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Sample records for schizophrenia bipolar disorder

  1. Violence in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volavka, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Although most psychiatric patients are not violent, serious mental illness is associated with increased risk of violent behavior. Most of the evidence available pertains to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. MEDLINE data base was searched for articles published between 1966 and November 2012 using the combination of key words 'schizophrenia' or 'bipolar disorder' with 'aggression' or 'violence'. For the treatment searches, generic names were used in combination with key words 'schizophrenia' or 'bipolar disorder' and 'aggression' No language constraint was applied. Only articles dealing with adults were included. The lists of references were searched manually to find additional articles. There were statistically significant increases of risk of violence in schizophrenia and in bipolar disorder in comparison with general population. The evidence suggests that the risk of violence is greater in bipolar disorder than in schizophrenia. Most of the violence in bipolar disorder occurs during the manic phase. The risk of violence in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is increased by comorbid substance use disorder. Violence among adults with schizophrenia may follow at least two distinct pathways-one associated with antisocial conduct, and another associated with the acute psychopathology of schizophrenia. Clozapine is the most effective treatment of aggressive behavior in schizophrenia. Emerging evidence suggests that olanzapine may be the second line of treatment. Treatment adherence is of key importance. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment of aggression in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are increasingly important. Cognitive behavioral approaches appear to be effective in cases where pharmacotherapy alone does not suffice. Violent behavior of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is a public health problem. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches should be used to treat not only violent behavior, but also contributing comorbidities such

  2. Cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortolato, Beatrice; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Köhler, Cristiano A

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). A neurocognitive profile characterized by widespread cognitive deficits across multiple domains in the context of substantial intellectual impairment, which appears to antedate illness onset, is a replicated...... studies. Meta-analytic techniques may offer an opportunity to synthesize findings and to control for potential sources of heterogeneity. Here, we performed a systematic review of meta-analyses of neuropsychological findings in SZ and BD. While there is no conclusive evidence for progressive cognitive...... deterioration in either SZ or BD, some findings point to more severe cognitive deficits in patients with early illness onset across both disorders. A compromised pattern of cognitive functioning in individuals at familiar and/or clinical risk to psychosis as well as in first-degree relatives of BD patients...

  3. Genetic Relationships Between Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizoaffective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardno, Alastair G.

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial evidence for partial overlap of genetic influences on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with family, twin, and adoption studies showing a genetic correlation between the disorders of around 0.6. Results of genome-wide association studies are consistent with commonly occurring genetic risk variants, contributing to both the shared and nonshared aspects, while studies of large, rare chromosomal structural variants, particularly copy number variants, show a stronger influence on schizophrenia than bipolar disorder to date. Schizoaffective disorder has been less investigated but shows substantial familial overlap with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A twin analysis is consistent with genetic influences on schizoaffective episodes being entirely shared with genetic influences on schizophrenic and manic episodes, while association studies suggest the possibility of some relatively specific genetic influences on broadly defined schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype. Further insights into genetic relationships between these disorders are expected as studies continue to increase in sample size and in technical and analytical sophistication, information on phenotypes beyond clinical diagnoses are increasingly incorporated, and approaches such as next-generation sequencing identify additional types of genetic risk variant. PMID:24567502

  4. Genetic relationships between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardno, Alastair G; Owen, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial evidence for partial overlap of genetic influences on schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with family, twin, and adoption studies showing a genetic correlation between the disorders of around 0.6. Results of genome-wide association studies are consistent with commonly occurring genetic risk variants, contributing to both the shared and nonshared aspects, while studies of large, rare chromosomal structural variants, particularly copy number variants, show a stronger influence on schizophrenia than bipolar disorder to date. Schizoaffective disorder has been less investigated but shows substantial familial overlap with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A twin analysis is consistent with genetic influences on schizoaffective episodes being entirely shared with genetic influences on schizophrenic and manic episodes, while association studies suggest the possibility of some relatively specific genetic influences on broadly defined schizoaffective disorder, bipolar subtype. Further insights into genetic relationships between these disorders are expected as studies continue to increase in sample size and in technical and analytical sophistication, information on phenotypes beyond clinical diagnoses are increasingly incorporated, and approaches such as next-generation sequencing identify additional types of genetic risk variant.

  5. Informing DSM-5: biological boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cosgrove, Victoria E; Suppes, Trisha

    2013-01-01

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) opted to retain existing diagnostic boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia...

  6. Anomalous subjective experiences in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, Jinyoung

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare anomalous subjective experiences in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression, in order to elucidate differences in subjective experiences and examine their potential clinical correlates in schizophrenia and mood disorders. The subjective experiences of 78 outpatients with schizophrenia (n=32), bipolar disorder (n=24) and unipolar depression (n=22), and 32 healthy controls were comprehensively assessed using the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ). The FCQ total score was significantly higher in the schizophrenia and depression groups than in the healthy control group. There were no significant differences in the FCQ total or subscale scores among the schizophrenia, unipolar depression, and bipolar disorder groups. In the schizophrenia group, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative factor score was a significant negative predictor of the severity of subjective experiences assessed by the FCQ total score. Disruption of subjective experiences in patients with unipolar depression was associated with greater severity of depressive symptoms and younger age. In the bipolar disorder group, women reported more disruptions in subjective experience. Anomalous subjective experiences measured by the FCQ are not specific to schizophrenia, and the severity of these experiences in unipolar depression is substantially high. The finding of a dissimilar pattern of predictors of subjective experiences across different diagnostic groups suggests the complexity and variety of factors contributing to anomalous subjective experiences in schizophrenia and mood disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuroimaging findings in late-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Changtae; Lim, Hyun Kook; Lee, Chang Uk

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in late-onset mental disorders. Among them, geriatric schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are significant health care risks and major causes of disability. We discussed whether late-onset schizophrenia (LOS) and late-onset bipolar (LOB) disorder can be a separate entity from early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) and early-onset bipolar (EOB) disorder in a subset of late-life schizophrenia or late-life bipolar disorder through neuroimaging studies. A literature search for imaging studies of LOS or LOB was performed in the PubMed database. Search terms used were "(imaging OR MRI OR CT OR SPECT OR DTI OR PET OR fMRI) AND (schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) AND late onset." Articles that were published in English before October 2013 were included. There were a few neuroimaging studies assessing whether LOS and LOB had different disease-specific neural substrates compared with EOS and EOB. These researches mainly observed volumetric differences in specific brain regions, white matter hyperintensities, diffusion tensor imaging, or functional neuroimaging to explore the differences between LOS and LOB and EOS and EOB. The aim of this review was to highlight the neural substrates involved in LOS and LOB through neuroimaging studies. The exploration of neuroanatomical markers may be the key to the understanding of underlying neurobiology in LOS and LOB.

  8. Multianalyte markers of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Faith; Schroeder, Jennifer; Stallings, Cassie; Origoni, Andrea; Bahn, Sabine; Yolken, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have identified altered molecular profiles in blood samples from individuals with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder using multianalyte immunoassay platforms but there has been little comparison of the two groups in the same investigation. A total of 337 participants including 146 with schizophrenia, 79 with bipolar disorder, and 112 non-psychiatric controls had a blood sample drawn from which 166 analytes were measured. The initial dataset was split; classification models were developed in a training dataset and their performance evaluated in a test dataset. Principal component analysis was used to generate factor scores that were then compared between the groups. In a training set, a total of 7 independent factors were generated using 29 markers that were both normally distributed and significantly associated with diagnosis. Many of these analytes are components of the immune system and involved in the inflammatory response to infectious agents and foreign antigens. Two of the seven principal component scores discriminated between individuals with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder; additional factors distinguished individuals with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from control individuals, while two factors were not significantly different between any of the diagnostic groups. In a test dataset, the schizophrenia vs. control Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis shows an overall accuracy of 77% for schizophrenia vs. bipolar disorder, 84% for schizophrenia vs. controls, and 72% for bipolar disorder vs. An increased understanding of the role of altered pathways in serious psychiatric disorders may lead to novel methods for disease diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Perisylvian GABA levels in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atagün, Murat İlhan; Şıkoğlu, Elif Muazzez; Soykan, Çağlar; Serdar Süleyman, Can; Ulusoy-Kaymak, Semra; Çayköylü, Ali; Algın, Oktay; Phillips, Mary Louise; Öngür, Dost; Moore, Constance Mary

    2017-01-10

    The aim of this study is to measure GABA levels of perisylvian cortices in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Patients with schizophrenia (n=25), bipolar I disorder (BD-I; n=28) and bipolar II disorder (BD-II; n=20) were compared with healthy controls (n=30). 1H-MRS data was acquired using a Siemens 3T whole body scanner to quantify right and left perisylvian structures' (including superior temporal lobes) GABA levels. Right perisylvian GABA values differed significantly between groups [χ2=9.62, df: 3, p=0.022]. GABA levels were significantly higher in the schizophrenia group compared with the healthy control group (p=0.002). Furthermore, Chlorpromazine equivalent doses of antipsychotics correlated with right hemisphere GABA levels (r2=0.68, p=0.006, n=33). GABA levels are elevated in the right hemisphere in patients with schizophrenia in comparison to bipolar disorder and healthy controls. The balance between excitatory and inhibitory controls over the cortical circuits may have direct relationship with GABAergic functions in auditory cortices. In addition, GABA levels may be altered by brain regions of interest, psychotropic medications, and clinical stage in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...... disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism...

  11. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  12. Prefrontal gyrification in psychotic bipolar I disorder vs. schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic, Igor; Maitra, Raka; Dietzek, Maren; Langbein, Kerstin; Smesny, Stefan; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia share phenotypic and genotypic features, but might differ in aspects of abnormal neurodevelopmental trajectories. We studied gyrification, a marker of early developmental pathology, in high-resolution MRI scans of 34 patients with schizophrenia, 17 euthymic bipolar I disorder patients with previous psychotic symptoms, and 34 matched healthy controls in order to test the hypothesis of overlapping and diverging prefrontal gyrification abnormalities. We applied a novel, validated method for measuring local gyrification in each vertex point of the reconstructed cortical surface. Psychotic bipolar I patients had higher gyrification in dorsal anterior and infragenual cingulate cortex compared to either schizophrenia or healthy controls, while schizophrenia patients had higher gyrification than controls in anterior medial (BA 10) and orbitofrontal areas, altogether indicating disease-specific alterations in the prefrontal cortex. Our findings indicate gyrification changes in a specific subgroup of bipolar I disorder to affect an area relevant to emotion regulation, and distinct from changes seen in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cognitive impairment in late life schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Paul D.; Schouws, Sigfried; Stek, Max; de Haan, Lieuwe; Smit, Jan; Eikelenboom, Piet; Beekman, Aartjan; Comijs, Hannie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence in younger populations suggests quantitative but not categorical differences in cognitive impairments between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. It is uncertain whether a similar distinction applies to patients in later life. We compared the cognitive abilities of older, community-living

  14. Social cognition and functional capacity in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas S; Sutton, Griffin P; Allen, Daniel N

    2014-12-15

    Social cognition is a functionally relevant predictor of capacity in schizophrenia (SZ), though research concerning its value for bipolar disorder (BD) is limited. The current investigation examined the relationship between two social cognitive factors and functional capacity in bipolar disorder. This study included 48 individuals with bipolar disorder (24 with psychotic features) and 30 patients with schizophrenia. Multiple regression controlling for estimated IQ scores was used to assess the predictive value of social cognitive factors on the UCSD Performance-Based Functional Skills Assessment (UPSA). Results found that for the bipolar with psychosis and schizophrenia groups, the social/emotion processing factor predicted the UPSA. The theory of mind factor only predicted the UPSA for the schizophrenia group.. Findings support the clinical utility of evaluating emotion processing in individuals with a history of psychosis. For BD, theory of mind may be better explained by a generalized cognitive deficit. In contrast, social/emotion processing may be linked to distinct neurobiological processes associated with psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mortality in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Clinical and serological predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Faith; Origoni, Andrea; Schroeder, Jennifer; Schweinfurth, Lucy A B; Stallings, Cassie; Savage, Christina L G; Katsafanas, Emily; Banis, Maria; Khushalani, Sunil; Yolken, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia and with bipolar disorder have a reduced life expectancy due largely to death from natural causes. The reasons for this increased mortality have not been completely defined. We prospectively assessed a cohort of persons with schizophrenia and one with bipolar disorder with a clinical evaluation and a blood sample from which immune and infectious disease markers were measured. Mortality was determined with data from the National Death Index following a period of up to 14years. We examined the role of demographic, clinical, and serological factors on mortality in bivariate and multivariate models. A total of 43/710 (6.1%) persons with schizophrenia and 12/406 (3.0%) with bipolar disorder died of natural causes. In the schizophrenia group, mortality was predicted by the following variables in a multivariate model: cigarette smoking (RR=6.93, 95% CI 1.59, 30.1, p=0.0099); autoimmune disorder (RR=8.08, 95% CI 2.50, 26.1, p=0.00047); gastrointestinal disorder (GI) (RR=3.53, 95% CI 1.43, 8.69 p=0.0061); and reduced maternal education (RR=0.84, 95% CI 0.72, 0.97), p=0.018. The combination of smoking and an autoimmune disorder yielded an unadjusted relative risk of 18.1 for mortality, and the combination of smoking and a GI disorder an unadjusted relative risk of 9.45, compared with individuals with neither risk factor. In the bipolar disorder group, significant bivariate predictors of mortality included lower cognitive score (RR=0.95, p=.0085) and the presence of type 1 or 2 diabetes (RR=3.90, p=.026). Given the extraordinary high risk of death due to smoking in schizophrenia, smoking cessation remains an urgent priority. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Role of 108 schizophrenia-associated loci in modulating psychopathological dimensions in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Chiara; Serretti, Alessandro

    2017-10-01

    The Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) identified 108 loci associated with schizophrenia, but their role in modulating specific psychopathological dimensions of the disease is unknown. This study investigated which symptom dimensions may be affected by these loci in schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Positive, negative and depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, cognition, violent behaviors, quality of life, and early onset were investigated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using the clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness (CATIE) and systematic treatment enhancement program for bipolar disorder (STEP-BD) studies. Individual loci were investigated, then genes within 50 Kbp from polymorphisms with p schizophrenia-associated variant (rs75059851) may modulate negative symptoms. Multi-locus models may provide interesting insights about the biological mechanisms that mediate psychopathological dimensions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia overlap: a new comorbidity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Agerbo, Esben; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker

    2009-10-01

    Growing evidence of an etiologic overlap between schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder has become increasingly difficult to disregard. We investigated the magnitude of the overlap between the clinical diagnoses of bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia over a 35-year period based on the entire Danish population. We established a register-based prospective cohort study of more than 2.5 million persons born in Denmark after 1954. Risks for the 3 psychiatric disorders were estimated by survival analysis using the Aalen-Johansen method. Cohort members were followed from 1970 to 2006. We introduced a new comorbidity index measuring the magnitude of the overlap between the 3 disorders. Overall, 12,734 patients were admitted with schizophrenia, 4,205 with bipolar disorder, and 1,881 with schizoaffective disorder. A female bipolar patient's risk of also being admitted with a schizoaffective disorder by the age of 45 years was approximately 103 times higher than that of a woman at the same age in the general population. Thus, we defined the comorbidity index between schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder at age 45 years to be 103. At age 45 years, the index between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder was 80 and between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder was 20. Similar large comorbidity indexes were found for men. A large comorbidity index between schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder was found, as well as a large index between bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder. But, more surprisingly, it was clear that a substantial comorbidity index between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia was present. This study supports the existence of an overlap between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia and thus challenges the strict categorical approach used in both DSM-IV and ICD-10 classification systems. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Contextual social cognition impairments in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Sandra; Herrera, Eduar; Villarin, Lilian; Theil, Donna; Gonzalez-Gadea, María Luz; Gomez, Pedro; Mosquera, Marcela; Huepe, David; Strejilevich, Sergio; Vigliecca, Nora Silvana; Matthäus, Franziska; Decety, Jean; Manes, Facundo; Ibañez, Agustín M

    2013-01-01

    The ability to integrate contextual information with social cues to generate social meaning is a key aspect of social cognition. It is widely accepted that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders have deficits in social cognition; however, previous studies on these disorders did not use tasks that replicate everyday situations. This study evaluates the performance of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders on social cognition tasks (emotional processing, empathy, and social norms knowledge) that incorporate different levels of contextual dependence and involvement of real-life scenarios. Furthermore, we explored the association between social cognition measures, clinical symptoms and executive functions. Using a logistic regression analysis, we explored whether the involvement of more basic skills in emotional processing predicted performance on empathy tasks. The results showed that both patient groups exhibited deficits in social cognition tasks with greater context sensitivity and involvement of real-life scenarios. These deficits were more severe in schizophrenic than in bipolar patients. Patients did not differ from controls in tasks involving explicit knowledge. Moreover, schizophrenic patients' depression levels were negatively correlated with performance on empathy tasks. Overall performance on emotion recognition predicted performance on intentionality attribution during the more ambiguous situations of the empathy task. These results suggest that social cognition deficits could be related to a general impairment in the capacity to implicitly integrate contextual cues. Important implications for the assessment and treatment of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, as well as for neurocognitive models of these pathologies are discussed.

  19. Compare of Executive Function in Bipolar I Disorder and Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza khodaei-Ardakani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is evidence for differential executive function in Bipolar I Disorder (BID and schizophrenia that may tend different cognitive deficits and abnormalities. The objective of this sudsy was to compare the executive function of BID and schizophrenic patients. Materials & Methods: We studied 50 patients with BID, and 50 with schizophrenia participants in outpatients' clinic of Rouzbeh hospital. All participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST the Persian version. The participants were mach in three basic variables which had most contributions in cognitive conditions in patients. They were Age, educational status and period of illness. Results: The two patient groups had compared performance on the WCST in compared with general population (P<0/05. In the WCST, schizophrenic patients showed impairment executive function than BID patients (P<0/05. Conclusion: findings indicated that schizophrenic patients had more dysfunctions executive function than the Bipolar disorder I patients. Although, both disorders may show impairment in executive function, but the dysfunction in schizophrenia greater than Bipolar I Disorder patients.

  20. Mitochondrial variants in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi Rollins

    Full Text Available Mitochondria provide most of the energy for brain cells by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial abnormalities and deficiencies in oxidative phosphorylation have been reported in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD, and major depressive disorder (MDD in transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies. Several mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence have been reported in SZ and BD patients.Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC from a cohort of 77 SZ, BD, and MDD subjects and age-matched controls (C was studied for mtDNA sequence variations and heteroplasmy levels using Affymetrix mtDNA resequencing arrays. Heteroplasmy levels by microarray were compared to levels obtained with SNaPshot and allele specific real-time PCR. This study examined the association between brain pH and mtDNA alleles. The microarray resequencing of mtDNA was 100% concordant with conventional sequencing results for 103 mtDNA variants. The rate of synonymous base pair substitutions in the coding regions of the mtDNA genome was 22% higher (p = 0.0017 in DLPFC of individuals with SZ compared to controls. The association of brain pH and super haplogroup (U, K, UK was significant (p = 0.004 and independent of postmortem interval time.Focusing on haplogroup and individual susceptibility factors in psychiatric disorders by considering mtDNA variants may lead to innovative treatments to improve mitochondrial health and brain function.

  1. Contextual Social Cognition Impairments in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarin, Lilian; Theil, Donna; Gonzalez-Gadea, María Luz; Gomez, Pedro; Mosquera, Marcela; Huepe, David; Strejilevich, Sergio; Vigliecca, Nora Silvana; Matthäus, Franziska; Decety, Jean; Manes, Facundo; Ibañez, Agustín M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to integrate contextual information with social cues to generate social meaning is a key aspect of social cognition. It is widely accepted that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders have deficits in social cognition; however, previous studies on these disorders did not use tasks that replicate everyday situations. Methodology/Principal Findings This study evaluates the performance of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders on social cognition tasks (emotional processing, empathy, and social norms knowledge) that incorporate different levels of contextual dependence and involvement of real-life scenarios. Furthermore, we explored the association between social cognition measures, clinical symptoms and executive functions. Using a logistic regression analysis, we explored whether the involvement of more basic skills in emotional processing predicted performance on empathy tasks. The results showed that both patient groups exhibited deficits in social cognition tasks with greater context sensitivity and involvement of real-life scenarios. These deficits were more severe in schizophrenic than in bipolar patients. Patients did not differ from controls in tasks involving explicit knowledge. Moreover, schizophrenic patients’ depression levels were negatively correlated with performance on empathy tasks. Conclusions/Significance Overall performance on emotion recognition predicted performance on intentionality attribution during the more ambiguous situations of the empathy task. These results suggest that social cognition deficits could be related to a general impairment in the capacity to implicitly integrate contextual cues. Important implications for the assessment and treatment of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, as well as for neurocognitive models of these pathologies are discussed. PMID:23520477

  2. Contextual social cognition impairments in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Baez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to integrate contextual information with social cues to generate social meaning is a key aspect of social cognition. It is widely accepted that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders have deficits in social cognition; however, previous studies on these disorders did not use tasks that replicate everyday situations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study evaluates the performance of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders on social cognition tasks (emotional processing, empathy, and social norms knowledge that incorporate different levels of contextual dependence and involvement of real-life scenarios. Furthermore, we explored the association between social cognition measures, clinical symptoms and executive functions. Using a logistic regression analysis, we explored whether the involvement of more basic skills in emotional processing predicted performance on empathy tasks. The results showed that both patient groups exhibited deficits in social cognition tasks with greater context sensitivity and involvement of real-life scenarios. These deficits were more severe in schizophrenic than in bipolar patients. Patients did not differ from controls in tasks involving explicit knowledge. Moreover, schizophrenic patients' depression levels were negatively correlated with performance on empathy tasks. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall performance on emotion recognition predicted performance on intentionality attribution during the more ambiguous situations of the empathy task. These results suggest that social cognition deficits could be related to a general impairment in the capacity to implicitly integrate contextual cues. Important implications for the assessment and treatment of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, as well as for neurocognitive models of these pathologies are discussed.

  3. The kynurenine pathway in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Sophie; Schwieler, Lilly; Imbeault, Sophie; Engberg, Göran

    2017-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation generates several neuroactive compounds. Of those, kynurenic acid is an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha7 nicotinic receptor antagonist. The kynurenic acid hypothesis of schizophrenia is built upon the fact that kynurenic acid blocks glutamate receptors and is elevated in schizophrenia. Kynurenic acid tightly controls glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission and elevated brain levels appear related to psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairments. Contributing to enhanced production of kynurenic acid, the expression and enzyme activity of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) are reduced in schizophrenia and in bipolar patients with a history of psychosis. The kynurenine pathway is also critically regulated by cytokines, and, indeed, the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 are elevated in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and stimulate the production of kynurenic acid. One physiological mechanism controlling the activity of the kynurenine pathway originates from the protein sorting nexin 7 (SNX7). This glial signaling pathway initiates a caspase-8-driven activation of IL-1β that induces tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase 2 (TDO2), an enzyme in the kynurenine pathway. A recent study shows that a genetic variation resulting in decreased expression of SNX7 is linked to increased central levels of kynurenic acid and ultimately to psychosis and cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder. Experimental studies highlight the detrimental effects of increased synthesis of kynurenic acid during sensitive periods of early brain development. Furthermore, experimental studies strongly support inhibition of kynurenine aminotransferase (KAT) II as a novel target and a valuable pharmacological strategy in the treatment of psychosis and for improving cognitive performance relevant for schizophrenia. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'. Copyright

  4. Schizoaffective disorder merges schizophrenia and bipolar disorders as one disease--there is no schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Charles Ray; Hurwitz, Nathaniel

    2007-07-01

    Schizoaffective disorder was named as a compromise diagnosis in 1933, and remains popular as judged by its place in the International Classification of Diseases and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, its frequent use in clinical practice, and its extensive discussion in the literature. Some, however, have questioned the validity of schizoaffective disorder as separate from psychotic mood disorder. We examined the literature to assess the rationale for the continuation of schizoaffective disorder as a legitimate diagnostic category. The diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder depends on the disease specificity of the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia; however, the psychotic symptoms for schizophrenia, traditionally held as specific, can be accounted for by psychotic bipolar. Further, the interrater reliability for diagnosing schizoaffective disorder is very low. A recent and expanding body of comparative evidence from a wide range of clinical and basic science studies, especially genetic, reveals multiple similarities between schizoaffective disorder, schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar. Schizoaffective disorder unifies schizophrenia and bipolar, blurring the zones of rarity between them and suggesting that schizoaffective disorder is not a separate, 'bona-fide' disease. Patients diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder likely suffer from a psychotic mood disorder. The diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder, which can result in substandard treatment, should be eliminated from the diagnostic nomenclature.

  5. Increased timing variability in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Bolbecker

    Full Text Available Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that impaired time perception and the neural circuitry underlying internal timing mechanisms may contribute to severe psychiatric disorders, including psychotic and mood disorders. The degree to which alterations in temporal perceptions reflect deficits that exist across psychosis-related phenotypes and the extent to which mood symptoms contribute to these deficits is currently unknown. In addition, compared to schizophrenia, where timing deficits have been more extensively investigated, sub-second timing has been studied relatively infrequently in bipolar disorder. The present study compared sub-second duration estimates of schizophrenia (SZ, schizoaffective disorder (SA, non-psychotic bipolar disorder (BDNP, bipolar disorder with psychotic features (BDP, and healthy non-psychiatric controls (HC on a well-established time perception task using sub-second durations. Participants included 66 SZ, 37 BDNP, 34 BDP, 31 SA, and 73 HC who participated in a temporal bisection task that required temporal judgements about auditory durations ranging from 300 to 600 milliseconds. Timing variability was significantly higher in SZ, BDP, and BDNP groups compared to healthy controls. The bisection point did not differ across groups. These findings suggest that both psychotic and mood symptoms may be associated with disruptions in internal timing mechanisms. Yet unexpected findings emerged. Specifically, the BDNP group had significantly increased variability compared to controls, but the SA group did not. In addition, these deficits appeared to exist independent of current symptom status. The absence of between group differences in bisection point suggests that increased variability in the SZ and bipolar disorder groups are due to alterations in perceptual timing in the sub-second range, possibly mediated by the cerebellum, rather than cognitive deficits.

  6. Brain Age in Early Stages of Bipolar Disorders or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Tomas; Franke, Katja; Kolenic, Marian; Capkova, Jana; Matejka, Martin; Propper, Lukas; Uher, Rudolf; Stopkova, Pavla; Novak, Tomas; Paus, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Spaniel, Filip; Alda, Martin

    2017-12-20

    The greater presence of neurodevelopmental antecedants may differentiate schizophrenia from bipolar disorders (BD). Machine learning/pattern recognition allows us to estimate the biological age of the brain from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans (MRI). The discrepancy between brain and chronological age could contribute to early detection and differentiation of BD and schizophrenia. We estimated brain age in 2 studies focusing on early stages of schizophrenia or BD. In the first study, we recruited 43 participants with first episode of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders (FES) and 43 controls. In the second study, we included 96 offspring of bipolar parents (48 unaffected, 48 affected) and 60 controls. We used relevance vector regression trained on an independent sample of 504 controls to estimate the brain age of study participants from structural MRI. We calculated the brain-age gap estimate (BrainAGE) score by subtracting the chronological age from the brain age. Participants with FES had higher BrainAGE scores than controls (F(1, 83) = 8.79, corrected P = .008, Cohen's d = 0.64). Their brain age was on average 2.64 ± 4.15 years greater than their chronological age (matched t(42) = 4.36, P < .001). In contrast, participants at risk or in the early stages of BD showed comparable BrainAGE scores to controls (F(2,149) = 1.04, corrected P = .70, η2 = 0.01) and comparable brain and chronological age. Early stages of schizophrenia, but not early stages of BD, were associated with advanced BrainAGE scores. Participants with FES showed neurostructural alterations, which made their brains appear 2.64 years older than their chronological age. BrainAGE scores could aid in early differential diagnosis between BD and schizophrenia.

  7. Are oxidative stress markers useful to distinguish schizoaffective disorder from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Feridun; Virit, Osman; Alpak, Gokay; Unal, Ahmet; Bulut, Mahmut; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Altindag, Abdurrahman; Celik, Hakim; Savas, Haluk A

    2014-04-01

    Schizoaffective disorder is a disease with both affective and psychotic symptoms. In this study, we aimed to compare oxidative metabolism markers of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenic patients. Furthermore, we also aimed to investigate whether schizoaffective disorder could be differentiated from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in terms of oxidative metabolism. Total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured in the blood samples that were collected from schizoaffective patients (n = 30), bipolar disorder patients (n = 30) and schizophrenic patients (n = 30). Oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated by dividing TOS by TAS. TOS and OSI were found to be higher in patients with schizoaffective disorder compared with those in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. TAS was not significantly different between the groups. Schizoaffective disorder was found to be different from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in terms of oxidative parameters. This result may indicate that schizoaffective disorder could differ from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in terms of biochemical parameters. Increased TOS levels observed in schizoaffective disorder may suggest poor clinical course and may be an indicator of poor prognosis.

  8. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, T H; Børglum, A D; Mors, O

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 22q may harbor risk genes for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder from the Faroe...

  9. Assessing neural tuning for object perception in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with multivariate pattern analysis of fMRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Reavis

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The results show for the first time MVPA can be used successfully to classify individual perceptual stimuli in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, the results do not provide evidence of abnormal neural tuning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  10. Study of Attention Deficit in Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Kafi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Attention deficit has significant effect on the life of patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the attention deficit in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In the present post-hoc study, 132 patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were selected via non-randomized sampling at Shafa Hospital (Rasht, Iran and then divided into four equal groups: chronic schizophrenia patients, first-episode patients, chronic bipolar patients, and first-episode bipolar patients. Thirty-three healthy individuals were selected as the control group. Subjects were evaluated by Stroop color-word test. The gathered Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: Attention deficit among chronic schizophrenics and patients suffering from bipolar disease was higher than the control group (p <1. Chronic schizophrenic patients compared with schizophrenia bipolar disease and first round schizophrenia showed more attention deficit. There was no significant difference among the first bipolar disease and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, as well as the first round schizophrenia (p<0.05. Conclusion: Attention deficit is more severe in schizophrenic patients than bipolar disorder, and chronicity is more effective in schizophrenic patients. Key words: Attention, Schizophrenia, Chronicity

  11. A genetic deconstruction of neurocognitive traits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla P D Fernandes

    Full Text Available Impairments in cognitive functions are common in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Cognitive traits have been proposed as useful for understanding the biological and genetic mechanisms implicated in cognitive function in healthy individuals and in the dysfunction observed in psychiatric disorders.Sets of genes associated with a range of cognitive functions often impaired in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were generated from a genome-wide association study (GWAS on a sample comprising 670 healthy Norwegian adults who were phenotyped for a broad battery of cognitive tests. These gene sets were then tested for enrichment of association in GWASs of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The GWAS data was derived from three independent single-centre schizophrenia samples, three independent single-centre bipolar disorder samples, and the multi-centre schizophrenia and bipolar disorder samples from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium.The strongest enrichments were observed for visuospatial attention and verbal abilities sets in bipolar disorder. Delayed verbal memory was also enriched in one sample of bipolar disorder. For schizophrenia, the strongest evidence of enrichment was observed for the sets of genes associated with performance in a colour-word interference test and for sets associated with memory learning slope.Our results are consistent with the increasing evidence that cognitive functions share genetic factors with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Our data provides evidence that genetic studies using polygenic and pleiotropic models can be used to link specific cognitive functions with psychiatric disorders.

