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Sample records for schizophrenia paranoid

  1. Predicting severity of paranoid schizophrenia

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    Kolesnichenko Elena Vladimirovna

    2015-01-01

    Clinical symptoms, course and outcomes of paranoid schizophrenia are polymorphic. 206 cases of paranoid schizophrenia were investigated. Clinical predictors were collected from hospital records and interviews. Quantitative assessment of the severity of schizophrenia as special indexes was used. Schizoid, epileptoid, psychasthenic and conformal accentuation of personality in the premorbid, early onset of psychosis, paranoid and hallucinatory-paranoid variants of onset predicted more expressed ...

  2. PARANOID INDIVIDUALS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA SHOW GREATER SOCIAL COGNITIVE BIAS AND WORSE SOCIAL FUNCTIONING THAN NON-PARANOID INDIVIDUALS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA.

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    Pinkham, Amy E; Harvey, Philip D; Penn, David L

    2016-03-01

    Paranoia is a common symptom of schizophrenia that may be related to how individuals process and respond to social stimuli. Previous investigations support a link between increased paranoia and greater social cognitive impairments, but these studies have been limited to single domains of social cognition, and no studies have examined how paranoia may influence functional outcome. Data from 147 individuals with schizophrenia were used to examine whether actively paranoid and non-paranoid individuals with schizophrenia differ in social cognition and functional outcomes. On measures assessing social cognitive bias, paranoid individuals endorsed more hostile and blaming attributions and identified more faces as untrustworthy; however, paranoid and non-paranoid individuals did not differ on emotion recognition and theory of mind tasks assessing social cognitive ability. Likewise, paranoid individuals showed greater impairments in real-world interpersonal relationships and social acceptability as compared to non-paranoid patients, but these differences did not extend to performance based tasks assessing functional capacity and social competence. These findings isolate specific social cognitive disparities between paranoid and non-paranoid subgroups and suggest that paranoia may exacerbate the social dysfunction that is commonly experienced by individuals with schizophrenia.

  3. Paranoid Schizophrenia versus Schizoaffective Disorder: Neuropsychological Aspects.

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    Leposavić, Ljubica; Leposavić, Ivana; Šaula-Marojević, Bijana; Gavrilović, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychological aspects of paranoid schizophrenia have still not been examined enough.These disorders are usually not studied separately, but are included in the studies about schizophrenic patients with positive symptoms. Despite the fact that schizophrenia represents a heterogeneous group of mental disorders, usually it is not separated from schizoaffective disorder in neuropsychological researches. The essence of this research is to evaluate cognitive functioning of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder by applying neuropsychological tests. The research included 91 subjects, right handed, from 30 to 53 years old, who were classified into three groups: inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia in remission (n=31), inpatients with schizoaffective disorder in remission (n=30) and healthy subjects (n=30). Both groups of patients showed poorer achievements than healthy subjects in most of the applied tests. Patients with schizoaffective disorder showed global loss of intellectual efficiency, executive dysfunction and compromised visual-construction organization. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed partial loss of intellectual efficiency with verbal IQ and executive functions preserved. In the remission phase, patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed cognitive disorders in moderate degree, but when it comes to patients with schizoaffective disorder, more massive cognitive, deficits were registered.

  4. Paranoid schizophrenia versus schizoaffective disorder: Neuropsychological aspects

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    Leposavić Ljubica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neuropsychological aspects of paranoid schizophrenia have still not been examined enough. These disorders are usually not studied separately, but are included in the studies about schizophrenic patients with positive symptoms. Despite the fact that schizophrenia represents a heterogeneous group of mental disorders, usually it is not separated from schizoaffective disorder in neuropsychological researches. Objective. The essence of this research is to evaluate cognitive functioning of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder by applying neuropsychological tests. Methods. The research included 91 subjects, right handed, from 30 to 53 years old, who were classified into three groups: inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia in remission (n=31, inpatients with schizoaffective disorder in remission (n=30 and healthy subjects (n=30. Results. Both groups of patients showed poorer achievements than healthy subjects in most of the applied tests. Patients with schizoaffective disorder showed global loss of intellectual efficiency, executive dysfunction and compromised visual-construction organization. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed partial loss of intellectual efficiency with verbal IQ and executive functions preserved. Conclusion. In the remission phase, patients with paranoid schizophrenia expressed cognitive disorders in moderate degree, but when it comes to patients with schizoaffective disorder, more massive cognitive deficits were registered.

  5. [Cognitive performance in schizophrenia (paranoid vs residual subtype)].

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    Dillon, Carol; Taragano, Fernando; Sarasola, Diego; Iturry, Mónica; Serrano, Cecilia; Raczkowski, Amalia; Allegri, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Several studies refer to the relationship between schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunctions. The most frequent disturbances accepted are the deficits in the executive, memory and verbal tests. However, there are few comparative data about the cognitive functioning of the different subtypes of schizophrenia. Analyze and compare the neuropsychological disturbances present in patients with paranoid and residual schizophrenia. Eleven patients with paranoid schizophrenia, eleven patients with residual schizophrenia (DSM-IV criteria), and thirty one normal subjects matched by age, educational level, and general cognitive level (Mini Mental State Examination (Folstein, 1975), were assessed with a semistructured psychiatric examination and an extensive neuropsychological battery. Significant differences were found in memory, language, and executive functions when schizophrenics were compared with normal subjects. Differences in similarities were found between paranoid and residual schizophrenics. Residual schizophrenics had more disturbances in neuropsychological tests in comparison with paranoid schizophrenics. Schizophrenics demonstrated disturbances in memory, language, executive functions and attention. Residual schizophrenics had more impairment in neuropsychological tests than paranoid schizophrenics.

  6. Amygdala Hyperactivity at Rest in Paranoid Individuals With Schizophrenia.

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    Pinkham, Amy E; Liu, Peiying; Lu, Hanzhang; Kriegsman, Michael; Simpson, Claire; Tamminga, Carol

    2015-08-01

    The amygdala's role in threat perception suggests that increased activation of this region may be related to paranoid ideation. However, investigations of amygdala function in paranoid individuals with schizophrenia, compared with both healthy individuals and nonparanoid individuals with schizophrenia, have consistently reported reduced task-related activation. The reliance of blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional MRI on a contrast between events and baseline, and the inability to quantitatively measure this baseline, may account for these counterintuitive findings. The present study tested for differences in baseline levels of amygdala activity in paranoid and nonparanoid individuals with schizophrenia using arterial spin labeling perfusion MRI. Resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and task-related activation of the amygdala were measured in 25 healthy individuals, 16 individuals with schizophrenia who were actively paranoid at the time of scanning, and 16 individuals with schizophrenia who were not paranoid. Analysis of relative CBF values extracted from the amygdala bilaterally revealed significantly increased activity in the left amygdala in paranoid patient volunteers compared with healthy comparison subjects and nonparanoid patient volunteers. Increased CBF was also evident in the right amygdala but did not reach the level of statistical significance. Paranoid volunteers also showed significantly decreased task-related activation of the amygdala compared with the two other groups. These findings suggest that amygdala hyperactivation may underlie paranoia in schizophrenia. Additionally, the reported differences between paranoid and nonparanoid patient volunteers emphasize the importance of considering symptom-based subgroups and baseline levels of activity in future investigations of neural activation in schizophrenia.

  7. Language Disorder In Schizophrenia Patient: A Case Study Of Five Schizophrenia Paranoid Patients In Simeulue District Hospital

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    Kurnia, Beby Febri

    2015-01-01

    Language disorder in schizophrenia patients is an acquired language disorder due to thought disorder. This analysis analyzed language disorder in schizophrenia paranoid patients in Simeulue District Hospital. The objective of this analysis were: (1) to find out the types of schizophrenic speech found in schizophrenia paranoid patients, (2) to find out the most dominant type of schizophrenia speech found in schizophrenia paranoid patients, and (3) to find out which patient has most severe lang...

  8. Paranoid individuals with schizophrenia show greater social cognitive bias and worse social functioning than non-paranoid individuals with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Amy E. Pinkham; Philip D. Harvey; David L. Penn

    2016-01-01

    Paranoia is a common symptom of schizophrenia that may be related to how individuals process and respond to social stimuli. Previous investigations support a link between increased paranoia and greater social cognitive impairments, but these studies have been limited to single domains of social cognition, and no studies have examined how paranoia may influence functional outcome. Data from 147 individuals with schizophrenia were used to examine whether actively paranoid and non-paranoid indiv...

  9. Do patients with paranoid and disorganized schizophrenia respond differently to antipsychotic drugs?

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    Corves, C; Engel, R R; Davis, J; Leucht, S

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the differential response to amisulpride in patients with paranoid versus disorganized schizophrenia. We reanalyzed the original data from five different randomized drug trials comparing Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores in a database containing 427 paranoid and 296 disorganized patients with schizophrenia. Both the disorganized and the paranoid group showed a substantial improvement of the BPRS total score within the first 4 weeks. In the paranoid group, mean (±SD) BPRS reduction was 16.9 (±14.6) (t = 24.06, df = 426, P Paranoid patients improved by 4.8 BPRS points more than disorganized patients (adjusted means 18.90 (CI = 17.33-20.37) for the paranoid and 14.1 (CI = 12.04 - 16.11) for the disorganized group. We conclude that amisulpride is effective in disorganized as well as in paranoid schizophrenia, but that symptom reduction in the disorganized subtype is less pronounced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Common variants in the TPH2 promoter confer susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Yi, Zhenghui; Zhang, Chen; Lu, Weihong; Song, Lisheng; Liu, Dentang; Xu, Yifeng; Fang, Yiru

    2012-07-01

    Serotonergic system-related genes may be good candidates in investigating the genetic basis of schizophrenia. Our previous study suggested that promoter region of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene (TPH2) may confer the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated whether common variants within TPH2 promoter may predispose to paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. A total of 509 patients who met DSM-IV criteria for paranoid schizophrenia and 510 matched healthy controls were recruited for this study. Five polymorphisms within TPH2 promoter region were tested. No statistically significant differences were found in allele or genotype frequencies between schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. The frequency of the rs4448731T-rs6582071A-rs7963803A-rs4570625T-rs11178997A haplotype was significantly higher in cases compared to the controls (P = 0.003; OR = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.15-1.95). Our results suggest that the common variants within TPH2 promoter are associated with paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. Further studies in larger samples are warranted to elucidate the role of TPH2 in the etiology of paranoid schizophrenia.

  11. Subjective emotional over-arousal to neutral social scenes in paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Haralanova, Evelina; Haralanov, Svetlozar; Beraldi, Anna; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Hennig-Fast, Kristina

    2012-02-01

    From the clinical practice and some experimental studies, it is apparent that paranoid schizophrenia patients tend to assign emotional salience to neutral social stimuli. This aberrant cognitive bias has been conceptualized to result from increased emotional arousal, but direct empirical data are scarce. The aim of the present study was to quantify the subjective emotional arousal (SEA) evoked by emotionally non-salient (neutral) compared to emotionally salient (negative) social stimuli in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Thirty male inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia psychosis and 30 demographically matched healthy controls rated their level of SEA in response to neutral and negative social scenes from the International Affective Picture System and the Munich Affective Picture System. Schizophrenia patients compared to healthy controls had an increased overall SEA level. This relatively higher SEA was evoked only by the neutral but not by the negative social scenes. To our knowledge, the present study is the first designed to directly demonstrate subjective emotional over-arousal to neutral social scenes in paranoid schizophrenia. This finding might explain previous clinical and experimental data and could be viewed as the missing link between the primary neurobiological and secondary psychological mechanisms of paranoid psychotic-symptom formation. Furthermore, despite being very short and easy to perform, the task we used appeared to be sensitive enough to reveal emotional dysregulation, in terms of emotional disinhibition/hyperactivation in paranoid schizophrenia patients. Thus, it could have further research and clinical applications, including as a neurobehavioral probe for imaging studies.

  12. Biosocial characteristics of patients with paranoid schizophrenia

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    Gergana K. Panayotova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is known as a complex disorder that combines both genetic and environmental factors. Different genes have been tested as candidates for association with schizophrenia and different environmental factors have been examined in many studies on epidemiology of schizophrenia. Specific environmental factors, such as nonspecific stress, mental and physical abuse, maternal diet during pregnancy, drug use, living in an urban setting, migration, seasonal effects on birth and exposure to infections, have been discussed as possible risk for schizophrenia. The present preliminary study is focused on the relations between biological and social characteristics of patients with paranoid schizophrenia with different cognitive levels, emotional and creative styles. Descriptive statistics, the Student's t-test and SPSS software, were used to analyse the relations mentioned. Differences between sexes and these concerning age of individuals (risk level of inheritance, ABO blood group distribution, triggering factors, aggressive behavior, single or multiple suicide attempts, levels of education and creative talents were indicated and discussed. The study identifies important trends and discuses essential biosocial relations in context of the knowledge for schizophrenia in Bulgaria. Future comparative investigations, including genetic markers and psychogenetic approaches, should be used in complex, in order to characterize the reasons for developing paranoid schizophrenia and the possible relations between biological, psychological and social factors better.

  13. Are there differential deficits in facial emotion recognition between paranoid and non-paranoid schizophrenia? A signal detection analysis.

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    Huang, Charles Lung-Cheng; Hsiao, Sigmund; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Howng, Shen-Long

    2013-10-30

    This study assessed facial emotion recognition abilities in subjects with paranoid and non-paranoid schizophrenia (NPS) using signal detection theory. We explore the differential deficits in facial emotion recognition in 44 paranoid patients with schizophrenia (PS) and 30 non-paranoid patients with schizophrenia (NPS), compared to 80 healthy controls. We used morphed faces with different intensities of emotion and computed the sensitivity index (d') of each emotion. The results showed that performance differed between the schizophrenia and healthy controls groups in the recognition of both negative and positive affects. The PS group performed worse than the healthy controls group but better than the NPS group in overall performance. Performance differed between the NPS and healthy controls groups in the recognition of all basic emotions and neutral faces; between the PS and healthy controls groups in the recognition of angry faces; and between the PS and NPS groups in the recognition of happiness, anger, sadness, disgust, and neutral affects. The facial emotion recognition impairment in schizophrenia may reflect a generalized deficit rather than a negative-emotion specific deficit. The PS group performed worse than the control group, but better than the NPS group in facial expression recognition, with differential deficits between PS and NPS patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Alexithymia and personality disorder functioning styles in paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Yu, Shaohua; Li, Huichun; Liu, Weibo; Zheng, Leilei; Ma, Ying; Chen, Qiaozhen; Chen, Yiping; Yu, Hualiang; Lu, Yunrong; Pan, Bing; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Personality disorder functioning styles might contribute to the inconclusive findings about alexithymic features in schizophrenia. We therefore studied the relationship between alexithymia and personality styles in paranoid schizophrenia. We administered the Chinese versions of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Parker Personality Measure (PERM), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale as well as the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scales to 60 paranoid schizophrenia patients and 60 healthy control subjects. Patients scored significantly higher on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, TAS 'difficulty identifying feelings' and 'difficulty describing feelings', Hamilton Depression Scale and most PERM scales. In healthy subjects, difficulty identifying feelings predicted the PERM 'dependent' style, and the Hamilton Anxiety Scale predicted difficulty identifying feelings and difficulty describing feelings. In patients, difficulty identifying feelings nonspecifically predicted all the PERM scales; by contrast, the PERM 'antisocial' style predicted difficulty identifying feelings, the 'avoidant' style predicted difficulty describing feelings, and the 'histrionic' and 'paranoid (-)' styles predicted 'externally oriented thinking'. Personality disorder functioning styles - instead of anxiety, depression, psychotic symptoms or disease duration - were specifically associated with alexithymia scales in our patients, which sheds light on a cognitive-personological substrate in paranoid schizophrenia on the one hand, and calls for a longitudinal design to discover how premorbid or postacute residual personality styles contribute to the sluggish disorder on the other. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Religious content of hallucinations in paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Krzystanek, Marek; Krysta, Krzysztof; Klasik, Adam; Krupka-Matuszczyk, Irena

    2012-09-01

    Different environmental factors are thought to be responsible for 15-20% of schizophrenia pathogenesis. Religion has long been considered a major force in human life, regardless of economic, social or political affiliation. How the perception of religion has changed over time, especially in the context of mental illness, was the focal point of this long-term comparative study. A random selection of 100 case histories from the years 1932, 1952, 1972 and 1992 was selected. By reviewing the subject history and medical notes, information on the presence of religious hallucinations and/or delusions were collected and grouped. Religious topics were demonstrated in 46.8% of the test population. Whereas there was a clear diversity of religious-themed delusions, "God", "Christ", "Mary", "Satan/devil" and "hell" all figured prominently across all reviewed years. There is a progressive decrease in the number of religious topics in paranoid schizophrenia. The transfer of holiness from historical saints onto a subject was observed. Evil dominates over good in productive symptoms in paranoid schizophrenia. The phenomenon of apocalyptic subjects in paranoid hallucinations and delusions increased after the Second World War. Religious topics of hallucinations and delusions change over time and relate to objective historical events and reflect changes in religiosity in society.

  16. Spinocerebellar ataxia-10 with paranoid schizophrenia

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    Bhavesh Trikamji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spino-cerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10 is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by cerebellar ataxia, seizures and nystagmus with a fragmented pursuit. Schizophrenia has been reported with SCAs 1 and 2 yet in SCA 10, psychiatric manifestations are uncommon. We report a Hispanic family involving a father and his four children with SCA10 genetic mutation. Two of his children, a 20-year-old female and a 23-year-old male, presented with gradually progressive spino-cerebellar ataxia and paranoid schizophrenia. Neurological examination revealed ocular dysmetria, dysdiadokinesia, impaired finger-to-nose exam, gait ataxia and hyperreflexia in both the cases. Additionally, they had a history of psychosis with destructive behavior, depression and paranoid delusions with auditory hallucinations. Serology and CSF studies were unremarkable and MRI brain revealed cerebellar volume loss. Ultimately, a test for ATAXIN-10 mutation was positive thus confirming the diagnosis of SCA10 in father and his four children. We now endeavor to investigate the association between schizophrenia and SCA10.

  17. Right lateralized white matter abnormalities in first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Zhening; Gao, Keming; Xiao, Changqing; Chen, Huafu; Zhao, Jingping

    2012-11-30

    Numerous studies in first-episode schizophrenia suggest the involvement of white matter (WM) abnormalities in multiple regions underlying the pathogenesis of this condition. However, there has never been a neuroimaging study in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia by using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method. Here, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with TBSS method to investigate the brain WM integrity in patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia. Twenty patients with first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia and 26 healthy subjects matched with age, gender, and education level were scanned with DTI. An automated TBSS approach was employed to analyze the data. Voxel-wise statistics revealed that patients with paranoid schizophrenia had decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) II, the right fornix, the right internal capsule, and the right external capsule compared to healthy subjects. Patients did not have increased FA values in any brain regions compared to healthy subjects. There was no correlation between the FA values in any brain regions and patient demographics and the severity of illness. Our findings suggest right-sided alterations of WM integrity in the WM tracts of cortical and subcortical regions may play an important role in the pathogenesis of paranoid schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Decreased resting-state interhemispheric coordination in first-episode, drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Guo, Wenbin; Xiao, Changqing; Liu, Guiying; Wooderson, Sarah C; Zhang, Zhikun; Zhang, Jian; Yu, Liuyu; Liu, Jianrong

    2014-01-03

    Dysconnectivity hypothesis posits that schizophrenia relates to abnormalities in neuronal connectivity. However, little is known about the alterations of the interhemispheric resting-state functional connectivity (FC) in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. In the present study, we used a newly developed voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) method to investigate the interhemispheric FC of the whole brain in patients with paranoid schizophrenia at rest. Forty-nine first-episode, drug-naive patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 50 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy subjects underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. An automated VMHC approach was used to analyze the data. Patients exhibited lower VMHC than healthy subjects in the precuneus (PCu), the precentral gyrus, the superior temporal gyrus (STG), the middle occipital gyrus (MOG), and the fusiform gyrus/cerebellum lobule VI. No region showed greater VMHC in the patient group than in the control group. Significantly negative correlation was observed between VMHC in the precentral gyrus and the PANSS positive/total scores, and between VMHC in the STG and the PANSS positive/negative/total scores. Our results suggest that interhemispheric resting-state FC of VMHC is reduced in paranoid schizophrenia with clinical implications for psychiatric symptomatology thus further contribute to the dysconnectivity hypothesis of schizophrenia. © 2013.

  19. [Microcirculation in patients with paranoid schizophrenia].

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    Sakharov, A V; Ozornin, A S; Golygina, S E; Vinogradova, A O; Shvets, M S

    2018-01-01

    To study microcirculation in patients with paranoid schizophrenia by laser Doppler flowmetry. Fifty-three patients at the age from 18 to 38 years with a diagnosis of 'paranoid schizophrenia' (F20.0) were examined in the acute psychotic state and after 3 weeks of therapy. The control group consisted of 20 healthy volunteers. To assess microcirculation, the noninvasive technique of laser Doppler flowmetry using a laser blood flow analyzer was used. Significant changes in the microcirculation persisting even over three weeks of therapy in patients were identified. The total microcirculation index was increased by 1.4 times which indicated the acceleration of blood flow. An increase in the average fluctuations of perfusion by 3.7 times and in the coefficient of variation by 1.9 times, which reflect the excessive strengthening of local mechanisms of regulation of microcirculation, were found. There were an increase in the myogenic tone and neurogenic tone of metarteriole and precapillary sphincters as well as bypass index.

  20. BIOMETRIC INDICES OF CONSTITUTIONAL RISKS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA IN MALE PATIENTS

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    Lebedeva Е.A

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the current study examines features and correlations of particular psychodynamic, dermatoglyphic characteristics and body constitution of men with paranoid schizophrenia. Study groups: 25 men having the "paranoid schizophrenia" (F20.0, 27 men having no mental diseases. Methods: psychodiagnostic tests (Hand test, the Big Five Inventory (BFI, anthropometry; dactyloscopy. Results: there were statistically significant differences in such personality factors as: extroversion and openness among two groups. Significantly smaller sizes of the chest and thigh circumferences were found in men with paranoid schizophrenia. The schizophrenic group exhibited higher frequency of "ulnar loop" and "double loop" finger pattern occurrence. Our study found a number of somato-psychic, dermato-psychic and dermato-somatic correlations, as well as correlations between personality factors and age. Conclusion: the examination of personality features correlated with markers of dermatoglyphic and body constitution helped to identify the predictors of risks for developing paranoid schizophrenia. This makes it possible the identification of at-risk groups with their monitoring and focusing on preventive programs

  1. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

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    Sandeep Grover

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. Results: In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Conclusion: Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  2. The interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 gene increases the susceptibility of paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Zheng Lin

    Full Text Available The association between BDNF gene functional Val66Met polymorphism rs6265 and the schizophrenia is far from being consistent. In addition to the heterogeneous in schizophrenia per se leading to the inconsistent results, the interaction among multi-genes is probably playing the main role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, but not a single gene. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2 is the high-affinity receptor of BDNF, and was reported to be associated with mood disorders, though no literature reported the association with schizophrenia. Thus, in the present study, total 402 patients with paranoid schizophrenia (the most common subtype of schizophrenia and matched 406 healthy controls were recruited to investigate the role of rs6265 in BDNF, three polymorphisms in NTRK2 gene (rs1387923, rs2769605 and rs1565445 and their interaction in the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population. We did not observe significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies between patients and healthy controls for all four polymorphisms separately. The haplotype analysis also showed no association between haplotype of NTRK2 genes (rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445 and paranoid schizophrenia. However, we found the association between the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 with paranoid schizophrenia by using the MDR method followed by conventional statistical analysis. The best gene-gene interaction model was a three-locus model (BDNF rs6265, NTRK2 rs1387923 and NTRK2 rs2769605, in which one low-risk and three high-risk four-locus genotype combinations were identified. Our findings implied that single polymorphism of rs6265 rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445 in BDNF and NTRK2 were not associated with the development of paranoid schizophrenia in a Han population, however, the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 genes polymorphisms (BDNF-rs6265, NTRK2-rs1387923 and NTRK2-rs2769605 may be involved in the susceptibility to paranoid

  3. The interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 gene increases the susceptibility of paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Lin, Zheng; Su, Yousong; Zhang, Chengfang; Xing, Mengjuan; Ding, Wenhua; Liao, Liwei; Guan, Yangtai; Li, Zezhi; Cui, Donghong

    2013-01-01

    The association between BDNF gene functional Val66Met polymorphism rs6265 and the schizophrenia is far from being consistent. In addition to the heterogeneous in schizophrenia per se leading to the inconsistent results, the interaction among multi-genes is probably playing the main role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, but not a single gene. Neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 2 (NTRK2) is the high-affinity receptor of BDNF, and was reported to be associated with mood disorders, though no literature reported the association with schizophrenia. Thus, in the present study, total 402 patients with paranoid schizophrenia (the most common subtype of schizophrenia) and matched 406 healthy controls were recruited to investigate the role of rs6265 in BDNF, three polymorphisms in NTRK2 gene (rs1387923, rs2769605 and rs1565445) and their interaction in the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population. We did not observe significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies between patients and healthy controls for all four polymorphisms separately. The haplotype analysis also showed no association between haplotype of NTRK2 genes (rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445) and paranoid schizophrenia. However, we found the association between the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 with paranoid schizophrenia by using the MDR method followed by conventional statistical analysis. The best gene-gene interaction model was a three-locus model (BDNF rs6265, NTRK2 rs1387923 and NTRK2 rs2769605), in which one low-risk and three high-risk four-locus genotype combinations were identified. Our findings implied that single polymorphism of rs6265 rs1387923, rs2769605, and rs1565445 in BDNF and NTRK2 were not associated with the development of paranoid schizophrenia in a Han population, however, the interaction of BDNF and NTRK2 genes polymorphisms (BDNF-rs6265, NTRK2-rs1387923 and NTRK2-rs2769605) may be involved in the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia.

  4. Case study: a young male with auditory hallucinations in paranoid schizophrenia.

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    Kotowski, Abigail

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate use of the nursing process and the standardized nursing languages of NANDA International (NANDA-I), the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), and the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) to assist a young male with paranoid schizophrenia to deal with auditory hallucinations. Data were obtained from the experience and expertise of the author and published literature. This case study demonstrates nurses' clinical decision making in providing care for an adolescent with mental illness. This case study provides the pertinent nursing diagnosis, patient outcomes, and nursing interventions for a young male with auditory hallucinations in paranoid schizophrenia. The use of NANDA-I, NOC, and NIC can provide the necessary framework for enhancing and improving the management of care with patients who experience auditory hallucinations in paranoid schizophrenia. © 2011, The Authors. International Journal of Nursing Terminologies and Classifications © 2011, NANDA International.

  5. No association between polymorphisms in the DDC gene and paranoid schizophrenia in a northern Chinese population.

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    Zhang, Boyu; Jia, Yanbin; Yuan, Yanbo; Yu, Xin; Xu, Qi; Shen, Yucun; Shen, Yan

    2004-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that dysfunctions of neurotransmitters are associated with schizophrenia. DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is an enzyme involved directly in the synthesis of dopamine and serotonin, and indirectly in the synthesis of noradrenaline. Therefore, the DDC gene can be considered a candidate gene for schizophrenia. We performed an association study between three single nucleotide polymorphisms in the DDC gene and paranoid schizophrenia. However, in our study no significant differences were found in the genotype distributions and allele frequencies between 80 paranoid schizophrenics and 108 controls for any of the polymorphisms. Neither did the haplotypes of the single nucleotide polymorphisms show any association with paranoid schizophrenia. Therefore, we conclude that the polymorphisms studied do not play a major role in paranoid schizophrenia pathogenesis in the population investigated.

  6. [The structure of aggression of the patients with paranoid schizophrenia and compensatory behavioral trends].

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    Reverchuk, I V; Khudyakova, Yu Yu

    To study the structure of aggression of the patients with paranoid schizophrenia depending on sex and illness duration. 102 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 101 healthy people, aged from 18 to 64 years, were examined. Quantitative indicators of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components of aggression were measured using the Buss-Perry questionnaire. The projective Hand-test was administered to assess aggressive behavioral tendencies and inclinations to aggressive behavior. The authors identified the dissociated structure of aggressiveness in patients with paranoid schizophrenia that manifested with dissociated cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components. The specifics of the structure of aggression and compensatory behavioral trends are described.

  7. Variants in TERT influencing telomere length are associated with paranoid schizophrenia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shuquan; Ye, Ning; Hu, Huiling; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most severe psychiatric disorders, with a high heritability of up to 80%. Several studies have reported telomere dysfunction in schizophrenia, and common variants in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. TERT is a key component of the telomerase complex that maintains telomere length by addition of telomere repeats to telomere ends, and has repeatedly shown association with mean lymphocyte telomere length (LTL). Thus, we hypothesized that TERT may be a novel susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. Using a Taqman protocol, we genotyped eight tag SNPs from the TERT locus in 1,072 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 1,284 control subjects from a Chinese Han population. We also measured mean LTL in 98 cases and 109 controls using a quantitative PCR-based technique. Chi-square tests showed that two SNPs, rs2075786 (P = 0.0009, OR = 0.76, 95%CI = 0.65-0.90) and rs4975605 (P = 0.0026, OR = 0.73, 95%CI = 0.60-0.90), were associated with a protective effect, while rs10069690 was associated with risk of paranoid schizophrenia (P = 0.0044, OR = 1.23, 95%CI = 1.07-1.42). Additionally, the rs2736118-rs2075786 haplotype showed significant association with paranoid schizophrenia (P = 0.0013). Moreover, mean LTL correlated with rs2075786 genotypes was significantly shorter in the patient group than the control group. The present results suggest that the TERT gene may be a novel candidate involved in the development of paranoid schizophrenia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. PET findings in patients with chronic paranoid schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesugi, Hideji; Toyoda, Junzo; Iio, Masaaki.

    1995-01-01

    The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of chronic schizophrenic patients with auditory hallucinations and paranoid delusions and normal controls was compared. The subjects were 5 male chronic inpatients (average age of 41.4 yrs, BPRS 29.3±15.0). Normal controls (6 males) were matched for age and sex. rCBF was determined by PET, based on the consecutive inhalation of 15 O-CO 2 . rCBF in the paranoid schizophrenics was significantly higher than that in normal controls in the temporal lobe and cerebellum (p<0.05). rCBF in paranoid schizophrenia showed a tendency to be higher in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, caudate nucleus, parahippocampus and putamen, but not in the thalamus. (author)

  9. PET findings in patients with chronic paranoid schizophrenia

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    Uesugi, Hideji [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan). National Center Hospital for Mental, Nervous and Muscular Disorders; Toyoda, Junzo; Iio, Masaaki

    1995-07-01

    The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of chronic schizophrenic patients with auditory hallucinations and paranoid delusions and normal controls was compared. The subjects were 5 male chronic inpatients (average age of 41.4 yrs, BPRS 29.3{+-}15.0). Normal controls (6 males) were matched for age and sex. rCBF was determined by PET, based on the consecutive inhalation of {sup 15}O-CO{sub 2}. rCBF in the paranoid schizophrenics was significantly higher than that in normal controls in the temporal lobe and cerebellum (p<0.05). rCBF in paranoid schizophrenia showed a tendency to be higher in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, caudate nucleus, parahippocampus and putamen, but not in the thalamus. (author).

  10. Paranoid personality disorder and the schizophrenia spectrum-Where to draw the line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Søren Fryd

    2013-08-01

    By means of a case vignette, this study explores the clinical intersection between paranoid personality disorder and other schizophrenia-spectrum illness. Even though the patient described had paramount signs of a paranoid personality disorder and was diagnosed as such, psychopathological symptoms extended considerably beyond the common concept and diagnostic criteria of the disorder. Management strategies included psychopharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions, yet psychosocial functioning permanently appeared defective. While there is a persistent need for an opportunity to distinguish the characteristic syndromal pattern of paranoid personality attributes, the case exemplifies the challenges associated with classifying some largely suspicious and distrustful eccentrics within the schizophrenia spectrum. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Differential impairment on measures of attention in patients with paranoid and nonparanoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michelle W C; Yip, James T H; Lee, Tatia M C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether patients with different subtypes of schizophrenia are differentially impaired on measures of attention. Forty-eight patients with schizophrenia (19 paranoid and 29 nonparanoid) and 48 healthy controls (matched on chronological age, sex, and years of education) were administered five measures of attention including the Stroop Color-Word Test (SCWT; Stroop, 1935), the Digit Vigilance Test (DVT; Lewis, 1992), the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT; Smith, 1982), the Backward Digit Span Test (BDST; Wechsler, 1987), and the Color Trails Test (CTT; D'Elia et al., 1996) to assess selective attention, sustained attention, switching attention, and attentional control processing by the latter two tests respectively. Results from the present study showed that patients with schizophrenia performed poorer on the SCWT, the DVT, and the SDMT, relative to their healthy counterparts. Furthermore, patients with different subtypes of schizophrenia also had different degrees of attentional impairment. While patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed worse on the SCWT, those with nonparanoid schizophrenia performed worse on the SDMT. Nevertheless, these findings may suggest that patients with paranoid and nonparanoid schizophrenia may have different profiles with respect to their performances on measures of attention.

  12. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms.

  13. PREDICTORS FORMATION OF SOCIAL MALADJUSTMENT IN PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH CONCOMITANT SOMATIC-NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Semionovici PIDKORYTOV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the level of stress in patients with paranoid schizophrenia with concomitant somatic-neurological disorders and quality of life as predictors of the formation of their social exclusion. The influence of somatic-neurological pathology for paranoid schizophrenia at different levels of stress.

  14. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms. PMID:21927380

  15. Socio-demographic and clinical profiles of paranoid and nonparanoid schizophrenia: a prospective, multicenter study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yu-Tao; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Chiu, Helen F K; Weng, Yong-Zhen; Bo, Qi-Jing; Chan, Sandra S M; Lee, Edwin H M; Ungvari, Gabor S

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to explore the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of paranoid and nonparanoid subtypes of schizophrenia. In a multicenter, randomized, controlled, longitudinal study, 374 clinically stable schizophrenia patients were interviewed at entry with standardized assessment instruments and followed for 12-26 months. In the multivariate analysis, male sex, married marital status, urban abode, and more frequent relapse over the study period were independently associated with paranoid schizophrenia. The socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of Chinese patients with the paranoid subtype of schizophrenia are different from those of their Caucasian counterparts who are more likely to be women and have a better outcome. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Discriminating between first- and second-order cognition in first-episode paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliksted, Vibeke; Samuelsen, Erla; Sandberg, Kristian; Bibby, Bo Martin; Overgaard, Morten Storm

    2017-03-01

    An impairment of visually perceiving backward masked stimuli is commonly observed in patients with schizophrenia, yet it is unclear whether this impairment is the result of a deficiency in first or higher order processing and for which subtypes of schizophrenia it is present. Here, we compare identification (first order) and metacognitive (higher order) performance in a visual masking paradigm between a highly homogenous group of young first-episode patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia (N = 11) to that of carefully matched healthy controls (N = 13). We find no difference across groups in first-order performance, but find a difference in metacognitive performance, particularly for stimuli with relatively high visibility. These results indicate that the masking deficit is present in first-episode patients with paranoid schizophrenia, but that it is primarily an impairment of metacognition.

  17. Hypothesis: grandiosity and guilt cause paranoia; paranoid schizophrenia is a psychotic mood disorder; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Charles Raymond

    2008-11-01

    Delusional paranoia has been associated with severe mental illness for over a century. Kraepelin introduced a disorder called "paranoid depression," but "paranoid" became linked to schizophrenia, not to mood disorders. Paranoid remains the most common subtype of schizophrenia, but some of these cases, as Kraepelin initially implied, may be unrecognized psychotic mood disorders, so the relationship of paranoid schizophrenia to psychotic bipolar disorder warrants reevaluation. To address whether paranoia associates more with schizophrenia or mood disorders, a selected literature is reviewed and 11 cases are summarized. Comparative clinical and recent molecular genetic data find phenotypic and genotypic commonalities between patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder lending support to the idea that paranoid schizophrenia could be the same disorder as psychotic bipolar disorder. A selected clinical literature finds no symptom, course, or characteristic traditionally considered diagnostic of schizophrenia that cannot be accounted for by psychotic bipolar disorder patients. For example, it is hypothesized here that 2 common mood-based symptoms, grandiosity and guilt, may underlie functional paranoia. Mania explains paranoia when there are grandiose delusions that one's possessions are so valuable that others will kill for them. Similarly, depression explains paranoia when delusional guilt convinces patients that they deserve punishment. In both cases, fear becomes the overwhelming emotion but patient and physician focus on the paranoia rather than on underlying mood symptoms can cause misdiagnoses. This study uses a clinical, case-based, hypothesis generation approach that warrants follow-up with a larger representative sample of psychotic patients followed prospectively to determine the degree to which the clinical course observed herein is typical of all such patients. Differential diagnoses, nomenclature, and treatment implications are

  18. Kallmann syndrome and paranoid schizophrenia: a rare combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Willem M A; Egger, Jos I M; Hovens, Johannes E; Hoefsloot, Lies

    2013-01-17

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a genetically heterogeneous and rare disorder characterised by the combination of hypothalamic hypogonadism and anosmia/hyposmia, a variable degree of intellectual disability and several somatic anomalies. In about one-third of the patients, mutations have been identified in at least seven different genes. Virtually no data are available about possible neuropsychiatric symptoms in KS. Here, a young adult male is described with a previous clinical diagnosis of KS and recent paranoid schizophrenia of which positive, but not negative symptoms, fully remitted upon treatment with antipsychotics. Neither genome-wide array analysis nor mutation analyses disclosed imbalances or mutations in any of presently known KS disease genes. This is the first report on a patient with KS and paranoid schizophrenia in whom extensive genetic analyses were performed. It is concluded that further studies are warranted in order to elucidate a possible increased risk for psychiatric symptoms in patients with KS.

  19. Assessment of white matter abnormalities in paranoid schizophrenia and bipolar mania patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liqian; Chen, Zhuangfei; Deng, Wei; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Mingli; Ma, Xiaohong; Huang, Chaohua; Jiang, Lijun; Wang, Yingcheng; Wang, Qiang; Collier, David A; Gong, Qiyong; Li, Tao

    2011-12-30

    White matter abnormalities have been repeatedly reported in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies, but the empirical evidence about the diagnostic specificity of white matter abnormalities in these disorders is still limited. This study sought to investigate the alterations in fractional anisotropy (FA) in white matter throughout the entire brain of patients from Chengdu, China with paranoid schizophrenia and bipolar mania. For this purpose, DTI was used to assess white matter integrity in patients with paranoid schizophrenia (n=25) and psychotic bipolar mania (n=18) who had been treated with standard pharmacotherapy for fewer than 5 days at the time of study, as well as in normal controls (n=30). The differences in FA were measured by use of voxel-based analysis. The results show that reduced FA was found in the left posterior corona radiata (PCR) in patients with psychotic bipolar mania and paranoid schizophrenia compared to the controls. Patients with psychotic bipolar mania also showed a significant reduction in FA in right posterior corona radiata and in right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR). A direct comparison between the two patient groups found no significant differences in any regions, and none of the findings were associated with illness duration. Correlation analysis indicated that FA values showed a significant negative correlation with positive symptom scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale in the left frontal-parietal lobe in the paranoid schizophrenia. It was concluded that common abnormalities in the left PCR might imply an overlap in white matter pathology in the two disorders and might be related to shared risk factors for the two disorders. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Clinical features of depression in the remission phase of paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, N N; Vishnevskaya, O A

    2013-01-01

    Phenomenological and pathogenetic features of depression developed in the remission phase of paranoid schizophrenia were studied in 75 patients (mean age 44.9±1.22 years). Depression was diagnosed in 58.7% patients. It has been shown that the psychopathological structure of depression was not homogenous and 63.6% cases were atypical. In 25% patients, depressive disorders were psychogenic. Depression concomitant with anxiety disorders was most common. Depression in the phase of remission developed most often in female patients older than 39 years and in male patients younger than 39 years. Cognitive function was not impaired in patients with depression in the remission phase of paranoid schizophrenia.

  1. Association study of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) +874T/A gene polymorphism in patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Owczarek, Aleksander; Suchanek, Renata; Kowalczyk, Malgorzata; Fila-Danilow, Anna; Borkowska, Paulina; Kucia, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Jan

    2011-03-01

    Schizophrenia is a multifactorial disease with changes affecting the immune system. Dysregulation of the cytokine network in schizophrenia has been well documented. Such changes may occur due to disturbances in cytokine levels that are linked to polymorphisms of cytokine genes. However, research in the role of cytokine gene polymorphisms in schizophrenia has been surprisingly scanty. The aim of this study was to identify, in a case control study, whether polymorphism of IFN-γ gene is a risk factor for the development of paranoid schizophrenia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that examines the association between the IFN-γ gene polymorphism and psychopathological symptoms in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Polymorphism of IFN-γ (+874T/A, rs 62559044) in schizophrenic patients (n=179), as well as healthy individuals (n=196), both Polish residents, was genotyped using AS-PCR method. Of note, when analyzing the results, we took into consideration the gender of studied individuals. Surprisingly, a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the first intron of the IFN-γ gene was found to be associated with paranoid schizophrenia in males, but not in females. The presence of allele A at position +874 in the IFN-γ gene correlates with 1.66-fold higher risk of paranoid schizophrenia development in males. Differences in the genotypes may have an important role in determining the level of I gene transcription. Because other polymorphisms have been demonstrated to influence IFN-γ transcription, further analysis is necessary to clarify the role of this gene in the pathogenesis of paranoid schizophrenia.

  2. Association study between BDNF C-281A polymorphism and paranoid schizophrenia in Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanek, Renata; Owczarek, Aleksander; Kowalski, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the candidate genes for schizophrenia. Polymorphism C-281A (rs28383487) in BDNF gene leads to the reduction of promoter activity in the hippocampal neurons in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the influence of alleles and genotypes of BDNF C-281A polymorphism on development, as well as the clinical course (age of onset, suicidal behaviour and psychopathology) of paranoid schizophrenia. The psychopathology was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) as subscale scores and also single-item scores. We have also performed the haplotype analysis with val66met BDNF polymorphism, which is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. We have not found significant differences in the distribution of genotypes and alleles between schizophrenic patients and controls in both the overall analysis, as well as sex stratified. Also, we have not shown statistically significant differences between genotype groups and PANSS scale. However, an association between C-281A polymorphism and time of the first episode of paranoid schizophrenia was revealed. Genotype C/A had been connected with later age of onset of paranoid schizophrenia in men but not in women (p schizophrenia group compared to the controls.

  3. [Impairment of attention and executive functions in patients with paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsygankov, B D; Khannanova, A N; Nekrasova, S V

    2013-01-01

    To study changes in attention and executive functions during psychopharmacotherapy in patients with paranoid schizophrenia, we have examined 120 patients with a first episode of paranoid schizophrenia treated with typical and atypical neuroleptics. Clinical and statistical analyses have revealed the heterogeneity within treatment groups that allowed to define two subgroups. These subgroups were characterized by a differed disease course (favorable or poor type). Before remission was achieved, the effect of atypical neuroleptics on cognitive performance was higher compared to typical neuroleptics. After remission, when doses of neuroleptics were decreased, a type of disease course played a main role. At 6 months after remission, attention and executive functions have improved in subgroups with favorable course of disease regardless of treatment.

  4. IFNGR2 genetic polymorphism associated with sex-specific paranoid schizophrenia risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemli, Achraf; Inoubli, Oumaima; Trifa, Fatma; Mechri, Anouar; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi; Jrad, Besma Bel Hadj

    2017-01-01

    Considering current scientific evidence about the significant role of chronic low grade inflammation in the physiopathology of schizophrenia, it has been hypothesized that changes in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon gamma may have a significant role in the predisposition to schizophrenia. This study focuses on identifying whether the functional polymorphism of interferon gamma receptor 2 (IFNGR2) is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. This study was conducted by the RFLP-PCR on a Tunisian population composed of 225 patients with different sub-types of schizophrenia and 166 controls. The IFNGR2 (Q64R) polymorphism analysis showed higher frequencies of minor homozygous genotype (RR) and allele (R) in all patients compared to controls (21.8% vs 10.2%; p = .006, OR = 2.54) and (44% vs 34.9%; p = .01; OR = 1.46), respectively. This correlation was confirmed only for males. This study also noted a significant increase of the mutated homozygous (RR) genotype and (R) allele frequencies of IFNGR2 in paranoid schizophrenics compared to controls (31.4% vs 10.2%; p = .001; OR = 3.34 and 47.2% vs 34.9%; p = .009; OR = 1.66, respectively). This increase remains significant after using binary logistic regression to eliminate confounding factors such as age and sex. Additionally, carriers of RR genotype have significant lower scores on the Scale of Assessment of Positive (SAPS) and negative (SANS) symptoms comparatively to the carrier of the QQ + QR genotypes, suggesting that the R recessive allele carriers could have milder symptoms. The IFNGR2Q64R polymorphism is correlated with male sex and paranoid schizophrenia. It is suggested that a chronic neuroinflammation may predispose to the paranoid schizophrenia development in men.

  5. Functional polymorphism in the interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 genes in patients with paranoid schizophrenia--a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Kowalczyk, Malgorzata; Suchanek, Renata; Owczarek, Aleksander; Fila-Danilow, Anna; Szczygiel, Aleksandra; Kowalski, Jan

    2010-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a multifactorial disease with changes in immunological system. Such changes are the result of cytokine-level disturbances connected with cytokine gene polymorphisms. However, research about cytokine gene polymorphisms in schizophrenia has been surprisingly limited and ambiguous. The aim of the study was to identify whether polymorphisms of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 are risk factors for the development of paranoid schizophrenia in case-control study. IL-6 (-174G/C; rs 1800795) and IL-10 (-1082G/A; rs 1800896) promoter polymorphisms in patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy individuals were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Differences in IL-6 and IL-10 promoter haplotypes may play an important role in determining the transcription level for IL-6 and IL-10 genes in schizophrenic patients. The presence of allele C at position -174 of IL-6 promoter sequence may correlate with increasing risk of paranoid schizophrenia in the Polish population, but research on a broadened group of people is needed. The presence of allele G at position -1082 of IL-10 promoter sequence correlates with increasing risk of paranoid schizophrenia in the Polish population. The coexistence of genotype GG at position -1082 of IL-10 promoter sequence and genotype GC at position -174 of IL-6 promoter sequence correlates with increasing risk of paranoid schizophrenia in the Polish population.

  6. Association of the Met-196-Arg variation of human tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Sihem; Ben Nejma, Mouna; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi; Ben Salem, Kamel; Romdhane, Abdelaziz; Nour, Mohamed; Jrad, Besma Bel Hadj

    2011-03-01

    Research has provided strong evidence for oligodendrocyte and myelin-related genes dysfunction in schizophrenia. Several studies have suggested abnormalities in the expression of myelin-related genes including tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) involved in the neurodegeneration and remyelination. In order to further assess the role of TNFR2 in schizophrenia, we examined a functional bi-allelic polymorphism associated with an impaired NF-KB signaling and cell survival. In the present case/control study, 220 patients with schizophrenia and 176 healthy controls were genotyped by RFLP-PCR for the T/G polymorphism at the position 676 in exon 6 of the TNFR2 gene. We found a trend towards over-representation of TNFR2 676G in the patients compared to the controls (p=0.19 and 0.09 respectively). Interestingly, when we evaluated the association between this genetic polymorphism and the clinical variables of schizophrenia, our findings indicated that the frequencies of the G/G genotype and the G allele were significantly higher in paranoid (p=0.014 and p=0.012 respectively) and adult-onset paranoid (p=0.004 and p=0.004 respectively) schizophrenia patient group compared to the controls. The potential association was confirmed by a logistic regression model only for development of the paranoid form of schizophrenia (p=0.022) indicating a substantially increased risk for paranoid schizophrenia with inheritance of the TNFR2(G) allele. In conclusion, this polymorphism in TNFR2 or a gene in proximity seems to be associated specifically with paranoid schizophrenia, at least in the Tunisian population. A replication of our findings in other and larger populations could be of particular importance to establish TNFR2 as one of the susceptibility genes of paranoid schizophrenia.

  7. [Event-related potentials P₃₀₀ with memory function and psychopathology in first-episode paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-bo; Chen, Qiao-zhen; Yin, Hou-min; Zheng, Lei-lei; Yu, Shao-hua; Chen, Yi-ping; Li, Hui-chun

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the variability of event-related potentials P(300) and the relationship with memory function/psychopathology in patients with first-episode paranoid schizophrenia. Thirty patients with first-episode paranoid schizophrenia (patient group) and twenty health subjects (control group) were enrolled in the study. The auditory event-related potentials P₃₀₀ at the scalp electrodes Cz, Pz and Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS) were examined in both groups, Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was evaluated in patient group. In comparison with control group, patients had longer latency of P₃₀₀ [(390.6 ± 47.6)ms at Cz and (393.3 ± 50.1)ms at Pz] (Pparanoid schizophrenia has memory deficit, which can be evaluated comprehensively by P₃₀₀ and WMS. The longer latency of P₃₀₀ might be associated with the increased severity of first-episode paranoid schizophrenia.

  8. Association study of interleukin-4 polymorphisms with paranoid schizophrenia in the Polish population: a critical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fila-Danilow, Anna; Kucia, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk, Malgorzata; Owczarek, Aleksander; Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Borkowska, Paulina; Suchanek, Renata; Kowalski, Jan

    2012-08-01

    Changes in immunological system are one of dysfunctions reported in schizophrenia. Some changes based on an imbalance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines results from cytokine gene polymorphisms. Interleukin-4 gene (IL4) is considered as a potential candidate gene in schizophrenia association studies. The aim of the current case-control study was to examine whether the -590C/T (rs2243250) and -33C/T (rs2070874) IL4 gene polymorphisms are implicated in paranoid schizophrenia development in the Polish population. Genotyping of polymorphisms was performed by using PCR-RFLP technique. The genotypes and alleles distribution of both SNPs were analysed in patients (n = 182) and healthy individuals constituted the control group (n = 215). The connection between some clinical variables and studied polymorphisms has been examined as well. We did not revealed any association between the -590C/T and -33C/T polymorphisms and paranoid schizophrenia. In case of both SNPs the homozygous TT genotype was extremely rare. Both polymorphic sites of the IL4 gene were found to be in a very strong linkage disequilibrium. However we did not identify a haplotype predispose to paranoid schizophrenia. No associations were also observed between the clinical course and psychopathology of the disease and the genotypes of both analysed polymorphisms. Our results suggest that the polymorphisms -590C/T in IL4 gene promoter region and -33C/T in the 5'-UTR are not involved in the pathophysiology of paranoid schizophrenia in Polish residents.

  9. Detection of visual events along the apparent motion trace in patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Lia Lira Olivier; Muckli, Lars; de Millas, Walter; Lautenschlager, Marion; Heinz, Andreas; Kathmann, Norbert; Sterzer, Philipp

    2012-07-30

    Dysfunctional prediction in sensory processing has been suggested as a possible causal mechanism in the development of delusions in patients with schizophrenia. Previous studies in healthy subjects have shown that while the perception of apparent motion can mask visual events along the illusory motion trace, such motion masking is reduced when events are spatio-temporally compatible with the illusion, and, therefore, predictable. Here we tested the hypothesis that this specific detection advantage for predictable target stimuli on the apparent motion trace is reduced in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Our data show that, although target detection along the illusory motion trace is generally impaired, both patients and healthy control participants detect predictable targets more often than unpredictable targets. Patients had a stronger motion masking effect when compared to controls. However, patients showed the same advantage in the detection of predictable targets as healthy control subjects. Our findings reveal stronger motion masking but intact prediction of visual events along the apparent motion trace in patients with paranoid schizophrenia and suggest that the sensory prediction mechanism underlying apparent motion is not impaired in paranoid schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Paranoid Schizophrenia: Assessing the Validity of the Diagnostic Schemata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, James Mark

    This paper is concerned with changes which have been proposed in the major current diagnostic system regarding paranoid schizophrenia. It is noted that the proposed changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition (DSM-III) would remove paranoia as a schizophrenic subtype and institute a spectrum description of…

  11. ALCOHOLIC HALLUCINOSIS AND PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA?A COMPARATIVE (CLINICAL AND FOLLOW UP) STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Sampath, G.; Kumar, Y. Vikram; Channabasavanna, S. M.; Keshavan, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY In a Study Of 90 patients of Alcoholic Hallucinosis and 30 patients of Paranoid Schizophrenia, it was found that delusions, delusions of infidelity, third person and running commentary auditory hallucinations and insight were not different in the two groups. Delusions of grandeur, passivity, thought echo and thought broadcast were significantly more frequent in paranoid schizophrenic patients. Anxiety, visual iiafracinatians and hallucinations in more than one modality at the same tim...

  12. Study of a possible role of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene in paranoid schizophrenia among a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuhui; Zhang, Jiexu; Yuan, Yanbo; Yu, Xin; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is the enzyme responsible for degradation of several monoamines, such as dopamine and serotonin that are considered as being two of the most important neurotransmitters involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. To study a possible role of the MAOA gene in conferring susceptibility to schizophrenia, the present study genotyped the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism and 41 SNPs across this gene among 555 unrelated patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 567 unrelated healthy controls. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis was employed to quantify expression of MAOA mRNA in 73 drug-free patients. While none of these genotyped DNA markers showed allelic association with paranoid schizophrenia, haplotypic association was found for the VNTR-rs6323, VNTR-rs1137070, and VNTR-rs6323-rs1137070 haplotypes in female subjects. Nevertheless, no significant change of the expression of MAOA mRNA was detected in either female or male patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Our study suggests that the interaction between genetic variants within the MAOA gene may contribute to an increased risk of paranoid schizophrenia, but the precise mechanism needs further investigation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. [Linkage analysis of susceptibility loci in 2 target chromosomes in pedigrees with paranoid schizophrenia and undifferentiated schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li-ping; Hu, Zheng-mao; Mu, Li-li; Mei, Gui-sen; Lu, Xiu-ling; Zheng, Yong-jun; Li, Pei-jian; Zhang, Ying-xue; Pan, Qian; Long, Zhi-gao; Dai, He-ping; Zhang, Zhuo-hua; Xia, Jia-hui; Zhao, Jing-ping; Xia, Kun

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the relationship of susceptibility loci in chromosomes 1q21-25 and 6p21-25 and schizophrenia subtypes in Chinese population. A genomic scan and parametric and non-parametric analyses were performed on 242 individuals from 36 schizophrenia pedigrees, including 19 paranoid schizophrenia and 17 undifferentiated schizophrenia pedigrees, from Henan province of China using 5 microsatellite markers in the chromosome region 1q21-25 and 8 microsatellite markers in the chromosome region 6p21-25, which were the candidates of previous studies. All affected subjects were diagnosed and typed according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). All subjects signed informed consent. In chromosome 1, parametric analysis under the dominant inheritance mode of all 36 pedigrees showed that the maximum multi-point heterogeneity Log of odds score method (HLOD) score was 1.33 (α = 0.38). The non-parametric analysis and the single point and multi-point nonparametric linkage (NPL) scores suggested linkage at D1S484, D1S2878, and D1S196. In the 19 paranoid schizophrenias pedigrees, linkage was not observed for any of the 5 markers. In the 17 undifferentiated schizophrenia pedigrees, the multi-point NPL score was 1.60 (P= 0.0367) at D1S484. The single point NPL score was 1.95(P= 0.0145) and the multi-point NPL score was 2.39 (P= 0.0041) at D1S2878. Additionally, the multi-point NPL score was 1.74 (P= 0.0255) at D1S196. These same three loci showed suggestive linkage during the integrative analysis of all 36 pedigrees. In chromosome 6, parametric linkage analysis under the dominant and recessive inheritance and the non-parametric linkage analysis of all 36 pedigrees and the 17 undifferentiated schizophrenia pedigrees, linkage was not observed for any of the 8 markers. In the 19 paranoid schizophrenias pedigrees, parametric analysis showed that under recessive

  14. Evidence for Distinguishable Treatment Costs among Paranoid Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirjak, Dusan; Hochlehnert, Achim; Thomann, Philipp Arthur; Kubera, Katharina Maria; Schnell, Knut

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia spectrum disorders result in enormous individual suffering and financial burden on patients and on society. In Germany, there are about 1,000,000 individuals suffering from schizophrenia (SZ) or schizoaffective disorder (SAD), a combination of psychotic and affective symptoms. Given the heterogeneous nature of these syndromes, one may assume that there is a difference in treatment costs among patients with paranoid SZ and SAD. However, the current the national system of cost accounting in psychiatry and psychosomatics in Germany assesses all schizophrenia spectrum disorders within one category. The study comprised a retrospective audit of data from 118 patients diagnosed with paranoid SZ (F20.0) and 71 patients with SAD (F25). We used the mean total costs as well as partial cost, i.e., mean costs for medication products, mean personal costs and mean infrastructure costs from each patient for the statistical analysis. We tested for differences in the four variables between SZ and SAD patients using ANCOVA and confirmed the results with bootstrapping. SAD patients had a longer duration of stay than patients with SZ (p = .02). Mean total costs were significantly higher for SAD patients (p = .023). Further, we found a significant difference in mean personnel costs (p = .02) between patients with SZ and SAD. However, we found no significant differences in mean pharmaceutical costs (p = .12) but a marginal difference of mean infrastructure costs (p = .05) between SZ and SAD. We found neither a common decrease of costs over time nor a differential decrease in SZ and SAD. We found evidence for a difference of case related costs of inpatient treatments for paranoid SZ and SAD. The differences in mean total costs seem to be primarily related to the mean personnel costs in patients with paranoid SZ and SAD rather than mean pharmaceutical costs, possibly due to higher personnel effort and infrastructure.

  15. Evidence for Distinguishable Treatment Costs among Paranoid Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Hirjak

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia spectrum disorders result in enormous individual suffering and financial burden on patients and on society. In Germany, there are about 1,000,000 individuals suffering from schizophrenia (SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SAD, a combination of psychotic and affective symptoms. Given the heterogeneous nature of these syndromes, one may assume that there is a difference in treatment costs among patients with paranoid SZ and SAD. However, the current the national system of cost accounting in psychiatry and psychosomatics in Germany assesses all schizophrenia spectrum disorders within one category.The study comprised a retrospective audit of data from 118 patients diagnosed with paranoid SZ (F20.0 and 71 patients with SAD (F25. We used the mean total costs as well as partial cost, i.e., mean costs for medication products, mean personal costs and mean infrastructure costs from each patient for the statistical analysis. We tested for differences in the four variables between SZ and SAD patients using ANCOVA and confirmed the results with bootstrapping.SAD patients had a longer duration of stay than patients with SZ (p = .02. Mean total costs were significantly higher for SAD patients (p = .023. Further, we found a significant difference in mean personnel costs (p = .02 between patients with SZ and SAD. However, we found no significant differences in mean pharmaceutical costs (p = .12 but a marginal difference of mean infrastructure costs (p = .05 between SZ and SAD. We found neither a common decrease of costs over time nor a differential decrease in SZ and SAD.We found evidence for a difference of case related costs of inpatient treatments for paranoid SZ and SAD. The differences in mean total costs seem to be primarily related to the mean personnel costs in patients with paranoid SZ and SAD rather than mean pharmaceutical costs, possibly due to higher personnel effort and infrastructure.

  16. Processing environmental stimuli in paranoid schizophrenia: recognizing facial emotions and performing executive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shao Hua; Zhu, Jun Peng; Xu, You; Zheng, Lei Lei; Chai, Hao; He, Wei; Liu, Wei Bo; Li, Hui Chun; Wang, Wei

    2012-12-01

    To study the contribution of executive function to abnormal recognition of facial expressions of emotion in schizophrenia patients. Abnormal recognition of facial expressions of emotion was assayed according to Japanese and Caucasian facial expressions of emotion (JACFEE), Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST), positive and negative symptom scale, and Hamilton anxiety and depression scale, respectively, in 88 paranoid schizophrenia patients and 75 healthy volunteers. Patients scored higher on the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale and the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scales, displayed lower JACFEE recognition accuracies and poorer WCST performances. The JACFEE recognition accuracy of contempt and disgust was negatively correlated with the negative symptom scale score while the recognition accuracy of fear was positively with the positive symptom scale score and the recognition accuracy of surprise was negatively with the general psychopathology score in patients. Moreover, the WCST could predict the JACFEE recognition accuracy of contempt, disgust, and sadness in patients, and the perseverative errors negatively predicted the recognition accuracy of sadness in healthy volunteers. The JACFEE recognition accuracy of sadness could predict the WCST categories in paranoid schizophrenia patients. Recognition accuracy of social-/moral emotions, such as contempt, disgust and sadness is related to the executive function in paranoid schizophrenia patients, especially when regarding sadness. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. De Clerambault\\'s syndrome in a paranoid Schizophrenia: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    De Clerambault\\'s syndrome in a paranoid Schizophrenia: a case report. AD Yussuf, PO Ajiboye, D Sulyman. Abstract. No Abstract. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences Vol. 15 (2) 2008: pp. 56-60. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  18. The Capgras syndrome in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J A; Leong, G B

    1992-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is characterized by a delusion of impostors who are thought to be physically similar but psychologically distinct from the misidentified person. This syndrome is generally thought to be relatively rare. Most of our knowledge about Capgras syndrome derives from single case studies and small series of cases usually from diagnostically heterogeneous groups. In this article, a series of 31 patients suffering from both paranoid schizophrenia and Capgras syndrome is described. Issues pertaining to the phenomenology of Capgras syndrome, the possible relation between Capgras syndrome and other delusional misidentification syndromes, and a neurobiological hypothesis aimed at explaining Capgras syndrome are discussed.

  19. Association of the IFN-γ (+874A/T) Genetic Polymorphism with Paranoid Schizophrenia in Tunisian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemli, Achraf; Eshili, Awatef; Trifa, Fatma; Mechri, Anouar; Zaafrane, Ferid; Gaha, Lotfi; Juckel, George; Tensaout, Besma Bel Hadj Jrad

    2017-02-01

    Since growing evidence suggests a significant role of chronic low-grade inflammation in the physiopathology of schizophrenia, we have hypothesized that functional genetic variant of the IFN gamma (IFN-γ; +874A/T; rs2430561) gene may be involved in the predisposition to schizophrenia. This research is based on a case-control study which aims to identify whether polymorphism of the IFN-γ gene is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. The RFLP-PCR genotyping of the IFN-γ gene was conducted on a Tunisian population composed of 218 patients and 162 controls. The IFN-γ (+874A/T) polymorphism analysis showed higher frequencies of minor homozygous genotype (TT) and allele (T) in all patients compared with controls (11.5 vs. 4.9%; p = 0.03, OR = 2.64 and 30.7 vs. 24.1%, p = 0.04, OR = 1.4, respectively). This correlation was confirmed for male but not for female patients. Also, the T allele was significantly more common among patients with paranoid schizophrenia when compared with controls (25.8 vs. 4.9%, p = 0.0001; OR = 6.7). Using the binary regression analysis to eliminate confounding factors as age and sex, only this last association remained significant (p = 0.03; OR = 1.76, CI = 1.05-2.93). In conclusion, our results showed a significant association between +874A/T polymorphism of IFN-γ and paranoid schizophrenia, suggesting that this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or another at proximity could predispose to paranoid schizophrenia. Since the minor allele of this polymorphism was correlated with an increased expression of their product, our study validates the hypothesis of excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine in the physiopathology of paranoid schizophrenia.

