for children with autism spectrum disorder. Evaluation of information on continuing education and the achieved level of swimming skills and swimming locomotion observed in children with autism spectrum disorder. Presentation and qualitative assessment of the four case studies and subsequent design of guidelines for sw...

  17. Specifics of swimming teaching children with autism spectrum disorder.

    OpenAIRE

    Baštová, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    Title: Specifics of swimming teaching children with autism spectrum disorder. Objectives: Application of the structured learning by the concept of common preparatory and basic swimming lessons for children with autism spectrum disorder. Presentation and evaluation of nine case studies and subsequent implementation of policy for teaching swimming to children with autism spectrum disorder. Methods: Analysis of specialized literature, case studies, surveys, interviews, scaling observation and st...

  18. Explicit versus implicit social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Callenmark, Björn; Kjellin, Lars; Rönnqvist, Louise; Bölte, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder is defined by reciprocal social-communication impairments, several studies have found no evidence for altered social cognition test performance. This study examined explicit (i.e. prompted) and implicit (i.e. spontaneous) variants of social cognition testing in autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 19 adolescents with autism spectrum disorder and 19 carefully matched typically devel