  12. Brain structural changes in schizoaffective disorder compared to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, B L; Canales-Rodríguez, E J; Madre, M; Radua, J; Monte, G; Alonso-Lana, S; Landin-Romero, R; Moreno-Alcázar, A; Bonnin, C M; Sarró, S; Ortiz-Gil, J; Gomar, J J; Moro, N; Fernandez-Corcuera, P; Goikolea, J M; Blanch, J; Salvador, R; Vieta, E; McKenna, P J; Pomarol-Clotet, E

    2016-01-01

    Brain structural changes in schizoaffective disorder, and how far they resemble those seen in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, have only been studied to a limited extent. Forty-five patients meeting DSM-IV and RDC criteria for schizoaffective disorder, groups of patients with 45 matched schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and 45 matched healthy controls were examined using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Analyses comparing each patient group with the healthy control subjects found that the patients with schizoaffective disorder and the patients with schizophrenia showed widespread and overlapping areas of significant volume reduction, but the patients with bipolar disorder did not. A subsequent analysis compared the combined group of patients with the controls followed by extraction of clusters. In regions where the patients differed significantly from the controls, no significant differences in mean volume between patients with schizoaffective disorder and patients with schizophrenia in any of five regions of volume reduction were found, but mean volumes in the patients with bipolar disorder were significantly smaller in three of five. The findings provide evidence that, in terms of structural gray matter brain abnormality, schizoaffective disorder resembles schizophrenia more than bipolar disorder. © 2015 The Authors. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Characteristics of patients diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Tobias; Baldessarini, Ross J; Franklin, Jeremy; Baethge, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    Information on basic demographic and clinical characteristics of schizoaffective disorder is sparse and subject to sampling bias and low diagnostic reliability. In the present study we aimed to: (i) estimate the demographic and clinical descriptors in schizoaffective disorder patients and (ii) compare the findings with those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. To minimize sampling bias and low reliability, we systematically reviewed studies that simultaneously compared schizoaffective, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder patients. We estimated demographic, clinical, and psychometric characteristics based on weighted pooling, and compared disorders by meta-analysis. We also estimated whether schizoaffective disorder is closer to schizophrenia or to bipolar disorder. We identified 50 studies that included 18312 patients. Most characteristics of the 2684 schizoaffective disorder patients fell between those of 4814 diagnosed with bipolar disorder and 10814 with schizophrenia. However, the schizoaffective group had the highest proportion of women (52%), had the youngest age at illness onset (23.3 ± 3.8 years), and had the highest standardized ratings of psychosis and depression. Differences in pooled parameters between schizoaffective versus schizophrenia and versus bipolar disorder subjects were similar. Values for patients with schizoaffective disorders mostly were intermediate between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, the majority of studies showed schizoaffective patients to be more like schizophrenia than bipolar disorder patients in seven out of nine demographic and clinical categories as well as in five out of eight psychometric measures. These results remained similar when we restricted the analyses to studies with psychotic bipolar disorder patients only or to studies using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IIIR and DSM-IV only. The present study provided estimates of important characteristics of schizoaffective

  14. Cortical morphology of adolescents with bipolar disorder and with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Joost; Alemán-Gómez, Yasser; Schnack, Hugo; Balaban, Evan; Pina-Camacho, Laura; Alfaro-Almagro, Fidel; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Otero, Soraya; Baeza, Inmaculada; Moreno, Dolores; Bargalló, Nuria; Parellada, Mara; Arango, Celso; Desco, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence points to overlapping decreases in cortical thickness and gyrification in the frontal lobe of patients with adult-onset schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychotic symptoms, but it is not clear if these findings generalize to patients with a disease onset during adolescence and what may be the mechanisms underlying a decrease in gyrification. This study analyzed cortical morphology using surface-based morphometry in 92 subjects (age range 11-18 years, 52 healthy controls and 40 adolescents with early-onset first-episode psychosis diagnosed with schizophrenia (n=20) or bipolar disorder with psychotic symptoms (n=20) based on a two year clinical follow up). Average lobar cortical thickness, surface area, gyrification index (GI) and sulcal width were compared between groups, and the relationship between the GI and sulcal width was assessed in the patient group. Both patients groups showed decreased cortical thickness and increased sulcal width in the frontal cortex when compared to healthy controls. The schizophrenia subgroup also had increased sulcal width in all other lobes. In the frontal cortex of the combined patient group sulcal width was negatively correlated (r=-0.58, pschizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychotic symptoms there is cortical thinning, decreased GI and increased sulcal width of the frontal cortex present at the time of the first psychotic episode. Decreased frontal GI is associated with the widening of the frontal sulci which may reduce sulcal surface area. These results suggest that abnormal growth (or more pronounced shrinkage during adolescence) of the frontal cortex represents a shared endophenotype for psychosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bipolar disorder and self-stigma: A comparison with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karidi, M V; Vassilopoulou, D; Savvidou, E; Vitoratou, S; Maillis, A; Rabavilas, A; Stefanis, C N

    2015-09-15

    Even though numerous studies have focused on the effects of self-stigma on patients with schizophrenia, little is known about self-stigma of patients with bipolar disorder (BD). In this study, a self-administered scale of self-stigmatising attitudes of patients with BD and schizophrenia was used to explore these attitudes, examine the potential differences between the two groups and study the factors that influence stigma within groups. Self-stigma of 120 patients with schizophrenia and BD was assessed with the Self-stigma Questionnaire (SSQ) and the Stigma Inventory for Mental Illness (SIMI). Presence of clinical symptoms, overall functioning and level of self-esteem were also evaluated. Self-stigma is present in both groups but differs in its intensity. Patients with BD experience self-stigma in a lesser degree without affecting their social life or overall functioning. Patients with schizophrenia adopt more intense self-stigmatising attitudes leading to social exclusion and lower level of overall functioning. The results are limited by the small sample size, whereas the inclusion of other questionnaires would broaden our insight to self-stigma. Self-stigma has a direct effect on overall functioning of patients with BD and schizophrenia tampering the clinical outcome of therapeutic interventions. Therefore, it should be incorporated in every treatment plan and be addressed as a clinical symptom of the mental illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Emotion Recognition Deficits in Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder: Findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Anthony C.; Reilly, James L.; Rubin, Leah H.; Daros, Alex R.; Gershon, Elliot S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Hill, S. Kristian; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Gur, Ruben C.; Sweeney, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Difficulty recognizing facial emotions is an important social-cognitive deficit associated with psychotic disorders. It also may reflect a familial risk for psychosis in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder. Objective The objectives of this study from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) consortium were to: 1) compare emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder with psychosis, 2) determine the familiality of emotion recognition deficits across these disorders, and 3) evaluate emotion recognition deficits in nonpsychotic relatives with and without elevated Cluster A and Cluster B personality disorder traits. Method Participants included probands with schizophrenia (n=297), schizoaffective disorder (depressed type, n=61; bipolar type, n=69), bipolar disorder with psychosis (n=248), their first-degree relatives (n=332, n=69, n=154, and n=286, respectively) and healthy controls (n=380). All participants completed the Penn Emotion Recognition Test, a standardized measure of facial emotion recognition assessing four basic emotions (happiness, sadness, anger and fear) and neutral expressions (no emotion). Results Compared to controls, emotion recognition deficits among probands increased progressively from bipolar disorder to schizoaffective disorder to schizophrenia. Proband and relative groups showed similar deficits perceiving angry and neutral faces, whereas deficits on fearful, happy and sad faces were primarily isolated to schizophrenia probands. Even non-psychotic relatives without elevated Cluster A or Cluster B personality disorder traits showed deficits on neutral and angry faces. Emotion recognition ability was moderately familial only in schizophrenia families. Conclusions Emotion recognition deficits are prominent but somewhat different across psychotic disorders. These deficits are reflected to a lesser extent in relatives, particularly on angry and

  17. Emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and psychotic bipolar disorder: Findings from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Anthony C; Reilly, James L; Rubin, Leah H; Daros, Alex R; Gershon, Elliot S; Tamminga, Carol A; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Hill, S Kristian; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Gur, Ruben C; Sweeney, John A

    2014-09-01

    Difficulty recognizing facial emotions is an important social-cognitive deficit associated with psychotic disorders. It also may reflect a familial risk for psychosis in schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder. The objectives of this study from the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) consortium were to: 1) compare emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder with psychosis, 2) determine the familiality of emotion recognition deficits across these disorders, and 3) evaluate emotion recognition deficits in nonpsychotic relatives with and without elevated Cluster A and Cluster B personality disorder traits. Participants included probands with schizophrenia (n=297), schizoaffective disorder (depressed type, n=61; bipolar type, n=69), bipolar disorder with psychosis (n=248), their first-degree relatives (n=332, n=69, n=154, and n=286, respectively) and healthy controls (n=380). All participants completed the Penn Emotion Recognition Test, a standardized measure of facial emotion recognition assessing four basic emotions (happiness, sadness, anger and fear) and neutral expressions (no emotion). Compared to controls, emotion recognition deficits among probands increased progressively from bipolar disorder to schizoaffective disorder to schizophrenia. Proband and relative groups showed similar deficits perceiving angry and neutral faces, whereas deficits on fearful, happy and sad faces were primarily isolated to schizophrenia probands. Even non-psychotic relatives without elevated Cluster A or Cluster B personality disorder traits showed deficits on neutral and angry faces. Emotion recognition ability was moderately familial only in schizophrenia families. Emotion recognition deficits are prominent but somewhat different across psychotic disorders. These deficits are reflected to a lesser extent in relatives, particularly on angry and neutral faces. Deficits were evident in non

  18. Effects of cannabis use on age at onset in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Jendricko, Tihana; Franic, Tomislav; Vidovic, Domagoj; De Vriendt, Nele; Sweers, Kim; Peuskens, Joseph; van Winkel, Ruud

    2011-03-01

    Cannabis use may decrease age at onset in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, given the evidence for substantial phenotypic and genetic overlap between both disorders. 766 patients, aged 16 to 65 years, were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) for substance abuse/use. 676 subjects were diagnosed with schizophrenia and 90 subjects with bipolar disorder. The influence of cannabis use on age at onset in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder was examined using regression analysis. Cannabis and other substance use was more frequent in patients with schizophrenia compared to the bipolar group. Both cannabis use and a schizophrenia diagnosis predicted earlier age at onset. There was a significant interaction between cannabis use and diagnosis, cannabis having a greater effect in bipolar patients. Age at onset in users of cannabis was comparable in both diagnostic groups whereas bipolar non-users were significantly older than schizophrenia non-users at onset. Cannabis use may decrease age at onset in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients and reduce the effect of diagnosis. This is consistent with the view that cannabis use may unmask a pre-existing genetic liability that is partly shared between patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Traumatic Stress Disorders and Risk of Subsequent Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder or Bipolar Disorder: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkels, Niels; Trabjerg, Betina; Arendt, Mikkel; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic stress disorders are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, there is a lack of prospective longitudinal studies investigating the risk of severe mental illness for people diagnosed with traumatic stress disorders. We aimed to assess if patients with acute stress reaction (ASR) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at increased risk of schizophrenia spectrum disorders or bipolar disorder. We performed a prospective cohort study covering the entire Danish population including information on inpatient and outpatient mental hospitals over 2 decades. Predictors were in- or outpatient diagnoses of ASR or PTSD. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% CIs of schizophrenia, schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and bipolar disorder. Persons with a traumatic stress disorder had a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia (IRR 3.80, CI 2.33-5.80), schizophrenia spectrum disorder (IRR 2.34, CI 1.46-3.53), and bipolar disorder (IRR 4.22, CI 2.25-7.13). Risks were highest in the first year after diagnosis of the traumatic stress disorder and remained significantly elevated after more than 5 years. Mental illness in a parent could not explain the association. Our findings support an association between diagnosed traumatic stress disorders and subsequent schizophrenia spectrum disorder or bipolar disorder. If replicated, this may increase clinical focus on patients with traumatic stress disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Pattern of neural responses to verbal fluency shows diagnostic specificity for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walshe Muriel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairments in executive function and language processing are characteristic of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Their functional neuroanatomy demonstrate features that are shared as well as specific to each disorder. Determining the distinct pattern of neural responses in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may provide biomarkers for their diagnoses. Methods 104 participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scans while performing a phonological verbal fluency task. Subjects were 32 patients with schizophrenia in remission, 32 patients with bipolar disorder in an euthymic state, and 40 healthy volunteers. Neural responses to verbal fluency were examined in each group, and the diagnostic potential of the pattern of the neural responses was assessed with machine learning analysis. Results During the verbal fluency task, both patient groups showed increased activation in the anterior cingulate, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right putamen as compared to healthy controls, as well as reduced deactivation of precuneus and posterior cingulate. The magnitude of activation was greatest in patients with schizophrenia, followed by patients with bipolar disorder and then healthy individuals. Additional recruitment in the right inferior frontal and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortices was observed in schizophrenia relative to both bipolar disorder and healthy subjects. The pattern of neural responses correctly identified individual patients with schizophrenia with an accuracy of 92%, and those with bipolar disorder with an accuracy of 79% in which mis-classification was typically of bipolar subjects as healthy controls. Conclusions In summary, both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with altered function in prefrontal, striatal and default mode networks, but the magnitude of this dysfunction is particularly marked in schizophrenia. The pattern of response to verbal fluency is highly

  1. A genetic deconstruction of neurocognitive traits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.D. Fernandes (Carla P.); A. Christoforou (Andrea); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); K.M. Ersland (Kari); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); M. Mattheisen (Manuel); A.J. Lundervold (Astri); I. Reinvang (Ivar); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); M. Rietschel (Marcella); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); T.M. Werge (Thomas); S. Cichon (Sven); T. Espeseth (Thomas); O.A. Andreassen (Ole); V.M. Steen (Vidar); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impairments in cognitive functions are common in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Cognitive traits have been proposed as useful for understanding the biological and genetic mechanisms implicated in cognitive function

  2. Cardiometabolic comorbidities, readmission, and costs in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a real-world analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U; Ng-Mak, Daisy S; Stafkey-Mailey, Dana; Farrelly, Eileen; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Loebel, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Serious mental illnesses are associated with increased risk of cardiometabolic comorbidities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiometabolic comorbidity and its association with hospitalization outcomes and costs among inpatients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. This retrospective database analysis reviewed patients with an inpatient diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Premier Perspective® Database (4/1/2010-6/30/2012). Patients were categorized into 4 cohorts based on the number of ICD-9-CM cardiometabolic comorbidities (i.e., 0, 1, 2, or 3+). Outcomes included length of stay, mortality during the index hospitalization, healthcare costs, and 30-day all-cause readmission rates. Of 57,506 patients with schizophrenia, 66.1% had at least one cardiometabolic comorbidity; 39.3% had two or more comorbidities. Of 124,803 patients with bipolar disorder, 60.5% had at least one cardiometabolic comorbidity; 33.4% had two or more. Average length of stay was 8.5 (for patients with schizophrenia) and 5.2 (for patients with bipolar disorder) days. Each additional cardiometabolic comorbidity was associated with an increase in length of stay for patients with bipolar disorder (p bipolar disorder). Each additional cardiometabolic comorbidity was associated with a significant increase in mortality for patients with bipolar disorder (OR 1.218, p bipolar disorder = 7-12%), and to incur higher costs (schizophrenia = $10,606-15,355; bipolar disorder = $7126-13,523) (all p bipolar disorder had cardiometabolic comorbidities. Greater cardiometabolic comorbidity burden was associated with an increased likelihood of readmission and higher costs among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, and an increase in length of stay and mortality for patients with bipolar disorder.

  3. Polygenic dissection of diagnosis and clinical dimensions of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fanous, Ayman H.; Ripke, Stephan; McQuillin, Andrew; Amdur, Richard L.; Gejman, Pablo V.; O’Donovan, Michael C; Andreassen, Ole A; Djurovic, Srdjan; Hultman, Christina M.; Kelsoe, John R; Jamain, Stephane; Landén, Mikael; Leboyer, Marion; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit

    2013-01-01

    PUBLISHED Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are two often severe disorders with high heritabilities. Recent studies have demonstrated a large overlap of genetic risk loci between these disorders but diagnostic and molecular distinctions still remain. Here, we perform a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 19 779 bipolar disorder (BP) and schizophrenia (SCZ) cases versus 19 423 controls, in addition to a direct comparison GWAS of 7129 SCZ cases versus 9252 BP cases. In our case...

  4. Infection and inflammation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Teppei; Matsuda, Taro; Hayes, Lindsay N; Yang, Shuojia; Rodriguez, Katrina; Severance, Emily G; Yolken, Robert H; Sawa, Akira; Eaton, William W

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between exposure to infectious agents and inflammation markers in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BP), and controls without a psychiatric disorder. We measured plasma levels of antibodies and innate immune markers and correlated them with clinical symptoms and cognitive function. In both SZ and BP, we found an increase in soluble CD14, and in BP an increase in C-reactive protein, IgM class antibodies against cytomegalovirus (CMV), and IgG class antibodies against herpes simplex virus 2. Furthermore in BP, we observed a negative relationship between IgG antibodies against CMV and scores for cognitive function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Social and nonsocial cognition in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: relative levels of impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghee; Altshuler, Lori; Glahn, David C; Miklowitz, David J; Ochsner, Kevin; Green, Michael F

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the relative extent of impairment in social and nonsocial cognitive domains in patients with bipolar disorder compared with schizophrenia patients and healthy comparison subjects. Sixty-eight clinically stable outpatients with bipolar disorder, 38 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia, and 36 healthy comparison subjects completed a range of social (facial affect perception, emotional regulation, empathic accuracy, mental state attribution, and self-referential memory) and nonsocial (speed of processing, attention/vigilance, working memory, verbal memory, visual memory, and reasoning/problem solving) cognitive tasks. For each social cognitive task, patients with bipolar disorder did not differ significantly from comparison subjects, and both groups performed better than schizophrenia patients. Within the bipolar group, clinical features and medication status were not related to social cognitive performance. Bipolar patients showed performance patterns across tasks (i.e., profiles) that were similar to those of comparison subjects on both social and nonsocial cognitive domains, whereas both groups differed from schizophrenia patients for both domains. Regarding relative impairment across the two cognitive domains, results revealed a significant group-by-domain interaction in which bipolar patients showed less impaired social than nonsocial cognition, while schizophrenia patients showed the opposite pattern. Bipolar patients showed less impairment on social relative to nonsocial cognitive performance, whereas schizophrenia patients showed more impairment on social relative to nonsocial cognitive performance. These results suggest that these two cognitive domains play different roles in bipolar disorder compared with in schizophrenia.

  6. Schizophrenia and Bipolar Affective Disorder: a Dimensional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Demet Sağlam; Arslan, Filiz Civil; Özkorumak, Evrim; Tiryaki, Ahmet

    2017-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SCH) and bipolar affective disorder (BAD) are currently classified separately according to the DSM (The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and ICD (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems) standardized diagnostic guidelines. However, the validity of this categorical approach is controversial because psychotic symptoms may be observed in both diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and social characteristics in a sample group consisting of patients diagnosed with SCH or BAD to help demonstrate the basic difficulty in the current classification of SCH and BAD as two etiologically distinct diseases. The study sample group consisted of 102 patients diagnosed with SCH and 92 patients diagnosed with BAD. All of the participants were evaluated by Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition with regard to beginning symptoms of the disease, the symptoms and signs of active disease period within total disease duration, continuining residual symptoms in intermediate period. The patients were administered the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Social Functioning Scale. The SCH and BAD groups in this study were statistically similar in terms of sex, length of education, age at disease onset, attempted suicide, quality of life and social functioning. Our study findings indicated that the course of disease in patients with BAD-1, in which psychotic features predominate and which exhibits a recurring course, shares various characteristics with SCH. It can be concluded that further phenomenological and neurobiological evaluations are required for intermediate cases with similiar clinical characteristics with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  7. Informing DSM-5: biological boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Victoria E; Suppes, Trisha

    2013-05-14

    The fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) opted to retain existing diagnostic boundaries between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia. The debate preceding this decision focused on understanding the biologic basis of these major mental illnesses. Evidence from genetics, neuroscience, and pharmacotherapeutics informed the DSM-5 development process. The following discussion will emphasize some of the key factors at the forefront of the debate. Family studies suggest a clear genetic link between bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia. However, large-scale genome-wide association studies have not been successful in identifying susceptibility genes that make substantial etiological contributions. Boundaries between psychotic disorders are not further clarified by looking at brain morphology. The fact that symptoms of bipolar I disorder, but not schizophrenia, are often responsive to medications such as lithium and other anticonvulsants must be interpreted within a larger framework of biological research. For DSM-5, existing nosological boundaries between bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia were retained and schizoaffective disorder preserved as an independent diagnosis since the biological data are not yet compelling enough to justify a move to a more neurodevelopmentally continuous model of psychosis.

  8. Theory of mind impairment: a distinct trait-marker for schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, E; Yücel, M; Pantelis, C

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to critically review the literature in order to determine if Theory of Mind (ToM) impairment can be considered a trait-marker for schizophrenia spectrum disorders and bipolar disorder (BD). After a thorough literature search, we reviewed the empirical studies investigating ToM impairments in remitted schizophrenia patients, first episode patients, subjects at high-risk (HR) for psychosis and first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients. Studies investigating ToM impairment in other schizophrenia spectrum conditions, affective psychosis and BD were also reviewed. ToM abnormalities exist at onset and continue throughout the course of schizophrenia, persist into remission, and while less severe, are apparent in HR populations. Mentalizing impairments are also observed in other forms of psychotic illness and BD. Mentalizing impairment in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and BD might reflect underlying general cognitive deficits and residual symptom expression, rather than representing a specific trait-marker.

  9. A genetic deconstruction of neurocognitive traits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Carla P. D.; Andrea Christoforou; Sudheer Giddaluru; Ersland, Kari M.; Srdjan Djurovic; Manuel Mattheisen; Lundervold, Astri J.; Ivar Reinvang; Nöthen, Markus M.; Marcella Rietschel; Ophoff, Roel A.; Albert Hofman; André G Uitterlinden; Thomas Werge; Sven Cichon

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Impairments in cognitive functions are common in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Cognitive traits have been proposed as useful for understanding the biological and genetic mechanisms implicated in cognitive function in healthy individuals and in the dysfunction observed in psychiatric disorders. Methods: Sets of genes associated with a range of cognitive functions often impaired in schizophrenia and bipolar dis...

  10. More Pronounced Deficits in Facial Emotion Recognition for Schizophrenia than Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goghari, Vina M; Sponheim, Scott R

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are typically separated in diagnostic systems. Behavioural, cognitive, and brain abnormalities associated with each disorder nonetheless overlap. We evaluated the diagnostic specificity of facial emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to determine whether select aspects of emotion recognition differed for the two disorders. The investigation used an experimental task that included the same facial images in an emotion recognition condition and an age recognition condition (to control for processes associated with general face recognition) in 27 schizophrenia patients, 16 bipolar I patients, and 30 controls. Schizophrenia and bipolar patients exhibited both shared and distinct aspects of facial emotion recognition deficits. Schizophrenia patients had deficits in recognizing angry facial expressions compared to healthy controls and bipolar patients. Compared to control participants, both schizophrenia and bipolar patients were more likely to mislabel facial expressions of anger as fear. Given that schizophrenia patients exhibited a deficit in emotion recognition for angry faces, which did not appear due to generalized perceptual and cognitive dysfunction, improving recognition of threat-related expression may be an important intervention target to improve social functioning in schizophrenia. PMID:23218816

  11. Substance use disorders in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depressive illness: a registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvåg, Ragnar; Knudsen, Gun Peggy; Bakken, Inger Johanne; Høye, Anne; Ystrom, Eivind; Surén, Pål; Reneflot, Anne; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2015-08-01

    To compare the prevalence and pattern of comorbid substance use disorders (SUD) between patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depressive illness. Data on presence of alcohol use disorder (AUD) and non-alcohol drug use disorder (DUD) were retrieved from the Norwegian Patient Register for individuals born between 1950 and 1989 who in the period 2009-2013 were diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or depressive illness according to the 10th version of the WHO International Classification of Diseases. The prevalence of AUD only, DUD only, or both was compared between men and women across age and diagnostic groups. The prevalence of SUD was 25.1 % in schizophrenia (AUD: 4.6 %, DUD: 15.6 %, AUD and DUD: 4.9 %), 20.1 % in bipolar disorder (AUD: 8.1 %, DUD: 7.6 %, AUD and DUD: 4.4 %), and 10.9 % in depressive illness (AUD: 4.4 %, DUD: 4.3 %, AUD and DUD: 2.2 %). Middle-aged men with bipolar disorder had the highest prevalence of AUD (19.1 %) and young men with schizophrenia had the highest prevalence of DUD (29.6 %). Of the specific DUDs, all but sedative use disorder were more prevalent in schizophrenia than the other groups. Cannabis and stimulant use disorder was found among 8.8 and 8.9 %, respectively, of the men with schizophrenia. The alarmingly high prevalence of DUD among young patients with severe mental disorders should encourage preventive efforts to reduce illicit drug use in the adolescent population.

  12. Genetic association between NRG1 and schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder in Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zujia; Chen, Jianhua; Khan, Raja Amjad Waheed; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Li, Wenjin; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-04-01

    Schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and bipolar disorder are three major psychiatric disorders affecting around 0.66%, 3.3%, and 1.5% of the Han Chinese population respectively. Several genetic linkage analyses and genome wide association studies identified NRG1 as a susceptibility gene of schizophrenia, which was validated by its role in neurodevelopment, glutamate, and other neurotransmitter receptor expression regulation. To further investigate whether NRG1 is a shared risk gene for major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder as well as schizophrenia, we performed an association study among 1,248 schizophrenia cases, 1,056 major depression cases, 1,344 bipolar disorder cases, and 1,248 controls. Totally 15 tag SNPs were genotyped and analyzed, and no population stratification was found in our sample set. Among the sites, rs4236710 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.015) and rs4512342 (Pallele  = 0.03, Pgenotye  = 0.045 after correction) were associated with schizophrenia, and rs2919375 (corrected Pgenotye  = 0.004) was associated with major depressive disorder. The haplotype rs4512342-rs6982890 showed association with schizophrenia (P = 0.03 for haplotype "TC" after correction), and haplotype rs4531002-rs11989919 proved to be a shared risk factor for both major depressive disorder ("CC": corrected P = 0.009) and bipolar disorder ("CT": corrected P = 0.003). Our results confirmed that NRG1 was a shared common susceptibility gene for major mental disorders in Han Chinese population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Impaired Context Processing is Attributable to Global Neuropsychological Impairment in Schizophrenia and Psychotic Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, James L; Hill, S Kristian; Gold, James M; Keefe, Richard S E; Clementz, Brett A; Gershon, Elliot; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Pearlson, Godfrey; Tamminga, Carol A; Sweeney, John A

    2017-03-01

    Context processing may reflect a specific cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Whether impaired context processing is observed across psychotic disorders or among relatives of affected individuals, and whether it is a deficit that is independent from the generalized neuropsychological deficits seen in psychotic disorders, are less established. Schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and psychotic bipolar probands (n = 660), their first-degree relatives (n = 741), and healthy individuals (n = 308) studied by the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes consortium performed an expectancy task requiring use of contextual information to overcome a pre-potent response. Sensitivity for target detection and false alarm rates on trials requiring inhibition or goal maintenance were measured. Proband groups and relatives with psychosis spectrum personality traits demonstrated reduced target sensitivity and elevated false alarm rates. False alarm rate was higher under inhibition vs goal maintenance conditions although this difference was attenuated in schizophrenia and schizoaffective proband groups. After accounting for global neuropsychological impairment, as reflected by the composite score from the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia neuropsychological battery, deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar proband groups were no longer significant. Performance measures were moderately familial. Reduced target detection, but not a specific deficit in context processing, is observed across psychotic disorders. Impairments in both goal maintenance and response inhibition appear to contribute comparably to deficits in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, whereas greater difficulty with response inhibition underlies deficits in bipolar disorder. Yet, these deficits are not independent from the generalized neurocognitive impairment observed in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder.

  14. Prevalences of autoimmune diseases in schizophrenia, bipolar I and II disorder, and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaschi, Laura; Kardell, Mathias; Johansson, Viktoria; Isgren, Anniella; Sellgren, Carl M; Altamura, A Carlo; Hultman, Christina M; Landén, Mikael

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies on the relationship between autoimmune diseases, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder are mainly based on hospital discharge registers with insufficient coverage of outpatient data. Furthermore, data is scant on the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in bipolar subgroups. Here we estimate the self-reported prevalences of autoimmune diseases in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder type I and II, and controls. Lifetime prevalence of autoimmune diseases was assessed through a structured interview in a sample of 9076 patients (schizophrenia N = 5278, bipolar disorder type I N = 1952, type II N = 1846) and 6485 controls. Comparative analyses were performed using logistic regressions. The prevalence of diabetes type 1 did not differ between groups. Hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism regardless of lithium effects, rheumatoid arthritis, and polymyalgia rheumatica were most common in bipolar disorder. Systemic lupus erythematosus was less common in bipolar disorder than in the other groups. The rate of autoimmune diseases did not differ significantly between bipolar subgroups. We conclude that prevalences of autoimmune diseases show clear differences between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but not between the bipolar subgroups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A validation of wrist actigraphy against polysomnography in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Sleep disturbances are frequent in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Actigraphy has been established as a generally reliable method to examine these disturbances across varying time spans, but the validity against polysomnography (PSG) is not well investigated...... for this population. We validated wrist-worn actigraphy against PSG in a population of chronic, medicated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From a clinical trial, we derived data from 37 patients with schizophrenia and five patients with bipolar disorder who were examined with one...... for the number of awakenings, and low or zero for the other examined sleep variables. These findings were reproduced in the subgroup analyses that compared men and women, as well as patients with bipolar versus schizophrenia spectrum disorders. When excluding patients with extensive periods of wakefulness after...