  20. [Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of 3 SNP loci in 5-HTT gene and paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Jin-Feng; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao; Xing, Jia-Xin; Sun, Yi-Hua; Yao, Jun; Zhao, Yi; Li, Chun-Mei; Wang, Bao-Jie

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the population genetic data of 3 SNP loci (rs25533, rs34388196 and rs1042173) of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT) gene and the association with paranoid schizophrenia. Three SNP loci of 5-HTT gene were examined in 132 paranoid schizophrenia patients and 150 unrelated healthy individuals of Northern Chinese Han population by PCR-RFLP technique. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test was performed using the chi-square test and the data of haplotype frequency and population genetics parameters were statistically analyzed. Among these three SNP loci, four haplotypes were obtained. There were no statistically significant differences between the patient group and the control group (P > 0.05). The DP values of the 3 SNP loci were 0.276, 0.502 and 0.502. The PIC of them were 0.151, 0.281 and 0.281. The PE of them were 0.014, 0.072 and 0.072. The three SNP loci and four haplotypes of 5-HTT gene have no association with paranoid schizophrenia, while the polymorphism still have high potential application in forensic practice.

  1. Actively paranoid patients with schizophrenia over attribute anger to neutral faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Amy E; Brensinger, Colleen; Kohler, Christian; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C

    2011-02-01

    Previous investigations of the influence of paranoia on facial affect recognition in schizophrenia have been inconclusive as some studies demonstrate better performance for paranoid relative to non-paranoid patients and others show that paranoid patients display greater impairments. These studies have been limited by small sample sizes and inconsistencies in the criteria used to define groups. Here, we utilized an established emotion recognition task and a large sample to examine differential performance in emotion recognition ability between patients who were actively paranoid (AP) and those who were not actively paranoid (NAP). Accuracy and error patterns on the Penn Emotion Recognition test (ER40) were examined in 132 patients (64 NAP and 68 AP). Groups were defined based on the presence of paranoid ideation at the time of testing rather than diagnostic subtype. AP and NAP patients did not differ in overall task accuracy; however, an emotion by group interaction indicated that AP patients were significantly worse than NAP patients at correctly labeling neutral faces. A comparison of error patterns on neutral stimuli revealed that the groups differed only in misattributions of anger expressions, with AP patients being significantly more likely to misidentify a neutral expression as angry. The present findings suggest that paranoia is associated with a tendency to over attribute threat to ambiguous stimuli and also lend support to emerging hypotheses of amygdala hyperactivation as a potential neural mechanism for paranoid ideation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Delusion and Gender in Paranoid Schizophrenia: Results of a Clinical Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler, V; Richter, R; Walter, M H

    2016-11-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether men and women differ in the frequency and phenomenology of delusions. Sample: Medical records of all patients who had been admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Germany between 2008 and 2011 for paranoid schizophrenia were analyzed. The sample consisted of 182 delusional inpatients (90 women, 92 men) with the diagnosis of a paranoid schizophrenia. Results: Men and women did not differ in the frequency of delusional themes. Analysis of delusional content, however, revealed considerable differences between them. Women with delusion of reference felt more often as being under constant surveillance compared to men. Men with delusion of reference showed a tendency to involve unspecified persons in their delusions and more often had the feeling of being talked about. Delusion of grandeur in women was more often built upon significant relationships with others. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Cognitive deficit in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: Its clinical and laboratory correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorofeikova, Mariia; Neznanov, Nikolay; Petrova, Nataliia

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to search for correlates of cognitive impairment in patients with paranoid schizophrenia among clinical, demographic, anamnestic and biochemical markers (NSE, S100B protein, BDNF, hs-CRP). Patients with paranoid schizophrenia (n=125) were examined using the Brief Assessment of Cognitive Function in Schizophrenia, the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure task, and a number of clinical scales including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The majority of patients demonstrated cognitive impairment. The type of impairment was highly heterogeneous and individual. Relationships were found between the degree of executive functioning and family history of mental illness; working memory and age of onset of schizophrenia; and visual memory and psychopathological symptomatology. Negative and affective symptoms were not significantly associated with cognitive functioning. Treatment with first generation antipsychotics was associated with a more frequent impairment of motor skills, and concomitant anticholinergic drugs, with reduced accuracy. Use of second-generation antipsychotics only was associated with better accuracy, working memory and speech fluency. Among the patients, 21.4% had signs of a systemic inflammatory response, indicating a possible role of inflammatory response in the development of schizophrenia. CRP, S100B and NSE levels reflected features of the course of illness and therapeutic response. Patients with lower concentrations of BDNF were characterized by lower processing speeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Successful treatment with risperidone increases 5-HT 3A receptor gene expression in patients with paranoid schizophrenia - data from a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongying; Fan, Yong; Zhao, Lei; Hao, Yong; Zhou, Xiajun; Guan, Yangtai; Li, Zezhi

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between peripheral 5-HT3A receptor mRNA level and risperidone efficiency in paranoid schizophrenia patients is still unknown. A total 52 first-episode and drug-naive paranoid schizophrenia patients who were treated with risperidone and 53 matched healthy controls were enrolled. Patients were naturalistically followed up for 8 weeks. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was applied to assess symptom severity of the patients at baseline and at the end of 8th week. There was no difference in 5-HT3A receptor mRNA level between paranoid schizophrenia patients and healthy controls at baseline ( p  = .24). Among 47 patients who completed 8-week naturalistic follow-up, 37 were responders to risperidone treatment. 5-HT3A receptor mRNA level of paranoid schizophrenia patients did not change in overall patients after 8-week treatment with risperidone ( p  = .29). However, 5-HT3A receptor mRNA level in responders increased significantly ( p  = .04), but not in nonresponders ( p  = .81). Successful treatment with risperidone increases 5-HT3A receptor gene expression in patients with paranoid schizophrenia, indicating that 5-HT3A receptor may be involved in the mechanism of risperidone effect.

  5. Alcohol abuse as the strongest risk factor for violent offending in patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudumija Slijepcevic, Marija; Jukic, Vlado; Novalic, Darko; Zarkovic-Palijan, Tija; Milosevic, Milan; Rosenzweig, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    To determine predictive risk factors for violent offending in patients with paranoid schizophrenia in Croatia. The cross-sectional study including male in-patients with paranoid schizophrenia with (N=104) and without (N=102) history of physical violence and violent offending was conducted simultaneously in several hospitals in Croatia during one-year period (2010-2011). Data on their sociodemographic characteristics, duration of untreated illness phase (DUP), alcohol abuse, suicidal behavior, personality features, and insight into illness were collected and compared between groups. Binary logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors of violent offending. Predictors of violent offending were older age, DUP before first contact with psychiatric services, and alcohol abuse. Regression model showed that the strongest positive predictive factor was harmful alcohol use, as determined by AUDIT test (odds ratio 37.01; 95% confidence interval 5.20-263.24). Psychopathy, emotional stability, and conscientiousness were significant positive predictive factors, while extroversion, pleasantness, and intellect were significant negative predictive factors for violent offending. This study found an association between alcohol abuse and the risk for violent offending in paranoid schizophrenia. We hope that this finding will help improve public and mental health prevention strategies in this vulnerable patient group.

  6. [Correlation between genetic polymorphisms of -855 G/C and -1140 G/A in GRIN1 gene and paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Jie; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao; Sun, Xue-Fei; Xing, Jia-Xin; Xuan, Jin-Feng; Wang, Bao-Jie

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of -855 G/C and -1140 G/A in promoter regions of GRIN1 gene and find their genetic correlation to paranoid schizophrenia as well as their applicable values in forensic medicine. The genetic polymorphisms of -855 G/C and -1140 G/A at the 5' end of GRIN1 gene were detected by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism and PAGE in 183 healthy unrelated individuals of northern Chinese Han population and 172 patients of paranoid schizophrenia, respectively. The chi2 test was used to identify Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of the genotype distribution. The differences of genotypes and allelic frequency distributions were compared between the two groups. Distributions of the genotypic frequencies satisfied Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both groups. The difference of genotypes was statistically significant between female patient group and female control group in -855 G/C distribution (P paranoid schizophrenia. The genetic factor of schizophrenia is involved in gender tendency. And it could be useful in forensic identification of schizophrenia.

  7. Genetic association between the dopamine D1-receptor gene and paranoid schizophrenia in a northern Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Ding, Mei; Xing, Jiaxin; Xuan, Jinfeng; Pang, Hao; Pan, Yuqing; Wang, Baojie

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission at the D1 receptor in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Genetic polymorphisms of the dopamine D1-receptor gene have a plausible role in modulating the risk of schizophrenia. To determine the role of DRD1 genetic polymorphisms as a risk factor for schizophrenia, we undertook a case-control study to look for an association between the DRD1 gene and schizophrenia. We genotyped eleven single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the DRD1 gene by deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing involving 173 paranoid schizophrenia patients and 213 unrelated healthy individuals. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the difference of genotype, allele, or haplotype distribution between cases and controls. A significantly lower risk of paranoid schizophrenia was associated with the AG + GG genotype of rs5326 and the AG + GG genotype of rs4532 compared to the AA genotype and the AA genotype, respectively. Distribution of haplotypes was no different between controls and paranoid schizophrenia patients. In the males, the genotype distribution of rs5326 was statistically different between cases and controls. In the females, the genotype distribution of rs4532 was statistically different between cases and controls. However, the aforementioned statistical significances were lost after Bonferroni correction. It is unlikely that DRD1 accounts for a substantial proportion of the genetic risk for schizophrenia. As an important dopaminergic gene, DRD1 may contribute to schizophrenia by interacting with other genes, and further relevant studies are warranted.

  8. S100B-immunopositive glia is elevated in paranoid as compared to residual schizophrenia: a morphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Johann; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bielau, Hendrik; Farkas, Nadine; Winter, Jana; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Brisch, Ralf; Gos, Tomasz; Mawrin, Christian; Myint, Aye Mu; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    Several studies have revealed increased S100B levels in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with schizophrenia. In this context, it was postulated that elevated levels of S100B may indicate changes of pathophysiological significance to brain tissue in general and astrocytes in particular. However, no histological study has been published on the cellular distribution of S100B in the brain of individuals with schizophrenia to clarify this hypothesis. The cell-density of S100B-immunopositive glia was analyzed in the anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPF), orbitofrontal, and superior temporal cortices/adjacent white matter, pyramidal layer/alveus of the hippocampus, and the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus of 18 patients with schizophrenia and 16 matched control subjects. Cortical brain regions contained more S100B-immunopositive glia in the schizophrenia group relative to controls (P=0.046). This effect was caused by the paranoid schizophrenia subgroup (P=0.018). Separate analysis of white matter revealed no diagnostic main group effect (P=0.846). However, the white matter of patients with paranoid schizophrenia contained more (mainly oligodendrocytic) S100B-positive glia as compared to residual schizophrenia (P=0.021). These effects were particularly pronounced in the DLPF brain area. Our study reveals distinct histological patterns of S100B immunoeactive glia in two schizophrenia subtypes. This may be indicative of a heterogenic pathophysiology or distinct compensatory abilities: Astro-/oligodendroglial activation may result in increased cellular S100B in paranoid schizophrenia. On the contrary, residual schizophrenia may be caused by white matter oligodendroglial damage or dysfunction, associated with a release of S100B into body fluids.

  9. Genetic variants in long non-coding RNA MIAT contribute to risk of paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shu-Quan; Hu, Hui-Ling; Ye, Ning; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    The heritability of schizophrenia has been reported to be as high as ~80%, but the contribution of genetic variants identified to this heritability remains to be estimated. Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) are involved in multiple processes critical to normal cellular function and dysfunction of lncRNA MIAT may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the genetic evidence of lncRNAs involved in schizophrenia has not been documented. Here, we conducted a two-stage association analysis on 8 tag SNPs that cover the whole MIAT locus in two independent Han Chinese schizophrenia case-control cohorts (discovery sample from Shanxi Province: 1093 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 1180 control subjects; replication cohort from Jilin Province: 1255 cases and 1209 healthy controls). In discovery stage, significant genetic association with paranoid schizophrenia was observed for rs1894720 (χ(2)=74.20, P=7.1E-18), of which minor allele (T) had an OR of 1.70 (95% CI=1.50-1.91). This association was confirmed in the replication cohort (χ(2)=22.66, P=1.9E-06, OR=1.32, 95%CI 1.18-1.49). Besides, a weak genotypic association was detected for rs4274 (χ(2)=4.96, df=2, P=0.03); the AA carriers showed increased disease risk (OR=1.30, 95%CI=1.03-1.64). No significant association was found between any haplotype and paranoid schizophrenia. The present studies showed that lncRNA MIAT was a novel susceptibility gene for paranoid schizophrenia in the Chinese Han population. Considering that most lncRNAs locate in non-coding regions, our result may explain why most susceptibility loci for schizophrenia identified by genome wide association studies were out of coding regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinico-Epidemiological Comparison of Delusion-Prominent and Hallucination-Prominent Clinical Subgroups of Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreinin, Anatoly; Krishtul, Vladimir; Kirsh, Zvi; Menuchin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Though hallucinations and delusions are prominent basic impairments in schizophrenia, reports of the relationship between hallucinatory and delusional symptoms among schizophrenia patients are scant. To examine the epidemiological and clinical differences between mainly hallucinatory and mainly delusional subgroups of paranoid schizophrenia patients. One hundred schizophrenia patients, paranoid type, were recruited. In a cross-sectional study, participants were divided into Mainly Hallucinatory (H) and Mainly Delusional (D) subgroups. Demographic variables were compared and clinical characteristics were evaluated using the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms, the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms, and the Clinical Global Impression Scale. The Quality-of-Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-18 was used to assess quality of life. Clinically, the H group was more heterogeneous as expressed by the broader range of scores that described the clinical picture of patients in that subgroup (in 43 of 78 variables, 55.13%) and similar ranges of scores (31 of 78 variables, 39.74%) for patients in the D group. Duration of hospitalization was significantly longer in group H than in group D (p=0.047). There was no statistically significant difference between the H and D subgroups in demographic characteristics. There are distinct epidemiological and clinical differences between the H and D subgroups, with more severe positive and negative symptoms and greater functional impairment in the H group. Paranoid schizophrenia patients with prominent hallucinations have poorer prognosis and need intensive therapeutic rehabilitation beginning with onset-of-illness. Further genetic studies and comparisons of fMRI and/or PET findings are warranted to investigate additional distinctive characteristics of these subgroups.

  11. [Ultrastructural changes of myelinated fibers in the brain in continuous and attack-like paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranova, N A; Kolomeets, N S; Vikhreva, O V; Zimina, I S; Rakhmanova, V I; Orlovskaya, D D

    Previously the authors have reported the ultrastructural pathology of myelinated fibers (MF) in the brain in schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of disease course on ultrastructural changes of MF. Postmortem electron microscopic morphometric study of MF was performed in the prefrontal cortex, caudate nucleus and hippocampus in 19 cases of paranoid schizophrenia. Fourteen cases of continuous schizophrenia, 5 cases of attack-like schizophrenia and 25 normal matched control cases were studied. The proportion (percentage) of pathological MF was estimated in the prefrontal cortex, layer 5, CA3 area of hippocampus, pyramidal layer, and in the head of the caudate nucleus. The percentage of MF having axonal atrophy and swelling of periaxonal oligodendrocyte process was significantly higher in both continuous and attack-like schizophrenia in all brain structures studied as compared to the control group. In the hippocampus and caudate nucleus, this parameter was increased significantly in attack-like schizophrenia as compared to continuous schizophrenia. In the prefrontal cortex. The percentage of the pathological MF having signs of deformation and destruction of myelin sheaths increased significantly only in continuous schizophrenia as compared to the control group. MF pathology is similar in attack-like and continuous paranoid schizophrenia but differ by the degree of severity of pathological MF. Abnormalities in MF contribute to the disconnectivity between the prefrontal cortex, caudate nucleus and hippocampus.

  12. Chronic non-fatal Datura abuse in a patient of paranoid schizophrenia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanra, Sourav; Khess, C R J; Srivastava, Naveen

    2015-04-01

    A range of psychoactive substances used by patients suffering from schizophrenia varies and may include those which are fatal and may cause serious toxicity leading to death. We here present a case report of a patient suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, who was abusing Datura stramonium over a prolonged period. A 32 year old male presented with aggressive behaviour, irritability for 6 years and regular intake of Datura seeds for 3 years. After taking detailed history and mental status examination (MSE), diagnoses of paranoid schizophrenia and mental and behavioral disorder due to use of hallucinogen were made. He had shown improvement on standard treatment with antipsychotics. D. stramonium is recognized among emerging new psychoactive substances being used across the world. Among various theories we discuss self-medication hypothesis as a mediating factor for this case. Though D. stramonium is notorious for its life threatening sequelae, clinicians should be aware of its chronic abuse as self-medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Attributional style in fist episode of schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders with and without paranoid ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Yulia; Burova, Vitalina; Garakh, Zanna; Gurovich, Isaac Ya

    2013-09-01

    In the present study we evaluated attributional style which refers to how individuals explain the causes for positive and negative events in their lives in patients with first episode of schizophrenia with and without paranoid ideation. 43 patients with first episode of psychosis and 37 matched normal controls completed Ambiguous Intentions Hostility Questionnaire (AIHQ) (Combs et al. 2007). Between group comparison of AIHQ scores showed a notable tendency to show aggressive response in overall patients group. We obtained significant elevation of hostility and blame biases scores in intentional and accidental situations in patients with paranoid ideation while the patients with non-paranoid ideation showed greater hostility and blame biases only in accidental situations as compared to controls. Correlations with positive and negative symptoms were obtained. Our findings suggest that patients with first episode of psychosis exhibit difficulties of the attribution biases which are interconnected with symptoms and thus indicate a trait-deficit of attributional style.

  14. [PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL PROGRAM AS A WAY OF CORRECTING MOTIVATIONAL COMPONENTS IN PATIENTS WITH PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH ABDOMINAL OBESITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayko, V; Korovina, L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of motivational and targeted psychoeducational programs designed for patients with paranoid schizophrenia with abdominal obesity. We observed 34 women aged 18-42 with continuous-flow type paranoid schizophrenia. All patients had a concomitant abdominal obesity, which developed secondarily after long-term administration of second generation antipsychotic medications (at least 1 year). Based on clinical-psychopathological and psychometric methods of assessment and on the analysis of Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire we have developed modules for psychoeducational programs. Based on the results of the treatment we conclude that the application of psychoeducational programs is an effective component of complex treatment of patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Abdominal obesity should be regarded as an important and the main side effect of long-term therapy with atypical antipsychotic medications. It has a marked negative effect on subjective assessment of patients and decreases the level of their mental and social adaptation. This factor should be the basis for the formation of re-socialization and compliance-oriented actions.

  15. Jack the Giant Tamer: Poetry Writing in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Constance

    1993-01-01

    Provides a brief case report on the use of poetry writing in the treatment of a patient with a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Notes that, after 23 sessions in which the patient said nothing, the patient brought a poem for the therapist to read at the 24 session. (SR)

  16. Heat shock protein 70 gene polymorphisms are associated with paranoid schizophrenia in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Malgorzata; Owczarek, Aleksander; Suchanek, Renata; Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Fila-Danilow, Anna; Borkowska, Paulina; Kucia, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Jan

    2014-03-01

    HSP70 genes have been considered as promising schizophrenia candidate genes based on their protective role in the central nervous system under stress conditions. In this study, we analyzed the potential implication of HSPA1A +190G/C, HSPA1B +1267A/G, and HSPA1L +2437T/C polymorphisms in the susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia in a homogenous Caucasian Polish population. In addition, we investigated the association of the polymorphisms with the clinical variables of the disease. Two hundred and three patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 243 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Polymorphisms of HSPA1A, -1B, and -1L genes were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP technique. Analyses were conducted in entire groups and in subgroups that were stratified according to gender. There were significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of HSPA1A polymorphism between the patients and controls. The +190CC genotype and +190C allele were over-represented in the patients and significantly increased the risk for developing schizophrenia (OR = 3.45 and OR = 1.61, respectively). Interestingly, such a risk was higher for females with the +190CC genotype than for males with the +190CC genotype (OR = 5.78 vs. OR = 2.76). We also identified the CGT haplotype as a risk haplotype for schizophrenia and demonstrated the effects of HSPA1A and HSPA1B genotypes on the psychopathology and age of onset. Our study provided the first evidence that the HSPA1A polymorphism may potentially increase the risk of developing paranoid schizophrenia. Further independent analyses in different populations to evaluate the role of gender are needed to replicate these results.

  17. BDNF val66met polymorphism is associated with age at onset and intensity of symptoms of paranoid schizophrenia in a Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanek, Renata; Owczarek, Aleksander; Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Kucia, Krzysztof; Kowalski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the candidate genes for schizophrenia. There is evidence that val66met polymorphism may be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The authors genotyped val66met (rs6265) polymorphism of the BDNF gene in 208 inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia and 254 control subjects in a Polish population. There was no association between val66met polymorphism and development of paranoid schizophrenia in either men or women. However, an association was found between this polymorphism and age at onset and psychopathology of paranoid schizophrenia. Men with the val/met genotype had an earlier age at onset, and the val/val genotype predisposed to more severe symptoms, particularly on the General Psychopathology Scale of the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS-G). The analysis of PANSS single items has shown that patients with the val/met genotype had higher scores on a hallucinatory behavior item than those with other genotypes.

  18. Theory of Mind differences in older patients with early-onset and late-onset paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets-Janssen, M M J; Meesters, P D; Comijs, H C; Eikelenboom, P; Smit, J H; de Haan, L; Beekman, A T F; Stek, M L

    2013-11-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is considered an essential element of social cognition. In younger schizophrenia patients, ToM impairments have extensively been demonstrated. It is not clear whether similar impairments can be found in older schizophrenia patients and if these impairments differ between older patients with early-onset and late-onset schizophrenia. Theory of Mind abilities were assessed using the Hinting Task in 15 older patients (age 60 years and older) with early-onset paranoid schizophrenia, 15 older patients with late-onset paranoid schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls. ANCOVA was performed to test differences between groups. Analyses were adjusted for level of education. Effect sizes, partial eta squared (ε(2) ), were computed as an indication of the clinical relevance of the findings. Patients with early-onset schizophrenia scored significantly lower on the Hinting Task (mean 16.1; SD 4.3) compared with patients with late-onset schizophrenia (mean 18.6; SD 1.5) and with healthy controls (mean 19.0; SD 1.4). The effect size of this difference was large (ε(2)  = 0.2). These results suggest that ToM functioning may be a protective factor modulating the age at onset of psychosis. Further studies into the relationship between social cognition and onset age of psychosis are warranted. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Ribosomal DNA transcription in the dorsal raphe nucleus is increased in residual but not in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyżanowska, Marta; Steiner, Johann; Brisch, Ralf; Mawrin, Christian; Busse, Stefan; Braun, Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Gos, Tomasz

    2015-03-01

    The central serotonergic system is implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, where the imbalance between dopamine, serotonin and glutamate plays a key pathophysiological role. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the main source of serotonergic innervation of forebrain limbic structures disturbed in schizophrenia patients. The study was carried out on paraffin-embedded brains from 17 (8 paranoid and 9 residual) schizophrenia patients and 28 matched controls without mental disorders. The transcriptional activity of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in DRN neurons was evaluated by the AgNOR silver-staining method. An increased rDNA transcriptional activity was found in schizophrenia patients in the cumulative analysis of all DRN subnuclei (t test, P = 0.02). Further subgroup analysis revealed that it was an effect specific for residual schizophrenia versus paranoid schizophrenia or control groups (ANOVA, P = 0.002). This effect was confounded neither by suicide nor by antipsychotic medication. Our findings suggest that increased activity of rDNA in DRN neurons is a distinct phenomenon in schizophrenia, particularly in residual patients. An activation of the rDNA transcription in DRN neurons may represent a compensatory mechanism to overcome the previously described prefrontal serotonergic hypofunction in this diagnostic subgroup.

  20. History of religious delusions and psychosocial functioning among Mexican patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-García, Rebeca; López-Luna, Sonia; Páez, Francisco; Escamilla, Raúl; Camarena, Beatriz; Fresán, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The association between global functionality and religiosity among patients from developing and predominantly Catholic countries warrants attention. To compare religiosity and psychosocial functioning in Mexican schizophrenia patients with and without a history of religious delusions, seventy-four patients with paranoid schizophrenia were recruited. Patients with a history of religious delusions had more psychiatric hospitalizations and poorer psychosocial functioning compared with those without a history of religious delusions. No differences emerged between groups in the total scores of religiosity scales. A history of religious delusions rather than religiosity itself may have an influence on psychosocial functioning among Mexican patients with schizophrenia.

  1. GABAergic system impairment in the hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus of patients with paranoid schizophrenia: A post-mortem study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Johann; Brisch, Ralf; Schiltz, Kolja; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Mawrin, Christian; Krzyżanowska, Marta; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Braun, Katharina; Schmitt, Andrea; Bogerts, Bernhard; Gos, Tomasz

    2016-11-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is a key enzyme in GABA synthesis and alterations in GABAergic neurotransmission related to glial abnormalities are thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This study aimed to identify potential differences regarding the neuropil expression of GAD between paranoid and residual schizophrenia. GAD65/67 immunostained histological sections were evaluated by quantitative densitometric analysis of GAD-immunoreactive (ir) neuropil. Regions of interest were the hippocampal formation (CA1 field and dentate gyrus [DG]), superior temporal gyrus (STG), and laterodorsal thalamic nucleus (LD). Data from 16 post-mortem schizophrenia patient samples (10 paranoid and 6 residual schizophrenia cases) were compared with those from 16 matched controls. Overall, schizophrenia patients showed a lower GAD-ir neuropil density (P=0.014), particularly in the right CA1 (P=0.033). However, the diagnostic subgroups differed significantly (Pparanoid versus residual patients (P=0.036) and controls (Pparanoid versus residual schizophrenia cases (P=0.042). GAD-ir neuropil density correlated positively with antipsychotic dosage, particularly in CA1 (right: r=0.850, P=0.004; left: r=0.800, P=0.010). Our finding of decreased relative density of GAD-ir neuropil suggests hypofunction of the GABAergic system, particularly in hippocampal CA1 field and STG layer V of patients with paranoid schizophrenia. The finding that antipsychotic medication seems to counterbalance GABAergic hypofunction in schizophrenia patients suggests the possibility of exploring new treatment avenues which target this system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Variants of cognitive deficiency depending on the clinical characteristics of the disease in patients with paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Lebedeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pecific aspects of cognitive impairments in patients with paranoid schizophrenia depending on the clinical characteristics of the disease have been studied. One hundred and thirty patients were examined. A clinico-psychological, experimental psychological and statistical methods were used. Three main types of cognitive deficiency with paranoid schizophrenia, associated with the onset, disease duration, and severity of psychiatric symptomology : 1 long-term course of the disease accompanied by the average level of clinical symptomology associated with abnormal attention and visuospatial functions; 2 late onset of the disease and unexpressed clinical symptomology combined with memory impairments; 3 acute onset and early age combined with the absence of cognitive impairments.

  3. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms in the DRD5 gene and paranoid schizophrenia in northern Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Ding, M; Pang, H; Xu, X M; Wang, B J

    2014-03-12

    Dopamine (DA) has been implicated in the pathophysiol-ogy of several psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, genes related to the dopaminergic (DAergic) system are good candidate genes for schizophrenia. One of receptors of the DA receptor system is dopa-mine receptor 5 (DRD5). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions of DRD5 gene may affect gene expression, influence biosynthesis of DA and underlie various neuropsychiatric disorders re-lated to DA dysfunction. The present study explored the association of SNPs within the DRD5 gene with paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. A total of 176 patients with schizophrenia and 206 healthy controls were genotyped for four DRD5 SNPs (rs77434921, rs2076907, rs6283, and rs1800762). Significant group differences were observed in the allele and genotype frequencies of rs77434921 and rs1800762 and in the frequen-cies of GC haplotypes corresponding to rs77434921-rs1800762. Our find-ings suggest that common genetic variations of DRD5 are likely to con-tribute to genetic susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. Further studies in larger samples are needed to replicate this association.

  4. FEATURES OF LIPID PEROXIDATION AND NEUROTROPHIC REGULATION IN PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Kolesnichenko

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the features of lipid peroxidation, activity of the antioxidative systems and level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Present study indicates associations between the studied parameters and type of progression, duration of disease and gender of patients.

  5. Maintenance Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Patient with Treatment-Resistant Paranoid Schizophrenia and Comorbid Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beppe Micallef-Trigona

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of choice for acute schizophrenia is antipsychotic drug treatment and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT and should only be considered as an option for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, where treatment with clozapine has already proven ineffective or intolerable. The use of ECT as a maintenance treatment for patients with schizophrenia and comorbid epilepsy is uncommon as scant evidence exists to support this. We describe a patient with a serious case of paranoid schizophrenia and comorbid epilepsy who had not responded to typical and atypical antipsychotic medication, but responded remarkably to acute ECT and required maintenance ECT to sustain a positive therapeutic response.

  6. ANANKASTIK PERSONALITY DISORDER IN SCHIZOPHRENIA PARANOID PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Damarnegara ..; A. A. Ngr. Andika

    2014-01-01

    Anankastik personality disorder is a health problem that can disturb the activities of person and can accompany a variety of other mental health problems. The patient in thiscase is a patient with an anankastik or obsessive compulsive personality disorder withthe axis I diagnoses is Paranoid Schizophrenia and was given haloperidol 2x5mg, buthave not done psychotherapy because the patient has not been cooperative. Theprognosis is dependent on patient compliance in taking medication and control...

  7. Subjective experience of emotions and emotional empathy in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Anja; Bahçesular, Katja; Brockmann, Eva-Maria; Biederbick, Sarah-Elisabeth; Dziobek, Isabel; Gallinat, Jürgen; Montag, Christiane

    2014-12-30

    Unlike the cognitive dimensions, alterations of the affective components of empathy in schizophrenia are less well understood. This study explored cognitive and affective dimensions of empathy in the context of the subjective experience of aspects of emotion processing, including emotion regulation, emotional contagion, and interpersonal distress, in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy controls. In addition, the predictive value of these parameters on psychosocial function was investigated. Fifty-five patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 55 healthy controls were investigated using the Multifaceted Empathy Test and Interpersonal Reactivity Index, as well as the Subjective Experience of Emotions and Emotional Contagion Scales. Individuals with schizophrenia showed impairments of cognitive empathy, but maintained emotional empathy. They reported significantly more negative emotional contagion, overwhelming emotions, lack of emotions, and symbolization of emotions by imagination, but less self-control of emotional expression than healthy persons. Besides cognitive empathy, the experience of a higher extent of overwhelming emotions and of less interpersonal distress predicted psychosocial function in patients. People with schizophrenia and healthy controls showed diverging patterns of how cognitive and emotional empathy related to the subjective aspects of emotion processing. It can be assumed that variables of emotion processing are important moderators of empathic abilities in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Morphological and functional abnormalities of salience network in the early-stage of paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Weidan; Li, Li; Zhang, Huiran; Ouyang, Xuan; Liu, Haihong; Zhao, Jingping; Li, Lingjiang; Xue, Zhimin; Xu, Ke; Tang, Haibo; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Zhening; Wang, Fei

    2012-10-01

    A salience network (SN), mainly composed of the anterior insula (AI) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), has been suggested to play an important role in salience attribution which has been proposed as central to the pathology of paranoid schizophrenia. The role of this SN in the pathophysiology of paranoid schizophrenia, however, still remains unclear. In the present study, voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity analyses were combined to identify morphological and functional abnormalities in the proposed SN in the early-stage of paranoid schizophrenia (ESPS). Voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity analyses were applied to 90 ESPS patients and 90 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Correlation analyses were performed to examine the relationships between various clinical variables and both gray matter morphology and functional connectivity within the SN in ESPS. Compared to the HC group, the ESPS group showed significantly reduced gray matter volume (GMV) in both bilateral AI and ACC. Moreover, significantly reduced functional connectivity within the SN sub-networks was identified in the ESPS group. These convergent morphological and functional deficits in SN were significantly associated with hallucinations. Additionally, illness duration correlated with reduced GMV in the left AI in ESPS. In conclusion, these findings provide convergent evidence for the morphological and functional abnormalities of the SN in ESPS. Moreover, the association of illness duration with the reduced GMV in the left AI suggests that the SN and the AI, in particular, may manifest progressive morphological changes that are especially important in the emergence of ESPS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 1-123 iodoamphetamine SPECT findings in paranoid schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, T.R.; Walker, B.S.; Matthieson, S.; Miller, C.D.; Raese, J.

    1989-01-01

    To find out if frontal metabolic and cerebral blood flow differ between normal subjects and patients with paranoid schizophrenia (PAR), the authors have examined regional synaptic amine metabolism. Using [I- 123]iodoamphetamine (IMP), the authors compared 85 subjects (61 PAR patients and 24 normal subjects) with single-head single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Virtually automatic analysis assigned relative tracer uptake to the frontal, anterior temporoparietal (TP), and posterior TP regions. Consistent with the visual inspection of two clinicians familiar with SPECT IMP images, this objective method yielded T-tests that showed higher relative frontal lobe ratios in normal subjects than in PAR patients (P =.03)

  10. TPH2 gene polymorphisms in the regulatory region are associated with paranoid schizophrenia in Northern Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X M; Ding, M; Pang, H; Wang, B J

    2014-03-12

    In the last years, serotonin (5-HT) has been related with the pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, genes related to the serotonergic (5-HTergic) system are good candidate genes for schizophrenia. The rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis is tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions of TPH2 gene may affect gene expression and biosynthesis of 5-HT triggering to various neuropsychiatric disorders related to 5-HT dysfunction. The present study explored the association of SNPs within the TPH2 gene with paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. A total of 164 patients with schizophrenia and 244 healthy controls were genotyped for six TPH2 SNPs (rs4570625, rs11178997, rs11178998, rs41317118, rs17110747, and rs41317114). Significant group differences were observed in the allele and genotype frequencies of rs4570625 and in the frequencies of GTA and TTA haplotypes corresponding to rs4570625-rs11178997-rs11178998. Our findings suggest that common genetic variations of TPH2 are likely to contribute to genetic susceptibility to paranoid schizophrenia in Han Chinese. Further studies in larger samples are needed to replicate this association.

  11. [The importance of the internal picture of the disease for the rehabilitative prognosis in paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pkhidenko, S V

    1993-07-01

    Clinico-catamnestic analysis of internal picture of disease was carried out in 237 patients with paranoid schizophrenia. High ratio of anosognosia (52%) was found. As many as 11% of patients aimed at overcoming morbid symptoms.

  12. Predisposition to depressive symptoms in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: constitutional-biological, socio-demographic factors and the debut of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. S. Zhyvago

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To identify the constitutional-biological, socio-demographic (microsocial and clinical-dynamic (the debut of the disease factors of predisposition to the depressive symptoms development in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Materials and methods. A clinical-anamnestic, socio-demographic, clinical-psychopathological and pathopsychological examinations of 82 patients with paranoid schizophrenia with depressive symptoms identified and compared with 47 patients with paranoid schizophrenia without depressive symptoms. The study was managed using the PANSS, CDSS, HDRS scales and a questionnaire for the assessment of social functioning and quality of the mentally ill life. Groups did not differ in the basic demographic indicators. The study of constitutional and biological predisposition factors included the study of heredity and premorbid characterological features of patients. Socio-demographic (before the onset of the disease microsocial conditions and the current stage factors –family relationships; characteristics of living conditions; financial position; the quality of nutrition. To factors of the disease onset were attributed: age debut; factors that preceded the first episode; syndromes of the first episode; the first reference to a psychiatrist; suicidal statements and intentions. Results. It was evaluated the prognostic significance of individual predisposing factors to depression in patients with paranoid schizophrenia and found the following factors of predisposition (p<0.05: the heredity of schizophrenia and affective disorders; low level of erudition, combined with emotional and volitional immaturity, anxiety, prone to mood swings; low income and the cost of food, clothing and leisure; poor living conditions; unstable or conflictual family relationships; the presence of the first episode of affective symptoms, such as depressive, which is stored in the further course of the disease, as well as anhedonia, sleep and appetite

  13. Power spectrum scale invariance identifies prefrontal dysregulation in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulescu, Anca R; Rubin, Denis; Strey, Helmut H; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2012-07-01

    Theory and experimental evidence suggest that complex living systems function close to the boundary of chaos, with erroneous organization to an improper dynamical range (too stiff or chaotic) underlying system-wide dysregulation and disease. We hypothesized that erroneous organization might therefore also characterize paranoid schizophrenia, via optimization abnormalities in the prefrontal-limbic circuit regulating emotion. To test this, we acquired fMRI scans from 35 subjects (N = 9 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and N = 26 healthy controls), while they viewed affect-valent stimuli. To quantify dynamic regulation, we analyzed the power spectrum scale invariance (PSSI) of fMRI time-courses and computed the geometry of time-delay (Poincaré) maps, a measure of variability. Patients and controls showed distinct PSSI in two clusters (k(1) : Z = 4.3215, P = 0.00002 and k(2) : Z = 3.9441, P = 0.00008), localized to the orbitofrontal/medial prefrontal cortex (Brodmann Area 10), represented by β close to white noise in patients (β ≈ 0) and in the pink noise range in controls (β ≈ -1). Interpreting the meaning of PSSI differences, the Poincaré maps indicated less variability in patients than controls (Z = -1.9437, P = 0.05 for k(1) ; Z = -2.5099, P = 0.01 for k(2) ). That the dynamics identified Brodmann Area 10 is consistent with previous schizophrenia research, which implicates this area in deficits of working memory, executive functioning, emotional regulation and underlying biological abnormalities in synaptic (glutamatergic) transmission. Our results additionally cohere with a large body of work finding pink noise to be the normal range of central function at the synaptic, cellular, and small network levels, and suggest that patients show less supple responsivity of this region. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The temporolimbic system theory of paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, M F

    1997-01-01

    The hippocampus serves as a funnel for heavily processed sensory information that has converged at the entorhinal cortex. Lesions of the hippocampus do not alter incoming sensory or motor information but, rather, alter their integration with our baggage of emotional experiences and social values. According to Bogerts, such a lesion would be ideally situated to result in laboriously processed sensory information that is out of context to our outside environment. In this regard, Bogerts describes the pathological findings of a patient with a gross delusional disorder. The salient finding at autopsy was a developmental lesion in the left posterior parahippocampal gyrus. Although a number of lesions have been described in the brains of patients with schizophrenia, Bogerts believes that those in the limbic system appear critical to the expression of paranoid symptoms.

  15. Disorders of working memory and selected cognitive processes inpatients treated for paranoid schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Giętkowski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Already since the times of Baddeley and Hitch the dorsolateral part of the frontal lobe was regarded as the function‑ al centre of the working memory. Working memory disorders are, on the other hand, one of the basic and consoli‑ dated disorders in the course of paranoid schizophrenia. The concept of neurodevelopmental schizophrenia com‑ bines these elements and associates the illness with the changes occurring in the brain in the prenatal period. The efficiency of the working memory system, which acts as a buffer manipulating with the possessed and inflowing information, influences the quality of other cognitive processes, such as long‑term memory, short‑term memory, con‑ centration and thinking. A study was performed on two groups: one experimental consisting of 31 people suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and one control group of 31 healthy people. In both groups a replica of Wisconsin Card Sorting Task was used in order to measure the efficiency of the working memory and selected tests from WAIS‑R (PL: the Polish adaptation of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale to assess the functioning of concentration, memory and thinking. The results of the study showed that in the experimental group the efficiency of the working memory is very low and that the illness affects the performance of concentration, memory and thinking. Moreover the tests proved that the working memory disorder increases with time.

  16. Facial emotion recognition in paranoid schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachse, Michael; Schlitt, Sabine; Hainz, Daniela; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Walter, Henrik; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Freitag, Christine M

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) share deficits in emotion processing. In order to identify convergent and divergent mechanisms, we investigated facial emotion recognition in SZ, high-functioning ASD (HFASD), and typically developed controls (TD). Different degrees of task difficulty and emotion complexity (face, eyes; basic emotions, complex emotions) were used. Two Benton tests were implemented in order to elicit potentially confounding visuo-perceptual functioning and facial processing. Nineteen participants with paranoid SZ, 22 with HFASD and 20 TD were included, aged between 14 and 33 years. Individuals with SZ were comparable to TD in all obtained emotion recognition measures, but showed reduced basic visuo-perceptual abilities. The HFASD group was impaired in the recognition of basic and complex emotions compared to both, SZ and TD. When facial identity recognition was adjusted for, group differences remained for the recognition of complex emotions only. Our results suggest that there is a SZ subgroup with predominantly paranoid symptoms that does not show problems in face processing and emotion recognition, but visuo-perceptual impairments. They also confirm the notion of a general facial and emotion recognition deficit in HFASD. No shared emotion recognition deficit was found for paranoid SZ and HFASD, emphasizing the differential cognitive underpinnings of both disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. ANANKASTIK PERSONALITY DISORDER IN SCHIZOPHRENIA PARANOID PATIENT: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damarnegara ..

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anankastik personality disorder is a health problem that can disturb the activities of person and can accompany a variety of other mental health problems. The patient in thiscase is a patient with an anankastik or obsessive compulsive personality disorder withthe axis I diagnoses is Paranoid Schizophrenia and was given haloperidol 2x5mg, buthave not done psychotherapy because the patient has not been cooperative. Theprognosis is dependent on patient compliance in taking medication and controls for thesetting of the dose, and the support of her family. 

  18. Intracranial Foreign Body in a Patient With Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andereggen, Lukas; Biétry, Damien; Kottke, Raimund; Andres, Robert H

    2017-10-01

    Self-inflicted penetrating head injuries in patients with paranoid schizophrenia are an infrequent phenomenon. The authors report on a psychiatric patient who presented with epistaxis. Computed tomography showed a nail passing from the nasal cavity into the frontal lobe. Given the proximity to large intracranial vessels, a craniotomy was performed and the nail was retracted. The patient later reported having hammered the nail into the nasal cavity with the intention to "kill the voice in my head." Despite use of the latest imaging modalities, metal artifacts may have limited the assessment of vascular involvement. Surgical decision-making preventing secondary damage is crucial in them.

  19. [Evoked potentials N200/P300 disorders and clinical phenotype in Cuban families with paranoid schizophrenia: a family-based association study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra López, Seidel; Martín Reyes, Migdyrai; Pedroso Rodríguez, María de Los Ángeles; Reyes Berazain, Adnelys; Mendoza Quiñones, Raúl; Bravo Collazo, Tania Martha; Días de Villarvilla, Thais; Machado Cano, María Julia; Bobés León, María Antonieta

    2015-04-01

    N200 and P300 event-related evoked potentials provide sensitive measurements of sensory and cognitive function and have been used to study information processing in patients with schizophrenia and their unaffected first-degree relatives. Reduced amplitude and increased latency of N200 and P300 potentials have been consistently reported in schizophrenia. Thus, event-related evoked potentials abnormalities are promising possible biological markers for genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia. To assess the association of changes in latency, amplitude and topographic distribution of potentials N200 and P300 of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives, in families with schizophrenia multiplex. We measured latency and amplitude of the N200 and P300 component of evoked potentials using an auditory odd-ball paradigm in 25 schizophrenic patients (probands) from 60 families multiply affected with paranoid schizophrenia, 23 of their non-schizophrenic first-degree relatives and 25 unrelated healthy controls, through a study of family association. Schizophrenic patients and their relatives showed significant latency prolongation and amplitude reduction of the N200 and P300 waves compared to controls. Left-temporal as compared to right-temporal N200 and P300 were significantly smaller in schizophrenic patients and their non-schizophrenic first-degree relatives than in controls. Our results suggest that event-related evoked potentials abnormalities may serve as markers of genetic vulnerability in schizophrenia. Confirming results of other researchers, this present study suggests that latency prolongation and amplitude reduction of the N200 and P300 waves and an altered topography at temporal sites may be a trait “marker” of paranoid schizophrenia.

  20. Different distribution patterns of lymphocytes and microglia in the hippocampus of patients with residual versus paranoid schizophrenia: further evidence for disease course-related immune alterations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Stefan; Busse, Mandy; Schiltz, Kolja; Bielau, Hendrik; Gos, Tomasz; Brisch, Ralf; Mawrin, Christian; Schmitt, Andrea; Jordan, Wolfgang; Müller, Ulf J; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Steiner, Johann

    2012-11-01

    Certain cytokines have been identified in the peripheral blood as trait markers of schizophrenia, while others are considered relapse-related state markers. Furthermore, data from peripheral blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nuclear imaging studies suggest that (1) blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction (e.g., immigration of lymphocytes into brain tissue and intrathecal antibody production) correlates with the development of negative symptoms, while (2) the brain's mononuclear phagocyte system (microglial cells) is activated during acute psychosis. Based on these neuroinflammatory hypotheses, we have quantified the numerical density of immunostained CD3+ T-lymphocytes, CD20+ B-lymphocytes, and HLA-DR+ microglial cells in the posterior hippocampus of 17 schizophrenia patients and 11 matched controls. Disease course-related immune alterations were considered by a separate analysis of residual (prevailing negative symptoms, n=7) and paranoid (prominent positive symptoms, n=10) schizophrenia cases. Higher densities of CD3+ and CD20+ lymphocytes were observed in residual versus paranoid schizophrenia (CD 3: left: P=0.047, right: P=0.038; CD20: left: P=0.020, right: P=0.010) and controls (CD3: left: P=0.057, right: P=0.069; CD20: left: P=0.008, right: P=0.006). In contrast, HLA-DR+ microglia were increased in paranoid schizophrenia versus residual schizophrenia (left: P=0.030, right: P=0.012). A similar trend emerged when this group was compared to controls (left: P=0.090, right: P=0.090). BBB impairment and infiltration of T cells and B cells may contribute to the pathophysiology of residual schizophrenia, while microglial activation seems to play a role in paranoid schizophrenia. The identification of diverse immune endophenotypes may facilitate the development of distinct anti-inflammatory schizophrenia therapies to normalize BBB function, (auto)antibody production or microglial activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Language Disorders Comparative Study in Patients with Paranoid and Non-Paranoid Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzam Parva

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main purpose of this study was the assay of language disorders in paranoid and non – paranoid long-stay Schizophrenic patients in Razi Psychiatric Center. Materials & Methods: Language disorders in 40 Schizophrenic Patients who were divided in 2 groups (paranoid and non – paranoid No: 20 male and female and studied by using Farsi Aphasia Test. All of the subjects were matched on the basis of gender, age, education, duration of illness and length of stay in hospital. The evaluated language skills were composed of Spontaneus Verbal Fluency, Descriptive Verbal Fluency, Quality of Spontaneus Speech, Quality of Descriptive Speech, Listening Comprehension, Oral Reading (Expression, Written Comprehension, Writing, (words, Repetition and Number of Words. Data were analysed by using of SPSS windows analysis. Results: show a global reduction in scores of skills compared with normal subjects and the most reduction is seen in Quality of Descriptive Speech, Fluency of Descriptive speech and Number of Words Skills. Conclusion: Paranoid patients versus non paranoids show significant differences in Fluency of Descriptive Speech, Listening Comprehension, Oral Reading and Number of Words, and global score of the test. among demographic variants, only educational situation has significant relevance with some items of the test.

  2. Deficits in theory of mind and social anxiety as independent paths to paranoid features in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaker, Paul H; Salvatore, Giampaolo; Grant, Megan L A; Procacci, Michele; Olesek, Kyle L; Buck, Kelly D; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2010-12-01

    Research suggests paranoia among persons with schizophrenia may be the result of a number of different psychological processes including deficits in theory of mind (ToM) and social anxiety. To test this hypothesis, this study sought to determine whether a group of highly paranoid persons with and without a ToM deficit could be detected and whether the group with paranoia and better ToM might have high levels of social anxiety. To explore this, a cluster analysis was performed on a group of 102 adults with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in a non-acute phase of illness on the basis of ratings of paranoid features using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and levels of ToM deficit using a factor score which summarized four different ToM assessments. Four groups were produced: High Paranoia/Poor ToM (n = 14); Low Paranoia/Good ToM (n = 22); Low Paranoia/Low Middle ToM (n=29); and High Paranoia/High Middle ToM (n = 23). Groups were then compared on self report of social anxiety. As predicted, the group with levels of high paranoid features and relatively better ToM performance had significantly higher levels of social anxiety than all other groups. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. [Glutamate receptors genes polymorphism and the risk of paranoid schizophrenia in Russians and tatars from the Republic of Bashkortostan].

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    Gareeva, A E; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that affects about 1% of the world population, leading to disability and social exclusion. Glutamatergic neurotransmission is a violation of one of the main hypotheses put forward to explain the neurobiological mechanisms of schizophrenia. Post mortem studies have found changes in the degree of affinity glutamate receptors, their transcription, and altered expression of their subunits in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus in patients with schizophrenia. As a result of genetic studies of gene family encoding ionotropic AMPA and kainate glutamate receptors in schizophrenia, ambiguous results were received. The association of polymorphic variants of genes GRIA2 and GRIK2 with paranoid schizophrenia and response to therapy with haloperidol in Russian and Tatar of the Republic of Bashkortostan was conducted in the present study. DNA samples of 257 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and of 349 healthy controls of Russian and Tatar ethnic group living in the Republic of Bashkortostan were involved into the present study. In the result of the present study: (1) high risk genetic markers of paranoid schizophrenia (PSZ) were obtained: in Russians-GR4IA2*CCC (OR = 9.60) and in Tatars-GRIK2*ATG (OR = 3.5), GRIK2*TGG (OR = 3.12) (2) The following low risk genetic markers of PSZ were revealed: in Tatars-GRIA2*T/T (rs43025506) of GRIA2 gene (OR = 0.34); in Russians.- GRIA2*CCT (OR = 0.481). (3) Genetic markers of low haloperido! treatment efficacy in respect of negative and positive symptoms GRIK2*T/T (rs2227281) of GRIK2 gene and GRAL42*C/C in Russians, GRIK2*A/A (rs995640) of GRIK2 gene in Tatars. (4) Genetic markers of low haloperidol treatment efficacy in respect of positive symptoms GRL42*C/C in Russians. The results of the present study support the hypothesis of the involvement of glutamate receptor genes in schizophrenia pathway. Considerable inter-ethnic'diversity of genetic risk factors for this disease was

  4. [The association of polymorphisms in SLC18A1, TPH1 and RELN genes with risk of paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaktionova, D Iu; Gareeva, A E; Khusnutdinova, E K; Nasedkina, T V

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a biochip for the analysis of polymorphisms in candidate genes for schizophrenia: DISC1, RELN, ZNF804A, PLXNA2, COMT, SLC18A41, CACNA1C, ANK3, TPH1, PLAA and SNAP-25. Using biochip the allele and genotype frequencies in 198 patients with schizophrenia and 192 healthy individuals have been obtained. For SLC18A1 polymorphism rs2270641 A>C, the frequencies of A allele (p = 0.007) and AA genotype (p = 0.002) were lower in patients compared with healthy individuals. A significant association was found between AA genotype (p = 0.036) of the TPH1 polymorphism rs1800532 C>A and schizophrenia. The C allele (p = 0.039) of the RELNpolymorphism rs7341475 C>T were lower in patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy individuals in a tatar population. Genotype AA of the TPH1 polymorphism rs1800532 C>A were more frequent in patients with schizophrenia compared with healthy individuals. Ithas been shown that the C allele (p = 0.0001) and GC (p = = 0.0001) genotype of the PLXNA2 polymorphism rs1327175 G>C are associated with the family history in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. The obtained data suggest that SLC18A1, TPH1 and RELN gene polymorphisms are associated with the risk of paranoid schizophrenia.

  5. Demographic features and premorbid personality disorder traits in relation to age of onset and sex in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokou, Maria; Gourzis, Philippos

    2014-03-30

    Personality disorders in the premorbid period of schizophrenia and particularly in relation to age of onset and sex, seem to be a rather under-researched area. In the present study, 88 patients with paranoid schizophrenia were examined, regarding demographic characteristics and premorbid personality disorder traits, in order to investigate for differences in the premorbid period of the disease, in relation to age of onset and sex. Age cutoff points were set at personality disorder traits were retrospectively assessed by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-Patient Edition for Axis II disorders (SCID-II). Comparisons were performed by applying the two-tailed Wilcoxon rank-sum and the χ(2) statistical tests. Young onset patients were characterized by significantly higher proportion of urban birth, single status, more avoidant premorbid personality disorder traits, and less passive-aggressive premorbid personality disorder traits, than late onset counterparts. Differences were more prominently shown in men. Earlier age of onset seems to be associated to increased social inhibition and worse psychosocial adaptation in the premorbid period of paranoid schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Can interpersonal hypersensitivity under subconscious condition explain paranoid symptom in schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yikang; Yang, Zhi; Zhao, Jinping; Li, Ting; Wang, Meijuan; Qian, Jie; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Jijun; Weng, Xuchu; Yu, Dehua; Li, Chunbo

    2017-06-01

    Interpersonal hypersensitivity is often observed in schizophrenia and has been associated with psychopathological deficits in schizophrenia. Here, we investigated dysfunctions of interpersonal information processing in schizophrenia at both conscious and subconscious levels. The experiment included 143 schizophrenia patients and 59 healthy controls. A continuous flashing suppression approach based on binocular rivalry was employed, which included two modes: invisible (subconscious) and visible (conscious). The accuracy and reaction time of a Gabor patch direction-detection task were assessed under three types of stimuli in both modes: images with no person (type 1), images with two to three noncommunicating persons (type 2), and images with more than three communicating individuals (type 3). In the visible mode, the accuracy of the Gabor patch direction-detection task in the case group was significantly lower than in the control group for the third type of stimuli (P = 0.015). In the invisible mode, however, the accuracy was higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.037). The response time difference of the Gabor patch direction-detection task for the third type of images in the invisible mode was negatively correlated with the duration of the illness (P = 0.008). These findings suggest that schizophrenia patients exhibit attentional bias to interpersonal interaction behaviors at both conscious and subliminal levels but toward opposite directions. Our findings shed light on the subconscious deficits under the paranoid symptom in schizophrenia. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Neurocognitive recovery of patients with paranoid schizophrenia

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    Olena Molchanova

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. At present neurocognitive impairment is considered a core feature of schizophrenia. This statement is grounded on cognitive impairment stability, the persistence of cognitive impairment independently of the disease stage and other symptoms of schizophrenia. The relevance of the search for cognitive remediation methods is determined by the influence of cognitive functioning on the functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia. In order to solve this problem, scientists are actively investigating such direction in the treatment of patients with this psychopathology as «neurocognitive therapy» or neurocognitive training. Objective.To evaluate the effectiveness of neurocognitive training in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Methods and materials. The patients who matched inclusion criteria were assessed on Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, Personal and Social Performance scale (PSP, neuropsychological tests (Trail Making Test part A and B, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Luria test at the baseline, 1st and 6th month. All patients who were included in the study were randomly assigned into two groups. The intervention group (n=40 underwent a standard supportive treatment and neurocognitive training. The control group (n=31 received supportive medication treatment alone. Results. After 1st month, a statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups was found both for the overall PANSS score improvement and improvement in several items, which represented the cognitive decline. Total PSP score increased significantly in the intervention group from 41-50 to 51-60 (р=0.0001. In Wisconsin Card Sorting Test the proportion of incorrect answers decreased by 31.4% (р=0.0001, perseverative errors by 20.1% (р=0.042, the number of completed categories increased by 33.5% (р=0.002. Conclusion. The proposed neurocognitive training program showed positive results, which was reflected in a statistically

  8. [Role of psychoeducation in therapy of women with paranoid schizophrenia on the background of abdominal obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayko, V; Korovina, L

    2013-03-01

    Sufficient information of patients and their relatives about essence of disease, principles of medicamental therapy, is one of major factors influencing on adherence of patients to therapy. Application of psychoeducation programs allows to activate a patient in partnership with a doctor, that assists the increase of compliance. Research aim - to improve quality of remission and readaptation of patients with paranoid schizophrenia by realization of the psychoeducation programs. 45 women in age of 18-60 being on treatment in the Kharkiv regional clinical psychiatric hospital №3, with a diagnosis paranoid schizophrenia were examined. Psychoeducation lessons were conducted in closed groups for 7-8 persons, 2 times per a week, by duration every lesson for 45 minutes. The psychoeducation module consisted of informative block and forming of practical skills. Realization of psychoeducation lesson in this contingent showed the efficiency. Communicative activity became better for all patients as well as their adherence to therapy, that gave possibility promptly expose and warn development of side effects, improve quality and level of social adaptation of patients life.

  9. Thirty Days without a Bite: Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Paranoid Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Mélanie; Doré, Marie-Claire; Laforce, Robert

    2014-09-25

    Wernicke's Encephalopathy (WE) is a preventable neurologic condition characterized by altered mental status, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. Although historically associated with alcoholism, a few authors have described WE in patients with non-alcohol related psychiatric disorders. We report herein the case of a 36-year-old young man with paranoid schizophrenia who was brought to hospital for confusion and difficulties with his vision. His roommate said he had gone about thirty days without eating '…because he was on a slimming cure'. History and physical examination suggested WE as a result of isolation and poor diet leading to nutritional deficiency. This was confirmed by brain magnetic resonance imaging showing classic thalamic, mammillary bodies and brainstem lesions. Of note, his cognitive profile was far more heterogeneous than what had classically been described in the literature and involved both cortical and subcortical pathology, generating memory but also significant executive deficits. Intravenous treatment with thiamine was given and our patient showed mild improvements in visual acuity and nystagmus. However, persistent cognitive and physical disabilities consistent with Korsakoff syndrome remained, and he now lives in a supervised home. This case illustrates the tragic consequences of nutritional deficiencies in a patient with paranoid schizophrenia. The threshold to suspect WE in schizophrenic patients should be lowered and in doubt prophylactic parenteral thiamine should be administered.

  10. SNP8NRG433E1006 NEUREGULIN-1 GENETIC VARIATION IN BATAKS ETHNIC WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA PARANOID AND HEALTHY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmeida Effendy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The neuregulin 1 (NRG1 gene which influences the development of white matter connectivity has been associated with schizophrenia. It influences neuronal migration, synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, neuron-glia communication, myelination, and neurotransmission in the brain and others. NRG1 is located in 8p13, and it is frequently replicated in schizphrenia. SNP8NRG433E1006 gene NRG1 is one of core at risk haplotype of schizphrenia. This study looked forward differences SNP8NRG433E1006 neuregulin 1 between Bataks ethnic with schizophrenia paranoid and Bataks ethnic healthy control. Methods: Batak ethnic with schizophrenia paranoid were recruited and interviewed with semi-structured MINI ICD-X to establish the diagnosis. All the eligible subjects were requested their permission for blood sampling. Healthy Batak ethnic were also recruited by mathcing the age and gender. The blood samples went through DNA isolation, Nested PCR, and DNA sequencing. Results: Ninety three subjects were recruited, but only 74 blood samples were succesfully sequenced. We found three types of polymorphisms, i.e. G/A allele at base pair (bp 76, G/T allele at bp 112, and deletion at bp 110 in Batak ethnic with schizophrenia. There were two kind sequences at bp 113-116 in Batak ethnics, and Batak ethnics with ATCG were at higher risk for having schizophrenia. This study support that NRG1 is a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene.

  11. The structure and dynamic of the defensive organization the personality in Paranoid Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Affective Disorders

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    I M Kadyrov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests a research model and discusses results of an empirical study of the defensive organization mechanisms of patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, schizoaffective and affective disorders. The research deals with structural and dynamic aspects of the defensive organization profiles in the mentioned three clinical groups.

  12. [Association polymorphic variants of GRIN2B gene with paranoid schizophrenia and response to common neuroleptics in Russians and Tatars from Bashkortostan Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareeva, A E; Zakirov, D F; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2013-09-01

    An analysis of the association of paranoid schizophrenia seeking with polymorphic variants of GRIN2B gene was performed in order to identify genetic risk factors of disease development and genetic markers of the response to therapy by neuroleptics in Russian and Tatar patients from Bashkortostan Republic (BB). In the course of the analysis, we revealed the following: 1) genetic markers of increased risk of developing paranoid schizophrenia in various ethnic groups, including, in Tatars, the GRIN2B* T/*Tgenotype (p = 0.003; OR = 2.33) and GRIN2B*T allele (p = 0.001; OR = 2.36), rs1805247; in Russians, the GRIN2B*T/*T genotype (p = 0.038; OR = 2.12) and GRIN2B* T allele (p = 0.028; OR = 2.03), rs1805247, genotype GRIN2B*A/*A (p = 0.042; OR = 2.12), rs1805476; 2) genetic markers of the reduced risk of developing paranoid schizophrenia; 3) genetic markers of therapy response and the risk of side effects development during neuroleptics (haloperidol) treatment in Bashkortostan. The significant interethnic diversity of genetic factors related to the risk of this disease development was noted.

  13. A study of theory of mind in paranoid schizophrenia: A theory or many theories?

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    Peter B. Scherzer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Social cognitive psychologists (Frith, 1992; Hardy-Baylé et al, 2003 sought to explain the social problems and clarify the clinical picture of schizophrenia by proposing a model that relates many of the symptoms to a problem of metarepresentation i.e. theory of mind (ToM. Given the differences in clinical samples and results between studies, and considering the wide range of what is considered to constitute ToM, the question is, is there a core function, or is ToM multifaceted with dissociable facets? If there are dissociable dimensions or facets which are affected in patients with paranoid schizophrenia? To answer these questions, a group of 21 individuals diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and 29 non-clinical control subjects, were tested on a battery of five different measures of theory of mind. The results confirmed that there was little difference in specificity of three of the tests in distinguishing between the clinical and non-clinical group, but there were important differences in the shared variance between the tests. Further analyses hint at two dimensions although a single factor with the same variance and the same contributing weights in both groups could explain the results. The deficits related to the attribution of cognitive and affective states to others inferred from available verbal and non-verbal information. Further analyses revealed incorrect attributions of mental states including the attribution of threatening intentions to others non-interpretative responses and incomplete answers, depending on the test of theory of mind.

  14. Paranoid schizophrenia is characterized by increased CB1 receptor binding in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Victoria S; Long, Leonora E; Weickert, Cyndi Shannon; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2011-07-01

    A number of studies suggest a dysregulation of the endogenous cannabinoid system in schizophrenia (SCZ). In the present study, we examined cannabinoid CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) binding and mRNA expression in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) (Brodmann's area 46) of SCZ patients and controls, post-mortem. Receptor density was investigated using autoradiography with the CB(1)R ligand [(3)H] CP 55,940 and CB(1)R mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR in a cohort of 16 patients with paranoid SCZ, 21 patients with non-paranoid SCZ and 37 controls matched for age, post-mortem interval and pH. All cases were obtained from the University of Sydney Tissue Resource Centre. Results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Bonferroni tests and with analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to control for demographic factors that would potentially influence CB(1)R expression. There was a main effect of diagnosis on [(3)H] CP 55,940 binding quantified across all layers of the DLPFC (F(2,71) = 3.740, p = 0.029). Post hoc tests indicated that this main effect was due to patients with paranoid SCZ having 22% higher levels of CB(1)R binding compared with the control group. When ANCOVA was employed, this effect was strengthened (F(2,67) = 6.048, p = 0.004) with paranoid SCZ patients differing significantly from the control (p = 0.004) and from the non-paranoid group (p = 0.016). In contrast, no significant differences were observed in mRNA expression between the different disease subtypes and the control group. Our findings confirm the existence of a CB(1)R dysregulation in SCZ and underline the need for further investigation of the role of this receptor particularly in those diagnosed with paranoid SCZ.

  15. Profiles of Cognitive Deficits in Paranoid Schizophrenia and Schizotypal Disorder

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    Lebedeva G.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the search for more accurate psycho-diagnostic methods and assessment tools for determining the degree of cognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenic disorders. The concepts of "cognitive deficits" and "cognitive profile", understood as the ratio of intact and damaged components of cognitive processes and their schematic representation are discussed. The authors substantiate the need for a clear gradation of cognitive impairments in schizophrenia, development of universal translation algorithms of traditional qualitative results (meaningful analysis of violations of cognitive activity in quantitative indicators. The article is based on the results of experimental psychological study. The investigation involved 128 patients: 76 people with Paranoid schizophrenia (F20 according to ICD-10 and 52 persons with Schizotypal disorder (F21 according to ICD-10. To assess the cognitive deficit, both traditional domestic methods and foreign tests, rarely used in the practice of a medical psychologist were conducted. The study analyzed the difference in cognitive tests performance between groups of patients with several types of schizophrenia and with different disease duration (up to 5 years and more. On the basis of quantitative data, a "cognitive profile" was lined for each disease. As a result, different variants of cognitive deficits, depending on the shape and course of the disease have been identified. The structure and dynamics of the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia and various forms depending on the different duration of the disease is described in detail. Also cognitive profiles compiled on this basis.

  16. The cognitive and affective structure of paranoid delusions: a transdiagnostic investigation of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentall, Richard P; Rowse, Georgina; Shryane, Nick; Kinderman, Peter; Howard, Robert; Blackwood, Nigel; Moore, Rosie; Corcoran, Rhiannon

    2009-03-01

    Paranoid delusions are a common symptom of a range of psychotic disorders. A variety of psychological mechanisms have been implicated in their cause, including a tendency to jump to conclusions, an impairment in the ability to understand the mental states of other people (theory of mind), an abnormal anticipation of threat, and an abnormal explanatory style coupled with low self-esteem. To determine the structure of the relationships among psychological mechanisms contributing to paranoia in a transdiagnostic sample. Cross-sectional design, with relationships between predictor variables and paranoia examined by structural equation models with latent variables. Publicly funded psychiatric services in London and the North West of England. One hundred seventy-three patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, major depression, or late-onset schizophrenia-like psychosis, subdivided according to whether they were currently experiencing paranoid delusions. Sixty-four healthy control participants matched for appropriate demographic variables were included. Assessments of theory of mind, jumping to conclusions bias, and general intellectual functioning, with measures of threat anticipation, emotion, self-esteem, and explanatory style. The best fitting (chi(2)(96) = 131.69, P = .01; comparative fit index = 0.95; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.96; root-mean-square error of approximation = 0.04) and most parsimonious model of the data indicated that paranoid delusions are associated with a combination of pessimistic thinking style (low self-esteem, pessimistic explanatory style, and negative emotion) and impaired cognitive performance (executive functioning, tendency to jump to conclusions, and ability to reason about the mental states of others). Pessimistic thinking correlated highly with paranoia even when controlling for cognitive performance (r = 0.65, P < .001), and cognitive performance correlated with paranoia when controlling for pessimism (r = -0.34, P < .001). Both

  17. [The Role of Neurotrophins and Neurexins Genes in the Risk of Paranoid Schizophrenia in Russians and Tatars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareeva, A E; Traks, T; Koks, S; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2015-07-01

    Schizophrenia affects about 1% of the population. Its etiology is not fully understood. Environmental conditions certainly contribute to the development of schizophrenia, but the determining factor is genetic predisposition: the coefficient of heritability of schizophrenia is about 80%, which is typical for the most highly heritable multifactorial diseases. Polymorphic loci of genes of enzymes and receptors involved in the processes of neuroprotection and neurotrophia play significant role in the development of this disease. In this paper we investigated 48 polymorphic variants of genes of the neurotrophins and neurexins family (BDNF, NTRK2, NTRK3, NGF, NXPH1, and NRXN1) in Russian and Tatar cases and in a control group living in the Republic of Bashkortostan. The results of this study confirm the important role of neurotrophin and neurexin genes in paranoid schizophrenia development.

  18. Long term telemedicine study of compliance in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzystanek, Marek; Krzeszowski, Dariusz; Jagoda, Karolina; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Low compliance is one of the crucial problems of contemporary psychiatry. Relapses, deterioration of cognitive functioning, negative symptoms, neuroleptic resistance are the examples of many consequences of noncompliance in schizophrenia The study was designed to assess the compliance in the 200 patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, all in the state of symptomatic remission and on the stable neuroleptic treatment. The compliance was assessed using a telepsychiatric system, sending reminders: 1 hour before the planned dose to remind them that drug intake is approaching, and at the moment of intake to check if they took the drug. The confirmed drug intakes were counted by the telepsychiatric system. 158 patients completed the study period. The compliance in the first month of the treatment was 44.6% and decreased over the rest of the period to the level of 33.4%. 50% of the schizophrenic patients were compliant at a level lower than 37%. This group was considered the low compliance group, and in this group the compliance increased after 6 months from 9.3% to 10.3% (p<0.0001). The compliance in the group of schizophrenic patients in remission is very low. The telemedicine system improves the compliance in the patients with the worst compliance.

  19. Association of interleukin 2 (IL-2), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and TNF-alpha (TNFα) gene polymorphisms with paranoid schizophrenia in a Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Samojedny, Monika; Owczarek, Aleksander; Kowalczyk, Małgorzata; Suchanek, Renata; Palacz, Marta; Kucia, Krzysztof; Fila-Daniłow, Anna; Borkowska, Paulina; Kowalski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Numerous reports have brought attention to the potential role of cytokines in schizophrenia. The aim of the study was to determine whether polymorphisms of IL-2, IL-6, and TNFα genes are risk factors for development of paranoid schizophrenia in a Polish population. Promoter polymorphisms of IL-6 (rs1800795), TNFα (rs1800629), and IL-2 (rs2069762) genes in patients (N=115) and controls (N=135) were genotyped by PCR-RFLP and AS-PCR methods, respectively. Genotype TT and allele T for IL-2 polymorphism, and genotype AA and allele A for TNFα polymorphism were found to be significantly associated with paranoid schizophrenia. Similarly, haplotypes CTA and GTA increased the risk (4.4 times and 5.9 times, respectively) of schizophrenia. To reveal associations between Positive and Negative Symptom Scale subscales and age at onset of schizophrenia, the authors used a novel method called Grade Correspondence Analysis. This analysis revealed that patients with early age at onset have higher scores on the Negative and General subscales of PANSS, and, in that group of patients, haplotype CTA was the most represented. As far as is known, this analysis was used for the first time with reference to genetic data.

  20. Comparative analysis of psychological adaptation in patients with paranoid schizophrenia and shizotypal disorder

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    A. V. Stepanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was the comparing of psychological adaptation characteristics (type of attitude to a disease, psychological defense mechanisms, special aspects of coping-strategy as exemplified by 2 groups of schizophrenia disorder patients: 1 schizotypal disorders (F-21 according to ICD-10; 2 paranoid schizophrenia (F-20 according to ICD-10. The authors arrived at the conclusion of the same nature if special aspects of psychological adaptation in the groups compared. At the same time, both groups compared showed imbalance of «the level of success» between individual characteristics constituting the module of psychological adaptation. This circumstance testifies to the fact that psychological adaptation in the patients with schizophrenic disorders should be evaluated on a case- bycase basis. In conclusion, the study revealed the necessity to take into consideration of these characteristics during rehabilitation of these patients.

  1. Engaging the Homeless Paranoid Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Gayatri

    2007-01-01

    For people who are disenfranchised from society for other reasons, especially homelessness, a paranoid delusional system can create an additional obstacle in the therapeutic engagement and treatment of such individuals. In this article, we describe a composite case of a homeless woman with paranoid schizophrenia. Through this case example, we will explore various obstacles to treatment and discuss strategies to overcome these hurdles to treatment, initiate a therapeutic alliance, and further facilitate and maintain therapy. PMID:20526407

  2. Delusional disorders--are they simply paranoid schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marneros, Andreas; Pillmann, Frank; Wustmann, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    This article tries to give an answer to the question of whether International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) persistent delusional disorder (PDD) or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) delusional disorder (DD) is simply paranoid schizophrenia (PS). Because ICD-10 PDD and DSM-IV DD are identical, we use DD as a synonym. A prospective and longitudinal study compared all inpatients with DD treated at the Halle-Wittenberg university hospital during a 14-year period with a previously investigated selected cohort of patients with PS. Sociodemographic data, symptomatology, course, and outcome parameters were examined using standardized instruments. The duration of the follow-up period in patients with DD was 10.8 years and for the PS patients 12.9 years. Significant differences between DD and PS were found: DD patients are, in comparison to patients with PS, significantly older at onset. Less of their first-degree relatives have mental disorders. They less frequently come from a broken home situation. First-rank symptoms, relevant negative symptoms, and primary hallucinations did not occur in patients with DD. Patients with DD were less frequently hospitalized, and the duration of their hospitalization was shorter. Their outcome is much better regarding employment, early retirement due to the disorder, and psychopharmacological medication. They more often had stable heterosexual partnerships and were autarkic. They had lower scores in the Disability Assessment Scale and in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. The diagnosis of DD is very stable over time. The findings of this study support the assumption that DDs are a separate entity and only exceptionally can be a prodrome of schizophrenia.

  3. [Neurophysiological Features of Perception of Emotional Stimuli in Health and in Patients with Paranoid Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, A Yu; Strelets, V B

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive and emotional disorders, as far as is known, are the main syndromes of schizophrenia. Disorders of these functions are mainly determined by the clinical picture, as well as by psychophysiological correlates. The purpose of our study was to identify some psychophysiological factors which cause perceptual and emotional disturbances in patients with schizophrenia. These disorders of mental functions form the first rank (top) syndrome in patients with schizophrenia [1]. The studied patients had acute psychosis with a predominance of paranoid hallucinatory syndrome and did not receive antipsychotic therapy; i.e., the disturbances of sensory perception were most pronounced. The analysis of early component P100 and intermediate one N170 of event related potentials (ERPs) in the control group showed an increased level of excitation in response to emotionally threatening stimuli; the amplitude increased and the latency decreased in all leads. In contrast the analysis of components P100 and N170 in the group of patients with schizophrenia showed the increased latency and decreased amplitude. The obtained data provide evidence of pathological inhibition in the passive perception of emotionally significant stimuli.

  4. Abnormal inter- and intra-hemispheric integration in male paranoid schizophrenia: a graph-theoretical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianhuai; Yao, Zhijian; Qin, Jiaolong; Yan, Rui; Hua, Lingling; Lu, Qing

    2015-06-25

    The human brain is a complex network of regions that are structurally interconnected by white matter (WM) tracts. Schizophrenia (SZ) can be conceptualized as a disconnection syndrome characterized by widespread disconnections in WM pathways. To assess whether or not anatomical disconnections are associated with disruption of the topological properties of inter- and intra-hemispheric networks in SZ. We acquired the diffusion tensor imaging data from 24 male patients with paranoid SZ during an acute phase of their illness and from 24 healthy age-matched male controls. The brain FA-weighted (fractional anisotropy-weighted) structural networks were constructed and the inter- and intra-hemispheric integration was assessed by estimating the average characteristic path lengths (CPLs) between and within the left and right hemisphere networks. The mean CPLs for all 18 inter-and intra-hemispheric CPLs assessed were longer in the SZ patient group than in the control group, but only some of these differences were significantly different: the CPLs for the overall inter-hemispheric and the left and right intra-hemispheric networks; the CPLs for the interhemisphere subnetworks of the frontal lobes, temporal lobes, and subcortical structures; and the CPL for the intra- frontal subnetwork in the right hemisphere. Among the 24 patients, the CPL of the inter-frontal subnetwork was positively associated with negative symptom severity, but this was the only significant result among 72 assessed correlations, so it may be a statistical artifact. Our findings suggest that the integrity of intra- and inter-hemispheric WM tracts is disrupted in males with paranoid SZ, supporting the brain network disconnection model (i.e., the (')connectivity hypothesis(')) of schizophrenia. Larger studies with less narrowly defined samples of individuals with schizophrenia are needed to confirm these results.

  5. Increased density of DISC1-immunoreactive oligodendroglial cells in fronto-parietal white matter of patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Jauch, Esther; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Mawrin, Christian; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Profound white matter abnormalities have repeatedly been described in schizophrenia, which involve the altered expression of numerous oligodendrocyte-associated genes. Transcripts of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene, a key susceptibility factor in schizophrenia, have recently been shown to be expressed by oligodendroglial cells and to negatively regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation. To learn more about the putative role(s) of oligodendroglia-associated DISC1 in schizophrenia, we analyzed the density of DISC1-immunoreactive oligodendrocytes in the fronto-parietal white matter in postmortem brains of patients with schizophrenia. Compared with controls (N = 12) and cases with undifferentiated/residual schizophrenia (N = 6), there was a significantly increased density of DISC1-expressing glial cells in paranoid schizophrenia (N = 12), which unlikely resulted from neuroleptic treatment. Pathophysiologically, over-expression of DISC1 protein(s) in white matter oligodendrocytes might add to the reduced levels of two myelin markers, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase and myelin basic protein in schizophrenia. Moreover, it might significantly contribute to cell cycle abnormalities as well as to deficits in oligodendroglial cell differentiation and maturation found in schizophrenia.

  6. [Ultrastructural pathology of oligodendrocytes in the white matter in continuous paranoid schizophrenia: a role for microglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranova, N A; Vikhreva, O V; Rakhmanova, V I; Orlovskaya, D D

    Previously the authors have reported the ultrastructural pathology and deficit of oligodendrocytes in gray and white matter of the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. The aim of the study was to determine of the effects of microglia on the ultrastructure of oligodendrocytes in the white matter underlying the prefrontal cortex in continuous schizophrenia. Postmortem morphometric electron microscopic study of oligodendrocytes in close apposition to microglia was performed in white matter underlying the prefrontal cortex (BA10). Eleven cases of chronic continuous schizophrenia and 11 normal controls were studied. Areas of oligodendrocytes, of their nuclei and cytoplasm, volume density (Vv) and the number of mitochondria, vacuoles of endoplasmic reticulum and lipofuscin granules were estimated. Group comparison was performed using ANCOVA. The schizophrenia group differed from the control group by paucity of ribosomes in the cytoplasm of oligodendrocytes, a significant decrease in Vv and the number of mitochondria and increase in the number of lipofuscin granules. Significant correlations between the parameters of lipofuscin granules, mitochondria and vacuoles were found only in the schizophrenia group. The number of lipofuscin granules were correlated positively with the illness duration. Dystrophic alterations of oligodendrocytes attached to microglial cells were found in the white matter of the prefrontal cortex in chronic paranoid schizophrenia as compared to controls. The data obtained suggest that microglia might contribute to abnormalities of energy, lipid and protein metabolism of oligodendrocytes in schizophrenia.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Experience with 2-[18F]Fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[18F]FA) in the Living Human Brain of Smokers with Paranoid Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRAŠIĆ, JAMES ROBERT; CASCELLA, NICOLA; KUMAR, ANIL; ZHOU, YUN; HILTON, JOHN; RAYMONT, VANESSA; CRABB, ANDREW; GUEVARA, MARIA RITA; HORTI, ANDREW G.; WONG, DEAN FOSTER

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing postmortem data (Breese, et al., 2000), we hypothesized that the densities of high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain exist in a continuum from highest to lowest as follows: smokers without schizophrenia > smokers with schizophrenia > nonsmokers without schizophrenia > nonsmokers with schizophrenia. Application of the Kruskal-Wallis Test (Stata, 2003) to the postmortem data (Breese, et al., 2000) confirmed the hypothesized order in the cortex and the hippocampus and attained significance in the caudate and the thalamus. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed for 60 minutes at 6 hours after the intravenous administration of 444 megabequerels [MBq] (12 mCi) 2-[18F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[18F]FA), a radiotracer for high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nAChRs, as a bolus plus continuous infusion to 10 adults (7 men and 3 women) (6 smokers including 5 with paranoid schizophrenia and 4 nonsmokers) ranging in age from 22 to 56 years (mean 40.1, standard deviation 13.6). The thalamic nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND) was 1.32 ± 0.19 (mean ± standard deviation) for healthy control nonsmokers; 0.50 ± 0.19 for smokers with paranoid schizophrenia; and 0.51 for the single smoker without paranoid schizophrenia. The thalamic BPNDs of nonsmokers were significantly higher than those of smokers who smoked cigarettes a few hours before the scans (P = 0.0105) (StataCorp, 2003), which was likely due to occupancy of nAChRs by inhaled nicotine in smokers. Further research is needed to rule out the effects of confounding variables. PMID:22169936

  8. Day/night changes in serum S100B protein concentrations in acute paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera-Fumero, Armando L; Díaz-Mesa, Estefanía; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Fernandez-Lopez, Lourdes; Cejas-Mendez, Maria Del Rosario

    2017-04-03

    There are day/night and seasonal changes in biological markers such as melatonin and cortisol. Controversial changes in serum S100B protein levels have been described in schizophrenia. We aim studying whether serum S100B levels present day/night variations in schizophrenia patients and whether S100B levels are related to psychopathology. Sixty-five paranoid schizophrenic inpatients participated in the study. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at admission and discharge. Blood was drawn at 12:00 (midday) and 00:00 (midnight) hours at admission and discharge. Sixty-five healthy subjects matched by age, gender and season acted as control group. At admission and discharge patients had significantly higher serum S100B concentrations at midday and midnight than healthy subjects. At admission, patients showed a day/night variation of S100B levels, with higher S100B levels at 12:00 than at 00:00h (143.7±26.3pg/ml vs. 96.9±16.6pg/ml). This day/night difference was not present in the control group. Midday and midnight S100B at admission decreased when compared to S100B at discharge (midday, 143.7±26.3 vs. 83.0±12, midnight 96.9±16.6 vs. 68.6±14.5). There was a positive correlation between the PANSS positive subscale and S100B concentrations at admission. This correlation was not present at discharge. acute paranoid schizophrenia inpatients present a day/night change of S100B serum levels at admission that disappears at discharge. The correlation between serum S100B concentrations and the PANSS positive scores at admission as well as the decrease of S100B at discharge may be interpreted as an acute biological response to the clinical state of the patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Avoidant Personality Disorder is a Separable Schizophrenia Spectrum Personality Disorder even when Controlling for the Presence of Paranoid and Schizotypal Personality Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fogelson, D. L.; Nuechterlein, K. H.; Asarnow, R. A.; Payne, D. L.; Subotnik, K. L.; Jacobson, K. C.; Neale, M. C.; Kendler, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    It is unresolved whether avoidant personality disorder (APD) is an independent schizophrenia (Sz)-spectrum personality disorder (PD). Some studies find APD and social anxiety symptoms (Sxs) to be a separable dimension of psychopathology in relatives (Rels) of schizophrenics while other studies find avoidant Sxs to be correlated with schizotypal and paranoid Sxs.

  10. [The Influence of Threatening Stimuli on the Component P200 in Patients with Paranoid Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelets, V B; Arkhipov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    We studied schizophrenic patients with the dominance of pseudohallucinations. As is well known, pseudohallucinations are the main syndrome of schizophrenia, the so-called first rank syndrome. Pseudohallucinations are defined as a disorder of sense (affective) perception. This disorder is mainly diagnosed from the clinical picture or by pathopsychologichal observations. We investigated the evoked potentials (EP) of brain after neutral and emotionally meaningful (threatening) visual stimuli in order to specify the neurophysiological disorders of affective perception in schizophrenic patients with severe paranoid-hallucinatory syndrome who did not receive neuroleptic therapy. The analysis of P200 component in healthy subjects showed an increase in the amplitude and shortening of the latency of this wave in response to thretaning stimuli, as compared to neutral stimuli. In the group of patients with schizophrenia, the analysis showed the same increase in the level of excitation in response to emotionally threatening stimuli. However, in schizophrenic patients there were also found certain areas where the amplitude and latency decreased or increased at the same time. The results show that patients with schizophrenia have the pathological effect of having parameters typical of the processes of both excitation and inhibition.

  11. Positron emission tomography experience with 2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[¹⁸F]FA) in the living human brain of smokers with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brašić, James Robert; Cascella, Nicola; Kumar, Anil; Zhou, Yun; Hilton, John; Raymont, Vanessa; Crabb, Andrew; Guevara, Maria Rita; Horti, Andrew G; Wong, Dean Foster

    2012-04-01

    Utilizing postmortem data (Breese et al. [2000] Neuropsychopharmacology 23:351-364), we hypothesized that the densities of high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the brain exist in a continuum from highest to lowest as follows: smokers without schizophrenia > smokers with schizophrenia > nonsmokers without schizophrenia > nonsmokers with schizophrenia. Application of the Kruskal-Wallis Test (Statacorp, 2003) to the postmortem data (Breese et al. [2000] Neuropsychopharmacology 23:351-364) confirmed the hypothesized order in the cortex and the hippocampus and attained significance in the caudate and the thalamus. Positron emission tomography (PET) was performed for 60 min at 6 h after the intravenous administration of 444 megabequerels [MBq] (12 mCi) 2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (2-[¹⁸F]FA), a radiotracer for high-affinity neuronal α4β2 nAChRs, as a bolus plus continuous infusion to 10 adults (seven men and three women) (six smokers including five with paranoid schizophrenia and four nonsmokers) ranging in age from 22 to 56 years (mean 40.1, standard deviation 13.6). The thalamic nondisplaceable binding potential (BP(ND) ) was 1.32 ± 0.19 (mean ± standard deviation) for healthy control nonsmokers; 0.50 ± 0.19 for smokers with paranoid schizophrenia; and 0.51 for the single smoker without paranoid schizophrenia. The thalamic BP(ND) s of nonsmokers were significantly higher than those of smokers who smoked cigarettes a few hours before the scans (P = 0.0105) (StataCorp, 2003), which was likely due to occupancy of nAChRs by inhaled nicotine in smokers. Further research is needed to rule out the effects of confounding variables. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Lipid spectrum changes and ECG in patients with paranoid schizophrenia in the course of therapy with atypical antipsychotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, L P; Parshukova, D A; Borodyuk, Yu N; Kornetova, E G; Tkacheva, G D; Seregin, A A; Burdovitsina, T G; Semke, A V

    2015-01-01

    To study correlations between parameters of lipid metabolism and ECG in patients with schizophrenia in light of therapy with atypical antipsychotics. We examined 42 patients with paranoid schizophrenia. All patients received atypical neuroleptics - seroquel, zyprexa, and rispolept. A group of controls included 25 healthy people. There was a significant increase (p=0.0002) in body mass (in average by 1.5 kg) in 88% patients. A significant increase in the concentration of serum triglycerides was identified as well. The concentration of VLDL in the patients with schizophrenia was 2 times higher compared to controls. After treatment, VLDL concentration increased even more considerably An increase in atherogenic index (AI) was up to 3.1 in patients with schizophrenia compared to 2.2 in controls. After treatment, Al increased up to 4 that demonstrated the high risk of development of atherosclerosis. A significant increase in QT interval in the ECG and heart rate (p=0.03) was revealed only in patients receiving rispolept. In patients receiving zyprexa and seroquel only heart rate was increased. The antipsychotics studied increase the risk of development of cardiovascular pathology.

  13. Facial emotion linked cooperation in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: a test on the Interpersonal Communication Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wai S; Yan Lu; Bond, Alyson J; Chan, Raymond Ck; Tam, Danny W H

    2011-09-01

    Patients with schizophrenia consistently show deficits in facial affect perception and social behaviours. It is illusive to suggest that these deficits in facial affect perception cause poor social behaviours. The present research aims to study how facial affects influence ingratiation, cooperation and punishment behaviours of the patients. Forty outpatients with paranoid schizophrenia, 26 matched depressed patients and 46 healthy volunteers were recruited. After measurement of clinical symptoms and depression, their facial emotion recognition, neurocognitive functioning and the facial affects dependent cooperative behaviour were measured using a modified version of Mixed-Motive Game. The depressed control group showed demographic characteristics, depression levels and neurocognitive functioning similar to the schizophrenic group. Patients with schizophrenia committed significantly more errors in neutral face identification than the other two groups. They were significantly more punitive on the Mixed-Motive Game in the neutral face condition. Neutral face misidentification was a unique emotion-processing deficit in the schizophrenic group. Their increase in punitive behaviours in the neutral face condition might confuse their family members and trigger more expressed emotion from them, thus increasing the risk of relapse. Family members might display more happy faces to promote positive relationships with patients.

  14. A three-month longitudinal study of changes in day/night serum total antioxidant capacity in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera-Fumero, Armando L; Díaz-Mesa, Estefanía; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Fernandez-Lopez, Lourdes; Guillen-Pino, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Free radicals and an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance have been involved in the schizophrenia pathophysiology. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) is a measure of the antioxidant capacity of a system. Day/night changes are a biological characteristic of hormones such as melatonin or cortisol. There is little information about TAC day/night changes in schizophrenia patients. The aim of this research is to study if there are day/night changes in serum TAC levels of schizophrenia patients. Thirty-two DSM-IV schizophrenia paranoid patients were studied. Blood was sampled at 12:00 and 00:00 h at admission, discharge and three months after hospital discharge (TMAHD). TAC results are expressed as mmol of Trolox/L. Patients did not have day/night TAC differences at admission (12:00: 0.67±0.12 vs. 00:00: 0.61±0.14, p>0.14) or discharge (12:00: 0.65±0.15 vs. 00:00: 0.65±0.12, p>0.99). At TMHD, patients had significantly higher TAC levels at midday than midnight (12:00: 0.83±0.10 vs. 00:00: 0.74±0.12, pday/night serum TAC changes when clinically relapsed and the normalization of day/night serum TAC changes at TMHD can be considered as a biological marker of schizophrenia evolution.

  15. Is the comprehension of idiomatic sentences indeed impaired in paranoid Schizophrenia? A window into semantic processing deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesciarelli, Francesca; Gamberoni, Tania; Ferlazzo, Fabio; Lo Russo, Leo; Pedrazzi, Francesca; Melati, Ermanno; Cacciari, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients have been reported to be more impaired in comprehending non-literal than literal language since early studies on proverbs. Preference for literal rather than figurative interpretations continues to be documented. The main aim of this study was to establish whether patients are indeed able to use combinatorial semantic processing to comprehend literal sentences and both combinatorial analysis, and retrieval of pre-stored meanings to comprehend idiomatic sentences. The study employed a sentence continuation task in which subjects were asked to decide whether a target word was a sensible continuation of a previous sentence fragment to investigate idiomatic and literal sentence comprehension in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Patients and healthy controls were faster in accepting sensible continuations than in rejecting non-sensible ones in both literal and idiomatic sentences. Patients were as accurate as controls in comprehending literal and idiomatic sentences, but they were overall slower than controls in all conditions. Once the contribution of cognitive covariates was partialled out, the response times (RTs) to sensible idiomatic continuations of patients did not significantly differ from those of controls. This suggests that the state of residual schizophrenia did not contribute to slower processing of sensible idioms above and beyond the cognitive deficits that are typically associated with schizophrenia. PMID:25346676

  16. Relationship between quality of life of men who’s wives suffer from the paranoid schizophrenia, and features its clinical-psychopathological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiya Driuchenko

    2016-09-01

      Summary Objective: to study the quality of life (QL of the men whose wives suffer paranoid schizophrenia (PS. Materials and methods. On the basis of the psychiatric department of the Transcarpathian regional narcological dispensary 100 women with PS and their husbands were examined during 2014 –2016. Agroup of comparison comprised of 50 husbands of mentally health women. Results. In husbands of PS women, decline in QL in all key areas has been revealed. Most pronounced it was in the areas of psychological (emotional well-being (index 6,04±1,66 points, self and independence in the actions (8,80±1,20 points, efficiency (8,07±1,49 points, interpersonal interaction (7,89±1,77 points social-emotional support (8,44±1,43 points, self-realization (7,35±2,06 points and spiritual realization (8,48 ± 1,14 points. Reduced QL of men in areas related to mental and social functioning had a close correlation with the severity of psychopathology of  their spouses. Conclusions. These data obtained formed the basis for the development of medical and psychological measures to support families of PS women. Key words: paranoid schizophrenia, women, men, quality of life.

  17. Keep at bay!--Abnormal personal space regulation as marker of paranoia in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoretsanitis, G; Kutynia, A; Stegmayer, K; Strik, W; Walther, S

    2016-01-01

    During threat, interpersonal distance is deliberately increased. Personal space regulation is related to amygdala function and altered in schizophrenia, but it remains unknown whether it is particularly associated with paranoid threat. We compared performance in two tests on personal space between 64 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 24 matched controls. Patients were stratified in those with paranoid threat, neutral affect or paranoid experience of power. In the stop-distance paradigm, participants indicated the minimum tolerable interpersonal distance. In the fixed-distance paradigm, they indicated the level of comfort at fixed interpersonal distances. Paranoid threat increased interpersonal distance two-fold in the stop-distance paradigm, and reduced comfort ratings in the fixed-distance paradigm. In contrast, patients experiencing paranoid power had high comfort ratings at any distance. Patients with neutral affect did not differ from controls in the stop-distance paradigm. Differences between groups remained when controlling for gender and positive symptom severity. Among schizophrenia patients, the stop-distance paradigm detected paranoid threat with 93% sensitivity and 83% specificity. Personal space regulation is not generally altered in schizophrenia. However, state paranoid experience has distinct contributions to personal space regulation. Subjects experiencing current paranoid threat share increased safety-seeking behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. [Schizophrenia and Liver Transplantation: Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Restrepo B; Marle, Duque G; Carlos, Cardeño C

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplantation is a treatment available for many patients with liver cirrhosis who find in this treatment a way to improve life expectancy and quality of life. Paranoid schizophrenia affects 1% of the general population, produces psychotic symptoms, and runs a chronic course in some cases with significant deterioration in all areas of life. To discuss the case of a patient with liver cirrhosis diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia during the evaluation protocol for liver transplantation. Case report. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis whose only alternative to improve life expectancy and quality of life was access to liver transplantation. During routine evaluations the liaison psychiatrist observed first-order psychotic symptoms and documented a life story that confirmed the presence of paranoid schizophrenia. Paranoid schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder common in the general population that can be a part of the medical comorbidities of patients requiring liver transplantation and is not an absolute contraindication to its completion. We are unaware of similar cases of liver transplantation in patients with schizophrenia in our country. We believe this is a big step on the road to overcome the stigma that mental illness imposes on patients. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. [Concomitant impact of organic pathology on the development of cognitive impairment in patients with attack-like paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, L Ia; Tagil'tseva, A V; Lifanova, D E; Ganzenko, M A; Gritsevskaia, T M; Ivanov, M B

    2014-01-01

    The study included 47 patients (23 men, 24 women) with ICD-10 diagnosis of attack-like paranoid schizophrenia. Patients were divided into two groups: with- (25 patients) or without (22 patients) a concomitant organic disease. Memory, attention and thinking were assessed with psychometric tests. Inter- and intra-group differences were identified that indicated a considerable impact of a concomitant CNS organic pathology on the development of cognitive impairment in the schizophrenic process and active antipsychotic therapy. The data obtained can be used in the development of a differentiated approach to the treatment of patients with concomitant organic pathology.

  20. Altered attentional and perceptual processes as indexed by N170 during gaze perception in schizophrenia: Relationship with perceived threat and paranoid delusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Ivy F; Calwas, Anita M; Chun, Jinsoo; Mueller, Savanna A; Taylor, Stephan F; Deldin, Patricia J

    2015-08-01

    Using gaze information to orient attention and guide behavior is critical to social adaptation. Previous studies have suggested that abnormal gaze perception in schizophrenia (SCZ) may originate in abnormal early attentional and perceptual processes and may be related to paranoid symptoms. Using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), this study investigated altered early attentional and perceptual processes during gaze perception and their relationship to paranoid delusions in SCZ. Twenty-eight individuals with SCZ or schizoaffective disorder and 32 demographically matched healthy controls (HCs) completed a gaze-discrimination task with face stimuli varying in gaze direction (direct, averted), head orientation (forward, deviated), and emotion (neutral, fearful). ERPs were recorded during the task. Participants rated experienced threat from each face after the task. Participants with SCZ were as accurate as, though slower than, HCs on the task. Participants with SCZ displayed enlarged N170 responses over the left hemisphere to averted gaze presented in fearful relative to neutral faces, indicating a heightened encoding sensitivity to faces signaling external threat. This abnormality was correlated with increased perceived threat and paranoid delusions. Participants with SCZ also showed a reduction of N170 modulation by head orientation (normally increased amplitude to deviated faces relative to forward faces), suggesting less integration of contextual cues of head orientation in gaze perception. The psychophysiological deviations observed during gaze discrimination in SCZ underscore the role of early attentional and perceptual abnormalities in social information processing and paranoid symptoms of SCZ. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Challenges in managing a mother with a dual diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy and paranoid schizophrenia - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasundera, Rajiv; Yogaratnam, Jegan

    2013-01-01

    Psychotic illness has a low incidence in the puerperal period. Peripartum cardiomyopathy as a complication of pregnancy is also rare. We report a case where the above two conditions occurred simultaneously in a patient and posed significant difficulties in the clinical management. She was diagnosed as having paranoid schizophrenia and peripartum cardiomyopathy. Many of the antipsychotics were contraindicated, and electroconvulsive therapy could not be administered due to the added risks involved with regard to anesthesia. She was therefore managed with clonazepam and olanzapine. This case highlights the challenges in a patient with a psychiatric illness presenting with comorbid physical illness. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A three-month longitudinal study of changes in day/night serum total antioxidant capacity in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando L Morera-Fumero

    Full Text Available Free radicals and an oxidant/antioxidant imbalance have been involved in the schizophrenia pathophysiology. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC is a measure of the antioxidant capacity of a system. Day/night changes are a biological characteristic of hormones such as melatonin or cortisol. There is little information about TAC day/night changes in schizophrenia patients. The aim of this research is to study if there are day/night changes in serum TAC levels of schizophrenia patients. Thirty-two DSM-IV schizophrenia paranoid patients were studied. Blood was sampled at 12:00 and 00:00 h at admission, discharge and three months after hospital discharge (TMAHD. TAC results are expressed as mmol of Trolox/L. Patients did not have day/night TAC differences at admission (12:00: 0.67±0.12 vs. 00:00: 0.61±0.14, p>0.14 or discharge (12:00: 0.65±0.15 vs. 00:00: 0.65±0.12, p>0.99. At TMHD, patients had significantly higher TAC levels at midday than midnight (12:00: 0.83±0.10 vs. 00:00: 0.74±0.12, p<0.006 as it has been reported in healthy subjects. There were no significant TAC differences at 12.00 and 00:00 between admission and discharge. At TMAHD, patients had significantly higher TAC levels than at admission and discharge, both at 12:00 and 00:00 h. In conclusion, the absence of day/night serum TAC changes when clinically relapsed and the normalization of day/night serum TAC changes at TMHD can be considered as a biological marker of schizophrenia evolution.

  3. Influence of Family and Childhood Memories in the Development and Manifestation of Paranoid Ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Célia Barreto; da Motta, Carolina; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Peixoto, Ermelindo

    2016-09-01

    Several studies point out to the influence of social experiences on perceptions of the environment and others in cognitive functioning and different aspects of psychopathology. The current study aimed at studying the influence of the psychosocial risk factors in a mixed sample of participants from the general population and affected by paranoid schizophrenia. The extent to which the existence of negative life events and events that are threatening to the inner models of the self (i.e., history of maltreatment, physical, social or psychological abuse) or the memories of these traumatic events occurring during childhood are related to the existence of paranoid beliefs in adulthood was explored. Results suggested that memories of parental behaviours characterized by antipathy from both parental figures, submissiveness and bullying victimization were important predictors of paranoid ideation in adult life. This further emphasizes the need for understanding the family and social dynamics of people presenting paranoid ideations to the development of therapeutic interventions that can effectively reduce the invalidation caused by severe psychopathology, as is the case of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Memories of family dynamics characterized by behaviours of antipathy from both parental figures, submissiveness and bullying victimization are important predictors of paranoid ideation in adult life. The study highlights the importance of exploring subjective recalls of feelings and behaviours associated with early rearing experiences, peer relationships and themes related to social rank theory in the roots of internal models of relationship with the self and others in the general sample, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and their first-degree relatives. Our findings indicate that schizophrenic patients in active phase differ regarding memories of threat and submission and are more likely to remember childhood experiences perceived as

  4. Predictors of subjective well-being in patients with paranoid symptoms: is insight necessarily advantageous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carmen; Provencio, María; Espinosa, Regina; Chaves, Covadonga; Fuentenebro, Filiberto

    2011-09-30

    In schizophrenia, poor insight has been associated with negative outcome. In fact, some studies have found insight to be associated with greater treatment adherence and lower levels of symptomatology, as well as better psychosocial functioning. However, others have found that insight into illness is associated with an increase in depression, low self-esteem, and possibly higher risk of suicide. We investigated the relationship between insight and well-being in a sample of 40 people presenting paranoid symptoms and diagnosed with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorder. Independent-samples t-tests revealed that compared to a paranoid group with high insight, paranoid participants with low insight had more self-acceptance, higher sense of autonomy and personal growth, and greater orientation towards gratification. Moderation analyses showed that when experiential avoidance was high, insight into paranoia had a detrimental effect on self-acceptance. Overall, our results support the need to explore which psychological variables moderate insight in patients with persecutory beliefs. We discuss the implications of these results for the research of paranoia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Premorbid IQ varies across different definitions of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urfer Parnas, Annick; Jansson, Lennart; Handest, Peter

    2007-01-01

    -10, St. Louis and Flexible System-Wide. Only the ICD-10 schizophrenia patients exhibited a significantly lower premorbid IQ. There were suggestive differences between the four examined systems as well as between the ICD-10 paranoid and non-paranoid subtypes. Exploration of crucial diagnostic features...

  6. Emotion recognition in Chinese people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chetwyn C H; Wong, Raymond; Wang, Kai; Lee, Tatia M C

    2008-01-15

    This study examined whether people with paranoid or nonparanoid schizophrenia would show emotion-recognition deficits, both facial and prosodic. Furthermore, this study examined the neuropsychological predictors of emotion-recognition ability in people with schizophrenia. Participants comprised 86 people, of whom: 43 were people diagnosed with schizophrenia and 43 were controls. The 43 clinical participants were placed in either the paranoid group (n=19) or the nonparanoid group (n=24). Each participant was administered the Facial Emotion Recognition task and the Prosodic Recognition task, together with other neuropsychological measures of attention and visual perception. People suffering from nonparanoid schizophrenia were found to have deficits in both facial and prosodic emotion recognition, after correction for the differences in the intelligence and depression scores between the two groups. Furthermore, spatial perception was observed to be the best predictor of facial emotion identification in individuals with nonparanoid schizophrenia, whereas attentional processing control predicted both prosodic emotion identification and discrimination in nonparanoid schizophrenia patients. Our findings suggest that patients with schizophrenia in remission may still suffer from impairment of certain aspects of emotion recognition.

  7. A paired case-control comparison of ziprasidone on visual sustained attention and visual selective attention in patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Zhang, Z H; Song, Y; Yuan, W; Liu, Z X; Tang, M Q

    2015-08-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the main targets of the treatment to schizophrenia.The atypical antipsychotic was proved to improve the cognition function of the patients. There were a few of clinical trials to detect the effect of medicine treatment on attention function. But the respective changes of sustained and selective attention in the patients with treatment of ziprasidone were rarely investigated. This present study was to explore the effect of ziprasidone on visual sustained and selective attention in schizophrenia. There were 81 patients who were treated with ziprasidone and matched with 81 healthy controls in this open-label trial. The functions were evaluated by Continuous Performance Test (CPT) and Color Word Test (CWT) at baseline and eight weeks later. Between two groups the functions were compared at the two time points, and in patients group those were compared prior to and post treatment. As compared with healthy controls, the functions of the patients were worse. But after 8 weeks treatment of ziprasidone the functions improved in some degree, which were indicated by the change of CPT and CWT indexes. Furthermore, those of patients post treatment were better than prior to treatment. Patients with paranoid schizophrenia have visual sustained and selective attention deficits. The deficits can be improved partly with ziprasidone treatment.

  8. [EEG frequency and regional properties in patients with paranoid schizophrenia: effects of positive and negative symptomatology prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V K; Kirenskaya, A V; Tkachenko, A A; Samylkin, D V; Novototsky-Vlasov, V Yu; Kovaleva, M E

    2015-01-01

    EEG changes in schizophrenic patients are caused by a multitude of factors related to clinical heterogeneity of the disease, current state of patients, and conducted therapy. EEG spectral analysis remains an actual methodical approach for the investigation of the neurophysiological mechanisms of the disease. The goal of the investigation was the study of frequency and regional EEG correlating with the intensity of productive and negative disorders. Models of summary prevalence of positive/negative disorders and evidence of concrete clinical indices of the PANSS scale were used. Spectral characteristics of background EEG in the frequency range of 1-60 Hz were studied in 35 patients with paranoid schizophrenia free from psychoactive medication and in 19 healthy volunteers. It was established that the main index of negative symptomatology in summary assessment was diffuse increase of spectral power of gamma and delta ranges. Deficient states with the predominance of volitional disorders were characterized by a lateralized increase of spectral power of beta-gamma ranges in the left hemisphere, and of delta range - in frontal areas of this hemisphere. Positive symptomatology was noticeably less reflected in EEG changes than negative ones. An analysis of psychopathological symptom complexes revealed the significance of spatially structured EEG patterns in the beta range: for the delusion disturbances with psychic automatism phenomena - in frontal areas of the left hemisphere, and for the paranoid syndrome with primary interpretative delusion - in cortical areas of the right hemisphere.

  9. Mistrustful and Misunderstood: A Review of Paranoid Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Royce

    2017-06-01

    Paranoid Personality Disorder (PPD) has historically been neglected by science out of proportion to its prevalence or its association with negative clinical outcomes. This review provides an update on what is known about PPD regarding its prevalence, demographics, comorbidity, biological mechanism, risk factors, and relationship to psychotic disorders. PPD has long been the subject of a rich and prescient theoretical literature which has provided a surprisingly coherent account of the psychological mechanism of non-delusional paranoia. Available data indicate that PPD has a close relationship with childhood trauma and social stress. Descriptive data on a sample of 115 individuals with Paranoid Personality Disorder is examined in comparison with a group of individuals with Borderline Personality Disorder. The descriptive data largely confirm previously identified relationships between Paranoid Personality Disorder and childhood trauma, violence, and race. We identify important similarities to and differences from Borderline Personality Disorder. PPD continues to be an important construct in the clinic and the laboratory. Available data lead to a reconsideration of the disorder as more closely related to trauma than to schizophrenia.

  10. Inductive Reasoning in Patients with Paranoid Type Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Emrah Karadere; Yasir Safak; Halime Seyma Ozcelik; Emre Demir; Mehmet Hakan Turkcapar

    2017-01-01

    The goal of our study is to evaluate the decision making and reasoning of the paranoid type schizophrenic patients, and their confidence in reasoning and perseverance in keeping to their decisions via using Reasoning with Inductive Argument Test (RIAT). Thirty-two delusional patients and 30 healthy volunteers were included in the study. After the diagnostic interview was conducted by SCID-I to the patients who were asked to participate in the study, RIAT test was applied by the interviewe...

  11. The Impact of the Sensory Integration Approach on Positive and Negative Symptoms in a Patient With Non-Paranoid Schizophrenia: A Case Report

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    Jadidi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction One of the problems that people with schizophrenia face is the inability to understand and interpret the sensory input from the environment. This report aims to describe the effects of the sensory integration approach on non-paranoid schizophrenia. The treatment involved eight sessions held 3 days a week and lasting 45 minutes each. The patient had a defined Iranians form social relationships schizophrenia evaluated and treatment. Sensory integration therapy in these patients focused on the following elements: vestibular and proprioceptive senses, exercises to improve walking, improving upper extremity coordination and movement, writing activities, cognitive skills, activities of daily living, and family therapy. Case Presentation The subject (A.H. was a 32-year-old male graduate student with no history of previous hospitalization. His diagnosis was schizophrenia. The reason for his hospitalization was that he was angry and violent toward his family. In addition, the patient had limited verbal and nonverbal skills, issues with self-control, and restricted community involvement. The results of the patient’s treatment for schizophrenia was assessed via a questionnaire on social skills. Conclusions After eight sessions, increased awareness of the environment, improved posture and gait pattern, improved motivation and enjoyment, improved patient tolerance, improved appearance and personal hygiene, loss of purposeful behavior, a realistic plan of action every day, improved attention span, improved decision-making skills, and improved community involvement and coping skills were achieved. The environment is rich in sensory stimuli. The integration and processing of each individual senses creates different behavioral responses. The results showed that a sensory integration approach combined with drug therapy is an effective treatment for patients with schizophrenia.

  12. Evidence from paranoid schizophrenia for more than one component of theory of mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Peter; Achim, André; Léveillé, Edith; Boisseau, Emilie; Stip, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported finding that performance was impaired on four out of five theory of mind (ToM) tests in a group of 21 individuals diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia (pScz), relative to a non-clinical group of 29 individuals (Scherzer et al., 2012). Only the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test did not distinguish between groups. A principal components analysis revealed that the results on the ToM battery could be explained by one general ToM factor with the possibility of a latent second factor. As well, the tests were not equally sensitive to the pathology. There was also overmentalization in some ToM tests and under-mentalisation in others. These results led us to postulate that there is more than one component to ToM. We hypothesized that correlations between the different EF measures and ToM tests would differ sufficiently within and between groups to support this hypothesis. We considered the relationship between the performance on eight EF tests and five ToM tests in the same diagnosed and non-clinical individuals as in the first study. The ToM tests shared few EF correlates and each had its own best EF predictor. These findings support the hypothesis of multiple ToM components. PMID:26579026

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum abnormalities in patients with different subtypes of schizophrenia

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    Ebru Unlu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reductions in the size of the corpus callosum (CC have been described for schizophrenia patients, but little is known about the possible regional differences in schizophrenia subtypes (paranoid, disorganised, undifferentiated, residual.  Methods. We recruited 58 chronically schizophrenic patients with different subtypes, and 31 age-and-gender matched healthy controls. The callosum was extracted from a midsagittal slice from T1 weighted magnetic resonance images, and areas of the total CC, its five subregions, CC length and total brain volume were compared between schizophrenia subtypes and controls. Five subregions were approximately matched to fibre pathways from cortical regions.  Results. Schizophrenia patients had reduced CC total area and length when compared with controls. Disorganised and undifferentiated schizophrenics had a smaller prefrontal area, while there was no significant difference for the paranoid and residual groups. The premotor/supplementary motor area was smaller in all schizophrenia subtypes. The motor area was smaller only in the disorganised group. A smaller sensory area was found in all subtypes except the residual group. Parietal, temporal and occipital areas were smaller in the paranoid and undifferentiated groups. Total brain volume was smaller in all schizophrenia subtypes compared with controls, but did not reach statistical significance.  Conclusion. These findings suggest that the heterogeneity of symptoms may lead to the different CC morphological characteristics in schizophrenia subtypes.

  14. Сomparative analysis of social disadaptation and criticality indicators in patients with schizoaffective disorder and paranoid schizophrenia as components of pathopersonological transformations

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    M. Ye. Khomitskyi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (SAD, both are included in endogenous psychoses group, which represents an extremely important problem in clinical practice and modern psychiatric theory considering steady expanding and transforming ideas about the systematic typology of mental diseases in recent years. Correctness of psychiatric disease diagnosis by clinicians determines therapeutic strategy, which directly influences the quality and duration of remission, the side effects of medicines severity, medical and social prognosis and quality of patient’s life. The aim – to carry out a comparative analysis of pathopersonological transformations, types of attitude to the disease and adaptability of patients with schizophrenia and SAD. Contingents and methods. On the basis of the Regional Clinical Psychiatric Hospital (Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine there were examined 76 patients with an diagnosis of "schizoaffective disorder" and 96 patients with an established diagnosis of "paranoid schizophrenia, episodic type of course", both with pronounced affective component in the structure of exacerbation episodes. Inclusion criterion in the sample for both groups was the state of clinical remission with reduction of psychotic symptoms. The main methods of investigation were catamnestic, clinical, psychopathological, psychodiagnostic (MMPI and PQBI techniques, as well as medical and statistical analysis. Results. The obtained results revealed a negative effect of both diseases on the level of psychosocial adaptation in various vectors (interpsychic for SAD and intrapsychic for schizophrenia, and also indicated the specific personological characteristics of the studied contingents. The prevalence of personality autization among patients with schizophrenia combined with anxious and neurotic features, which define the leading mechanism of delusion formation, while impulsivity and psychopathyzation, which dominate the personality

  15. Combined social cognitive and neurocognitive rehabilitation strategies in schizophrenia: neuropsychological and psychopathological influences on Theory of Mind improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechi, M; Bosia, M; Spangaro, M; Buonocore, M; Cocchi, F; Pigoni, A; Piantanida, M; Guglielmino, C; Bianchi, L; Smeraldi, E; Cavallaro, R

    2015-11-01

    Neurocognitive and social cognitive impairments represent important treatment targets in schizophrenia, as they are significant predictors of functional outcome. Different rehabilitative interventions have recently been developed, addressing both cognitive and psychosocial domains. Although promising, results are still heterogeneous and predictors of treatment outcome are not yet identified. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of two newly developed social cognitive interventions, respectively based on the use of videotaped material and comic strips, combined with domain-specific Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT). We also analysed possible predictors of training outcome, including basal neurocognitive performance, the degree of cognitive improvement after CRT and psychopathological variables. Seventy-five patients with schizophrenia treated with CRT, were randomly assigned to: social cognitive training (SCT) group, Theory of Mind Intervention (ToMI) group, and active control group (ACG). ANOVAs showed that SCT and ToMI groups improved significantly in ToM measures, whereas the ACG did not. We reported no influences of neuropsychological measures and improvement after CRT on changes in ToM. Both paranoid and non-paranoid subjects improved significantly after ToMI and SCT, without differences between groups, despite the better performance in basal ToM found among paranoid patients. In the ACG only non-paranoid patients showed an improvement in non-verbal ToM. Results showed that both ToMI and SCT are effective in improving ToM in schizophrenia with no influence of neuropsychological domains. Our data also suggest that paranoid symptoms may discriminate between different types of ToM difficulties in schizophrenia.

  16. Avoidant personality disorder symptoms in first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients predict performance on neurocognitive measures: the UCLA family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelson, D L; Asarnow, R A; Sugar, C A; Subotnik, K L; Jacobson, K C; Neale, M C; Kendler, K S; Kuppinger, H; Nuechterlein, K H

    2010-07-01

    Whether avoidant personality disorder symptoms are related to neurocognitive impairments that aggregate in relatives of schizophrenics is unknown. We report the relationship between avoidant personality disorder symptoms and neurocognitive performance in the first-degree relatives of probands with schizophrenia. 367 first-degree relatives of probands with schizophrenia and 245 relatives of community controls were interviewed for the presence of avoidant personality symptoms and symptoms of paranoid and schizotypal personality disorders and administered neurocognitive measures. Relationships between neurocognitive measures and avoidant symptoms were analyzed using linear mixed models. Avoidant dimensional scores predicted performance on the span of apprehension (SPAN), 3-7 Continuous Performance Test (3-7 CPT), and Trail Making Test (TMT-B) in schizophrenia relatives. These relationships remained significant on the SPAN even after adjustment for paranoid or schizotypal dimensional scores and on the TMT-B after adjustment for paranoid dimensional scores. Moreover, in a second set of analyses comparing schizophrenia relatives to controls there were significant or trending differences in the degree of the relationship between avoidant symptoms and each of these neurocognitive measures even after adjustments for paranoid and schizotypal dimensional scores. The substantial correlation between avoidant and schizotypal symptoms suggests that these personality disorders are not independent. Avoidant and in some cases schizotypal dimensional scores are significant predictors of variability in these neurocognitive measures. In all analyses, higher levels of avoidant symptoms were associated with worse performance on the neurocognitive measures in relatives of schizophrenia probands. These results support the hypothesis that avoidant personality disorder may be a schizophrenia spectrum phenotype. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. What can the study of first impressions tell us about attitudinal ambivalence and paranoia in schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Todorov, Alexander; Rebani, Yasmina; Ferrari, Kelsey; Lee, Sang Han; Calderone, Daniel; Nolan, Karen A; Butler, Pamela; Malaspina, Dolores; Javitt, Daniel C

    2016-04-30

    Although social cognition deficits have been associated with schizophrenia, social trait judgments - or first impressions - have rarely been studied. These first impressions, formed immediately after looking at a person's face, have significant social consequences. Eighty-one individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 62 control subjects rated 30 neutral faces on 10 positive or negative traits: attractive, mean, trustworthy, intelligent, dominant, fun, sociable, aggressive, emotionally stable and weird. Compared to controls, patients gave higher ratings for positive traits as well as for negative traits. Patients also demonstrated more ambivalence in their ratings. Patients who were exhibiting paranoid symptoms assigned higher intensity ratings for positive social traits than non-paranoid patients. Social trait ratings were negatively correlated with everyday problem solving skills in patients. Although patients appeared to form impressions of others in a manner similar to controls, they tended to assign higher scores for both positive and negative traits. This may help explain the social deficits observed in schizophrenia: first impressions of higher degree are harder to correct, and ambivalent attitudes may impair the motivation to interact with others. Consistent with research on paranoia and self-esteem, actively-paranoid patients' positive social traits judgments were of higher intensity than non-paranoid patients'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Behavioral Experiments in the Treatment of Paranoid Schizophrenia: A Single Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Roger; Nordahl, Hans M.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first description of cognitive therapy of paranoid delusions appeared in the literature, the empirical support for cognitive behavioral therapy in treating psychotic symptoms has been widely established. The aim of the present case study is to show how the behavioral experiment can be used as a powerful tool to change delusional thinking…

  19. Low levels of serum total antioxidant capacity and presence at admission and absence at discharge of a day/night change as a marker of acute paranoid schizophrenia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera-Fumero, Armando L; Díaz-Mesa, Estefanía; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Fernandez-Lopez, Lourdes; Cejas-Mendez, Maria Del Rosario

    2017-03-01

    An oxidant-antioxidant system dysregulation has been described as a schizophrenia pathophysiological base. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) is one measure of the antioxidant capacity of a system. Day/night concentration changes is a biological characteristic of hormones such as melatonin or cortisol. There is no information about TAC day/night changes in schizophrenia. Studying the existence of a day/night TAC change in schizophrenia. Forty-three DSM-IV paranoid schizophrenia inpatients participated in the study. Thirty healthy subjects matched by age and gender acted as control group. Blood was sampled at 12:00 and 00:00h the day after admission and the day before discharge. Serum TAC was measured by the ABTS radical cation technique and expressed in Trolox mmol/L. Patients had significantly lower TAC levels at admission and discharge (12:00 and 00:00) than controls. At admission patients had a TAC day/night change, with higher day-time than night-time levels (0.66±0.14 vs 0.60±0.15) as well as healthy subjects (0.83±0.07 vs 0.77±0.11). At discharge patients had a similar TAC level at 12:00 and 00:00 (0.64±0.15 vs 0.63±0.14). Schizophrenic patients present a deficit of the antioxidant system. The initial presence and the later absence of a day/night change deserves future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychotic experiences and aggression inoutpatients with schizophrenia

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    Konstantinos Tsirigotis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Some authors report that aggressive behaviour in schizophrenia is of heterogeneous sources, for example, aggression may be an impulsive action and even deliberate behaviour designed to intimidate others. Violence and aggressive behaviour may also be associated with psychotic experiences, such as delusions or hallucinations. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between psychotic experiences and the intensiveness of hostility and aggression in patients with paranoid schizophrenia. Material and method: Seventy outpatients (35 men and 35 women with paranoid schizophrenia were examined. Relevant scales, subscales and indices of the Polish version of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI were used. Results: The analysis of correlation and the factor analysis revealed a number of statistically significant correlations between the scores of the scales assessing psychotic experiences and those assessing the intensiveness of hostility and aggression. Conclusions: The results of this study confirm the presence of a number of relationships between psychotic experiences and felt hostility and aggression. Psychotic symptoms and indices of aggressiveness created five factors: “psychoticism,” “hostility,” “psychopathic aggression,” “poignancy,” “persecutory ideas.” Important for the felt hostility and aggressiveness in patients turned out to be experienced anxiety about their mental health because of the sense of the unreality of what is going on and because of the sense of alienation of their own thoughts. Another important factor turned out to be a sense of being wronged by life, misunderstood by others, and the belief that people have a grudge and try to harm. In contrast, characteristics, attitudes and behaviour which are the opposite of paranoid disorders, i.e. faith in people and optimistic attitude towards them, are an important factor for the inhibition of aggression.

  1. EEG Phase Synchronization In Patients With Paranoid Schizophrenia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bob, P.; Paluš, Milan; Šusta, M.; Glaslová, K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 447, č. 1 (2008), s. 73-77 ISSN 0304-3940 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : EEG * phase synchronization * coherence * schizophrenia * feature binding Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2008

  2. Association Study of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor 1 (TNFR1 Gene Polymorphisms with Schizophrenia in the Polish Population

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    Renata Suchanek-Raif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating mental disorder with undetermined aetiology. Previous research has suggested that dysregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and their receptors plays a role in developing schizophrenia. We examined the association of the three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs4149576, rs4149577, and rs1860545 in the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1 gene with the development and psychopathology of paranoid schizophrenia in the Polish Caucasian sample consisting of 388 patients and 657 control subjects. The psychopathology was assessed using a five-factor model of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS. SNPs were genotyped using the TaqMan 5′-exonuclease allelic discrimination assay. The SNPs tested were not associated with a predisposition to paranoid schizophrenia in either the entire sample or after stratification according to gender. However, rs4149577 and rs1860545 SNPs were associated with the intensity of the PANSS excitement symptoms in men, which may contribute to the risk of violent behavior. Polymorphisms in the TNFR1 gene may have an impact on the symptomatology of schizophrenia in men.

  3. [Religiousness of patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia. Wide-ranging studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    (1) The correlations between: (1.1) various aspects of religiousness and (1.2) age, anxiety-state, anxiety-trait, locus of control, and, in the group of patients with shizophrenia: span of treatment, rate of therapy, ego psychopathology, paranoid and depression dimensions, self-rating of state of self-feeling, state of feeling of illness, and quality of life and (2) the comparison of various aspects of religiousness of patients with schizophrenia and healthy people were studied. The Scale of Christian Religiousness, Individual Religiousness Scale, Intrinsic, Extrinsic and Quest Religious Orientation Scales, Scale of Fundamentalism, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Rotter's questionnaire of locus of control, Scharfetter's questionnaire of ego psychopathology, Paranoid-Depresivity Scale-abridgment, Frankfurt Self-feeling Scale-abridgment, visual analogy of self-feeling, visual analogy of feeling of illness, and questionnaire of quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) were used in the study. 91 adults both of sexes, 60 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia according to ICD-10 and DCR-10 in the diagnostic group and 31 healthy persons were studied. It was noticed that: (1) various correlations are manifested between religiousness and psychopathology of patients with schizophrenia; (2) patients diagnosed as having schizophrenia have a significantly higher level of extrinsic religiousness and fundamentalism than healthy individuals; (3) many results pointed out in the bibliography had no verification in these studies. Intrinsic, extrinsic, quest, and orthodox religiousness and fundamentalism realize significant functions in psychopathology of schizophrenia disorder. The knowledge about religiousness of schizophrenia patients can be important for diagnostic and therapeutic processes of the disorder.

  4. Suicide risk in schizophrenia: an analysis of 17 consecutive suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, P I; Lehtonen, J; Lönnqvist, J

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactional factors related to the recognition of suicide risk in patients with schizophrenia. The study focused on 17 schizophrenia patients who had committed suicide during the National Suicide Prevention Project in Finland between April 1, 1987, and March 31, 1988, in the province of Kuopio. Consensus case reports were assembled by using the psychological autopsy method. Study methods included structured and in-depth interviews of next of kin and interviews of health care or social services workers who had treated the suicide victims. Male and female patients with schizophrenia committed suicide in equal proportions. Most had suffered from schizophrenia for more than 15 years; all but one had been receiving psychiatric treatment at the time of suicide. Retrospective assessment indicated that 59 percent of the patients were clinically depressed at the time of suicide. In 76 percent of the cases, the mental health professionals involved in treatment had not believed that there was a risk of suicide during their last contact with the patient. In 29 percent of the cases, the patient's paranoid ideas concerning treatment personnel had increased. Patients' withdrawal from human relationships because of depression was related to loss of the treatment professionals' concern for the patients. The findings in this descriptive study suggest that withdrawal by a patient with schizophrenia and an increase in the patient's paranoid behavior should be regarded as signals of risk of suicide.

  5. Avoidant personality disorder is a separable schizophrenia-spectrum personality disorder even when controlling for the presence of paranoid and schizotypal personality disorders The UCLA family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelson, D L; Nuechterlein, K H; Asarnow, R A; Payne, D L; Subotnik, K L; Jacobson, K C; Neale, M C; Kendler, K S

    2007-03-01

    It is unresolved whether avoidant personality disorder (APD) is an independent schizophrenia (Sz)-spectrum personality disorder (PD). Some studies find APD and social anxiety symptoms (Sxs) to be separable dimensions of psychopathology in relatives (Rels) of schizophrenics while other studies find avoidant Sxs to be correlated with schizotypal and paranoid Sxs. Rates of APD among first-degree Rels of Sz probands, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) probands, and community control (CC) probands were examined. Further analyses examined rates when controlling for the presence of schizotypal (SPD) and paranoid (PPD) personality disorders, differences in APD Sxs between relative groups, and whether APD in Rels of Szs reflects a near miss for another Sz-spectrum PD. Three hundred sixty-two first-degree Rels of Sz probands, 201 relatives of ADHD probands, and 245 Rels of CC probands were interviewed for the presence of DSM-III-R Axis I and II disorders. Diagnoses, integrating family history, interview information, and medical records, were determined. APD occurred more frequently in Rels of Sz probands compared to CC probands (pavoids social or occupational activities..." and "exaggerates the potential difficulties..." 65% of the Rels of Sz probands who had diagnoses of APD were more than one criterion short of a DSM-III-R diagnosis of either SPD or PPD. This indicates that APD is a separate Sz-spectrum disorder, and not merely a sub-clinical form of SPD or PPD.