  16. Brain structure in schizophrenia vs. psychotic bipolar I disorder: A VBM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic, Igor; Maitra, Raka; Langbein, Kerstin; Dietzek, Maren; Lorenz, Carsten; Smesny, Stefan; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Sauer, Heinrich; Gaser, Christian

    2015-07-01

    While schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have been assumed to share phenotypic and genotypic features, there is also evidence for overlapping brain structural correlates, although it is unclear whether these relate to shared psychotic features. In this study, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM8) in 34 schizophrenia patients, 17 euthymic bipolar I disorder patients (with a history of psychotic symptoms), and 34 healthy controls. Our results indicate that compared to healthy controls schizophrenia patients show grey matter deficits (pschizophrenia vs. bipolar I patients (pschizophrenia patients in the (posterior) hippocampus bilaterally, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left cerebellum. Compared to healthy controls, the deficits in bipolar I patients only reached significance at pschizophrenia and bipolar disorder might not be related to mere appearance of psychotic symptoms at some stage of the disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Minor physical anomalies in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder and the neurodevelopmental continuum of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akabaliev, Valentin Hristov; Sivkov, Stefan Todorov; Mantarkov, Mladen Yordanov

    2014-09-01

    Minor physical anomalies (MPAs) have been investigated by numerous studies in patients with schizophrenia in support of the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of the disorder, but have rarely been examined in patients with bipolar disorder or in direct comparisons between the two conditions. The main objective of the present study was to compare the prevalence of MPAs in psychiatrically healthy controls, patients with bipolar I disorder, and patients with schizophrenia. A slightly modified version of the Waldrop Physical Anomaly Scale was used to assess MPAs in psychiatrically healthy controls (n = 103), patients with bipolar I disorder (n = 61), and patients with schizophrenia (n = 128). In five out of six topographic regions (mouth, feet, head, eyes, and ears) there was a pattern of lowest regional MPA scores in controls, intermediate in bipolar I disorder, and highest in schizophrenia. The cephalofacial composite score and the total MPA score showed the same pattern, with all between-group differences being statistically significant. Seven individual MPAs in the discriminant analysis model contributed independently to the prediction of the triple-dependent status of 'psychiatrically healthy control, bipolar I disorder patient, schizophrenia patient': high/arched palate, fine electric hair, large gap between first and second toes, third toe ≥ second toe, epicanthus, malformed ears, and furrowed tongue. Our findings support the existence of a continuum of neurodevelopmental adversity within the clinical spectrum of psychosis, with bipolar I disorder occupying an intermediate position between psychiatric health and schizophrenia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Overlapping and Segregating Structural Brain Abnormalities in Twins With Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; van Baal, G. Caroline M.; Schnack, Hugo G.; Brans, Rachel G. H.; van der Schot, Astrid C.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Lepage, Claude; Collins, D. Louis; Evans, Alan C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Nolen, Willem; Kahn, Rene S.

    Context: The nosologic dichotomy between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) as formulated by Kraepelin is currently being questioned, stimulated by the finding that schizophrenia and BD partly share a common genetic origin. Although both disorders are characterized by changes in brain

  19. Cerebellar volume in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder with and without psychotic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidi, C; d'Albis, M-A; Wessa, M; Linke, J; Phillips, M L; Delavest, M; Bellivier, F; Versace, A; Almeida, J; Sarrazin, S; Poupon, C; Le Dudal, K; Daban, C; Hamdani, N; Leboyer, M; Houenou, J

    2015-03-01

    There is growing evidence that cerebellum plays a crucial role in cognition and emotional regulation. Cerebellum is likely to be involved in the physiopathology of both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The objective of our study was to compare cerebellar size between patients with bipolar disorder, patients with schizophrenia, and healthy controls in a multicenter sample. In addition, we studied the influence of psychotic features on cerebellar size in patients with bipolar disorder. One hundred and fifteen patients with bipolar I disorder, 32 patients with schizophrenia, and 52 healthy controls underwent 3 Tesla MRI. Automated segmentation of cerebellum was performed using FreeSurfer software. Volumes of cerebellar cortex and white matter were extracted. Analyses of covariance were conducted, and age, sex, and intracranial volume were considered as covariates. Bilateral cerebellar cortical volumes were smaller in patients with schizophrenia compared with patients with bipolar I disorder and healthy controls. We found no significant difference of cerebellar volume between bipolar patients with and without psychotic features. No change was evidenced in white matter. Our results suggest that reduction in cerebellar cortical volume is specific to schizophrenia. Cerebellar dysfunction in bipolar disorder, if present, appears to be more subtle than a reduction in cerebellar volume. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Can Psychological, Social and Demographical Factors Predict Clinical Characteristics Symptomatology of Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Joanna; Kapelski, Pawel; Łabędzka, Magdalena; Skibinska, Maria; Zaremba, Dorota; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Hauser, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia (SCH) is a complex, psychiatric disorder affecting 1 % of population. Its clinical phenotype is heterogeneous with delusions, hallucinations, depression, disorganized behaviour and negative symptoms. Bipolar affective disorder (BD) refers to periodic changes in mood and activity from depression to mania. It affects 0.5-1.5 % of population. Two types of disorder (type I and type II) are distinguished by severity of mania episodes. In our analysis, we aimed to check if clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions occurrence in BD and SCH cases. We included total sample of 443 bipolar and 439 schizophrenia patients. Diagnosis was based on DSM-IV criteria using Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We applied regression models to analyse associations between clinical and demographical traits from OPCRIT and symptom dimensions. We used previously computed dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder as quantitative traits for regression models. Male gender seemed protective factor for depression dimension in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder sample. Presence of definite psychosocial stressor prior disease seemed risk factor for depressive and suicidal domain in BD and SCH. OPCRIT items describing premorbid functioning seemed related with depression, positive and disorganised dimensions in schizophrenia and psychotic in BD. We proved clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We also saw relation between clinical dimensions and course of disorder and impairment during disorder.

  1. Marital adjustment of patients with substance dependence, schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shital S Muke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marital adjustment is considered as a part of social well-being. Disturbed marital relationship can directly affect the disease adjustment and the way they face disease outcomes and complications. It may adversely affect physical health, mental health, the quality-of-life and even economic status of individuals. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the marital adjustment among patients with substance dependence, schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of each 30 patients with substance dependence, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, diagnosed as per international classification of diseases-10 diagnostic criteria for research with a minimum duration of illness of 1 year were evaluated using marital adjustment questionnaire. The data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistics. Results: Prevalence of poor marital adjustment in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder and substance dependence was 60%, 70% and 50% respectively. There was a significant difference on overall marital adjustment among substance dependence and bipolar affective disorder patients. There was no significant difference on overall marital adjustment among patients with substance dependence and schizophrenia as well as among patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. On marital adjustment domains, schizophrenia patients had significantly poor sexual adjustment than substance dependence patients while bipolar affective disorder patients had significantly poor sexual and social adjustment compared with substance dependence patients. Conclusion: Patients with substance dependence have significant better overall marital adjustment compared with bipolar affective disorder patients. Patients with substance dependence have significantly better social and sexual adjustment than patients with bipolar affective disorder as well as significantly better sexual

  2. Multidimensional assessment of impulsivity in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder: testing for shared endophenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortgang, R G; Hultman, C M; van Erp, T G M; Cannon, T D

    2016-05-01

    Impulsivity is associated with bipolar disorder as a clinical feature during and between manic episodes and is considered a potential endophenotype for the disorder. Schizophrenia and major depressive disorder share substantial genetic overlap with bipolar disorder, and these two disorders have also been associated with elevations in impulsivity. However, little is known about the degree of overlap among these disorders in discrete subfacets of impulsivity and whether any overlap is purely phenotypic or due to shared genetic diathesis. We focused on five subfacets of impulsivity: self-reported attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity, self-reported sensation seeking, and a behavioral measure of motor inhibition (stop signal reaction time; SSRT). We examined these facets within and across disorder proband and co-twin groups, modeled heritability, and tested for endophenotypic patterning in a sample of twin pairs recruited from the Swedish Twin Registry (N = 420). We found evidence of moderate to high levels of heritability for all five subfacets. All three proband groups and their unaffected co-twins showed elevations on attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity. Schizophrenia probands (but not their co-twins) showed significantly lower sensation seeking, and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder probands (but not in their co-twins) had significantly longer SSRTs, compared with healthy controls and the other groups. Attentional, motor, and non-planning impulsivity emerged as potential shared endophenotypes for the three disorders, whereas sensation seeking and SSRT were associated with phenotypic affection but not genetic loading for these disorders.

  3. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Adult Outpatients With Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerman, Remco; Cohen, Dan; Schulte, Peter F J; Nugter, Annet

    2016-12-01

    Several studies show an association between schizophrenia and low levels of vitamin D. To date, there are only few studies about the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with bipolar disorder. We hypothesized that vitamin D deficiency is less common among patients with bipolar disorder than among patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A second hypothesis is that vitamin D deficiency is more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorders than among the general Dutch population.Most studies have been conducted with hospitalized patients; in this study, we only included outpatients. All outpatients of a center for bipolar disorders and all outpatients of 3 flexible assertive community treatment teams were asked to participate in this cross-sectional study. We included 118 patients with bipolar disorder and 202 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Vitamin D levels were deficient in 30.3% (95% confidence interval, 25.5-35.6) of the cases. The type of psychiatric disorder was not a predictor of vitamin D deficiency. The absolute difference in risk of deficiency between the study population and the Dutch Caucasian population was 23.8% (95% confidence interval, 18.3%-29.3%). In this study, vitamin D deficiency was 4.7 times more common among outpatients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder than among the Dutch general population.Given the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, we believe that outpatients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or schizoaffective disorder should be considered at risk of having low levels of vitamin D. Annual measurement of vitamin D levels in psychiatric outpatients with these disorders seems to be justified to maintain bone health, muscle strength, and to prevent osteoporosis.

  4. Thought and language disorders in very early onset schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Pantano

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thought and language disorders are main features of adults with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders however studies on such abnormalities are scant in young patients with very early onset psychosis (VEOS. The aim of the present study is to assess the relationship between language and thought disorders in patients with very early onset schizophrenia (SCZ, schizoaffective disorders (SCA and bipolar disorders (BD. Method Forty-one patients (18 SCZ, 16 BD, and 7 SCA with mean age less than 15 years old were assessed through a series of neurocognitive and psycholinguistic tests, including the Thought, Language and Communication Scale (TLC. Results SCZ group performed worse in all tests as well as the TLC, followed by SCA and BD groups respectively. Thought disorders were related to deficits in executive functioning and semantic processing, and the metaphors’ test was the best predictor of TLC functioning. Discussion TD in SCZ, SCA and BD are one of the most important features in patients with VEOS and that the evaluation of metaphor comprehension can be an important instrument in the early detection of this disorder.

  5. Detecting allocentric and egocentric navigation deficits in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Alireza; Hesami, Ehsan; Kargar, Mahmoud; Shams, Jamal

    2018-04-01

    Present evidence suggests that the use of virtual reality has great advantages in evaluating visuospatial navigation and memory for the diagnosis of psychiatric or other neurological disorders. There are a few virtual reality studies on allocentric and egocentric memories in schizophrenia, but studies on both memories in bipolar disorder are lacking. The objective of this study was to compare the performance of allocentric and egocentric memories in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. For this resolve, an advanced virtual reality navigation task (VRNT) was presented to distinguish the navigational performances of these patients. Twenty subjects with schizophrenia and 20 bipolar disorder patients were compared with 20 healthy-matched controls on the newly developed VRNT consisting of a virtual neighbourhood (allocentric memory) and a virtual maze (egocentric memory). The results demonstrated that schizophrenia patients were significantly impaired on all allocentric, egocentric, visual, and verbal memory tasks compared with patients with bipolar disorder and normal subjects. Dissimilarly, the performance of patients with bipolar disorder was slightly lower than that of control subjects in all these abilities, but no significant differences were observed. It was concluded that allocentric and egocentric navigation deficits are detectable in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using VRNT, and this task along with RAVLT and ROCFT can be used as a valid clinical tool for distinguishing these patients from normal subjects.

  6. Rates and Predictors of Conversion to Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder Following Substance-Induced Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzer, Marie Stefanie Kejser; Nordentoft, Merete; Hjorthøj, Carsten

    2017-11-28

    The authors investigated the rates of conversion to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder after a substance-induced psychosis, as well as risk factors for conversion. All patient information was extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System and the Psychiatric Central Research Register. The study population included all persons who received a diagnosis of substance-induced psychosis between 1994 and 2014 (N=6,788); patients were followed until first occurrence of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder or until death, emigration, or August 2014. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to obtain cumulative probabilities for the conversion from a substance-induced psychosis to schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios for all covariates. Overall, 32.2% (95% CI=29.7-34.9) of patients with a substance-induced psychosis converted to either bipolar or schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The highest conversion rate was found for cannabis-induced psychosis, with 47.4% (95% CI=42.7-52.3) converting to either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Young age was associated with a higher risk of converting to schizophrenia. Self-harm after a substance-induced psychosis was significantly linked to a higher risk of converting to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Half the cases of conversion to schizophrenia occurred within 3.1 years after a substance-induced psychosis, and half the cases of conversion to bipolar disorder occurred within 4.4 years. Substance-induced psychosis is strongly associated with the development of severe mental illness, and a long follow-up period is needed to identify the majority of cases.

  7. Comparative study of cost of care of outpatients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somaiya, Mansi; Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit

    2014-12-01

    To assess and compare the average annual the cost of illness of outpatients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Cost of illness in 75 out-patients with bipolar disorder and 53 out-patients with schizophrenia was assessed over a 9-month period by using bottom-up approach. The cost of 9 months was annualized by dividing the 9 months cost by 3 and then multiplying the obtained figure with 4. Total average annual costs of care of bipolar disorder was Indian rupees 32,759 (US $ 655.18) and that of schizophrenia was Indian rupees 48,059 (US $ 961.18) and there was no significant difference between the two groups. In both the groups, indirect costs (bipolar disorder-64.0%; Schizophrenia-77.6%) were higher than direct costs (bipolar disorder-36%; Schizophrenia-22.4%). Cost of medications was high. Patient and their families bore the main brunt of financial burden (95.4-96% of the total cost). In Bipolar disorder total treatment costs were significantly higher in those who had lower level of functioning. In bipolar disorder group number of visits to the hospital correlated with total cost, indirect cost and provider's cost, whereas in schizophrenia group total number of visits correlated with provider's cost only. Only a small proportion (13.7%) of the total cost of bipolar disorder was predicted by presence or absence of alcohol dependence and number of visits. In the schizophrenia group, only positive symptom score as per the rating on PANSS appeared as a significant predictor of total cost, explaining 15.6% of the total cost. Costs for outpatients with bipolar disorder are similar to the cost of outpatients with schizophrenia. Costs are higher in patients of bipolar disorder with lower level of functioning. Findings of the study suggests that reducing the number of visits to the hospital by providing care at the doorsteps, focusing on reduction of substance use and improving the level of functioning of the patients can reduce the cost of care of bipolar disorder

  8. Metabolic syndrome in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: dietary and lifestyle factors compared to the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, Michael J; Taylor, Stephan F; Dalack, Gregory; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Burghardt, Kyle J; Evans, Simon J; McInnis, Melvin I; Grove, Tyler B; Brook, Robert D; Zöllner, Sebastian K; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2014-05-01

    Since a poor diet is often cited as a contributor to metabolic syndrome for subjects diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, we sought to examine dietary intake, cigarette smoking, and physical activity in these populations and compare them with those for the general population. Individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder (n = 116) and schizophrenia (n = 143) were assessed for dietary intake, lifestyle habits, and metabolic syndrome and compared to age-, gender-, and race-matched subjects from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2000. Additionally, matched subgroups within the patient populations were compared to elicit any differences. As expected, the metabolic syndrome rate was higher in the samples with bipolar disorder (33%) and schizophrenia (47%) compared to matched NHANES controls (17% and 11%, respectively), and not different between the patient groups. Surprisingly, both subjects with bipolar disorder and those with schizophrenia consumed fewer total calories, carbohydrates and fats, as well as more fiber (p schizophrenia had significantly lower total and low-density cholesterol levels (p disorder smoked less (p = 0.001), exercised more (p = 0.004), and had lower body mass indexes (p = 0.009) compared to subjects with schizophrenia. Counter to predictions, few dietary differences could be discerned between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and NHANES control groups. The subjects with bipolar disorder exhibited healthier behaviors than the patients with schizophrenia. Additional research regarding metabolic syndrome mechanisms, focusing on non-dietary contributions, is needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Review of risperidone for the treatment of pediatric and adolescent bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Bishop

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey R Bishop1,2, Mani N Pavuluri21Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Pediatric Mood Disorders Program and Center for Cognitive Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Risperidone is a commonly used medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in children and adolescents. It has been studied as a monotherapy treatment in early onset schizophrenia and as both monotherapy and combination therapy for pediatric bipolar disorder. Studies to date indicate that risperidone is an effective treatment for positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and mania symptoms of bipolar disorder. In young patient populations, side effects such as weight gain, extrapyramidal side effects, and prolactin elevation require consideration when evaluating the risk benefit ratio for individual patients. Here we review published studies of risperidone for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in children and adolescents to provide practitioners with an overview of published data on the efficacy and safety of risperidone in these patient populations.Keywords: risperidone, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, children, adolescents

  10. Polygenic dissection of diagnosis and clinical dimensions of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruderfer, D M; Fanous, A H; Ripke, S

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are two often severe disorders with high heritabilities. Recent studies have demonstrated a large overlap of genetic risk loci between these disorders but diagnostic and molecular distinctions still remain. Here, we perform a combined genome-wide association study...... (GWAS) of 19 779 bipolar disorder (BP) and schizophrenia (SCZ) cases versus 19 423 controls, in addition to a direct comparison GWAS of 7129 SCZ cases versus 9252 BP cases. In our case-control analysis, we identify five previously identified regions reaching genome-wide significance (CACNA1C, IFI44L...

  11. Association of obesity and treated hypertension and diabetes with cognitive ability in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depp, Colin A; Strassnig, Martin; Mausbach, Brent T; Bowie, Christopher R; Wolyniec, Paula; Thornquist, Mary H; Luke, James R; McGrath, John A; Pulver, Ann E; Patterson, Thomas L; Harvey, Philip D

    2014-06-01

    People with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia are at greater risk for obesity and other cardio-metabolic risk factors, and several prior studies have linked these risk factors to poorer cognitive ability. In a large ethnically homogenous outpatient sample, we examined associations among variables related to obesity, treated hypertension and/or diabetes and cognitive abilities in these two patient populations. In a study cohort of outpatients with either bipolar disorder (n = 341) or schizophrenia (n = 417), we investigated the association of self-reported body mass index and current use of medications for hypertension or diabetes with performance on a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. We examined sociodemographic and clinical factors as potential covariates. Patients with bipolar disorder were less likely to be overweight or obese than patients with schizophrenia, and also less likely to be prescribed medication for hypertension or diabetes. However, obesity and treated hypertension were associated with worse global cognitive ability in bipolar disorder (as well as with poorer performance on individual tests of processing speed, reasoning/problem-solving, and sustained attention), with no such relationships observed in schizophrenia. Obesity was not associated with symptom severity in either group. Although less prevalent in bipolar disorder compared to schizophrenia, obesity was associated with substantially worse cognitive performance in bipolar disorder. This association was independent of symptom severity and not present in schizophrenia. Better understanding of the mechanisms and management of obesity may aid in efforts to preserve cognitive health in bipolar disorder. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A genetic deconstruction of neurocognitive traits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Carla P D; Christoforou, Andrea; Giddaluru, Sudheer

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in cognitive functions are common in patients suffering from psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Cognitive traits have been proposed as useful for understanding the biological and genetic mechanisms implicated in cognitive function in healthy individuals...... and in the dysfunction observed in psychiatric disorders....

  13. Resting-state fMRI connectivity impairment in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyelan, Miklos; Ikuta, Toshikazu; DeRosse, Pamela; Braga, Raphael J; Burdick, Katherine E; John, Majnu; Kingsley, Peter B; Malhotra, Anil K; Szeszko, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share aspects of phenomenology and neurobiology and thus may represent a continuum of disease. Few studies have compared connectivity across the brain in these disorders or investigated their functional correlates. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate global and regional connectivity in 32 healthy controls, 19 patients with bipolar disorder, and 18 schizophrenia patients. Patients also received comprehensive neuropsychological and clinical assessments. We computed correlation matrices among 266 regions of interest within the brain, with the primary dependent measure being overall global connectivity strength of each region with every other region. Patients with schizophrenia had significantly lower global connectivity compared with healthy controls, whereas patients with bipolar disorder had global connectivity intermediate to and significantly different from those of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Post hoc analyses revealed that compared with healthy controls, both patient groups had significantly lower connectivity in the paracingulate gyrus and right thalamus. Patients with schizophrenia also had significantly lower connectivity in the temporal occipital fusiform cortex, left caudate nucleus, and left thalamus compared with healthy controls. There were no significant differences among the patient groups in any of these regions. Lower global connectivity among all patients was associated with worse neuropsychological and clinical functioning, but these effects were not specific to any patient group. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may represent a continuum of global disconnectivity in the brain but that regional functional specificity may not be evident.

  14. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in schizoaffective disorder: comparison of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycı, Demet; Ozdel, Osman; Sözeri-Varma, Gülfizar; Kıroğlu, Yılmaz; Tümkaya, Selim

    2012-04-27

    The aim of this study was to compare schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia based on (1)H-MRS metabolite values in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and executive functions. The subjects comprised 15 patients with bipolar disorder type I (BD), 15 with schizophrenia (SCH), 15 with schizoaffective disorder (SAD) and 15 healthy controls. We performed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) bilaterally. Levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho) and creatine-containing compounds (Cr) were measured in the DLPFC using (1)H-MRS. We administered the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the Stroop Test (ST) to evaluate executive functions. The SAD, BD and SCH patients had lower levels of NAA than the control group. The SAD and BD patients had low levels of Cho compared to the control group. The left DLPFC Cr levels in all of the patient groups and the right DLPFC Cr levels in the BD and SAD groups were lower than in the control group. The levels of NAA Cho and Cr were not related to executive functions and attention performance. Cr level were related to attention processes, only in SCH. Our results indicate that NAA levels are reduced in schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, but the reduction in the levels of NAA is not a distinctive feature among these three illnesses. Schizoaffective and bipolar disorders have similar features related to the levels of compounds containing Cho and Cr. This similarity may be related to these illnesses both having an affective basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Abnormal early brain responses during visual search are evident in schizophrenia but not bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMeerten, Nicolaas J; Dubke, Rachel E; Stanwyck, John J; Kang, Seung Suk; Sponheim, Scott R

    2016-01-01

    People with schizophrenia show deficits in processing visual stimuli but neural abnormalities underlying the deficits are unclear and it is unknown whether such functional brain abnormalities are present in other severe mental disorders or in individuals who carry genetic liability for schizophrenia. To better characterize brain responses underlying visual search deficits and test their specificity to schizophrenia we gathered behavioral and electrophysiological responses during visual search (i.e., Span of Apprehension [SOA] task) from 38 people with schizophrenia, 31 people with bipolar disorder, 58 biological relatives of people with schizophrenia, 37 biological relatives of people with bipolar disorder, and 65 non-psychiatric control participants. Through subtracting neural responses associated with purely sensory aspects of the stimuli we found that people with schizophrenia exhibited reduced early posterior task-related neural responses (i.e., Span Endogenous Negativity [SEN]) while other groups showed normative responses. People with schizophrenia exhibited longer reaction times than controls during visual search but nearly identical accuracy. Those individuals with schizophrenia who had larger SENs performed more efficiently (i.e., shorter reaction times) on the SOA task suggesting that modulation of early visual cortical responses facilitated their visual search. People with schizophrenia also exhibited a diminished P300 response compared to other groups. Unaffected first-degree relatives of people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed an amplified N1 response over posterior brain regions in comparison to other groups. Diminished early posterior brain responses are associated with impaired visual search in schizophrenia and appear to be specifically associated with the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Comparison of metabolic syndrome prevalence in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayerifard, Razieh; Bureng, Majid Akbari; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Namjoo, Massood; Rajezi, Sepideh

    2017-11-01

    Research has shown that the metabolic syndrome is more prevalent among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder. Given the scarcity of research on the disorders, this paper aims to compare the prevalence of the syndrome among the two groups of patients. A total of 120 individuals participated in this cross sectional study: 60 patients with schizophrenia (26 males and 34 females) and 60 patients with bipolar I disorder (32 males and 28 females). The psychological disorders were diagnosed by some experienced psychiatrists according to the DSM-V. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to ATP III guidelines. Metabolic syndrome prevalence among schizophrenic and bipolar I patients was 28 and 36 percent, respectively; the disparity in prevalence is not significant. According to the results, compared to their male counterparts, females were more prone significant to metabolic syndrome. Moreover, diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher among bipolar I patients. On the other hand, schizophrenic males were observed to have higher fasting blood sugar levels in comparison to bipolar I males patients. Age, consumption of second generation antipsychotics or antidepressants, and the duration of the disorder were found to be related to metabolic syndrome. This study showed that metabolic syndrome is not more prevalent among bipolar I patients, compared to those with schizophrenia. Also, women are more likely to be affected by the syndrome. A number of factors such as age, consumption of medication, and duration of the disorder are associated with the likelihood of the syndrome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The Loudness Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials (LDAEP) in individuals at risk for developing bipolar disorders and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenmuller, Florence; Heekeren, Karsten; Meier, Magali; Theodoridou, Anastasia; Walitza, Susanne; Haker, Helene; Rössler, Wulf; Kawohl, Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    The Loudness Dependence of Auditory Evoked Potentials (LDAEP) is considered as an indicator of central serotonergic activity. Alteration of serotonergic neurotransmission was reported in bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. In line with previous reports on clinically manifest disorders, we expected a weaker LDAEP in subjects at risk for bipolar disorders and schizophrenia compared to healthy controls. We analyzed LDAEP of individuals at risk for developing bipolar disorders (n=27), with high-risk status (n=74) and ultra-high-risk status for schizophrenia (n=86) and healthy controls (n=47). The LDAEP did not differ between subjects at risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorders and controls. Among subjects without medication (n=122), the at-risk-bipolar group showed a trend towards a weaker LDAEP than both the high-risk and the ultra-high-risk groups for schizophrenia. The LDAEP did not appear as a vulnerability marker for schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. This suggests that an altered LDAEP may not be measurable until the onset of clinically manifest disorder. However, the hypothesis that pathogenic mechanisms leading to bipolar disorders may differ from those leading to schizophrenia is supported. This is the first study investigating LDAEP in a population at risk for bipolar disorders. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative neuropsychiatry: white matter abnormalities in children and adolescents with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T; Langen, C; Schmidt, M; Hough, M; James, A

    2015-02-01

    There is considerable evidence that white matter abnormalities play a key role in the pathogenesis of a number of major psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Few studies, however, have compared white matter abnormalities early in the course of the illness. A total of 102 children and adolescents participated in the study, including 43 with early-onset schizophrenia, 13 with early-onset bipolar affective disorder, 17 with obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 29 healthy controls. Diffusion tensor imaging scans were obtained on all children and the images were assessed for the presence of non-spatially overlapping regions of white matter differences, a novel algorithm known as the pothole approach. Patients with early-onset schizophrenia and early-onset bipolar affective disorder had a significantly greater number of white matter potholes compared to controls, but the total number of potholes did not differ between the two groups. The volumes of the potholes were significantly larger in patients with early-onset bipolar affective disorder compared to the early-onset schizophrenia group. Children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder showed no differences in the total number of white matter potholes compared to controls. White matter abnormalities in early-onset schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder are more global in nature, whereas children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder do not show widespread differences in FA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Emotional intelligence and non-social cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajo-Apor, B; Kemmler, G; Pardeller, S; Plass, T; Mühlbacher, M; Welte, A-S; Fleischhacker, W W; Hofer, A

    2017-01-01

    The different patterns of Emotional Intelligence (EI) deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are are not yet well understood. This study compares EI levels among these groups and highlights the potential impact of non-social cognition on EI. Fifty-eight schizophrenia and 60 bipolar outpatients were investigated using the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). Analyses of covariance were performed with adjustment for the BACS composite score. Compared to bipolar subjects, schizophrenia patients showed significantly lower levels in both EI and non-social cognition. After adjustment for the BACS composite score, the difference in EI was lost. The mediation analysis revealed that differences between schizophrenia and bipolar patients in strategic EI are almost fully attributable to the mediating effect of non-social cognition. Our findings suggest that in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients EI is strongly influenced by non-social cognitive functioning. This has to be taken into account when interpreting MSCEIT data in comparative studies in serious mental illness and emphasizes the importance of cognitive remediation.

  20. The association between Darier disease, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia revisited: a population-based family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlöf, Martin; Bergen, Sarah E; Långström, Niklas; Larsson, Henrik; Boman, Marcus; Craddock, Nick; Östberg, Per; Lundström, Sebastian; Sjölander, Arvid; Nordlind, Klas; Landén, Mikael; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Darier disease is an autosomal dominant skin disorder caused by mutations in the ATPase, Ca++ transporting, cardiac muscle, slow twitch 2 (ATP2A2) gene and previously reported to cosegregate with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in occasional pedigrees. It is, however, unknown whether these associations exist also in the general population, and the objective of this study was to examine this question. We compared a national sample of individuals with Darier disease and their first-degree relatives with matched unexposed individuals from the general population and their first-degree relatives, respectively. To examine risks for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using conditional logistic regressions. Individuals with Darier disease had a 4.3 times higher risk of being diagnosed with bipolar disorder (95% CI: 2.6-7.3) and a 2.3 times higher risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia (95% CI: 1.1-5.2) than matched individuals from the general population. Relatives of individuals with Darier disease had a 1.6 times higher risk of having bipolar disorder (95% CI: 1.1-2.5) than relatives of matched individuals from the general population, but no increased risk of schizophrenia (risk ratio = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.4-1.8). The association between Darier disease and bipolar disorder is manifest also in the population, and our data suggest that genetic variability within the ATP2A2 gene that causes Darier disease also confers susceptibility for bipolar disorder. The Darier-causing mutations merit additional attention in molecular genetic research on bipolar disorder. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Platelet parameters (PLT, MPV, P-LCR) in patients with schizophrenia, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Adam; Szczepocka, Ewa

    2016-03-30

    There are no studies comparing platelet parameters platelet parameters (platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR)) between patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine and compare differences in PLT, MPV and P-LCR in patients with schizophrenia, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, naturalistic study of 2377 patients (schizophrenia n=1243; unipolar depression n=791; bipolar disorder n=343, including bipolar depression n=259 and mania n=84). There were significant differences for PLT, MPV and P-LCR values between study groups. A significant percentage of patients with bipolar disorder had abnormal (too low or too high) number of platelets. Negative correlation between PLT and age was found in all study groups and positive correlation between age and MPV and P-LCR was found in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Theory of Mind in Bipolar Disorder, with Comparison to the Impairments Observed in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachel L C; Young, Allan H

    2015-01-01

    Our ability to make sense of information on the potential intentions and dispositions of others is of paramount importance for understanding their communicative intent, and for judging what an appropriate reaction might be. Thus, anything that impinges on this ability has the potential to cause significant social impairment, and compromise an individual's level of functioning. Both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are known to feature theory of mind impairment. We conducted a theoretical review to determine the extent and types of theory of mind impairment in bipolar disorder, and evaluate their relationship to medication and symptoms. We also considered possible mediatory mechanisms, and set out to discover what else could be learnt about the impairment in bipolar disorder by comparison to the profile of impairment in schizophrenia. The literature established that in bipolar disorder (i) some form of theory of mind impairment has been observed in all mood states, including euthymia, (ii) the form of theory of mind assessed and task used to make the assessment influence the impairment observed, and (iii) there might be some relationship to cognitive impairment, although a relationship to standard clinical variables was harder to establish. What also became clear in the literature on bipolar disorder itself was the possible relationship of theory of mind impairment to history of psychotic symptoms. Direct comparative studies, including patients with schizophrenia, were thus examined, and provided several important directions for future research on the bases of impairment in bipolar disorder. Particularly prominent was the issue of whether theory of mind impairment could be considered a candidate endophenotype for the psychoses, although current evidence suggests that this may be premature. The differences in impairment across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may, however, have genuine differential effects on social functioning and the likely success of

  3. Theory of Mind in Bipolar Disorder, with Comparison to the Impairments Observed in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachel L. C.; Young, Allan H.