  6. Selective, sustained, and shift in attention in patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagh-Shenas, H; Toobai, S; Makaremi, A

    2002-12-01

    Attentional deficits are a prominent aspect of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. The present study was designed to investigate attention deficit in a group of patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia. According to the segmental set theory suggested by Hogarty and Flesher, three aspects of attention problems, selective, sustained, and shift in attention, were studied. The 30 patients hospitalized on three psychiatric wards at Shiraz and Isfahan and 30 normal healthy subjects matched for age, sex, and years of education were administered a computerized Continuous Performance Test, Stroop Color-word Test, and Wisconsin Card Sorting test. Analysis showed patients performed more poorly than control subjects on measured aspects of attention. The acute/chronic classification did not predict differences in attention scores between subtypes of schizophrenia, while the positive/negative classification did. Paranoid, undifferentiated, and residual groups by subtypes of schizophrenia showed similar performance on the Continuous Performance Test, but were significantly different on errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting test and on reaction time to Stroop stimuli in the incongruent color-word condition. Patients with paranoid diagnosis performed better than other subtypes on these tasks. Present results suggest that the Continuous Performance Test is valuable for differentiating of schizophrenia spectrum disorder, while scores on Stroop and Wisconsin card sorting may have better diagnostic value for differentiating subtypes of the disorder.

  7. Paranoid thinking as a heuristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Antonio; Cella, Matteo

    2010-08-01

    Paranoid thinking can be viewed as a human heuristic used by individuals to deal with uncertainty during stressful situations. Under stress, individuals are likely to emphasize the threatening value of neutral stimuli and increase the reliance on paranoia-based heuristic to interpreter events and guide their decisions. Paranoid thinking can also be activated by stress arising from the possibility of losing a good opportunity; this may result in an abnormal allocation of attentional resources to social agents. A better understanding of the interplay between cognitive heuristics and emotional processes may help to detect situations in which paranoid thinking is likely to exacerbate and improve intervention for individuals with delusional disorders.

  8. Hubungan Dukungan Sosial Keluarga dengan Frekuensi Kekambuhan Pasien Skizofrenia Paranoid Di Poliklinik Rumah Sakit Jiwa Daerah Propsu Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Sebayang, Septian Mixrofa

    2011-01-01

    Social support is one source of stress management and influence a person's health condition. The purpose of this study is to find out the relationship between family social support with paranoid schizophrenia of patients relapse frequency in the Polyclinic Psychiatric Sumatera Utara Distric Hospital in Medan. This study design is a descriptive correlation. Purposive sampling were required 32 respondents. The result of the study shows that there is a significant correlation between f...

  9. Catha edulis chewing effects on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients

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    Kotb El-Sayed MI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed-I Kotb El-Sayed, Hatem-K Amin Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Helwan University, Ain Helwan, Helwan, Cairo, Egypt Background: The current study’s aim is to evaluate the possible interaction effects of khat chewing on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients.Patients and methods: In the study group, 42 male subjects suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and were classified according to their khat chewing habits into two subgroups: either khat-chewer subgroup (SKc; n=21; r=11, h=10 or non-khat-chewer subgroup (SNKc; n=21, r=11, h=10. Each subgroup was further subdivided according to type of treatment into r (risperidone and h (haloperidol. Healthy male subjects (37 were subdivided into healthy khat-chewer as positive controls (HKc, n=17 and healthy non-khat-chewer as negative controls (HNKc, n=20. Plasma dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC, homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were estimated.Results: ANOVA and post hoc analysis showed that dopamine was illustrating significant elevation in all khat chewing groups. DOPAC was illustrating significant decrease in all khat chewing groups with an interesting outcome showing significant increase in DOPAC in SNKcr group due to risperidone effect. Homovanillic acid, serotonin, hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and norepinephrine were illustrating significant elevations in all khat chewing groups. Epinephrine was illustrating significant elevation in all chewers than non-chewers groups. Unexpected significant decrease in epinephrine in the SNKcr group indicated that risperidone drug is decreasing epinephrine through indirect mechanism involving calcium.Conclusion: Khat chewing in schizophrenic patients is contraindicated because it aggravates the disease symptoms, attenuates all used treatment medications, and deteriorates all biochemical markers of the patients. Keywords

  10. Emotional intelligence as an indicator of cognitive functioning in patients with schizophrenia

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    Samoylova D.D.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze the variability of emotional intelligence as an indicator of cognitive functioning in groups of patients with schizophrenia, depending on the duration of the disease, the duration of treatment and the treatment regimen used. Material and Methods. A total of 420 patients with a clinical diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia were examined. All patients were divided into groups according to the duration of the disease and the therapy. The research included the medical documentation analyses and the application of «Ekman's Faces» psychodiagnostic scale. Results. There was an improvement of the indicator in the group of primary patients receiving treatment with atypical antipsychotics in combination with rehabilitation. Conclusion. The obtained data allows to make a conclusion about the effect of the duration of the disease, the observation, and also the nature of the conducted therapy on the variability of the emotional intelligence indicator in patients with a paranoid form of schizophrenia and may be used to select a psychotherapeutic algorithm for this category of patients. The obtained results prove the necessity of using questionnaire for emotional intelligence «Ekman's faces» and specific therapy in the early stages of the disease.

  11. Levothyroxine Augmentation in Clozapine Resistant Schizophrenia: A Case Report and Review

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    Ruohollah Seddigh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many reports that show different thyroid abnormalities in schizophrenia without clear establishment of their role in etiology and treatment outcome of schizophrenia. Among these reports, there are only a few that consider a role for thyroid hormones as augmenting agents in the treatment with antipsychotic drugs. This case report outlines symptom subsidence of a patient with clozapine refractory paranoid schizophrenia and normal thyroid function who added levothyroxine to clozapine and found that symptoms of psychosis returned once levothyroxine was discontinued. Although this observation needs to be confirmed in controlled clinical trials, we aimed to discuss possible hypothesized mechanisms underlying this observation.

  12. Schizophrenia, Obsessive Covert Mental Rituals and Social Anxiety: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J.; Edwards, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    This case study reports the outcomes of cognitive therapy for social anxiety in a 45-year-old man with a 27-year history of paranoid schizophrenia. The intervention targeted the overlapping and interrelated symptoms of social anxiety and delusional beliefs. After 11 sessions of treatment, the patient showed no improvement in social anxiety,…

  13. Is disorganized schizophrenia a predictor of treatment resistance? Evidence from an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bertolucci Ortiz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether inpatients with disorganized schizophrenia are more resistant to treatment. Method: Eighty-five inpatients were assessed at admission and at discharge for schizophrenia subtype, symptom severity, and treatment resistance criteria. Results: Disorganized patients were significantly more treatment-resistant than paranoid patients (60%, p = 0.001, and presented worse scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI-S, and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF (p < 0.001. Although the difference was not significant, 80% of treatment-resistant patients with disorganized schizophrenia responded to clozapine. Conclusion: Patients with the disorganized subtype of schizophrenia should benefit from clozapine as a second-line agent.

  14. Validation of the Paranoid Thoughts Scale in Iranian Population

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    Karim Abdolmohammadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Considering that paranoid thought has one-dimensional approach, use of long questionnaires has no clinical and research application, therefore use of short questionnaires seems necessary. The Green et al. paranoid thought scale is a short self-assessment tool for assessing paranoid thought in non-clinical and clinical group. This research was conducted to validate this questionnaire in Iranian population. Methods: In this cross-sectional survey, 356 students were selected using stratified sampling method and assessed by GPTS and Minnesota multiphasic paranoid inventory (MMPI in 2015. Validity was assessed simultaneously with MMPI testing. Results: The correlation coefficient of GPTS and MMPI scores was α=0.71 and significant (p<0.001. Internal consistency value was estimated to be 0.81 according to Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Conclusion: GPTS is an appropriate and short tool for screening in paranoid thought-related researches. Keywords: Paranoid disorders; Personality tests; Validation studies.

  15. Interview Investigation of Insecure Attachment Styles as Mediators between Poor Childhood Care and Schizophrenia-Spectrum Phenomenology.

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    Tamara Sheinbaum

    Full Text Available Insecure attachment styles have received theoretical attention and some initial empirical support as mediators between childhood adverse experiences and psychotic phenomena; however, further specificity needs investigating. The present interview study aimed to examine (i whether two forms of poor childhood care, namely parental antipathy and role reversal, were associated with subclinical positive and negative symptoms and schizophrenia-spectrum personality disorder (PD traits, and (ii whether such associations were mediated by specific insecure attachment styles.A total of 214 nonclinical young adults were interviewed for subclinical symptoms (Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States, schizophrenia-spectrum PDs (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders, poor childhood care (Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Interview, and attachment style (Attachment Style Interview. Participants also completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and all the analyses were conducted partialling out the effects of depressive symptoms.Both parental antipathy and role reversal were associated with subclinical positive symptoms and with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits. Role reversal was also associated with subclinical negative symptoms. Angry-dismissive attachment mediated associations between antipathy and subclinical positive symptoms and both angry-dismissive and enmeshed attachment mediated associations of antipathy with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits. Enmeshed attachment mediated associations of role reversal with paranoid and schizotypal PD traits.Attachment theory can inform lifespan models of how adverse developmental environments may increase the risk for psychosis. Insecure attachment provides a promising mechanism for understanding the development of schizophrenia-spectrum phenomenology and may offer a useful target for prophylactic intervention.

  16. Indirect self-destructiveness in individuals with schizophrenia

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    Konstantinos Tsirigotis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the indirect self-destructiveness syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Two hundred individuals with paranoid schizophrenia (117 men and 83 women, mean age 37.15 years, all in remission, were examined using the Polish version of the Chronic Self-Destructiveness Scale. Two hundred well-matched healthy individuals served as a control group. Results: The intensity of indirect self-destructiveness was greater in the schizophrenia group than in controls. The intensity of each manifestation was as follows (in decreasing order: helplessness and passiveness in the face of difficulties (A5, personal and social neglects (A3, lack of planfulness (A4, poor health maintenance (A2, transgression and risk (A1. Conclusion: Patients with schizophrenia displayed more behaviors that were indirectly self-destructive than healthy controls; they scored better than healthy controls only on caring for their own health. The patients showed the lowest intensity of behaviors connected with the active form of indirect self-destructiveness, and the highest intensity of behaviors connected with the passive form. These findings may enable delivery of more effective forms of pharmacological and psychosocial help to patients with schizophrenia.

  17. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, R.J.; Duncan, G.C.; Weinman, M.L.; Barr, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured via xenon133 inhalation technique in 23 patients with schizophrenia and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. The mean blood flow to both hemispheres was found to be lower for the patients. The patients and their controls did not differ on interhemispheric differences in blood flow. There were no differences in rCBF between medicated and unmedicated, subchronic and chronic, and paranoid and nonparanoid patients. Hallucinations were associated with reduced blood flow to several postcentral regions

  18. Regional cerebral blood flow in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, R.J.; Duncan, G.C.; Weinman, M.L.; Barr, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured via xenon133 inhalation technique in 23 patients with schizophrenia and 18 age- and sex-matched controls. The mean blood flow to both hemispheres was found to be lower for the patients. The patients and their controls did not differ on interhemispheric differences in blood flow. There were no differences in rCBF between medicated and unmedicated, subchronic and chronic, and paranoid and nonparanoid patients. Hallucinations were associated with reduced blood flow to several postcentral regions.

  19. Thinking Clearly About Schizotypy: Hewing to the Schizophrenia Liability Core, Considering Interesting Tangents, and Avoiding Conceptual Quicksand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzenweger, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of schizotypy represents a rich and complex psychopathology construct. Furthermore, the construct implies a theoretical model that has considerable utility as an organizing framework for the study of schizophrenia, schizophrenia-related psychopathology (eg, delusional disorder, psychosis-NOS (not otherwise specified), schizotypal, and paranoid personality disorder), and putative schizophrenia endophenotypes as suggested by Rado, Meehl, Gottesman, Lenzenweger, and others. The understanding (and misunderstanding) of the schizophrenia-related schizotypy model, particularly as regards clinical illness, as well as an alternative approach to the construct require vigilance in order to ensure the methodological approach continues to yield the fruit that it can in illuminating the pathogenesis of schizophrenia-related psychopathology. The articles in the Special Section in this issue of Schizophrenia Bulletin highlight methodological and theoretical issues that should be examined carefully. PMID:25810061

  20. Predictors of treatment resistance in patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimberley, Theresa; Støvring, Henrik; Sørensen, Holger J

    2016-01-01

    ·13-1·37]), comorbid personality disorder (1·24 [1·11-1·39]), psychotropic drug use (antipsychotics 1·51 [1·35-1·69], antidepressants 1·15 [1·03-1·29], and benzodiazepines 1·22 [1·10-1·37]), and previous suicide attempt (1·21 [1·07-1·39]) were all significantly associated with treatment-resistant schizophrenia...... (provincial 1·38 [1·23-1·56], rural 1·44 [1·25-1·65]), primary education level (0·88 [0·79-0·98]), more than 30 bed-days in psychiatric hospital in the year before first schizophrenia diagnosis (1·54 [1·35-1·75]), inpatient at first schizophrenia diagnosis (2·07 [1·87-2·29]), paranoid subtype (1·24 [1...

  1. [Mineralization of the basal ganglia as the supposed cause of poor tolerance of zuclopenthixol in a patient with long-term untreated paranoid schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichowicz, Hubert M; Wilkowska, Alina; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Kummer, Łukasz; Konarzewska, Joanna; Raczak, Alicja

    2013-01-01

    Formations described as intracranial calcifications can appear in the course of diseases of the central nervous system, other systems and organs (e.g. endocrine), but also as a disorder of idiopathic character. They are frequently located in subcortical nuclei and usually constitute an incidental finding. This report presents the case of a patient suffering from paranoid schizophrenia for approximately 40 years, who did not agree to any treatment and was hospitalized against her will because she was the threat to the lives of others. She was treated with zuklopentixol resulting in positive symptoms reduction and considerable improvement in social functioning. Unfortunately neurological symptoms appeared: bradykinesis, rigidity--of the type of the lead pipe, balance, posture and gait abnormalities, disturbances in precise hands movements, double-sided Rossolimo's sign, plantar reflex without the participation of the big toe on the left. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated changes in the form of lenticular nuclei calcification and reduction of signal intensity in posterior parts of both putamens. Neurological symptoms decreased significantly after switching to atypical neuroleptic (olanzapine), and the patient did not require any additional treatment. Mineralization of the basal ganglia can often be associated with psychiatric disorders and it shouldn't be neglected because it can require modification of pharmacotherapy or additional neurological treatment.

  2. The association between social phobia, social anxiety cognitions and paranoid symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutters, S I J; Dominguez, M-d-G; Knappe, S; Lieb, R; van Os, J; Schruers, K R J; Wittchen, H-U

    2012-03-01

    Previous research suggests high levels of comorbidity between social phobia and paranoid symptoms, although the nature of this association remains unclear. Data were derived from the Early Developmental Stages of Psychopathology study, a 10-year longitudinal study in a representative German community sample of 3021 participants aged 14-24 years at baseline. The Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to assess social phobia and paranoid symptoms, along with data on social phobia features. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were conducted. Differential associations with environmental risk factors and temperamental traits were investigated. Lifetime social phobia and paranoid symptoms were associated with each other cross-sectionally (OR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.31-2.47). Lifetime paranoid symptoms were associated specifically with social anxiety cognitions. Lifetime cognitions of negative evaluation predicted later onset of paranoid symptoms, whereas onset of social phobia was predicted by cognitions of loss of control and fear/avoidance of social situations. Lifetime social phobia and paranoid symptoms shared temperamental traits of behavioural inhibition, but differed in environmental risks. The present study showed that paranoid symptoms and social phobia share similarities in cognitive profile and inhibited temperament. Avoidance appears to be important in the development of social phobia, whereas cannabis use and traumatic experiences may drive paranoid thinking in vulnerable individuals. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Schizophrenia and violent behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martins Valença

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report the case of a woman who killed a child. After a forensic psychiatric appraisal to evaluate penal responsibility, she was considered not guilty by reason of insanity and mandatorily committed to the central forensic psychiatric hospital in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The patient received a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia, based on DSM-IV-TR. She was not in psychiatric treatment and showed psychotic symptoms before the violent behavior became manifest. The study of motivational factors in homicidal behavior may provide further knowledge for understanding, preventing and treating it in such cases.

  4. Increased Blood-Reelin-Levels in First Episode Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Hornig

    Full Text Available Reelin is an extracellular glycoprotein involved in several functions of brain development, synaptogenesis and dendritic proliferation. Numerous studies found perturbation in the reelin system and altered serum reelin levels in neuropsychiatric patients using the western blot procedure. In the international literature, this is the first study that made use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to analyze serum reelin protein concentration quantitatively.In order to study possible alterations in reelin blood levels in schizophrenia, we analyzed this signal in schizophrenic patients with a first episode hallucinatory and paranoid syndrome and control subjects in a pilot study design.We found increased blood reelin protein concentration in schizophrenic patients compared to healthy controls.Our findings point to a relevant role of reelin metabolism in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.Reelin could be a biomarker for the course of disease or psychopharmacological treatment.We conclude that the reelin protein blood concentration might be a relevant signal with respect to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  5. Central- and autonomic nervous system coupling in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Steffen; Bolz, Mathias; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction has been well described in schizophrenia (SZ), a severe mental disorder. Nevertheless, the coupling between the ANS and central brain activity has been not addressed until now in SZ. The interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and ANS need to be considered as a feedback–feed-forward system that supports flexible and adaptive responses to specific demands. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, this study investigates central–autonomic couplings (CAC) studying heart rate, blood pressure and electroencephalogram in paranoid schizophrenic patients, comparing them with age–gender-matched healthy subjects (CO). The emphasis is to determine how these couplings are composed by the different regulatory aspects of the CNS–ANS. We found that CAC were bidirectional, and that the causal influence of central activity towards systolic blood pressure was more strongly pronounced than such causal influence towards heart rate in paranoid schizophrenic patients when compared with CO. In paranoid schizophrenic patients, the central activity was a much stronger variable, being more random and having fewer rhythmic oscillatory components. This study provides a more in-depth understanding of the interplay of neuronal and autonomic regulatory processes in SZ and most likely greater insights into the complex relationship between psychotic stages and autonomic activity. PMID:27044986

  6. Emotional, Cognitive and Behavioral Reactions to Paranoid Symptoms in Clinical and Nonclinical Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Célia Barreto; da Motta, Carolina; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Peixoto, Ermelindo Manuel Bernardo

    Paranoia is a disruptive belief that can vary across a continuum, ranging from persecutory delusions presented in clinical settings to paranoid cognitions that are highly prevalent in the general population. The literature suggests that paranoid thoughts derive from the activation of a paranoid schema or information processing biases that can be sensitive to socially ambiguous stimuli and influence the processing of threatening situations. Four groups (schizophrenic participants in active psychotic phases, n=61; stable participants in remission, n=30; participants' relatives, n=32; and, healthy controls, n=64) were assessed with self-report questionnaires to determine how the reactions to paranoia of clinical patients differ from healthy individuals. Cognitive, emotional and behavioral dimensions of their reactions to these paranoid thoughts were examined. Paranoid individuals were present in all groups. Most participants referred to the rejection by others as an important trigger of paranoid ideations, while active psychotics were unable to identify triggering situations to their thoughts and reactions. This may be a determinant to the different reactions and the different degree of invalidation caused by paranoid thoughts observed across groups. Clinical and nonclinical expressions of paranoid ideations differ in terms of their cognitive, emotional and behavioral components. It is suggested that, in socially ambiguous situations, paranoid participants (presenting lower thresholds of paranoid schema activation) lose the opportunity to disconfirm their paranoid beliefs by resourcing to more maladaptive coping strategies. Consequently, by dwelling on these thoughts, the amount of time spent thinking about their condition and the disability related to the disease increases.

  7. Baseline and cognition activated regional cerebral brain flow of naive paranoid schizophrenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Huafang; Gu Niufan; Xiu Yan; Chen Shaoliang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the baseline and cognition activated regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in naive paranoid schizophrenics and the relationships between the symptoms and rCBF. Methods: The scale of positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) was adopted to evaluate the symptoms of schizophrenia. The baseline and cognition activated 99 Tc m -ethylcysteinate dimmer (ECD) SPECT were performed one after the other within two days. Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) was used as cognitive task. Semi-quantitative analyses were applied. Results: There were no significant differences of WCST results between two groups. Compared with normal controls, the baseline rCBF ratios of left to right interior posterior temporal cortex in patients were significantly higher, while that of left mid-medial frontal cortex was significantly lower in patients. There was no significant difference of rCBF ratios of baseline to cognition activated states in patients. WCST couldn't activate the frontal function in patients. The total score of PANSS, score of positive subscale and general syndrome subscale were correlated with the rCBF ratio of several regions of interest (ROIs) . Some symptoms were correlated with the rCBF ratio of some ROIs. Conclusions: The hyperperfusion of left and right temporal inferior posterior cortex and hypoperfusion of left mid-medial frontal cortex could be seen in naive paranoid schizophrenics. Hypofrontality existed in patients before treatment. Some positive symptoms were correlated with the rCBF of some ROI

  8. Increased dysbindin-1B isoform expression in schizophrenia and its propensity in aggresome formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiliang; Sun, Yuhui; Ye, Haihong; Zhu, Li; Liu, Jianghong; Wu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Le; He, Tingting; Shen, Yan; Wu, Jane Y; Xu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in the human dysbindin-1 gene (DTNBP1) have been associated with schizophrenia. As a result of alternative splicing, the human DTNBP1 gene generates at least three distinct protein isoforms, dysbindin-1A, -1B and -1C. Significant effort has focused on dysbindin-1A, an important player in multiple steps of neurodevelopment. However, the other isoforms, dysbindin-1B and dysbindin-1C have not been well characterized. Nor have been associated with human diseases. Here we report an increase in expression of DTNBP1b mRNA in patients with paranoid schizophrenia as compared with healthy controls. A single-nucleotide polymorphism located in intron 9, rs117610176, has been identified and associated with paranoid schizophrenia, and its C allele leads to an increase of DTNBP1b mRNA splicing. Our data show that different dysbindin splicing isoforms exhibit distinct subcellular distribution, suggesting their distinct functional activities. Dysbindin-1B forms aggresomes at the perinuclear region, whereas dysbindin-1A and -1C proteins exhibit diffused patterns in the cytoplasm. Dysbindin-1A interacts with dysbindin-1B, getting recruited to the aggresome structure when co-expressed with dysbindin-1B. Moreover, cortical neurons over-expressing dysbindin-1B show reduction in neurite outgrowth, suggesting that dysbindin-1B may interfere with dysbindin-1A function in a dominant-negative manner. Taken together, our study uncovers a previously unknown association of DTNBP1b expression with schizophrenia in addition to its distinct biochemical and functional properties. PMID:27462430

  9. Distinct structural alterations independently contributing to working memory deficits and symptomatology in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierhut, Kathrin C; Schulte-Kemna, Anna; Kaufmann, Jörn; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Schiltz, Kolja

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia is considered a brain disease with a quite heterogeneous clinical presentation. Studies in schizophrenia have yielded a wide array of correlations between structural and functional brain changes and clinical and cognitive symptoms. Reductions of grey matter volume (GMV) in the prefrontal and temporal cortex have been described which are crucial for the development of positive and negative symptoms and impaired working memory (WM). Associations between GMV reduction and positive and negative symptoms as well as WM impairment were assessed in schizophrenia patients (symptomatology in 34, WM in 26) and compared to healthy controls (36 total, WM in 26). GMV was determined by voxel-based morphometry and its relation to positive and negative symptoms as well as WM performance was assessed. In schizophrenia patients, reductions of GMV were evident in anterior cingulate cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), superior temporal cortex, and insula. GMV reductions in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) were associated with positive symptom severity as well as WM impairment. Furthermore, the absolute GMV of VLPFC was strongly related to negative symptoms. These predicted WM performance as well as processing speed. The present results support the assumption of two distinct pathomechanisms responsible for impaired WM in schizophrenia: (1) GMV reductions in the VLPFC predict the severity of negative symptoms. Increased negative symptoms in turn are associated with a slowing down of processing speed and predict an impaired WM. (2) GMV reductions in the temporal and mediofrontal cortex are involved in the development of positive symptoms and impair WM performance, too. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Delusional disorder and schizophrenia: a comparative study across multiple domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, V; Cuesta, M J

    2016-10-01

    Delusional disorder (DD) is an under-researched condition and its relationship to schizophrenia (SZ) controversial. This study aimed to further characterize DD and to examine multi-domain evidence for the distinction between DD and SZ. Using univariate analyses we examined 146 subjects with DD, 114 subjects with paranoid SZ and 244 subjects with non-paranoid SZ on 52 characteristics from several domains including demographics, risk factors, premorbid features, illness characteristics, index episode features, delusional-related features, response to treatment and outcome. In a further step, we searched for independent associations of the examined characteristics with DD v. SZ. Univariate analyses showed that DD differed from either form of SZ in 40 characteristics, the pattern of findings indicated that paranoid SZ was much more similar to non-paranoid SZ than DD. Relative to subjects with SZ, those with DD were more likely to have drug abuse before illness onset, better premorbid sexual adjustment, later age at illness onset, higher levels of affective symptoms and lack of insight, poorer response to antipsychotic medication, better functioning in the domains of personal care, paid work and social functioning; last, subjects with DD had fewer but more severe delusions and higher ratings of conviction of delusional experience than those with SZ. Predominance of jealousy and somatic delusions was confined to subjects with DD. DD and SZ represent two distinct classes of disorders, the differential features of DD being of nosological, aetiological and therapeutic relevance.

  11. Theory of Mind differences in older patients with early-onset and late-onset paranoid schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets-Janssen, M. M. J.; Meesters, P. D.; Comijs, H. C.; Eikelenboom, P.; Smit, J. H.; de Haan, L.; Beekman, A. T. F.; Stek, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    Theory of Mind (ToM) is considered an essential element of social cognition. In younger schizophrenia patients, ToM impairments have extensively been demonstrated. It is not clear whether similar impairments can be found in older schizophrenia patients and if these impairments differ between older

  12. Theory of mind differences in older patients with early-onset and late-onset paranoid schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets-Janssen, M.M.J.; Meesters, P.D.; Comijs, H.C.; Eikelenboom, P.; Smit, J.H.; de Haan, L.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Stek, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Theory of Mind (ToM) is considered an essential element of social cognition. In younger schizophrenia patients, ToM impairments have extensively been demonstrated. It is not clear whether similar impairments can be found in older schizophrenia patients and if these impairments differ

  13. LIFE EVENTS WITH STRESSFUL EFFECT ON PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA ACCORDING TO THE SEX AND AGE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Nikolova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature life events with stressful effect are significant both for initiation and progress of the schizophrenia. Having this in mind we set our aim to be investigating the relationship between life events (considered as stressful, sex and age trough questioning 50 patients with paranoid schizophrenia. The results of our study showed presence of correlation between some of the studied life events, assessed as stressful. The analysis of the data revealed that both sex and age are influencing the assessment of the significance of the life events and “increases” their importance both for women and men.

  14. Role of perceived family environment in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Lal Dewangan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Family plays an important role in mental health of its member, thus its contribution can also be discerned in pathogenesis. Maintenance and relapse of several mental illnesses have been also attributed to the family environment (FE. This study explores FE as perceived by schizophrenia patients. Methodology: A case–control study was conducted in Chhattisgarh, India, to measure the association of perceived FE with schizophrenia. Between February 2014 and January 2015, 100 paranoid schizophrenia patients and 100 neighborhood-based healthy (based on 28-item General Health Questionnaire controls were recruited. Minimum school-educated individuals aged 20–35 years were eligible if they/their caregivers provided consent. Interpersonal relationships and FE were assessed by an interviewer-administered 69-item FE scale. Results: The odds of suffering from schizophrenia increased with age, decreased with education, income, and found to be less among married. Schizophrenia risk was negatively associated with mean scores for cohesion, acceptance/caring, active-recreational orientation, and organization. Negative symptoms of schizophrenia were less pronounced among patients belonging to joint families. Conclusion: Thus, to minimize the burden and morbidity associated with schizophrenia, interventions to improve FE by minimizing conflict and improving cohesion, acceptance/caring, active-recreational orientation, and organization, and specifically targeting older, less-educated, poor, and married individuals in nuclear families seemed necessary.

  15. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryzunov, Y.A. E-mail: grysunov@sci.lebedev.ru; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Komarova, M.N.; Misionzhnik, E.Yu.; Uzbekov, M.G.; Molodetskich, A.V.; Dobretsov, G.E.; Yakimenko, M.N

    2000-06-21

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using 'amplitude standard' method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ('bright' K-35 molecules with {tau}{sub 1}=8.0{+-}0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence ({tau}{sub 2}=1.44{+-}0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly.

  16. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryzunov, Y.A.; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Komarova, M.N.; Misionzhnik, E.Yu.; Uzbekov, M.G.; Molodetskich, A.V.; Dobretsov, G.E.; Yakimenko, M.N.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using 'amplitude standard' method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ('bright' K-35 molecules with τ 1 =8.0±0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence (τ 2 =1.44±0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly

  17. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryzunov, Yu. A.; Syrejshchikova, T. I.; Komarova, M. N.; Misionzhnik, E. Yu; Uzbekov, M. G.; Molodetskich, A. V.; Dobretsov, G. E.; Yakimenko, M. N.

    2000-06-01

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using "amplitude standard" method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ("bright" K-35 molecules with τ1=8.0±0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence ( τ2=1.44±0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly.

  18. 'The verses of madness': schizophrenia and poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankir, Ahmed Khaldoon; Holloway, David; Agius, Mark; Zaman, Rashid

    2012-12-20

    In the early 19th century, Lombroso introduced the concept of hereditary taint to describe the coexistence of 'madness' and creativity. In a recent investigation, Rust et al reported a study designed to test the traditionally assumed relationship between creativity and schizophrenia. They uncovered an association between creative originality and the positive cognitive aspects of schizotypal thinking. Poetry is not only the 'product' of psychopathology but it can also be utilised as a form of therapy: "My name is David Holloway, I am a 33 year old poet/blogger with paranoid schizophrenia. A poet called Charles Bukowski has described poetry as the 'ultimate psychiatrist', and I am a firm believer in this. The strongest part of my personality is my belief in the power of love. My recovery has relied heavily on medication, diet and exercise. However it is the power of poetry that has been my true inspiration."

  19. Can I trust you? Negative affective priming influences social judgments in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Christine I.; Tully, Laura M.; Verosky, Sara C.; Fisher, Melissa; Holland, Christine; Vinogradov, Sophia

    2010-01-01

    Successful social interactions rely on the ability to make accurate judgments based on social cues as well as the ability to control the influence of internal or external affective information on those judgments. Prior research suggests that individuals with schizophrenia misinterpret social stimuli and this misinterpretation contributes to impaired social functioning. We tested the hypothesis that for people with schizophrenia social judgments are abnormally influenced by affective information. 23 schizophrenia and 35 healthy control participants rated the trustworthiness of faces following the presentation of neutral, negative (threat-related), or positive affective primes. Results showed that all participants rated faces as less trustworthy following negative affective primes compared to faces that followed neutral or positive primes. Importantly, this effect was significantly more pronounced for schizophrenia participants, suggesting that schizophrenia may be characterised by an exaggerated influence of negative affective information on social judgment. Furthermore, the extent that the negative affective prime influenced trustworthiness judgments was significantly associated with patients’ severity of positive symptoms, particularly feelings of persecution. These findings suggest that for people with schizophrenia negative affective information contributes to an interpretive bias, consistent with paranoid ideation, when judging the trustworthiness of others. This bias may contribute to social impairments in schizophrenia. PMID:20919787

  20. Sensitization, Epileptic-Like Symptoms and Local Synchronization in Patients with Paranoid Schizophrenia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bob, P.; Paluš, Milan; Šusta, M.; Glaslová, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2010), s. 143-146 ISSN 0278-5846 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : coarse-grained information rate * EEG * limbic irritability * schizophrenia * synchronization Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.877, year: 2010

  1. aggressive behaviour towards a care-giver: a case report of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FOBUR

    Results: Clinical features met the criteria for diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia following a relapse due to ... Keywords: Aggressive behaviour, Care-Giver, Paranoid, Schizophrenia .... This act confirms earlier studies which considered.

  2. Physical anhedonia in the acute phase of schizophrenia

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    Petridou Eleni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study is to investigate the relationship between physical anhedonia and psychopathological parameters, pharmacological parameters or motor side-effects in a sample of inpatients with schizophrenia in an acute episode of their illness. Method Eighty one patients with schizophrenia, consecutively admitted, with an acute episode of their illness, at the Eginition Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, University of Athens, during a one-year period were investigated regarding possible relationships between physical anhedonia, social-demographic data and clinical parameters as well as motor side-effects, induced by antipsychotic agents. All patients were assessed using the Chapman Revised Physical Anhedonia Scale (RPAS, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, the Rating Scale for Extrapyramidal Side-Effects (EPSE, the Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale (BARS and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS. Simple cross tabulations were initially employed. Subsequently, multiple regression analysis was performed. Results Both positive and negative symptoms were associated with physical anhedonia. A positive association between physical anhedonia and the non-paranoid sub-category of schizophrenia was also proved. Conclusion According to these results, it seems that in the acute phase of schizophrenia, physical anhedonia may be a contributing factor to patient's psychopathology.

  3. Delusional disorder-somatic type (or body dysmorphic disorder) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to distinguish cases of delusional disorder of somatic subtype from severe somatization .... features suggestive of a paranoid schizophrenia. Paranoid schizophrenia ... Of note is that the patient's personality and psychosocial functioning were ...

  4. Interpretation bias towards vague faces in individuals with paranoid personality disorder traits

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    Mohsen Doustkam

    2017-10-01

     Conclusion: Individuals with paranoid personality traits have more biases than normal individuals in terms of interpreting vague faces. The results of this study indicated the importance of attention to cognitive biases among individuals with paranoid personality traits or paranoid personality disorder because such biases can significantly influence behavioral patterns in individuals, and consequently degrade their functioning. Also, bias towards the processing of negative signs appears to be the most important cognitive element is involved in interpersonal relationships.

  5. Paranoid personality disorder: a synthesis of developmental, dynamic, and descriptive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S

    1990-01-01

    Suspiciousness, feeling persecuted, and grandiosity constitute the classical triad associated with paranoid personality. However, a more important feature appears to be the discrepancy between the outer persona and the inner world of such individuals. The split is pervasive and involves self-concept, object-relations, affects, morality, sexuality, and cognitive style. Outwardly, paranoid individuals are demanding, arrogant, mistrustful, driven, unromantic, moralistic, and acutely vigilant towards the external environment. Internally, however, they are frightened, timid, self-doubting, gullible, inconsiderate, vulnerable to erotomania, and cognitively unable to grasp the totality of actual events. This way of conceptualizing the paranoid symptomatology is superior to ordinary check-list methods since it (1) links the phenomenological and psychostructural aspects of the condition, (2) helps in a more meaningful differential diagnosis of paranoid from other personality disorders, and most importantly, (3) hints at areas that require exploration in the psychotherapeutic management or psychoanalysis of such individuals.

  6. Neurocognitive functioning in parents of schizophrenia patients: Attentional and executive performance vary with genetic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Rauschenbach, Svenja; Lennertz, Leonhard; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Petrovsky, Nadine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Pukrop, Ralf; Dreher, Jan; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Maier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael

    2015-12-30

    Neuropsychological deficits are candidate endophenotypes of schizophrenia which can assist to explain the neurocognitive impact of genetic risk variants. The identification of endophenotypes is often based on the familiality of these phenotypes. Several studies demonstrate neuropsychological deficits in unaffected biological relatives of schizophrenia patients without differentiating between genetic and non-genetic factors underlying these deficits. We assessed N=129 unaffected biological parents of schizophrenia patients, N=28 schizophrenia patients (paranoid subtype), and N=143 controls without a family history of schizophrenia with an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Direct comparison of N=22 parents with an ancestral history of schizophrenia (more likely carriers, MLC) and N=17 of their spouses without such a history (less likely carriers, LLC) allowed the separation of genetic and non-genetic aspects in cognition. Overall, parents showed significant deficits in neuropsychological tasks from all cognitive domains with medium effect sizes. Direct comparisons of MLC- and LLC-parents showed that attentional and executive tasks were most strongly affected by genetic loading. To conclude, unaffected parents of schizophrenia patients showed modest yet significant impairments in attention, memory, and executive functioning. In particular, attentional and executive impairments varied most strongly with genetic loading for schizophrenia, prioritising these dysfunctions for genotype-endophenotype analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Discussion of Bogerts' temporolimbic system theory of paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, J W; Farber, N B

    1997-01-01

    Olney and Farber present their work with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, which are psychotogens, and propose that the structural changes described by Bogerts could be accounted for by a two-stage process. The first stage of the process would occur early in life and would culminate in the selective loss of NMDA-receptor bearing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons and thus render the brain into a NMDA receptor hypofunctional (NRH) state. Such a loss would set the foundation for the second stage in which the neural circuits that have been altered by the loss of these GABAergic interneurons would become activated in late adolescence but would be dysfunctional. Dysfunction of this circuit would lead to the psychopathology of schizophrenia and potentially, if severe enough, to neuronal degeneration. Thus, the changes described by Bogerts could originate partially in early life and partially in adulthood. Based on their animal model, the authors suggest studies that should be carried out in humans.

  8. Schizophrenia: an integrated sociodevelopmental-cognitive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Oliver D; Murray, Robin M

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia remains a major burden1. The dopamine (DA) and neurodevelopmental hypotheses attempt to explain the pathogenic mechanisms and origins of the disorder respectively2-4. Recently an alternative, the cognitive model, has gained popularity5. However the first two theories have not been satisfactorily integrated, and the most influential iteration of the cognitive model makes no mention of DA, neurodevelopment, or indeed the brain5. Here we show that developmental alterations secondary to variant genes, early hazards to the brain and childhood adversity, sensitise the DA system, and result in excessive presynaptic DA synthesis and DA release. Social adversity biases the cognitive schema that the individual uses to interpret experiences towards paranoid interpretations. Subsequent stress results in dysregulated DA release, causing the misattribution of salience to stimuli, which are then misinterpreted by the biased cognitive processes. The resulting paranoia and hallucinations in turn cause further stress, and eventually repeated DA dysregulation hard-wires the psychotic beliefs. Finally we consider the implications of this model for understanding and treating schizophrenia. PMID:24315522

  9. Comparative study on clinically latent aggressiveness inoutpatients with schizophrenia treated with classical antipsychotics and with risperidone

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    Konstantinos Tsirigotis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The use of neuroleptics causes not only regression of psychotic symptoms; neuroleptics affect also the patients’ mental state which is changing not only due to medications effects but also secondarily, as a result of regression of psychotic symptoms. The aim of this study was evaluation of subjectively felt “silent” (clinically latent hostility and aggressiveness in patients with paranoid schizophrenia treated with typical neuroleptics and risperidone. Material and methods: Sixty patients (30 patients treated with typical neuroleptics and the other 30 – with risperidone were examined with the Polish version of the following tools: Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI, Adjective Check List (ACL and Stern Activities Index (SAI. Results: The statistical analysis of the obtained results yielded many statistically significant differences within the intensity of hostility and aggressiveness in the examined groups. Conclusions: The results of this study showed a higher severity of psychological and personality problems in patients treated with typical neuroleptics, as compared to those treated with risperidone. In patients with paranoid schizophrenia treated with risperidone a lower severity of psychopathological, especially schizophrenic and paranoid, symptoms and lower hostility and aggressiveness were found. Considering that risperidone improves verbal functions, it can be assumed that this entails an improvement in the patients’ communicative competences, thereby improving also their interpersonal relationships. The results of this study indicate a higher susceptibility of people in this group to social influences and less hostility and negativity experienced by them.

  10. The impact of social stress on self-esteem and paranoid ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesting, Marie-Luise; Bredenpohl, Marcel; Klenke, Julia; Westermann, Stefan; Lincoln, Tania M

    2013-03-01

    Vulnerability-stress models propose that social stress triggers psychotic episodes in high risk individuals. Previous studies found not only stress but also a decrease in self-esteem to precede the formation of delusions. As evidence for causal conclusions has not been provided yet, the present study assessed the direct impact of social stress on paranoid beliefs using an experimental design and considered a decrease in self-esteem as a mediator and the proneness to psychosis and paranoia as moderators of the effect. A nonclinical population sample (n = 76) was randomly assigned to an experimental (EG) or a control group condition (CG). In the EG, participants were excluded during a virtual ball game (Cyberball) by the other two players and received a negative feedback after performing a test. The CG was included in the game and received a neutral feedback. Before and after the experimental conditions, emotions, self-esteem and paranoid beliefs were assessed using state-adapted questionnaires. After the social stress induction, the EG reported a higher increase in subclinical paranoid beliefs compared to the CG. The impact of social stress on paranoid ideation was mediated by a decrease in self-esteem and moderated by proneness to paranoia. Individuals who felt distressed by paranoid thoughts at baseline were more likely to react with an increase in paranoid ideation under social stress. The results need to be confirmed in a patient sample to draw conclusions about the processes involved in the formation of delusions in clinically relevant stages. The impact of social stress on symptom formation and self-esteem is discussed in terms of recent models of symptom formation and interventions in psychosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Schizophrenia and the use of alcohol and other drugs: epidemiological profile

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    Jássia Lopes Freitas da Silveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at characterizing the social demographic and clinical profile of patients with schizophrenia and alcohol and other drugs addiction of a Center of Psychosocial Attention III of the Central-Western region of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, from July 1st, 1997 to July 1st, 2013. It is a descriptive, observational and retrospective epidemiological study. The sample consisted of 1618 patients and the main results were: prevalence of male patients (60.4% and the age range was 21 - 30 years old (48.2%, presented more expressive abuse of alcohol (35.6% and cannabinoids (29.5% and the most frequent diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia (41.7%. Understanding the factors associated to the coexistence of both conditions can provide a basis for the creation of interventional strategies to improve the prognosis of these patients.

  12. A Case Report on Management of Father Daughter Incest with Schizophrenia

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    Tanjir Rashid Soron

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Incest is a neglected and hidden public health problem. This case is about a patient who was victim of sexual abuse, suffered from schizophrenia and abused his biological daughter. He was physically and sexually abused by seniors and classmates, developed paranoid delusion and auditory hallucination. During the course of the illness, he was hospitalized several times as a case of schizophrenia and sexual dysfunction was his main concern. The patient’s illness followed a waxing and waning course. He took medication on on-and-off basis. He abused his biological daughter sexually at the later stage of the illness. Ultimately, the patient attempted suicide after an indecent sexual act with another relative and he was admitted to the hospital. He was treated with risperidone that was titrated to 10 mg per day. After continuing the medication for 2 years he regained a functioning life and remained stable with medication. This case shows the importance of exploring the sexual behavior of the patients and sharing the experience may help in the treatment of schizophrenia patients with incest.

  13. Paranoid Personality Has a Dimensional Latent Structure: Taxometric Analyses of Community and Clinical Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Edens, John F.; Marcus, David K.; Morey, Leslie C.

    2009-01-01

    Although paranoid personality is one of the most commonly diagnosed personality disorders and is associated with numerous negative life consequences, relatively little is known about the structural properties of this condition. This study examines whether paranoid personality traits represent a latent dimension or a discrete class (i.e., taxon). In study 1, we conducted taxometric analyses of paranoid personality disorder criteria in a sample of 731 patients participating in the Collaborative...

  14. Do patients think cannabis causes schizophrenia? - A qualitative study on the causal beliefs of cannabis using patients with schizophrenia

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    Schaub Michael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a considerable amount of debate among the research community whether cannabis use may cause schizophrenia and whether cannabis use of patients with schizophrenia is associated with earlier and more frequent relapses. Considering that studies exploring patients' view on controversial topics have contributed to our understanding of important clinical issues, it is surprising how little these views have been explored to add to our understanding of the link between cannabis and psychosis. The present study was designed to elucidate whether patients with schizophrenia who use cannabis believe that its use has caused their schizophrenia and to explore these patients other beliefs and perceptions about the effects of the drug. Methods We recruited ten consecutive patients fulfilling criteria for paranoid schizophrenia and for a harmful use of/dependence from cannabis (ICD-10 F20.0 + F12.1 or F12.2 from the in- and outpatient clinic of the Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich. They were interviewed using qualitative methodology. Furthermore, information on amount, frequency, and effects of use was obtained. A grounded theory approach to data analysis was taken to evaluate findings. Results None of the patients described a causal link between the use of cannabis and their schizophrenia. Disease models included upbringing under difficult circumstances (5 or use of substances other than cannabis (e. g. hallucinogens, 3. Two patients gave other reasons. Four patients considered cannabis a therapeutic aid and reported that positive effects (reduction of anxiety and tension prevailed over its possible disadvantages (exacerbation of positive symptoms. Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia did not establish a causal link between schizophrenia and the use of cannabis. We suggest that clinicians consider our findings in their work with patients suffering from these co-occurring disorders. Withholding treatment or excluding

  15. Trastorno paranoide de la personalidad

    OpenAIRE

    Palencia de la Fuente, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Se resumen las variantes, características, tratamientos, mitos y relatos históricos referentes al trastorno paranoide de la personalidad, mostrando sus semejanzas y diferencias con otros trastornos mentales y de personalidad. Se recopilan definiciones oficiales y aportaciones de autores diversos que aporten novedades, desmientan rumores y apoyen estudios o hipótesis

  16. [Diagnostic process and management of schizophrenia in Spain: the ACEE project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca Baldomero, E; Leal Cercós, C; Varela, C; Riesgo, Y; Roca, M

    2006-01-01

    Although schizophrenia has a great impact on the health care, social and family levels, there is little epidemiological information on patients with schizophrenia, its diagnosis and treatment in Spain. The ACEE (Abordaje Clínico de la Esquizofrenia en España; Clinical Approach to Schizophrenia in Spain) study was designed with the primary objective of defining the management of schizophrenia in Spain from the perspective of current clinical practice. ACEE is a descriptive cross-sectional multicenter observational study with data collected in the setting of current clinical practice by means of a specifically designed questionnaire. A total of 1,937 patients have been studied (83% pertaining to the public sector and 17% to private one). Most subjects had paranoid schizophrenia in the stabilization phase, and did not work because of their illness. Most (96%) were receiving antipsychotic treatment and 55% also received some non-drug treatment. Negative symptoms were more frequent than positive symptoms (88% versus 63%). Significant differences were observed for type of patients and diagnostic procedures involved between the public and private health care sectors. The ACEE study shows that schizophrenic patients attending Spanish psychiatric centers are mainly single, non-working males who are living in their family setting. Treatment basically consists of antipsychotics combined with other drugs, and few complementary examinations are performed.

  17. Evoked potentials N200/P300 disorders and clinical phenotype in Cuban families with paranoid schizophrenia: a family-based association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidel Guerra López

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN Los potenciales relacionados a eventos N200 y P300 son herramientas sensibles para evaluar el funcionamiento sensorial y cognitivo. Debido a que, frecuentemente se reporta una prolongación de la latencia y una disminución de la amplitud de los componentes N200 y P300 en pacientes con esquizofrenia, estos potenciales constituyen marcadores biológicos de vulnerabilidad genética para este trastorno mental. OBJETIVO Precisar la asociación de las alteraciones en la latencia, la amplitud y la distribución topográfica de los potenciales N200 y P300 de pacientes con esquizofrenia paranoide y sus familiares sanos de primer grado, pertenecientes a familias con esquizofrenia multiplex. MÉTODOS Se utilizó un paradigma “odd-ball” auditivo para evaluar la latencia, la amplitud y la distribución topográfica de los componentes N200 y P300 en 25 pacientes con esquizofrenia paranoide (probandos, 23 familiares sanos de primer grado y 25 sujetos controles, mediante un estudio de asociación familiar en 60 familias afectadas con esquizofrenia multiplex. RESULTADOS Los probandos y sus familiares mostraron una prolongación significativa de la latencia y una disminución de amplitud de las ondas N200 y P300 cuando se compararon con los sujetos sanos. De igual forma, la amplitud de los potenciales N200 y P300 resultó significativamente disminuida en regiones temporales del hemisferio izquierdo de los probandos y sus familiares con respecto al grupo control. CONCLUSIONES En concordancia con resultados de otros investigadores, este estudio sugiere que, la prolongación de latencia, la disminución de amplitud y las alteraciones en la distribución topográficas detectadas en regiones temporales de los potenciales N200 y P300, pueden constituir por su elevada asociación familiar, marcadores de rasgo para la esquizofrenia paranoide.

  18. Quality of Life in Patients With Chronic Schizophrenia in Semnan, Iran

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    Jamali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Schizophrenia is one of the most common psychiatric disorders and one of the ten leading causes of mental disability. Level of education, family factors and individual culture affect the patients’ quality of life. Objectives Due to the greater prevalence of this disease and the impact of its symptoms on the one’s quality of life, this study was conducted on the people with chronic schizophrenia to determine in which aspects of their quality of life is more likely affected in Semnan, Iran. Patients and Methods This descriptive, analytical and cross-sectional study was conducted on 37 patients with non-paranoid schizophrenia. To evaluate their quality of life, the short-form of the questionnaire of world health organization quality of life (WHOQOL-26 was used. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Results The participants in this study gained the highest quality of life in the domain of physical, environmental and psychological health and social relationships. There was no significant relationship between the different aspects of the quality of life in this study. Conclusions It can be concluded that schizophrenia can have an effect on the quality of life. Some items such as family care, early and on time treatment play an important role in increasing the quality of life.

  19. Clozapine for severe ("kraepelinian" schizophrenia: Sustained improvement over 5 years

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    Ricardo de Oliveira-Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Clozapine has become a keystone in the treatment of schizophrenia because of its efficacy as an antipsychotic with negligible neuroleptic effects. The long-term stability of its effects, however, is poorly understood, because most studies have probed the usefulness of clozapine over a period of weeks to several months at the most. Knowing whether clozapine's benefits are sustained over the very long-term, i.e., more than 5 years, may be critical for cost-benefit analyses. Objective: To report the results of an open study on the efficacy of clozapine over the very long-term. Methods: Thirty-three adults (26 men with severe (kraepelinian schizophrenia were assessed at regular intervals using a brief neuropsychiatric battery over a 5-year period. Results: A significant improvement was observed between the pre-clozapine and the first "on-clozapine" evaluation. This improvement was paralleled by a remarkable conversion of schizophrenia from "active" (mostly paranoid into "residual" in 70% of all patients. Eight patients became functionally productive to the point of being capable of living an independent life. Roughly one-third of our cases showed no improvement. Conclusions: Clozapine is a safe and effective drug for patients with severe schizophrenia who have failed to improve on other antipsychotic drugs. Clozapine's maximal benefit is established by the end of the first year of treatment and continues unabated for many years thereafter. Clozapine-resistant patients remain a major challenge calling for the discovery of new treatments for schizophrenia.

  20. Longitudinal relations between symptoms, neurocognition, and self-concept in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Klaus; Kriston, Levente; Wittorf, Andreas; Herrlich, Jutta; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Klingberg, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive models suggest that the self-concept of persons with psychosis can be fundamentally affected. Self-concepts were found to be related to different symptom domains when measured concurrently. Longitudinal investigations to disentangle the possible causal associations are rare. We examined a sample of 160 people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who took part in a psychotherapy study. All participants had the DSM-IV diagnosis of a schizophrenia and pronounced negative symptoms. Neurocognition, symptoms, and self-concepts were assessed at two time points 12 months apart. Structural equation modeling was used to test whether symptoms influence self-concepts (scar-model) or self-concepts affect symptoms (vulnerability model). Negative symptoms correlated concurrently with self-concepts. Neurocognitive deficits are associated with more negative self-concepts 12 months later. Interpersonal self-concepts were found to be relevant for paranoia. The findings implicate that if deficits in neurocognition are present, fostering a positive self-concept should be an issue in therapy. Negative interpersonal self-concept indicates an increased risk for paranoid delusions in the course of 1 year. New aspects for cognitive models in schizophrenia and clinical implications are discussed.

  1. Longitudinal relations between symptoms, neurocognition and self-concept in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus eHesse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cognitive models suggest that the self-concept of persons with psychosis can be fundamentally affected. Self-concepts were found to be related to different symptom domains when measured concurrently. Longitudinal investigations to disentangle the possible causal associations are rare. Method: We examined a sample of 160 people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia who took part in a psychotherapy study. All participants had the DSM-IV diagnosis of a schizophrenia and pronounced negative symptoms. Neurocognition, symptoms and self-concepts were assessed at two time points twelve months apart. Structural equation modelling was used to test whether symptoms influence self-concepts (scar-model or self-concepts affect symptoms (vulnerability model. Results: Negative symptoms correlated concurrently with self-concepts. Neurocognitive deficits are associated with more negative self-concepts twelve months later. Interpersonal self-concepts were found to be relevant for paranoia. Conclusion: The findings implicate that if deficits in neurocognition are present, fostering a positive self-concept should be an issue in therapy. Negative interpersonal self-concept indicates an increased risk for paranoid delusions in the course of one year. New aspects for cognitive models in schizophrenia and clinical implications are discussed

  2. Characteristics of homicide offenders with Schizophrenia from the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golenkov, Andrei; Large, Matthew; Nielssen, Olav; Tsymbalova, Alla

    2011-12-01

    It has been suggested that the characteristics of homicides committed by people with schizophrenia from regions with a high total homicide rate differ from the characteristics of homicides by people with schizophrenia from regions with low rates of homicide. Homicide offenders in the Chuvash Republic of the Russian Federation have been systematically examined for over 30 years. This study reports on a review of the documents from pre-trial psychiatric assessments and legal proceedings of all people charged with homicide offenses between 1981 and 2010 who were found to have schizophrenia. There were 133 people (120 men, 13 women) with an ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia who committed a homicide offense in the 30 years of the study, including 15 repeat homicide offenders and 9 homicides with multiple victims. The odds ratio (OR) for homicide associated with schizophrenia was 13.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) (11.4-16.0). The mean age of the offenders was 34.8 (SD 9.6) and most had the paranoid subtype of schizophrenia (78%). The majority of victims were family members (51%) or acquaintances (43%). Delusions of persecution, auditory hallucinations and other positive symptoms were present in 58% of offenders at the time of the homicide. The remaining 42% exhibited negative symptoms such as emotional deficits, had antisocial attitudes or were regarded as having impaired self-control. Alcohol intoxication was reported at the time of 45% of homicides. Stabbing was the most common method and few of the homicides involved firearms. The characteristics of homicide offenders with schizophrenia from Chuvashia do not appear to differ greatly from those of homicide offenders with schizophrenia from regions with far lower rates of homicide. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The (CTGn polymorphism in the NOTCH4 gene is not associated with schizophrenia in Japanese individuals

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    Okubo Takehito

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human NOTCH4 gene is a candidate gene for schizophrenia due to its chromosomal location and neurobiological roles. In a British linkage study, NOTCH4 gene polymorphisms were highly associated with schizophrenia. In a Japanese case-control association study, however, these polymorphisms did not show significant associations with schizophrenia. We conducted a case-control study with Japanese subjects to explore an association between the triplet repeat polymorphism in the NOTCH4 gene and schizophrenia, including subtypes of schizophrenia, longitudinal disease course characteristics, and a positive family history for psychoses. Methods We examined the (CTGn repeat polymorphism in the NOTCH4 gene among 100 healthy Japanese individuals and 102 patients with schizophrenia (22 paranoid, 38 disorganized, 29 residual, 64 episodic, 31 continuous, 42 with prominent negative symptoms, and 46 with positive family histories using a polymerase chain reaction-based, single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis. Results Five different alleles consisting of 6, 9, 10, 11, and 13 repeats of CTG (Leu in patients with schizophrenia, and 4 alleles consisting of 6, 9, 10, and 11 repeats in controls were found. No significant differences in genotype or allele frequencies of repeat numbers were found between controls and patients. In addition, there were no associations between the polymorphism and schizophrenia subtypes, longitudinal disease course characteristics, or positive family history of the patients. Conclusions Our data suggest a lack of association between the NOTCH4 gene triplet repeat polymorphism and schizophrenia in Japanese individuals.

  4. [Fratricide and Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende Leal, Juliana; Martins Valença, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Fratricide is the killing of one's own bother. It's a type of homicide rarely seen on psychiatric practice. This is still a theme which is poorly studied, and not well understood by the scientific literature. To report a case of a men, with paranoid schizophrenia that murdered his own bother and had a psychiatric forensic evaluation to establish his penal responsibility. A psychiatric interview was carried out and the psychiatric diagnosis was established based on the interview and analysis of forensic and medical records, using the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Literature review was held about the theme. The examinee was considered not guilty by reason of insanity, due to the presence of a mental disorder that affected her entire understanding and volition of the practiced act. The study of such cases may illustrate and identify motivating factors related to homicidal behavior in individuals with severe mental disorders. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Anatomía de una confusión: error diagnóstico de patología paranoide en víctimas de mobbing Anatomia de uma confusão: erro diagnóstico de patologia paranoide em vítimas de mobbing Anatomy of a misunderstanding: wrong diagnosis of paranoid pathology in victims of mobbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Martínez-Hernáez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Diversas investigaciones subrayan el alto riesgo de error diagnóstico de trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad entre víctimas de mobbing o acoso psicológico en el trabajo (APT. OBJETIVO: Analizar hasta qué punto los síntomas asociados con el mobbing son confundidos con criterios de dos nosologías del espectro paranoide (trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad. MÉTODOS: Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica desde 1990 hasta Junio de 2009 en PubMed y SciELO. RESULTADOS: La identificación de síntomas del espectro paranoide en las víctimas de mobbing no resulta consistente con la literatura que, en cambio, indica una fuerte presencia de síntomas del espectro del estrés postraumático (hasta el 92%, aunque no se cumpla el criterio A1 de esta nosología. Se apuntan algunas causas del error diagnóstico, tales como la tendencia a confundir hipervigilancia (criterio D4 del trastorno por estrés postraumático en el DSM-IV-TR con ideación paranoide, la existencia de un perfil defensivo en las víctimas de APT y la falta de reconocimiento por parte de los clínicos del impacto estresante y traumatizante del mobbing. CONCLUSIÓN: Se requieren investigaciones longitudinales y mixtas (cualitativos/cuantitativos para establecer criterios robustos de diagnóstico diferencial entre las manifestaciones clínicas asociadas al mobbing y los síntomas paranoides.CONTEXTO: Diversos estudos evidenciam o alto risco de erro diagnóstico de transtorno delirante e transtorno da personalidade paranoide entre as vítimas de mobbing ou assédio psicológico no trabalho (APT. OBJETIVO: Analisar a associação dos sintomas atribuídos ao mobbing com os critérios de duas nosologias do grupo paranoide (transtorno delirante e transtorno da personalidade paranoide. MÉTODOS: Realiza-se uma revisão bibliográfica de 1990 a junho de 2009 em PubMed e SciELO. RESULTADOS: A identificação de sintomas paranoides em

  6. Theory of mind network activity is altered in subjects with familial liability for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnke, Sebastian; Erk, Susanne; Schnell, Knut; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Schmierer, Phöbe; Romund, Lydia; Garbusow, Maria; Wackerhagen, Carolin; Ripke, Stephan; Grimm, Oliver; Haller, Leila; Witt, Stephanie H.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Tost, Heike; Heinz, Andreas; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Walter, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    As evidenced by a multitude of studies, abnormalities in Theory of Mind (ToM) and its neural processing might constitute an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. If so, neural alterations during ToM should be observable in unaffected relatives of patients as well, since they share a considerable amount of genetic risk. While behaviorally, impaired ToM function is confirmed meta-analytically in relatives, evidence on aberrant function of the neural ToM network is sparse and inconclusive. The present study therefore aimed to further explore the neural correlates of ToM in relatives of schizophrenia. About 297 controls and 63 unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia performed a ToM task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Consistent with the literature relatives exhibited decreased activity of the medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, increased recruitment of the right middle temporal gyrus and posterior cingulate cortex was found, which was related to subclinical paranoid symptoms in relatives. These results further support decreased medial prefrontal activation during ToM as an intermediate phenotype of genetic risk for schizophrenia. Enhanced recruitment of posterior ToM areas in relatives might indicate inefficiency mechanisms in the presence of genetic risk. PMID:26341902

  7. Paranoid beliefs and realistic expectations of victimization: Data from the survey of police-public encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Hyun-Jin; Nam, Boyoung; Fedina, Lisa; Smith, Melissa Edmondson; Schiffman, Jason; Link, Bruce; DeVylder, Jordan E

    2018-03-08

    The anticipation of threat or victimization is a core feature of paranoia. Cognitive theories of paranoia suggest that paranoid thoughts may arise as a psychological response to trauma exposure, which likewise may lead to greater anticipation of subsequent victimization. Little is known, however, about the relation between paranoid beliefs and anticipated victimization when accounting for past victimization experience. The present study aimed to address whether the experiences of past victimization contribute to the link between paranoid beliefs and the anticipation of threat or victimization, with a particular focus on exposure to police violence. Data were collected through the Survey of Police-Public Encounters (N=1615), a cross-sectional, general population survey study conducted in four Eastern U.S. cities. Associations between paranoia and anticipated victimization were assessed using linear regression models, with and without adjustment for past victimization exposure. Paranoid beliefs were positively associated with police victimization expectations (β=0.19, ptheories of paranoia in which paranoid beliefs may be a severe but normative reaction to past victimization exposures in some cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Paranoid Adipsia-induced Severe Hypernatremia and Uremia treated with Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hee Seung; Kim, Sun Moon; Kim, Hye-young; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2013-01-01

    We describe a patient with severe hypernatremia and uremia caused by paranoid adipsia who was treated successfully with hydration and hemodialysis. A previously healthy 40-year-old woman developed the paranoid idea that her water was poisoned, so she refused to drink any water. On admission, her blood urea nitrogen was 208mg/dL, creatinine 4.90mg/dL, serum osmolality 452mOsm/L, serum sodium 172mEq/L, urine specific gravity ?1.030, urine osmolality 698mOsm/L, and urine sodium/potassium/chlorid...

  9. Clinical characteristics and premorbid variables in childhood-onset schizophrenia: a descriptive study of twelve cases from a schizophrenia founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydell, R J; van der Walt, C; Roos, J L; Scribante, L; Ladikos, A

    2009-05-01

    To analyze clinical and demographic data of childhood-onset (12 years and younger) schizophrenia patients collected for a genetic study in schizophrenia, undertaken nationally in South Africa, using multiple parameters. Patients with an onset of schizophrenia at 12 years or younger, were included. From the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), patients' information and summary report data was tabulated and analyzed. Specific subgroups were further compared. This sub-population of 12 subjects was further compared with a group of the adult sample. Of the 12 patients recruited, prominent results were: male to female ratio of 1:1; all had insidious onset of psychosis; a third had all 3 multidimensional impairment (MDI) symptoms; all patients that received ADHD treatment had ADHD treatment failure; two thirds had milestone delay; 58% had birth complications; a third were predominantly bottle fed; 42% had family history of schizophrenia; a third had family history of other major psychiatric conditions; all patients had at least one non-psychotic deviant behaviour (NPDB); no patient used cannabis; all delusions were paranoid; 92% had school achievement difficulty and a third had treatment resistance. Gender comparison included: earlier onset of psychosis in females; all females had aggression versus a third of males; more females had school achievement difficulty than males; males had more treatment resistance. Patients with MDI, compared to the sample average had: earlier onset of non-psychotic deviant behaviour; lower school drop-out rate; less social difficulty and no treatment resistance. The results compare well to previous research on this topic. The new concepts introduced by the present study require further investigation.