    2016-01-01

    Our ability to make sense of information on the potential intentions and dispositions of others is of paramount importance for understanding their communicative intent, and for judging what an appropriate reaction might be. Thus, anything that impinges on this ability has the potential to cause significant social impairment, and compromise an individual’s level of functioning. Both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are known to feature theory of mind impairment. We conducted a theoretical review to determine the extent and types of theory of mind impairment in bipolar disorder, and evaluate their relationship to medication and symptoms. We also considered possible mediatory mechanisms, and set out to discover what else could be learnt about the impairment in bipolar disorder by comparison to the profile of impairment in schizophrenia. The literature established that in bipolar disorder (i) some form of theory of mind impairment has been observed in all mood states, including euthymia, (ii) the form of theory of mind assessed and task used to make the assessment influence the impairment observed, and (iii) there might be some relationship to cognitive impairment, although a relationship to standard clinical variables was harder to establish. What also became clear in the literature on bipolar disorder itself was the possible relationship of theory of mind impairment to history of psychotic symptoms. Direct comparative studies, including patients with schizophrenia, were thus examined, and provided several important directions for future research on the bases of impairment in bipolar disorder. Particularly prominent was the issue of whether theory of mind impairment could be considered a candidate endophenotype for the psychoses, although current evidence suggests that this may be premature. The differences in impairment across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may, however, have genuine differential effects on social functioning and the likely success of

  4. Theory of mind in bipolar disorder and its comparison to the impairments observed in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. C. Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to make sense of information on the potential intentions and dispositions of others is of paramount importance for understanding their communicative intent, and for judging what an appropriate reaction might be. Thus anything that impinges on this ability has the potential to cause significant social impairment, and compromise an individual’s level of functioning. Both bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are known to feature theory of mind impairment. We conducted a theoretical review to determine the extent and types of theory of mind impairment in bipolar disorder, and evaluate their relationship to medication and symptoms. We also considered possible mediatory mechanisms, and set out to discover what else could be learnt about the impairment in bipolar disorder by comparison to the profile of impairment in schizophrenia. The literature established that in bipolar disorder (i some form of theory of mind impairment has been observed in all mood states, including euthymia, (ii the form of theory of mind assessed and task used to make the assessment influence the impairment observed, and (iii there might be some relationship to cognitive impairment, although a relationship to standard clinical variables was harder to establish. What also became clear in the literature on bipolar disorder itself was the possible relationship of theory of mind impairment to history of psychotic symptoms. Direct comparative studies including patients with schizophrenia were thus examined, and provided several important directions for future research on the bases of impairment in bipolar disorder. Particularly prominent was the issue of whether theory of mind impairment could be considered a candidate endophenotype for the psychoses, although current evidence suggests this may be premature. The differences in impairment across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may, however, have genuine differential effects on social functioning and the likely success

  5. Education and employment levels among Jamaican patients newly diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Bertilee; Curtis-Downes, Desdemona; Gibson, Roger C

    2013-05-01

    Comparisons between persons with bipolar disorder and those with schizophrenia are not well researched in the Caribbean. To compare the educational and occupational attainments in Jamaicans diagnosed with these two disorders. Data on diagnosis, educational level, type of employment and other basic socio-demographic variables were collected from Jamaican hospital patients who were newly diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Fisher's exact and χ2 tests, as well as binary logistic regression, were used to explore how these characteristics varied according to diagnosis. Statistical significance was taken at p educational attainment than bipolar disorder (p = .022 for educational level attained; p = .026 for completion of secondary school). The majority (87.1%) of the 93 patients included in the analysis had no specific marketable job skills. However, the proportion of persons with bipolar disorder who had such skills was three times the corresponding proportion of persons with schizophrenia. The low educational achievement among persons with schizophrenia makes education a potentially important area for interventions targeted at this group. Because gross deficiencies in job skills were common to both patient groups, improvement in job skill levels is an important goal for persons with either of these disorders.

  6. Global brain connectivity alterations in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skåtun, Kristina C; Kaufmann, Tobias; Tønnesen, Siren; Biele, Guido; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Alnæs, Dag; Andreassen, Ole A; Westlye, Lars T

    2016-08-01

    The human brain is organized into functionally distinct modules of which interactions constitute the human functional connectome. Accumulating evidence has implicated perturbations in the patterns of brain connectivity across a range of neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders, but little is known about diagnostic specificity. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are severe mental disorders with partly overlapping symptomatology. Neuroimaging has demonstrated brain network disintegration in the pathophysiologies; however, to which degree the 2 diagnoses present with overlapping abnormalities remains unclear. We collected resting-state fMRI data from patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and from healthy controls. Aiming to characterize connectivity differences across 2 severe mental disorders, we derived global functional connectivity using eigenvector centrality mapping, which allows for regional inference of centrality or importance in the brain network. Seventy-one patients with schizophrenia, 43 with bipolar disorder and 196 healthy controls participated in our study. We found significant effects of diagnosis in 12 clusters, where pairwise comparisons showed decreased global connectivity in high-centrality clusters: sensory regions in patients with schizophrenia and subcortical regions in both patient groups. Increased connectivity occurred in frontal and parietal clusters in patients with schizophrenia, with intermediate effects in those with bipolar disorder. Patient groups differed in most cortical clusters, with the strongest effects in sensory regions. Methodological concerns of in-scanner motion and the use of full correlation measures may make analyses more vulnerable to noise. Our results show decreased eigenvector centrality of limbic structures in both patient groups and in sensory regions in patients with schizophrenia as well as increased centrality in frontal and parietal regions in both groups, with stronger effects in patients with

  7. Cross-diagnostic comparison of duration mismatch negativity and P3a in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahshan, Carol; Wynn, Jonathan K; Mathis, Kristopher I; Altshuler, Lori L; Glahn, David C; Green, Michael F

    2012-05-01

    Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia share common pathophysiological processes and may have similar perceptual abnormalities. Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a - event-related potentials associated with auditory preattentional processing - have been extensively studied in schizophrenia, but rarely in bipolar disorder. Furthermore, MMN and P3a have not been examined between diagnostic subgroups of patients with bipolar disorder. We evaluated MMN and P3a in patients with bipolar disorder compared to patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. MMN and P3a were assessed in 52 bipolar disorder patients, 30 schizophrenia patients, and 27 healthy control subjects during a duration-deviant auditory oddball paradigm. Significant MMN and P3a amplitude reductions were present in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia relative to controls. The MMN reduction was more prominent in patients with schizophrenia than bipolar disorder, at a trend level. P3a did not differ significantly between patient groups. There were no MMN or P3a differences between patients with bipolar I (n = 34) and bipolar II (n = 18) disorder. Patients with bipolar I disorder failed to show lateralized MMN, in contrast to the other groups. No MMN or P3a differences were found between patients with bipolar disorder taking (n = 12) and not taking (n = 40) lithium, as well as between those taking (n = 30) and not taking (n = 22) antipsychotic medications. Patients with bipolar disorder showed deficits in preattentive auditory processing, including MMN deficits that are less severe and P3a deficits that are slightly more pronounced, than those seen in schizophrenia. © 2012 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  8. Update on extended release quetiapine fumarate in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Khalili N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nizar El-KhaliliAlpine Clinic, Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine fumarate is available both as an immediate release (IR and as an extended release (XR formulation allowing flexibility of dosing for individual patients. Approved uses of quetiapine XR include the treatment of schizophrenia (including maintenance therapy for prevention of relapse, the treatment of bipolar disorder (manic and depressive episodes, and the prevention of recurrence in patients with bipolar disorder who respond to quetiapine XR. This narrative review provides an update on quetiapine XR in these indications. The pharmacological profile of quetiapine, including a moderate affinity for dopamine D2 receptors and higher affinity for serotonin 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT2A receptors, may explain its broad efficacy and low propensity for extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS. The XR formulation has similar bioavailability but prolonged plasma levels compared with the IR formulation, allowing for less frequent (once-daily dosing. Clinical studies have confirmed the efficacy of quetiapine XR in relieving the acute symptoms of schizophrenia during short-term trials, and reducing the risk for relapse in long-term studies. Direct switching from the IR formulation to the same dose of the XR formulation did not reveal any loss of efficacy or tolerability issues, and switching patients to quetiapine XR from conventional or other atypical antipsychotics (for reasons of insufficient efficacy or tolerability also proved to be beneficial and generally well tolerated. In bipolar disorder, quetiapine XR has also proven effective in relieving acute depressive and manic symptoms. Adverse events with quetiapine XR in patients with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are similar to those associated with the IR formulation, the most common being sedation, dry mouth, somnolence, dizziness, and headache. The low propensity for EPS is maintained with the XR formulation

  9. [METABOLIC SYNDROME AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA, BIPOLAR DISORDER AND SCHIZOAFFECTIVE DISORDER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Calero Franco, Paloma; Sánchez Sánchez, Blanca; Rodríguez Criado, Natalia; Pinilla Santos, Berta; Bravo Herrero, Sandra; Cruz Fourcade, José Fernando; Martín Aragón, Rubén

    2015-12-01

    patients with severe mental ilness such as schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder die at least 20 years earlier than general population. Despite preventive strategies, cardiovascular disease is the first cause of death. analyse the percentage of patients with a high body mass index, metabolic syndrome and their cardiovascular risk at 10 years in patients with a diagnosis, based in DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder. These patients were hospitalized because and acute condition of their mental ilness in the Brief Hospitalization Unit of Hospital Universitario de Móstoles between November of 2014 and June of 2015. in 53 patients, 34 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, 16 with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and 3 with a schizoaffective disorder, weight, size abdominal perimeter measures and blood pressure were collected. The body mass index was assesed. Blood tests were taken and we use sugar, triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels as paramethers for the ATP III and Framingham criteria. We also review the clinical history of the patients and lifestyle and use of toxic substances were registered. 51% of the patients were men and 49% were women. The average age was 40. 38% of the patients were overweighed, 22% obese and 4% had morbid obesity. 26% of the patients had metabolic syndrome, the clinical evolution of the majority of these patients was of more tan 10 years and they also have been treated with different antypsychotics and antidepressants. Using the Framingham criteria, 11% of the patients had a cardiovascular risk higher than 10 % in the next 10 years. overweight and its consequences in patients with a severe mental ilness are intimately related with their lifestyle, disparities in the access to health resources, the clinical evolution of the disease and pharmacotherapy. Strategies to promote physical health in these patients in the spanish health sistme are insufficient

  10. Schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder: perspectives for the development of therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundram, S; Joyce, P R; Kennedy, M A

    2003-08-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder remain two of the most severe and difficult to treat psychotic disorders hampered by our poor understanding of their pathologies. The development of typical antipsychotic drugs opened an avenue of investigation through the dopamine D2 receptor in schizophrenia. With the reintroduction of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine came the development of a new generation of atypical agents and hypotheses challenging the centrality of this receptor in explaining antipsychotic effects. Evaluation of these competing theories does not provide sufficient evidence to displace the importance of the dopamine D2 receptor in antipsychotic efficacy, but does raise limitations of it as an explanatory hypothesis. Further, the treatment of other symptom domains in schizophrenia remains relatively neglected and open for the development of novel therapies. Similar to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder presents a diversity of clinical states but unlike schizophrenia, its mainstay of treatment, lithium, has not had a clear receptor target impeding understanding of the disorder's pathology and treatment. This has pushed investigation into other domains emphasising a number of intracellular signalling pathways and glial-neuronal interactions. The heavy genetic loading of bipolar disorder has allowed linkage analyses to identify a number of putative regions, however, the diversity of phenotypes complicates such studies. Polymorphisms of candidate genes have yielded potential leads such as dopamine beta hydroxylase in mood disorder and the serotonin transporter for treatment response. It is anticipated that combiningthe above approaches may hold promise for the development of more effective treatments.

  11. High educational performance is a distinctive feature of bipolar disorder : A study on cognition in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia patients, relatives and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeker, A.; Boks, M. P M; Abramovic, L.; Verkooijen, S.; Van Bergen, A. H.; Hillegers, M. H J; Spijker, A. T.; Hoencamp, E.; Regeer, E. J.; Riemersma-Van Der Lek, R. F.; Stevens, A. W M M; Schulte, P. F J; Vonk, R.; Hoekstra, R.; Van Beveren, N. J M; Kupka, R. W.; Brouwer, R. M.; Bearden, C. E.; MacCabe, J. H.; Ophoff, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with lower intelligence and poor educational performance relative to the general population. This is, to a lesser degree, also found in first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients. It is unclear whether bipolar disorder I (BD-I) patients and their

  12. High educational performance is a distinctive feature of bipolar disorder : a study on cognition in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia patients, relatives and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeker, A.; Boks, M. P. M.; Abramovic, L.; Verkooijen, S.; van Bergen, A. H.; Hillegers, M. H. J.; Spijker, A. T.; Hoencamp, E.; Regeer, E. J.; Riemersma-Van der Lek, R. F.; Stevens, A. W. M. M.; Schulte, P. F. J.; Vonk, R.; Hoekstra, R.; van Beveren, N. J. M.; Kupka, R. W.; Brouwer, R. M.; Bearden, C. E.; MacCabe, J. H.; Ophoff, R. A.

    Background. Schizophrenia is associated with lower intelligence and poor educational performance relative to the general population. This is, to a lesser degree, also found in first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients. It is unclear whether bipolar disorder I (BD-I) patients and their

  13. Markers of inflammation and stress distinguish subsets of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillman, S G; Sinclair, D; Fung, S J; Webster, M J; Shannon Weickert, C

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share a number of common features, both symptomatically and biologically. Abnormalities in the neuroimmune and the stress-signaling pathways have been previously identified in brains of individuals with both diseases. However, the possible relationship between abnormalities in stress and neuroimmune signaling within the cortex of people with psychotic illness has not been defined. To test the hypothesis that combined alterations in brain stress responsiveness and neuroimmune/inflammatory status are characteristic of some individuals suffering from major mental illness, we examined gene expression in the Stanley Array Cohort of 35 controls, 35 individuals with schizophrenia and 34 individuals with bipolar disorder. We used levels of 8 inflammatory-related transcripts, of which SERPINA3 was significantly elevated in individuals with schizophrenia (F(2,88)=4.137, Pschizophrenia (n=15), and a trend toward having more bipolar disorder individuals (n=11), when compared with controls (n=6). Using these subgroups, we tested which microarray-assessed transcriptional changes may be associated with high inflammatory/stress groups using ingenuity analysis and found that an extended network of gene expression changes involving immune, growth factors, inhibitory signaling and cell death factors also distinguished these groups. Our work demonstrates that some of the heterogeneity in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be partially explained by inflammation/stress interactions, and that this biological subtype cuts across Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-defined categories. PMID:24569695

  14. Working memory predicts presence of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lisanne M; Bodapati, Anjuli S; Sharma, Rajiv P; Rosen, Cherise

    2018-02-01

    The recent dramatic increase in research investigating auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) has broadened the former narrow focus on schizophrenia to incorporate additional populations that experience these symptoms. However, an understanding of potential shared mechanisms remains elusive. Based on theories suggesting a failure of top-down cognitive control, we aimed to compare the relationship between AVHs and cognition in two categorical diagnoses of psychosis, schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder. A total of 124 adults aged 21-60 participated, of whom 76 had present-state psychosis (schizophrenia, n = 53; bipolar disorder with psychosis, n = 23), and 48 were non-clinical controls. Diagnosis and hallucination presence was determined using the Structured Clinical Diagnostic Interview for DSM-IV TR. AVHs severity was assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Participants also completed the MATRICS cognitive battery. The bipolar disorder with psychosis group performed better than the schizophrenia group for cognitive domains of Processing speed, Attention, Working memory (WM), and Visual memory. Hierarchical binary logistic regression found that WM significantly predicted presence of AVHs in both psychotic groups, but diagnosis did not significantly increase the predictive value of the model. A hierarchical multiple linear regression found that schizophrenia diagnosis was the only significant predictor of hallucination severity. The findings of this study-the first, to our knowledge, to compare the relationship between AVHs and MATRICS domains across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with psychosis-support theories that deficits in WM underly the genesis of AVHs. WM potentially represents a shared mechanism of AVHs across diagnoses, supporting dimensional classifications of these psychotic disorders. However, non-cognitive factors predictive of hallucination severity may be specific to schizophrenia.

  15. Quality indicators in the treatment of patients with depression, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Consensus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Miquel; de Dios, Consuelo; Pérez, Víctor; Ignacio, Emilio; Serrano, Manuel; Vieta, Eduard; Mira, José Joaquín; Guilabert, Mercedes; Roca, Miquel

    2018-01-06

    To define a set of indicators for mental health care, monitoring quality assurance in schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorders in Spain. Qualitative research. Consensus-based study involving 6 psychiatrists on the steering committee and a panel of 43 psychiatrists working in several health services in Spain. An initial proposal of 44 indicators for depression, 42 for schizophrenia and 58 for bipolar disorder was elaborated after reviewing the literature. This proposal was analysed by experts using the Delphi technique. The valuation of these indicators in successive rounds allowed those with less degree of consensus to be discarded. Feasibility, sensitivity and clinical relevance were considered. The study was carried out between July 2015 and March 2016. Seventy indicators were defined by consensus: 17 for major depression, 16 for schizophrenia, 17 for bipolar disorder and 20 common to all three pathologies. These indicators included measures related to adequacy, patient safety, exacerbation, mechanical restraint, suicidal behaviour, psychoeducation, adherence, mortality and physical health. This set of indicators allows quality monitoring in the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, depression or bipolar disorder. Mental health care authorities and professionals can use this proposal for developing a balanced scorecard adjusted to their priorities and welfare objectives. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Cognitive functioning in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: A quantitative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam, L.; Arts, B.; Van Os, J.; Aleman, A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evidence suggests that cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder may be impaired even in euthymic states, but it is unclear if the pattern of deficits is similar to the deficits found in schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to review quantitatively the studies on cognitive performance

  17. Cognitive functioning in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder : A quantitative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krabbendam, L; Arts, B; van Os, J; Aleman, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evidence suggests that cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder may be impaired even in euthymic states, but it is unclear if the pattern of deficits is similar to the deficits found in schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to review quantitatively the studies on cognitive performance

  18. Assessment of relatedness between neurocan gene as bipolar disorder susceptibility locus and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilijana Oruč

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Large scale genetic association meta-analyses showed that neurocan (NCAN gene polymorphism rs1064395 is susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder. These studies also included patients with bipolar disorder originated from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Followed by theory of shared genetic elements between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia susceptibility, other studies explored several genetic factors with schizophrenia vulnerability as well. In this work, authors investigated the association between previously confirmed bipolar disorder genetic risk factor-neurocan with schizophrenia in a population sample of Bosnia and Herzegovina.Ethical aspects of this research were assessed by Ethics Committee of Clinical Center University of Sarajevo. Blood samples for DNA extraction were taken from the total of 86 patients and healthy individuals who previously signed informed consent. Genotyping for rs 1064395 was done using direct sequencing method. A case-control analysis of common genetic polymorphism within neurocan gene and schizophrenia status in a consecutively sampled patient cohort have been done using Fisher-exact test with odds-ratio calculation. No statistically significant allele and genotype association with disease status was found (p>0.05.Our finding supports the fact that large-scale genetic association studies approach need to be employed when detecting the variants with small additive effect in phenotypes with complex ethiology.

  19. Identification of susceptibility genes for bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia on chromosome 22q13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Jacob Eg

    2006-01-01

    Linkage analyses suggest that chromosome 22q12-13 may harbor one or more shared susceptibility loci for bipolar affective disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SZ). In a study of distantly related cases and control individuals from the Faeroe Islands our group has previously reported that chromosome 22...

  20. [Cortical Release Signs in Patients with Schizophrenia, Depressive Disorders, and Bipolar Affective Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Espriella, Ricardo Andrés; Hernández, José Fernando; Espejo, Lina María

    2013-12-01

    Determining the presence of cortical release signs associated with white matter damage, is a clinically easy method to perform. The objective of this study is to determine the presence of cortical release signs in patients with mental illnesses and cerebrovascular disease, as well as its clinical usefulness, given that it indicates cortical damage. A review was made of cortical release signs in patients hospitalized in clinical psychiatry and general hospitals with bipolar affective disorder (40), depression (37), schizophrenia (33), cardiovascular disease (33) and dementia (37). The signs of cortical release do not have the same importance as cortical damage. For example, the glabellar reflex was found in all the groups, that of paratonia, particularly in the group with schizophrenia, and others signs in the group of patients with dementia. It is suggested that these signs imply subcortical white matter damage. The appearance of these signs shows the need for a follow up of patients diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder, depression and schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Thought Disorder in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder Probands, Their Relatives, and Nonpsychiatric Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Charity J; Coleman, Michael J; Ulgen, Ayse; Boling, Lenore; Cole, Jonathan O; Johnson, Frederick V; Lerbinger, Jan; Bodkin, J Alexander; Holzman, Philip S; Levy, Deborah L

    2017-05-01

    Thought disorder (TD) has long been associated with schizophrenia (SZ) and is now widely recognized as a symptom of mania and other psychotic disorders as well. Previous studies have suggested that the TD found in the clinically unaffected relatives of SZ, schizoaffective and bipolar probands is qualitatively similar to that found in the probands themselves. Here, we examine which quantitative measures of TD optimize the distinction between patients with diagnoses of SZ and bipolar disorder with psychotic features (BP) from nonpsychiatric controls (NC) and from each other. In addition, we investigate whether these same TD measures also distinguish their respective clinically unaffected relatives (RelSZ, RelBP) from controls as well as from each other. We find that deviant verbalizations are significantly associated with SZ and are co-familial in clinically unaffected RelSZ, but are dissociated from, and are not co-familial for, BP disorder. In contrast, combinatory thinking was nonspecifically associated with psychosis, but did not aggregate in either group of relatives. These results provide further support for the usefulness of TD for identifying potential non-penetrant carriers of SZ-risk genes, in turn enhancing the power of genetic analyses. These findings also suggest that further refinement of the TD phenotype may be needed in order to be suitable for use in genetic studies of bipolar disorder. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Characteristics and Service Use of Older Adults with Schizoaffective Disorder Versus Older Adults with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Stephanie A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Whiteman, Karen L; Scherer, Emily; Bartels, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if schizoaffective disorder in older adults is differentiated from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with respect to community functioning, cognitive functioning, psychiatric symptoms, and service use. Secondary analysis of baseline data collected from the Helping Older People Experience Success psychosocial skills training and health management study. Three community mental health centers in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Adults over the age of 50 (N = 139, mean age: 59.7 years, SD: 7.4 years) with persistent functional impairment and a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder (N = 52), schizophrenia (N = 51), or bipolar disorder (N = 36). Health status (36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]), performance-based community living skills (UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment), neuropsychological functioning (Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning subtests), psychiatric symptoms (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms), medical severity (Charlson comorbidity index), and acute service use. Older adults with schizoaffective disorder had depressive symptoms of similar severity to bipolar disorder, and thought disorder symptoms of similar severity to schizophrenia. Schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia was associated with better community functioning, but poorer subjective physical and mental health functioning as measured by the SF-36. Older adults with schizoaffective disorder had greater acute hospitalization compared with adults with schizophrenia, though their use of acute care services was comparable to individuals with bipolar disorder. Findings from this study suggest that schizoaffective disorder in older adults occupies a distinct profile from either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with respect to community functional status, symptom profile, and acute services utilization. Copyright © 2017

  3. VRK2 gene expression in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesli, Martin; Wirgenes, Katrine Verena; Hughes, Timothy; Bettella, Francesco; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Hoseth, Eva S; Nerhus, Mari; Lagerberg, Trine V; Steen, Nils E; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid; Dieset, Ingrid; Djurovic, Srdjan; Andreassen, Ole A

    2016-08-01

    Common variants in the Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, but the relevance of its encoded protein VRK2 in the disorder remains unclear. To identify potential differences in VRK2 gene expression levels between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, psychosis not otherwise specified (PNOS) and healthy controls. VRK2 mRNA level was measured in whole blood in 652 individuals (schizophrenia, n = 201; bipolar disorder, n = 167; PNOS, n = 61; healthy controls, n = 223), and compared across diagnostic categories and subcategories. Additionally, we analysed for association between 1566 VRK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms and mRNA levels. We found lower VRK2 mRNA levels in schizophrenia compared with healthy controls (Pdisorder (Pdisorder (P = 0.00026). Expression quantitative trait loci in close proximity to the transcription start site of the short isoforms of the VRK2 gene were identified. Altered VRK2 gene expression seems specific for schizophrenia and PNOS, which is in accordance with findings from genome-wide association studies. These results suggest that reduced VRK2 mRNA levels are involved in the underlying mechanisms in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  4. Exploring the psychosis functional connectome: aberrant intrinsic networks in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vince D Calhoun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic functional brain networks (INs are regions showing temporal coherence with one another. These INs are present in the context of a task (as opposed to an undirected task such as rest, albeit modulated to a degree both spatially and temporally. Prominent networks include the default mode, attentional fronto-parietal, executive control, bilateral temporal lobe and motor networks. The characterization of INs has recently gained considerable momentum, however; most previous studies evaluate only a small subset of the intrinsic networks (e.g. default mode. In this paper we use independent component analysis to study INs decomposed from fMRI data collected in a large group of schizophrenia patients, healthy controls, and individuals with bipolar disorder, while performing an auditory oddball task. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share significant overlap in clinical symptoms, brain characteristics, and risk genes which motivates our goal of identifying whether functional imaging data can differentiate the two disorders. We tested for group differences in properties of all identified intrinsic networks including spatial maps, spectra, and functional network connectivity. A small set of default mode, temporal lobe, and frontal networks with default mode regions appearing to play a key role in all comparisons. Bipolar subjects showed more prominent changes in ventromedial and prefrontal default mode regions whereas schizophrenia patients showed changes in posterior default mode regions. Anti-correlations between left parietal areas and dorsolateral prefrontal cortical areas were different in bipolar and schizophrenia patients and amplitude was significantly different from healthy controls in both patient groups. Patients exhibited similar frequency behavior across multiple networks with decreased low frequency power. In summary, a comprehensive analysis of intrinsic networks reveals a key role for the default mode in both schizophrenia and

  5. Polymorphisms in NRGN are associated with schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zujia; Chen, Jianhua; Khan, Raja Amjad Waheed; Wang, Meng; Song, Zhijian; Li, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jiawei; Li, Wenjin; Shi, Yongyong

    2016-04-01

    The NRGN gene locates on 11q24 and encodes a postsynaptic protein kinase substrate that binds calmodulin in the absence of calcium. In a previous genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in the Caucasian population, rs12807809 of NRGN was found to be significantly associated with schizophrenia, moreover, it was further found to be associated with bipolar disorder. We recruited 1248 schizophrenia cases, 1344 bipolar disorder cases, 1056 major depressive disorder cases, and 1248 healthy controls from Han Chinese population. Rs12807809 and another two tag SNPs of NRGN were genotyped and analyzed in three diseases respectively. A meta-analysis of rs12807809 was also conducted to verify its association with schizophrenia in Han Chinese population. Rs7113041 was associated with bipolar disorder (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval (OR, 95% CI)=1.194, 1.032-1.383; Pgenotype=0.0126), and rs12278912 was associated with major depressive disorder (OR, 95% CI=0.789, 0.673-0.924; Pallele=0.0102, Pgenotype=0.0399) after Bonferroni correction. The "GA" haplotype of rs7113041-rs12278912 was significantly associated with schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (corresponding P values were 2.85E-04, 3.00E-03, and 5.40E-04 after Bonferroni correction). Despite the association between NRGN and psychoses we have found, we failed to validate the positive variant rs12807809, which was reported in the Caucasian genome-wide association study both in our single site association test and the meta-analysis. Functional studies are needed to illuminate the role of NRGN in the pathogenesis of these mental disorders. Our findings prove that NRGN is a shared susceptibility gene of schizophrenia, major depression and bipolar disorder in Han Chinese, and this might provide a new target for the diagnosis and treatment of these mental disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Homer1a protein expression in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Stefan L; Llenos, Ida C; Miller, Christine L; Dulay, Jeannette R; Haybaeck, Johannes; Weis, Serge

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, there was growing interest in postsynaptic density proteins in the central nervous system. Of the most important candidates of this specialized region are proteins belonging to the Homer protein family. This family of scaffolding proteins is suspected to participate in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. The present study aims to compare Homer1a expression in the hippocampus and cingulate gyrus of patients with major psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze changes of Homer1a protein expression in the hippocampal formation and the cingulate gyrus from the respective disease groups. Glial cells of the cingulate gyrus gray matter showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls. The same results were seen when comparing cingulate gyrus gray matter glial cells in bipolar disorder with major depression. Stratum oriens glial cells of the hippocampus showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls and major depression. Stratum lacunosum glial cells showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to major depression. In stratum oriens interneurons Homer1a levels were increased in all disease groups when compared to controls. Stratum lucidum axons showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls. Our data demonstrate altered Homer1a levels in specific brain regions and cell types of patients suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. These findings support the role of Homer proteins as interesting candidates in neuropsychiatric pathophysiology and treatment.

  7. Social cognition in schizophrenia in comparison to bipolar disorder: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Emre; Pantelis, Christos

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common characteristic of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BP). While these deficits are more severe in schizophrenia, there is a significant overlap between conditions. However, it was hypothesized that social cognitive deficits might be more specific to schizophrenia. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing facial emotion recognition and theory of mind (ToM) abilities in schizophrenia and BP. 26 studies comparing 1301 patients with schizophrenia and 1075 with BP were included. Schizophrenia patients significantly underperformed compared with BP patients in both facial emotion recognition (d=0.39) and ToM (d=0.57). Neurocognitive deficits significantly contributed to schizophrenia-BP group differences for ToM. However, between-group differences for social cognition were not statistically more severe than neurocognition. Social cognitive impairment is more severe in schizophrenia in comparison to BP. However, between-group differences are modest and are comparable to other neurocognitive differences between schizophrenia and BP. There is significant overlap in social cognitive performance deficits observed in both schizophrenia and BP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Heart disease treatment and mortality in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder - changes in the Danish population between 1994 and 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Nordentoft, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have much higher heart disease mortality rates than the general population. The objective was to compare the general population with persons with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or other psychiatric disorders in terms of rates of somatic...... significantly among persons with schizophrenia: compared with the general population, the rise in the mortality rate ratio equalled 1.12 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.15) every second year. This was not the case for persons with bipolar disorder [1.02 (0.98-1.05), not significant] or other psychiatric...... disorders [1.00 (0.99-1.01), not significant]. The entire period saw a lower hospitalization rate and fewer invasive cardiac procedures among persons with schizophrenia than among the general population. The higher mortality (with increasing trends) from heart disease in persons with schizophrenia compared...

  9. Twenty year multi-follow-up of different types of hallucinations in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goghari, Vina M; Harrow, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Hallucinations are a salient feature of both psychotic and mood disorders. Currently there is a call for more research on the phenomenology of different forms of hallucinations, in a broader array of disorders, to further both theoretical knowledge and clinical utility. We investigated auditory, visual, and olfactory hallucinations at index hospitalization and auditory and visual hallucinations prospectively for 20years in 150 young patients, namely 51 schizophrenia, 25 schizoaffective, 28 bipolar, and 79 unipolar depression. For the index hospitalization, the data showed schizophrenia and schizoaffective patients had a greater rate of auditory and visual hallucinations than bipolar and depression patients. However, over the longitudinal trajectory of their illness, a greater percentage of schizophrenia patients had auditory and visual hallucinations than schizoaffective patients, as well as bipolar and depression patients. Also, in contrast to the initial period, schizoaffective patients did not differentiate themselves over the follow-up period from bipolar patients. Bipolar and depression patients did not significantly differ at index hospitalization or at follow-up. We found visual hallucinations differentiated the groups to a greater degree over the 20year course than did auditory hallucinations. These findings suggest the longitudinal course is more important for differentiating schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, whereas the initial years may be more useful to differentiate schizoaffective disorder from bipolar disorder. Furthermore, we found that the early presence of auditory hallucinations was associated with a reduced likelihood for a future period of recovery. No olfactory hallucinations were present at the index hospitalization in any patients. Over the course of 20years, a minority of schizophrenia patients presented with olfactory hallucinations, and very few schizoaffective and bipolar patients presented with olfactory hallucinations. This

  10. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, T H; Børglum, A D; Mors, O

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 22q may harbor risk genes for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder from the Far...... tested for the presence of a missense mutation in the WKL1 gene encoding a putative cation channel close to segment D22S1161--D22S922, which has been associated with schizophrenia. We did not find this mutation in schizophrenic or bipolar patients or the controls from the Faroe Islands....

  11. Improvements in metabolic abnormalities among overweight schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventriglio, A; Gentile, A; Baldessarini, R J; Martone, S; Vitrani, G; La Marca, A; Bellomo, A

    2014-09-01

    As weight-gain and metabolic abnormalities during treatment with psychotropic drugs are of great concern, we evaluated effects of psycho-education and medical monitoring on metabolic changes among severely mentally ill patients. During repeated, systematic psycho-education about general health among 66 consecutive patients diagnosed with DSM-IV-TR schizophrenia (n=33) or type-I bipolar disorder (n=33), we evaluated (at intake 1, 2, 3, and 6 months) clinical psychiatric status, treatments and doses, recorded physiological parameters, and assessed attitudes about medication. At intake, patients with schizophrenia vs bipolar disorder were receiving 3-7 times more psychotropic medication, with 14% higher initial body-mass index (BMI: 29.1 vs 25.6 kg/m²), 12 times more obesity, and significantly higher serum lipid concentrations. During 6-months follow-up, among bipolar disorder patients, polytherapy and serum lipid concentrations declined more than among schizophrenia patients (e.g., total cholesterol+triglycerides, by 3.21 vs 1.75%/month). BMI remained stable. Declining lipid levels were associated with older age, bipolar disorder, being unemployed, higher antipsychotic doses, and lower initial BPRS scores (all P ≤ 0.001). Psychotropic treatments were more complex, and metabolic measures more abnormal among bipolar disorder than schizophrenia patients. Intensive psycho-education, clinical monitoring, and encouragement of weight-control for six months were associated with improvements in metabolic measures (but not to BMI), and more realistic attitudes about medication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic connectivity states estimated from resting fMRI Identify differences among Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and healthy control subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rashid, Barnaly; Damaraju, Eswar; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Calhoun, Vince D

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) share significant overlap in clinical symptoms, brain characteristics, and risk genes, and both are associated with dysconnectivity among large-scale brain networks...

  13. A possible common basis for MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: Lessons from electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goded eShahaf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There is ample electrophysiological evidence of attention dysfunction in the EEG/ERP signal of various psychopathologies such as major depressive disorder (MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The reduced attention-related ERP waves show much similarity between MDD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia, raising the question whether there are similarities in the neurophysiologic process that underlies attention dysfunction in these pathologies. The present work suggests that there is such a unified underlying neurophysiologic process, which results in reduced attention in the three pathologies. Naturally, as these pathologies involve different clinical manifestations, we expect differences in their underlying neurophysiology. These differences and their subtle manifestation in the ERP marker for attention are also discussed.MDD, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are just three of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, which involve changes in the EEG/ERP manifestations of attention. Further work should expand the basic model presented here to offer comprehensive modeling of these multiple disorders and to emphasize similarities and dissimilarities of the underlying neurophysiologic processes.

  14. Increased expression in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of CAPON in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported linkage of markers on chromosome 1q22 to schizophrenia, a finding supported by several independent studies. Within this linkage region, we have identified significant linkage disequilibrium between schizophrenia and markers within the gene for carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (CAPON. Prior sequencing of the ten exons of CAPON failed to reveal a coding mutation associated with illness.We screened a human fetal brain cDNA library and identified a new isoform of CAPON that consists of the terminal two exons of the gene, and verified the expression of the predicted corresponding protein in human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. We examined the expression levels of both the ten-exon CAPON transcript and this new isoform in postmortem brain samples from the Stanley Array Collection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of RNA from the DLPFC in 105 individuals (35 with schizophrenia, 35 with bipolar disorder, and 35 psychiatrically normal controls revealed significantly (p < 0.005 increased expression of the new isoform in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Furthermore, this increased expression was significantly associated (p < 0.05 with genotype at three single-nucleotide polymorphisms previously identified as being in linkage disequilibrium with schizophrenia.Based on the known interactions between CAPON, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, and proteins associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR complex, overexpression of either CAPON isoform would be expected to disrupt the association between nNOS and the NMDAR, leading to changes consistent with the NMDAR hypofunctioning hypothesis of schizophrenia. This study adds support to a role of CAPON in schizophrenia, produces new evidence implicating this gene in the etiology of bipolar disorder, and suggests a possible mechanism of action of CAPON in psychiatric illness.

  15. Olanzapine in Chinese patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue HBH

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hai Bo Haber Xue,1 Li Liu,1 Hena Zhang,2 William Montgomery,3 Tamás Treuer41Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd, Shanghai Branch, Shanghai, 2China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 3Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, Australia; 4Eli Lilly & Co, Budapest, HungaryBackground: Despite the burden of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the Chinese population, country-specific data to guide practitioners regarding antipsychotic therapy are lacking. The primary aim of this systematic review was to examine evidence of the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of olanzapine in Chinese populations.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted using databases covering international and Chinese core journals using search terms related to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, specified countries (People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and olanzapine treatment. Following initial screening, inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to the search results to identify relevant studies from which data were extracted.Results: A total of 489 publications were retrieved and 61 studies were identified for inclusion. Most studies were related to schizophrenia (n=54, with six studies related to bipolar disorder and one study related to both conditions. The quality of study methods and reporting in international journals was noticeably better than in Chinese language journals. Most studies included relatively small patient populations and were of short duration. The efficacy of olanzapine in Chinese populations was confirmed by multiple comparative and noncomparative studies that found statistically significant reductions in symptom measures in studies conducted for ≥6 weeks (schizophrenia or ≥3 weeks (bipolar disorder. Findings related to effectiveness (treatment discontinuation, quality of life, and neurocognitive improvements were generally consistent with those observed in non-Chinese populations. No new

  16. High frequencies of de novo CNVs in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malhotra, Dheeraj

    2011-12-22

    While it is known that rare copy-number variants (CNVs) contribute to risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders, the role of CNVs in bipolar disorder is unclear. Here, we reasoned that a contribution of CNVs to mood disorders might be most evident for de novo mutations. We performed a genome-wide analysis of de novo CNVs in a cohort of 788 trios. Diagnoses of offspring included bipolar disorder (n = 185), schizophrenia (n = 177), and healthy controls (n = 426). Frequencies of de novo CNVs were significantly higher in bipolar disorder as compared with controls (OR = 4.8 [1.4,16.0], p = 0.009). De novo CNVs were particularly enriched among cases with an age at onset younger than 18 (OR = 6.3 [1.7,22.6], p = 0.006). We also confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia (OR = 5.0 [1.5,16.8], p = 0.007). Our results suggest that rare spontaneous mutations are an important contributor to risk for bipolar disorder and other major neuropsychiatric diseases.

  17. Seasonality shows evidence for polygenic architecture and genetic correlation with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Enda M; Raheja, Uttam K; Stephens, Sarah H; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Vaswani, Dipika; Nijjar, Gagan V; Ryan, Kathleen A; Youssufi, Hassaan; Gehrman, Philip R; Shuldiner, Alan R; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Wray, Naomi R; Nelson, Elliot C; Mitchell, Braxton D; Postolache, Teodor T

    2015-02-01

    To test common genetic variants for association with seasonality (seasonal changes in mood and behavior) and to investigate whether there are shared genetic risk factors between psychiatric disorders and seasonality. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) were conducted in Australian (between 1988 and 1990 and between 2010 and 2013) and Amish (between May 2010 and December 2011) samples in whom the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ) had been administered, and the results were meta-analyzed in a total sample of 4,156 individuals. Genetic risk scores based on results from prior large GWAS studies of bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia were calculated to test for overlap in risk between psychiatric disorders and seasonality. The most significant association was with rs11825064 (P = 1.7 × 10⁻⁶, β = 0.64, standard error = 0.13), an intergenic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) found on chromosome 11. The evidence for overlap in risk factors was strongest for schizophrenia and seasonality, with the schizophrenia genetic profile scores explaining 3% of the variance in log-transformed global seasonality scores. Bipolar disorder genetic profile scores were also associated with seasonality, although at much weaker levels (minimum P value = 3.4 × 10⁻³), and no evidence for overlap in risk was detected between MDD and seasonality. Common SNPs of large effect most likely do not exist for seasonality in the populations examined. As expected, there were overlapping genetic risk factors for bipolar disorder (but not MDD) with seasonality. Unexpectedly, the risk for schizophrenia and seasonality had the largest overlap, an unprecedented finding that requires replication in other populations and has potential clinical implications considering overlapping cognitive deficits in seasonal affective disorders and schizophrenia. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Frontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: comparisons with schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hennessy, Robin J

    2010-09-01

    Any developmental relationship between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia engenders continuing debate. As the brain and face emerge in embryological intimacy, brain dysmorphogenesis is accompanied by facial dysmorphogenesis. 3D laser surface imaging was used to capture the facial surface of 13 male and 14 female patients with bipolar disorder in comparison with 61 male and 75 female control subjects and with 37 male and 32 female patients with schizophrenia. Surface images were analysed using geometric morphometrics and 3D visualisations to identify domains of facial shape that distinguish bipolar patients from controls and bipolar patients from those with schizophrenia. Both male and female bipolar patients evidenced significant facial dysmorphology: common to male and female patients was overall facial widening, increased width of nose, narrowing of mouth and upward displacement of the chin; dysmorphology differed between male and female patients for nose length, lip thickness and tragion height. There were few morphological differences in comparison with schizophrenia patients. That dysmorphology of the frontonasal prominences and related facial regions in bipolar disorder is more similar to than different from that found in schizophrenia indicates some common dysmorphogenesis. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia might reflect similar insult(s) acting over slightly differing time-frames or slightly differing insult(s) acting over a similar time-frame.

  19. A meta-analysis of blood cytokine network alterations in psychiatric patients: comparisons between schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, D R; Rapaport, M H; Miller, B J

    2016-12-01

    Schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder (MDD) have all been associated with aberrant blood cytokine levels; however, neither the pattern of cytokine alterations nor the impact of clinical status have been compared across disorders. We performed a meta-analysis of blood cytokines in acutely and chronically ill patients with these major psychiatric disorders. Articles were identified by searching the PubMed, PsycInfo and Web of Science, and the reference lists of these studies. Sixty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria (40 schizophrenia, 10 bipolar disorder and 18 MDD) for acutely ill patients. Forty-six studies met the inclusion criteria (18 schizophrenia, 16 bipolar disorder and 12 MDD) for chronically ill patients. Levels of two cytokines (interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)), one soluble cytokine receptor (sIL-2R), and one cytokine receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) were significantly increased in acutely ill patients with schizophrenia, bipolar mania and MDD compared with controls (Pschizophrenia and MDD (Pschizophrenia; and IL-1RA levels in bipolar mania decreased. In chronically ill patients, the levels of IL-6 were significantly increased in schizophrenia, euthymic (but not depressed) bipolar disorder and MDD compared with controls (Pschizophrenia and euthymic bipolar disorder. Overall, there were similarities in the pattern of cytokine alterations in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and MDD during acute and chronic phases of illness, raising the possibility of common underlying pathways for immune dysfunction. Effects of treatment on cytokines were more robust for schizophrenia and MDD, but were more frequently studied than for acute mania. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of major psychiatric disorders.

  20. Anatomical dysconnectivity in bipolar disorder compared with schizophrenia: A selective review of structural network analyses using diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Stefani; Holleran, Laurena; Cannon, Dara M; McDonald, Colm

    2017-02-01

    The dysconnectivity hypothesis suggests that psychotic illnesses arise not from regionally specific focal pathophysiology, but rather from impaired neuroanatomical integration across networks of brain regions. Decreased white matter organization has been hypothesized to be a feature of psychotic illnesses in general, which is supported by meta-analyses of DTI studies in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Although many diffusion MRI studies investigate bipolar disorder and schizophrenia alone, relatively few studies directly compare structural features in these psychotic illnesses. Recently, the application of graph theory analyses to DTI data has supported the dysconnectivity hypothesis in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, employing topological properties to assess neuroanatomical dysconnectivity. This selective review evaluates white matter alterations using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, with a focus upon direct comparison DTI studies in both psychotic illnesses. We then expand in more detail on the development of network analyses and the application of these techniques in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Converging evidence indicates that frontal connectivity alterations are common to both disorders, with prominent fronto-temporal deficits identified in schizophrenia and inter-hemispheric and limbic alterations reported in bipolar disorder. In bipolar disorder, most connectome reports use cortical maps alone, which given the importance of the limbic system in emotional regulation may limit the scope of network approaches in mood disorders. Further direct connectivity comparisons between these psychotic illnesses may assist in unravelling the neuroanatomical deviations underpinning the overlapping features of psychosis and cognitive impairment, and the more diagnostically distinctive features of affective disturbance in bipolar disorder and deficit syndrome in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Cytomegalovirus seropositivity and serointensity are associated with hippocampal volume and verbal memory in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houenou, J; d'Albis, M-A; Daban, C; Hamdani, N; Delavest, M; Lepine, J P; Vederine, F-E; Carde, S; Lajnef, M; Cabon, C; Dickerson, F; Yolken, R H; Tamouza, R; Poupon, C; Leboyer, M

    2014-01-03

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a member of the herpesviridae family that has a limbic and temporal gray matter tropism. It is usually latent in humans but has been associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and cognitive deficits in some populations. Hippocampal decreased volume and dysfunction play a critical role in these cognitive deficits. We hypothesized that CMV seropositivity and serointensity would be associated with hippocampal volume and cognitive functioning in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. 102 healthy controls, 118 patients with bipolar disorder and 69 patients with schizophrenia performed the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) and had blood samples drawn to assess CMV IgG levels. A subgroup of 52 healthy controls, 31 patients with bipolar disorder and 27 patients with schizophrenia underwent T1 MRI for hippocampal volumetry. We analyzed the association between CMV serointensity and seropositivity with hippocampal volume. We also explored the correlation between CMV serointensity and seropositivity and CVLT scores. In both patient groups but not in controls, higher CMV serointensity was significantly associated with smaller right hippocampal volume. Further, in the group of patients with schizophrenia but not bipolar disorder, CMV serointensity was negatively correlated with CVLT scores. CMV IgG titers are associated with decreased hippocampal volume and poorer episodic verbal memory in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The mechanism of this association warrants further exploration. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mortality gap for people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: UK-based cohort study 2000-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Joseph F; Marston, Louise; Walters, Kate; King, Michael B; Osborn, David P J

    2017-09-01

    BackgroundBipolar disorder and schizophrenia are associated with increased mortality relative to the general population. There is an international emphasis on decreasing this excess mortality.AimsTo determine whether the mortality gap between individuals with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia and the general population has decreased.MethodA nationally representative cohort study using primary care electronic health records from 2000 to 2014, comparing all patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia and the general population. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality.ResultsIndividuals with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia had elevated mortality (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.79, 95% CI 1.67-1.88 and 2.08, 95% CI 1.98-2.19 respectively). Adjusted HRs for bipolar disorder increased by 0.14/year (95% CI 0.10-0.19) from 2006 to 2014. The adjusted HRs for schizophrenia increased gradually from 2004 to 2010 (0.11/year, 95% CI 0.04-0.17) and rapidly after 2010 (0.34/year, 95% CI 0.18-0.49).ConclusionsThe mortality gap between individuals with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and the general population is widening. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  3. Plasma cortisol-dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) ratios in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peter; Watson, Stuart; Smith, Margaret S; Young, Allan H; Ferrier, I Nicol

    2007-02-01

    Hypercortisolaemia is a feature of many severe psychiatric illnesses and has been suggested to be both a causal and exacerbating factor of clinical symptoms and neurocognitive impairment. The adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has antiglucocorticoid properties that may have regulatory effects on glucocorticoid action in the brain. However, there is a paucity of data on these steroids and their ratio in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We therefore sought to assess cortisol and DHEA levels and the cortisol-DHEA ratio in patients with schizophrenia (n=20) and bipolar disorder (n=20), on stable medication for a minimum of 6 weeks, and healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects (n=20). Steroid levels were measured from plasma samples collected at 30 min intervals from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Cortisol levels were found to be significantly elevated in both patient groups compared with controls. DHEA levels were elevated in schizophrenic patients compared with bipolar patients and controls, but there was no evidence of a difference in the cortisol-DHEA ratio of the groups. These data suggest that afternoon hypercortisolaemia is evident in symptomatic bipolar and schizophrenic patients compared to controls. However, an elevation in DHEA levels may represent a specific endocrine marker in schizophrenia.

  4. Prevalence of liver disease in veterans with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bret E; Rodriguez, Veronica L; Linke, Alex; Sikirica, Mirko; Dirani, Riad; Hauser, Peter

    2011-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of three liver diseases [hepatitis C virus (HCV), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcohol-induced cirrhosis] in patients (veterans) with/without schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder. A retrospective electronic chart review of Veterans Integrated Services Network 20 facilities from January 1, 2001 to December 21, 2006 selected patients to one of two groups: schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder or bipolar disorder. Patients in both groups were compared with veterans in an equal-sized random sample from the same data set of veterans without psychiatric diagnoses. Logistic regression models evaluated risk for overall liver diseases as well as HCV, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic-induced cirrhosis. Patients with schizophrenia (n=6521) had a higher prevalence of liver disease [22.4% versus 3.2%; odds ratio (OR)=8.73]; HCV (16.5% versus 1.9%; OR=10.21); and alcohol-related cirrhosis (1.6% versus 0.4%; OR=4.09) than matched controls. Patients with bipolar disorder (n=5319) had a higher prevalence of liver disease (21.5% versus 3.5%; OR=7.58); HCV (15.5% versus 2.1%; OR=8.60); and alcohol-related cirrhosis (1.6% versus 0.4%; OR=3.82) than matched controls. Risk factors for liver disease in patients with schizophrenia (versus matched controls) included diabetes (OR=1.29), hypertension (OR=1.27), HIV (OR=3.54), substance use disorder (SUD) (OR=2.28), alcohol use disorder (OR=3.05) and schizophrenia (OR=2.74). Risk factors for development of liver disease for patients with bipolar disorder: diabetes (OR=1.40), HIV (OR=3.66), SUD (OR=2.68), alcohol use disorder (OR=3.22) and bipolar disorder (OR=2.27). This study in veterans shows that the presence of mental illness and its comorbidities represents a significant risk factor for the diagnosis of liver disease, including HCV and alcohol-related cirrhosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Stem cell-derived neurons in the development of targeted treatment for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmuff, Bradley; Liu, Bangyan; Karmacharya, Rakesh

    2017-04-01

    The recent advent of induced pluripotent stem cells has enabled the study of patient-specific and disease-related neurons in vitro and has facilitated new directions of inquiry into disease mechanisms. With these approaches, we now have the possibility of correlating ex vivo cellular phenotypes with individual patient response to treatment and/or side effects, which makes targeted treatments for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder a distinct prospect in the coming years. Here, we briefly review the current state of stem cell-based models and explore studies that are providing new insights into the disease biology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, which are laying the foundations for the development of novel targeted therapies.

  6. Differential impairment of social cognition factors in bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas S; Allen, Daniel N; Sutton, Griffin P; Vertinski, Mary; Ringdahl, Erik N

    2013-12-01

    While it is well-established that patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder exhibit deficits in social cognition, few studies have separately examined bipolar disorder with and without psychotic features. The current study addressed this gap by comparing patients with bipolar disorder with (BD+) and without (BD-) psychotic features, patients with schizophrenia (SZ), and healthy controls (NC) across social cognitive measures. Principal factor analysis on five social cognition tasks extracted a two-factor structure comprised of social/emotional processing and theory of mind. Factor scores were compared among the four groups. Results identified differential patterns of impairment between the BD+ and BD- group on the social/emotional processing factor while all clinical groups performed poorer than controls on the theory of mind factor. This provides evidence that a history of psychosis should be taken into account while evaluating social cognition in patients with bipolar disorder and also raises hypotheses about the relationship between social cognition and psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Marital adjustment of patients with substance dependence, schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Shital S Muke; Girish M Ghanawat; Suprakash Chaudhury; Sujit K Mishra; Verma, A. N.; Singh, Amool R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Marital adjustment is considered as a part of social well-being. Disturbed marital relationship can directly affect the disease adjustment and the way they face disease outcomes and complications. It may adversely affect physical health, mental health, the quality-of-life and even economic status of individuals. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the marital adjustment among patients with substance dependence, schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Materials and Meth...

  8. Cardiovascular risk factors among patients with schizophrenia, bipolar, depressive, anxiety, and personality disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Piñar, M.; Mathur, R.; Foguet, Q.; Ayis, S.; Robson, J.; Ayerbe, L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The evidence informing the management of cardiovascular risk in patients with psychiatric disorders is weak. Methods This cohort study used data from all patients, aged ≥ 30, registered in 140 primary care practices (n = 524,952) in London to estimate the risk of developing diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, tobacco consumption, obesity, and physical inactivity, between 2005 and 2015, for patients with a previous diagnosis of schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, bipolar or pers...

  9. No association between serum cholesterol and death by suicide in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, or major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Yi, Ki Kyoung; Na, Riji; Lim, Ahyoung; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-12-05

    Previous research on serum total cholesterol and suicidality has yielded conflicting results. Several studies have reported a link between low serum total cholesterol and suicidality, whereas others have failed to replicate these findings, particularly in patients with major affective disorders. These discordant findings may reflect the fact that studies often do not distinguish between patients with bipolar and unipolar depression; moreover, definitions and classification schemes for suicide attempts in the literature vary widely. Subjects were patients with one of the three major psychiatric disorders commonly associated with suicide: schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder, and major depressive disorder (MDD). We compared serum lipid levels in patients who died by suicide (82 schizophrenia, 23 bipolar affective disorder, and 67 MDD) and non-suicide controls (200 schizophrenia, 49 bipolar affective disorder, and 175 MDD). Serum lipid profiles did not differ between patients who died by suicide and control patients in any diagnostic group. Our results do not support the use of biological indicators such as serum total cholesterol to predict suicide risk among patients with a major psychiatric disorder.

  10. Antithetical asymmetry in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder: a line bisection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Naren P; Arasappa, Rashmi; Reddy, Nalini N; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2010-05-01

    Evolutionary theories link the pathogenesis of psychosis with anomalous brain asymmetry. Research shows that aberrant lateralization is linked to schizophrenia with elevated rates of left-handedness and reversal of normal cerebral asymmetries. However, lateralization is underexamined in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) and the available literature suggests the possibility of greater lateralization, which is diametrically opposite to what is observed in schizophrenia. For the first time, we report concurrent analyses of asymmetry in BPAD and schizophrenia using a line bisection task. We examined 164 subjects (31 patients with BPAD in remission, 30 patients with schizophrenia, and 103 healthy controls) using a two-hand line bisection task with established methodology. Raters with good inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.8) measured deviation from the center. Task performance was compared using analysis of covariance with age, sex, and education as covariates. Study groups did not differ significantly on age, sex, and handedness (p > 0.06). Patients (both schizophrenia and BPAD) had significantly more errors in identifying the center than controls (p < 0.001). Patients with schizophrenia bisected fewer lines at center than controls and BPAD subjects (p < 0.001). Using their right hand, schizophrenia patients had significant rightward deviation and BPAD patients had leftward deviation (p = 0.001). A significant interaction between diagnosis and direction of deviation (p = 0.01) was noted, with significant rightward deviation in schizophrenia and a trend toward leftward deviation in BPAD. Study findings suggest attenuation of normal pseudoneglect in schizophrenia and accentuation of normal pseudoneglect in BPAD, indicating lesser lateralization in schizophrenia and possibly greater lateralization in BPAD. From an evolutionary perspective, schizophrenia and BPAD might have antithetical origins.

  11. Comparisons of the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR in the acute treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuowei; Kemp, David E.; Chan, Philip K.; Fang, Yiru; Ganocy, Stephen J.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Gao, Keming

    2012-01-01

    Quetiapine extended-release (quetiapine-XR) has been studied in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The purpose of this study was to compare the tolerability and sensitivity of quetiapine-XR among these psychiatric conditions. The discontinuation due to adverse events (DAEs) and reported somnolence in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine-XR in these psychiatric conditions were examined. The absolute risk reduction or increase and the number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) or harm (NNTH) for DAEs and reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR ≥300 mg/d relative to placebo were estimated. Data from one study in schizophrenia (n=465), one in mania (n=316), one in bipolar depression (n=280), two in refractory MDD (n=624), two in MDD (n=669) and three in GAD (n=1109) were available. The risk for DAEs of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in bipolar depression (NNTH=9), refractory MDD (NNTH=8), MDD (NNTH=9), and GAD (NNTH=5), but not in schizophrenia and mania. The risk for reported somnolence of quetiapine-XR relative to placebo was significantly increased in schizophrenia (600 mg/d NNTH=15 and 800 mg/d NNTH=11), mania (NNTH=8), bipolar depression (NNTH=4), refractory MDD (NNTH=5), MDD (NNTH=5) and GAD (NNTH=5). These results suggest that patients with GAD had the poorest tolerability during treatment with quetiapine-XR, but they had a similar sensitivity as those with bipolar depression and MDD. Patients with schizophrenia or mania had a higher tolerability and a lower sensitivity than those with bipolar depression, MDD, or GAD. PMID:20875219

  12. Relative Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction in People with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-I; Chen, Su-Chiu; Liu, Shen-Ing; Sun, Fang-Ju; Juang, Jimmy J M; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Kao, Kai-Liang; Dewey, Michael E; Prince, Martin; Stewart, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Despite high mortality associated with serious mental illness, risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear, especially for patients with bipolar disorder. The main objective was to investigate the relative risk of AMI associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in a national sample. Using nationwide administrative data, an 11-year historic cohort study was assembled, comprised of cases aged 18 and above who had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, compared to a random sample of all other adults excluding those with diagnoses of serious mental illness. Incident AMI as a primary diagnosis was ascertained. Hazard ratios stratified by age and gender were calculated and Cox regression models were used to adjust for other covariates. A total of 70,225 people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and 207,592 people without serious mental illness were compared. Hazard ratios in men adjusted for age, income and urbanization were 1.15 (95% CI 1.01~1.32) for schizophrenia and 1.37 (1.08~1.73)for bipolar disorder, and in women, 1.85 (1.58~2.18) and 1.88(1.47~2.41) respectively. Further adjustment for treated hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia attenuated the hazard ratio for men with schizophrenia but not the other comparison groups. Hazard ratios were significantly stronger in women than men and were stronger in younger compared to older age groups for both disorders; however, gender modification was only significant in people with schizophrenia, and age modification only significant in people with bipolar disorder. In this large national sample, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were associated with raised risk of AMI in women and in the younger age groups although showed differences in potential confounding and modifying factors.

  13. Relative Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction in People with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-I Wu

    Full Text Available Despite high mortality associated with serious mental illness, risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI remains unclear, especially for patients with bipolar disorder. The main objective was to investigate the relative risk of AMI associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in a national sample.Using nationwide administrative data, an 11-year historic cohort study was assembled, comprised of cases aged 18 and above who had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, compared to a random sample of all other adults excluding those with diagnoses of serious mental illness. Incident AMI as a primary diagnosis was ascertained. Hazard ratios stratified by age and gender were calculated and Cox regression models were used to adjust for other covariates.A total of 70,225 people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and 207,592 people without serious mental illness were compared. Hazard ratios in men adjusted for age, income and urbanization were 1.15 (95% CI 1.01~1.32 for schizophrenia and 1.37 (1.08~1.73for bipolar disorder, and in women, 1.85 (1.58~2.18 and 1.88(1.47~2.41 respectively. Further adjustment for treated hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia attenuated the hazard ratio for men with schizophrenia but not the other comparison groups. Hazard ratios were significantly stronger in women than men and were stronger in younger compared to older age groups for both disorders; however, gender modification was only significant in people with schizophrenia, and age modification only significant in people with bipolar disorder.In this large national sample, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were associated with raised risk of AMI in women and in the younger age groups although showed differences in potential confounding and modifying factors.