  10. SOCIODEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF SCHIZOPHRENIA WITH AND WITHOUT OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE SYMPTOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adavalath Druhin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Schizophrenia is a complex neurobehavioural disorder affecting about 1% of the general population. Schizophrenia is characterised by disordered cognition including a “gain of function” in psychotic symptoms and “loss of function” in specific cognitive functions such as working and declarative memory, but without the progressive dementia that characterises classical neurodegenerative disorder. The primary aim of the study was to compare the profile of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia with and without obsessive compulsive symptoms. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study. Consecutive patients in the age group of 18-59 years diagnosed to have schizophrenia with at least 2 years of duration of illness consulting in outpatient department of psychiatry and inpatients admitted in psychiatry ward at a tertiary care centre at northern Kerala were included. Clinical status of the patient was assessed using Structured Clinical Interview for DSM - IV - TR (SCID I, the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS and Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS severity and symptom checklist. YBOCS ≥16 was labelled as OCD. Sociodemographic profile of the patients will be collected using specially designed pro forma. Data analysis was done using software “R” (Chi-square and t test. RESULTS A total of 73 participants formed the study sample. The schizophrenia with OCS were better educated were more likely to come from a semi-urban background had alcohol dependence and longer duration of untreated illness than the group with schizophrenia alone. Though, there was increased frequency of paranoid subtype in the study sample, schizophrenia patients with OCD/OCS had majority of undifferentiated subtype. There is no difference in gender, family type, marital status, occupation, religion or socioeconomic status. CONCLUSION Schizophrenia patients with OCS/OCD and without OCS/OCD have comparable clinical profile with few

  11. Anatomía de una confusión: error diagnóstico de patología paranoide en víctimas de mobbing Anatomia de uma confusão: erro diagnóstico de patologia paranoide em vítimas de mobbing Anatomy of a misunderstanding: wrong diagnosis of paranoid pathology in victims of mobbing

    OpenAIRE

    Ángel Martínez-Hernáez; Leticia Medeiros-Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXTO: Diversas investigaciones subrayan el alto riesgo de error diagnóstico de trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad entre víctimas de mobbing o acoso psicológico en el trabajo (APT). OBJETIVO: Analizar hasta qué punto los síntomas asociados con el mobbing son confundidos con criterios de dos nosologías del espectro paranoide (trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad). MÉTODOS: Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica desde 1990 hasta Junio de 2009 ...

  12. Comment on Differentiating Paranoid From Nonparanoid Schizophrenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, James F.

    1971-01-01

    Three methods of differentiating paranoid from nonparanoid schizophrenics were compared using 97 males from a Veterans Administration hospital. Official hospital diagnosis and behavior ratings were found to be significantly correlated, while self-report correlated with neither of the other two techniques. Implications for research are briefly…

  13. The appreciation of visual jokes in people with schizophrenia: a study of 'mentalizing' ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, R; Cahill, C; Frith, C D

    1997-04-11

    It has been suggested that certain characteristic symptoms of schizophrenia reflect a specific deficit in the ability to attribute mental states to others ('mentalizing'). Patients with negative features, particularly social withdrawal and blunted affect, those with thought disorder and patients with paranoid symptoms have difficulties when they try to infer what is going on in the minds of other people. This study examines this notion using two sets of cartoon jokes. While the first set can be understood purely using physical and semantic analysis, the second set requires that the viewer appreciates the mental state of the main character in order to 'get' the joke. For control subjects there was no difference in the ability to understand the two types of joke, while the schizophrenic patients found the mental state jokes significantly more difficult to understand. This effect was most marked in patients with behavioural disorders and those reporting passivity experiences. Those with paranoid delusions also showed a selective comprehension deficit with the mental state stimuli. Patients who were symptom free at the time of testing showed normal performance.

  14. Effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Hazari, Nandita; Avasthi, Ajit

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) among patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia (TRS). Records of patients who had received ECT were reviewed to identify patients with TRS who were administered ECT in combination with clozapine. Socio-demographic, clinical data and ECT details were extracted. The most common diagnosis was of paranoid schizophrenia (49%) followed by undifferentiated schizophrenia (36%). A-fifth (22%) of the patients were judged to have poor response to clozapine. The mean number of ECTs given were 13.97 (SD-7.67) and mean clozapine dose was 287.5mgs/day (SD-100.1). About two-thirds (63%) of the patients showed >30% reduction in scores on different symptom-rating scales with combined use of clozapine and ECT. Among clozapine non-responders, approximately 69% responded to the combination. Post-ECT rise in blood pressure was the most common side effect (16.9%) followed by prolonged seizures (7%). Long-term follow-up data was available for 47 out of the 59 patients. More than two-third (N=34; 72%) followed-up for an average of 30 months (SD 32.3; range: 1-120), maintained well with continued clozapine treatment. To conclude, results of this study further endorse the effectiveness, safety and long-term benefits of the clozapine-ECT combination in TRS and clozapine-refractory schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonverbal Synchrony in Social Interactions of Patients with Schizophrenia Indicates Socio-Communicative Deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeno Kupper

    Full Text Available Disordered interpersonal communication can be a serious problem in schizophrenia. Recent advances in computer-based measures allow reliable and objective quantification of nonverbal behavior. Research using these novel measures has shown that objective amounts of body and head movement in patients with schizophrenia during social interactions are closely related to the symptom profiles of these patients. In addition to and above mere amounts of movement, the degree of synchrony, or imitation, between patients and normal interactants may be indicative of core deficits underlying various problems in domains related to interpersonal communication, such as symptoms, social competence, and social functioning.Nonverbal synchrony was assessed objectively using Motion Energy Analysis (MEA in 378 brief, videotaped role-play scenes involving 27 stabilized outpatients diagnosed with paranoid-type schizophrenia.Low nonverbal synchrony was indicative of symptoms, low social competence, impaired social functioning, and low self-evaluation of competence. These relationships remained largely significant when correcting for the amounts of patients' movement. When patients showed reduced imitation of their interactants' movements, negative symptoms were likely to be prominent. Conversely, positive symptoms were more prominent in patients when their interaction partners' imitation of their movements was reduced.Nonverbal synchrony can be an objective and sensitive indicator of the severity of patients' problems. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nonverbal synchrony may provide novel insights into specific relationships between symptoms, cognition, and core communicative problems in schizophrenia.

  16. Aggressive behaviour towards a care-giver: a case report of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paranoid schizophrenic patients may show dysfunctional impulsive aggression which may be caused by several factors such as environmental frustration. ... Conclusions: Elevated risk forviolent-offending in paranoid schizophrenia is not just ...

  17. Self psychology as a shift away from the paranoid strain in classical analytic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terman, David M

    2014-12-01

    Classical psychoanalytic theory has a paranoid strain. There is, in effect, an "evil other"--the id--within each individual that must be tamed in development and confronted and worked through as resistance in treatment. This last has historically endgendered an adversarial relationship between patient and analyst. This paranoid strain came from a paranoid element in Freud's personality that affected his worldview, his relationships, and his theory. Self psychology offers a different view of development and conflict. It stresses the child's need for responsiveness from and admiration of caretakers in order to develop a well-functioning self. Though severe behavioral and character problems may result from faults in the process of self-construction, the essential need is not instinctual discharge but connection. Hence the long-assumed opposition between individual needs and social institutions or between patient and analyst is no longer inevitable or universal. Rather, an understanding of the primary need for connection creates both a different interpretive stance and a more cooperative ambience. These changes in theory and technique are traced to Kohut's personal struggles to emancipate himself from his paranoid mother. © 2014 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  18. Ustabil rygfraktur hos en patient med paranoid skizofreni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydemann, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The misdiagnosis of somatic illness in the psychiatric population can have grave consequences. Somatic symptoms are easily overseen or misinterpreted and a careful history and examination is essential when approaching this group of patients. We report a case of a patient with a history of paranoid...

  19. Stability in MMPI among adoptees with high and low genetic risk for schizophrenia and with low Communication Deviance of their adoptive parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siira, Virva; Wahlberg, Karl-Erik; Hakko, Helinä; Tienari, Pekka

    2013-11-30

    Stability has been considered an important aspect of vulnerability to schizophrenia. The temporal stability of the scales in the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) was examined, using adoptees from the Finnish Adoptive Family Study of Schizophrenia. Adoptees who were high-risk (HR) offspring of biological mothers having a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n=28) and low-risk (LR) controls (n=46) were evaluated using 15 MMPI scales at the initial assessment (HR, mean age 24 years; LR, mean age 23 years) and at the follow-up assessment after a mean interval of 11 years. Stability of the MMPI scales was also assessed in the groups of adoptees, assigned according to the adoptive parents'(n=44) communication style using Communication Deviance (CD) scale as an environmental factor. Initial Lie, Frequency, Correction, Psychopathic Deviate, Schizophrenia, Manifest Hostility, Hypomania, Phobias, Psychoticism, Religious Fundamentalism, Social Maladjustment, Paranoid Schizophrenia, Golden-Meehl Indicators, Schizophrenia Proneness and 8-6 scale scores significantly predicted the MMPI scores at the follow-up assessment indicating stability in the characteristics of thinking, affective expression, social relatedness and volition. Low CD in the family had an effect on the stabilization of personality traits such as social withdrawal and restricted affectivity assessed by Correction and Hostility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thematic Reasoning and Theory of Mind. Accounting for Social Inference Difficulties in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon Corcoran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Corcoran (2000, 2001 has suggested that theory of mind judgements can be arrived at using analogical reasoning skills and she has proposed that this is the route that people with schizophrenia take when they make inferences about others' mental states. Recent work has demonstrated a robust relationship between mental state inference and autobiographical memory, providing initial support for the model. This study examines the model further by exploring the assertion that in schizophrenia the ability to infer the mental states of others also depends upon effective social reasoning in conditional contexts. Method 59 people with a DSM IV diagnosis of schizophrenia and 44 healthy subjects performed four versions of the thematic selection task. The versions varied according to the familiarity and social nature of the material they incorporated. The same subjects also completed the Hinting Task, a measure of theory of mind and tests of intellectual functioning and narrative recall. Results The schizophrenia and the normal control groups differed in their performance on all of the measures except that of intellectual functioning. Explorations within the schizophrenia group indicated that social reasoning was most markedly affected in the patients with negative signs and in those with paranoid delusions while for the hinting task, those with negative signs performed significantly worse than those in remission but this difference seemed to be due to these patients' poorer narrative memory. There was evidence in the schizophrenia data to support the hypothesis of a relationship between theory of mind and social conditional reasoning. Conclusion This work provided further support for the idea that in patients with schizophrenia at least, judgements about the mental states of others are achieved using analogical reasoning.

  1. Effect of perceived intimacy on social decision-making in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunyoung; Shin, Jung Eun; Han, Kiwan; Shin, Yu-Bin; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Social dysfunctions including emotional perception and social decision-making are common in patients with schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to determine the level of intimacy formation and the effect of intimacy on social decision in patients with schizophrenia using virtual reality tasks, which simulate complicated social situations. Twenty-seven patients with schizophrenia and 30 healthy controls performed the 2 virtual social tasks: the intimacy task and the social decision task. The first one was to estimate repeatedly how intimate participants felt with each avatar after listening to what avatars said. The second one was to decide whether or not participants accepted the requests of easy, medium, or hard difficulty by the intimate or distant avatars. During the intimacy task, the intimacy rating scores for intimate avatars were not significantly different between groups, but those for distant avatars were significantly higher in patients than in controls. During the social decision task, the difference in the acceptance rate between intimate and distant avatars was significantly smaller in patients than in controls. In detail, a significant group difference in the acceptance rate was found only for the hard requests, but not for the easy and medium difficulty requests. These results suggest that patients with schizophrenia have a deficit in emotional perception and social decision-making. Various factors such as a peculiarity of emotional deficits, motivational deficits, concreteness, and paranoid tendency may contribute to these abnormalities.

  2. The role of electro-encephalography in Third-World psychiatry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    have no excuse for not diagnosing these patients as schizophrenic.' TABLE I. PSYCHIATRIC PRESENTATIONS OF ORGANIC. BRAIN DISEASE. Anxiety catatonic schizophrenia. Depression. Hebephrenic schizophrenia. Hysteria. Mania. Manic-depressive psychosis. Obsessive/compulsive disorder. Paranoid schizophrenia.

  3. Functional Impairment In People with Schizophrenia: Focus on Employability and Eligibility for Disability Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Philip D.; Heaton, Robert K.; Carpenter, William T.; Green, Michael F.; Gold, James M.; Schoenbaum, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background The Social Security Administration (SSA) is considering whether schizophrenia may warrant inclusion in their new “Compassionate Allowance” process, which aims to identify diseases and other medical conditions that invariably quality for Social Security disability benefits and require no more than minimal objective medical information. This paper summarizes evidence on the empirical association between schizophrenia and vocational disability. A companion paper examines the reliability and validity of schizophrenia diagnosis which is critically relevant for granting a long-term disability on the basis of current diagnosis. Methods This is a selective literature review and synthesis, based on a work plan developed in a meeting of experts convened by the National Institute of Mental Health and the SSA. This review of the prevalence of disability is focused on the criteria for receipt of disability compensation for psychotic disorders currently employed by the SSA. Results Disability in multiple functional domains is detected in nearly every person with schizophrenia. Clinical remission is much more common than functional recovery, but most patients experience occasional relapses even with treatment adherence, and remissions do not predict functional recovery. Under SSA’s current disability determination process, approximately 80% of SSDI/SSI applications in SSA’s diagnostic category of “Schizophrenia/Paranoid Functional Disorders” are allowed, compared to around half of SSDI/SSI applications overall. Moreover, the allowance rate is even higher among applicants with schizophrenia. Many unsuccessful applicants are not denied, but rather simply are unable to manage the process of appeal after initial denials. Discussion Research evidence suggests that disability applicants with a valid diagnosis of schizophrenia have significant impairment across multiple dimensions of functioning, and will typically remain impaired for the duration of normal

  4. Prediction of Somatization on the Basis of Self-steem, Insomnia and Paranoid Thoughts in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Ghadiri Sourman Abadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Somatization is a somatoform disorder, which medical examinations are not able to explain its reason. In the present research, the role of self-esteem, insomnia, and paranoid thoughts was investigated in somatization disorder. Methods: This descriptive and correlational study was conducted on all students studying at University of Tabriz in the academic year 2014-2015. A total of 270 subjects were selected using stratified random sampling method. In this research, Eysenck Self-Esteem Inventory, Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, Somatization Questionnaire (PHQ-15, and Green et al. Paranoid Thought Scales (GPTS were used. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis tests. Results: Correlation results indicated that somatization disorder has a significant positive relationship with paranoid thoughts and insomnia and a significant negative relationship with self-esteem. Also, based on the results of multiple regression analysis, Insomnia Index had the greatest ability to predict somatization disorder. Conclusion: The findings of this research revealed that factors, such as insomnia, paranoid thoughts, and low self-esteem should be considered in the treatment of somatization disorder.

  5. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in depressed patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are neurotrophins-proteins that induce the survival, development, and function of neurons. Their role in the development of schizophrenia and mood disorders is widely studied. This study was aimed to determine whether depression affects levels of BDNF and NT-3 in patients with schizophrenia. Data for 53 Caucasian adult hospitalized patients with chronic paranoid schizophrenia was compared with 27 healthy subjects. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and positive, negative and general sub-scores, the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and the Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI). Patients were defined as depressed (SHZ-DEP) with scores CDSS > 6 and HDRS > 7, otherwise they were included into the non-depressed group (SHZ-nonDEP). In total, 17 patients (32.1%) with schizophrenia met criteria for depression. SHZ-DEP patients had higher scores in HDRS, CDSS, PANSS total, PANSS negative, PANSS general and CGI (p BDNF or NT-3 levels between patients with schizophrenia and controls. BDNF levels were lower in SHZ-DEP compared to SHZ-nonDEP: 18.82 ± 5.95 versus 22.10 ± 5.31 ng/mL, p = 0.045. NT-3 levels were higher in SHZ-DEP compared to SHZ-nonDEP: 133.31 ± 222.19 versus 56.04 ± 201.28 pg/mL, p = 0.033. There were no differences in neurotrophin levels between patients with schizophrenia and controls. We found lower BDNF and higher NT-3 serum levels in depressed patients with schizophrenia.

  6. [Decision-making and schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adida, M; Maurel, M; Kaladjian, A; Fakra, E; Lazerges, P; Da Fonseca, D; Belzeaux, R; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2011-12-01

    Abnormalities involving the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have long been postulated to underpin the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Investigations of PFC integrity have focused mainly on the dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC) and abnormalities in this region have been extensively documented. However, defects in schizophrenia may extend to other prefrontal regions, including the ventromedial PFC (VMPFC), and evidence of VMPFC abnormalities comes from neuropathological, structural and functional studies. Patients with acquired brain injury to the VMPFC display profound disruption of social behaviour and poor judgment in their personal lives. The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) was developed to assess decision-making in these neurological cases : it presents a series of 100 choices from four card decks that differ in the distribution of rewarding and punishing outcomes. Whilst healthy volunteers gradually develop a preference for the two "safe" decks over the course of the task, patients with VMPFC lesions maintain a preference for the two "risky" decks which are associated with high reinforcement in the short term, but significant long-term debt. Interestingly, damage to VMPFC may cause both poor performance on the IGT and lack of insight concerning the acquired personality modification. Recently, our group reported a trait-related decisionmaking impairment in the three phases of bipolar disorder. In a PET study, VMPFC dysfunction was shown in bipolar manic patients impaired on a decision-making task and an association between decision-making cognition and lack of insight was described in mania. A quantitative association between grey matter volume of VMPFC and memory impairment was previously reported in schizophrenia. Research suggests that lack of insight is a prevalent feature in schizophrenia patients, like auditory hallucinations, paranoid or bizarre delusions, and disorganized speech and thinking. Because schizophrenia is associated with significant social or occupational

  7. Guidelines for Individual and Group Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for the Treatment of Persons Diagnosed with Psychosis and/or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Slađana Štrkalj; Petrović, Branka Restek; Urlić, Ivan; Grah, Majda; Mayer, Nina; Stijačić, Dubravka; Jendričko, Tihana; Martić-Biočina, Sanja

    2017-09-01

    The hereby presented guidelines for the use of psychodynamic psychotherapy are based on references and research in the field of individual and group therapy and they refer to psychotherapy for patients suffering from the first psychotic episode, schizophrenia, schizoaffective psychosis, bipolar disorder and paranoid psychosis. The aim was to provide an overview of present literature and to give recommendations based on current knowledge. Clinical experience and research of the outcomes of psychodynamic psychotherapy encourage positioning of such treatments among recommendations for treating various mental disorders, as well as in the field of psychotherapy of patients with psychotic disorders (PD).

  8. Calorimetric monitoring of the serum proteome in schizophrenia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumova, Sashka [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Rukova, Blaga [Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University of Sofia, 2 Zdrave Str., Sofia 1431 (Bulgaria); Todinova, Svetla [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Gartcheva, Lidia [National Specialized Hospital for Active Treating of Haematological Diseases, 6 Plovdivsko pole Str., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Milanova, Vihra [Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Sofia, 1 Sv. Georgi Sofiiski Str., Sofia 1431 (Bulgaria); Toncheva, Draga [Department of Medical Genetics, Medical University of Sofia, 2 Zdrave Str., Sofia 1431 (Bulgaria); Taneva, Stefka G., E-mail: stefka.germanova@ehu.es [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2013-11-20

    Highlights: • DSC reveals modified thermal behavior of blood serum from schizophrenic patients. • The high-abundance portion of the serum proteome is thermally stabilized in Sz. • The Sz plasma thermograms are classified in four distinct calorimetric groups. • The effectiveness of drug treatment correlates with the plasma thermodynamic behavior. - Abstract: Schizophrenia (Sz) is a multifactorial mental disorder with high frequency. Due to its chronic and relapsing nature there is a strong need for biomarkers for early psychosis detection and objective evaluation of drug (usually antipsychotics) treatment effect. Here differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is applied to thermodynamically characterize the blood serum proteome of paranoid schizophrenia patients on routine antipsychotic treatment in comparison to healthy controls. DSC revealed significant modifications in the thermodynamic behavior of blood sera from Sz patients, the overall thermal profile being changed in all Sz cases under study. The calorimetric profiles were classified in four distinct groups, reflecting different thermal stabilization of the high-abundance portion of the serum proteome. The observed positive (thermograms becoming closer to the healthy profile) or negative (thermograms deviating stronger from the healthy profile) proteome thermal stability switches and the Sz thermograms persistence in patients’ follow-up corresponded well with the effect of drug treatment.

  9. Calorimetric monitoring of the serum proteome in schizophrenia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumova, Sashka; Rukova, Blaga; Todinova, Svetla; Gartcheva, Lidia; Milanova, Vihra; Toncheva, Draga; Taneva, Stefka G.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • DSC reveals modified thermal behavior of blood serum from schizophrenic patients. • The high-abundance portion of the serum proteome is thermally stabilized in Sz. • The Sz plasma thermograms are classified in four distinct calorimetric groups. • The effectiveness of drug treatment correlates with the plasma thermodynamic behavior. - Abstract: Schizophrenia (Sz) is a multifactorial mental disorder with high frequency. Due to its chronic and relapsing nature there is a strong need for biomarkers for early psychosis detection and objective evaluation of drug (usually antipsychotics) treatment effect. Here differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is applied to thermodynamically characterize the blood serum proteome of paranoid schizophrenia patients on routine antipsychotic treatment in comparison to healthy controls. DSC revealed significant modifications in the thermodynamic behavior of blood sera from Sz patients, the overall thermal profile being changed in all Sz cases under study. The calorimetric profiles were classified in four distinct groups, reflecting different thermal stabilization of the high-abundance portion of the serum proteome. The observed positive (thermograms becoming closer to the healthy profile) or negative (thermograms deviating stronger from the healthy profile) proteome thermal stability switches and the Sz thermograms persistence in patients’ follow-up corresponded well with the effect of drug treatment

  10. Self-reported Cognitive Biases Moderate the Associations Between Social Stress and Paranoid Ideation in a Virtual Reality Experimental Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos; Veling, Wim; Counotte, Jacqueline; van der Gaag, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cognitive biases are associated with psychosis liability and paranoid ideation. This study investigated the moderating relationship between pre-existing self-reported cognitive biases and the occurrence of paranoid ideation in response to different levels of social stress in a virtual

  11. Social cognition and work performance of persons with schizophrenia in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Panmi; Siu, Andrew M H

    2015-01-01

    Social-cognitive deficits have a significant impact on the community and vocational functioning of persons with schizophrenia. This study aimed to explore the relationship between social-cognitive abilities and vocational functioning in a Chinese population. We recruited 30 outpatients with schizophrenia to participate. We administered the Chinese Social Cognition and Screening Questionnaire (C-SCSQ) to assess Theory of Mind (ToM), attributional bias, and neurocognition; the Facial Expression Identification Test (FEIT) to assess emotion perception (EP) ability, and the Chinese Work Personality Profile (CWPP) to assess work performance in a simulated work setting. ToM showed a significant negative correlation with attributional bias. The neurocognitive measure displayed a significant positive correlation with ToM and EP. The structural equation model was a good fit to the data (CFI=0.91, RMSEA=0.12), and showed that social-cognitive abilities had a significant impact (-0.41) on work performance. Of the four social-cognitive domains, ToM and paranoid attributional style (PAS) contributed significantly to variations in work performance. These results support the theory that social-cognitive abilities have an impact on work performance. ToM has a positive impact whereas PAS has an adverse effect. Persons with schizophrenia present specific deficits in their social-cognitive abilities, which have significant impact on their work performance and employability.

  12. The Role of Insight in Moderating the Association Between Depressive Symptoms in People With Schizophrenia and Stigma Among Their Nearest Relatives: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupchanka, Dzmitry; Katliar, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence of a positive association between insight and depression among patients with schizophrenia. Self-stigma was shown to play a mediating role in this association. We attempted to broaden this concept by investigating insight as a potential moderator of the association between depressive symptoms amongst people with schizophrenia and stigmatizing views towards people with mental disorders in their close social environment. Method: In the initial sample of 120 pairs, data were gathered from 96 patients with a diagnosis of “paranoid schizophrenia” and 96 of their nearest relatives (80% response rate). In this cross-sectional study data were collected by clinical interview using the following questionnaires: “The Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder,” “Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia,” and “Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale.” The stigmatizing views of patients’ nearest relatives towards people with mental disorders were assessed with the “Mental Health in Public Conscience” scale. Results: Among patients with schizophrenia depressive symptom severity was positively associated with the intensity of nearest relatives’ stigmatizing beliefs (“Nonbiological vision of mental illness,” τ = 0.24; P insight. Directions for further research and practical implications are discussed. PMID:26970100

  13. Evidence from paranoid schizophrania for more than one component of theory of mind

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    Peter eScherzer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported finding that performance was impaired on four out of five theory of mind (ToM tests in a group of 21 individuals diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia (pScz, relative to a non-clinical group of 29 individuals (Scherzer, Léveillé, Achim, Scherzer, Boisseau, & Stip, 2012. Only the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET did not distinguish between groups. A principal components analysis revealed that the results on the ToM battery could be explained by one general ToM factor with the possibility of a latent second factor. As well, the tests were not equally sensitive to the pathology. There was also overmentalization in some ToM tests and under-mentalisation in others. These results led us to postulate that there is more than one component to ToM. We hypothesized that correlations between the different EF measures and ToM tests would differ sufficiently within and between groups to support this hypothesis. We considered the relationship between the performance on eight EF tests and five ToM tests in the same diagnosed and non-clinical individuals as in the first study. The ToM test shared few EF correlates and each had its own best EF predictor.. These findings support the hypothesis of multiple ToM components

  14. Oscillatory cortical network involved in auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia.

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    Remko van Lutterveld

    Full Text Available Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH, a prominent symptom of schizophrenia, are often highly distressing for patients. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of hallucinations could increase therapeutic options. Magnetoencephalography (MEG provides direct measures of neuronal activity and has an excellent temporal resolution, offering a unique opportunity to study AVH pathophysiology.Twelve patients (10 paranoid schizophrenia, 2 psychosis not otherwise specified indicated the presence of AVH by button-press while lying in a MEG scanner. As a control condition, patients performed a self-paced button-press task. AVH-state and non-AVH state were contrasted in a region-of-interest (ROI approach. In addition, the two seconds before AVH onset were contrasted with the two seconds after AVH onset to elucidate a possible triggering mechanism.AVH correlated with a decrease in beta-band power in the left temporal cortex. A decrease in alpha-band power was observed in the right inferior frontal gyrus. AVH onset was related to a decrease in theta-band power in the right hippocampus.These results suggest that AVH are triggered by a short aberration in the theta band in a memory-related structure, followed by activity in language areas accompanying the experience of AVH itself.

  15. Effect of systemic family therapy on rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia

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    Wei Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of systemic family therapy on the rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: A total of 86 patients with schizophrenia who were admitted in our hospital from February, 2011 to February, 2014 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. A total of 43 healthy individuals for physical examinations were served as the healthy group. The patients in the control group were given risperidone in a single dose, and telephone follow-up. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given systemic family therapy. The morning fasting venous blood before treatment and 3 months after treatment in the healthy group and patients with schizophrenia was collected. BDNF, NGF, GFAP, IL-6, and TNF-α were detected. After 6-month treatment, SCL-90 was used to evaluate the psychological state. Results: The serum BDNF and NGF levels before and after treatment in the observation group and the control group were significantly lower than those in the healthy group, while GFAP level was significantly higher than that in the healthy group (P0.05. The serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after treatment in the observation group and the control group were significantly higher than those in the healthy group (P0.05. After 6-month treatment, the scores of somatization, interpersonal relationship, fear, anxiety, hostility, paranoid, depression, obsession, and mental disorder in the observation group were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment (P0.05. Conclusions: The systemic family therapy is an effective adjuvant method for the rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia, and can effectively improve the mental health status; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  16. Effect of systemic family therapy on rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Na Li; Ying-Ting Li; Shu-Qing Dong; Li-Mei Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of systemic family therapy on the rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia.Methods: A total of 86 patients with schizophrenia who were admitted in our hospital from February, 2011 to February, 2014 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. A total of 43 healthy individuals for physical examinations were served as the healthy group. The patients in the control group were given risperidone in a single dose, and telephone follow-up. On this basis, the patients in the observation group were given systemic family therapy. The morning fasting venous blood before treatment and 3 months after treatment in the healthy group and patients with schizophrenia was collected. BDNF, NGF, GFAP, IL-6, and TNF-α were detected. After 6-month treatment, SCL-90 was used to evaluate the psychological state.Results: The serum BDNF and NGF levels before and after treatment in the observation group and the control group were significantly lower than those in the healthy group, while GFAP level was significantly higher than that in the healthy group (P0.05). The serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels before and after treatment in the observation group and the control group were significantly higher than those in the healthy group (P0.05). After 6-month treatment, the scores of somatization, interpersonal relationship, fear, anxiety, hostility, paranoid, depression, obsession, and mental disorder in the observation group were significantly reduced when compared with before treatment (P0.05).Conclusions:The systemic family therapy is an effective adjuvant method for the rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia, and can effectively improve the mental health status; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended in the clinic.

  17. Virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy versus waiting list control for paranoid ideation and social avoidance in patients with psychotic disorders:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos M.C.A.; Geraets, Chris N.W.; Veling, Wim; van Beilen, Marije; Staring, Anton B.P.; Gijsman, Harm J.; Delespaul, Philippe A.E.G.; van der Gaag, Mark

    Background: Many patients with psychotic disorders have persistent paranoid ideation and avoid social situations because of suspiciousness and anxiety. We investigated the effects of virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy (VR-CBT) on paranoid thoughts and social participation. Methods:

  18. Depersonalisation and schizophrenia: Comparative study of initial and multiple episodes of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Luque, Rogelio; Chauca-Chauca, Geli Marie; Alonso-Lobato, Pablo; Jaen-Moreno, M Jose

    2016-01-01

    The phenomena of depersonalisation/derealisation have classically been associated with the initial phases of psychosis, and it is assumed that they would precede (even by years) the onset of clinical psychosis, being much more common in the prodromal and acute phases of the illness. The aims of the present study are to analyse the differences in depersonalisation/derealisation between patients with initial and multiple episodes and the factors that could influence this. A descriptive, controlled and cross-sectional study of 48 patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia (20 with an initial episode and 28 with multiple episodes). These patients were assessed using scales such as the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale, the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale, and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. Participants with initial episodes score higher on both the Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale, and the subscale of the Dissociative Experiences Scale that evaluates such experiences. There were no associations between these types of experience and the positive symptoms subscale of the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. Depersonalisation/derealisation experiences appear with greater frequency, duration and intensity in patients in the early stages of the illnesses, gradually decreasing as they become chronic. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. A structural equation model of the relationship between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Scott

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence points to relationships between insomnia, negative affect, and paranoid thinking. However, studies are needed to examine (i whether negative affect mediates the relation between insomnia and paranoid thinking, (ii whether different types of insomnia exert different effects on paranoia, and (iii to compare the impact of objective and self-reported sleeping difficulties.Structural equation modelling was therefore used to test competing models of the relationships between self-reported insomnia, negative affect, and paranoia. n = 348 participants completed measures of insomnia, negative affect and paranoia. A subset of these participants (n = 91 went on to monitor their sleep objectively (using a portable sleep monitor made by Zeo for seven consecutive nights. Associations between objectively recorded sleep, negative affect, and paranoia were explored using linear regression.The findings supported a fully mediated model where self-reported delayed sleep onset, but not self-reported problems with sleep maintenance or objective measures of sleep, was directly associated with negative affect that, in turn, was associated with paranoia. There was no evidence of a direct association between delayed sleep onset or sleep maintenance problems and paranoia.Taken together, the findings point to an association between perceived (but not objective difficulties initially falling asleep (but not maintaining sleep and paranoid thinking; a relationship that is fully mediated by negative affect. Future research should seek to disentangle the causal relationships between sleep, negative affect, and paranoia (e.g., by examining the effect of an intervention using prospective designs that incorporate experience sampling. Indeed, interventions might profitably target (i perceived sleep quality, (ii sleep onset, and / or (iii emotion regulation as a route to reducing negative affect and, thus, paranoid thinking.

  20. Anatomía de una confusión: error diagnóstico de patología paranoide en víctimas de mobbing

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Hernáez,Ángel; Medeiros-Ferreira,Leticia

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXTO: Diversas investigaciones subrayan el alto riesgo de error diagnóstico de trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad entre víctimas de mobbing o acoso psicológico en el trabajo (APT). OBJETIVO: Analizar hasta qué punto los síntomas asociados con el mobbing son confundidos con criterios de dos nosologías del espectro paranoide (trastorno delirante y trastorno paranoide de la personalidad). MÉTODOS: Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica desde 1990 hasta Junio de 2009 ...

  1. Gut feelings, deliberative thought, and paranoid ideation: A study of experiential and rational reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Evans, Nicole; Lister, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Rapid intuitive hunches or gut feelings may be a compelling source of evidence for paranoid ideas. Conversely, a failure to apply effortful analytic thinking may contribute to the persistence of such thoughts. Our main aim was to examine for the first time the associations of persecutory thinking with experiential and rational thinking styles. Five hundred individuals recruited from the general population completed self-report assessments of current persecutory ideation, general reasoning styles and personality traits. Persecutory ideation was independently associated with greater use of experiential reasoning and less use of rational reasoning. The correlations were small. Persecutory ideation was also positively associated with neuroticism and negatively correlated with extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness. There was no evidence of an interaction between neuroticism and experiential reasoning in the prediction of paranoia, but high experiential reasoning in the context of low rational reasoning was particularly associated with persecutory ideation. Overall, the study provides rare evidence of self-reported general reasoning styles being associated with delusional ideation. Perceived reliance on intuition is associated with paranoid thinking, while perceived reliance on deliberation is associated with fewer such thoughts. The dual process theory of reasoning may provide a framework to contribute to the understanding of paranoid thinking. PMID:22406393

  2. [3H]Dopamine uptake by platelet storage granules in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabey, J.M.; Graff, E.; Oberman, Z.; Lerner, A.; Sigal, M.

    1992-01-01

    [ 3 H]Dopamine (DA) uptake by platelet storage granules was determined in 26 schizophrenic male patients, paranoid type (14 acute stage; 12 in remission) and 20 age-matched, normal controls. maximum velocity (Vmax) of DA uptake was significantly higher in acute patients, than patients in remission or controls (p>0.05). The apparent Michaelis constant (kM) of DA uptake in acute patients was also significantly different from chronic patients a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol produced a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol (10 -4 , 10 -5 M) did not affect the assay. Considering that a DA disequilibrium in schizophrenia may be expressed not only in the brain, but also in the periphery and that an increased amount of DA accumulated in the vesicles, implies that an increased quantity of catecholamine is available for release, our findings suggest additional evidence for the role of DA overactivity in the pathophysiology of this disorder

  3. Multivariate analyses of CT findings in typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Takuji; Watanabe, Toyonobu; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the brain morphological differences between typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, the brain CTs of 41 patients with typical schizophrenia, 27 patients with atypical psychosis (ATP), and 20 controls were examined. The schizophrenics had larger values for 9 CT indices, i.e., interhemispheric fissure (IHF) index, VBR, 2 lateral ventricles (L-V) and 3rd venricle (III-V) indices, and 4 sylvian fissure (SF) indices, while the values of ATP patients for 3 SF indices were greater than for the controls. Moreover, the schizophrenics had greater III-V and L-V indices than the ATP patients. The correlation matrix of CT indices indicates that the III-V index correlated well with the other CT indices, whereas the VBR, IHF and right SF indices did not. Therefore, it was speculated that there might be 3 subgroups, each of which has a main focus of alteration in the above-mentioned regions. Therefore, all the cases were divided by means of a cluster analysis into 5 groups. Group I, which contained mainly normal controls, and Group II, which consisted mainly of atypical psychosis patients, had no abnormal CT findings. Group III, which comprised mainly ATP pateints and paranoid type schizophrenics, had right SF enlargement. Group IV, which showed significant IHF enlargement, and the residue group, which had larger VBR and significant left SF enlargement, consisted mostly of schizophrenics. Thus, our results suggest that the classification by CT data corresponds on the whole to our clinical diagnosis, according to which schizophrenic psychosis is divided into typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, and that each of the two psychosis groups may be further classified into distinct subgroups. (author)

  4. Multivariate analyses of CT findings in typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takuji; Watanabe, Toyonobu; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takeo (Aichi Medical Univ., Nagakute (Japan))

    1992-09-01

    In order to investigate the brain morphological differences between typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, the brain CTs of 41 patients with typical schizophrenia, 27 patients with atypical psychosis (ATP), and 20 controls were examined. The schizophrenics had larger values for 9 CT indices, i.e., interhemispheric fissure (IHF) index, VBR, 2 lateral ventricles (L-V) and 3rd venricle (III-V) indices, and 4 sylvian fissure (SF) indices, while the values of ATP patients for 3 SF indices were greater than for the controls. Moreover, the schizophrenics had greater III-V and L-V indices than the ATP patients. The correlation matrix of CT indices indicates that the III-V index correlated well with the other CT indices, whereas the VBR, IHF and right SF indices did not. Therefore, it was speculated that there might be 3 subgroups, each of which has a main focus of alteration in the above-mentioned regions. Therefore, all the cases were divided by means of a cluster analysis into 5 groups. Group I, which contained mainly normal controls, and Group II, which consisted mainly of atypical psychosis patients, had no abnormal CT findings. Group III, which comprised mainly ATP pateints and paranoid type schizophrenics, had right SF enlargement. Group IV, which showed significant IHF enlargement, and the residue group, which had larger VBR and significant left SF enlargement, consisted mostly of schizophrenics. Thus, our results suggest that the classification by CT data corresponds on the whole to our clinical diagnosis, according to which schizophrenic psychosis is divided into typical schizophrenia and atypical psychosis, and that each of the two psychosis groups may be further classified into distinct subgroups. (author).

  5. The predictive value of early maladaptive schemas in paranoid responses to social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundag, Johanna; Ascone, Leonie; Lincoln, Tania M

    2018-01-01

    Social stress and negatively valenced cognitive representations of the self (self-schemas) play an important role in the formation of delusions. However, it has not been investigated whether and which self-schemas explain paranoid responses to social stress. Building on the framework of schema theory, the aim of this study was thus to investigate whether more pronounced early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) were associated with increased paranoid ideation after a social stress induction in patients with persecutory delusions (PD). Patients with PD (n = 20) and healthy controls (n = 40) were assessed for EMSs with the Young Schema Questionnaire. They were then exposed to a social stress situation in which they were socially excluded in a Cyberball paradigm. Prior to and after the social stress induction, paranoid symptoms were assessed. Patients with PD responded with a stronger increase in paranoia and revealed a significantly higher EMS total score compared to the healthy controls. As expected, higher increases in paranoia following the social stress were accounted for by higher EMS total scores. Exploratory analyses showed that particularly the specific EMSs Defectiveness/Shame and Enmeshment/Undeveloped Self were associated with the increase in paranoia. EMSs are associated with stress-related symptom increases in patients with PD. It thus seems worthwhile to further investigate the relevance of specific schemas for paranoia. The findings also suggest that addressing EMSs in psychological treatment of patients with PD holds potential. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Metabolic profiling of CSF: evidence that early intervention may impact on disease progression and outcome in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Holmes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The identification of schizophrenia biomarkers is a crucial step towards improving current diagnosis, developing new presymptomatic treatments, identifying high-risk individuals and disease subgroups, and assessing the efficacy of preventative interventions at a rate that is not currently possible.(1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with computerized pattern recognition analysis were employed to investigate metabolic profiles of a total of 152 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from drug-naïve or minimally treated patients with first-onset paranoid schizophrenia (referred to as "schizophrenia" in the following text and healthy controls. Partial least square discriminant analysis showed a highly significant separation of patients with first-onset schizophrenia away from healthy controls. Short-term treatment with antipsychotic medication resulted in a normalization of the disease signature in over half the patients, well before overt clinical improvement. No normalization was observed in patients in which treatment had not been initiated at first presentation, providing the first molecular evidence for the importance of early intervention for psychotic disorders. Furthermore, the alterations identified in drug-naïve patients could be validated in a test sample set achieving a sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 85%, respectively.Our findings suggest brain-specific alterations in glucoregulatory processes in the CSF of drug-naïve patients with first-onset schizophrenia, implying that these abnormalities are intrinsic to the disease, rather than a side effect of antipsychotic medication. Short-term treatment with atypical antipsychotic medication resulted in a normalization of the CSF disease signature in half the patients well before a clinical improvement would be expected. Furthermore, our results suggest that the initiation of antipsychotic treatment during a first psychotic episode may influence treatment response

  7. ( sup 3 H)Dopamine uptake by platelet storage granules in schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabey, J.M.; Graff, E.; Oberman, Z. (Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (Israel)); Lerner, A.; Sigal, M. (Tel-Aviv Univ. (Israel))

    1992-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)Dopamine (DA) uptake by platelet storage granules was determined in 26 schizophrenic male patients, paranoid type (14 acute stage; 12 in remission) and 20 age-matched, normal controls. maximum velocity (Vmax) of DA uptake was significantly higher in acute patients, than patients in remission or controls (p>0.05). The apparent Michaelis constant (kM) of DA uptake in acute patients was also significantly different from chronic patients a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol produced a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol (10{sup {minus}4}, 10{sup {minus}5} M) did not affect the assay. Considering that a DA disequilibrium in schizophrenia may be expressed not only in the brain, but also in the periphery and that an increased amount of DA accumulated in the vesicles, implies that an increased quantity of catecholamine is available for release, our findings suggest additional evidence for the role of DA overactivity in the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  8. A Tale of Two Paranoids: A Critical Analysis of the Use of the Paranoid Style and Public Secrecy by Donald Trump and Viktor Orbán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andria Timmer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decade, a rising tide of right-wing populism across the globe has inspired a renewed push toward nationalism. Capitalizing on an increasingly chaotic public sphere, leaders are stoking fear in their constituents such that their radical ideologies and hardline policy decisions may be enacted. This article offers a comparative study of two leaders exploiting the vulnerabilities of their respective citizenries: United States President Donald Trump and Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orbán. Drawing from and reimagining Richard Hofstadter’s germane essay, “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” we argue that both represent a new manifestation of the paranoid style as it enables (and is enabled by “public secrecy.” By controlling the media and redirecting collective attention by way of rhetorical sleight of hand, the two are able to sow disorder and confusion such that their secrecy may persist out in the open. Despite using similar issues to promulgate fear and paranoia, most prominently the refugee and immigration crises, and their similar end goals, the two must nonetheless engage in different discursive strategies that reflect the distinct cultures and histories of their respective countries.

  9. Relationships between paranoid thinking, self-esteem and the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Rosalind; Rowse, Georgina; Slade, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether paranoid experiences and levels of self-esteem fluctuate over the menstrual cycle and whether levels of self-esteem are lower when perceived persecution is felt to be deserved. Measures of anxiety, depression, persecution, deservedness and self-esteem were completed on-line by 278 women over their menstrual cycle. Responses were compared at the paramenstrual (3 days before and after menses onset) and mid-cycle phase. At the paramenstrual phase persecution, negative self-esteem, anxiety and depression were higher and positive self-esteem was lower than at mid-cycle. A greater proportion of women experienced persecution as deserved at the paramenstrual phase. This was associated with higher depression and negative self-esteem scores. Increased levels of deservedness significantly strengthened the relationship between persecution and negative, but not positive, self-esteem. These findings suggest that the paramenstrual phase is a time of vulnerability to increased paranoid experiences, an increased likelihood that feelings of persecution will feel deserved and lowered self-esteem. The findings support the view that interpersonal sensitivities may be key to menstrual cycle symptoms and have an impact on relationships. Further, the study illustrated that ideas developed for psychosis could make a valuable contribution to understanding and managing this aspect of menstruation-related distress.

  10. Os possíveis papéis da S100B na esquizofrenia Potential roles of S100B in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Steiner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Evidências científicas do aumento da concentração da proteína S100B no sangue de pacientes esquizofrênicos são muito consistentes. No passado essa informação era principalmente considerada como reflexo da disfunção astroglial ou da barreira hematoencefálica. MÉTODOS: Pesquisa de publicações no PubMed até o dia 15 de junho de 2011 visando estabelecer potenciais ligações entre a proteína S100B e as hipóteses correntes da esquizofrenia. RESULTADOS: A S100B está potencialmente associada com as hipóteses dopaminérgica e glutamatérgica. O aumento da expressão de S100B tem sido detectado em astrócitos corticais em casos de esquizofrenia paranoide, enquanto se observa uma redução da expressão em oligodendrócitos na esquizofrenia residual, dando suporte à hipótese glial. Recentemente, a hipótese da neuroinflamação da esquizofrenia tem recebido atenção crescente. Nesse sentido, a S100B pode funcionar como uma citocina secretada por células gliais, linfócitos CD8+ e células NK, levando à ativação de monócitos e microglia. Além disso, a S100B apresenta propriedades do tipo adipocina e pode estar desregulada na esquizofrenia, devido a distúrbios da sinalização de insulina, levando ao aumento da liberação de S100B e ácidos graxos do tecido adiposo. CONCLUSÃO: A expressão de S100B em diferentes tipos celulares está envolvida em muitos processos regulatórios. Atualmente, não pode ser respondido qual mecanismo relacionado à esquizofrenia é o mais importante.BACKGROUND: Scientific evidence for increased S100B concentrations in the peripheral blood of acutely ill schizophrenia patients is consistent. In the past, this finding was mainly considered to reflect astroglial or blood-brain barrier dysfunction. METHODS: Using Entrez, PubMed was searched for articles published on or before June 15, 2011, including electronic early release publications, in order to determine other potential links between S

  11. Os possíveis papéis da S100B na esquizofrenia Potential roles of S100B in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Steiner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Evidências científicas do aumento da concentração da proteína S100B no sangue de pacientes esquizofrênicos são muito consistentes. No passado essa informação era principalmente considerada como reflexo da disfunção astroglial ou da barreira hematoencefálica. MÉTODOS: Pesquisa de publicações no PubMed até o dia 15 de junho de 2011 visando estabelecer potenciais ligações entre a proteína S100B e as hipóteses correntes da esquizofrenia. RESULTADOS: A S100B está potencialmente associada com as hipóteses dopaminérgica e glutamatérgica. O aumento da expressão de S100B tem sido detectado em astrócitos corticais em casos de esquizofrenia paranoide, enquanto se observa uma redução da expressão em oligodendrócitos na esquizofrenia residual, dando suporte à hipótese glial. Recentemente, a hipótese da neuroinflamação da esquizofrenia tem recebido atenção crescente. Nesse sentido, a S100B pode funcionar como uma citocina secretada por células gliais, linfócitos CD8+ e células NK, levando à ativação de monócitos e microglia. Além disso, a S100B apresenta propriedades do tipo adipocina e pode estar desregulada na esquizofrenia, devido a distúrbios da sinalização de insulina, levando ao aumento da liberação de S100B e ácidos graxos do tecido adiposo. CONCLUSÃO: A expressão de S100B em diferentes tipos celulares está envolvida em muitos processos regulatórios. Atualmente, não pode ser respondido qual mecanismo relacionado à esquizofrenia é o mais importante.BACKGROUND: Scientific evidence for increased S100B concentrations in the peripheral blood of acutely ill schizophrenia patients is consistent. In the past, this finding was mainly considered to reflect astroglial or blood-brain barrier dysfunction. METHODS: Using Entrez, PubMed was searched for articles published on or before June 15, 2011, including electronic early release publications, in order to determine other potential links between S

  12. Личностные особенности больных шизофренией с депрессивной и парадепрессивной симптоматикой в структуре заболевания = Personality features of schizophrenia patients with depressive and predepression symptoms in the structure of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Sincha

    2016-05-01

    reflected in the three versions of the personality profiles of patients with schizophrenia with depressive phenomena in the structure of diseases: a nosodepressive (paradepressive, paranoide-neurotic (paranoide-dysphoric, sociogenic -neurotic (iatrogenic disorders.   Keywords: depression, schizophrenia, psychopathogenesis, psychodiagnostics.

  13. [Schizotypical Disorder or Schizophrenia? Assessment of Penal Responsibility in a Patricide Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrim, Ruy Justo C; Forte Stuchi, Luísa; Martins Valença, Alexandre

    2013-09-01

    Patricide is the murder of one of the parents. We report a case of a man who had committed two homicides, at different times, one of them being considered a parricide. He was referred for forensic psychiatric evaluation and later evaluated in a psychiatric assistance service. Psychiatric interview was carried out and the final psychiatric diagnosis was established based on the DSM-IV-TR criteria and retrospective analysis of forensic and clinical records. The court appointed forensic experts concluded that the patient suffered from schizotypical disorder, presenting cognitive and volitive impairment. He was found not guilty by reason of insanity. Later, in a second assessment, being in a psychiatric assistance service, the patient received a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. The determination of criminal responsibility is essential to the proper disposition of convicted persons in any system of criminal law that protects human rights. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationships between paranoid thinking, self-esteem and the menstrual cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Brock, R.; Rowse, G.; Slade, P.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether paranoid experiences and levels of self-esteem fluctuate over the menstrual cycle and whether levels of self-esteem are lower when perceived persecution is felt to be deserved. Measures of anxiety, depression, persecution, deservedness and self-esteem were completed on-line by 278 women over their menstrual cycle. Responses were compared at the paramenstrual (3 days before and after menses onset) and mid-cycle phase. At the paramenstrual phase persecuti...

  15. The Vicious Cycle of Family Atmosphere, Interpersonal Self-concepts, and Paranoia in Schizophrenia-A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Klaus; Kriston, Levente; Mehl, Stephanie; Wittorf, Andreas; Wiedemann, Wolfgang; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Klingberg, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Recent cognitive models of paranoid delusions highlight the role of self-concepts in the development and maintenance of paranoia. Evidence is growing that especially interpersonal self-concepts are relevant in the genesis of paranoia. In addition, negative interpersonal life-experiences are supposed to influence the course of paranoia. As dysfunctional family atmosphere corresponds with multiple distressing dyadic experiences, it could be a risk factor for the development and maintenance of paranoia. A total of 160 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were assessed twice within 12 months. Standardized questionnaires and symptom rating scales were used to measure interpersonal self-concepts, perceived family atmosphere, and paranoia. Data were analyzed using longitudinal cross-lagged structural equation models. Perceived negative family atmosphere was associated with the development of more pronounced negative interpersonal self-concepts 12 months later. Moreover, paranoia was related to negative family atmosphere after 12 months as well. As tests revealed that reversed associations were not able to explain the data, we found evidence for a vicious cycle between paranoia, family atmosphere, and interpersonal self-concepts as suggested by theoretical/cognitive model of paranoid delusions. Results suggest that broader interventions for patients and their caretakers that aim at improving family atmosphere might also be able to improve negative self-concepts and paranoia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Quantifying over-activity in bipolar and schizophrenia patients in a human open field paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Kincaid, Meegin; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2010-06-30

    It has been suggested that a cardinal symptom of mania is over-activity and exaggerated goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to quantify this behavior objectively in a laboratory environment. Having a methodology to assess over-activity reliably might be useful in distinguishing manic bipolar disorder (BD) from schizophrenia (SCZ) during highly activated states. In the current study, quantifiable measures of object interaction were assessed using a multivariate approach. Additionally, symptom correlates of over-activity were assessed. Patients admitted to an acute care psychiatric hospital for either BD with mania or SCZ (paranoid and non-paranoid subtypes) as well as non-patient comparison (NC) participants were assessed in an open field setting referred to as the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM). Activity and interactions with novel and engaging objects were recorded for 15min via a concealed video camera and rated for exploratory behavior. Both BD and SCZ patients spent more time near the objects and exhibited more overall walking compared to NC. In contrast, BD patients exhibited greater physical contact with objects (number of object interactions and time spent with objects) relative to SCZ patients or NC participants, as well as more perseverative and socially disinhibited behaviors, indicating a unique pattern of over-activity and goal-directed behavior. Further analyses revealed a distinction between SCZ patients according to their subtype. The current study extends our methodology for quantifying exploration and over-activity in a controlled laboratory setting and aids in assessing the overlap and distinguishing characteristics of BD and SCZ.

  17. Virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy versus waiting list control for paranoid ideation and social avoidance in patients with psychotic disorders : A single-blind randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos M C A; Geraets, Chris N W; Veling, Wim; van Beilen, Marije; Staring, Anton B P; Gijsman, Harm J; Delespaul, Philippe A E G; van der Gaag, Mark

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients with psychotic disorders have persistent paranoid ideation and avoid social situations because of suspiciousness and anxiety. We investigated the effects of virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy (VR-CBT) on paranoid thoughts and social participation. METHODS:

  18. Descriptive study of 20 patients with schizophrenia in Boyacá, Colombia Schizophrenia = Estudio descriptivo de una muestra de pacientes con esquizofrenia residentes en el departamento de Boyacá, Colombia Zayda Lorena Corredor Rozo1 , Mayely Paola Sánchez Espinosa1 , Milena Rondón Lagos2 , Paola Liliana Páez Rojas3 , Carolina Cortés Duque4 , Ruth Maribel Forero Castro5 RESUMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zayda Lorena Corredor Rozo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a multifactorial disease with high genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance. In Boyacá, Colombia, we studied a group of 20 schizo- phrenic patients (16 men and four women in order to establish their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, and the genetic and predisposing factors. Cytogenetic studies and a descriptive anal- ysis of qualitative and quantitative variables were done. More often the disease started in young adults (average age of initiation: 22.5 years. The predomi- nant subtype (8/20 was paranoid schizophrenia, with progressive start (14/20. Predisposing factors were found in 15 patients, namely: physical in nine, social in five and economic in one. All cariotypes were normal. Clinical features did not associate with either the sociodemographic characteristics or the genetic and predisposing factors; this is evidence of the clinical heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Patients and their families received genetic counseling and explanations on the results, the possibility of recur- rences and the risk of suffering the disease when a relative is affected by it. Further and larger studies are required in order to determine if the factors eval- uated in this work have influence on the develop- ment of the disease.

  19. Paranoid thinking, cognitive bias and dangerous neighbourhoods: Implications for perception of threat and expectations of victimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Alexander; Egan, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    Paranoid thinking is prevalent in the non-clinical population and cognitive mechanisms of heuristic reasoning and jumping to conclusions bias contributes to its formation and maintenance. This study investigated the degree to which paranoia, perceived environmental risk, heuristic reasoning and jumping to conclusions bias (measured with the beads task) contribute to misinterpretation of neutral stimuli, and whether this informed judgements regarding vulnerability to threat and crime. It is also investigated whether impulsiveness is a confounding factor on the beads task. Two hundred participants were recruited using a snowball-sampling method for a quantitative cross-sectional study. Participants reported demographic information, three psychometric questionnaires and two experimental tasks via an online paradigm hosted by the Bristol Online Survey tool. Participants with high paranoia scores perceived their environment to be more dangerous than those with low scores. Participants with high paranoia scores also overestimated threat in neutral stimuli and had high expectations of future victimisation. Jumping to conclusions on the beads task did not predict fear of crime outcomes, but was predicted by impulsivity. Participants who demonstrated paranoid thinking were more likely to reside in perceived dangerous neighbourhoods and overestimate threat. While this could indicate a paranoid heuristic, it is a potentially rational response to prior experiences of crime and victimisation. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. The relationship of the Severe Personality disorders with behavioral activation and inhibition systems in patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Jani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the disruptive effects of personality disorders on personal and family life, it is essential to recognize their predisposing factors to understand them more accurately, and identify their preventive measures treatment facilitators. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the relationship of severe personality disorders with behavioral activation and inhibition systems in patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders. Methods: The present descriptive-correlational study recruited patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders presenting to psychiatry clinics in Ardabil using convenient sampling method. A total of 30 paranoid patients, 30 borderline patients and 20 schizotypal patients were selected by a psychiatrist through psychiatric examination, clinical interview and completing Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III. The following instruments were used: MCMI- III and behavioral activation-inhibition system scale (BIS-BAS. The data were analyzed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient and stepwise regression. Results: BIS and BAS systems were both significant for predicting borderline and paranoid personality disorders, but only BIS was significant for predicting schizotypal personality disorder. Conclusion: These findings can help experts to have a better and more accurate understanding of personality disorders and use proper methods to predict the probability of these disorders and develop treatments.

  1. Video-based quantification of body movement during social interaction indicates the severity of negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Zeno; Ramseyer, Fabian; Hoffmann, Holger; Kalbermatten, Samuel; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    In schizophrenia, nonverbal behavior, including body movement, is of theoretical and clinical importance. Although reduced nonverbal expressiveness is a major component of the negative symptoms encountered in schizophrenia, few studies have objectively assessed body movement during social interaction. In the present study, 378 brief, videotaped role-play scenes involving 27 stabilized outpatients diagnosed with paranoid-type schizophrenia were analyzed using Motion Energy Analysis (MEA). This method enables the objective measuring of body movement in conjunction with ordinary video recordings. Correlations between movement parameters (percentage of time in movement, movement speed) and symptom ratings from independent PANSS interviews were calculated. Movement parameters proved to be highly reliable. In keeping with predictions, reduced movement and movement speed correlated with negative symptoms. Accordingly, in patients who exhibited noticeable movement for less than 20% of the observation time, prominent negative symptoms were highly probable. As a control measure, the percentage of movement exhibited by the patients during role-play scenes was compared to that of their normal interactants. Patients with negative symptoms differed from normal interactants by showing significantly reduced head and body movement. Two specific positive symptoms were possibly related to movement parameters: suspiciousness tended to correlate with reduced head movement, and the expression of unusual thought content tended to relate to increased movement. Overall, a close and theoretically meaningful association between the objective movement parameters and the symptom profiles was found. MEA appears to be an objective, reliable and valid method for quantifying nonverbal behavior, an aspect which may furnish new insights into the processes related to reduced expressiveness in schizophrenia. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Voice and vibration sensations in the speech forming organs: clinical and theoretical aspects of rare symptoms specific for schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, W; Lolas, F; Wolpert, E

    1978-01-01

    When studying 750 psychiatric in-patients with psychoses of various diagnostic groups, the symptoms of voice sensations and vibration feelings could only be found among patients with paranoid schizophrenia. In addition, these symptoms were located exclusively in body areas that are involved in the peripheral motor production of voice and speech (areas of head, throat, thorax). In 11 of 15 such cases that could be identified, the sensations of voices and vibrations occurred simultaneously and in identical body parts; in the remaining 4 cases only voices without vibration sensations were reported. Therefore these symptoms can be considered as highly specific for schizophrenia. According to the terminology of Bleuler these two symptoms are because of their rareness to be taken as accessoric symptoms; according to the terminology of Kurt Schneider they have the value of first rank symptoms because of their highly diagnostic specifity for schizophrenia. The pathogenesis of these symptoms is on the one hand discussed under the perspective of language development and the changing function of language for behaviour control; on the other hand, the pathogenesis of these symptoms is discussed from the viewpoint of cybernetic, or neurophysiological-neuroanatomical foundation of speech production and speech control. Both models of explanation have in common that the ideational component of speech is noticed as acustic halluzinations and the motor proprioceptive part of speech is noticed as sensation of vibrations, both in a typically schiphrenic manner, i.e. dissociated and ego-alienated.

  3. Towards a new classification of stable phase schizophrenia into major and simple neuro-cognitive psychosis: Results of unsupervised machine learning analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Sriswasdi, Sira; Thika, Supaksorn; Stoyanov, Drozdstoy; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Carvalho, André F; Geffard, Michel; Maes, Michael

    2018-05-23

    Deficit schizophrenia, as defined by the Schedule for Deficit Syndrome, may represent a distinct diagnostic class defined by neurocognitive impairments coupled with changes in IgA/IgM responses to tryptophan catabolites (TRYCATs). Adequate classifications should be based on supervised and unsupervised learning rather than on consensus criteria. This study used machine learning as means to provide a more accurate classification of patients with stable phase schizophrenia. We found that using negative symptoms as discriminatory variables, schizophrenia patients may be divided into two distinct classes modelled by (A) impairments in IgA/IgM responses to noxious and generally more protective tryptophan catabolites, (B) impairments in episodic and semantic memory, paired associative learning and false memory creation, and (C) psychotic, excitation, hostility, mannerism, negative, and affective symptoms. The first cluster shows increased negative, psychotic, excitation, hostility, mannerism, depression and anxiety symptoms, and more neuroimmune and cognitive disorders and is therefore called "major neurocognitive psychosis" (MNP). The second cluster, called "simple neurocognitive psychosis" (SNP) is discriminated from normal controls by the same features although the impairments are less well developed than in MNP. The latter is additionally externally validated by lowered quality of life, body mass (reflecting a leptosome body type), and education (reflecting lower cognitive reserve). Previous distinctions including "type 1" (positive)/"type 2" (negative) and DSM-IV-TR (eg, paranoid) schizophrenia could not be validated using machine learning techniques. Previous names of the illness, including schizophrenia, are not very adequate because they do not describe the features of the illness, namely, interrelated neuroimmune, cognitive, and clinical features. Stable-phase schizophrenia consists of 2 relevant qualitatively distinct categories or nosological entities with SNP

  4. SA30. Self-Assessment of Amotivation and Insight into Patients With Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papsuev, Oleg; Movina, Larisa; Minyaycheva, Maria; Luther, Lauren

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Schizophrenia is a disabling disorder characterized by negative and cognitive symptoms. The negative symptom domain of low motivation has recently been found to be an important determinant of functioning. Currently, motivation is frequently assessed with either self-rated or clinician-rated motivation measures. However, little is known about the overlap between self-rated and clinician-rated motivation and whether these two assessment types are differentially related to clinical variables. Therefore, this study investigated (1) the association between self-rated and clinician-rated motivation, (2) the clinical correlates of both motivation assessment types, and (3) the correlates of the discrepancy between the motivation assessments types. Methods: Fifty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were assessed by trained clinicians using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Calgary Depression Scale (CDSS), and both the clinician-rated (C) and self-rated (S) versions of the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES). Neurocognition was assessed with the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). Social cognition was assessed with the Hinting Task, the Relationships Across Domains measure, and the Ekman-60 emotion recognition task. Results: The AES-C and AES-S were positively correlated (r = .43; P amotivation subscale items (N2 (r = .51), N4 (r = .45)). However, a significant correlation between the AES-C and the G16 item of the PANSS amotivation subscale was not observed. The AES-S was not significantly correlated with any of the PANSS amotivation items. The AES-C did not correlate with the PANSS depression item or the CDSS total score, while moderate correlations with the AES-S were observed with both (r = .38 and r = .45, respectively). The AES-C/AES-S discrepancy score was positively correlated with the PANSS insight item (r = 0.39) and the presence of a paranoid schizophrenia diagnosis (r = .32). No

  5. Paranoia as an Antecedent and Consequence of Getting Ahead in Organizations: Time-Lagged Effects Between Paranoid Cognitions, Self-Monitoring, and Changes in Span of Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Van Quaquebeke

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A six-month, time-lagged online survey among 441 employees in diverse industries was conducted to investigate the role paranoia plays as an antecedent and as a consequence of advancement in organizations. The background of the study is the argument that it requires active social sense-making and behavioral adaptability to advance in organizations. The present paper thus explores the extent to which employees’ paranoid cognitions—representative of a heightened albeit suspicious sense-making and behavioral adaptability—link with their advancement in organizations (operationalized as changes in afforded span of control, both as an antecedent and an outcome. Following the strategy to illuminate the process by interaction analysis, both conditions (antecedent and outcome are examined in interaction with employees’ self-monitoring, which is considered representative of a heightened but healthy sense-making and behavioral adaptability. Results support the expected interference interaction between paranoid cognitions and self-monitoring in that each can to some degree compensate for the other in explaining employees’ organizational advancement. Reversely, changes in span of control also affected paranoid cognitions. In particular, low self-monitors, i.e. those low in adaptive sense-making, reacted with heightened paranoid cognitions when demoted. In effect, the present study is thus the first to empirically support that paranoid cognitions can be a consequence but also a prerequisite for getting ahead in organizations. Practical advice should, however, be suspended until it is better understood whether and under what circumstances paranoia may relate not only to personally getting ahead but also to an increased effectiveness for the benefit of the organization.