  14. A Meta-Analysis of Neuropsychological Functioning in Patients with Early Onset Schizophrenia and Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Rebeca Garcia; Castellanos, F. Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Despite the nosological distinction between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, there is increasing evidence that these conditions share phenomenological characteristics. To examine the similarities in their patterns of cognitive impairment, we conducted a meta-analysis from 12 studies of Early Onset Schizophrenia (EOS) and 12 studies of Pediatric…

  15. Increased mortality among patients admitted with major psychiatric disorders: a register-based study comparing mortality in unipolar depressive disorder, bipolar affective disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Munk-Olsen, Trine; Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    disorder has never been examined in a population-based study. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to examine and compare mortality rates after admission with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, unipolar depressive disorder, or bipolar affective disorder and to examine the impact of family history......: Unipolar depressive disorder, bipolar affective disorder, and schizoaffective disorder were associated with the same pattern of excess mortality. Schizophrenia had a lower mortality from unnatural causes of death and a higher mortality from natural causes compared to the 3 other disorders. Family history......CONTEXT: Persons suffering from severe mental disorder have an excess mortality compared to persons with no mental disorder. However, the magnitude of the excess mortality differs from one mental disorder to another, and the impact on mortality if a first-degree family member suffers from a mental...

  16. Association study of candidate genes for susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder on chromosome 22Q13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Jacob; Binderup, Helle; Mors, Ole

    Chromosome 22q is suspected to harbor risk genes for schizophrenia as well as bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. In a recent study of distantly related patients from...... the Faroe Islands we have obtained evidence suggesting two regions on chromosome 22q13 to potentially harbor susceptibility genes for both schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We have selected a number of candidate genes from these two regions for further analysis, including the neuro-gene WKL1...... and unrelated controls, and in a Scottish case-control sample comprising 200 schizophrenics, 200 bipolar patients and 200 controls. None of the investigated SNPs have so far showed strong evidence of association to either bipolar disorder or schizophrenia....

  17. Developmental trajectory of cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder: comparison with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Emre

    2015-02-01

    Both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BP) are associated with neurocognitive deficits. However, it has been suggested that schizophrenia, but not BP, is characterised by premorbid cognitive impairments and neurodevelopmental abnormalities. In this paper, studies investigating neurocognitive deficits in premorbid, high-risk and first-episode BP were reviewed and these findings were compared with outcome of studies in schizophrenia. Available evidence suggests that cognitive deficits are evident in first-episode BP and such deficits can be evident even years before the onset of the illness in some patients. Trajectory of cognitive deficits from childhood to adulthood can be very similar in schizophrenia and many patients with BP. Developmental lag in acquisition of cognitive skills is a risk factor for both disorders. However, unlike schizophrenia, not only impaired cognition but also supranormal premorbid cognitive/scholastic performance predict BP. Neurodevelopmental cognitive impairment is evident in some but not all patients with BP. A model suggesting that only BP patients who share common genetic risk factors with schizophrenia have premorbid neurodevelopmental cognitive deficits is proposed. In this model, combination of absence of neurodevelopmental abnormalities and BP-related temperamental characteristics explains the relationship between supranormal cognition and risk for BP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  18. [Disturbances of social cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder--similarities and differences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Anna; Andrzejewska, Marta; Rybakowski, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the article, two aspects of social cognition, such as the Theory of Mind (ToM), i.e. the ability to infer about mental and affective states of other people, having both cognitive and perceptive aspects as well as empathy, i.e. the ability to understand other person's perspective and take an emotional response of the observer to the affective state of the other person, were presented. Next, research on social cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) has been reviewed, and the disturbances, observed in these two illnesses were compared, with particular emphasis on studies investigating social cognition in both schizophrenia and BD. The results of studies show that ToM disturbances occur both in schizophrenia and BD patients, however, in schizophrenia they are of greater severity. As for empathy, patients with schizophrenia have significant disturbances of recognizing emotions, as well as of cognitive and affective empathy. Patients with BD do not have abnormalities in cognitive empathy, have lesser disturbances of emotion recognition disorder compared with schizophrenia and show a connection between disturbances of affective empathy and the course of the disease (time period after manic or depressive episode). Further exploration of these issues seems important in order to determine to what extent the disturbances of social cognition can influence social and professional life of patients. It is also a potential area for therapeutic interventions supportive to pharmacotherapy.

  19. Initial association of NR2E1 with bipolar disorder and identification of candidate mutations in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and aggression through resequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravinesh A; McGhee, Kevin A; Leach, Stephen; Bonaguro, Russell; Maclean, Alan; Aguirre-Hernandez, Rosalia; Abrahams, Brett S; Coccaro, Emil F; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Turecki, Gustavo; Condon, Anne; Muir, Walter J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Blackwood, Douglas H; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2008-09-05

    Nuclear receptor 2E1 gene (NR2E1) resides within a 6q21-22 locus for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mice deleted for Nr2e1 show altered neurogenesis, cortical and limbic abnormalities, aggression, hyperexcitability, and cognitive impairment. NR2E1 is therefore a positional and functional candidate for involvement in mental illness. We performed association analyses in 394 patients with bipolar disorder, 396 with schizophrenia, and 479 controls using six common markers and haplotypes. We also performed a comprehensive mutation screen of NR2E1, resequencing its entire coding region, complete 5' and 3' untranslated regions, consensus splice-sites, and evolutionarily conserved regions in 126 humans with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or aggressive disorders. NR2E1 was associated with bipolar disorder I and II [odds ratio (OR = 0.77, P = 0.013), bipolar disorder I (OR = 0.77, P = 0.015), bipolar disorder in females (OR = 0.72, P = 0.009), and with age at onset < or = 25 years (OR = 0.67, P = 0.006)], all of which remained significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. We identified eight novel candidate mutations that were absent in 325 controls; four of these were predicted to alter known neural transcription factor binding sites. Analyses of NR2E1 mRNA in human brain revealed forebrain-specific transcription. The data presented support the hypothesis that genetic variation at NR2E1 may be associated with susceptibility to brain-behavior disorders. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Impairments of motor function among children with a familial risk of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder at 7 years old in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burton, Birgitte Klee; Thorup, Anne A. E.; Jepsen, Jens Richardt

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Owing to the genetic overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, we aimed to assess domain-specific motor aberrations and disorder specificity among 7-year-old children with a familial risk of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder by comparing children in familial risk groups with...

  1. Using summary data from the Danish National Registers to estimate heritabilities for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder

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    Naomi R Wray

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of heritability of psychiatric disorders quantify the genetic contribution to their etiology. Estimation of these parameters requires affected status on probands and their family members. Traditionally, heritabilities have been estimated from families ascertained from specific hospital registers, but accumulating sufficient numbers of families can be difficult. Larger sample sizes are achievable from national registries, but calculation of heritability from individual level data from these data sets is accompanied by other problems. Here, we use published summary data from a national population-based cohort of > 2.6 million persons in Denmark to estimate heritabilities of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder. The summary data comprised cumulative incidences up to 52 years of age for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and up to 51 years for major depressive disorder in offspring where either one or both parents were diagnosed with one of these disorders. Estimates of the heritabilities of the liability to developing schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder are 0.67 (95% confidence interval (CI 0.64-0.71, 0.62 (95%CI 0.58-0.65 and 0.32 (95%CI 0.30-0.34 respectively. The estimates may be inflated by common environmental effects, but despite this, they are somewhat lower for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder than those estimated from contemporary twin samples. The lower estimates may reflect the diverse environments (including diagnostic interpretation that contribute to national data, compared to twin/family studies. Our estimates are similar to those estimated previously from national data of Sweden, and they may be more representative of the international samples brought together for large-scale genome-wide association studies. We investigated estimation of genetic correlations from these data. We used simulation to conclude that estimates may not be interpretable and so only report them in

  2. Shared intermediate phenotypes for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: neuroanatomical features of subtypes distinguished by executive dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Alana M.; Quidé, Yann; Laurens, Kristin R.; O’Reilly, Nicole; Rowland, Jesseca E.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Green, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shared genetic vulnerability for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be associated with common neuroanatomical features. In view of the evidence for working memory dysfunction as a candidate intermediate phenotype for both disorders, we explored neuroanatomical distinctions between subtypes defined according to working memory (n-back task) performance. Methods We analyzed T1-weighted MRI scans for patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder, bipolar-I disorder (BD-I) and healthy controls. The VBM8 toolbox was used to assess differences in grey and white matter volume across traditional diagnostic groups (schizophrenia v. BD-I). Subsequently, groups were defined as “executively spared” (ES) based on the achievement of greater than 50% accuracy in the 2-back task performance (comparable to performance in the control group) or “executively deficit” (ED) based on the achievement of less than 50% accuracy. Results Our study included 40 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, 30 patients with BD-I and 34 controls. Both the schizophrenia and BD-I groups showed grey matter volume reductions relative to the control group, but not relative to each other. The ED subtype (n = 32 [10 BD-I, 22 schizophrenia]) showed grey matter volume reductions in the bilateral superior and medial frontal gyri, right inferior opercular gyri and hippocampus relative to controls. The ES subtype (n = 38 [20 BD-I, 18 schizophrenia]) showed grey matter volume reductions in the right precuneus and left superior and medial orbital frontal gyri relative to controls. The ED subtype showed grey matter volume reduction in the right inferior frontal and precentral gyri relative to the ES subtype. There were no significant differences in white matter volume in any group comparisons. Limitations This analysis was limited by small sample sizes. Further, insufficient numbers were available to assess a control-deficit comparison group. We were unable to assess the effects of mood

  3. Biological treatment of acute agitation or aggression with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in the inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U; Yu, Xin; Xiang, Yutao; Kane, John M; Masand, Prakash

    2017-05-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are chronic illnesses that commonly present with symptoms of acute agitation and aggression. These symptoms must be managed rapidly to prevent potential harm to the patient and others, including their caregivers, peers, and health care workers. A number of treatment options are available to clinicians to manage acute agitation and aggression, including non-pharmacologic behavioral and environmental de-escalation strategies, as well as biological treatment options such as pharmacologic agents and electroconvulsive therapy. We summarize the available biological treatment options for patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder presenting with acute agitation or aggression in the inpatient setting, focusing on antipsychotics. The following searches were used in PubMed to obtain the most relevant advances in treating schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with acute agitation and aggression: (agitation, agitated, aggression, aggressive, hostile, hostility, violent, or violence) and (schizophr*, psychosis, psychot*, psychos*, mania, manic, or bipolar) and (*pharmacologic, antipsychotic*, neuroleptic*, antiepileptic*, anti-seizure*, mood stabilizer*, lithium, benzodiazepine*, beta blocker, beta-blocker, alpha2, alpha-2, *histamine*, electroconvulsive, ECT, shock, or transcranial). Individual searches were performed for each drug class. The studies were limited to peer-reviewed, English-language, and human studies. Most were placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or meta-analyses. Among pharmacologic agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and lithium have been studied in randomized trials. Some typical and, more recently, atypical antipsychotics are available as both oral and short-acting intramuscular (IM) formulations, with 1 typical antipsychotic also available as an inhalable formulation. Among the pharmacologic agents studied in RCTs, atypical antipsychotics have the best evidence to support

  4. New developments in the management of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: potential use of cariprazine

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    Werner FM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Felix-Martin Werner,1,2 Rafael Coveñas2 1Euro Akademie Pößneck, Higher Vocational School for Elderly Care and Occupational Therapy, Pößneck, Germany; 2Institute of Neurosciences of Castilla y León (INCYL, Laboratory of Neuroanatomy of the Peptidergic Systems (Lab. 14, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Abstract: Cariprazine is a recently developed antipsychotic drug with a partial agonism for the D2 and D3 receptors. It shows a tenfold greater affinity for the D3 receptor. In clinical trials, its therapeutic effect has been tested in patients with an acute exacerbation of schizophrenia and in patients with acute mania in bipolar disorder. Like risperidone, cariprazine improves positive and negative schizophrenic symptoms, and ameliorates cognitive functions. Cariprazine induces extrapyramidal symptoms less often than risperidone and can cause acute akathisia. It is a prolactin-sparing antipsychotic drug and has a favorable metabolic profile. In acute mania in bipolar disorder, it treats manic symptoms significantly better than placebo. As a consequence of its improved adverse effects, cariprazine improves patients’ quality of life to a greater extent than other second-generation antipsychotic drugs. Cariprazine is a promising antipsychotic drug in the treatment of schizophrenia, acute mania in bipolar disorder, and in schizophrenia with mania. In these patients, its long-term therapeutic effect and its action in comparison with other second-generation antipsychotic drugs, above all aripiprazole, remain to be tested in clinical trials. Keywords: cariprazine, second-generation antipsychotic drug, schizophrenia, acute mania, D2 receptor, D3 receptor, partial agonism, akathisia, metabolic parameters, cognitive function 

  5. Association study of 21 circadian genes with bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hader A; Talkowski, Michael E; Wood, Joel; Chowdari, Kodavali V; McClain, Lora; Prasad, Konasale; Montrose, Debra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Friedman, Edward S; Allen, Michael H; Bowden, Charles L; Calabrese, Joseph; El-Mallakh, Rif S; Escamilla, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V; Fossey, Mark D; Gyulai, Laszlo; Loftis, Jennifer M; Hauser, Peter; Ketter, Terence A; Marangell, Lauren B; Miklowitz, David J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Patel, Jayendra; Sachs, Gary S; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W; Laird, Nan; Keshavan, Matcheri; Thase, Michael E; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Lewis, David; Monk, Tim; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L

    2012-01-01

    Objective Published studies suggest associations between circadian gene polymorphisms and bipolar I disorder (BPI), as well as schizoaffective disorder (SZA) and schizophrenia (SZ). The results are plausible, based on prior studies of circadian abnormalities. As replications have not been attempted uniformly, we evaluated representative, common polymorphisms in all three disorders. Methods We assayed 276 publicly available ‘tag’ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 21 circadian genes among 523 patients with BPI, 527 patients with SZ/SZA, and 477 screened adult controls. Detected associations were evaluated in relation to two published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Results Using gene-based tests, suggestive associations were noted between EGR3 and BPI (p = 0.017), and between NPAS2 and SZ/SZA (p = 0.034). Three SNPs were associated with both sets of disorders (NPAS2: rs13025524 and rs11123857; RORB: rs10491929; p < 0.05). None of the associations remained significant following corrections for multiple comparisons. Approximately 15% of the analyzed SNPs overlapped with an independent study that conducted GWAS for BPI; suggestive overlap between the GWAS analyses and ours was noted at ARNTL. Conclusions Several suggestive, novel associations were detected with circadian genes and BPI and SZ/SZA, but the present analyses do not support associations with common polymorphisms that confer risk with odds ratios greater than 1.5. Additional analyses using adequately powered samples are warranted to further evaluate these results. PMID:19839995

  6. Bipolar Disorder

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    Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness. People who have it go through unusual mood changes. They go ... The down feeling is depression. The causes of bipolar disorder aren't always clear. It runs in families. ...

  7. Assessing neural tuning for object perception in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with multivariate pattern analysis of fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavis, Eric A; Lee, Junghee; Wynn, Jonathan K; Engel, Stephen A; Cohen, Mark S; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Glahn, David C; Altshuler, Lori L; Green, Michael F

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in visual perception are well-established in schizophrenia and are linked to abnormal activity in the lateral occipital complex (LOC). Related deficits may exist in bipolar disorder. LOC contains neurons tuned to object features. It is unknown whether neural tuning in LOC or other visual areas is abnormal in patients, contributing to abnormal perception during visual tasks. This study used multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) to investigate perceptual tuning for objects in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Fifty schizophrenia participants, 51 bipolar disorder participants, and 47 matched healthy controls completed five functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) runs of a perceptual task in which they viewed pictures of four different objects and an outdoor scene. We performed classification analyses designed to assess the distinctiveness of activity corresponding to perception of each stimulus in LOC (a functionally localized region of interest). We also performed similar classification analyses throughout the brain using a searchlight technique. We compared classification accuracy and patterns of classification errors across groups. Stimulus classification accuracy was significantly above chance in all groups in LOC and throughout visual cortex. Classification errors were mostly within-category confusions (e.g., misclassifying one chair as another chair). There were no group differences in classification accuracy or patterns of confusion. The results show for the first time MVPA can be used successfully to classify individual perceptual stimuli in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, the results do not provide evidence of abnormal neural tuning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  8. Fatty acid composition of the postmortem prefrontal cortex of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Kei; Maekawa, Motoko; Toyota, Tomoko; Dean, Brian; Hamazaki, Tomohito; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2015-06-30

    Postmortem brain studies have shown abnormal levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid, in the frontal cortex (particularly the orbitofrontal cortex) of patients with depression, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. However, the results from regions in the frontal cortex other than the orbitofrontal cortex are inconsistent. In this study we investigated whether patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder have abnormalities in PUFA levels in the prefrontal cortex [Brodmann area (BA) 8]. In postmortem studies, fatty acids in the phospholipids of the prefrontal cortex (BA8) were evaluated by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography. Specimens were evaluated for patients with schizophrenia (n=15), bipolar disorder (n=15), or major depressive disorder (n=15) and compared with unaffected controls (n=15). In contrast to previous studies, we found no significant differences in the levels of PUFAs or other fatty acids in the prefrontal cortex (BA8) between patients and controls. Subanalysis by sex also showed no significant differences. No significant differences were found in any individual fatty acids between suicide and non-suicide cases. These psychiatric disorders might be characterized by very specific fatty acid compositions in certain areas of the brain, and BA8 might not be involved in abnormalities of PUFA metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A study of hippocampal shape anomaly in schizophrenia and in families multiply affected by schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

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    Connor, S.E.J. [Department of Neuroradiology, Kings Healthcare NHS Trust, King' s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, SE5 9RS, London (United Kingdom); Ng, V. [Department of Neuroimaging, Maudsley Hospital, London (United Kingdom); McDonald, C.; Schulze, K.; Morgan, K.; Dazzan, P.; Murray, R.M. [Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Hippocampal shape anomaly (HSA), characterised by a rounded hippocampus, has been documented in congenital malformations and epileptic patients. Subtle structural hippocampal abnormalities have been demonstrated in patients with schizophrenia. We tested the hypothesis that HSA is more frequent in schizophrenia, particularly in patients from families multiply affected by schizophrenia, and that HSA is transmitted within these families. We also aimed to define the anatomical features of the hippocampus and other cerebral structures in the HSA spectrum and to determine the prevalence of HSA in a control group. We reviewed the magnetic resonance imaging of a large number of subjects with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, many of who came from multiply affected families, relatives of the affected probands, and controls. Quantitative measures of hippocampal shape and position and other qualitative anatomical measures were performed (including depth of dominant sulcus cortical cap, angle of dominant sulcus and hippocampal fissure, bulk of collateral white matter, prominence of temporal horn lateral recess and blurring of internal hippocampal architecture) on subjects with HSA. A spectrum of mild, moderate and severe HSA was defined. The prevalence of HSA was, 7.8% for the controls (n=218), 9.3% for all schizophrenic subjects (n=151) and 12.3% for familial schizophrenic subjects (n=57). There was a greater prevalence of moderate or severe forms of HSA in familial schizophrenics than controls. However, there was no increase in the prevalence of HSA in the unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenic patients or in patients with familial bipolar disorder. HSA was rarely transmitted in families. HSA was frequently associated with a deep, vertical collateral/occipito-temporal sulcus and a steep hippocampal fissure. Our data raise the possibility that HSA is linked to disturbances of certain neurodevelopmental genes associated with schizophrenia. However, the lack of

  10. Do the Trajectories of Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia Follow a Universal Staging Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Anne; Malhi, Gin S; Grof, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to address the question of whether a universal staging model of severe psychiatric disorders is a viable direction for future research by examining the extant literature. A narrative review was conducted of the relevant historical, conceptual, and empirical literature pertaining to the clinical trajectory of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia and issues relevant to staging. There is substantive evidence that classic recurrent bipolar disorder is separable from schizophrenia on the basis of family history, developmental and clinical course, treatment response, and neurobiological findings. However, because of the intrinsic heterogeneity of diagnostic categories that has been amplified by recent changes in psychiatric taxonomy, key distinctions between the groups have become obfuscated. While mapping risk and illness markers to emerging psychopathology is a logical approach and may be of value for some psychiatric disorders and/or their clinical subtypes, robust evidence supporting identifiable stages per se is still lacking. Presently, even rudimentary stages such as prodromes cannot be meaningfully applied across different disorders and no commonalities can be found for the basis of universal staging. Advances in the prediction of risk, accurate early illness detection, and tailored intervention will require mapping biomarkers and other risk indicators to reliable clinical phases of illness progression. Given the capricious nature of mood and psychotic disorders, this task is likely to yield success only if conducted in narrowly defined subgroups of individuals at high risk for specific illnesses. This approach is diametrically opposite to that being promulgated by proponents of a universal staging model.

  11. Differences in parental bonding between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Evidence of prodromal symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Fernando Grilo; Passos, Ives C; Krolow, Ana Carla; Reckziegel, Ramiro; Vasconcelos-Moreno, Mirela Paiva; Spanemberg, Lucas; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia

    2015-07-01

    The Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) examines parent-child bonds and attachment during the first 16 years. Our study aims to compare PBI scores between patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD). We analyzed PBI scores in 59 patients with schizophrenia, 36 with BD and 52 healthy controls using ANCOVA, with age, gender and years of education as covariates. Bonferroni correction was used to adjust for multiple comparisons. PBI has maternal and paternal scores, each one with two domains: care and overprotection. In PBI maternal and paternal care domains, patients with schizophrenia showed significantly higher scores when compared with BD patients (pschizophrenia only showed significantly higher scores of PBI maternal care domain (p=0.037). BD patients showed significantly lower PBI care scores compared with healthy controls (maternal score: p=0.016; paternal score: pschizophrenia (p=0.004; p=0.021) and healthy controls (p=0.014; p=0.008); while no significant difference was observed between patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. "P values" are according to Bonferroni correction. There are significant differences in the perception of attachment between schizophrenia and BD. This finding may shed some light to better understand the prodromal symptoms of each disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of psychotic bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia: an international, multisite study.

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    Tondo, L; Vázquez, G H; Baethge, C; Baronessa, C; Bolzani, L; Koukopoulos, A; Mazzarini, L; Murru, A; Pacchiarotti, I; Pinna, M; Salvatore, P; Sani, G; Selle, V; Spalletta, G; Girardi, P; Tohen, M; Vieta, E; Baldessarini, R J

    2016-01-01

    Nosological distinctions among schizoaffective disorder (SA), bipolar I disorder with psychotic features (BDp), and schizophrenia (SZ) remain unresolved. We compared 2269 subjects with psychotic features in DSM-IV-TR diagnoses (1435 BDp, 463 SZ, 371 SA) from 8 collaborating international sites, by 12 sociodemographic and clinical measures, all between diagnostic pairs. In bivariate comparisons, SA was consistently intermediate between BDp and SZ for 11/12 features (except onset stressors), and SZ vs. BDp differed in all 12 factors. SA differed from both BDp and SZ in 9/12 factors: SA and BDp were similar in education and suicidal ideation or acts; SA and SZ were similar in education, onset stressors, and substance abuse. Meta-analytic comparisons of diagnostic pairs for 10 categorical factors indicated similar differences of SA from both SZ and BDp. Multivariate modeling indicated significantly independent differences between BDp and SZ (8 factors), SA vs. SZ (5), and BDp vs. SA (3). Measurement variance was similar for all diagnoses. SA was consistently intermediate between BDp and SZ. The three diagnostic groups ranked: BDp > SA > SZ related to lesser morbidity or disability. The findings are not consistent with a dyadic Kraepelinian categorization, although the considerable overlap among the three DSM-IV diagnostic groups indicates uncertain boundaries if they represent distinct disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, T H; Børglum, A D; Mors, O

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 22q may harbor risk genes for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder from the Faroe...... Islands were typed for 35 evenly distributed polymorphic markers on 22q in a search for shared risk genes in the two disorders. No single marker was strongly associated with either disease, but five two-marker segments that cluster within two regions on the chromosome have haplotypes occurring...... tested for the presence of a missense mutation in the WKL1 gene encoding a putative cation channel close to segment D22S1161--D22S922, which has been associated with schizophrenia. We did not find this mutation in schizophrenic or bipolar patients or the controls from the Faroe Islands....

  14. Quality of life in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: The impact of symptomatic remission and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, A; Mizuno, Y; Wartelsteiner, F; Wolfgang Fleischhacker, W; Frajo-Apor, B; Kemmler, G; Mimura, M; Pardeller, S; Sondermann, C; Suzuki, T; Welte, A; Uchida, H

    2017-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is significantly affected in individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder (BD-I). The current study investigated whether symptomatic remission and resilience might differently impact HRQOL in these patients. Fifty-two patients with schizophrenia and 60 patients suffering from BD-I from outpatient mental health services as well as 77 healthy control subjects from the general community were included into a cross-sectional study. HRQOL and resilience were assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF and the Resilience Scale. In patients, psychopathology was quantified by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale or the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively. Notably, both patient groups showed lower HRQOL and resilience compared to control subjects, non-remitted patients indicated lower HRQOL than remitted ones. The effect of remission on HRQOL was significantly larger in patients with BD-I than in those with schizophrenia but did not explain the difference in HRQOL between groups. Resilience predicted HRQOL in all three groups. When accounting for the effect of resilience among remitted patients, only the difference in HRQOL between schizophrenia patients and control subjects was significant. These findings demonstrate the impact of symptomatic remission and resilience on HRQOL of both patients suffering from schizophrenia and BD-I and indicate that these factors are especially relevant for HRQOL of patients with BD-I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Re-analysis of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia gene expression complements the Kraepelinian dichotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Kui; Di Lieto, Antonio; Corander, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) is based solely on clinical features and upon a subset of overlapping symptoms. Within the last years, an increasing amount of clinical, epidemiological and genetic data suggested inconsistent with the Kraepelinian dichotomy...... genes were shared between the syndromes. We identified genes of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional machineries altered in BD and genes of the development changed in SZ. Our results showed that the genomic expression profile of BD and SZ had some similarity but still could be well...

  16. Neurocognitive function in clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder: Comparisons with schizophrenia patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Yun; Wang, Peng-Wei; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2017-05-01

    This study compared the levels of the five domains of neurocognitive function-executive function, attention, memory, verbal comprehension, and perceptual organization-among clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder, individuals with long-term schizophrenia, and a group of controls. We recruited a total of 93 clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder, 94 individuals with schizophrenia, and 106 controls in this study. Their neurocognitive function was measured using a series of neurocognitive function tests: the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III), Line Cancellation Test, Visual Form Discrimination, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Continuous Performance Task, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition. Neurocognitive function was compared among the three groups through a multivariate analysis of variance. The results indicated that when the effect of age was controlled, clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder and those with schizophrenia demonstrated poor neurocognitive function on all tests except for the WAIS-III Similarity and Information and the Line Cancellation Test. The individuals with bipolar I disorder had similar levels of neurocognitive function compared with the schizophrenia group, but higher levels of neurocognitive function on the WAIS-III Comprehension, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and Wechsler Memory Scale-Third Edition Auditory Immediate and Delayed Index and Visual Immediate and Delayed Index. The conclusions of this study suggest that compared with controls, individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have poorer neurocognitive function, even when clinically stable. Individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have similar levels of deficits in several domains of neurocognitive function. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  17. Neurocognitive function in clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder: Comparisons with schizophrenia patients and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yun Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the levels of the five domains of neurocognitive function—executive function, attention, memory, verbal comprehension, and perceptual organization—among clinically stable individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder, individuals with long-term schizophrenia, and a group of controls. We recruited a total of 93 clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder, 94 individuals with schizophrenia, and 106 controls in this study. Their neurocognitive function was measured using a series of neurocognitive function tests: the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale—Third Edition (WAIS-III, Line Cancellation Test, Visual Form Discrimination, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Continuous Performance Task, and Wechsler Memory Scale—Third Edition. Neurocognitive function was compared among the three groups through a multivariate analysis of variance. The results indicated that when the effect of age was controlled, clinically stable individuals with bipolar I disorder and those with schizophrenia demonstrated poor neurocognitive function on all tests except for the WAIS-III Similarity and Information and the Line Cancellation Test. The individuals with bipolar I disorder had similar levels of neurocognitive function compared with the schizophrenia group, but higher levels of neurocognitive function on the WAIS-III Comprehension, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and Wechsler Memory Scale—Third Edition Auditory Immediate and Delayed Index and Visual Immediate and Delayed Index. The conclusions of this study suggest that compared with controls, individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have poorer neurocognitive function, even when clinically stable. Individuals with long-term bipolar I disorder and those with long-term schizophrenia have similar levels of deficits in several domains of neurocognitive function.

  18. Decreased expression of Sprouty2 in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a correlation with BDNF expression.

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    Anilkumar Pillai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current theories on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia suggest altered brain plasticity such as decreased neural proliferation and migration, delayed myelination, and abnormal synaptic modeling, in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia. Though functional alterations in BDNF, which plays important role in neuroplasticity, are implicated in many abnormalities found in schizophrenia, the regulatory mechanism(s involved in the abnormal signaling of BDNF in schizophrenia is not clear. The present study investigated whether Sprouty2, a regulator of growth factor signaling, is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia, and is associated with the changes in BDNF mRNA in this disorder. The potential effect of antipsychotic drugs on Sprouty2 expression was tested in adult rats. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sprouty2 and BDNF gene expression were analyzed in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from the Stanley Array Collection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of RNA in 100 individuals (35 with schizophrenia, 31 with bipolar disorder, and 34 psychiatrically normal controls showed significantly decreased expression of Sprouty2 and BDNF in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Moreover, a significant correlation between these two genes existed in control, schizophrenia and bipolar subjects. Long-term treatment with antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol and olanzapine, showed differential effects on both Sprouty2 and BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the frontal cortex of rats. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrating decreased expression of Sprouty2 associated with changes in BDNF, suggest the possibility that these decreases are secondary to treatment rather than to factors that are significant in the disease process of either schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. Further exploration of Sprouty2-related signal transduction pathways may be helpful to design novel treatment strategies for these disorders.

  19. Decreased expression of Sprouty2 in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a correlation with BDNF expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anilkumar

    2008-03-12

    Current theories on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia suggest altered brain plasticity such as decreased neural proliferation and migration, delayed myelination, and abnormal synaptic modeling, in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia. Though functional alterations in BDNF, which plays important role in neuroplasticity, are implicated in many abnormalities found in schizophrenia, the regulatory mechanism(s) involved in the abnormal signaling of BDNF in schizophrenia is not clear. The present study investigated whether Sprouty2, a regulator of growth factor signaling, is abnormally expressed in schizophrenia, and is associated with the changes in BDNF mRNA in this disorder. The potential effect of antipsychotic drugs on Sprouty2 expression was tested in adult rats. Sprouty2 and BDNF gene expression were analyzed in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex samples from the Stanley Array Collection. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of RNA in 100 individuals (35 with schizophrenia, 31 with bipolar disorder, and 34 psychiatrically normal controls) showed significantly decreased expression of Sprouty2 and BDNF in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Moreover, a significant correlation between these two genes existed in control, schizophrenia and bipolar subjects. Long-term treatment with antipsychotic drugs, haloperidol and olanzapine, showed differential effects on both Sprouty2 and BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the frontal cortex of rats. These findings demonstrating decreased expression of Sprouty2 associated with changes in BDNF, suggest the possibility that these decreases are secondary to treatment rather than to factors that are significant in the disease process of either schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. Further exploration of Sprouty2-related signal transduction pathways may be helpful to design novel treatment strategies for these disorders.