  6. Virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy versus waiting list control for paranoid ideation and social avoidance in patients with psychotic disorders: a single-blind randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot-Kolder, Roos M C A; Geraets, Chris N W; Veling, Wim; van Beilen, Marije; Staring, Anton B P; Gijsman, Harm J; Delespaul, Philippe A E G; van der Gaag, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Many patients with psychotic disorders have persistent paranoid ideation and avoid social situations because of suspiciousness and anxiety. We investigated the effects of virtual-reality-based cognitive behavioural therapy (VR-CBT) on paranoid thoughts and social participation. In this randomised controlled trial at seven Dutch mental health centres, outpatients aged 18-65 years with a DSM-IV-diagnosed psychotic disorder and paranoid ideation in the past month were randomly assigned (1:1) via block randomisation to VR-CBT (in addition to treatment as usual) or the waiting list control group (treatment as usual). VR-CBT consisted of 16 individual therapy sessions (each 1 h long). Assessments were done at baseline, after treatment (ie, 3 months from baseline), and at a 6 month follow-up visit. The primary outcome was social participation, which we operationalised as the amount of time spent with other people, momentary paranoia, perceived social threat, and momentary anxiety. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial was retrospectively registered with ISRCTN, number 12929657. Between April 1, 2014, and Dec 31, 2015, 116 patients with a psychotic disorder were randomly assigned, 58 to the VR-CBT group and 58 to the waiting list control group. Compared with the control, VR-CBT did not significantly increase the amount of time spent with other people at the post-treatment assessment. Momentary paranoid ideation (b=-0·331 [95% CI -0·432 to -0·230], pproblems were mediators of change in paranoid ideation. No adverse events were reported relating to the therapy or assessments. Our results suggest that the addition of VR-CBT to standard treatment can reduce paranoid ideation and momentary anxiety in patients with a psychotic disorder. Fonds NutsOhra, Stichting tot Steun VCVGZ. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Co-morbidity of personality disorder in schizophrenia among psychiatric outpatients in China: data from epidemiologic survey in a clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, YanYan; Zhang, TianHong; Chow, Annabelle; Tang, YingYing; Xu, LiHua; Dai, YunFei; Liu, XiaoHua; Su, Tong; Pan, Xiao; Cui, Yi; Li, ZiQiang; Jiang, KaiDa; Xiao, ZePing; Tang, YunXiang; Wang, JiJun

    2016-07-08

    The reported rates of personality disorder (PD) in subjects with schizophrenia (SZ) are quite varied across different countries, and less is known about the heterogeneity of PD among subjects with SZ. We examined the co-morbidity of PD among patients who are in the stable phase of SZ. 850 subjects were randomly sampled from patients diagnosed with SZ in psychiatric and psycho-counseling clinics at Shanghai Mental Health Center. Co-morbidity of PDs was assessed through preliminary screening and patients were administered several modules of the SCID-II. Evidence of heterogeneity was evaluated by comparing patients diagnosed with SZ with those who presented with either affective disorder or neurosis (ADN). 204 outpatients (24.0 %) in the stable phase of SZ met criteria for at least one type of DSM-IV PD. There was a higher prevalence of Cluster-A (odd and eccentric PD) and C (anxious and panic PD) PDs in SZ (around 12.0 %). The most prevalent PD was the paranoid subtype (7.65 %). Subjects with SZ were significantly more likely to have schizotypal PD (4.4 % vs. 2.1 %, p = 0.003) and paranoid PD (7.6 % vs. 5.4 %, p = 0.034), but much less likely to have borderline, obsessive-compulsive, depressive, narcissistic and histrionic PD. These findings suggest that DSM-IV PD is common in patients with SZ than in the general population. Patterns of co-morbidity with PDs in SZ are different from ADN.

  8. Manganese and acute paranoid psychosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egger Jos I

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal development and body function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course and usually starts with complaints of headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, irritability and emotional instability. Later, several organ systems may be affected and, due to neurotoxicity, an atypical parkinsonian syndrome may emerge. With regard to neuropsychiatry, an array of symptoms may develop up to 30 years after intoxication, of which gait and speech abnormalities, cognitive and motor slowing, mood changes and hallucinations are the most common. Psychotic phenomena are rarely reported. Case presentation We describe the case of a 49-year-old Caucasian man working as a welder who was referred to our facility for evaluation of acute paranoid psychotic behavior. Our patient's medical history made no mention of any somatic complaints or psychiatric symptoms, and he had been involved in a professional career as a metalworker. On magnetic resonance imaging scanning of his brain, a bilateral hyperdensity of the globus pallidus, suggestive for manganese intoxication, was found. His manganese serum level was 52 to 97 nmol/L (range: 7 to 20 nmol/L. A diagnosis of organic psychotic disorder due to manganese overexposure was made. His psychotic symptoms disappeared within two weeks of treatment with low-dose risperidone. At three months later, serum manganese was decreased to slightly elevated levels and the magnetic resonance imaging T1 signal intensity was reduced. No signs of Parkinsonism were found and a definite diagnosis of manganese-induced apathy syndrome was made. Conclusion Although neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms caused by (chronic manganese exposure have been reported frequently in the past, in the present day the disorder is rarely diagnosed. In this report we stress that manganese intoxication can still occur, in our case in a confined

  9. A comparison of symptoms and family history in schizophrenia with and without prior cannabis use: implications for the concept of cannabis psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, J; Dean, K; Dutta, R; Giouroukou, E; Fearon, P; Murray, R

    2007-07-01

    There is considerable interest in cannabis use in psychosis. It has been suggested that the chronic psychosis associated with cannabis use, is symptomatically distinct from idiopathic schizophrenia. Several studies have reported differences in psychopathology and family history in people with schizophrenia according to whether or not they were cannabis users. We set out to test the hypotheses arising from these studies that cannabis use is associated with more bizarre behaviour, more thought disorder, fewer negative symptoms including blunted affect, more delusions of reference, more paranoid delusions and a stronger family history of schizophrenia. We used a case register that contained 757 cases of first onset schizophrenia, 182 (24%) of whom had used cannabis in the year prior to first presentation, 552 (73%) had not and 3% had missing data. We completed the OPCRIT checklist on all patients and investigated differences in the proportion of people with distractibility, bizarre behaviour, positive formal thought disorder, delusions of reference, well organised delusions, any first rank symptom, persecutory delusions, abusive/accusatory hallucinations, blunted affect, negative thought disorder, any negative symptoms (catatonia, blunted affect, negative thought disorder, or deterioration), lack of insight, suicidal ideation and a positive family history of schizophrenia, using chi square tests. Logistic regression modelling was then used to determine whether prior cannabis use affected the presence of the characteristics after controlling for age, sex and ethnicity. There was no statistically significant effect of cannabis use on the presence of any of the above. There remained however a non-significant trend towards more insight (OR 0.65 p=0.055 for "loss of insight") and a finding of fewer abusive or accusatory hallucinations (OR 0.65 p=0.049) of borderline significance amongst the cannabis users. These were in the hypothesised direction. There was no evidence of

  10. Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hallucinations are frightening, and not all delusions are paranoid in nature. See the doctor. When helping someone ... a history of serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, the hallucinations and/or delusions may be related ...

  11. Magical Ideation and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Leonard; Neufeld, Richard W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Administered the Eckblad and Chapman (1983) Magical Ideation Scale to groups of paranoid and nonparanoid schizophrenics and control subjects. Schizophrenics scored significantly higher than nonschizophrenic patients (mainly cases of affective disorder) and normal control subjects. Discusses theoretical and prognostic utility of this finding.…

  12. Dependency, detachment and psychopathology in a nonclinical sample: General relations and gender differences. Is there a new line of inquiry on paranoid pathology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel R. Abuín

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio, se administraron tanto el Test del Perfil de la Relación de Bornstein (RPT como el cuestionario de 90 síntomas de Derogatis (SCl-90-R a una muestra no clínica de 119 sujetos de Madrid. La dependencia saludable, el desapego disfuncional y la sobredependencia destructiva (subescalas del RPT fueron evaluadas y correlacionadas con las dimensiones de psicopatología del SCL-90- R. La sobredependencia destructiva correlacionó positivamente con todas las dimensiones de psicopatología. Por el contrario, la dependencia saludable correlacionó negativamente con todas estas dimensiones de psicopatología. Se han encontrado diferencias de género con respecto a la correlación entre el desapego disfuncional y la ideación paranoide. En las mujeres, el desapego disfuncional correlacionó positivamente con al ideación paranoide, mientras que en los hombres esta correlación fue negativa y no significativa. Estas diferencias de género en la relación entre el desapego disfuncional y la ideación paranoide sugieren una nueva línea de investigación sobre la patología paranoide. Se exploran además las puntuaciones de psicopatología del SCL-90-R en diferentes grupos de individuos con diferentes perfiles de dependenciadesapego, a partir de las puntuaciones del Test del Perfil de Relación.

  13. Negative schemata about the self and others and paranoid ideation in at-risk states and those with persisting positive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hendrik; de Millas, Walter; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Herrlich, Jutta; Hasan, Alkomiet; Janssen, Birgit; Juckel, Georg; Karow, Anne; Kircher, Tilo; Kiszkenow-Bäker, Stefanie; Klingberg, Stefan; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Krüger-Özgürdal, Seza; Lambert, Martin; Lautenschlager, Marion; Maier, Wolfgang; Michel, Tanja Maria; Mehl, Stefanie; Müller, Bernhard W; Pützfeld, Verena; Rausch, Franziska; Riedel, Michael; Sartory, Gudrun; Schneider, Frank; Wagner, Michael; Wiedemann, Georg; Wittorf, Andreas; Wobrock, Thomas; Wölwer, Wolfgang; Zink, Mathias; Bechdolf, Andreas

    2017-05-19

    The objective of this study is to test the conflicting theories concerning the association of negative self and other schemata and paranoid ideation. A risk-based approach, including risk stratification, is used to gain insight into the association of the negative self and other schemata that may be shared by individuals or differentiate between individuals at clinical high risk (CHR) for a first-episode psychosis and those with full-blown psychosis. The dataset includes a sample of individuals at CHR (n = 137) and a sample of individuals with persisting positive symptoms (PPS, n = 211). The CHR sample was subdivided according to a prognostic index yielding 4 CHR sub-classes with increasing risk for transition to psychosis. Negative beliefs about the self were associated with paranoid ideation in CHR and a lower risk state. In the highest risk state and full-blown psychosis, there is an association with negative beliefs about others. These findings are in line with theories suggesting a switch from a predominantly activated negative self-schema to a malevolent others-schema in association with paranoid ideation along the risk-continuum. However, due to methodological limitations these results should be replicated by future studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Tropical Journal of Health Sciences - Vol 15, No 2 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence on Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection on the serum levels of antioxidant vitamins and trace elements ... De Clerambault\\'s syndrome in a paranoid Schizophrenia: a case report · EMAIL ... AD Yussuf, PO Ajiboye, D Sulyman, 56-60.

  15. Rethinking schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Thomas R

    2010-11-11

    How will we view schizophrenia in 2030? Schizophrenia today is a chronic, frequently disabling mental disorder that affects about one per cent of the world's population. After a century of studying schizophrenia, the cause of the disorder remains unknown. Treatments, especially pharmacological treatments, have been in wide use for nearly half a century, yet there is little evidence that these treatments have substantially improved outcomes for most people with schizophrenia. These current unsatisfactory outcomes may change as we approach schizophrenia as a neurodevelopmental disorder with psychosis as a late, potentially preventable stage of the illness. This 'rethinking' of schizophrenia as a neurodevelopmental disorder, which is profoundly different from the way we have seen this illness for the past century, yields new hope for prevention and cure over the next two decades.

  16. [The concept of schizoidia in psychiatry : From schizoidia to schizotypy and cluster A personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2017-12-01

    From a perspective of conceptual evolution schizoidia was initially considered to describe features both of the premorbid personality of schizophrenic patients and of the personalities of non-psychotic family members (Bleuler, Kahlbaum, Kraepelin). On a psychopatholocial level a close link to the complex basic symptom of autism was stressed. From the very beginnings of modern psychiatry schizoidia was discussed within a conceptual frame of schizophrenia spectrum disorders (Kretschmer, Hoch, Polatin). Approaches to operationalize these conceptual works laid the basis for the cluster A personalities in DSM-III. Due to the prominent concept of schizotypy (Kety, Rado, Meehl) three split up diagnostic categories of schizotypal, schizoid and paranoid personality disorders resulted. Cluster A personality disorders are frequent in community-based epidemiological studies. Health-care seeking behaviour due to primary personality-related problems, however, seems to be less paramount compared to cluster B and C personality disorders. Many family- and twin-based genetic studies convincingly stress a close link between schizotypal personality disorder and schizophrenia. This link is less pronounced for paranoid personality disorder, and even vanishingly low for schizoid personality disorder. From a perspective of schizophrenia spectrum disorders a vast amount of data from molecular genetic, neurobiological, neuropsychological and psychosocial research has impressingly confirmed this link for schizotypal personality disorder. Major research deficits, however, have to be noticed for paranoid and schizoid personality disorder.

  17. Rethinking Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Insel, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    How will we view schizophrenia in 2030? Schizophrenia today is a chronic, frequently disabling mental disorder that affects about one per cent of the world's population. After a century of studying schizophrenia, the cause of the disorder remains unknown. Treatments, especially pharmacological treatments, have been in wide use for nearly half a century, yet there is little evidence that these treatments have substantially improved outcomes for most people with schizophrenia. These current uns...

  18. Cotard Syndrome without Depressive Symptoms in a Schizophrenic Patient.

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado, P; Ribeiro, R; Cerqueira, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Cotard Syndrome without Depressive Symptoms in a Schizophrenic Patient Introduction . Cotard syndrome is a rare condition characterized by nihilistic delusions concerning body or life that can be found in several neuropsychiatry conditions. It is typically associated with depressive symptoms. Method . We present a case of Cotard syndrome without depressive symptoms in the context of known paranoid schizophrenia. A literature review of Cotard syndrome in schizophrenia was performed. Res...

  19. Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, René S; Sommer, Iris E; Murray, Robin M; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weinberger, Daniel R; Cannon, Tyrone D; O'Donovan, Michael; Correll, Christoph U; Kane, John M; van Os, Jim; Insel, Thomas R

    2015-11-12

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric disorder with a heterogeneous genetic and neurobiological background that influences early brain development, and is expressed as a combination of psychotic symptoms - such as hallucinations, delusions and disorganization - and motivational and cognitive dysfunctions. The mean lifetime prevalence of the disorder is just below 1%, but large regional differences in prevalence rates are evident owing to disparities in urbanicity and patterns of immigration. Although gross brain pathology is not a characteristic of schizophrenia, the disorder involves subtle pathological changes in specific neural cell populations and in cell-cell communication. Schizophrenia, as a cognitive and behavioural disorder, is ultimately about how the brain processes information. Indeed, neuroimaging studies have shown that information processing is functionally abnormal in patients with first-episode and chronic schizophrenia. Although pharmacological treatments for schizophrenia can relieve psychotic symptoms, such drugs generally do not lead to substantial improvements in social, cognitive and occupational functioning. Psychosocial interventions such as cognitive-behavioural therapy, cognitive remediation and supported education and employment have added treatment value, but are inconsistently applied. Given that schizophrenia starts many years before a diagnosis is typically made, the identification of individuals at risk and those in the early phases of the disorder, and the exploration of preventive approaches are crucial.

  20. Paranoids, pygmies, pariahs and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The spread of nuclear weapons has finally become a central item on the foreign policy agenda. But the fervor of most opponents of proliferation has been matched only by their reluctance to deal with the causes of the threat. The misplaced focus on ways to isolate weapons-related capabilities obscures the importance of the stickier but more salient problem of the incentives many nations have to get a bomb: fear or ambition. As long as antiproliferation strategy goes no further than schemes to keep the genie in a few bottles, we risk doing both more and less than necessary. Distressingly few arms-control enthusiasts have faced up to the full price of nonproliferation. The needed reorientation in thinking, which is really only a return to the ageless problem of balance of power, has been impeded by prevalent fallacies of emphasis about what causes the threat, who the candidates for proliferation are, and what strategies are applicable to which candidates. The author proceeds to discuss: (1) causes (the moralist fallacy, the economic fallacy, the diseconomic fallacy, and the technicist fallacy); (2) candidates (the pygmy states, the paranoid states, the pariah states, and five options of the U.S.); (3) cures (the fatalist fallacy, the multilateral fallacy, the embargo fallacy, the safeguards fallacy, the umbrella fallacy, the two-wrongs-don't-make-a-right fallacy, and the golden key fallacy); and (4) choices

  1. The application of bifrontal electrotherapy in patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia – case series description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Nowakowska

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrotherapy is considered a very effective and safe therapeutic method. Its most frequently described adverse effect is the impairment of cognitive functions. Currently, the most commonly applied form of electrotherapy are bitemporal procedures and the most frequent and best-studied indication for its application are depressive disorders. A method combining high effectiveness with satisfactory safety is the bifrontal application of the electrodes, although study results are often inconsistent. An issue which should also be noted is the lack of studies comparing the effectiveness of bifrontal and bitemporal procedures in the reduction of positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and assessing the safety of these methods in terms of the influence on cognitive functions. The present paper presents a clinical description of four patients with schizophrenia who have undergone electrotherapy procedures performed applying the bifrontal method. The decisive indication for applying the bifrontal procedures were the memory disturbances the persistence of which was reported by the patients during the application of bitemporal procedures. The analysed clinical cases indicate the effectiveness of the bifrontal electrotherapy procedures which was comparable with the effectiveness of bitemporal procedures with the simultaneous better toleration of the former. Improvement was observed in terms of paranoid, catatonic and negative schizophrenia symptoms. At the same time the patients reported subjectively better tolerance of the procedures, as well as improvement in the recalling of facts and events.

  2. A Flexible-Dose Study of Paliperidone ER in Patients With Nonacute Schizophrenia Previously Treated Unsuccessfully With Oral Olanzapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Moshe; Dilbaz, Nesrin; Rosa, Fernanda; Paterakis, Periklis; Milanova, Vihra; Smulevich, Anatoly B; Lahaye, Marjolein; Schreiner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the tolerability, safety, and treatment response of switching from oral olanzapine to paliperidone extended release (ER). Adult patients with nonacute schizophrenia who had been treated unsuccessfully with oral olanzapine were switched to flexible doses of paliperidone ER (3 to 12 mg/d). The primary efficacy outcome was a ≥ 20% improvement in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total scores from baseline to endpoint for patients who switched medications because of lack of efficacy with olanzapine and noninferiority versus previous olanzapine treatment (mean endpoint change in PANSS total scores vs. baseline of ≤ 5 points) for patients who switched for reasons other than lack of efficacy. Safety and tolerability were assessed by monitoring adverse events, extrapyramidal symptoms, and weight change. Of 396 patients, 65.2% were men, mean age was 40.0 ± 12.0 years, and 75.5% had paranoid schizophrenia. Among the patients whose main reason for switching was lack of efficacy, an improvement in the PANSS total score of ≥ 20% occurred in 57.4% of patients. Noninferiority was confirmed for each subgroup of patients whose main reason for switching was something other than lack of efficacy. Paliperidone ER was generally well tolerated. Extrapyramidal symptoms as measured by total Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale scores showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvements at endpoint, the average weight decreased by 0.8 ± 5.2 kg at endpoint, and a clinically relevant weight gain of ≥ 7% occurred in 8.0% of patients. Paliperidone ER flexibly-dosed over 6 months was well tolerated and associated with a meaningful clinical response in patients with nonacute schizophrenia who had previously been unsuccessfully treated with oral olanzapine.

  3. [The fragmentation of representational space in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagnol, A; Oïta, M; Montreuil, M; Granger, B; Lubart, T

    2003-01-01

    Existent neurocognitive models of schizophrenia converge towards a core of impairments involving working memory, context processing, action planning, controlled and intentional processing. However, the emergence of this core remains itself difficult to explain and more specific hypotheses do not explain the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. To overcome these limits, we propose a new paradigm based on representational theory from cognitive science. Some recent developments of this theory enable us to describe a subjective universe as a representational space which is displayed from memory. We outline a conceptual framework to construct such a representational space from analogical -representations that can be activated in working memory and are connected to a network of symbolic structures. These connections are notably made through an analytic process of the analogical fragments, which involves the attentional focus. This framework allows us to define rigorously some defense processes in response to traumatic tensions that are expressed on the representational space. The fragmentation of representational space is a consequence of a defensive denial based on an impairment of the analytic process. The fragmentation forms some parasitic areas in memory which are excluded from the main part of the representational space and disturb information processing. The key clinical concepts of paranoid syndromes can be defined in this conceptual framework: mental automatism, delusional intuition, acute destructuration, psychotic dissociation, and autistic withdrawal. We show that these syndromes imply each other, which in return increases the fragmentation of the representational space. Some new concepts emerge naturally in this framework, such as the concept of "suture" which is defined as a link between a parasitic area and the main representational space. Schizophrenia appears as a borderline case of fragmentation of the representational space. This conceptual framework is

  4. An Investigation of the "Jumping to Conclusions" Data-Gathering Bias and Paranoid Thoughts in Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänsch, Claire; Hare, Dougal Julian

    2014-01-01

    The existence of a data-gathering bias, in the form of jumping to conclusions, and links to paranoid ideation was investigated in Asperger syndrome (AS). People with AS (N = 30) were compared to a neurotypical control group (N = 30) on the Reading the Mind in the Eyes and the Beads tasks, with self-report measures of depression, general anxiety,…

  5. The Study of Frequency Self Care Strategies against Auditory Hallucinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Nadem

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In schizophrenic clients, self-care strategies against auditory hallucinations can decrease disturbances results in hallucination. This study was aimed to assess frequency of self-care strategies against auditory hallucinations in paranoid schizophrenic patients, hospitalized in Shafa Hospital.Materials and Method: This was a descriptive study on 201 patients with paranoid schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatry unit with convenience sampling in Rasht. The gathered data consists of two parts, first unit demographic characteristic and the second part, self- report questionnaire include 38 items about self-care strategies.Results: There were statistically significant relationship between demographic variables and knowledg effect and self-care strategies against auditory hallucinaions. Sex with phisical domain p0.07, marriage status with cognitive domain (p>0.07 and life status with behavioural domain (p>0.01. 53.2% of reported type of our auditory hallucinations were command hallucinations, furtheremore the most effective self-care strategies against auditory hallucinations were from physical domain and substance abuse (82.1% was the most effective strategies in this domain.Conclusion: The client with paranoid schizophrenia used more than physical domain strategies against auditory hallucinaions and this result highlight need those to approprait nursing intervention. Instruction and leading about selection the effective self-care strategies against auditory ha

  6. SCHIZOPHRENIA: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Parle Milind; Sharma Kailash

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia continues to be a mysterious disease fascinating the minds of psychiatrists, pharmacologists and neuroscientists all over the world for more than a century. The crucial welfare of the millions afflicted with schizophrenia is at stake. The cause of schizophrenia is not yet identified. However, it appears from the available reports that schizophrenia results from genetic, occupational and environmental risk factors, which act independently or combine synergistically to develop sch...

  7. Pattern and Prevalence of Psychiatric Consultations in Other Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    The study showed that out of a total admission of 54, 7 45 in the entire .... diabetes. 6. BAD. 6oHIV. 7o schizophrenia [paranoid, catatonic) ..... Celsia J, Roberts J. Meta-analysis of the relationship .... Bjelland I, Dahi AA, Holmen J. Journal of ...

  8. Behavioral Analytic Approach to Placement of Patients in Community Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Henry S.; And Others

    Twenty adult psychiatric outpatients were assessed by their primary therapists on the Current Behavior Inventory prior to placing them in community settings. The diagnoses included schizophrenia, major affective disorder, dysthymic disorder, and atypical paranoid disorder. The inventory assessed behaviors in four areas: independent community…

  9. Individual Differences In The Executive Control Of Attention, Memory, And Thought, And Their Associations With Schizotypy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael J.; Meier, Matt E.; Smeekens, Bridget A.; Gross, Georgina M.; Chun, Charlotte A.; Silvia, Paul J.; Kwapil, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    A large correlational study took a latent-variable approach to the generality of executive control by testing the individual-differences structure of executive-attention capabilities and assessing their prediction of schizotypy, a multidimensional construct (with negative, positive, disorganized, and paranoid factors) conveying risk for schizophrenia. Although schizophrenia is convincingly linked to executive deficits, the schizotypy literature is equivocal. Subjects completed tasks of working memory capacity (WMC), attention restraint (inhibiting prepotent responses), and attention constraint (focusing visual attention amid distractors), the latter two in an effort to fractionate the “inhibition” construct. We also assessed mind-wandering propensity (via in-task thought probes) and coefficient of variation in response times (RT CoV) from several tasks as more novel indices of executive attention. WMC, attention restraint, attention constraint, mind wandering, and RT CoV were correlated but separable constructs, indicating some distinctions among “attention control” abilities; WMC correlated more strongly with attentional restraint than constraint, and mind wandering correlated more strongly with attentional restraint, attentional constraint, and RT CoV than with WMC. Across structural models, no executive construct predicted negative schizotypy and only mind wandering and RT CoV consistently (but modestly) predicted positive, disorganized, and paranoid schizotypy; stalwart executive constructs in the schizophrenia literature — WMC and attention restraint — showed little to no predictive power, beyond restraint’s prediction of paranoia. Either executive deficits are consequences rather than risk factors for schizophrenia, or executive failures barely precede or precipitate diagnosable schizophrenia symptoms. PMID:27454042

  10. First episode schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with schizophrenia present clinically with psychotic, negative and cognitive ... changes in their emotions, cognition or behaviour which may indicate a ... contribute 80% to the risk of schizophrenia developing. A number of .... Positive symptoms ... Depression ... treatment of first episode schizophrenia is of critical importance.

  11. Neuropsychological Differences Among Subtypes of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Gerald; Halperin, Keith M.

    1977-01-01

    A common pool of schizophrenic subjects was subdivided and analyzed three separate times on the basis of three sets of criteria: paranoid versus nonparanoid, neurologically normal versus neurologically abnormal, and long-term institutionalization versus short-term institutionalization. Differences in ability levels and patterns were determined for…

  12. Influence of contact with schizophrenia on implicit attitudes towards schizophrenia patients held by clinical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omori Ataru

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with schizophrenia and their families have suffered greatly from stigmatizing effects. Although many efforts have been made to eradicate both prejudice and stigma, they still prevail even among medical professionals, and little is known about how contact with schizophrenia patients affects their attitudes towards schizophrenia. Methods We assessed the impact of the renaming of the Japanese term for schizophrenia on clinical residents and also evaluated the influence of contact with schizophrenia patients on attitudes toward schizophrenia by comparing the attitudes toward schizophrenia before and after a one-month clinical training period in psychiatry. Fifty-one clinical residents participated. Their attitudes toward schizophrenia were assessed twice, before and one month after clinical training in psychiatry using the Implicit Association Test (IAT as well as Link’s devaluation-discrimination scale. Results The old term for schizophrenia, “Seishin-Bunretsu-Byo”, was more congruent with criminal than the new term for schizophrenia, “Togo-Shitcho-Sho”, before clinical training. However, quite opposite to our expectation, after clinical training the new term had become even more congruent with criminal than the old term. There was no significant correlation between Link's scale and IAT effect. Conclusions Renaming the Japanese term for schizophrenia still reduced the negative images of schizophrenia among clinical residents. However, contact with schizophrenia patients unexpectedly changed clinical residents’ attitudes towards schizophrenia negatively. Our results might contribute to an understanding of the formation of negative attitudes about schizophrenia and assist in developing appropriate clinical training in psychiatry that could reduce prejudice and stigma concerning schizophrenia.

  13. Design and validation of standardized clinical and functional remission criteria in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosolov, Sergey N; Potapov, Andrey V; Ushakov, Uriy V; Shafarenko, Aleksey A; Kostyukova, Anastasiya B

    2014-01-01

    Background International Remission Criteria (IRC) for schizophrenia were developed recently by a group of internationally known experts. The IRC detect only 10%–30% of cases and do not cover the diversity of forms and social functioning. Our aim was to design a more applicable tool and validate its use – the Standardized Clinical and Functional Remission Criteria (SCFRC). Methods We used a 6-month follow-up study of 203 outpatients from two Moscow centers and another further sample of stable patients from a 1-year controlled trial of atypical versus typical medication. Diagnosis was confirmed by International Classification of Diseases Version 10 (ICD10) criteria and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Patients were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, including intensity threshold, and further classified using the Russian domestic remission criteria and the level of social and personal functioning, according to the Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP). The SCFRC were formulated and were validated by a data reanalysis on the first population sample and on a second independent sample (104 patients) and in an open-label prospective randomized 12-month comparative study of risperidone long-acting injectable (RLAI) versus olanzapine. Results Only 64 of the 203 outpatients (31.5%) initially met the IRC, and 53 patients (26.1%) met the IRC after 6 months, without a change in treatment. Patients who were in remission had episodic and progressive deficit (39.6%), or remittent (15%) paranoid schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder (17%). In addition, 105 patients of 139 (51.7%), who did not meet symptomatic IRC, remained stable within the period. Reanalysis of data revealed that 65.5% of the patients met the SCFRC. In the controlled trial, 70% of patients in the RLAI group met the SCFRC and only 19% the IRC. In the routine treatment group, 55.9% met the SCFRC and only 5.7% the IRC. Results of the further independent

  14. Compulsory outpatient treatment can prevent involuntary commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene Nørregård; Svensson, Eva Maria Birgitta; Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette

    2014-01-01

    describes a patient with paranoid schizophrenia who several times developed severe psychotic symptoms shortly after discharge due to lack of compliance with treatment. Within one year of co-pt the patient was not admitted to hospital and improved in overall functioning. After terminating co-pt the patient...

  15. The importance of 'Group Social Support' in treatment and re-union ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... unknown for sometimes. Some may be assisted by good Samaritans while others might fell under the circumstances of criminals. Social support and medical treatment may be required to reunite some of these subjects as illustrated by this case report. KeyWords : Paranoid Schizophrenia, Homelessness, Social support ...

  16. Theory of mind, insecure attachment and paranoia in adolescents with early psychosis and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver-Nieberg, Nikie; Fett, Anne-Kathrin J.; Meijer, Carin J.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Shergill, Sukhi S.; de Haan, Lieuwe; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Impaired Theory of Mind (ToM) is found in adults with schizophrenia and is associated with paranoid symptoms. Insecure attachment is proposed to underlie impaired ToM as well as paranoia. Insight into associations between insecure attachment and impaired ToM skills may help clinicians and patients

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging study of corpus callosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parietal, temporal and occipital areas were smaller in the paranoid and undifferentiated groups. Total brain volume was smaller in all schizophrenia subtypes compared with controls, but did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion. These findings suggest that the heterogeneity of symptoms may lead to the different CC ...

  18. Intentional minds: A philosophical analysis of intention tested through fMRI experiments involving people with schizophrenia, people with autism, and healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno G Bara

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show how we empirically tested one of the most relevant topics in philosophy of mind through a series of fMRI experiments: the classification of different types of intention. To this aim, firstly we trace a theoretical distinction among private, prospective and communicative intentions. Second, we propose a set of predictions concerning the recognition of these three types of intention in healthy individuals, and we report the experimental results corroborating our theoretical model of intention. Third, we derive from our model predictions relevant for the domain of psychopathological functioning. In particular, we treat the cases of both hyper-intentionality (as in paranoid schizophrenia and hypo-intentionality (as in autistic spectrum disorders. Our conclusion is that the theoretical model of intention we propose contributes to enlarge our knowledge on the neurobiological bases of intention processing, in both healthy people and in people with impairments to the neurocognitive system that underlies intention recognition.

  19. Intentional Minds: A Philosophical Analysis of Intention Tested through fMRI Experiments Involving People with Schizophrenia, People with Autism, and Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, Bruno G; Ciaramidaro, Angela; Walter, Henrik; Adenzato, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    IN THIS PAPER WE SHOW HOW WE EMPIRICALLY TESTED ONE OF THE MOST RELEVANT TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY OF MIND THROUGH A SERIES OF FMRI EXPERIMENTS: the classification of different types of intention. To this aim, firstly we trace a theoretical distinction among private, prospective, and communicative intentions. Second, we propose a set of predictions concerning the recognition of these three types of intention in healthy individuals, and we report the experimental results corroborating our theoretical model of intention. Third, we derive from our model predictions relevant for the domain of psychopathological functioning. In particular, we treat the cases of both hyper-intentionality (as in paranoid schizophrenia) and hypo-intentionality (as in autistic spectrum disorders). Our conclusion is that the theoretical model of intention we propose contributes to enlarge our knowledge on the neurobiological bases of intention processing, in both healthy people and in people with impairments to the neurocognitive system that underlies intention recognition.

  20. Canadian Practice Guidelines for Comprehensive Community Treatment for Schizophrenia and Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, Donald; Anderson, Elizabeth; Kelly, Martina; Lesage, Alain; Summerville, Chris

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the features and components of a comprehensive system of services for people living with schizophrenia. A comprehensive system was conceived as one that served the full range of people with schizophrenia and was designed with consideration of the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia. The system should provide access to the full range of evidence-based services, should be recovery oriented, and should provide patient-centred care. A systematic search was conducted for published guidelines for schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The guidelines were rated by at least 2 raters, and recommendations adopted were primarily drawn from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (2014) Guideline on Psychosis and Schizophrenia in adults and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines on management of schizophrenia. The recommendations adapted for Canada cover the range of services required to provide comprehensive services. Comprehensive services for people with schizophrenia can be organized and delivered to improve the quality of life of people with schizophrenia and their carers. The services need to be organized in a system that provides access to those who need them.

  1. Dreaming and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickney, Jeffrey L.

    Parallels between dream states and schizophrenia suggest that the study of dreams may offer some information about schizophrenia. A major theoretical assumption of the research on dreaming and schizophrenia is that, in schizophrenics, the dream state intrudes on the awake state creating a dreamlike symptomatology. This theory, called the REM…

  2. Relevance of Schneider\\'s first-rank symptoms in Zulu patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of Schneider's first-rank symptoms (FRS) in Zulu patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and to ascertain the diagnostic and prognostic significance of Schneider's FRS in this group. Methods: This descriptive study was done on 75 psychiatric Zulu ...

  3. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 100 of 319 ... The Tropical Journal of Health Sciences. ... Vol 24, No 4 (2017), Comparative Assessment of Health Workers Performance and The Performance Factors at Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Hospitals ... Vol 15, No 2 (2008), De Clerambault\\'s syndrome in a paranoid Schizophrenia: a case report, Abstract.

  4. Mismatch negativity in chronic schizophrenia and first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Dean F; Shenton, Martha E; Griggs, Carlye B; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; McCarley, Robert W

    2002-08-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related brain potential that is sensitive to stimulus deviation from a repetitive pattern. The MMN is thought primarily to reflect the activity of sensory memory, with, at most, moderate influences of higher-level cognitive processes, such as attention. The MMN is reported to be reduced in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, it is unknown whether MMN is reduced in patients with first-episode schizophrenia (at first hospitalization). Subject groups comprised patients with chronic schizophrenia (n = 16) and older control subjects (n = 13), and patients with first-episode schizophrenia (n = 21) and younger control subjects (n = 27). The MMN was visualized by subtracting the averaged event-related brain potential to standard tones (1 kHz [95% of all tones]) from the event-related brain potential to pitch-deviant tones (1.2 kHz [5% of all tones]). The MMN voltage was the mean voltage from 100 to 200 milliseconds. Pitch-deviant MMN was reduced by approximately 47% in patients with chronic illness along the sagittal midline relative to controls. The MMN was not reduced in patients with first-episode schizophrenia. All 4 groups showed approximately 64% larger MMN to pitch-deviant tones over the right hemisphere compared with the left hemisphere. The pitch-deviant MMN reductions present in patients with chronic schizophrenia are not present at first hospitalization. The sensory, echoic memory functions indexed by MMN seem unaffected early in the schizophrenia disease process. Reductions in MMN amplitude may develop over time and index the progression of the disorder, although that can only be definitively determined by longitudinal assessments.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Schizophrenia Schizophrenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Schizophrenia is a brain disorder classified as a psychosis, ...

  6. Schizophrenia and Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Cetin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is one of the major causes of premature death among patients with schizophrenia. Follow-up studies have estimated that 4-5% of these patients die by suicide. Reducing the high rates of suicide in schizophrenia is possible with understanding of predictive risk factors. Various studies have identified risk factors for suicide in schizophrenia patients. Clinical risk factors include previous suicide attempts, comorbid depression, feelings of hopelessness, concept of insight and substance abuse. Biopsychosocial factors, such as a high intelligence quotient and high level of premorbid functioning, have also been associated with an increased risk of suicide in patients with schizophrenia. The risk of suicide is considered to be highest in the early course of illness. Antipsychotic drugs, in particular clozapine and antidepressants may be helpful in reducing the risk of suicide in schizophrenia.

  7. [Risk assessment of thrombotic events in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder in the acute state: the 'fibrinodynamics' technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusov, O S; Matveev, I A; Kirillov, P S; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Vasilyeva, E F; Katasonov, A B; Zozulya, S A; Klushnik, T P

    To assess the risk of thrombotic events in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder based on 'fibrinodynamics' technology. A group of 76 women, including 38 with paranoid schizophrenia (F20.0), 18 with schizoaffective disorder (F25.1) in the acute stage, and 20 healthy controls, participated in the study. The technology includes the study of coagulation and fibrinolysis, Karmin author software, and calculation of peak time and hemostasis potential of spontaneous clots. Growth and lysis of fibrin clots were studied in plasma purified from platelets. All preanalytic procedures were conducted within 30 minutes after blood sampling. Blood serum was studied separately using the neuroimmunological test. Dynamic of brightness profiles of the clots was determined and a number of parameters (peak time and hemostasis potential of spontaneous clots) were calculated using the Karmin software. In patients with schizophrenia, the dynamic brightness profile of the clots has two peaks: the first peak is formed as a result of the growth and lysis of the clot initiated by the activator, the second peak is due to the growth and lysis of spontaneous clots in the volume of the measuring cuvette far from the activator. In healthy donors, the second peak under experimental conditions is absent. In the group of schizophrenic patients, a strong negative correlation is observed between the peak time of the second peak and the activity of leukocyte elastase (Spearman R = -0.75, p<0.0001), i.e. the greater the activity of elastase, the earlier the maximum of the second peak is formed and vice versa. In the control group, there is no such correlation. Evaluation of the potential of hemostasis of spontaneous clots showed that in 42% of schizophrenic patients this parameter is shifted above the norm, which indicates an increased risk of thrombosis of small brain arteries in these patients. The developed technology of 'fibrinodynamics' has a good potential for introduction into

  8. Design and validation of standardized clinical and functional remission criteria in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosolov SN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergey N Mosolov,1 Andrey V Potapov,1 Uriy V Ushakov,2 Aleksey A Shafarenko,1 Anastasiya B Kostyukova11Department of Mental Disorders Therapy, Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry, Moscow, Russia; 2Moscow Psychiatric Outpatient Services #21, Moscow, RussiaBackground: International Remission Criteria (IRC for schizophrenia were developed recently by a group of internationally known experts. The IRC detect only 10%–30% of cases and do not cover the diversity of forms and social functioning. Our aim was to design a more applicable tool and validate its use – the Standardized Clinical and Functional Remission Criteria (SCFRC.Methods: We used a 6-month follow-up study of 203 outpatients from two Moscow centers and another further sample of stable patients from a 1-year controlled trial of atypical versus typical medication. Diagnosis was confirmed by International Classification of Diseases Version 10 (ICD10 criteria and the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. Patients were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, including intensity threshold, and further classified using the Russian domestic remission criteria and the level of social and personal functioning, according to the Personal and Social Performance Scale (PSP. The SCFRC were formulated and were validated by a data reanalysis on the first population sample and on a second independent sample (104 patients and in an open-label prospective randomized 12-month comparative study of risperidone long-acting injectable (RLAI versus olanzapine.Results: Only 64 of the 203 outpatients (31.5% initially met the IRC, and 53 patients (26.1% met the IRC after 6 months, without a change in treatment. Patients who were in remission had episodic and progressive deficit (39.6%, or remittent (15% paranoid schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder (17%. In addition, 105 patients of 139 (51.7%, who did not meet symptomatic IRC, remained stable within the period. Reanalysis of

  9. Occipital bending in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maller, Jerome J; Anderson, Rodney J; Thomson, Richard H; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of occipital bending (an occipital lobe crossing or twisting across the midline) in subjects with schizophrenia and matched healthy controls. Occipital bending prevalence was investigated in 37 patients with schizophrenia and 44 healthy controls. Ratings showed that prevalence was nearly three times higher among schizophrenia patients (13/37 [35.1%]) than in control subjects (6/44 [13.6%]). Furthermore, those with schizophrenia had greater normalized gray matter volume but less white matter volume and had larger brain-to-cranial ratio. The results suggest that occipital bending is more prevalent among schizophrenia patients than healthy subjects and that schizophrenia patients have different gray matter-white matter proportions. Although the cause and clinical ramifications of occipital bending are unclear, the results infer that occipital bending may be a marker of psychiatric illness.

  10. Auditory Processing Speed and Signal Detection in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korboot, P. J.; Damiani, N.

    1976-01-01

    Two differing explanations of schizophrenic processing deficit were examined: Chapman and McGhie's and Yates'. Thirty-two schizophrenics, classified on the acute-chronic and paranoid-nonparanoid dimensions, and eight neurotics were tested on two dichotic listening tasks. (Editor)

  11. Drama therapy for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, R A; Dent-Brown, K

    2007-01-24

    Medication is the mainstay of treatment for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses, but many people continue to experience symptoms in spite of medication (Johnstone 1998). In addition to medication, creative therapies, such as drama therapy may prove beneficial. Drama therapy is a form of treatment that encourages spontaneity and creativity. It can promote emotional expression, but does not necessarily require the participant to have insight into their condition or psychological-mindset. To review the effects of drama therapy and related approaches as an adjunctive treatment for schizophrenia compared with standard care and other psychosocial interventions. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (October 2006), hand searched reference lists, hand searched Dramatherapy (the journal of the British Association of Dramatherapists) and Arts in Psychotherapy and contacted relevant authors. We included all randomised controlled trials that compared drama therapy, psychodrama and related approaches with standard care or other psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia. We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data from the studies. We excluded data where more than 50% of participants in any group were lost to follow up. For continuous outcomes we calculated a weighted mean difference and its 95% confidence interval. For binary outcomes we calculated a fixed effects risk ratio (RR), its 95% confidence interval (CI) and a number needed to treat (NNT). The search identified 183 references but only five studies (total n=210) met the inclusion criteria. All of the studies were on inpatient populations and compared the intervention with standard inpatient care. One study had drama therapy as the intervention, one had role-playing, one had a social drama group and two used psychodrama. Two of the included studies were Chinese and it is difficult to know whether psychodrama and indeed inpatient psychiatric care in China is comparable with the

  12. Foreign body ingestions in a schizophrenic patient | Alao | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Here, we report a case of ingestion of a rolled, metal tuna can lid in a male prison inmate previously diagnosed with depression and paranoid schizophrenia. Following evaluation by the surgical team, the foreign body was removed by laparotomy and the patient was discharged back to the prison without complication.

  13. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 88 ... Vol 2, No 2 (2009), Attitudes To, Knowledge and Practice of Self-Breast Examination Among Female Healthcare Workers at the Murtala Muhammad Specialist Hospital, Kano ... Vol 4, No 3 (2012), Coprophagia in a Nigerian patient with paranoid schizophrenia: A case report and literature review, Abstract.

  14. No Evidence That Schizophrenia Candidate Genes Are More Associated With Schizophrenia Than Noncandidate Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Emma C; Border, Richard; Melroy-Greif, Whitney E; de Leeuw, Christiaan A; Ehringer, Marissa A; Keller, Matthew C

    2017-11-15

    A recent analysis of 25 historical candidate gene polymorphisms for schizophrenia in the largest genome-wide association study conducted to date suggested that these commonly studied variants were no more associated with the disorder than would be expected by chance. However, the same study identified other variants within those candidate genes that demonstrated genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia. As such, it is possible that variants within historic schizophrenia candidate genes are associated with schizophrenia at levels above those expected by chance, even if the most-studied specific polymorphisms are not. The present study used association statistics from the largest schizophrenia genome-wide association study conducted to date as input to a gene set analysis to investigate whether variants within schizophrenia candidate genes are enriched for association with schizophrenia. As a group, variants in the most-studied candidate genes were no more associated with schizophrenia than were variants in control sets of noncandidate genes. While a small subset of candidate genes did appear to be significantly associated with schizophrenia, these genes were not particularly noteworthy given the large number of more strongly associated noncandidate genes. The history of schizophrenia research should serve as a cautionary tale to candidate gene investigators examining other phenotypes: our findings indicate that the most investigated candidate gene hypotheses of schizophrenia are not well supported by genome-wide association studies, and it is likely that this will be the case for other complex traits as well. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring rationality in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Rasmus; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Owen, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    Background Empirical studies of rationality (syllogisms) in patients with schizophrenia have obtained different results. One study found that patients reason more logically if the syllogism is presented through an unusual content. Aims To explore syllogism-based rationality in schizophrenia. Meth...... differences became non-significant. Conclusions When taking intelligence and neuropsychological performance into account, patients with schizophrenia and controls perform similarly on syllogism tests of rationality.......Background Empirical studies of rationality (syllogisms) in patients with schizophrenia have obtained different results. One study found that patients reason more logically if the syllogism is presented through an unusual content. Aims To explore syllogism-based rationality in schizophrenia. Method...... Thirty-eight first-admitted patients with schizophrenia and 38 healthy controls solved 29 syllogisms that varied in presentation content (ordinary v. unusual) and validity (valid v. invalid). Statistical tests were made of unadjusted and adjusted group differences in models adjusting for intelligence...

  16. Schizophrenia on YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Matthew M; Nour, Murraih H; Tsatalou, Olga-Maria; Barrera, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    YouTube ( www.youtube.com ) is the most popular video-sharing Web site on the Internet and is used by medical students as a source of information regarding mental health conditions, including schizophrenia. The accuracy and educational utility of schizophrenia presentations on YouTube are unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accuracy of depictions of psychosis in the context of a diagnosis of schizophrenia (referred to in this article as "acute schizophrenia") on YouTube and to assess the utility of these videos as educational tools for teaching medical students to recognize the clinical features of acute schizophrenia. YouTube was searched for videos purporting to show acute schizophrenia. Eligible videos were independently rated by two consultant psychiatrists on two separate occasions 22 days apart for diagnostic accuracy, psychopathology, and educational utility. Videos (N=4,200) were assessed against predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The majority were not eligible for further analysis, mostly because they did not claim to show a patient with schizophrenia (74%) or contained duplicated content (11%). Of 35 videos that met the eligibility and adequacy criteria, only 12 accurately depicted acute schizophrenia. Accurate videos were characterized by persecutory delusions (83%), inappropriate affect (75%), and negative symptoms (83%). Despite the fact that 83% of accurate videos were deemed to have good educational utility compared with 15% of inaccurate videos, accurate and inaccurate videos had similar view counts (290,048 versus 186,124). Schizophrenia presentations on YouTube offer a distorted picture of the condition.

  17. Treatment of paranoid personality disorder with cognitive analytic therapy: a mixed methods single case experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, Stephen; Hardy, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    Paranoid personality disorder (PPD) presents as chronic and widespread interpersonal distrust, whereby the actions of others are interpreted as malevolent and malicious. This research details the assessment, formulation and treatment of a case of PPD within a 24-session contract of cognitive analytic therapy (CAT). The outcome methodology was an A/B with extended follow-up single case experimental design (SCED). The SCED was supplemented with qualitative patient interviewing via the Change Interview regarding their experience of CAT, whether change had taken place and detailing of any identified change mechanisms. Quantitative results show that five out of the six daily rated paranoia target complaint measures were extinguished during the treatment phase. Qualitatively, the patient attributed change to the therapy conducted. The results suggest that CAT was an effective intervention in this case of PPD and are discussed in terms of identified methodological shortcomings, treatment implications and the potential for generating a convincing evidence base for the psychotherapy of PPD. Narrative reformulation using a CAT model offers a key opportunity for the patient to achieve a new understanding of their paranoia. Psychotherapy for PPD requires a cognitive component, within a boundaried and relational therapy, that is able to reflect on paranoid enactments and ruptures within the therapeutic relationship.There is a large role for clinician-researchers in developing a PPD outcome evidence base. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons contribute to the clinical features...... of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations...... in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology...

  19. Auditory Hallucinations in Polyglots | Hemphill | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patients' mental performance was relatively better when the non-home language was used. In the psychosis of toxic, drug, and organic origin and in epilepsy, hallucinations may be multilingual, in contrast to schizophrenia. This is of value in differential diagnosis. A case of paranoid psychosis in which a White man had ...

  20. Women and schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Thara, R.; Kamath, Shantha

    2015-01-01

    Women's mental health is closely linked to their status in society. This paper outlines the clinical features of women with schizophrenia and highlights the interpersonal and social ramifications on their lives. There is no significant gender difference in the incidence and prevalence of schizophrenia. There is no clear trend in mortality, although suicides seem to be more in women with schizophrenia. In India, women face a lot of problems, especially in relation to marriage, pregnancy, child...

  1. The Danish Schizophrenia Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Haller, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database: To systematically monitor and improve the quality of treatment and care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. In addition, the database is accessible as a resource for research. Study population: Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and receiving mental health care...... to the data for use in specific research projects by applying to the steering committee. Conclusion: The Danish Schizophrenia Registry represents a valuable source of informative data to monitor and improve the quality of care of patients with schizophrenia in Denmark. However, continuous resources and time...

  2. Association between variations in the disrupted in schizophrenia 1 gene and schizophrenia: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiliang; Ren, Jun; Ye, Haihong

    2018-04-20

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder. Genetic and functional studies have strongly implicated the disrupted in schizophrenia 1 gene (DISC1) as a candidate susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. Moreover, recent association studies have indicated that several DISC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with schizophrenia. However, the association is hardly replicate in different ethnic group. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of the association between DISC1 SNPs and schizophrenia in which the samples were divided into subgroups according to ethnicity. Both rs3738401 and rs821616 showed not significantly association with schizophrenia in the Caucasian, Asian, Japanese or Han Chinese populations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Income inequality and schizophrenia: increased schizophrenia incidence in countries with high levels of income inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jonathan K; Tomita, Andrew; Kapadia, Amy S

    2014-03-01

    Income inequality is associated with numerous negative health outcomes. There is evidence that ecological-level socio-environmental factors may increase risk for schizophrenia. The aim was to investigate whether measures of income inequality are associated with incidence of schizophrenia at the country level. We conducted a systematic review of incidence rates for schizophrenia, reported between 1975 and 2011. For each country, national measures of income inequality (Gini coefficient) along with covariate risk factors for schizophrenia were obtained. Multi-level mixed-effects Poisson regression was performed to investigate the relationship between Gini coefficients and incidence rates of schizophrenia controlling for covariates. One hundred and seven incidence rates (from 26 countries) were included. Mean incidence of schizophrenia was 18.50 per 100,000 (SD = 11.9; range = 1.7-67). There was a significant positive relationship between incidence rate of schizophrenia and Gini coefficient (β = 1.02; Z = 2.28; p = .02; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.03). Countries characterized by a large rich-poor gap may be at increased risk of schizophrenia. We suggest that income inequality impacts negatively on social cohesion, eroding social capital, and that chronic stress associated with living in highly disparate societies places individuals at risk of schizophrenia.

  4. Non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungdalh, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives The primary treatment for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders is antipsychotic medication. One of the many public health challenges in mental illness, is to identify contributing factors to non-adherence to pharmacological treatment. The objective...... of this study was to perform an updated systematic review of risk factors for non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia in a European and American context. Methods The study was a systematic literature review of studies that included at least two measurements of pharmacological adherence...... of illness, alcohol or drug abuse and unspecified younger age. Conclusions The findings in this systematic literature review are consistent with previous reviews on non-adherence and schizophrenia. It stresses the methodological challenges in psychiatric adherence research and establishes the need for more...

  5. Systematic Prioritization and Integrative Analysis of Copy Number Variations in Schizophrenia Reveal Key Schizophrenia Susceptibility Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiongjian; Huang, Liang; Han, Leng; Luo, Zhenwu; Hu, Fang; Tieu, Roger; Gan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common mental disorder with high heritability and strong genetic heterogeneity. Common disease-common variants hypothesis predicts that schizophrenia is attributable in part to common genetic variants. However, recent studies have clearly demonstrated that copy number variations (CNVs) also play pivotal roles in schizophrenia susceptibility and explain a proportion of missing heritability. Though numerous CNVs have been identified, many of the regions affected by CNVs show poor overlapping among different studies, and it is not known whether the genes disrupted by CNVs contribute to the risk of schizophrenia. By using cumulative scoring, we systematically prioritized the genes affected by CNVs in schizophrenia. We identified 8 top genes that are frequently disrupted by CNVs, including NRXN1, CHRNA7, BCL9, CYFIP1, GJA8, NDE1, SNAP29, and GJA5. Integration of genes affected by CNVs with known schizophrenia susceptibility genes (from previous genetic linkage and association studies) reveals that many genes disrupted by CNVs are also associated with schizophrenia. Further protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis indicates that protein products of genes affected by CNVs frequently interact with known schizophrenia-associated proteins. Finally, systematic integration of CNVs prioritization data with genetic association and PPI data identifies key schizophrenia candidate genes. Our results provide a global overview of genes impacted by CNVs in schizophrenia and reveal a densely interconnected molecular network of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia. Though the prioritized top genes represent promising schizophrenia risk genes, further work with different prioritization methods and independent samples is needed to confirm these findings. Nevertheless, the identified key candidate genes may have important roles in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, and further functional characterization of these genes may provide pivotal targets for future therapeutics and

  6. Artificial Sanity: A Case Study for a Class in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Sheila O'Brien

    2005-01-01

    Using the story of death row inmate Charles Singleton, who developed paranoid schizophrenia while in prison awaiting execution, this case study explores the relationship between a society's concept of mental illness and its treatment of people who are mentally ill. Students are asked to identify the model of mental illness assumed by each of the…

  7. Cotard Syndrome without Depressive Symptoms in a Schizophrenic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Pedro; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Cerqueira, João J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Cotard syndrome is a rare condition characterized by nihilistic delusions concerning body or life that can be found in several neuropsychiatry conditions. It is typically associated with depressive symptoms. Method. We present a case of Cotard syndrome without depressive symptoms in the context of known paranoid schizophrenia. A literature review of Cotard syndrome in schizophrenia was performed. Results. Although there are few descriptions of this syndrome in schizophrenia, patients usually present depressive mood and psychomotor retardation, features not seen in our patient. Loss of the sense of the inner self, present in schizophrenia, could explain patient's symptomatology but neurobiological bases of this syndrome remain unclear. Conclusion. Despite not being considered in actual classifications, Cotard syndrome is still relevant and psychiatric evaluation is critical to diagnosing and treating this condition in psychiatric patients.

  8. Biological study in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Kiyoto; Yoshikawa, Akane; Natsubori, Takanobu; Koike, Shinsuke; Nagai, Tatsuya; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Yukika; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with enormous morbidity, mortality, personal disability, and social cost. Although considerable research on schizophrenia has been performed, the etiology of this disease has not been fully elucidated. In recent years, imaging and genetic technologies have been developed dramatically. Disturbances in glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. We attempted an integrative review, of studies pertaining to recent advances of schizophrenia research with a focus on neuroimaging and genetic studies. Additionally, we present the preliminary findings of the clinical research in our outpatient unit, specialized for early intervention, at the University of Tokyo Hospital. (author)

  9. Risk for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy: population based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping; Xu, Huylan; Laursen, Thomas Munk

    2005-01-01

    .20) in people with a history of epilepsy. The effect of epilepsy was the same in men and in women and increased with age. Family history of psychosis and a family history of epilepsy were significant risk factors for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis, and the effect of epilepsy, both in cases......OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether age at onset of epilepsy, type of epilepsy, family history of psychosis, or family history of epilepsy affect the risk of schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis among patients with epilepsy. DESIGN: Comparison of population based data. SETTING: Danish...... and families, was greater among people with no family history of psychosis. In addition, the increased risk for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis did not differ by type of epilepsy but increased with increasing number of admissions to hospital and, particularly, was significantly greater for people...

  10. The schizophrenia risk gene ZNF804A influences the antipsychotic response of positive schizophrenia symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Mössner, R; Schumacher, A; Wagner, M; Lennertz, L; Steinbrecher, A; Quednow, Boris B; Rujescu, D; Rietschel, M; Maier, W

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors determining the response to antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia are poorly understood. A new schizophrenia susceptibility gene, the zinc-finger gene ZNF804A, has recently been identified. To assess the pharmacogenetic importance of this gene, we treated 144 schizophrenia patients and assessed the response of positive and negative symptoms by PANSS. Patients homozygous for the ZNF804A risk allele for schizophrenia (rs1344706 AA) showed poorer improvement of positive sympto...

  11. Resting EEG deficits in accused murderers with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Robert A; Yang, Yaling; Raine, Adrian; Han, Chenbo; Liu, Jianghong; Li, Liejia

    2011-10-31

    Empirical evidence continues to suggest a biologically distinct violent subtype of schizophrenia. The present study examined whether murderers with schizophrenia would demonstrate resting EEG deficits distinguishing them from both non-violent schizophrenia patients and murderers without schizophrenia. Resting EEG data were collected from five diagnostic groups (normal controls, non-murderers with schizophrenia, murderers with schizophrenia, murderers without schizophrenia, and murderers with psychiatric conditions other than schizophrenia) at a brain hospital in Nanjing, China. Murderers with schizophrenia were characterized by increased left-hemispheric fast-wave EEG activity relative to non-violent schizophrenia patients, while non-violent schizophrenia patients instead demonstrated increased diffuse slow-wave activity compared to all other groups. Results are discussed within the framework of a proposed left-hemispheric over-processing hypothesis specific to violent individuals with schizophrenia, involving left hemispheric hyperarousal deficits, which may lead to a homicidally violent schizophrenia outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Schizophrenia : Current concepts in aetiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is perhaps the most devastating neuropsychiatric illness. Worldwide, its prevalence rate is about 1%. Schizophrenia is considered a neurodevelopmental disorder involving the interplay of susceptibility genes and environmental factors. There is a wide range of pathologic findings, but there is no specific or diagnostic laboratory abnormality. Till date, the aetiology, neuropathology, and pathophysiology of schizophrenia remain elusive. Over the last forty years, the dopaminergic model has been the leading neurochemical hypothesis of schizophrenia. Yet it remains unlikely that dopaminergic dysfunction, on its own. Glutamatergic models provide an alternate approach for conceptualizing the brain abnormalities associated with schizophrenia. New pharmacological and behavioral approaches aimed at potentiating glutamatergic neurotransmission, offer new hopeforfuture clinical development

  13. Pharmacotherapy of Schizophrenia: Ploypharmacy Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rahiminejad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nSchizophrenia is a debilitating illness, rating as one of the leading causes of lost years of quality of life. The illness imposes a disproportionate burden on patients and their families, healthcare systems and society. Pharmacological management is the cornerstone of treatment of schizophrenia, and antipsychotics, both first generation of antipsychotics and second generation of antipsychotics, are efficacious in reducing levels of psychopathology in acute episodes of schizophrenia. Clearly a need for innovative treatment strategies in schizophrenia that will ensure increased effectiveness against negative symptoms and cognitive dysfunction dysfunction. Therefore, in majority of cases polypharmacy is one of the effective approaches. This review focused on polypharmacy in the treatment of schizophrenia and in particular negative symptoms.

  14. Cognitive Remediation in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Vieira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Several reviews of the literature support the idea that cognitive deficits observed in a large percentage of patients with schizophrenia are responsible for the cognitive performance deficit and functional disability associated with the disease. The grow- ing importance of neurocognition in Psychiatry, especially with regard to planning strategies and rehabilitative therapies to improve the prognosis of patients contrib- utes to the interest of achieving this literature review on cognitive rehabilitation in schizophrenia. In this work, drawn from research in the areas of schizophrenia, cog- nition, cognitive rehabilitation and cognitive remediation (2000-2012 through PubMed and The Cochrane Collaboration, it is intended, to describe the types of psychological and behavioral therapies recommended in the treatment of cognitive disabilities in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. This review will also highlight the clinical and scientific evidence of each of these therapies, as their effect on cognitive performance, symptoms and functionality in patients with schizophrenia.

  15. Toxoplasma gondii and schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtari Mohammadreza; Mokhtari Mojgan

    2006-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that infectious agents may contribute to some cases of schizophrenia. In animals, infection with Toxoplasma gondii can alter behavior and neurotransmitter function. In humans, acute infection with T. gondii can produce psychotic symptoms similar to those displayed by persons with schizophrenia. Since 1953, a total of 19 studies of T. gondii antibodies in persons with schizophrenia and other severe psychiatric disorders and in controls have been reported; ...

  16. Visual masking & schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herzog

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Visual masking is a frequently used tool in schizophrenia research. Visual masking has a very high sensitivity and specificity and masking paradigms have been proven to be endophenotypes. Whereas masking is a powerful technique to study schizophrenia, the underlying mechanisms are discussed controversially. For example, for more than 25 years, masking deficits of schizophrenia patients were mainly attributed to a deficient magno-cellular system (M-system. Here, we show that there is very little evidence that masking deficits are magno-cellular deficits. We will discuss the magno-cellular and other approaches in detail and highlight their pros and cons.

  17. Loss aversion in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trémeau, Fabien; Brady, Melissa; Saccente, Erica; Moreno, Alexis; Epstein, Henry; Citrome, Leslie; Malaspina, Dolores; Javitt, Daniel

    2008-08-01

    Loss aversion in decision-making refers to a higher sensitivity to losses than to gains. Loss aversion is conceived as an affective interference in cognitive processes such as judgment and decision-making. Loss aversion in non-risky choices has not been studied in schizophrenia. Forty-two individuals with schizophrenia and 42 non-patient control subjects, matched by gender and age, were randomized to two different scenarios (a buying scenario and a selling scenario). Subjects were asked to evaluate the price of a decorated mug. Schizophrenia subjects were re-tested four weeks later with the other scenario. Contrary to non-patient controls, schizophrenia subjects did not show loss aversion. In the schizophrenia group, absence of loss aversion was correlated with age, duration of illness, number of months in State hospitals, and poorer performance in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, but not with current psychopathology and two domains of emotional experience. Absence of loss aversion in schizophrenia represents a deficit in the processing of emotional information during decision-making. It can be interpreted as a lack of integration between the emotional and the cognitive systems, or to a more diffuse and de-differentiated impact of emotional information on decision-making. Future studies should bring more clarity to this question.