  20. Cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: a systematic review of meta-analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortolato B

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Bortolato,1 Kamilla W Miskowiak,2 Cristiano A Köhler,3 Eduard Vieta,4 André F Carvalho3 1Department of Mental Health, ULSS 10 “Veneto Orientale”, Venice, Italy; 2Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Translational Psychiatry Research Group and Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Brazil; 4Bipolar Disorders Program, Institute of Neuroscience, Hospital Clínic Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain Abstract: Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD. A neurocognitive profile characterized by widespread cognitive deficits across multiple domains in the context of substantial intellectual impairment, which appears to antedate illness onset, is a replicated finding in SZ. There is no specific neuropsychological signature that can facilitate the diagnostic differentiation of SZ and BD, notwithstanding, neuropsychological deficits appear more severe in SZ. The literature in this field has provided contradictory results due to methodological differences across studies. Meta-analytic techniques may offer an opportunity to synthesize findings and to control for potential sources of heterogeneity. Here, we performed a systematic review of meta-analyses of neuropsychological findings in SZ and BD. While there is no conclusive evidence for progressive cognitive deterioration in either SZ or BD, some findings point to more severe cognitive deficits in patients with early illness onset across both disorders. A compromised pattern of cognitive functioning in individuals at familiar and/or clinical risk to psychosis as well as in first-degree relatives of BD patients suggests that early neurodevelopmental factors may play a role in the emergence of cognitive deficits in both disorders. Premorbid intellectual impairment in SZ and at least in a

  1. Common and disease-specific dysfunctions of brain systems underlying attentional and executive control in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Tobias; Wolter, Sarah; Falck, Stefanie; Wild, Eva; Wild, Florian; Gruber, Eva; Falkai, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder broadly overlap in multiple areas involving clinical phenomenology, genetics, and neurobiology. Still, the investigation into specific elementary (sub-)processes of executive functioning may help to define clear points of distinction between these categorical diagnoses to validate the nosological dichotomy and, indirectly, to further elucidate their pathophysiological underpinnings. In the present behavioral study, we sought to separate common from diagnosis-specific deficits in a series of specific elementary sub-functions of executive processing in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. For our purpose, we administered a modern and multi-purpose neuropsychological task paradigm to equal-sized and matched groups of schizophrenia patients, patients with bipolar disorder, and healthy control subjects. First, schizophrenia patients compared to the bipolar group exhibited a more pronounced deficit in general measures of task performance comprising both response speed and accuracy. Additionally, bipolar patients showed increased advance task preparation, i.e., were better able to compensate for response speed deficits when longer preparation intervals were provided. Set-shifting, on the other hand, was impaired to a similar degree in both patient groups. Finally, schizophrenia patients exhibited a specific deficit in conflict processing (inhibitory control) and the shielding of task-relevant processing from distraction (i.e., attentional maintenance). The present investigation suggests that specific neuropsychological measures of elementary executive functions may represent important points of dissociation between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, which may help to differentiate the pathophysiological underpinnings of these major psychiatric disorders. In this context, the present findings highlight the measures of inhibitory control and attentional maintenance as promising candidates.

  2. Fractal analysis of MRI data for the characterization of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squarcina, Letizia; De Luca, Alberto; Bellani, Marcella; Brambilla, Paolo; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2015-02-01

    Fractal geometry can be used to analyze shape and patterns in brain images. With this study we use fractals to analyze T1 data of patients affected by schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, with the aim of distinguishing between healthy and pathological brains using the complexity of brain structure, in particular of grey matter, as a marker of disease. 39 healthy volunteers, 25 subjects affected by schizophrenia and 11 patients affected by bipolar disorder underwent an MRI session. We evaluated fractal dimension of the brain cortex and its substructures, calculated with an algorithm based on the box-count algorithm. We modified this algorithm, with the aim of avoiding the segmentation processing step and using all the information stored in the image grey levels. Moreover, to increase sensitivity to local structural changes, we computed a value of fractal dimension for each slice of the brain or of the particular structure. To have reference values in comparing healthy subjects with patients, we built a template by averaging fractal dimension values of the healthy volunteers data. Standard deviation was evaluated and used to create a confidence interval. We also performed a slice by slice t-test to assess the difference at slice level between the three groups. Consistent average fractal dimension values were found across all the structures in healthy controls, while in the pathological groups we found consistent differences, indicating a change in brain and structures complexity induced by these disorders.

  3. Fractal analysis of MRI data for the characterization of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squarcina, Letizia; De Luca, Alberto; Bellani, Marcella; Brambilla, Paolo; Turkheimer, Federico E; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2015-02-21

    Fractal geometry can be used to analyze shape and patterns in brain images. With this study we use fractals to analyze T1 data of patients affected by schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, with the aim of distinguishing between healthy and pathological brains using the complexity of brain structure, in particular of grey matter, as a marker of disease. 39 healthy volunteers, 25 subjects affected by schizophrenia and 11 patients affected by bipolar disorder underwent an MRI session. We evaluated fractal dimension of the brain cortex and its substructures, calculated with an algorithm based on the box-count algorithm. We modified this algorithm, with the aim of avoiding the segmentation processing step and using all the information stored in the image grey levels. Moreover, to increase sensitivity to local structural changes, we computed a value of fractal dimension for each slice of the brain or of the particular structure. To have reference values in comparing healthy subjects with patients, we built a template by averaging fractal dimension values of the healthy volunteers data. Standard deviation was evaluated and used to create a confidence interval. We also performed a slice by slice t-test to assess the difference at slice level between the three groups. Consistent average fractal dimension values were found across all the structures in healthy controls, while in the pathological groups we found consistent differences, indicating a change in brain and structures complexity induced by these disorders.

  4. Measuring pathology using the PANSS across diagnoses: Inconsistency of the positive symptom domain across schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ariana E; Mansolf, Maxwell; Reise, Steven P; Savitz, Adam; Salvadore, Giacomo; Li, Qingqin; Bilder, Robert M

    2017-12-01

    Although the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was developed for use in schizophrenia (SZ), antipsychotic drug trials use the PANSS to measure symptom change also for bipolar (BP) and schizoaffective (SA) disorder, extending beyond its original indications. If the dimensions measured by the PANSS are different across diagnoses, then the same score change for the same drug condition may have different meanings depending on which group is being studied. Here, we evaluated whether the factor structure in the PANSS was consistent across schizophrenia (n = 3647), bipolar disorder (n = 858), and schizoaffective disorder (n = 592). Along with congruency coefficients, Hancock's H, and Jaccard indices, we used target rotations and statistical tests of invariance based on confirmatory factor models. We found the five symptom dimensions measured by the 30-item PANSS did not generalize well to schizoaffective and bipolar disorders. A model based on an 18-item version of the PANSS generalized better across SZ and BP groups, but significant problems remained in generalizing some of the factors to the SA sample. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder showed greater similarity in factor structure than did schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. The Anxiety/Depression factor was the most consistent across disorders, while the Positive factor was the least consistent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical and biological correlates of resilience in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuya; Hofer, Alex; Suzuki, Takefumi; Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Wartelsteiner, Fabienne; Kemmler, Georg; Saruta, Juri; Tsukinoki, Keiichi; Mimura, Masaru; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    The concept of resilience is relevant in understanding the heterogeneous outcomes noted in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, clinical and biological correlates of resilience in these populations have rarely been investigated. We aimed to identify key correlates of subjective resilience in such patients using comprehensive assessments and to explore associations between resilience levels and peripheral biomarkers. 180 subjects with DSM-IV schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and healthy controls (60 per group) were included. Demographic and clinical variables were assessed by means of interview and various psychometric scales. Furthermore, blood and saliva samples were obtained for the assessment of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and alpha-amylase levels. Cross-sectional associations with resilience, as assessed by the 25-item Resilience Scale were sought. Resilience Scale total scores were significantly higher in healthy individuals (130.1, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 124.8-135.4) compared to subjects with schizophrenia (109.9, 95% CI: 104.6-115.2, presilience in all three groups. In addition, internalized stigma and depression were relevant factors in the schizophrenia and bipolar disorder group, respectively. Correlations between resilience levels and peripheral biomarkers did not reach significance. Although causal relationships must be confirmed in prospective studies, our results have implications in developing psychological interventions to enhance resilience in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The biological correlates of resilience in these populations warrant further investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The visual P3a in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: effects of target and distractor stimuli on the P300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G

    2012-05-15

    Amplitude reduction of the P300 event-related potential has long been suggested as a marker for schizophrenia. However, recent research has shown that this reduction in the P300 amplitude is not specific to schizophrenia as it can also be observed in related illnesses such as bipolar disorder. Due to this lack of specificity the P300 elicited using traditional oddball paradigms may be a less valuable endophenotypic marker. The current study employed a cognitively demanding three-stimulus oddball paradigm to elicit the P300 to visual target and distracting stimuli. Patients with schizophrenia showed amplitude reductions of P300 components to targets, distractors and frequent stimuli. The P300 in patients with bipolar disorder was not significantly different from either group. The pattern of results may further the understanding of the nature of the impairment in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clustered coding variants in the glutamate receptor complexes of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René A W Frank

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Current models of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder implicate multiple genes, however their biological relationships remain elusive. To test the genetic role of glutamate receptors and their interacting scaffold proteins, the exons of ten glutamatergic 'hub' genes in 1304 individuals were re-sequenced in case and control samples. No significant difference in the overall number of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs was observed between cases and controls. However, cluster analysis of nsSNPs identified two exons encoding the cysteine-rich domain and first transmembrane helix of GRM1 as a risk locus with five mutations highly enriched within these domains. A new splice variant lacking the transmembrane GPCR domain of GRM1 was discovered in the human brain and the GRM1 mutation cluster could perturb the regulation of this variant. The predicted effect on individuals harbouring multiple mutations distributed in their ten hub genes was also examined. Diseased individuals possessed an increased load of deleteriousness from multiple concurrent rare and common coding variants. Together, these data suggest a disease model in which the interplay of compound genetic coding variants, distributed among glutamate receptors and their interacting proteins, contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

  8. Cortical Morphology Characteristics of Young Offspring of Patients With Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugranyes, Gisela; Solé-Padullés, Cristina; de la Serna, Elena; Borras, Roger; Romero, Soledad; Sanchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Garcia-Rizo, Clemente; Goikolea, Jose Manuel; Bargallo, Nuria; Moreno, Dolores; Baeza, Inmaculada; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2017-01-01

    Cortical surface area and thickness abnormalities have been observed in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders; however, no study thus far has examined cortical morphologic measurements in children and adolescents at genetic risk for the disorders comparatively. One hundred thirty-seven participants, including 36 offspring of patients with schizophrenia (SzO), 54 offspring of patients with bipolar disorder (BpO), and 47 offspring of community controls (CcO), 6 to 17 years old, were assessed with clinical and neuroimaging methods. Sixty-nine percent of the sample was reassessed at a 27.6-month (mean) follow-up. Cortical surface reconstruction was applied to measure cortical area and thickness using FreeSurfer; mixed-effects models were used to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal differences in global and lobar morphologic measurements. The SzO group exhibited a cross-sectional decrease in global, parietal, and occipital lobe surface area compared with the CcO group, and in the occipital lobe compared with the BpO group. In the SzO group, global and parietal surface area values were inversely associated with attenuated positive and negative prodromal symptom scores. No cross-sectional differences in cortical thickness were observed. Division of the sample by pubertal status showed group-by-time interactions in the pubertal and postpubertal SzO subgroup, with less longitudinal decrease in cortical surface area and thickness than in the CcO and BpO subgroups, respectively. The SzO, but not the BpO, group was characterized by cross-sectional decreases in surface area, and this was associated with prodromal symptoms. Longitudinal changes in cortical morphology associated with risk for schizophrenia may be expressed differently according to developmental stage. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased MRI-based cortical grey/white-matter contrast in sensory and motor regions in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, K N; Nerland, S; Norbom, L B; Doan, N T; Nesvåg, R; Mørch-Johnsen, L; Haukvik, U K; Melle, I; Andreassen, O A; Westlye, L T; Agartz, I

    2016-07-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share genetic risk factors and one possible illness mechanism is abnormal myelination. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue intensities are sensitive to myelin content. Therefore, the contrast between grey- and white-matter intensities may reflect myelination along the cortical surface. MRI images were obtained from patients with schizophrenia (n = 214), bipolar disorder (n = 185), and healthy controls (n = 278) and processed in FreeSurfer. The grey/white-matter contrast was computed at each vertex as the difference between average grey-matter intensity (sampled 0-60% into the cortical ribbon) and average white-matter intensity (sampled 0-1.5 mm into subcortical white matter), normalized by their average. Group differences were tested using linear models covarying for age and sex. Patients with schizophrenia had increased contrast compared to controls bilaterally in the post- and precentral gyri, the transverse temporal gyri and posterior insulae, and in parieto-occipital regions. In bipolar disorder, increased contrast was primarily localized in the left precentral gyrus. There were no significant differences between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Findings of increased contrast remained after adjusting for cortical area, thickness, and gyrification. We found no association with antipsychotic medication dose. Increased contrast was found in highly myelinated low-level sensory and motor regions in schizophrenia, and to a lesser extent in bipolar disorder. We propose that these findings indicate reduced intracortical myelin. In accordance with the corollary discharge hypothesis, this could cause disinhibition of sensory input, resulting in distorted perceptual processing leading to the characteristic positive symptoms of schizophrenia.

  10. Association between ST8SIA2 and the Risk of Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder across Diagnostic Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, So Yung; Huh, Ik Soo; Baek, Ji Hyun; Cho, Eun-Young; Choi, Mi Ji; Ryu, Seunghyong; Kim, Ji Sun; Park, Taesung; Ha, Kyooseob; Hong, Kyung Sue

    2015-01-01

    Findings from family studies and recent genome-wide association studies have indicated overlap in the risk genes between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD). After finding a linkage between the ST8SIA2 (ST8 alpha-N-acetyl-neuraminide alpha-2, 8-sicalyltransferase 2 gene) locus (15q26) and mixed families with schizophrenia and BD, several studies have reported a significant association between this gene and schizophrenia or BD. We investigated the genetic association between ST8SIA2 and both schizophrenia and BD in the Korean population. A total of 582 patients with schizophrenia, 339 patients with BD, and 502 healthy controls were included. Thirty-one tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the ST8SIA2 region and three other SNPs showing significant associations in previous studies were genotyped. The associations were evaluated by logistic regression analysis using additive, dominant, and recessive genetic models. Fourteen of 34 SNPs showed a nominally significant association (p schizophrenia and combined schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder (BD-I) groups. The strongest association was observed in rs11637898 for schizophrenia (p = 0.0033) and BD-I (p = 0.0050) under the dominant model. The association between rs11637898 and the combined schizophrenia and BD-I group (p = 0.0006, under the dominant model) remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. We identified a possible role of ST8SIA2 in the common susceptibility of schizophrenia and BD-I. However, no association trend was observed for bipolar II disorder. Further efforts are needed to identify a specific phenotype associated with this gene crossing the current diagnostic categories.

  11. Fine mapping of ZNF804A and genome-wide significant evidence for its involvement in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, H J

    2011-04-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) reported evidence for association between rs1344706 within ZNF804A (encoding zinc-finger protein 804A) and schizophrenia (P=1.61 × 10(-7)), and stronger evidence when the phenotype was broadened to include bipolar disorder (P=9.96 × 10(-9)). In this study we provide additional evidence for association through meta-analysis of a larger data set (schizophrenia\\/schizoaffective disorder N=18 945, schizophrenia plus bipolar disorder N=21 274 and controls N=38 675). We also sought to better localize the association signal using a combination of de novo polymorphism discovery in exons, pooled de novo polymorphism discovery spanning the genomic sequence of the locus and high-density linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping. The meta-analysis provided evidence for association between rs1344706 that surpasses widely accepted benchmarks of significance by several orders of magnitude for both schizophrenia (P=2.5 × 10(-11), odds ratio (OR) 1.10, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.14) and schizophrenia and bipolar disorder combined (P=4.1 × 10(-13), OR 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.14). After de novo polymorphism discovery and detailed association analysis, rs1344706 remained the most strongly associated marker in the gene. The allelic association at the ZNF804A locus is now one of the most compelling in schizophrenia to date, and supports the accumulating data suggesting overlapping genetic risk between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

  12. Systematic review of appropriate cognitive assessment instruments used in clinical trials of schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkour, Nadia; Samp, Jennifer; Akhras, Kasem; El Hammi, Emna; Soussi, Imen; Zahra, Fatma; Duru, Gérard; Kooli, Amna; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-05-30

    Cognitive dysfunction is increasingly recognized as a symptom in mental conditions including schizophrenia, major depressive disorder (MDD), and bipolar disorder (BPD). Despite the many available cognitive assessment instruments, consensus is lacking on their appropriate use in clinical trials. We conducted a systematic literature review in Embase, PubMed/Medline and PsychINFO to identify appropriate cognitive function instruments for use in clinical trials of schizophrenia, MDD, and BPD. Instruments were identified from the articles. Instruments and articles were excluded if they did not address schizophrenia, MDD, or BPD. Instrument appropriateness was further assessed by the criteria of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) initiative: test-retest reliability, utility, relationship to functional status, potential changeability to pharmacological agents, and tolerability and practicality for clinical trials. The database search yielded 173 articles describing 150 instruments used to assess cognitive function. Seventeen additional instruments were identified through Google and clinicaltrials.gov. Among all these, only 30 (18%) were deemed appropriate for use in the diseases of interest. Of these, 27 were studied in schizophrenia, one in MDD and two in BPD. These findings suggest the need for careful selection of appropriate cognitive assessment instruments, as not all may be valid in these disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of Per3 length polymorphism with bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ramanujam Karthikeyan,1 Ganapathy Marimuthu,1 Chellamuthu Ramasubramanian,2 Gautham Arunachal,2 Ahmed S BaHammam,3 David Warren Spence,4 Daniel P Cardinali,5 Gregory M Brown,6 Seithikurippu R Pandi-Perumal7 1Department of Animal Behaviour and Physiology, School of Biological Sciences, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai, India; 2MS Chellamuthu Trust and Research Foundation, KK Nagar, Madurai, India; 3University Sleep Disorders Center, College of Medicine, National Plan for Science and Technology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Independent researcher, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 5Department of Teaching and Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 6Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; 7Center for Healthful Behavior Change (CHBC, Division of Health and Behavior, Department of Population Health, NYU Langone Medical Center, Clinical and Translational Research Institute, New York, New York, USA Background: Sleep–wake disturbances have frequently been reported in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and are considered to be caused by an underlying circadian rhythm disorder. The study presented here was designed to investigate the existence of Per3 polymorphism in bipolar disorder type I (BD-I and schizophrenic patients in South India.Methods: Blood samples were collected from 311 BD-I patients, 293 schizophrenia patients, and 346 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Per3 genotyping was performed on DNA by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers.Results: An increased prevalence of five repeat homozygotes was seen in BD-I patients as compared with healthy controls (odds ratio =1.72 [95% confidence interval: 1.08–2.76, P=0.02]. In BD-I patients, the frequency of the five repeat allele was higher (allele frequency =0.41, and that of the four repeat allele lower (allele frequency =0.36 (χ2=4.634; P<0.03 than in

  14. Fatty acid composition of the postmortem corpus callosum of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, K; Maekawa, M; Toyota, T; Dean, B; Hamazaki, T; Yoshikawa, T

    2017-01-01

    Studies investigating the relationship between n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels and psychiatric disorders have thus far focused mainly on analyzing gray matter, rather than white matter, in the postmortem brain. In this study, we investigated whether PUFA levels showed abnormalities in the corpus callosum, the largest area of white matter, in the postmortem brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder. Fatty acids in the phospholipids of the postmortem corpus callosum were evaluated by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. Specimens were evaluated for patients with schizophrenia (n=15), bipolar disorder (n=15), or major depressive disorder (n=15) and compared with unaffected controls (n=15). In contrast to some previous studies, no significant differences were found in the levels of PUFAs or other fatty acids in the corpus callosum between patients and controls. A subanalysis by sex gave the same results. No significant differences were found in any PUFAs between suicide completers and non-suicide cases regardless of psychiatric disorder diagnosis. Patients with psychiatric disorders did not exhibit n-3 PUFAs deficits in the postmortem corpus callosum relative to the unaffected controls, and the corpus callosum might not be involved in abnormalities of PUFA metabolism. This area of research is still at an early stage and requires further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduced heart rate variability in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, D S; Westlye, L T; Kaufmann, T; Rustan, Ø G; Brandt, C L; Haatveit, B; Steen, N E; Andreassen, O A

    2016-01-01

    Despite current diagnostic systems distinguishing schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) as separate diseases, emerging evidence suggests they share a number of clinical and epidemiological features, such as increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. It is not well understood if poor cardiac autonomic nervous system regulation, which can be indexed non-invasively by the calculation of heart rate variability (HRV), contributes to these common CVD risk factors in both diseases. We calculated HRV in 47 patients with SZ, 33 patients with BD and 212 healthy controls. Measures of symptom severity were also collected from the patient groups. Heart rate variability was significantly reduced in both these disorders in comparison with the healthy participants; however, there were no HRV differences between disorders. Importantly, these reductions were independent of the medication, age or body mass index effects. There was also preliminary evidence that patients with reduced HRV had increased overall and negative psychosis symptom severity regardless of SZ or BD diagnosis. We suggest that HRV may provide a possible biomarker of CVD risk and symptom severity in severe mental illness. Thus, our results highlight the importance of cardiometabolic screening across SZ and bipolar spectrum disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: The road from similarities and clinical heterogeneity to neurobiological types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacquino, Claudia; De Rossi, Pietro; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2015-09-20

    Although diagnosis is a central issue in medical care, in psychiatry its value is still controversial. The function of diagnosis is to indicate treatments and to help clinicians take better care of patients. The fundamental role of diagnosis is to predict outcome and prognosis. To date serious concern persists regarding the clinical utility and predictive validity of the diagnosis system in psychiatry, which is at the most syndromal. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, which nosologists consider two distinct disorders, are the most discussed psychiatric illnesses. Recent findings in different fields of psychiatric research, such as neuroimaging, neuropathology, neuroimmunology, neuropsychology and genetics, have led to other conceptualizations. Individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder vary greatly with regard to symptoms, illness course, treatment response, cognitive and functional impairment and biological correlates. In fact, it is possible to find heterogeneous correlates even within the same syndrome, i.e., from one stage of the disorder to another. Thus, it is possible to identify different subsyndromes, which share some clinical and neurobiological characteristics. The main goal of modern psychiatry is to ovethrow these barriers and to obtain a better understanding of the biological profiles underlying heterogeneous clinical features and thus reduce the variance and lead to a homogeneous definition. The translational research model, which connects the basic neuroscience research field with clinical experience in psychiatry, aims to investigate different neurobiological features of syndromes and of the shared neurobiological features between two syndromes. In fact, this approach should help us to better understand the neurobiological pathways underlying clinical entities, and even to distinguish different, more homogeneous, diagnostic subtypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Verbal episodic memory along the course of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepielewski, Letícia S; Massuda, Raffael; Goi, Pedro; Sulzbach-Vianna, Miréia; Reckziegel, Ramiro; Costanzi, Monise; Kapczinski, Flavio; Rosa, Adriane R; Gama, Clarissa S

    2015-02-01

    Impairment on episodic memory (EM) has been strongly correlated with psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). Morevover, the effects of course and progression of the illness on cognitive functioning have not been well established. The aim of the present study is to assess performance of episodic memory in BD and SZ according to their clinical stages. Subjects who met DSM-IV criteria for bipolar disorder (n=43) and schizophrenia (31), on euthymia or clinical remission, were recruited from the outpatients facilities at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (Brazil). They were classified into two clinical stages (early or late for BD, and recent onset or chronic for SZ) and compared to 54 healthy controls. Episodic memory performance was assessed by means the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) that measures verbal learning and episodic memory in both disorders. Our results showed that patients in early stage of BD (EBD) performed better performance on the total immediate free recall (p<0.0001, F=12.060) as well as in delayed free recall (p<0.0001, F=13.914) compared to late stage (LBD) and SZ groups. In the ability to retain words learned, LBD and chronic (CSZ) were more impaired than other groups. Furthermore, the variation of learning (i.e, learning effects) along the 3 trials of immediate free recall was similar between groups. In conclusion, we found a cognitive decline alongside with the progression of BD whereas such impairment was evident in the early of SZ. Despite this, both groups (BD and SZ) seem to maintain the ability to learn. It emphasizes the relevance of studying new therapeutic strategies, in particular, cognitive rehabilitation/remediation techniques as promissory treatment for psychiatric patients, even in those with moderate disabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  18. Altered prefrontal cortical MARCKS and PPP1R9A mRNA expression in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopaske, Glenn T; Subburaju, Sivan; Coyle, Joseph T; Benes, Francine M

    2015-05-01

    We previously observed dendritic spine loss in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder subjects. In the current study, we sought to determine if the mRNA expression of genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton and spines correlated with spine loss. Five candidate genes were identified using previously obtained microarray data from the DLPFC from schizophrenia and control subjects. The relative mRNA expression of the genes linked to dendritic spine growth and function, i.e. IGF1R, MARCKS, PPP1R9A, PTPRF, and ARHGEF2, was assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in the DLPFC from a second cohort including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and control subjects. Functional pathway analysis was conducted to determine which actin cytoskeleton-regulatory pathways the genes of interest interact with. MARCKS mRNA expression was increased in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder subjects. PPP1R9A mRNA expression was increased in bipolar disorder subjects. For IGF1R, mRNA expression did not differ significantly among groups; however, it did show a significant, negative correlation with dendrite length. MARCKS and PPP1R9A mRNA expression did not correlate with spine loss, but they interact with NMDA receptor signaling pathways that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and spines. MARCKS and PPP1R9A might contribute to spine loss in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder through their interactions, possibly indirect ones, with NMDA signaling pathways that regulate spine structure and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cortical thickness, cortical surface area and subcortical volumes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients with cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartberg, Cecilie Bhandari; Lange, Elisabeth H; Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Haukvik, Unn K; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Cannabis is associated with increased risk for severe mental illness and is commonly used among individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. In this study we investigated associations between cannabis use and brain structures among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for 77 schizophrenia and 55 bipolar patients with a history of cannabis use (defined as lifetime use >10 times during one month or abuse/dependence), and 97 schizophrenia, 85 bipolar disorder patients and 277 healthy controls without any previous cannabis use. Cortical thickness, cortical surface area and subcortical volumes were compared between groups. Both hypothesis-driven region-of-interest analyses from 11 preselected brain regions in each hemisphere and exploratory point-by-point analyses were performed. We tested for diagnostic interactions and controlled for potential confounders. After controlling for confounders such as tobacco use and alcohol use disorders we found reduced cortical thickness in the caudal middle frontal gyrus compared to non-user patients and healthy controls. The findings were not significant when patients with co-morbid alcohol and illicit drug use were excluded from the analyses, but onset of cannabis use before illness onset was associated with cortical thinning in the caudal middle frontal gyrus. To conclude, we found no structural brain changes associated with cannabis use among patients with severe mental illness, but the findings indicate excess cortical thinning among those who use cannabis before illness onset. The present findings support the understanding that cannabis use is associated with limited brain effects in schizophrenia as well as bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  20. A register based epidemiological description of risk factors and outcomes for major psychiatric disorders, focusing on a comparison between bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk

    2006-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the results from 3 cohort studies describing risk factors for and mortality of major psychiatric disorders with focus on comparison between schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Furthermore, the results are evaluated in the context of the dichotomization...... of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. The studies were based on four Danish registers: the Psychiatric Central Register, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Cause of Death Register, and the Danish Medical Birth Register. From the registers, large population based cohorts were identified...... and followed over several decades. Survival analysis techniques were applied to identify risk factors and mortality rates. The results demonstrated an overlap in risk factors for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. Excess mortality (compared to persons never admitted with a psychiatric disorder...

  1. Efficacy of Atypical Antipsychotics in the Management of Acute Agitation and Aggression in Hospitalized Patients with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder: Results from a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Correll, Christoph U; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Xu, Yifeng; Huang, Jizhong; Yang, Fude; Wang, Gang; Si, Tianmei; Kane, John M; Masand, Prakash

    2016-10-25

    Acute agitation and aggression are common symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss the prevalence, clinical assessment strategies, treatment options, and current Western and Chinese guidelines for the management of acute agitation and aggression in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Among available approaches, we discuss in detail recent evidence supporting the use of intramuscular (IM) antipsychotics and some recently approved oral atypical antipsychotics for the management of acute aggression and agitation in hospitalized patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia presenting with acute agitation or aggression, highlighting some differences between individual antipsychotic agents.

  2. Subjective Versus Objective Weight Gain During Acute Treatment With Second-Generation Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Keming; Fang, Fang; Wang, Zuowei; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2016-12-01

    To compare objective and subjective weight gain of second-generation antipsychotics in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. English-language literature published and cited in PubMed (MEDLINE) from January 1966 to December 2015 was searched with the keywords antipsychotic, atypical antipsychotic, or generic/brand name of atypical antipsychotics, and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, bipolar mania, or bipolar depression, and safety, tolerability, weight gain, and randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. The absolute risk increases and the numbers needed to treat to harm (NNH) for ≥7% weight gain (objective) and self-report weight gain (subjective) were estimated. In schizophrenia, the NNH for 7% or greater weight gain ranged from 5 to 62, and the NNH for self-reported weight gain was from 11 to -224. The ratio of self-reported NNH to 7% or greater NNH was from 1.5 to 8.0. In bipolar mania, the NNH for 7% or greater weight gain ranged from 7 to -101 and the NNH for self-reported weight gain was from 13 to 84. The ratio of self-reported NNH to 7% or greater NNH was from 0.9 to 2.5. In bipolar depression, the NNH for 7% or greater weight gain ranged from 5 to 69, and the NNH for self-reported weight gain was from 8 to 17. The ratio of self-reported NNH to 7% or greater NNH was 1.2 to 1.6. Subjective reporting underestimated the risk of antipsychotic-related weight gain compared with objectively measured weight change. Self-awareness of antipsychotic-related weight gain was lower in patients with schizophrenia than in patients with bipolar disorder. Measuring weight change during antipsychotic treatment should be a routine practice.