  18. Inductive Reasoning in Patients with Paranoid Type Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emrah Karadere

    2017-08-01

    According to this study apart from the area of delusions, it can be say that the reasoning of the patients is normal. Our study indicates that when the delusional patients are compared to the control group in terms of jumping to conclusion and modifying their initial beliefs, they are not different when given similarly sufficient amount of data. [JCBPR 2017; 6(2.000: 67-74

  19. Kallmann syndrome and paranoid schizophrenia: A rare combination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); J.E.J.M. Hovens (Hans); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractKallmann syndrome (KS) is a genetically heterogeneous and rare disorder characterised by the combination of hypothalamic hypogonadism and anosmia/hyposmia, a variable degree of intellectual disability and several somatic anomalies. In about one-third of the patients, mutations have been

  20. Bleuler and the neurobiology of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckers, Stephan

    2011-11-01

    Schizophrenia remains a major challenge for psychiatry. One hundred years after the publication of Eugen Bleuler's monograph, we are still debating the nosology and mechanisms of schizophrenia. We have stalled in the development of more effective treatments, after success with the introduction of antipsychotic medication. Cure and prevention remain in the distance. This article reviews the importance of Bleuler's monograph for the neuroscientific exploration of schizophrenia. While Bleuler assumed that schizophrenia has a neural basis, he remained agnostic on possible mechanisms and skeptical about the value of pathological diagnosis. He preferred psychological understanding over neural explanation. He gave hope by making schizophrenia dimensional and less predictive of course and outcome. To make progress now, we need to redefine schizophrenia at the level of the brain.

  1. Whole-genome sequencing of monozygotic twins discordant for schizophrenia indicates multiple genetic risk factors for schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinsong Tang; Fan He; Fengyu Zhang; Yin Yao Shugart; Chunyu Liu; Yanqing Tang; Raymond C.K.Chan; Chuan-Yue Wang; Yong-Gang Yao; Xiaogang Chen; Yu Fan; Hong Li; Qun Xiang; Deng-Feng Zhang; Zongchang Li; Ying He; Yanhui Liao; Ya Wang

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common disorder with a high heritability,but its genetic architecture is still elusive.We implemented whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of 8 families with monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia to assess potential association of de novo mutations (DNMs) or inherited variants with susceptibility to schizophrenia.Eight non-synonymous DNMs (including one splicing site) were identified and shared by twins,which were either located in previously reported schizophrenia risk genes (p.V24689I mutation in TTN,p.S2506T mutation in GCN1L1,IVS3+1G > T in DOCK1) or had a benign to damaging effect according to in silico prediction analysis.By searching the inherited rare damaging or loss-of-function (LOF) variants and common susceptible alleles from three classes of schizophrenia candidate genes,we were able to distill genetic alterations in several schizophrenia risk genes,including GAD1,PLXNA2,RELN and FEZ1.Four inherited copy number variations (CNVs;including a large deletion at 16p13.11) implicated for schizophrenia were identified in four families,respectively.Most of families carried both missense DNMs and inherited risk variants,which might suggest that DNMs,inherited rare damaging variants and common risk alleles together conferred to schizophrenia susceptibility.Our results support that schizophrenia is caused by a combination of multiple genetic factors,with each DNM/variant showing a relatively small effect size.

  2. Cotard Syndrome without Depressive Symptoms in a Schizophrenic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Morgado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cotard syndrome is a rare condition characterized by nihilistic delusions concerning body or life that can be found in several neuropsychiatry conditions. It is typically associated with depressive symptoms. Method. We present a case of Cotard syndrome without depressive symptoms in the context of known paranoid schizophrenia. A literature review of Cotard syndrome in schizophrenia was performed. Results. Although there are few descriptions of this syndrome in schizophrenia, patients usually present depressive mood and psychomotor retardation, features not seen in our patient. Loss of the sense of the inner self, present in schizophrenia, could explain patient’s symptomatology but neurobiological bases of this syndrome remain unclear. Conclusion. Despite not being considered in actual classifications, Cotard syndrome is still relevant and psychiatric evaluation is critical to diagnosing and treating this condition in psychiatric patients.

  3. Schizophrenia and city life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G; David, A; Andréasson, S; Allebeck, P

    1992-07-18

    Prevalence of schizophrenia and rates of first admission to hospital for this disorder are higher in most modern industrialised cities, and in urban compared with rural areas. The "geographical drift" hypothesis (ie, most schizophrenics tend to drift into city areas because of their illness or its prodrome) has remained largely unchallenged. We have investigated the association between place of upbringing and the incidence of schizophrenia with data from a cohort of 49,191 male Swedish conscripts linked to the Swedish National Register of Psychiatric Care. The incidence of schizophrenia was 1.65 times higher (95% confidence interval 1.19-2.28) among men brought up in cities than in those who had had a rural upbringing. The association persisted despite adjustment for other factors associated with city life such as cannabis use, parental divorce, and family history of psychiatric disorder. This finding cannot be explained by the widely held notion that people with schizophrenia drift into cities at the beginning of their illness. We conclude that undetermined environmental factors found in cities increase the risk of schizophrenia.

  4. Criterion and construct validity of the CogState Schizophrenia Battery in Japanese patients with schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisuke Yoshida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The CogState Schizophrenia Battery (CSB, a computerized cognitive battery, covers all the same cognitive domains as the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery but is briefer to conduct. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the criterion and construct validity of the Japanese language version of the CSB (CSB-J in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Forty Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 40 Japanese healthy controls with matching age, gender, and premorbid intelligence quotient were enrolled. The CSB-J and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia, Japanese-language version (BACS-J were performed once. The structure of the CSB-J was also evaluated by a factor analysis. Similar to the BACS-J, the CSB-J was sensitive to cognitive impairment in Japanese patients with schizophrenia. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between the CSB-J composite score and the BACS-J composite score. A factor analysis showed a three-factor model consisting of memory, speed, and social cognition factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that the CSB-J is a useful and rapid automatically administered computerized battery for assessing broad cognitive domains in Japanese patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Mosaic Turner syndrome associated with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sook Young; Park, Joo Won; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jun, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jeong Seop; Lee, Ji Eun

    2014-03-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex-chromosome disorder; occurring in 1 in 2,500 female births. There are sporadic few case reports of concomitant Turner syndrome with schizophrenia worldwide. Most Turner females had a 45,X monosomy, whereas the majority of comorbidity between Turner syndrome and schizophrenia had a mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX). We present a case of a 21-year-old woman with Turner syndrome, mosaic karyotype (45,X/46,XX), showing mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. HOPA gene within Xq13 is related to mental retardation, hypothyroidism, and schizophrenia. Our case may be a potential clue which supports the hypothesis for involvement of genes on X chromosome in development of schizophrenia. Further studies including comorbid cases reports are need in order to discern the cause of schizophrenia in patients having Turner syndrome.

  6. Role of 108 schizophrenia-associated loci in modulating psychopathological dimensions in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Chiara; Serretti, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) identified 108 loci associated with schizophrenia, but their role in modulating specific psychopathological dimensions of the disease is unknown. This study investigated which symptom dimensions may be affected by these loci in schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Positive, negative and depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, cognition, violent behaviors, quality of life, and early onset were investigated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using the clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness (CATIE) and systematic treatment enhancement program for bipolar disorder (STEP-BD) studies. Individual loci were investigated, then genes within 50 Kbp from polymorphisms with p schizophrenia-associated variant (rs75059851) may modulate negative symptoms. Multi-locus models may provide interesting insights about the biological mechanisms that mediate psychopathological dimensions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Técnicas de intervención dinámica y arte en pacientes con psicopatología severa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Pérez La Rotta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic interventions and art for patients with severe psychopathologyThis study points to the benefits of dynamic psychotherapy with art on patients with severe psychopathology. Participants were patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and drug abuse, from a psychiatric clinic in Bogotá. Colombia. The paper shows the techniques and the results of art in the psychotherapeutic process.

  8. Whole-genome sequencing of monozygotic twins discordant for schizophrenia indicates multiple genetic risk factors for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinsong; Fan, Yu; Li, Hong; Xiang, Qun; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Li, Zongchang; He, Ying; Liao, Yanhui; Wang, Ya; He, Fan; Zhang, Fengyu; Shugart, Yin Yao; Liu, Chunyu; Tang, Yanqing; Chan, Raymond C K; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Yao, Yong-Gang; Chen, Xiaogang

    2017-06-20

    Schizophrenia is a common disorder with a high heritability, but its genetic architecture is still elusive. We implemented whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of 8 families with monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for schizophrenia to assess potential association of de novo mutations (DNMs) or inherited variants with susceptibility to schizophrenia. Eight non-synonymous DNMs (including one splicing site) were identified and shared by twins, which were either located in previously reported schizophrenia risk genes (p.V24689I mutation in TTN, p.S2506T mutation in GCN1L1, IVS3+1G > T in DOCK1) or had a benign to damaging effect according to in silico prediction analysis. By searching the inherited rare damaging or loss-of-function (LOF) variants and common susceptible alleles from three classes of schizophrenia candidate genes, we were able to distill genetic alterations in several schizophrenia risk genes, including GAD1, PLXNA2, RELN and FEZ1. Four inherited copy number variations (CNVs; including a large deletion at 16p13.11) implicated for schizophrenia were identified in four families, respectively. Most of families carried both missense DNMs and inherited risk variants, which might suggest that DNMs, inherited rare damaging variants and common risk alleles together conferred to schizophrenia susceptibility. Our results support that schizophrenia is caused by a combination of multiple genetic factors, with each DNM/variant showing a relatively small effect size. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. All rights reserved.

  9. Spouse with schizophrenia and risk of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Christopher; Agerbo, Esben; Nielsen, Philip Rising

    2016-12-01

    Increased prevalence of lifestyle risk factors or shared etiology may underlie the association between schizophrenia and the subsequent risk of dementia. We explored the association between having a spouse with schizophrenia and the risk of dementia. We found a positive relationship between having a spouse with schizophrenia and vascular dementia in individuals without a mental disorder themselves but no association between having a spouse with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's dementia. As spouses share environmental risk factors and lifestyle, this might suggest that the excess risk of dementia in probands with schizophrenia could be ascribed to the unhealthy living environment among individuals with schizophrenia.

  10. Heterogeneity of schizophrenia: Genetic and symptomatic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Sakae

    2013-10-01

    Schizophrenia may have etiological heterogeneity, and may reflect common symptomatology caused by many genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we show the potential existence of heterogeneity in schizophrenia based on the results of our previous studies. In our study of the NOTCH4 gene, there were no significant associations between any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NOTCH4 and schizophrenia. However, exploratory analyses suggested that the SNP, rs3134928 may be associated with early-onset schizophrenia, and that rs387071 may be associated with schizophrenia characterized by negative symptoms. In our highly familial schizophrenia study, the African-American cohort without environmental exposure showed a possible linkage at marker 8p23.1 in the dominant model and in the European-American cohort, a marker at 22q13.32 showed a probable linkage in the recessive model. In the less familial schizophrenia families, these linkages were not shown. Based on our eye movement study, a putative subtype of schizophrenia with severe symptoms related to excitement/hostility, negative symptoms and disorganization may be associated with chromosome 22q11. We consider that a sample stratification approach may clarify the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Therefore, this approach may lead to a more straightforward way of identifying susceptibility genes of schizophrenia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Environmental risk factors and their impact on the age of onset of schizophrenia: Comparing familial to non-familial schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Martin; Hamann, Melanie; Schwerthöffer, Dirk; Froböse, Teresa; Vukovich, Ruth; Pitschel-Walz, Gabriele; Bäuml, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Several risk factors for schizophrenia have yet been identified. The aim of our study was to investigate how certain childhood and adolescent risk factors predict the age of onset of psychosis in patients with and without a familial component (i.e. a relative with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder). Aside from the age of onset of psychosis, we examined the risk factors for schizophrenia including obstetric complications, birth during winter or spring, behavioral deviances or delayed motor and speech development, exposure to adverse life events and exposure to substance use within a group of 100 patients (45 female, 55 male) with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 35.15 ± 13.21. Birth complications and cannabis abuse are predictors for an earlier onset of schizophrenia in patients with non-familial schizophrenia. No environmental risk factors for an earlier age of onset in familial schizophrenia have been identified. Certain environmental risk factors for schizophrenia seem to have an impact on the age of onset of psychosis in non-familial schizophrenia, they do not seem to have an impact on familial schizophrenia.

  12. Cannabis use and cognition in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Else-Marie Løberg

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available People with schizophrenia frequently report cannabis use, and cannabis may be a risk factor for schizophrenia, mediated through effects on brain function and biochemistry. Thus, it is conceivable that cannabis may also influence cognitive functioning in this patients group. We report data from our own laboratory on the use of cannabis by schizophrenia patients, and review the existing literature on the effects of cannabis on cognition in schizophrenia and related psychosis. Of the 23 studies that were found, 14 reported that the cannabis users had better cognitive performance than the schizophrenia non-users. Eight studies reported no or minimal differences in cognitive performance in the two groups, but only one study reported better cognitive performance in the schizophrenia non-user group. Our own results confirm the overall impression from the literature review of better cognitive performance in the cannabis user group. These paradoxical findings may have several explanations, which are discussed. We suggest that cannabis causes a transient cognitive breakdown enabling the development of psychosis, imitating the typical cognitive vulnerability seen in schizophrenia. This is further supported by an earlier age of onset and fewer neurological soft signs in the cannabis-related schizophrenia group, suggesting an alternative pathway to psychosis.

  13. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...... with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...... restricting the analyses to people with no history of epilepsy. A history of both febrile seizures and epilepsy was associated with a 204% increased risk of schizophrenia (RR=3.04; 95% CI, 1.36-6.79) as compared with people with no such history. CONCLUSIONS: We found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia...

  14. Schizophrenia and Metacognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, Stephen F.; Mors, Ole; Nordentoft, Merete

    2014-01-01

    tested for relationships between course of illness and levels of specific metacognitions in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. A large cohort of people with first episode psychosis (n = 578) recruited as part the OPUS trial (1998–2000) were tested. Information about course of illness (remitted, episodic...... beliefs may also impact on positive symptoms and course of illness within schizophrenia....

  15. Neurodevelopmental correlates in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivković Maja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary aetiopathogenetic considerations, based on neuro-imaging genetic and developmental neurobiology studies, suggest neurodevelopmental origin of schizophrenia. Several lines of evidence including structural abnormalities on in vivo brain imaging, the excess of prenatal and obstetric complications and the association of congenital and minor physical anomalies with schizophrenia, strongly indicate the neurodevelopmental pathogenesis of schizophrenia. On the other hand, controversial concept of psychotic continuum suggests schizophrenia and depression sharing the same genetic contribution to the pathogenesis. If this would be the case, depression could also be considered as neuro developmental disorder. The aims of the study were to investigate the association between: a pregnancy and birth complications (PBC, and b minor physical anomalies (MPA and schizophrenia or depression. Experimental groups consisted of 60 schizophrenic, 28 major depression patients and 30 healthy controls. All patients were diagnosed according to DSM-IV. Schizophrenic group was divided with regard to PANSS score into positive (n=32 and negative form (n=28 subgroups. PBC information were gathered from maternal recall while MPA were examined by using Waldrop scale for adults. The results showed that negative and positive schizophrenic subgroups had significantly more PBC than depressive group (p<0,05, as well than controls (p<0,001; p<0,05; respectively. There was no significant trend for more PBC in negative than in positive subgroup. All schizophrenic patients had higher rates of MPA than depressives (p<0,05. This trend for more MPA was not significant in comparison with healthy controls. These findings suggest that schizophrenia, especially its negative forms, could be considered as a member of the spectrum of neuro developmental disorders, which does not seem to be the case with depression. PBC and MPA could also be valuable in evaluation of risks for

  16. Treating schizophrenia during menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Amnon; Brzezinski-Sinai, Noa A; Seeman, Mary V

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this review is to examine three questions: What are the risks and benefits of treating women with schizophrenia with hormone therapy (HT) at menopause? Should the antipsychotic regimen be changed at menopause? Do early- and late-onset women with schizophrenia respond differently to HT at menopause? MEDLINE databases for the years 1990 to 2016 were searched using the following interactive terms: schizophrenia, gender, menopause, estrogen, and hormones. The selected articles (62 out of 800 abstracts) were chosen on the basis of their applicability to the objectives of this targeted narrative review. HT during the perimenopause in women with schizophrenia ameliorates psychotic and cognitive symptoms, and may also help affective symptoms. Vasomotor, genitourinary, and sleep symptoms are also reduced. Depending on the woman's age and personal risk factors and antipsychotic side effects, the risk of breast cancer and cardiovascular disease may be increased. Antipsychotic types and doses may need to be adjusted at menopause, as may be the mode of administration. Both HT and changes in antipsychotic management should be considered for women with schizophrenia at menopause. The question about differences in response between early- and late-onset women cannot yet be answered.

  17. [Risk factors of schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvisaari, Jaana

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a multifactorial, neurodevelopmental disorder caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Disturbances of brain development begin prenatally, while different environmental insults further affect postnatal brain maturation during childhood and adolescence. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have succeeded in identifying hundreds of new risk variants for common, multifactorial diseases. In schizophrenia research, GWAS have found several rare copy number variants that considerably increase the risk of schizophrenia, and have shown an association between schizophrenia and the major histocompatibility complex. Research on environmental risk factors in recent years has provided new information particularly on risk factors related to pregnancy and childhood rearing environment. Gene-environment interactions have become a central research topic. There is evidence that genetically susceptible children are more vulnerable to the effects of unstable childhood rearing environment and other environmental risk factors.

  18. Schizophrenia: a review of neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, J; Kelly, B D; O'Connor, W T

    2004-01-01

    The last few decades have seen significant advances in our understanding of the neurochemical basis of schizophrenia. To describe the neurotransmitter systems and nerve circuits implicated in schizophrenia; to compare the neuropharmacology of typical and atypical anti-psychotic agents; and to describe recent developments in the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia. Relevant pharmacological, neurophysiological and psychiatric literature was examined and reviewed. Schizophrenia is associated with abnormalities of multiple neurotransmitter systems, including dopamine, serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate. Typical and atypical antipsychotic agents differ in their receptor-binding affinities, which are related to their differing side-effect profiles. Novel therapeutic strategies include normalisation of synaptic dopamine or serotonin levels, serotonin receptor antagonism and modulation of cerebral protein synthesis. The ideal treatment for schizophrenia may not be a single pharmacological agent but several agents that match the different expressions of the illness, in combination with psycho-social interventions.

  19. Impaired glutathione synthesis in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gysin, René; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Sandell, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex multifactorial brain disorder with a genetic component. Convergent evidence has implicated oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) deficits in the pathogenesis of this disease. The aim of the present study was to test whether schizophrenia is associated with a deficit...... of GSH synthesis. Cultured skin fibroblasts from schizophrenia patients and control subjects were challenged with oxidative stress, and parameters of the rate-limiting enzyme for the GSH synthesis, the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), were measured. Stressed cells of patients had a 26% (P = 0.......002) decreased GCL activity as compared with controls. This reduction correlated with a 29% (P schizophrenia in two...

  20. Wellness within illness: happiness in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Barton W; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Depp, Colin A; Glorioso, Danielle K; Jeste, Dilip V

    2014-10-01

    Schizophrenia is typically a chronic disorder and among the most severe forms of serious mental illnesses in terms of adverse impact on quality of life. Yet, there have been suggestions that some people with schizophrenia can experience an overall sense of happiness in their lives. We investigated happiness among 72 outpatients with non-remitted chronic schizophrenia with a mean duration of illness of 24.4 years, and 64 healthy comparison subjects (HCs). Despite continued treatment with antipsychotic medications, the individuals with schizophrenia manifested a mild to moderate level of psychopathology. People with schizophrenia reported lower mean levels of happiness than HCs, but there was substantial heterogeneity within the schizophrenia group. Level of happiness in persons with schizophrenia was significantly correlated with higher mental health-related quality of life, and several positive psychosocial factors (lower perceived stress, and higher levels of resilience, optimism, and personal mastery). However, level of happiness was not related to sociodemographic characteristics, duration of illness, severity of positive or negative symptoms, physical function, medical comorbidity, or cognitive functioning. Except for an absence of an association with resilience, the pattern of correlations of happiness with other variables seen among HCs was similar to that in individuals with schizophrenia. Although happiness may be harder to achieve in the context of a serious mental illness, it nonetheless appears to be a viable treatment goal in schizophrenia. Psychotherapies targeting positive coping factors such as resilience, optimism, and personal mastery warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Common variants conferring risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansson, Hreinn; Ophoff, Roel A; Steinberg, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disorder, caused by both genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. Research on pathogenesis has traditionally focused on neurotransmitter systems in the brain, particularly those involving dopamine. Schizophrenia has been considered a separate disease...... conform to classical nosological disease boundaries. Certain CNVs confer not only high relative risk of schizophrenia but also of other psychiatric disorders. The structural variations associated with schizophrenia can involve several genes and the phenotypic syndromes, or the 'genomic disorders', have.......2. Our findings implicating the MHC region are consistent with an immune component to schizophrenia risk, whereas the association with NRGN and TCF4 points to perturbation of pathways involved in brain development, memory and cognition....

  2. Molecular Imaging in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, H.C.; Doorduin, J.; van Berckel, B.N.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we aim to shed light on the schizophrenia spectrum disorders using molecular imaging. Schizophrenia spectrum disorders consist primarily of the disorders with full-blown psychosis in their course and are grouped in the DSM-IV category of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.

  3. Forensic importance of jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzinić, Lana; Goreta, Miroslav; Jukić, Vlado; Dordević, Veljko; Koić, Elvira; Herceg, Miroslav

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the investigation is to define as clearly as possible specific forensic psychiatric characteristics of persons who committed homicide and or attempted due to jealousy (the nature and severity of psychopathology, the level of responsibility, danger for the community, intensity and nature of aggression, the victimologic dimension, the relation of alcohol and jealousy). A retrospective method based on forensic psychiatric expertises in the period 1975-1999 was used. They encompassed 200 examinees that committed murder or attempted it. The results show the connection of psychotic jealousy with the highest degree of danger in diagnostic categories of paranoid psychosis and paranoid schizophrenia. The time span from the first manifestations of jealousy until the actual commitment of a crime is the longest in personality disorders and the shortest in schizophrenia. Exogenous provoking situations were dominant for committing homicide due to jealousy in personality disorders. Acute alcohol intoxication has a specific significance in crime due to jealousy in the same diagnostic category. Clear criteria were designed for forensic psychiatric evaluation of murder and attempts of homicide caused by jealousy, which will be of help in everyday practice in the field forensic work and treatment.

  4. Downregulated kynurenine 3-monooxygenase gene expression and enzyme activity in schizophrenia and genetic association with schizophrenia endophenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonodi, Ikwunga; Stine, O Colin; Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Mitchell, Braxton D; Hong, L Elliot; Kajii, Yasushi; Thaker, Gunvant K; Schwarcz, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Kynurenic acid, a metabolite of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, is an antagonist at N-methyl-d-aspartate and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and modulates glutamate, dopamine, and acetylcholine signaling. Cortical kynurenic acid concentrations are elevated in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of schizophrenia patients. The proximal cause may be an impairment of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a rate-limiting enzyme at the branching point of the kynurenine pathway. To examine KMO messenger RNA expression and KMO enzyme activity in postmortem tissue from the frontal eye field (FEF; Brodmann area 6) obtained from schizophrenia individuals compared with healthy control individuals and to explore the relationship between KMO single-nucleotide polymorphisms and schizophrenia oculomotor endophenotypes. Case-control postmortem and clinical study. Maryland Brain Collection, outpatient clinics. Postmortem specimens from schizophrenia patients (n = 32) and control donors (n = 32) and a clinical sample of schizophrenia patients (n = 248) and healthy controls (n = 228). Comparison of quantitative KMO messenger RNA expression and KMO enzyme activity in postmortem FEF tissue between schizophrenia patients and controls and association of KMO single-nucleotide polymorphisms with messenger RNA expression in postmortem FEF and schizophrenia and oculomotor endophenotypes (ie, smooth pursuit eye movements and oculomotor delayed response). In postmortem tissue, we found a significant and correlated reduction in KMO gene expression and KMO enzyme activity in the FEF in schizophrenia patients. In the clinical sample, KMO rs2275163 was not associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia but showed modest effects on predictive pursuit and visuospatial working memory endophenotypes. Our results provide converging lines of evidence implicating reduced KMO activity in the etiopathophysiology of schizophrenia and related neurocognitive deficits.

  5. Social cognition in patients with schizophrenia, their unaffected first degree relatives and healthy controls. Comparison between groups and analysis of associated clinical and sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Sosa, Juana Teresa; Gil Santiago, Hiurma; Trujillo Cubas, Angel; Winter Navarro, Marta; León Pérez, Petra; Guerra Cazorla, Luz Marina; Martín Jiménez, José María

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the social cognition in patients with schizophrenia, healthy first-degree relatives and controls, by studying the relationship between social cognition and nonsocial cognition, psychopathology, and other clinical and sociodemographic variables. The total sample was comprised of patients diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia (N = 29), healthy first-degree relatives (N = 21) and controls (N = 28). All groups were assessed with an ad hoc questionnaire and a Social Cognition Scale, which assessed the domains: emotional processing, social perception and attributional style in a Spanish population. The patient group was also assessed with the Scale for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and the Mini-mental state examination. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS version 15.0. Patients scored significantly worse in all domains of social cognition assessed, compared with controls, and mastery attributional style, compared with relatives. The type of psychopathology correlated negatively and statistically significantly with different domains of social cognition: negative symptoms with emotional processing and attributional style, and positive symptoms with social perception. Basic cognition scores correlated positively and statistically significantly with the domains social perception and attributional style. Social cognition has become an interesting object of study, especially in how it relates to non-social cognition, psychopathology and global functioning of patients, bringing new elements to be considered in the early detection, comprehensive treatment and psychosocial rehabilitation of patients. Its conceptualization as trait variable, the consideration of the existence of a continuum between patients and relatives are plausible hypotheses that require further research. Copyright © 2012 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting risk and the emergence of schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, Mary C

    2012-09-01

    This article gives an overview of genetic and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. The presence of certain molecular, biological, and psychosocial factors at certain points in the life span, has been linked to later development of schizophrenia. All need to be considered in the context of schizophrenia as a lifelong brain disorder. Research interest in schizophrenia is shifting to late childhood\\/early adolescence for screening and preventative measures. This article discusses those environmental risk factors for schizophrenia for which there is the largest evidence base.

  7. [Prevention of schizophrenia: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Research over the years has introduced multiple interventions for schizophrenia. Notwithstanding the nature of intervention pharmacological or psychological a complete cure for the condition remains a much-desired, yet unachieved goal. What is required is an exploration of alternative intervention strategies for treating schizophrenia a preventive approach is such an option. The chronic nature of schizophrenia and its associated disabilities have a tremendously negative affect the quality of life of patients, their families, and communities. Among the preferred approaches to reducing the negative consequences associated with the disorder is the prevention of its emergence. This review aimed to present the available data on the prevention of schizophrenia data that suggest some pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions have a potential role in the prevention of schizophrenia. Nonetheless, the findings are restricted to a few sites and are at best preliminary; as such, the findings must be replicated in new studies that include large samples and different settings.

  8. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  9. First rank symptoms for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares-Weiser, Karla; Maayan, Nicola; Bergman, Hanna; Davenport, Clare; Kirkham, Amanda J; Grabowski, Sarah; Adams, Clive E

    2015-01-25

    Early and accurate diagnosis and treatment of schizophrenia may have long-term advantages for the patient; the longer psychosis goes untreated the more severe the repercussions for relapse and recovery. If the correct diagnosis is not schizophrenia, but another psychotic disorder with some symptoms similar to schizophrenia, appropriate treatment might be delayed, with possible severe repercussions for the person involved and their family. There is widespread uncertainty about the diagnostic accuracy of First Rank Symptoms (FRS); we examined whether they are a useful diagnostic tool to differentiate schizophrenia from other psychotic disorders. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of one or multiple FRS for diagnosing schizophrenia, verified by clinical history and examination by a qualified professional (e.g. psychiatrists, nurses, social workers), with or without the use of operational criteria and checklists, in people thought to have non-organic psychotic symptoms. We conducted searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycInfo using OvidSP in April, June, July 2011 and December 2012. We also searched MEDION in December 2013. We selected studies that consecutively enrolled or randomly selected adults and adolescents with symptoms of psychosis, and assessed the diagnostic accuracy of FRS for schizophrenia compared to history and clinical examination performed by a qualified professional, which may or may not involve the use of symptom checklists or based on operational criteria such as ICD and DSM. Two review authors independently screened all references for inclusion. Risk of bias in included studies were assessed using the QUADAS-2 instrument. We recorded the number of true positives (TP), true negatives (TN), false positives (FP), and false negatives (FN) for constructing a 2 x 2 table for each study or derived 2 x 2 data from reported summary statistics such as sensitivity, specificity, and/or likelihood ratios. We included 21 studies with a total of 6253 participants

  10. Exploring social cognition in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbech, Rasmus; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare social cognition between groups of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and healthy controls and to replicate two previous studies using tests of social cognition that may be particularly sensitive to social cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Thirty......-eight first-admitted patients with schizophrenia and 38 healthy controls solved 11 “imaginary conversation (i.e., theory of mind)” items, 10 “psychological understanding” items, and 10 “practical understanding” items. Statistical tests were made of unadjusted and adjusted group differences in models adjusting...... nonsignificant. When intelligence and global cognitive functioning is taken into account, schizophrenia patients and healthy controls perform similarly on social cognitive tests. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg...

  11. Variations in the Incidence of Schizophrenia: Data Versus Dogma

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John J

    2006-01-01

    The schizophrenia research community has shared a belief that the incidence of schizophrenia shows little variation. This belief is related to the dogma that schizophrenia affects all individuals equally, regardless of sex, race, or nationality. However, there is now robust evidence that the incidence of schizophrenia is characterized by substantial variability. There is prominent variation in the incidence of schizophrenia between sites. The incidence of schizophrenia is significantly higher in males than in females (male:female ratio = 1.4). Migrants and those living in urban areas have a higher incidence of schizophrenia. The incidence of schizophrenia has fluctuations across time. In addition, the prevalence of schizophrenia is also characterized by prominent variation. The realization that schizophrenia is characterized by rich and informative gradients will serve as a catalyst for future research. PMID:16135560

  12. Extraordinary system of delusions and the social functioning - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skoczeń Nikodem

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenic psychoses are a heterogeneous group of diseases that affect about 1% of the world’s population. The first symptoms of the disease usually manifest between ages 20 and 30. The diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia and its subtypes are characterized in detail in ICD-10. Diagnosis is based primarily on the presence of productive symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations occurring for at least one month which cannot be explained in another way. Schizophrenia is a disease which largely affects social functioning of patients, such as occupational performance, family life, interpersonal relationships or housing situation. Apart from the sociological aspect, social lives of schizophrenia sufferers are significantly impoverished due to cognitive impairment associated with improper functioning of NMDA receptors. The study describes a case of a patient suffering from paranoid schizophrenia which sheds light on the social functioning of this group of patients.

  13. Neurodevelopment, GABA system dysfunction, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin J; Mirnics, Karoly

    2015-01-01

    The origins of schizophrenia have eluded clinicians and researchers since Kraepelin and Bleuler began documenting their findings. However, large clinical research efforts in recent decades have identified numerous genetic and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. The combined data strongly support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia and underscore the importance of the common converging effects of diverse insults. In this review, we discuss the evidence that genetic and environmental risk factors that predispose to schizophrenia disrupt the development and normal functioning of the GABAergic system.

  14. Neurodevelopment, GABA System Dysfunction, and Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin J; Mirnics, Karoly

    2015-01-01

    The origins of schizophrenia have eluded clinicians and researchers since Kraepelin and Bleuler began documenting their findings. However, large clinical research efforts in recent decades have identified numerous genetic and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. The combined data strongly support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia and underscore the importance of the common converging effects of diverse insults. In this review, we discuss the evidence that genetic and environmental risk factors that predispose to schizophrenia disrupt the development and normal functioning of the GABAergic system. PMID:24759129

  15. Insecure attachment is associated with paranoia but not hallucinations in psychotic patients: the mediating role of negative self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, S; Sitko, K; Bentall, R P

    2015-05-01

    A growing body of research has investigated associations between insecure attachment styles and psychosis. However, despite good theoretical and epidemiological reasons for hypothesising that insecure attachment may be specifically implicated in paranoid delusions, few studies have considered the role it plays in specific symptoms. We examined the relationship between attachment style, paranoid beliefs and hallucinatory experiences in a sample of 176 people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 113 healthy controls. We also investigated the possible role of negative self-esteem in mediating this association. Insecure attachment predicted paranoia but not hallucinations after co-morbidity between the symptoms was controlled for. Negative self-esteem partially mediated the association between attachment anxiety and clinical paranoia, and fully mediated the relationship between attachment avoidance and clinical paranoia. It may be fruitful to explore attachment representations in psychological treatments for paranoid patients. If future research confirms the importance of disrupted attachment as a risk factor for persecutory delusions, consideration might be given to how to protect vulnerable young people, for example those raised in children's homes.

  16. Insight in schizophrenia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The issue of insight in schizophrenia must be assumed to be one of the most important aspects of the clinical examination. Comprehensive studies have shown that between 50% and 80% of all patients suffering from schizophrenia do not believe that they have a disorder. In recent years, poor insight in schizophrenia has been the subject of increasing interest, as manifested in a number of studies discussed in the present review. Some of these studies focus on insight correlated to various parameters such as psychopathology, neuropsychology, clinical relevance and compliance. Other studies refer to more theoretical implications, among these the issue of defining the concept of insight: whether insight can be seen as a "primary" phenomenon in schizophrenia, and whether insight may be graduated, dimensioned or increased. Several authors have developed rating scales in an attempt to obtain a measure for the degree or dimension of insight. Here, the range of parameters employed gives an excellent impression of the complexity of the concept of insight. In the concluding discussion, a phenomenological aspect is brought in, in an attempt to place the concept of insight in relation to disturbances of the self in schizophrenia and to primary symptoms in schizophrenia, amongst these autism.

  17. Risk architecture of schizophrenia: the role of epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrakic, Dragan M; Zorumski, Charles F; Svrakic, Nenad M; Zwir, Igor; Cloninger, Claude R

    2013-03-01

    To systematize existing data and review new findings on the cause of schizophrenia and outline an improved mixed model of schizophrenia risk. Multiple and variable genetic and environmental factors interact to influence the risk of schizophrenia. Both rare variants with large effect and common variants with small effect contribute to genetic risk of schizophrenia, with no indication for differential impact on its clinical features. Accumulating evidence supports a genetic architecture of schizophrenia with multiple scenarios, including additive polygenic, heterogeneity, and mixed polygenic-heterogeneity. The epigenetic mechanisms that mediate gene-environment (GxE) interactions provide a framework to incorporate environmental factors into models of schizophrenia risk. Environmental pathogens with small effect on risk have robust effects in the context of family history of schizophrenia. Hence, genetic risk for schizophrenia may be expressed in part as sensitivity to environmental factors. We propose an improved mixed model of schizophrenia risk in which abnormal epigenetic states with large effects are superimposed on a polygenic liability to schizophrenia. This scenario can account for GxE interactions and shared family environment, which in many cases are not explained by a single structural variant of large effect superimposed on polygenes (the traditional mixed model).

  18. A case of paliperidone-palmitate-induced tardive dyskinesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lally, John

    2012-06-13

    OBJECTIVES: This is one of the first cases reported in the literature of paliperidone-palmitate-induced prolonged dyskinesia. METHOD: Case report. RESULTS: We report the case of a 49-year-old woman with paranoid schizophrenia who developed orofacial dyskinesia some 4 months after the commencement of paliperidone long-acting injection. CONCLUSION: This case serves as a clinical reminder that dyskinesia can occur with all antipsychotic medications.

  19. Schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine

    2013-01-01

    The DSM-5 list of diagnoses concerning schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders is expected to be revised and graduated from mild to severe. The proposed changes for the diagnosis of schizophrenia affect demands for characteristic symptoms, clarify relation to pervasive developmental...... diagnostic reliability and validity, but it is estimated to exclude about 2 % of patients currently diagnosed with DSM-IV schizophrenia from fulfilling criteria for DSM-5 schizophrenia. It might generate a problem for future young patients if the changes concerning demands on characteristic symptoms turn out...

  20. The relationship of the Severe Personality disorders with behavioral activation and inhibition systems in patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Setareh Jani; Mehri Molaee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Given the disruptive effects of personality disorders on personal and family life, it is essential to recognize their predisposing factors to understand them more accurately, and identify their preventive measures treatment facilitators. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the relationship of severe personality disorders with behavioral activation and inhibition systems in patients with paranoid, borderline and schizotypal personality disorders. Methods: The present...

  1. Schizophrenia, vitamin D, and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay-Sim, Alan; Féron, François; Eyles, Darryl; Burne, Thomas; McGrath, John

    2004-01-01

    Schizophrenia research is invigorated at present by the recent discovery of several plausible candidate susceptibility genes identified from genetic linkage and gene expression studies of brains from persons with schizophrenia. It is a current challenge to reconcile this gathering evidence for specific candidate susceptibility genes with the "neurodevelopmental hypothesis," which posits that schizophrenia arises from gene-environment interactions that disrupt brain development. We make the case here that schizophrenia may result not from numerous genes of small effect, but a few genes of transcriptional regulation acting during brain development. In particular we propose that low vitamin D during brain development interacts with susceptibility genes to alter the trajectory of brain development, probably by epigenetic regulation that alters gene expression throughout adult life. Vitamin D is an attractive "environmental" candidate because it appears to explain several key epidemiological features of schizophrenia. Vitamin D is an attractive "genetic" candidate because its nuclear hormone receptor regulates gene expression and nervous system development. The polygenic quality of schizophrenia, with linkage to many genes of small effect, maybe brought together via this "vitamin D hypothesis." We also discuss the possibility of a broader set of environmental and genetic factors interacting via the nuclear hormone receptors to affect the development of the brain leading to schizophrenia.

  2. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in Individuals With Schizophrenia and Healthy Aging: Testing the Accelerated Aging Hypothesis of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Farhana; Mulsant, Benoit H; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Rajji, Tarek K

    2017-07-01

    Schizophrenia has been hypothesized to be a syndrome of accelerated aging. Brain plasticity is vulnerable to the normal aging process and affected in schizophrenia: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important neuroplasticity molecule. The present review explores the accelerated aging hypothesis of schizophrenia by comparing changes in BDNF expression in schizophrenia with aging-associated changes. Individuals with schizophrenia show patterns of increased overall mortality, metabolic abnormalities, and cognitive decline normally observed later in life in the healthy population. An overall decrease is observed in BDNF expression in schizophrenia compared to healthy controls and in older individuals compared to a younger cohort. There is a marked decrease in BDNF levels in the frontal regions and in the periphery among older individuals and those with schizophrenia; however, data for BDNF expression in the occipital, parietal, and temporal cortices and the hippocampus is inconclusive. Accelerated aging hypothesis is supported based on frontal regions and peripheral studies; however, further studies are needed in other brain regions.

  3. The Role of Inflammation in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert eMüller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHigh levels of pro-inflammatory substances such as cytokines have been described in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of schizophrenia patients. Animal models of schizophrenia show that under certain conditions an immune disturbance during early life, such as an infection-triggered immune activation, might trigger lifelong increased immune reactivity. A large epidemiological study clearly demonstrated that severe infections and autoimmune disorders are risk factors for schizophrenia. Genetic studies have shown a strong signal for schizophrenia on chromosome 6p22.1, in a region related to the human leucocyte antigen (HLA system and other immune functions. Another line of evidence demonstrates that chronic (disstress is associated with immune activation. The vulnerability-stress-inflammation model of schizophrenia includes the contribution of stress on the basis of increased genetic vulnerability for the pathogenesis

  4. Parental psychiatric hospitalisation and offspring schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Reinisch, June M

    2009-01-01

    The risk of schizophrenia has been linked with a family history of schizophrenia and less strongly with other psychiatric disorders in family members. Using data from the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort and from the Danish Psychiatric Case Register, we studied the relationship between offspring risk...... of schizophrenia and a range of psychotic and non-psychotic psychiatric diagnoses in parents. Psychiatric admission data after 1969 were available for 7047 cohort members born between 1959 and 1961, and for 7006 mothers and 6993 fathers. Univariate analysis showed that neurosis, alcohol and substance dependence...... in both parents were associated with elevated risk of offspring schizophrenia; in addition, maternal schizophrenia, affective disorder and personality disorder were associated with elevated risk. Controlling for parental age, parental social status, and parental psychiatric co-diagnosis, offspring risk...

  5. Use of the word schizophrenia in Portuguese newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Silva, Nuno; Falcão de Almeida, Telma; Araújo, Filipa; Molodynski, Andrew; Venâncio, Ângela; Bouça, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Stigmatizing references to schizophrenia have a negative impact on self-esteem, deter treatment seeking and diminish the effectiveness of treatment. To analyze the reporting of schizophrenia in Portuguese newspapers. We analyzed five high circulation Portuguese newspapers between 2007 and 2013. We selected all news containing the word "esquizofrenia" (schizophrenia). Several variables were collected. About 1058 news items contained the word schizophrenia. Schizophrenia was mentioned metaphorically in 40% of the cases and in the context of Crime in 22%. When used in a Criminal context, schizophrenia was mostly attributed to people who were the perpetrators of the crime (93%). When used metaphorically, schizophrenia had a negative connotation in 90% of cases. We found an increasing reporting of schizophrenia in the criminal news and serious crimes. Our results suggest the media has an active role promoting stigma, as well as passively broadcasting and thus passing on prejudices.

  6. Reliability of clinical ICD-10 schizophrenia diagnoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Klaus D; Frederiksen, Julie N; Hansen, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Concern has been expressed as to the reliability of clinical ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia. This study was designed to assess the diagnostic reliability of the clinical ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia in a random sample of Danish in- and outpatients with a history of psychosis. A sample...... value (87%) of ICD-10 schizophrenia and an overall good agreement between clinical and OPCRIT-derived diagnoses (kappa=0.60). An even higher positive predictive value was obtained when diagnoses were amalgamated into a diagnostic entity of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (98%). Near perfect agreement...... was seen between OPCRIT-derived ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnoses (kappa=0.87). Thus, this study demonstrates high reliability of the clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia and even more so of the diagnosis of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder....

  7. NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Selma Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Neuropsychology has had an explosive grow in the last decades. It contributions to the fields of Psychiatry are growing in an exponential rate. Research related to schizophrenia has bringing new views of the nature of the disease, at the same time offering contradictions and questions pending to resolve. The present article exposes the most relevant discoveries in the neuropshychology of schizophrenia neuroanatomy dysfunctions, development neurofuntionality, alterations in neurotransmitters a...

  8. The incidence of schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders in Denmark in the period 2000-2012. A register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühl, Johanne Olivia Grønne; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Thorup, Anne; Nordentoft, Merete

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to examine changes over time in the incidence of broad and narrow schizophrenia spectrum disorders in Denmark from 2000 to 2012. Patients were classified as incident schizophrenia if registered with a first time in- or outpatient contact with relevant diagnostic codes in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register between 2000 and 2012. Their history of contacts was traced back to 1969. Broad schizophrenia included schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder, persistent delusional disorder, acute and transient psychotic disorders, schizoaffective disorders, and other nonorganic and unspecified psychotic disorders, (ICD 10 codes F20-F29). Narrow schizophrenia was defined with the ICD 10 codes F20.0-F20.9. Incidence rates (IR) and incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated using Poisson regression. The IRR for broad schizophrenia increased by 1.43 (CI 95% 1.34-1.52) for females and 1.26 (CI 95% 1.20-1.33) for males. IRR for narrow schizophrenia increased by 1.36 (CI 95% 1.24-1.48) for females and 1.20 (CI 95% 1.11-1.29) for males. There was a significantly increased incidence in patients up to 32years of age. This was mainly explained by a significant 2-3 fold increase in outpatient incidence. We found a significant decrease in IRR for patients with broad and narrow schizophrenia aged 33 or older for both in- and outpatients. The increased incidence of schizophrenia could partly be explained by better implementation of the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia in child and adolescent psychiatry and improved access to early intervention services, but a true increase in incidence of schizophrenia cannot be excluded. The decrease of incidence in the older age group could indicate that the national Danish early intervention strategy was successful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Disrupted Olfactory Integration in Schizophrenia: Functional Connectivity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiparizoska, Sara; Ikuta, Toshikazu

    2017-09-01

    Evidence for olfactory dysfunction in schizophrenia has been firmly established. However, in the typical understanding of schizophrenia, olfaction is not recognized to contribute to or interact with the illness. Despite the solid presence of olfactory dysfunction in schizophrenia, its relation to the rest of the illness remains largely unclear. Here, we aimed to examine functional connectivity of the olfactory bulb, olfactory tract, and piriform cortices and isolate the network that would account for the altered olfaction in schizophrenia. We examined the functional connectivity of these specific olfactory regions in order to isolate other brain regions associated with olfactory processing in schizophrenia. Using the resting state functional MRI data from the Center for Biomedical Research Excellence in Brain Function and Mental Illness, we compared 84 patients of schizophrenia and 90 individuals without schizophrenia. The schizophrenia group showed disconnectivity between the anterior piriform cortex and the nucleus accumbens, between the posterior piriform cortex and the middle frontal gyrus, and between the olfactory tract and the visual cortices. The current results suggest functional disconnectivity of olfactory regions in schizophrenia, which may account for olfactory dysfunction and disrupted integration with other sensory modalities in schizophrenia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  10. Psychosis among "healthy" siblings of schizophrenia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Arajärvi, Ritva; Ukkola, Jonna; Haukka, Jari; Suvisaari, Jaana; Hintikka, Jukka; Partonen, Timo; Lönnqvist, Jouko

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Schizophrenia aggregates in families and accurate diagnoses are essential for genetic studies of schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated whether siblings of patients with schizophrenia can be identified as free of any psychotic disorder using only register information. We also analyzed the emergence of psychotic disorders among siblings of patients with schizophrenia during seven to eleven years of follow-up. Methods A genetically homogenous population isolate in no...

  11. Registered criminality and sanctioning of schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkner, Runa; Haastrup, Soeren; Joergensen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with schizophrenia have been shown to have an increased risk of criminality, especially violent crimes. AIMS: The aim of the current study was to describe the pattern of crimes committed by Danish patients with schizophrenia and examine the sanctions given for crimes in relat...... than imprison, individuals with schizophrenia. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that greater alertness is needed in the judicial system for individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia....

  12. STUDY OF SUICIDE ATTEMPTS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesan Madras Sundararajan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Schizophrenia is a major mental illness whose sufferers have been found to have lesser longevity than general population. The most common cause for premature death in schizophrenia is suicide. There are very few Indian studies on suicide in persons suffering from schizophrenia. OBJECTIVES The objectives were to study the frequency of suicide attempt in schizophrenia to compare and study the clinical and sociodemographic profile of suicide attempters and non-attempters in schizophrenia and to analyse and study the various risk factors of suicide attempts in persons suffering from schizophrenia. METHODS A sample of 100 consecutive patients attending review OPD of a government tertiary care hospital in Chennai were selected. Those who had a diagnosis of schizophrenia were screened for past suicide attempts. They were divided into two groups as suicide attempters and non-attempters and analysed using the SAPS (Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms, SANS (Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms, Calgary depression scale, and Beck’s suicide intent scale. RESULTS People suffering from schizophrenia are at a high risk for making suicidal attempts (27% especially when the illness is acute and severe in early stages when accompanied by depressive symptoms. Demographic profile such as age, sex, education, occupation, socio-economic status, marital status, and family type were not significantly related to suicide attempts. Family history of suicide was a significant factor in patients with suicide attempts. Majority of the attempts were of medium-to-high intent, hanging being the commonest method, and were attributed to most commonly delusions and depressive symptoms.

  13. Schizophrenia and Violence: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fazel, Seena; Gulati, Gautam; Linsell, Louise; Geddes, John R.; Grann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Schizophrenia is a lifelong, severe psychotic condition. One in 100 people will have at least one episode of schizophrenia during their lifetime. Symptoms include delusions (for example, patients believe that someone is plotting against them) and hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that are not there). In men, schizophrenia usually starts in the late teens or early 20s; women tend to develop schizophrenia a little later. The causes of schizophrenia include gen...

  14. Facial emotion perception in schizophrenia: Does sex matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, Jasmine; Kring, Ann M

    2016-06-22

    To review the literature on sex differences in facial emotion perception (FEP) across the schizophrenia spectrum. We conducted a systematic review of empirical articles that were included in five separate meta-analyses of FEP across the schizophrenia spectrum, including meta-analyses that predominantly examined adults with chronic schizophrenia, people with early (onset prior to age 18) or recent-onset (experiencing their first or second psychotic episode or illness duration less than 2 years) schizophrenia, and unaffected first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia. We also examined articles written in English (from November 2011 through June 2015) that were not included in the aforementioned meta-analyses through a literature search in the PubMed database. All relevant articles were accessed in full text. We examined all studies to determine the sample sizes, diagnostic characteristics, demographic information, methodologies, results, and whether each individual study reported on sex differences. The results from the meta-analyses themselves as well as the individual studies are reported in tables and text. We retrieved 134 articles included in five separate meta-analyses and the PubMed database that examined FEP across the schizophrenia spectrum. Of these articles, 38 examined sex differences in FEP. Thirty of these studies did not find sex differences in FEP in either chronically ill adults with schizophrenia, early-onset or recently diagnosed people with schizophrenia, or first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia. Of the eight studies that found sex differences in FEP, three found that chronically ill women outperformed men, one study found that girls with early-onset schizophrenia outperformed boys, and two studies found that women (including first-degree relatives, adults with schizophrenia, and the healthy control group) outperformed men on FEP tasks. In total, six of the eight studies that examined sex differences in FEP found that women

  15. Superior intellectual ability in schizophrenia: neuropsychological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCabe, James H; Brébion, Gildas; Reichenberg, Abraham; Ganguly, Taposhri; McKenna, Peter J; Murray, Robin M; David, Anthony S

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that neurocognitive impairment is a core deficit in schizophrenia. However, it appears that some patients with schizophrenia have intelligence quotients (IQs) in the superior range. In this study, we sought out schizophrenia patients with an estimated premorbid Intelligence Quotient (IQ) of at least 115 and studied their neuropsychological profile. Thirty-four patients meeting diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV), with mean estimated premorbid IQ of 120, were recruited and divided into two subgroups, according to whether or not their IQ had declined by at least 10 points from their premorbid estimate. Their performance on an extensive neuropsychological battery was compared with that of 19 IQ-matched healthy controls and a group of 16 "typical" schizophrenia patients with estimated premorbid IQ Schizophrenia patients whose estimated premorbid and current IQ both lay in the superior range were statistically indistinguishable from IQ-matched healthy controls on all neurocognitive tests. However, their profile of relative performance in subtests was similar to that of typical schizophrenia patients. Patients with superior premorbid IQ and evidence of intellectual deterioration had intermediate scores. Our results confirm the existence of patients meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia who have markedly superior premorbid intellectual level and appear to be free of gross neuropsychological deficits. We discuss the implications of these findings for the primacy of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  16. Conflict adaptation in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamse, Elger; Ruitenberg, Marit; Boddewyn, Sarah; Oreel, Edith; de Schryver, Maarten; Morrens, Manuel; van Dijck, Jean-Philippe

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive control impairments may contribute strongly to the overall cognitive deficits observed in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. In the current study we explore a specific cognitive control function referred to as conflict adaptation. Previous studies on conflict adaptation in schizophrenia showed equivocal results, and, moreover, were plagued by confounded research designs. Here we assessed for the first time conflict adaptation in schizophrenia with a design that avoided the major confounds of feature integration and stimulus-response contingency learning. Sixteen patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and sixteen healthy, matched controls performed a vocal Stroop task to determine the congruency sequence effect - a marker of conflict adaptation. A reliable congruency sequence effect was observed for both healthy controls and patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. These findings indicate that schizophrenia is not necessarily accompanied by impaired conflict adaptation. As schizophrenia has been related to abnormal functioning in core conflict adaptation areas such as anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, further research is required to better understand the precise impact of such abnormal brain functioning at the behavioral level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Christianity and Schizophrenia Redux: An Empirical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéri, Szabolcs; Kelemen, Oguz

    2016-04-09

    This paper explores the relationship among schizophrenia, spirituality, and Christian religiosity. We interviewed 120 patients with schizophrenia and 120 control individuals (74.2 % of individuals with self-reported Christian religions). Patients with schizophrenia showed increases in positive spirituality and decreases in positive congregational support, as measured by the Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality. There was no significant difference in Christian religiosity. Higher positive spirituality was predicted by more severe self-disorder, perceptual disorder, and positive clinical symptoms. Schizophrenia patients with religious delusions did not exhibit enhanced Christian beliefs and rituals. These results do not confirm the hypothesis of general hyper-religiosity in schizophrenia.

  18. Early and sustained dynamic intervention in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Rosenbaum, Bent

    2009-01-01

    This paper is based on the Danish National Schizophrenia Project manual for psychodynamic individual psychotherapy with persons in states of schizophrenia. The methods for engaging with and treating a patient with schizophrenia in a supportive, psychodynamic way are described....

  19. Altered Cerebral Blood Flow Covariance Network in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown abnormal cerebral blood flow (CBF) in schizophrenia; however, it remains unclear how topological properties of CBF network are altered in this disorder. Here, arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI was employed to measure resting-state CBF in 96 schizophrenia patients and 91 healthy controls. CBF covariance network of each group was constructed by calculating across-subject CBF covariance between 90 brain regions. Graph theory was used to compare intergroup differences in global and nodal topological measures of the network. Both schizophrenia patients and healthy controls had small-world topology in CBF covariance networks, implying an optimal balance between functional segregation and integration. Compared with healthy controls, schizophrenia patients showed reduced small-worldness, normalized clustering coefficient and local efficiency of the network, suggesting a shift toward randomized network topology in schizophrenia. Furthermore, schizophrenia patients exhibited altered nodal centrality in the perceptual-, affective-, language-, and spatial-related regions, indicating functional disturbance of these systems in schizophrenia. This study demonstrated for the first time that schizophrenia patients have disrupted topological properties in CBF covariance network, which provides a new perspective (efficiency of blood flow distribution between brain regions) for understanding neural mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  20. The cost of schizophrenia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sado M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitsuhiro Sado,1 Ataru Inagaki,2 Akihiro Koreki,1 Martin Knapp,3 Lee Andrew Kissane,4 Masaru Mimura,1 Kimio Yoshimura4 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, 2Center for Clinical Psychopharmacology, Institute of Neuropsychiatry, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK; 4Department of Health Policy and Management, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Introduction: Schizophrenia is a disorder that produces considerable burdens due to its often relapsing/remitting or chronic longitudinal course. This burden is felt not only by patients themselves, but also by their families and health care systems. Although the societal burden caused by this disorder has been evaluated in several countries, the magnitude of the societal cost of schizophrenia in Japan has never been estimated. The aim of this study is to clarify the societal burden of schizophrenia by estimating the cost of schizophrenia in Japan in 2008. Methods: A human capital approach was adopted to estimate the cost of schizophrenia. The total cost of schizophrenia was calculated as the sum of the direct, morbidity, and mortality costs. Schizophrenia was defined as disorders coded as F20.0–F20.9 according to the International Classification of Diseases-10. The data required to estimate the total cost was collected from publicly available statistics or previously reported studies. Results: The total cost of schizophrenia in Japan in 2008 was JPY 2.77 trillion (USD 23.8 billion. While the direct cost was JPY 0.770 trillion (USD 6.59 billion, the morbidity and mortality costs were JPY 1.85 trillion (USD 15.8 billion and JPY 0.155 trillion (USD 1.33 billion, respectively. Conclusion: The societal burden caused by schizophrenia is tremendous in Japan, similar to that in other developed countries where published data exist. Compared with other disorders, such as depression or anxiety disorders

  1. Inflammation and the Two-Hit Hypothesis of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenson, Keith A.; Kusnecov, Alex W.; Silverstein, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    The high societal and individual cost of schizophrenia necessitates finding better, more effective treatment, diagnosis, and prevention strategies. One of the obstacles in this endeavor is the diverse set of etiologies that comprises schizophrenia. A substantial body of evidence has grown over the last few decades to suggest that schizophrenia is a heterogeneous syndrome with overlapping symptoms and etiologies. At the same time, an increasing number of clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have shown links between schizophrenia and inflammatory conditions. In this review, we analyze the literature on inflammation and schizophrenia, with a particular focus on comorbidity, biomarkers, and environmental insults. We then identify several mechanisms by which inflammation could influence the development of schizophrenia via the two-hit hypothesis. Lastly, we note the relevance of these findings to clinical applications in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:24247023

  2. Glutamatergic System and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Ozdemir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. It has a role several cognitive functions including learning, memory and perception. Glutamatergic neurotransmission is also involved in regulating neuronal migration, synaptogenesis, and the pruning neurons. Glutamatergic exci-totoxicity has been implicated in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests that glutamatergic dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptor antagonists such as phencyclidine and ketamine can cause both the positive and negative symptoms psychotic symptoms in normal humans, and worsen these symptoms in persons with schizophrenia. Hence, it has been hypotesized that schizophrenia may be associated with decreased NMDA-receptor activity. According to the hypothesis, NMDA reseptor hypofunction can lead to decreased inhibition of glutamatergic neurons and excessive glutamate release. Finally, the reduction of gray matter in several brain regions seen in patients with schizophrenia has been suggested to be the result of neurotoxicity mediated by NMDA receptors. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(4.000: 394-405

  3. Large recurrent microdeletions associated with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefansson, H.; Rujescu, D.; Cichon, S.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced fecundity, associated with severe mental disorders, places negative selection pressure on risk alleles and may explain, in part, why common variants have not been found that confer risk of disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and mental retardation. Thus, rare variants may account...... and autism. In a genome-wide search for CNVs associating with schizophrenia, we used a population-based sample to identify de novo CNVs by analysing 9,878 transmissions from parents to offspring. The 66 de novo CNVs identified were tested for association in a sample of 1,433 schizophrenia cases and 33......,250 controls. Three deletions at 1q21.1, 15q11.2 and 15q13.3 showing nominal association with schizophrenia in the first sample (phase I) were followed up in a second sample of 3,285 cases and 7,951 controls (phase II). All three deletions significantly associate with schizophrenia and related psychoses...

  4. A review of schizophrenia research in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K Y; Salina, A A

    2014-08-01

    Research in schizophrenia has advanced tremendously. One hundred and seventy five articles related to Schizophrenia were found from a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. This project aims to examine published research articles, in local and international journals in order to provide a glimpse of the research interest in Malaysia with regards to schizophrenia. Single case study, case series report, reviews and registry reports were not included in this review. Medication trial, unless it concerned a wider scope of psychopharmacology was also excluded from this review. A total of 105 articles were included in this review. Despite numerous genetics studies conducted and published, a definitive conclusion on the aetiology or mechanism underlying schizophrenia remains elusive. The National Mental Health - Schizophrenia Registry (NMHR) proved to be an important platform for many studies and publications. Studies stemmed from NMHR have provided significant insight into the baseline characteristic of patients with schizophrenia, pathway to care, and outcomes of the illness. International and regional collaborations have also encouraged important work involving stigma and discrimination in schizophrenia. Ministry of Health's hospitals (MOH) are the main research sites in the country with regards to schizophrenia research. Numbers of schizophrenia research are still low in relation to the number of universities and hospitals in the country. Some of the weaknesses include duplication of studies, over-emphasising clinical trials and ignoring basic clinical research, and the lack of publications in international and regional journals.

  5. Cognition-Emotion Dysinteraction in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eAnticevic

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolving theories of schizophrenia emphasize a ‘disconnection’ in distributed fronto-striatal-limbic neural systems, which may give rise to breakdowns in cognition and emotional function. We discuss these diverse domains of function from the perspective of disrupted neural circuits involved in ‘cold’ cognitive vs. ‘hot’ affective operations and the interplay between these processes. We focus on three research areas that highlight cognition-emotion dysinteractions in schizophrenia: First, we discuss the role of cognitive deficits in the ‘maintenance’ of emotional information. We review recent evidence suggesting that motivational abnormalities in schizophrenia may in part arise due to a disrupted ability to ‘maintain’ affective information over time. Here, dysfunction in a prototypical ‘cold’ cognitive operation may result in ‘affective’ deficits in schizophrenia. Second, we discuss abnormalities in the detection and ascription of salience, manifest as excessive processing of non-emotional stimuli and inappropriate distractibility. We review emerging evidence suggesting deficits in some, but not other, specific emotional processes in schizophrenia – namely an intact ability to perceive emotion ‘in the moment’ but poor prospective valuation of stimuli and heightened reactivity to stimuli that ought to be filtered. Third, we discuss abnormalities in learning mechanisms that may give rise to delusions, the fixed, false and often emotionally charged beliefs that accompany psychosis. We discuss the role of affect in aberrant belief formation, mostly ignored by current theoretical models. Together, we attempt to provide a consilient overview for how breakdowns in neural systems underlying affect and cognition in psychosis interact across symptom domains. We conclude with a brief treatment of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and the need to close our explanatory gap between cellular-level hypotheses and complex

  6. NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Selma Sánchez

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychology has had an explosive grow in the last decades. It contributions to the fields of Psychiatry are growing in an exponential rate. Research related to schizophrenia has bringing new views of the nature of the disease, at the same time offering contradictions and questions pending to resolve. The present article exposes the most relevant discoveries in the neuropshychology of schizophrenia neuroanatomy dysfunctions, development neurofuntionality, alterations in neurotransmitters and cognitive deficiencies and areas for exploring.

  7. Neurodevelopment, GABA System Dysfunction, and Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Martin J; Mirnics, Karoly

    2014-01-01

    The origins of schizophrenia have eluded clinicians and researchers since Kraepelin and Bleuler began documenting their findings. However, large clinical research efforts in recent decades have identified numerous genetic and environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. The combined data strongly support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia and underscore the importance of the common converging effects of diverse insults. In this review, we discuss the evidence that genetic and...

  8. Excess Early Mortality in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Nordentoft, Merete; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is often referred to as one of the most severe mental disorders, primarily because of the very high mortality rates of those with the disorder. This article reviews the literature on excess early mortality in persons with schizophrenia and suggests reasons for the high mortality...... as well as possible ways to reduce it. Persons with schizophrenia have an exceptionally short life expectancy. High mortality is found in all age groups, resulting in a life expectancy of approximately 20 years below that of the general population. Evidence suggests that persons with schizophrenia may...... not have seen the same improvement in life expectancy as the general population during the past decades. Thus, the mortality gap not only persists but may actually have increased. The most urgent research agenda concerns primary candidates for modifiable risk factors contributing to this excess mortality...

  9. Stigma, schizophrenia and the media: exploring changes in the reporting of schizophrenia in major U.S. newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh, Arshya; Wittenauer, Justine; Carr, Erika

    2011-11-01

    Newspaper media are a major source of information about mental illness in the United States. Previous research has shown that some printed material has been both negative and stigmatizing, which can have a detrimental impact on individuals with mental illnesses. Such perceptions represented in the media may cause those with mental illnesses to internalize a negative and stigmatizing stereotype and hinder the public's understanding of mental illness. In recent years, advocacy groups have increased their efforts to combat stigmatization of those with mental illnesses. This study focused specifically on the use of stigmatizing language concerning schizophrenia in U.S. newspapers. Because advocacy to decrease stigmatization of mental illness has increased in recent years, this study compared media depictions of schizophrenia in 2000 and 2010 to determine if there had been a reduction in reporting of dangerousness and perpetration of crime by people with schizophrenia or in stigmatizing language. All articles published in five high-circulation newspapers from diverse urban geographical regions between January 1 and June 1 in 2000 and 2010 that contained the words "schizophrenia" or "schizophrenic" were reviewed. Articles were categorized under the categories of education, incidental reference, medical and pharmaceutical news, metaphorical use, charity, obituary, medically inappropriate, and human interest. Human interest articles were further subcategorized into advocacy, crimes committed by people with schizophrenia, crimes committed against those suffering from schizophrenia, and issues related to poor mental health care. There was a statistically significant decrease in reporting of crime committed by people with schizophrenia in 2010 compared with 2000. However, no significant difference was found in metaphorical usage of the terms schizophrenia and schizophrenic between 2000 and 2010.

  10. Biological aspects of cannabis consumption in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serban Ionela Lacramioara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia and psychotic disorders are major health issues with particular implications for both the individual and the medical system. Epidemiological data show a more frequent consumption of drugs in schizophrenic patients when compared to the general population. Studies have shown that the abuse of substances is the most common comorbidity associated with schizophrenia. Among illicit substances, cannabis is the most commonly encountered among patients with schizophrenia. Similar clinical features of schizophrenia and cannabis consumption could be explained by some common neurobiological implications. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor stimulation is associated with psychotic-type phenomena and schizophrenia and NMDA receptors are involved in the clinical effects of cannabis consumption. Thus, the CB1 receptors that are spread mainly at the level of the NMDA secretory neurons are activated by tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive component of cannabis. Moreover, cannabis abuse in association with other factors may contribute in triggering schizophrenia. Therefore, patients diagnosed with schizophrenia that abuse substances such as cannabis could represent a special category of patients that require a complex therapeutic approach, especially considering the multiple problems implicated, such as reduced compliance with treatment, unfavorable evolution and prognosis with multiple relapses and frequent hospitalizations.

  11. Schizophrenia: breaking down the barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, R

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews the key issues presented during the Fourth International Conference on Schizophrenia, which was held in October 1996 in Vancouver, Canada. The main emphasis was placed on the problem of stigma, loneliness and work as well as on the necessity to further elucidate the physiopathology of schizophrenia. Some of the barriers discussed are unlikely to disappear from human societies in the short term with any possible cure for schizophrenia as they are part of any major long-term illness, of which there is a long and ever increasing list.

  12. Does abnormal sleep impair memory consolidation in schizophrenia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara S Manoach

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Although disturbed sleep is a prominent feature of schizophrenia, its relation to the pathophysiology, signs, and symptoms of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Sleep disturbances are well known to impair cognition in healthy individuals. Yet, in spite of its ubiquity in schizophrenia, abnormal sleep has generally been overlooked as a potential contributor to cognitive deficits. Amelioration of cognitive deficits is a current priority of the schizophrenia research community, but most efforts to define, characterize, and quantify cognitive deficits focus on cross-sectional measures. While this approach provides a valid snapshot of function, there is now overwhelming evidence that critical aspects of learning and memory consolidation happen offline, both over time and with sleep. Initial memory encoding is followed by a prolonged period of consolidation, integration, and reorganization, that continues over days or even years. Much of this evolution of memories is mediated by sleep. This article briefly reviews (i abnormal sleep in schizophrenia, (ii sleep-dependent memory consolidation in healthy individuals, (iii recent findings of impaired sleep-dependent memory consolidation in schizophrenia, and (iv implications of impaired sleep-dependent memory consolidation in schizophrenia. This literature suggests that abnormal sleep in schizophrenia disrupts attention and impairs sleep-dependent memory consolidation and task automation. We conclude that these sleep-dependent impairments may contribute substantially to generalized cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Understanding this contribution may open new avenues to ameliorating cognitive dysfunction and thereby improve outcome in schizophrenia.

  13. Effects of handedness (left vs right) and cannabis abuse on intermanual coordination and negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients of the paranoid type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorynia, Inge; Schwaiger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Intermanual coordination as an index of interhemispheric transfer and negative symptoms were investigated in 50 left- and 42 right-handed schizophrenic inpatients of the paranoid type, also including drug abusers. The primary objective was to show that there were higher values in intermanual coordination and fewer manifestations of negative symptoms in the left-handed compared to the right-handed patients. This assumption was based on previous studies. Most importantly, right- and left-handed patients showed a different behaviour in intermanual coordination, when the duration of illness was taken into consideration. Thus, long-term left-handed paranoid patients performed better in intermanual coordination and showed fewer manifestations of negative symptoms than did long-term right-handed patients. These results were true for the large group of all patients, and among them for the subgroup of patients without drug abuse. Consequently, higher scores in intermanual coordination in left-handed patients may be related to a better interhemispheric crosstalk resulting in less pronounced negative symptoms. Secondary objectives assessed by explorative data analysis included the effects of cannabis abuse. While cannabis abuse may be more prevalent in left-handed patients, its effects may be more pronounced in right-handed patients, scoring higher in intermanual coordination and lower in manifestations of negative symptoms.

  14. "Negative symptoms"secondary to intracranial tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Kate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial tumors are increasingly common in the elderly population. They may present with varied symptoms, some of which may be psychiatric in nature. In patients with known psychiatric disorders, these symptoms may be misattributed resulting in a delay in diagnosis and management. We present a case of an elderly female with paranoid schizophrenia and new onset symptoms secondary to intracranial tumor, which were initially misdiagnosed.

  15. Bleuler and the Neurobiology of Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Heckers, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia remains a major challenge for psychiatry. One hundred years after the publication of Eugen Bleuler’s monograph, we are still debating the nosology and mechanisms of schizophrenia. We have stalled in the development of more effective treatments, after success with the introduction of antipsychotic medication. Cure and prevention remain in the distance. This article reviews the importance of Bleuler’s monograph for the neuroscientific exploration of schizophrenia. While Bleuler as...

  16. Risk factors for development of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Dunglová, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe disease. There is a complicity of genetic and environmental factors in schizophrenia onset. Factors with probable influence on development of schizophrenia are rate of urbanization, geographic location, migration, month of birth, maternal nutrition during pregnancy and birth complications, stress during pregnancy, length of lactation period, prenatal and postnatal infection exposure, exposure to a cat during childhood or cannabis abuse. Until now the information on t...

  17. Mysticism and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef; Henriksen, Mads Gram

    2016-01-01

    Mysticism and schizophrenia are different categories of human existence and experience. Nonetheless, they exhibit important phenomenological affinities, which, however, remain largely unaddressed. In this study, we explore structural analogies between key features of mysticism and major clinical......-phenomenological aspects of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders-i.e. attitudes, the nature of experience, and the 'other', mystical or psychotic reality. Not only do these features gravitate around the issue of the basic dimensions of consciousness, they crucially seem to implicate and presuppose a specific alteration...

  18. The relevance of motivation in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulet Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lately there is a growing interest in the negative symptoms in schizophrenia and their mechanisms of action, with special focus on the motivation process. The lack of motivation is increasingly recognized to be a very important impediment to positive management in schizophrenic pathology. In this mini-review, we described the current understanding of the nature and causes of the specific motivational deficits in schizophrenia in order to find better management strategies for this heterogeneous disorder. All the data and theories presented here clearly demonstrate that amotivation is a fundamental aspect of the negative symptomatology in schizophrenia and could represent a useful factor in understanding and improving the mechanisms and further management of schizophrenia.

  19. GWAS, Cytomegalovirus Infection, and Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Jakob; Børglum, Anders; Pearce, Brad D

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, good progress has been made in uncovering the genetic underpinnings of schizophrenia. Even so, as a polygenic disorder, schizophrenia has a complex etiology that is far from understood. Meanwhile, data are being collected enabling the study of interactions between genes...... and the environment. A confluence of data from genetic and environmental exposure studies point to the role of infections and immunity in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In a recent study by Børglum et al., a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the gene CTNNA3 was identified that may provide clues to gene......-environment interactions. The carriers of the minor allele for the SNP had a fivefold risk of later developing schizophrenia if their mothers were CMV positive, while the children not carrying the allele had no excess risk from maternal CMV. In the current paper, we summarize recent advances to clarify a possible...

  20. Schizophrenia and second language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersudsky, Yuly; Fine, Jonathan; Gorjaltsan, Igor; Chen, Osnat; Walters, Joel

    2005-05-01

    Language acquisition involves brain processes that can be affected by lesions or dysfunctions in several brain systems and second language acquisition may depend on different brain substrates than first language acquisition in childhood. A total of 16 Russian immigrants to Israel, 8 diagnosed schizophrenics and 8 healthy immigrants, were compared. The primary data for this study were collected via sociolinguistic interviews. The two groups use language and learn language in very much the same way. Only exophoric reference and blocking revealed meaningful differences between the schizophrenics and healthy counterparts. This does not mean of course that schizophrenia does not induce language abnormalities. Our study focuses on those aspects of language that are typically difficult to acquire in second language acquisition. Despite the cognitive compromises in schizophrenia and the manifest atypicalities in language of speakers with schizophrenia, the process of acquiring a second language seems relatively unaffected by schizophrenia.

  1. Visualization analysis of author collaborations in schizophrenia research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-02-19

    Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that levies a heavy medical toll and cost burden throughout the world. Scientific collaborations are necessary for progress in psychiatric research. However, there have been few publications on scientific collaborations in schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of author collaborations in schizophrenia research. This study used 58,107 records on schizophrenia from 2003 to 2012 which were downloaded from Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI Expanded) via Web of Science. CiteSpace III, an information visualization and analysis software, was used to make a visual analysis. Collaborative author networks within the field of schizophrenia were determined using published documents. We found that external author collaboration networks were more scattered while potential author collaboration networks were more compact. Results from hierarchical clustering analysis showed that the main collaborative field was genetic research in schizophrenia. Based on the results, authors belonging to different institutions and in different countries should be encouraged to collaborate in schizophrenia research. This will help researchers focus their studies on key issues, and allow each other to offer reasonable suggestions for making polices and providing scientific evidence to effectively diagnose, prevent, and cure schizophrenia.

  2. Tourette syndrome and comorbid early-onset schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbeshian, Jacob; Peng, Chun-Zi; Burd, Larry

    2009-12-01

    A study of the shared phenomenology between Tourette syndrome (TS) and schizophrenia. An illustrative case report is presented. We used a chart review of 399 clinically ascertained patients with TS to identify 10 cases meeting criteria for schizophrenia. From our 10 patients, salient clinical characteristics were then tabulated. We then extracted similar clinical characteristics from a previously published series of patients with comorbid TS and schizophrenia in order to combine cases and allow for a comparison between childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS), adolescent-onset schizophrenia (AdolOS), and adult-onset schizophrenia (AduOS) cases in these groups. We found 10 cases of schizophrenia (all were males) in the 399 TS patients for a prevalence rate of 2.5% (95% CI 0.96-4.04). Mean age of tic onset for TS diagnostic criteria ranged from 2-14 years with a mean of 8.2 years. The mean age of diagnosis for schizophrenia was 14.2 (range 9-23 years). We found six cases of schizophrenia with onset of positive psychotic symptoms by 13 years of age, two cases with onset after 13 years of age and before 18 years of age, and two cases with onset after 18 years of age. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder was present at a higher rate (70%) than one would expect in a clinically ascertained group of patients with TS. Comparison between COS, AdolOS and AduOS in our pooled cases noted a sex bias skewed toward males. Catatonic symptoms may be more likely in child or adolescent onset cases and negative symptoms more likely in AduOS cases. The 2.5% prevalence of schizophrenia in our TS sample exceeds the 1% expected rate of schizophrenia in the general population (chi-square=9.14; P=.0025). The six cases of COS (before 13 years of age) exceeds the expected rate of 1-2 per 100,000 (chi-square=4499; P=.0001). The 752-fold increase in observed rates of comorbid TS and COS over expected rates suggests a role for unknown common underlying etiologic factors. Based on clinical features

  3. Genome-wide expression in veterans with schizophrenia further validates the immune hypothesis for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Gabriel R; Dimitrov, Dimitre H; Lee, Shuko; Braida, Nicole; Yantis, Jesse; Honaker, Craig; Cuellar, Joe; Walss-Bass, Consuelo

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to test whether a dysregulation of gene expression may be the underlying cause of previously reported elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in veterans with schizophrenia. We performed a genome-wide expression analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from veterans with schizophrenia and controls, and our results show that 167 genes and putative loci were differently expressed between groups. These genes were enriched primarily for pathways related to inflammatory mechanisms and formed networks related to cell death and survival, immune cell trafficking, among others, which is in line with previous reports and further validates the inflammatory hypothesis of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuregulin-1 genotypes and eye movements in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, H.M.; Ettinger, U.; Magnusdottir, B.B.

    2010-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) is a putative susceptibility gene for schizophrenia but the neurocognitive processes that may involve NRG-1 in schizophrenia are unknown. Deficits in antisaccade (AS) and smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM) are promising endophenotypes, which may be associated with brain...... dysfunctions underlying the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of NRG-1 genotypes with AS and SPEM in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Patients (N = 113) and controls (N = 106) were genotyped for two NRG-1 single nucleotide polymorphisms...... findings of impaired AS and SPEM performance in schizophrenia patients (all P

  5. The neuroproteomics of schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    English, Jane A

    2011-01-15

    Proteomics is the study of global gene expression of an organ, body system, fluid, or cellular compartment at the protein level. Proteomic findings are reflective of complex gene × environment interactions, and the importance of this is increasingly appreciated in schizophrenia research. In this review, we outline the main proteomic methods available to researchers in this area and summarize, for the first time, the findings of the main quantitative neuroproteomic investigations of schizophrenia brain. Our review of these data revealed 16 gray matter proteins, and eight white matter proteins that were differentially expressed in the same direction in two or more investigations. Pathway analysis identified cellular assembly and organization as particularly disrupted in both gray and white matter, whereas the glycolysis-gluconeogenesis pathway was the major signaling pathway significantly altered in both. Reassuringly, these findings show remarkable convergence with functional pathways and positional candidate genes implicated from genomic studies. The specificity of schizophrenia proteomic findings are also addressed in the context of neuroproteomic investigations of neurodegenerative disorders and bipolar disorder. Finally, we discuss the major challenges in the field of neuroproteomics, such as the need for high throughput validation methods and optimal sample preparation. Future directions in the neuroproteomics of schizophrenia, including the use of blood-based biomarker work, the need to focus on subproteomes, and the increasing use of mass spectrometry-based methods are all discussed. This area of research is still in its infancy and offers huge potential to our understanding of schizophrenia on a cellular level.

  6. Vitamin D in schizophrenia: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Mathew; Natarajan, Radhika; Fan, Xiaoduo

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin D (vitD) is known for its essential role in calcium homeostasis and bone health. VitD is made endogenously in the skin from UVB radiation from sunlight. VitD is now considered as a potent neurosteroid hormone, critical to brain development and normal brain function, and is known for its anti-inflammatory property affecting various aspects of human health. VitD ligand-receptor, a receptor that mediates much of vitD's biological actions, has been found throughout the body including the central nervous system. VitD deficiency is common in patients with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a debilitating chronic mental illness characterised by positive symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, and negative symptoms including flat affect and lack of motivation. Several environmental risk factors for schizophrenia, such as season of birth, latitude and migration, have been linked to vitD deficiency. Recent studies have suggested a potential role of vitD in the development of schizophrenia. For example, neonatal vitD status is associated with the risk of developing schizophrenia in later life obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and cardiovascular disease, which are commonly seen in patients with schizophrenia. It has been well established that vitD deficiency is related to these metabolic problems. The biological mechanism is most likely related to vitD's action on the regulation of inflammatory and immunological processes, consequently affecting the manifestation of clinical symptoms and treatment response of schizophrenia. Potential benefits of vitD supplementation to improve schizophrenia symptoms as well as physical health in patients with schizophrenia should be further explored in future studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Neuropsychological Impairments in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder: Findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, S. Kristian; Reilly, James L.; Keefe, Richard S.E.; Gold, James M.; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Gershon, Elliot S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Sweeney, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Familial neuropsychological deficits are well established in schizophrenia but remain less well characterized in other psychotic disorders. This study from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) consortium 1) compares cognitive impairment in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychosis, 2) tests a continuum model of cognitive dysfunction in psychotic disorders, 3) reports familiality of cognitive impairments across psychotic disorders, and 4) evaluates cognitive impairment among nonpsychotic relatives with and without cluster A personality traits. Method Participants included probands with schizophrenia (N=293), psychotic bipolar disorder (N=227), schizoaffective disorder (manic, N=110; depressed, N=55), their first-degree relatives (N=316, N=259, N=133, and N=64, respectively), and healthy comparison subjects (N=295). All participants completed the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) neuropsychological battery. Results Cognitive impairments among psychotic probands, compared to healthy comparison subjects, were progressively greater from bipolar disorder (z=−0.77) to schizoaffective disorder (manic z=−1.08; depressed z=−1.25) to schizophrenia (z=−1.42). Profiles across subtests of the BACS were similar across disorders. Familiality of deficits was significant and comparable in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Of particular interest were similar levels of neuropsychological deficits in relatives with elevated cluster A personality traits across proband diagnoses. Nonpsychotic relatives of schizophrenia probands without these personality traits exhibited significant cognitive impairments, while relatives of bipolar probands did not. Conclusions Robust cognitive deficits are present and familial in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder. Severity of cognitive impairments across psychotic disorders was consistent with a continuum model, in which more prominent affective features and less

  8. Illness perspectives of Thais diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseeha, Ladda; Chontawan, Ratanawadee; Sethabouppha, Hunsa; Disayavanish, Chamlong; Turale, Sue

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the perceptions of 18 people diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1-10 years to uncover how they perceived themselves and their illness. It also involved 12 family members who added their perceptions. The data were collected using in-depth interviews, reflective journaling, and observations. The data were analyzed through the lens of Heidegger's hermeneutic phenomenology. Four themes emerged: perceptions of mental illness, perceptions of the causes of illness, perceptions of discrimination, and attempting to live with schizophrenia. The findings included strong underlying cultural and spiritual beliefs, and attitudes unique to the Thai participants, including the causation of schizophrenia by supernatural powers, black magic, and bad karma stemming from past deeds. Understanding the perceptions of the participants might help health-care providers to be more sensitive to those living with schizophrenia in Thailand and elsewhere. In particular, the findings could be useful in informing psychiatric careproviders about developing better caring systems for clients diagnosed with schizophrenia. This should help the sufferers of schizophrenia to live their lives to their own satisfaction and as normally as possible.

  9. Attribution bias and social anxiety in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M. Achim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia have produced mixed results, whereas such biases have been more consistently reported in people with anxiety disorders. Anxiety comorbidities are frequent in schizophrenia, in particular social anxiety disorder, which could influence their patterns of attribution biases. The objective of the present study was thus to determine if individuals with schizophrenia and a comorbid social anxiety disorder (SZ+ show distinct attribution biases as compared with individuals with schizophrenia without social anxiety (SZ− and healthy controls. Attribution biases were assessed with the Internal, Personal, and Situational Attributions Questionnaire in 41 individual with schizophrenia and 41 healthy controls. Results revealed the lack of the normal externalizing bias in SZ+, whereas SZ− did not significantly differ from healthy controls on this dimension. The personalizing bias was not influenced by social anxiety but was in contrast linked with delusions, with a greater personalizing bias in individuals with current delusions. Future studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia should carefully document symptom presentation, including social anxiety.

  10. Disruption of Conscious Access in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitch, Lucie; Dehaene, Stanislas; Gaillard, Raphaël

    2017-11-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and complex psychiatric disorder resulting in delusions, hallucinations, and cognitive impairments. Across a variety of paradigms, an elevated threshold for conscious perception has been repeatedly observed in persons with schizophrenia. Remarkably, even subtle measures of subliminal processing appear to be preserved. We argue here that the dissociation between impaired conscious access and intact unconscious processing may be due to a specific disruption of top-down attentional amplification. This proposal is compatible with the neurophysiological disturbances observed in schizophrenia, including dysconnectivity, abnormal neural oscillations, and glutamatergic and cholinergic dysregulation. Therefore, placing impaired conscious access as a central feature of schizophrenia can help researchers develop a coherent and parsimonious pathophysiological framework of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-disorders and the Schizophrenia Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Julie; Parnas, Josef

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Self-disorders (SD) have been described as a core feature of schizophrenia both in classical and recent psychopathological literature. However, the specificity of SD for the schizophrenia spectrum disorders has never been demonstrated in a diagnostically heterogeneous sample, nor has...... the concurrent validity of SD been examined. AIM: (1) To examine the specificity of Examination of Anomalous Self-Experiences (EASE) measured SD to the schizophrenia spectrum disorder in first contact inpatients, (2) to explore the internal consistency and factorial structure of the EASE, (3) to assess...... the concurrent validity of SD by exploring correlations between SD and the canonical psychopathological dimensions of schizophrenia, (4) to explore relations of SD to intelligence, sociodemographic, and extrinsic illness characteristics. METHODS: A total of 100 consecutive first admission patients underwent...

  12. Schizophrenia, substance abuse, and violent crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Seena; Långström, Niklas; Hjern, Anders; Grann, Martin; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2009-05-20

    Persons with schizophrenia are thought to be at increased risk of committing violent crime 4 to 6 times the level of general population individuals without this disorder. However, risk estimates vary substantially across studies, and considerable uncertainty exists as to what mediates this elevated risk. Despite this uncertainty, current guidelines recommend that violence risk assessment should be conducted for all patients with schizophrenia. To determine the risk of violent crime among patients diagnosed as having schizophrenia and the role of substance abuse in mediating this risk. Longitudinal designs were used to link data from nationwide Swedish registers of hospital admissions and criminal convictions in 1973-2006. Risk of violent crime in patients after diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 8003) was compared with that among general population controls (n = 80 025). Potential confounders (age, sex, income, and marital and immigrant status) and mediators (substance abuse comorbidity) were measured at baseline. To study familial confounding, we also investigated risk of violence among unaffected siblings (n = 8123) of patients with schizophrenia. Information on treatment was not available. Violent crime (any criminal conviction for homicide, assault, robbery, arson, any sexual offense, illegal threats, or intimidation). In patients with schizophrenia, 1054 (13.2%) had at least 1 violent offense compared with 4276 (5.3%) of general population controls (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-2.2). The risk was mostly confined to patients with substance abuse comorbidity (of whom 27.6% committed an offense), yielding an increased risk of violent crime among such patients (adjusted OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 3.9-5.0), whereas the risk increase was small in schizophrenia patients without substance abuse comorbidity (8.5% of whom had at least 1 violent offense; adjusted OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4; Pgenetic or early environmental) confounding of the

  13. Comparative Study of Mental Health of High School Teachers and Educational Counselors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Shakiba

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teachers have an important effect on mental health and development of students. Teaching and counseling may be stressful jobs. The objective of this study was to compare psychological status of high school teachers and educational counselors measured by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI.Materials and Method: In a cross-sectional study 60 teachers (20 male and 40 female and 60 educational counselors (20 male and 40 female from high schools of Zahedan city were recruited randomly and asked to complete Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (Iranian short form of MMPI. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t test.Results: The results showed significant differences between teachers and educational counselors in 6 clinical scales of MMPI so that the teachers had higher scores than educational counselors in D (depression, Pd (psychopathy, Pa (paranoid, Pt (Psychastenia, Sc (schizophrenia and Ma (hypomania scales of MMPI. Mean scores of Male counselors in hysteria and psychopathy were higher than female's scores and also female teachers had higher mean scores in hypochondria, hysteria, paranoid, psychastenia and schizophrenia than male teachers.Conclusion: Although the profiles of both teachers and educational counselors were normal but teachers had higher mean scores than counselors, thus, efforts need to be made to explore possible factors associated to those differences

  14. A STUDY OF THOUGHT, LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION (T.L.C) DISORDERS IN SCHIZOPHRNIA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Pralay Kumar; Chaturvedi, S.K.; Gopinath, P.S.

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY This study examines in detail - i) the magnitude, nature and severity of thought disorder in schizophrenia, ii) the correlations between type and severity of thought disorder with socio-demographic and clinical variables, and iii) differences between different subtypes of schizophrenia. Forty five schizophrenics (Research Diagnostic Criteria) were assessed by ‘live’ interview as well as tape recorded interviews. Instruments used for assessment were (a) Scale for assessment of Thought, Language and Communication (Andreasen 1978), (b) Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (Overall & Gorham 1962), (c) Mini Mental State (Folstein 1975), and (d) Clinical and demographic data recording proforma. The Schizophrenic patients were subdivided as (i) Acute and chronic (R.D.C.), (ii) Paranoid and non-paranoid; and (iii) Negative, positive, mixed (Andreasen's criteria) and intragroup and intergroup differences were computed. Poverty of speech, tangentiality, derailment, loss of goal, perseveration were found to be the commonest thought disorders. Positive and negative thought disorders were seen in equiproportion in both positive and negative schizophrenics. Significant differences were noted between thought disorders and education as well as habitat. Rural patients more often had negative formal thought disorders. Literates had more often clanging, neologism, circumstantiality and echolalia. This study provides ample information on the nature of thought disorder in Indian schizophrenic subjects. PMID:21927321

  15. Development of the Positive Emotions Program for Schizophrenia (PEPS: an intervention to improve pleasure and motivation in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eNguyen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The efficacy of drug-based treatments and psychological interventions on the primary negative symptoms of schizophrenia remains limited. Recent literature has distinguished negative symptoms associated with a diminished capacity to experience, from those associated with a limited capacity for expression. The Positive Emotions Program for Schizophrenia (PEPS is a new method that specifically aims to reduce the syndrome of a diminished capacity to experience. Methods: The intervention’s vital ingredients were identified through a literature review of emotion in schizophrenia and positive psychology. The program has been beta-tested on various groups of healthcare professionals. Results: A detailed description of the final version of PEPS is presented here. The French version of the program is freely downloadable. Conclusions: PEPS is a specific, short, easy to use, group-based intervention to improve pleasure and motivation in schizophrenia. It was built considering a recovery-oriented approach to schizophrenia.

  16. Problem solving skills for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J; Li, Chunbo

    2007-04-18

    The severe and long-lasting symptoms of schizophrenia are often the cause of severe disability. Environmental stress such as life events and the practical problems people face in their daily can worsen the symptoms of schizophrenia. Deficits in problem solving skills in people with schizophrenia affect their independent and interpersonal functioning and impair their quality of life. As a result, therapies such as problem solving therapy have been developed to improve problem solving skills for people with schizophrenia. To review the effectiveness of problem solving therapy compared with other comparable therapies or routine care for those with schizophrenia. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (September 2006), which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We inspected references of all identified studies for further trials. We included all clinical randomised trials comparing problem solving therapy with other comparable therapies or routine care. We extracted data independently. For homogenous dichotomous data we calculated random effects, relative risk (RR), 95% confidence intervals (CI) and, where appropriate, numbers needed to treat (NNT) on an intention-to-treat basis. For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) using a random effects statistical model. We included only three small trials (n=52) that evaluated problem solving versus routine care, coping skills training or non-specific interaction. Inadequate reporting of data rendered many outcomes unusable. We were unable to undertake meta-analysis. Overall results were limited and inconclusive with no significant differences between treatment groups for hospital admission, mental state, behaviour, social skills or leaving the study early. No data were presented for global state, quality of life or satisfaction. We found insufficient evidence to confirm or refute the benefits of problem solving therapy as an additional

  17. Updating the mild encephalitis hypothesis of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechter, K

    2013-04-05

    Schizophrenia seems to be a heterogeneous disorder. Emerging evidence indicates that low level neuroinflammation (LLNI) may not occur infrequently. Many infectious agents with low overall pathogenicity are risk factors for psychoses including schizophrenia and for autoimmune disorders. According to the mild encephalitis (ME) hypothesis, LLNI represents the core pathogenetic mechanism in a schizophrenia subgroup that has syndromal overlap with other psychiatric disorders. ME may be triggered by infections, autoimmunity, toxicity, or trauma. A 'late hit' and gene-environment interaction are required to explain major findings about schizophrenia, and both aspects would be consistent with the ME hypothesis. Schizophrenia risk genes stay rather constant within populations despite a resulting low number of progeny; this may result from advantages associated with risk genes, e.g., an improved immune response, which may act protectively within changing environments, although they are associated with the disadvantage of increased susceptibility to psychotic disorders. Specific schizophrenic symptoms may arise with instances of LLNI when certain brain functional systems are involved, in addition to being shaped by pre-existing liability factors. Prodrome phase and the transition to a diseased status may be related to LLNI processes emerging and varying over time. The variability in the course of schizophrenia resembles the varying courses of autoimmune disorders, which result from three required factors: genes, the environment, and the immune system. Preliminary criteria for subgrouping neurodevelopmental, genetic, ME, and other types of schizophrenias are provided. A rare example of ME schizophrenia may be observed in Borna disease virus infection. Neurodevelopmental schizophrenia due to early infections has been estimated by others to explain approximately 30% of cases, but the underlying pathomechanisms of transition to disease remain in question. LLNI (e.g. from

  18. Increased plasma agmatine levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzbay, Tayfun; Goktalay, Gokhan; Kayir, Hakan; Eker, Salih S; Sarandol, Asli; Oral, Sema; Buyukuysal, Levent; Ulusoy, Gokhan; Kirli, Selcuk

    2013-08-01

    Agmatine is an endogenous substance, synthesized from l-arginine, and it is proposed to be a new neurotransmitter. Preclinical studies indicated that agmatine may have an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This study was organized to investigate plasma agmatine in patients with schizophrenia and in healthy controls. Eighteen patients with schizophrenia and 19 healthy individuals constituted the subjects. Agmatine levels in the plasma were measured using the HPLC method. The S100B protein level, which is a peripheral biomarker for brain damage, was also measured using the ELISA method. While plasma levels of agmatine in patients with schizophrenia were significantly increased (p agmatine levels as a clinical diagnostic test would significantly differentiate between patients with schizophrenia and those in the control group (predictive value: 0.969; p  0.05). A multiple regression analysis revealed that the age of the patient and the severity of the illness, as indicated by the PANSS score, significantly contributed the plasma agmatine levels in patients with schizophrenia. These results support the hypothesis that an excess agmatine release is important in the development of schizophrenia. The findings also imply that the plasma agmatine level may be a potential biomarker of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Guidelines for the Pharmacotherapy of Schizophrenia in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Gary; Addington, Donald; Honer, William; Ismail, Zahinoor; Raedler, Thomas; Teehan, Michael

    2017-09-01

    The present guidelines address the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia in adults across different stages, phases, and symptom domains. Guidelines were developed using the ADAPTE process, which takes advantage of existing guidelines. Six guidelines were identified for adaptation, with recommendations extracted from each. For those specific to the pharmacotherapy of schizophrenia in adults, a working group selected between guidelines and recommendations to create an adapted guideline. Recommendations can be categorized into 6 areas that include 1) first-episode schizophrenia, 2) acute exacerbation, 3) relapse prevention and maintenance treatment, 4) treatment-resistant schizophrenia, 5) clozapine-resistant schizophrenia, and 6) specific symptom domains. For each category, recommendations are made based on the available evidence, which is discussed and linked to other established guidelines. In most cases, evidence-based recommendations are made that can be used to guide current clinical treatment and decision making. Notably, however, there is a paucity of established evidence to guide treatment decision making in the case of clozapine-resistant schizophrenia, a subsample that represents a sizable proportion of those with schizophrenia.

  20. Social priming increases nonverbal expressive behaviors in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Del-Monte

    Full Text Available Semantic priming tasks are classically used to influence and implicitly promote target behaviors. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that prosocial semantic priming modulated feelings of social affiliation. The main aim of this study was to determine whether inducing feelings of social affiliation using priming tasks could modulate nonverbal social behaviors in schizophrenia. We used the Scrambled Sentence Task to prime schizophrenia patients according to three priming group conditions: pro-social, non-social or anti-social. Forty-five schizophrenia patients, diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR, were randomly assigned to one of the three priming groups of 15 participants. We evaluated nonverbal social behaviors using the Motor-Affective subscale of the Motor-Affective-Social-Scale. Results showed that schizophrenia patients with pro-social priming had significantly more nonverbal behaviors than schizophrenia patients with anti-social and non-social priming conditions. Schizophrenia patient behaviors are affected by social priming. Our results have several clinical implications for the rehabilitation of social skills impairments frequently encountered among individuals with schizophrenia.

  1. Hospital Contacts With Infection and Risk of Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Philip Finn Rising; Benros, Michael E; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-01-01

    Infections and immune responses have been suggested to play an important role in the etiology of schizophrenia. Several studies have reported associations between maternal infections during pregnancy and the child's risk of schizophrenia; however, infection during childhood and adolescence...... a hospital contact with infection before their schizophrenia diagnosis (45%). Our results indicate that individuals who have had a hospital contact with infection are more likely to develop schizophrenia (relative risk [RR] = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.32-1.51) than individuals who had not had such a hospital contact....... Bacterial infection was the type of infection that was associated with the highest risk of schizophrenia (RR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.47-1.82). Our study does not exclude that a certain type of infection may have a specific effect; yet, it does suggest that schizophrenia is associated with a wide range...

  2. Canadian Schizophrenia Guidelines: Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders with Coexisting Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockford, David; Addington, Donald

    2017-09-01

    Persons with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders frequently have coexisting substance use disorders that require modifications to treatment approaches for best outcomes. The objectives of this review were to identify evidence-based practices best practices that improve outcomes for individuals with schizophrenia and substance used disorders. We reviewed guidelines that were published in the last 5 years and that included systematic reviews or meta-analyses. Most of our recommendations came from 2 publications from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE): the 2011 guidance titled Coexisting Severe Mental Illness (Psychosis) and Substance Misuse: Assessment and Management in Healthcare Settings and the 2014 guidance titled Psychosis and Schizophrenia in Adults: Prevention and Management. We placed these recommendations into the Canadian context to create this guideline. Evidence supports the inclusion of individuals with coexisting substance use disorders in first-episode psychosis programs. The programs should integrate psychosis and substance use treatments, emphasizing ongoing monitoring of both substance use and patterns and symptoms. The best outcomes are achieved with combined use of antipsychotic medications and addiction-based psychosocial interventions. However, limited evidence is available to recommend using one antipsychotic medication over another or one psychosocial intervention over another for persons with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders with coexisting substance use disorders. Treating persons who have schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders with coexisting substance use disorders can present clinical challenges, but modifications in practice can help engage and retain people in treatment, where significant improvements over time can be expected.

  3. [Influence of paternal age in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, A; Szöke, A; Leboyer, M; Schürhoff, F

    2011-06-01

    Schizophrenia is an aetiologically heterogeneous syndrome, with a strong genetic component. Despite a reduced fertility in this disorder, its prevalence is maintained and could be explained by de novo genetic mutations. Advanced paternal age (APA) is a major source of new mutations in human beings and could thus be associated with an increased risk of developing schizophrenia in offspring. New mutations related to APA have been implicated as a cause of sporadic cases in several autosomal dominant diseases and also in neurodevelopmental diseases, autism, intellectual disabilities, and social functioning. The aim of the present study was to summarize the results of studies investigating the role of APA, and to discuss some interpretations. All relevant studies were identified through the National Library of Medicine (PubMed(®) database). Keywords used for research were "age" and "schizophrenia" linked to "paternal or father". We have identified and analysed eight cohort studies, five case-control studies, two meta-analyses, and one review concerning different father's mutations potentially transmitted, two studies comparing paternal age at conception between sporadic versus familial cases of schizophrenia. All studies selected have been published between 2000 and 2009. After controlling for several confounding factors including maternal age, the relative risk of schizophrenia increased from 1.84 to 4.62 in offspring of fathers with an older age of fatherhood. Mother's age showed no significant effects after adjusting for paternal age. There was a significant association between paternal age and risk of developing schizophrenia, there was a weaker association with psychosis. The results of these different studies are confirmed by two recent meta-analyses which found an increased risk of schizophrenia in offspring of fathers older than 35 years. Two main hypotheses could explain these results. The first one is based on the presence of new mutations in the

  4. Visualization analysis of author collaborations in schizophrenia research

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that levies a heavy medical toll and cost burden throughout the world. Scientific collaborations are necessary for progress in psychiatric research. However, there have been few publications on scientific collaborations in schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of author collaborations in schizophrenia research. Methods This study used 58,107 records on schizophrenia from 2003 to 2012 which were downloaded from S...

  5. Prospective memory in schizophrenia: relationship to medication management skills, neurocognition, and symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, Sarah A; Maye, Jacqueline; Rogers, Alexandra; Correll, David; Zamroziewicz, Marta; Kurtz, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Impaired adherence to medication regimens is a serious concern for individuals with schizophrenia linked to relapse and poorer outcomes. One possible reason for poor adherence to medication is poor ability to remember future intentions, labeled prospective memory skills. It has been demonstrated in several studies that individuals with schizophrenia have impairments in prospective memory that are linked to everyday life skills. However, there have been no studies, to our knowledge, examining the relationship of a clinical measure of prospective memory to medication management skills, a key element of successful adherence. In this Study 41 individuals with schizophrenia and 25 healthy adults were administered a standardized test battery that included measures of prospective memory, medication management skills, neurocognition, and symptoms. Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated impairments in prospective memory (both time and event-based) relative to healthy controls. Performance on the test of prospective memory was correlated with the standardized measure of medication management in individuals with schizophrenia. Moreover, the test of prospective memory predicted skills in medication adherence even after measures of neurocognition were accounted for. This suggests that prospective memory may play a key role in medication management skills and thus should be a target of cognitive remediation programs.

  6. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-08-16

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease.

  7. Cognition-emotion dysinteraction in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticevic, Alan; Corlett, Philip R

    2012-01-01

    Evolving theories of schizophrenia emphasize a "disconnection" in distributed fronto-striatal-limbic neural systems, which may give rise to breakdowns in cognition and emotional function. We discuss these diverse domains of function from the perspective of disrupted neural circuits involved in "cold" cognitive vs. "hot" affective operations and the interplay between these processes. We focus on three research areas that highlight cognition-emotion dysinteractions in schizophrenia: First, we discuss the role of cognitive deficits in the "maintenance" of emotional information. We review recent evidence suggesting that motivational abnormalities in schizophrenia may in part arise due to a disrupted ability to "maintain" affective information over time. Here, dysfunction in a prototypical "cold" cognitive operation may result in "affective" deficits in schizophrenia. Second, we discuss abnormalities in the detection and ascription of salience, manifest as excessive processing of non-emotional stimuli and inappropriate distractibility. We review emerging evidence suggesting deficits in some, but not other, specific emotional processes in schizophrenia - namely an intact ability to perceive emotion "in-the-moment" but poor prospective valuation of stimuli and heightened reactivity to stimuli that ought to be filtered. Third, we discuss abnormalities in learning mechanisms that may give rise to delusions, the fixed, false, and often emotionally charged beliefs that accompany psychosis. We highlight the role of affect in aberrant belief formation, mostly ignored by current theoretical models. Together, we attempt to provide a consilient overview for how breakdowns in neural systems underlying affect and cognition in psychosis interact across symptom domains. We conclude with a brief treatment of the neurobiology of schizophrenia and the need to close our explanatory gap between cellular-level hypotheses and complex behavioral symptoms observed in this illness.

  8. Registered criminality and sanctioning of schizophrenia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkner, Runa; Haastrup, Soeren; Joergensen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with schizophrenia have been shown to have an increased risk of criminality, especially violent crimes. AIMS: The aim of the current study was to describe the pattern of crimes committed by Danish patients with schizophrenia and examine the sanctions given for crimes...... in relation to the different periods in the patients' lives: not yet known to the psychiatric hospital system, known to the system but not yet diagnosed with schizophrenia, and after being diagnosed with schizophrenia. METHODS: Information from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register was correlated...... with data from the Danish National Crime Register. RESULTS: One of the more prominent findings was that 16% of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia receive a prison sentence or a suspended prison sentence, despite the fact that Denmark is a co-signatory of the European Prison Rules and should treat, rather...

  9. Unipolar Depression in Paroxysmal Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Bobrov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the current study, the clinical characteristics of unipolar depression in the clinical picture of schizophrenia with the paroxysmal type of disease course are presented. Given the concomitant depression with phobic symptoms, the following clinical variants are marked: depression with generalized social phobia and/or anthropophobia and depression with generalized pathological body sensations and hypochondriacal phobias. In other words, we are talking about a necessity to allocate a special type of schizophrenia with affective structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms. Information on the basic treatment strategy of schizophrenia with depressive structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms in everyday psychiatric practice is also provided.

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TOBACCO DEPENDENCE AND SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayan Widhidewi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco dependence in schizophrenia patients is a problem that got more concern, withfew treatment options. Peoples with schizophrenia have a prevalence rate of cigarettesmoking two until four times higher than the general population. Consequently, patientsalso have a lower smoking quit rate than the general population. Tobacco dependence inthis population may complicate symptoms and also has adverse physiological effects onpatients. Besides that, patients with schizophrenia tend to smoke more heavily thansmokers in general population. This can increased smoking-related morbidity andmortality and impose a significant financial burden on patients. Recent studiesdemonstrated that patients with schizophrenia smoke before the onset of the illness andalso start smoking earlier than the average population. Patients become psychotic earlierthan patients who do not smoke, and require higher dose of anti-psychotic medications.

  11. Smoking in Schizophrenia: an Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šagud, Marina; Vuksan-Ćusa, Bjanka; Jakšić, Nenad; Mihaljević-Peleš, Alma; Rojnić Kuzman, Martina; Pivac, Nela

    2018-06-01

    Patients with schizophrenia continue to have the highest rate of both smoking and heavy nicotine dependence. The interaction between smoking and schizophrenia is complex. There is evidence of the shared genetic background. Recent preclinical and clinical research has further investigated self-medication hypothesis, given that nicotine might alleviate cortical dysfunction. While prior research indicated some favorable effects of smoking on cognitive performance, particulatly on attention/vigilance, recent studies did not confirm those findings. Lower severity of negative symptoms in smokers was not confirmed across studies. Cigarette smoking decreases clozapine and olanzapine concentrations. There is no consistent evidence of favorable effects of nicotine on symptoms in schizophrenia, but the evidence of detrimental effects of smoking on general health is highly consistent. Smoking cessation should be a priority in patients with schizophrenia.

  12. The NCAN gene: schizophrenia susceptibility and cognitive dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang P

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Peirong Wang,1 Jun Cai,2 Jianliang Ni,1 Jiangtao Zhang,1 Wei Tang,3 Chen Zhang2 1Department of Psychiatry, Tongde Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 2Schizophrenia Program, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Wenzhou Kangning Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Background: Cognitive dysfunction has been recognized as a cardinal feature of schizophrenia. Elucidating the neurobiological substrates of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia would help identify the underlying mechanism of this disorder. The rs1064395 single nucleotide polymorphism, within the gene encoding neurocan (NCAN, is reported to be associated with schizophrenia in European populations and may influence brain structure in patients with schizophrenia.Methods: In this study, we aimed to explore whether NCAN rs1064395 confers some risk for schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunction in Han Chinese. We recruited 681 patients with schizophrenia and 699 healthy subjects. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were evaluated according to Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS.Results: There were no significant differences in genotype or allele distributions of the rs1064395 polymorphism between the schizophrenia and control groups. Patients showed significantly poorer performance than controls on immediate memory, visuospatial skill, language, attention, delayed memory, and total RBANS score. Patients with the A/A or A/G genotype of rs1064395 had lower scores of immediate memory, visuospatial skill, attention, and total RBANS score than those with the G/G genotype. We performed an expression quantitative trait loci analysis and observed a significant association between rs1064395 and NCAN expression in the frontal (P=0.0022, P=0.022 after Bonferroni correction and cerebellar cortex (P=0.0032, P=0.032 after Bonferroni correction.Conclusion: Our findings indicate

  13. Differences in Neuropsychological Functioning Between Homicidal and Nonviolent Schizophrenia Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, John; Cobia, Derin J; Reilly, James; Brook, Michael; Hanlon, Robert E

    2018-02-07

    Few studies have compared performance on neurocognitive measures between violent and nonviolent schizophrenia samples. A better understanding of neurocognitive dysfunction in violent individuals with schizophrenia could increase the efficacy of violence reduction strategies and aid in risk assessment and adjudication processes. This study aimed to compare neuropsychological performance between 25 homicide offenders with schizophrenia and 25 nonviolent schizophrenia controls. The groups were matched for age, race, sex, and handedness. Independent t-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to compare the schizophrenia groups' performance on measures of cognition, including composite scores assessing domain level functioning and individual neuropsychological tests. Results indicated the violent schizophrenia group performed worse on measures of memory and executive functioning, and the Intellectual Functioning composite score, when compared to the nonviolent schizophrenia sample. These findings replicate previous research documenting neuropsychological deficits specific to violent individuals with schizophrenia and support research implicating fronto-limbic dysfunction among violent offenders with schizophrenia. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  14. Comorbidities and risk factors among patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2015-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are charged with maintaining a holistic approach to their patients' health. While most patients with schizophrenia attend public mental health services and/or non-government organisations supporting people with mental illness, 88.2% of people with a psychotic illness (the majority being schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) had visited a GP in the previous year. For at least 30-40% of people living with schizophrenia in Australia, ongoing management is provided by their GP alone. Moreover, there is evidence that patients with schizophrenia value the help provided by GPs. Patients with schizophrenia have reduced life expectancy. Overseas research (primarily from the UK and US) has found that the poor physical health of patients with schizophrenia can be attributed to a number of factors such as modifiable lifestyle risk factors and side effects of medication, compounded by causes intrinsic to the illness such as mental stress and loss of initiative.

  15. Music-evoked emotions in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Daijyu; Arai, Makoto; Itokawa, Masanari

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have reported that people with schizophrenia have impaired musical abilities. Here we developed a simple music-based assay to assess patient's ability to associate a minor chord with sadness. We further characterize correlations between impaired musical responses and psychiatric symptoms. We exposed participants sequentially to two sets of sound stimuli, first a C-major progression and chord, and second a C-minor progression and chord. Participants were asked which stimulus they associated with sadness, the first set, the second set, or neither. The severity of psychiatric symptoms was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Study participants were 29 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and 29 healthy volunteers matched in age, gender and musical background. 37.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]:19.1-56.7) of patients with schizophrenia associated the minor chord set as sad, compared with 97.9% (95%CI: 89.5-103.6) of controls. Four patients were diagnosed with treatment-resistant schizophrenia, and all four failed to associate the minor chord with sadness. Patients who did not recognize minor chords as sad had significantly higher scores on all PANSS subscales. A simple test allows music-evoked emotions to be assessed in schizophrenia patient, and may show potential relationships between music-evoked emotions and psychiatric symptoms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Capgras delusion for animals and inanimate objects in Parkinson?s Disease: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Lucrezia; Piacentini, Sylvie; Soliveri, Paola; Scarone, Silvio; Gambini, Orsola

    2015-01-01

    Background Capgras delusion is a delusional misidentification syndrome, in which the patient is convinced that someone that is well known to them, usually a close relative, has been replaced by an impostor or double. Although it has been frequently described in psychotic syndromes, including paranoid schizophrenia, over a third of the documented cases of Capgras delusion are observed in patients with organic brain lesions or neurodegenerative disease, including Parkinson?s Disease. Variants o...

  17. Elevated Serum Levels of Homocysteine as an Early Prognostic Factor of Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Kevere

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Goal. The aim was to examine the serum levels of homocysteine (Hcy and their associations with the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders as well as controls. Materials and Methods. There were 198 patients: 82 with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, 22 with mood disorders, and 94 controls. The level of Hcy was determined by an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography system. MTHFR C677T polymorphism was analysed using the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction method. Results. The average level of Hcy was μmol/L for patients with schizophrenia, μmol/L for patients with affective disorders, versus μmol/L in a control. The highest level of Hcy has been observed in patients with episodic-recurrent course of schizophrenia (μmol/L, paranoid schizophrenia continuous (μmol/L, and in patients with affective disorders (μmol/L. An association between the MTHFR gene C677T polymorphism and Hcy level was found by linear regression analysis (, . Conclusions. The data indicate a link between Hcy levels and schizophrenia and mood disorders. No associations between the level of Hcy in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders and the MTHFR C677T polymorphism were found.

  18. Core of schizophrenia: estrangement, dementia or neurocognitive disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urfer-Parnas, Annick; Mortensen, Erik L; Parnas, Josef

    2010-01-01

    ) Is there empirical evidence pointing to a close similarity between schizophrenia and organic dementia? (3) Does empirical evidence support the view that intellectual impairment and/or more specific neuropsychological dysfunctions are core features of schizophrenia? The classic authors agreed that the intellectual......BACKGROUND: The recent literature frequently represents schizophrenia as a deteriorating neurocognitive process similar to organic degenerative dementia. METHODS: This study addresses the following questions: (1) Did the classic authors equate degenerative dementia with schizophrenia? (2...... dysfunctions were most likely a consequence rather than a primary, causal factor in the manifestation of schizophrenia despite their consensus on the assumption of its neurobiological origins. Rather, they considered impairments of intelligence and neurocognition as an expression of pseudodementia, i...

  19. Using patient-reported outcomes in schizophrenia: the Scottish Schizophrenia Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Robert; Cameron, Rosie; Norrie, John

    2009-02-01

    The primary aim of the Scottish Schizophrenia Outcomes Study (SSOS) was to assess the feasibility and utility of routinely collecting outcome data in everyday clinical settings. Data were collected over three years in the Scottish National Health Service (NHS). There were two secondary aims of SSOS: first, to compare data from patient-rated, objective, and clinician-rated outcomes, and second, to describe trends in outcome data and service use across Scotland over the three years of the study (2002-2005). This study used a naturalistic, longitudinal, observational cohort design. A representative sample of 1,015 persons with ICD-10 F20-F29 diagnoses (schizophrenia, schizotypal disorders, or delusional disorders) was assessed annually using the clinician-rated measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scale (HoNOS), and the patient-reported assessment, the Avon Mental Health Measure (Avon). Objective outcomes data and information on services and interventions were collected. Data were analyzed with regression modeling. Of the 1,015 persons recruited, 78% of the cohort (N=789) completed the study. Over the study period, significant decreases were seen in the number of hospitalizations, incidence of attempted suicide and self-harm, and civil detentions. Avon scores indicated significant improvement on all subscales (behavior, social, access, and mental health) and on the total score. However, HoNOS scores on the behavior and symptom subscales did not change, scores on the impairment subscale increased significantly (indicating increased levels of impairment), and scores on the social subscale decreased significantly (indicating improved social functioning). This study has demonstrated that it is feasible within the Scottish NHS to routinely collect meaningful outcomes data in schizophrenia. Patient-reported assessments were also successfully collected and used in care plans. This model shows that it is possible to incorporate patient-reported assessments into routine

  20. Emotion in Schizophrenia: Where Feeling Meets Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, Ann M; Caponigro, Janelle M

    2010-08-01

    Our understanding of the nature of emotional difficulties in schizophrenia has been greatly enhanced by translational research over the past two decades. By incorporating methods and theories from affective science, researchers have been able to discover that people with schizophrenia exhibit very few outward displays of emotion but report experiencing strong feelings in the presence of emotionally evocative stimuli or events. Recent behavioral, psychophysiological, and brain imaging research has pointed to the importance of considering the time course of emotion in schizophrenia. This work has shown that people with schizophrenia have the ability to experience emotion in the moment; however, they appear to have difficulties when anticipating future pleasurable experiences, and this perhaps affects their motivation to have such experiences. While advancements in our understanding of emotional experience and expression in individuals with schizophrenia have been made, these developments have led to a new collection of research questions directed at understanding the time course of emotion in schizophrenia, including the role of memory and anticipation in motivated behavior, translating laboratory findings to the development of new assessment tools and new treatments targeting emotional impairments in people with this disorder.

  1. Cognition in schizophrenia: Past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Green

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia Research: Cognition will serve an important function – a place where interests converge and investigators can learn about the recent developments in this area. This new journal will provide rapid dissemination of information to people who will make good use of it. In this initial article, we comment globally on the study of cognition in schizophrenia: how we got here, where we are, and where we are going. The goal of this first article is to place the study of cognition in schizophrenia within a historical and scientific context. In a field as richly textured as ours it is impossible to hit all the important areas, and we hope the reader will forgive our omissions. Phrased in cognitive terms, our limited presentation of the past is a matter of selective memory, the present is a matter of selective attention, and the future is a matter of selective prospection. This broad introduction emphasizes that cognition in schizophrenia provides clues to pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome. In fact, the study of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia has become wholly intertwined with the study of schizophrenia itself.

  2. Researchers Find a Mechanism for Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issue Health Capsule Researchers Find a Mechanism for Schizophrenia En español Send us your comments Scientists uncovered a mechanism behind genetic variations previously linked to schizophrenia. The findings may lead to new clinical approaches. ...

  3. Vitamin D Levels in Different Severity Groups of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlade, Kehinde Sola; Olaniyan, Oyejide Afolabi; Lasebikan, Victor Olufolahan; Rahamon, Sheu Kadiri

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency (VDD) continues to be associated with schizophrenia, but there is the dearth of information on the relationship between the severity of schizophrenia and plasma levels of vitamin D. This study, therefore, determined the plasma levels of vitamin D in different severity groups of schizophrenia. Plasma level of vitamin D was determined in 60 patients with schizophrenia and 30 apparently healthy individuals who served as controls. Patients with schizophrenia were classified into mildly ill, moderately ill, markedly ill, and severely ill groups using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The mean level of vitamin D was significantly lower in patients with schizophrenia compared with the controls. Similarly, there was a significant association between VDD and schizophrenia. The mean plasma levels of vitamin D were not significantly different when the mildly, moderately, markedly, and severely ill groups were compared with one another and there was no significant correlation between vitamin D level and PANSS scores. Furthermore, patients on atypical antipsychotics had an insignificantly lower level of vitamin D compared with the patients on typical antipsychotics. It could be concluded from this study that patients with schizophrenia have low plasma vitamin D level which does not appear to be associated with the severity of schizophrenia and type of antipsychotics. Therefore, regular screening for vitamin D status of patients with schizophrenia is suggested in order to allow for the institution of appropriate clinical intervention when necessary.

  4. Vitamin D Levels in Different Severity Groups of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde Sola Akinlade

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundVitamin D deficiency (VDD continues to be associated with schizophrenia, but there is the dearth of information on the relationship between the severity of schizophrenia and plasma levels of vitamin D. This study, therefore, determined the plasma levels of vitamin D in different severity groups of schizophrenia.Materials and methodsPlasma level of vitamin D was determined in 60 patients with schizophrenia and 30 apparently healthy individuals who served as controls. Patients with schizophrenia were classified into mildly ill, moderately ill, markedly ill, and severely ill groups using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS.ResultsThe mean level of vitamin D was significantly lower in patients with schizophrenia compared with the controls. Similarly, there was a significant association between VDD and schizophrenia. The mean plasma levels of vitamin D were not significantly different when the mildly, moderately, markedly, and severely ill groups were compared with one another and there was no significant correlation between vitamin D level and PANSS scores. Furthermore, patients on atypical antipsychotics had an insignificantly lower level of vitamin D compared with the patients on typical antipsychotics.ConclusionIt could be concluded from this study that patients with schizophrenia have low plasma vitamin D level which does not appear to be associated with the severity of schizophrenia and type of antipsychotics. Therefore, regular screening for vitamin D status of patients with schizophrenia is suggested in order to allow for the institution of appropriate clinical intervention when necessary.

  5. Self-stigma in schizophrenia: a concept analysis.

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    Omori, Yoshimi; Mori, Chizuru; White, Ann H

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify the phenomenon and definition of self-stigma in schizophrenia. Self-stigma in schizophrenia affects patients' well-being and attitudes to treatment. Although stigma and self-stigma have interactive and different characteristics, theses definitions are not clearly distinguished. Mental illnesses may have different stereotypes but are treated equally in some studies. Lack of awareness of illness is a common feature in schizophrenia but has not been focused in self-stigma studies. Further studies are needed to clarify the phenomenon of self-stigma in people with schizophrenia and to develop interventions targeted at reducing self-stigma. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The biochemical womb of schizophrenia: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, N; Gautam, S; Gaur, M; Sharma, P; Dadheech, G; Mishra, S

    2008-10-01

    The conclusive identification of specific etiological factors or pathogenic processes in the illness of schizophrenia has remained elusive despite great technological progress. The convergence of state-of-art scientific studies in molecular genetics, molecular neuropathophysiology, in vivo brain imaging and psychopharmacology, however, indicates that we may be coming much closer to understanding the genesis of schizophrenia. In near future, the diagnosis and assessment of schizophrenia using biochemical markers may become a "dream come true" for the medical community as well as for the general population. An understanding of the biochemistry/ visa vis pathophysiology of schizophrenia is essential to the discovery of preventive measures and therapeutic intervention.

  7. Impairment of probabilistic reward-based learning in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Julia A; Bellebaum, Christian; Brüne, Martin; Juckel, Georg; Daum, Irene

    2009-09-01

    Recent models assume that some symptoms of schizophrenia originate from defective reward processing mechanisms. Understanding the precise nature of reward-based learning impairments might thus make an important contribution to the understanding of schizophrenia and the development of treatment strategies. The present study investigated several features of probabilistic reward-based stimulus association learning, namely the acquisition of initial contingencies, reversal learning, generalization abilities, and the effects of reward magnitude. Compared to healthy controls, individuals with schizophrenia exhibited attenuated overall performance during acquisition, whereas learning rates across blocks were similar to the rates of controls. On the group level, persons with schizophrenia were, however, unable to learn the reversal of the initial reward contingencies. Exploratory analysis of only the subgroup of individuals with schizophrenia who showed significant learning during acquisition yielded deficits in reversal learning with low reward magnitudes only. There was further evidence of a mild generalization impairment of the persons with schizophrenia in an acquired equivalence task. In summary, although there was evidence of intact basic processing of reward magnitudes, individuals with schizophrenia were impaired at using this feedback for the adaptive guidance of behavior.

  8. Potential Value of Genomic Copy Number Variations in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Zhuo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder affecting approximately 1% of the global population, and the disease has imposed a considerable burden on families and society. Although, the exact cause of schizophrenia remains unknown, several lines of scientific evidence have revealed that genetic variants are strongly correlated with the development and early onset of the disease. In fact, the heritability among patients suffering from schizophrenia is as high as 80%. Genomic copy number variations (CNVs are one of the main forms of genomic variations, ubiquitously occurring in the human genome. An increasing number of studies have shown that CNVs account for population diversity and genetically related diseases, including schizophrenia. The last decade has witnessed rapid advances in the development of novel genomic technologies, which have led to the identification of schizophrenia-associated CNVs, insight into the roles of the affected genes in their intervals in schizophrenia, and successful manipulation of the target CNVs. In this review, we focus on the recent discoveries of important CNVs that are associated with schizophrenia and outline the potential values that the study of CNVs will bring to the areas of schizophrenia research, diagnosis, and therapy. Furthermore, with the help of the novel genetic tool known as the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats-associated nuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9 system, the pathogenic CNVs as genomic defects could be corrected. In conclusion, the recent novel findings of schizophrenia-associated CNVs offer an exciting opportunity for schizophrenia research to decipher the pathological mechanisms underlying the onset and development of schizophrenia as well as to provide potential clinical applications in genetic counseling, diagnosis, and therapy for this complex mental disease.

  9. Religiosity and psychological resilience in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: an international cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Y; Hofer, A; Frajo-Apor, B; Wartelsteiner, F; Kemmler, G; Pardeller, S; Suzuki, T; Mimura, M; Fleischhacker, W W; Uchida, H

    2018-04-01

    The impact of religious/spiritual activities on clinical outcomes in patients with serious mental illnesses remains controversial, which was addressed in this international cross-sectional study. Three-hundred sixty-nine subjects were recruited from Austria (n = 189) and Japan (n = 180), consisting of 112 outpatients with paranoid schizophrenia, 120 with bipolar I disorder (DSM-IV), and 137 healthy controls. Religiosity was assessed in terms of attendance and importance of religious/spiritual activities, while resilience was assessed using the 25-item Resilience Scale. General linear models were used to test whether higher religiosity will be associated with higher resilience, higher social functioning, and lower psychopathology. The association between levels of spiritual well-being and resilience was also examined. Attendance of religious services (F [4,365] = 0.827, P = 0.509) and importance of religion/spirituality (F [3,365] = 1.513, P = 0.211) did not show significant associations with resilience. Regarding clinical measures, a modest association between higher importance of religion/spirituality and residual manic symptoms was observed in bipolar patients (F [3,118] = 3.120, P = 0.029). In contrast to the findings regarding religiosity, spiritual well-being showed a strong positive correlation with resilience (r = 0.584, P resilience, social functioning, and psychopathology was not evident in our sample. Spiritual well-being appears more relevant to resilience than religiosity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of the family schizophrenia psychoeducation program for individuals with recent onset schizophrenia in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoc, T N; Weiss, B; Trung, L T

    2016-08-01

    Although psychoeducation has been found effective for improving the life functioning of patients with schizophrenia in high income countries, there have been relatively few studies of schizophrenia psychoeducation adapted for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), particularly in Southeast Asia. The present study assessed effects of the Family Schizophrenia Psychoeducation Program (FSPP) among Vietnamese patients and their families on the patients' (1) quality of life and (2) medication non-compliance, and the family and patients' (3) stigma towards schizophrenia, and (4) consumer satisfaction. This intervention study involved 59 patients, and their families, from the Da Nang Psychiatric Hospital, randomly assigned to treatment (n=30) or control (n=29) conditions. Control subjects received services as usual (antipsychotic medication); treatment group subjects received the FSPP as well. Blind-rater assessments were conducted at T1 immediately after project enrollment (prior to participating in the FSPP) and at T2 six months later. There were significant treatment effects on: (1) quality of life, (2) stigma, (3) medication compliance, and (4) consumer satisfaction, with all effects favoring the treatment group. Effect sizes were moderate to large. This psychoeducation program appears to reduce stigma, improve quality of life and medication compliance, and increase consumer satisfaction of Vietnamese patients with schizophrenia and their families, beyond the effects of antipsychotic medication. It involves relatively little cost, and it may be useful for it or equivalent programs to be implemented in other hospitals in Viet Nam, and potentially other low-income Asian countries to improve the lives of patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Schizophrenia-Like Phenotype Inherited by the F2 Generation of a Gestational Disruption Model of Schizophrenia.