  3. Social and clinical comparison between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder type I with psychosis in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Adriana; Barguil, Marcela; Contreras, Javier; Montero, Patricia; Dassori, Albana; Escamilla, Michael A; Raventós, Henriette

    2010-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SC) and bipolar disorder (BP) are two of the most severe and incapacitating mental disorders. It has been questioned whether these two conditions designate distinct illnesses with different etiologies or whether they represent different ends of a clinical spectrum with a common etiology. This study compares social and clinical characteristics of 84 SC and 84 BP subjects from the Costa Rican Central Valley (CRCV) using information from the DIGS, FIGS and psychiatric records. Each of these subjects had a best estimate lifetime consensus diagnosis of either bipolar type I or SC. Subjects with SC differed from subjects with BP in social adjustment measures like marital and employment status, and number of children. Both groups were very similar in years of education, age of onset of their illness, history of other psychiatric co-morbidities, and treatment received. The high percentage of psychosis in the BP group (97.6%) may largely explain the similarities found between groups in their clinical characteristics. The differences in social and functional decline support the original dichotomy described by Kraepelin based on chronicity and periodicity between these two psychotic disorders.

  4. A first national survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and autism in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durand-Zaleski Isabelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to support evidence-based policies for reduction of stigma, a better understanding of its components: ignorance (knowledge, prejudice (attitude and discrimination (behaviour is necessary. This study explores public perceptions and quantifies stigma for three chronic mental disorders: autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in France. Methods Survey of 1000 adults selected from an established market research panel. The 21-item questionnaire explored knowledge, attitudes and behaviours toward each disorder. Results Although 95% respondents recognized the names of each disorder fewer than 70% could report specific characteristics and only 33% considered that publically available information was adequate; most respondents identified the media as their main resource. Labeling of conditions in a negative way was frequent (61% when referring to mental disorders in general, but fell significantly (18% when linked to an individual with a disorder. Individuals with schizophrenia are assumed to be dangerous; 65% respondents would engage in social distancing from such an individual, versus 29% for bipolar disorders and 7% for autism (p  Conclusion This first population-based survey in France shows that attitudes towards bipolar disorders and autism are less prejudicial than towards schizophrenia. However, most public attitudes and behaviours towards different disorders appear to be based on assumptions rather than knowledge or evidence suggesting a generic information or anti-stigma programme is unlikely to be effective.

  5. Dynamic Connectivity States Estimated from Resting fMRI Identify Differences among Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Healthy Control Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnaly eRashid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share significant overlap in clinical symptoms, brain characteristics, and risk genes, and both are associated with dysconnectivity among large-scale brain networks. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data facilitates studying macroscopic connectivity among distant brain regions. Standard approaches to identifying such connectivity include seed-based correlation and data-driven clustering methods such as independent component analysis (ICA but typically focus on average connectivity. In this study, we utilize ICA on rsfMRI data to obtain intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs in cohorts of healthy controls (HC and age matched schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients. Subsequently, we investigated difference in functional network connectivity (FNC, defined as pairwise correlations among the timecourses of ICNs, between healthy controls and patients. We quantified differences in both static (average and dynamic (windowed connectivity during the entire scan duration. Disease-specific differences were identified in connectivity within different dynamic states. Schizophrenia patients showed more differences from healthy subjects than did bipolars, including both hyper and hypo connectivity in one common connectivity state (dynamic state 3. Also group differences between schizophrenia and bipolar patients were identified in patterns (states of connectivity involving the frontal (dynamic state 1 and frontal-parietal regions (dynamic state 3. Our results provide new information about these illnesses and strongly suggest that state-based analyses are critical to avoid averaging together important factors that can help distinguish these clinical groups.

  6. No molecular evidence of Borna disease virus among schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatizadeh-Malekshahi, Somayeh; Ahmadkhaniha, Hamid Reza; Kiani, Seyed Jalal; Nejati, Ahmad; Janani, Leila; Yavarian, Jila

    2017-04-01

    Viruses have been suggested as one of the risk factors for psychiatric disorders. Among infectious agents Borna disease virus (BDV) has been known as a neurotropic virus which is able to cause neurological disorders in different animals. Recently there were controversial findings about BDV association with pathogenesis of human psychotic disorders. Here we performed a nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for detection of BDV P40 RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples of schizophrenia (SC), bipolar disorder (BD) patients and healthy controls (HCs). Only one out of 120 (0.8 %) psychiatric patients and two samples (2.7%) in 75 HCs showed positive results. There were no significant molecular evidence of BDV infection in 120 psychotic patients (60 SC and 60 BD) and 75 matched HCs. Our findings showed no association between BDV infection and pathogenesis of these psychiatric disorders. This is an interesting issue given both the as yet un-clarified role of BDV in human mental disorders and addressing patients in the so far under-investigating Middle East era.

  7. Global improvement with cariprazine in the treatment of bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia: A pooled post hoc analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgam, Suresh; Earley, Willie; Lu, Kaifeng; Németh, György; Laszlovszky, István; Volk, Stephen; Litman, Robert E

    2017-12-01

    Global rating scale measures are useful for assessing the clinical relevance of patient change. Cariprazine, a dopamine D3 and D2 receptor partial agonist, is FDA-approved for the adult treatment of acute manic/mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia. Post hoc evaluations of Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) scores from the cariprazine pivotal trials in both indications were conducted. Data from 3 bipolar mania and 3 schizophrenia trials were pooled by indication (bipolar disorder = 1033; schizophrenia = 1466). Cariprazine- and placebo-treated patients were categorised by baseline CGI-S scores; the proportion of patients who improved from more severe categories at baseline to less severe categories at end-point was evaluated using a logistic regression model. Correlations between Young Mania Rating Scale and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score changes and category shifts were also evaluated. In both disease states, more cariprazine- than placebo-treated patients had improved CGI-S scores at end-point; more placebo-treated patients had worse end-point scores. More cariprazine- vs placebo-treated patients shifted from the extremely/severely ill to mildly ill/better category (bipolar disorder = 55% vs 36%, odds ratio [OR] = 2.1; P = .09; schizophrenia = 42% vs 18%, OR = 3.4, PPost hoc analyses showed that more cariprazine- than placebo-treated patients with bipolar mania or schizophrenia had statistically significant and clinically meaningful CGI-S improvement. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Nation-Wide Study on the Percentage of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder Patients Who Earn Minimum Wage or Above

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Michael; Kapara, Ori; Goldberg, Shira; Yoffe, Rinat; Noy, Shlomo; Weiser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although it is undisputable that patients with severe mental illness have impaired ability to work, the extent of this is unclear. This is a nation-wide, cross-sectional survey of patients who have been hospitalized with severe mental illness earning minimum wage or above. Method: Data from the Israeli Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry were linked with nation-wide data from the National Insurance Institute (the equivalent of US Social Security) on personal income. Hospitalization data were obtained on all consecutive admissions to any psychiatric hospital in the country between 1990–2008 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, other nonaffective psychotic disorders, or bipolar disorder (N = 35 673). Earning minimum wage or more was defined as earning at least 1000 USD/month, which was equivalent to minimum wage in Israel in December 2010. Results: The percentages of patients with only 1 admission who were earning minimum wage or above in December 2010 were as follows: 10.6% of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia; 21.6% of patients with a diagnosis of nonaffective psychotic disorders; and 24.2% of patients with bipolar disorder. The percentages of patients with multiple admissions who were earning minimum wage or above were as follows: 5.8% of patients with schizophrenia; 11.2% of patients with nonaffective psychotic disorders; and 19.9% of patients with bipolar disorder. Conclusions: Despite potential confounders, the results indicate that patients with schizophrenia, nonaffective psychotic disorders, or bipolar disorder have a poor employment outcome, even if they have only been admitted once. These results emphasize the importance of improving interventions to re-integrate these individuals into the work force. PMID:25796051

  9. Common proteomic changes in the hippocampus in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and particular evidence for involvement of cornu ammonis regions 2 and 3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The hippocampus is strongly implicated in schizophrenia and, to a lesser degree, bipolar disorder. Proteomic investigations of the different regions of the hippocampus may help us to clarify the basis and the disease specificity of the changes.

  10. Medication adherence and utilization in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder receiving aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge: A retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Ariel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are chronic debilitating disorders that are often treated with second-generation antipsychotic agents, such as aripiprazole, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. While patients who are hospitalized for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder often receive these agents at discharge, comparatively little information exists on subsequent patterns of pharmacotherapy. Methods Using a database linking hospital admission records to health insurance claims, we identified all patients hospitalized for schizophrenia (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 295.XX or bipolar disorder (296.0, 296.1, 296.4-296.89 between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2008 who received aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at discharge. Patients not continuously enrolled for 6 months before and after hospitalization (“pre-admission” and “follow-up”, respectively were excluded. We examined patterns of use of these agents during follow-up, including adherence with treatment (using medication possession ratios [MPRs] and cumulative medication gaps [CMGs] and therapy switching. Analyses were undertaken separately for patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively. Results We identified a total of 43 patients with schizophrenia, and 84 patients with bipolar disorder. During the 6-month period following hospitalization, patients with schizophrenia received an average of 101 therapy-days with the second-generation antipsychotic agent prescribed at discharge; for patients with bipolar disorder, the corresponding value was 68 therapy-days. Mean MPR at 6 months was 55.1% for schizophrenia patients, and 37.3% for those with bipolar disorder; approximately one-quarter of patients switched to another agent over this period. Conclusions Medication compliance is poor in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who initiate treatment with aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge.

  11. Differential working memory performance as support for the Kraepelinian dichotomy between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder? An experimental neuropsychological study using circuit-specific working memory tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilles, David; Jung, Raphael; Gruber, Eva; Falkai, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2013-05-01

    The traditional clinical dichotomy of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder has been challenged by recent findings of an at least in part common genetic basis. The investigation of neurocognitive functions like working memory may thereby contribute to elucidate common versus distinct pathophysiological processes of the major psychoses. To date direct comparisons of working memory functioning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have been rare and moreover have revealed inconsistent findings. In this study we aimed to further clarify the diagnostic specificity of working memory deficits in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Fifty patients with schizophrenia, 23 patients with bipolar disorder and 53 healthy controls were tested with regard to specific dysfunctions of verbal and visuospatial working memory components using a set of well-characterized, brain circuit-specific paradigms with established brain-behaviour relationships. Patients with schizophrenia showed marked deficits across different working memory domains while bipolar patients performed intermediate with no significant differences compared to the control group. Working memory performance of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder significantly differed in only one particular task requiring articulatory rehearsal of verbal information. While these results do not provide unequivocal support for the Kraepelinian dichotomy, they are consistent with recent findings suggesting the existence of a specific subgroup of schizophrenia patients phenotypically characterized by selective deficits of the articulatory rehearsal mechanism of verbal working memory.

  12. Anticonvulsants in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunze, Heinz C R

    2010-04-01

    Anticonvulsant drugs are widely used in psychiatric indications. This includes alcohol and benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms, panic and anxiety disorders, dementia, schizophrenia, and to some extent personality disorders. Besides pain syndromes, their main domain outside epilepsy, however, is bipolar disorder. Carbamazepine, valproate, and lamotrigine are meanwhile recognized mood stabilizers, but several other antiepileptic drugs have also been tried out with diverging or inconclusive results. Understanding the mechanisms of action and identifying similarities between anticonvulsants effective in bipolar disorder may also enhance our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder.

  13. Chronic somatic comorbidity and excess mortality due to natural causes in persons with schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Munk Laursen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Suicide and death by accidents in persons with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are common, but excess mortality from natural death accounts for even more years of life lost. The impact of somatic comorbidity, however, often is not duly considered in analyses and explanations of excess mortality in patients with psychotic disorders. OBJECTIVE/METHODS: This study investigates and evaluates the impact of 19 severe chronic diseases on excess mortality due to diseases and medical conditions (natural death in individuals with psychotic disorders compared with the general population using a population-based cohort study in Denmark. Incidence/mortality rate ratios of admission/mortality were calculated using survival analysis. RESULTS: Cohort members with psychotic disorders had higher incidence rates of hospital contacts for almost all of the 19 disorders than the general population. The mortality rate ratio (MRR of natural death was 7.10 (95% CI 6.45, 7.81 for schizophrenic men, decreasing to 4.64 (95% CI 4.21, 5.10 after adjustment for the somatic disorders. The same pattern existed in women and in both genders with bipolar disorder. Highest MRRs were observed for psychotic patients without hospital admissions with the investigated somatic disorders. CONCLUSION: Chronic somatic diseases accounted for half of the excess mortality in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Chronic disorders investigated in this paper seem to be under-treated or under-detected among such patients.

  14. Efficacy of Atypical Antipsychotics in the Management of Acute Agitation and Aggression in Hospitalized Patients with Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder: Results from a Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Correll, Christoph U.; ,; Kane, John M.; Masand, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Summary Acute agitation and aggression are common symptoms in patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss the prevalence, clinical assessment strategies, treatment options, and current Western and Chinese guidelines for the management of acute agitation and aggression in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Among available approaches, we discuss in detail recent evidence supporting the use of intramuscular (IM) antipsychotics and some recently appr...

  15. Levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL, HDL and glucose in patients with schizophrenia, unipolar depression and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Adam; Strzelecki, Dominik; Kłoszewska, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate differences in triglycerides (TGA), cholesterol (TC), HDL, LDL and glucose (FPG) levels in patients with acute schizophrenia, unipolar depression, bipolar depression and bipolar mania. Results for 2305 Caucasian patients were included in the study (1377 women, 59.7%; mean age 45.6). Mean TGA level was: schizophrenia: 139.9±90.6 mg/dL, unipolar depression: 125.4±70.8 mg/dL, bipolar disorder: 141.1±81.9 mg/dL, bipolar depression: 147.7±82.8 mg/dL mg/dL, bipolar mania: 120.2±76.1 mg/dL, inter-group differences were significant (pschizophrenia: 188.5±40.4 mg/dL, unipolar depression: 198.8±50.7 mg/dL, bipolar disorder: 194.4±48.3 mg/dL, bipolar depression: 198.9±48.8 mg/dL, bipolar mania: 180.1±43.8 mg/dL, inter-group differences were significant (pschizophrenia: 45.3±13.9 mg/dL, unipolar depression: 48.1±14.8 mg/dL, bipolar disorder: 45.4±15.3 mg/dL, bipolar depression: 45.1±15.4 mg/dL, bipolar mania: 46.4±15.1 mg/dL, inter-group differences were significant (pschizophrenia: 115.4±34.7 mg/dL, unipolar depression: 125.7±44.1 mg/dL, bipolar disorder: 120.9±42.1 mg/dL, bipolar depression: 124.5±43.1 mg/dL, bipolar mania: 109.3±36.9 mg/dL, inter-group differences were significant (pschizophrenia: 95.9±24.9 mg/dL, unipolar depression: 94.8±22.9 mg/dL, bipolar disorder: 97.2±24.4 mg/dL, bipolar depression: 98.3±25.3 mg/dL, bipolar mania: 93.9±21.1 mg/dL, inter-group differences were not significant (p=0.08). Odds ratios for glucose and lipids abnormalities, correlations with age, sex distribution in diagnostic groups for normal ranges of glucose and lipids, differences in glucose and lipids levels between the age groups were also calculated. Our results confirm that there is a high prevalence of lipid and glucose abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders (both unipolar and bipolar). However, we have demonstrated that these diagnostic groups differ in terms of types and frequency of these

  16. Bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Frederick K.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir

    1999-01-01

    Bipolar disorder's unique combination of three characteristics - clear genetic diathesis, distinctive clinical features, early availability of an effective treatment (lithium) - explains its special place in the history of psychiatry and its contribution to the current explosive growth of neuroscience. This article looks at the state of the art in bipolar disorder from the vantage point of: (i) genetics (possible linkages on chromosomes 18 and 21q, polygenic hypothesis, research into genetic ...

  17. Types of Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments and Therapies Join a Study Learn More Bipolar Disorder Overview Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive ... known as major depressive disorder with mixed features. Bipolar Disorder and Other Illnesses Some bipolar disorder symptoms are ...

  18. Genome-Wide Methylome Analyses Reveal Novel Epigenetic Regulation Patterns in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongsheng; Camarillo, Cynthia; Xu, Juan; Arana, Tania Bedard; Xiao, Yun; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Hong; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Escamilla, Michael A.; Armas, Regina; Mendoza, Ricardo; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Jerez Magaña, Alvaro Antonio; Rubin, Lewis P.; Li, Xia; Xu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP) are complex genetic disorders. Their appearance is also likely informed by as yet only partially described epigenetic contributions. Using a sequencing-based method for genome-wide analysis, we quantitatively compared the blood DNA methylation landscapes in SZ and BP subjects to control, both in an understudied population, Hispanics along the US-Mexico border. Remarkably, we identified thousands of differentially methylated regions for SZ and BP preferentially located in promoters 3′-UTRs and 5′-UTRs of genes. Distinct patterns of aberrant methylation of promoter sequences were located surrounding transcription start sites. In these instances, aberrant methylation occurred in CpG islands (CGIs) as well as in flanking regions as well as in CGI sparse promoters. Pathway analysis of genes displaying these distinct aberrant promoter methylation patterns showed enhancement of epigenetic changes in numerous genes previously related to psychiatric disorders and neurodevelopment. Integration of gene expression data further suggests that in SZ aberrant promoter methylation is significantly associated with altered gene transcription. In particular, we found significant associations between (1) promoter CGIs hypermethylation with gene repression and (2) CGI 3′-shore hypomethylation with increased gene expression. Finally, we constructed a specific methylation analysis platform that facilitates viewing and comparing aberrant genome methylation in human neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25734057

  19. Anticipated and experienced discrimination amongst people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Simone; Clement, Sarah; Gabbidon, Jheanell; Jeffery, Debra; Dockery, Lisa; Lassman, Francesca; Brohan, Elaine; Henderson, R Claire; Williams, Paul; Howard, Louise M; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-05-29

    The unfair treatment of individuals with severe mental illness has been linked to poorer physical and mental health outcomes. Additionally, anticipation of discrimination may lead some individuals to avoid participation in particular life areas, leading to greater isolation and social marginalisation. This study aimed to establish the levels and clinical and socio-demographic associations of anticipated and experienced discrimination amongst those diagnosed with a schizophrenia and comparator severe mental illnesses (bipolar and major depressive disorders). This study was a cross-sectional analysis of anticipated and experienced discrimination from 202 individuals in South London (47% with schizophrenia, 32% with depression and 20% with bipolar disorder). 93% of the sample anticipated discrimination and 87% of participants had experienced discrimination in at least one area of life in the previous year. There was a significant association between the anticipation and the experience of discrimination. Higher levels of experienced discrimination were reported by those of a mixed ethnicity, and those with higher levels of education. Women anticipated more discrimination than men. Neither diagnosis nor levels of functioning were associated with the extent of discrimination. Clinical symptoms of anxiety, depression and suspiciousness were associated with more experienced and anticipated discrimination respectively. The unfair treatment of individuals with severe mental illnesses remains unacceptably common. Population level interventions are needed to reduce levels of discrimination and to safeguard individuals. Interventions are also required to assist those with severe mental illness to reduce internalised stigma and social avoidance.

  20. A Test of the Transdiagnostic Dopamine Hypothesis of Psychosis Using Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging in Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Sameer; Nour, Matthew M; Veronese, Mattia; Rogdaki, Maria; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Azis, Matilda; Turkheimer, Federico; McGuire, Philip; Young, Allan H; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    The dopamine hypothesis suggests that dopamine abnormalities underlie psychosis, irrespective of diagnosis, implicating dopamine dysregulation in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, in line with the research domain criteria approach. However, this hypothesis has not been directly examined in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder with psychosis. To test whether dopamine synthesis capacity is elevated in bipolar disorder with psychosis and how this compares with schizophrenia and matched controls and to examine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is associated with psychotic symptom severity, irrespective of diagnostic class. This cross-sectional case-control positron emission tomographic study was performed in the setting of first-episode psychosis services in an inner-city area (London, England). Sixty individuals participated in the study (22 with bipolar psychosis [18 antipsychotic naive or free], 16 with schizophrenia [14 antipsychotic naive or free], and 22 matched controls) and underwent fluorodihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine ([18F]-DOPA) positron emission tomography to examine dopamine synthesis capacity. Standardized clinical measures, including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning, were administered. The study dates were March 2013 to November 2016. Dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) and clinical measures (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning). The mean (SD) ages of participants were 23.6 (3.6) years in 22 individuals with bipolar psychosis (13 male), 26.3 (4.4) years in 16 individuals with schizophrenia (14 male), and 24.5 (4.5) years in controls (14 male). There was a significant group difference in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) (F2,57 = 6.80, P = .002). Kicer was significantly elevated in both the bipolar group (mean [SD], 13.18 [1.08] × 10-3 min-1; P = .002) and the schizophrenia

  1. Transcription factor SP4 phosphorylation is altered in the postmortem cerebellum of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinacho, Raquel; Saia, Gregory; Meana, J Javier; Gill, Grace; Ramos, Belén

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors play important roles in the control of neuronal function in physiological and pathological conditions. We previously reported reduced levels of transcription factor SP4 protein, but not transcript, in the cerebellum in bipolar disorder and associated with more severe negative symptoms in schizophrenia. We have recently reported phosphorylation of Sp4 at S770, which is regulated by membrane depolarization and NMDA receptor activity. The aim of this study was to investigate SP4 S770 phosphorylation in bipolar disorder and its association with negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and to explore the potential relationship between phosphorylation and protein abundance. Here we report a significant increase in SP4 phosphorylation in the cerebellum, but not the prefrontal cortex, of bipolar disorder subjects (n=10) (80% suicide) compared to matched controls (n=10). We found that SP4 phosphorylation inversely correlated with SP4 levels independently of disease status in both areas of the human brain. Moreover, SP4 phosphorylation in the cerebellum positively correlated with negative symptoms in schizophrenia subjects (n=15). Further, we observed that a phospho-mimetic mutation in truncated Sp4 was sufficient to significantly decrease Sp4 steady-state levels, while a non-phosphorylatable mutant showed increased stability in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Our results indicate that SP4 S770 phosphorylation is increased in the cerebellum in bipolar disorder subjects that committed suicide and in severe schizophrenia subjects, and may be part of a degradation signal that controls Sp4 abundance in cerebellar granule neurons. This opens the possibility that modulation of SP4 phosphorylation may contribute to the molecular pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  2. A first national survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and autism in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Scott, Jan; Rouillon, Frédéric; Leboyer, Marion

    2012-08-28

    In order to support evidence-based policies for reduction of stigma, a better understanding of its components: ignorance (knowledge), prejudice (attitude) and discrimination (behaviour) is necessary. This study explores public perceptions and quantifies stigma for three chronic mental disorders: autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in France. Survey of 1000 adults selected from an established market research panel. The 21-item questionnaire explored knowledge, attitudes and behaviours toward each disorder. Although 95% respondents recognized the names of each disorder fewer than 70% could report specific characteristics and only 33% considered that publically available information was adequate; most respondents identified the media as their main resource. Labeling of conditions in a negative way was frequent (61%) when referring to mental disorders in general, but fell significantly (18%) when linked to an individual with a disorder. Individuals with schizophrenia are assumed to be dangerous; 65% respondents would engage in social distancing from such an individual, versus 29% for bipolar disorders and 7% for autism (p autism are less prejudicial than towards schizophrenia. However, most public attitudes and behaviours towards different disorders appear to be based on assumptions rather than knowledge or evidence suggesting a generic information or anti-stigma programme is unlikely to be effective.

  3. Relationships between corpus callosum and language lateralization in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tréhout, Maxime; Leroux, Elise; Delcroix, Nicolas; Dollfus, Sonia

    2017-09-01

    The question of whether there is a continuum or a dichotomy among patients with schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorders (BD) has not been clearly resolved and remains a challenge. Thus, the identification of specific biomarkers of these disorders might be helpful. The present study investigated the volume of the corpus callosum (CC) and functional lateralization for language as potential biomarkers and their relationships in SZ and BD. The study included 20 patients with SZ, 20 patients with BD and 40 healthy controls (HC). A functional lateralization index (FLI) was computed for each participant within the language comprehension network. For each participant, the volume of the total CC and those of three subregions were extracted. These variables and their anatomo-functional relationships were investigated. In comparison to HC, SZ patients presented a decreased leftward lateralization for language, whereas this was not found in BD patients. However, as compared to SZ patients and HC, BD patients showed a reduction in CC volume associated with a lower leftward lateralization for language. Our study revealed that SZ patients displayed a reduction of the leftward functional lateralization for language; however, no reduction of CC volume was observed, whereas BD patients presented a decreased volume of the CC associated with a lower leftward asymmetry for language. The results of our study detected distinct anomalies in both SZ and BD that may be considered as specific biomarkers of these disorders related to neurodevelopmental models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Configural and Featural Face Processing Influences on Emotion Recognition in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E; Joshua, Nicole; Castle, David J; Rossell, Susan L

    2017-03-01

    Emotion recognition impairments have been demonstrated in schizophrenia (Sz), but are less consistent and lesser in magnitude in bipolar disorder (BD). This may be related to the extent to which different face processing strategies are engaged during emotion recognition in each of these disorders. We recently showed that Sz patients had impairments in the use of both featural and configural face processing strategies, whereas BD patients were impaired only in the use of the latter. Here we examine the influence that these impairments have on facial emotion recognition in these cohorts. Twenty-eight individuals with Sz, 28 individuals with BD, and 28 healthy controls completed a facial emotion labeling task with two conditions designed to separate the use of featural and configural face processing strategies; part-based and whole-face emotion recognition. Sz patients performed worse than controls on both conditions, and worse than BD patients on the whole-face condition. BD patients performed worse than controls on the whole-face condition only. Configural processing deficits appear to influence the recognition of facial emotions in BD, whereas both configural and featural processing abnormalities impair emotion recognition in Sz. This may explain discrepancies in the profiles of emotion recognition between the disorders. (JINS, 2017, 23, 287-291).

  5. A Loss-of-Function Variant in a Minor Isoform of ANK3 Protects Against Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Timothy; Hansson, Lars; Sønderby, Ida E; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Zuber, Verena; Tesli, Martin; Song, Jie; Hultman, Christina M; Bergen, Sarah E; Landén, Mikael; Melle, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole Andreas; Djurovic, Srdjan

    2016-08-15

    Ankyrin-3 (ANK3) was one of the first genes to reach significance in a bipolar disorder genome-wide association study. Many subsequent association studies confirmed this finding and implicated this gene in schizophrenia. However, the exact nature of the role of ANK3 in the pathophysiology remains elusive. In particular, the specific isoforms involved and the nature of the imbalance are unknown. We genotyped a Norwegian sample of 402 patients with bipolar disorder, 293 patients with schizophrenia, and 330 healthy control subjects genome-wide with the Illumina Human Exome BeadChip. We performed allelic association tests at the genome-wide and gene levels and found a significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism in a splice site of ANK3. We replicated this finding in two other samples and studied the functional effect of this single nucleotide polymorphism by performing quantitative polymerase chain reaction on the affected exon junction in complementary DNA from blood total RNA. The splice site single nucleotide polymorphism (rs41283526) is located in an alternatively spliced exon of ANK3 and has a strong and significant protective effect against bipolar disorder (odds ratio = .31) and schizophrenia (odds ratio = .21). The minor allele of rs41283526 is a loss-of-function variant that disables the correct splicing of the transcript. Data from the BrainSpan human developmental transcriptome show that the exon bearing this variant is expressed only in a minor isoform of ANK3, the transcription of which is initiated in early adolescence. Our results suggest that an elevated expression of this transcript starting in adolescence may be an important factor in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neurobiological bases of the influence of predictions on perception - implications for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rössler, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Aberrations in the control and mediation of top-down- and bottom-up-processes in sensory processing, as well as disruptions in the dopamine (DA) system are central features of recent theories on the emergence and persistence of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BPD). The aim of the present dissertation is to show a relationship between visual perception and genetically determined aberrations in the dopaminergic system and to derive implications for the respective aetiological models. ...

  7. Distinct patterns of dysfunctional appetitive and aversive motivation in bipolar disorder versus schizophrenia: An event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, William P; Wynn, Jonathan K; Hajcak, Greg; Altshuler, Lori; Green, Michael F

    2016-05-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with different clinical profiles of disturbances in motivation, yet few studies have compared the neurophysiological correlates of such disturbances. Outpatients with schizophrenia (n = 34), or bipolar disorder I (n = 33), and healthy controls (n = 31) completed a task in which the late positive potential (LPP), an index of motivated attention, was assessed along motivational gradients determined by apparent distance from potential rewards or punishments. Sequences of cues signaling possible monetary gains or losses appeared to loom progressively closer to the viewer; a reaction time (RT) task after the final cue determined the outcome. Controls showed the expected pattern with LPPs for appetitive and aversive cues that were initially elevated, smaller during intermediate positions, and escalated just prior to the RT task. The clinical groups showed different patterns in the final positions just prior to the RT task: the bipolar group's LPPs to both types of cues peaked relatively early during looming sequences and subsequently decreased, whereas the schizophrenia group showed relatively small LPP escalations, particularly for aversive cues. These distinct patterns suggest that the temporal unfolding of attentional resource allocation for motivationally significant events may qualitatively differ between these disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Relational memory in psychotic bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Julia M; Williams, Lisa E; Cohen, Neal; Heckers, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Recent research has highlighted the phenotypic and genetic overlap of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder parallel those seen in schizophrenia, particularly for bipolar disorder patients with a history of psychotic features. Here we explored whether relational memory deficits, which are prominent in schizophrenia, are also present in patients with psychotic bipolar disorder. Methods We tested 25 patients with psychotic bipolar disorder on a relational memory paradigm previously employed to quantify deficits in schizophrenia. During the training, participants learned to associate a set of faces and background scenes. During the testing, participants viewed a single background overlaid by three trained faces and were asked to recall the matching face, which was either present (Match trials) or absent (Non-Match trials). Explicit recognition and eye-movement data were collected and compared to 28 schizophrenia patients and 27 healthy subjects from a previously published dataset. Results Contrary to our prediction, we found psychotic bipolar disorder patients were less impaired in relational memory than schizophrenia subjects. Bipolar disorder subjects showed eye-movement behavior similar to healthy controls, whereas schizophrenia subjects were impaired relative to both groups. However, bipolar disorder patients with current delusions and/or hallucinations were more impaired than bipolar disorder patients not currently experiencing these symptoms. Conclusions We found that patients with psychotic bipolar disorder had better relational memory performance than schizophrenia patients, indicating that a history of psychotic symptoms does not lead to a significant relational memory deficit. PMID:22834462

  9. Bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, F K; Ghaemi, S N

    1999-06-01

    Bipolar disorder's unique combination of three characteristics - clear genetic diathesis, distinctive clinical features, early availability of an effective treatment (lithium) - explains its special place in the history of psychiatry and its contribution to the current explosive growth of neuroscience. This article looks at the state of the art in bipolar disorder from the vantage point of: (i) genetics (possible linkages on chromosomes 18 and 21q, polygenic hypothesis, research into genetic markers); (ii) diagnosis (new focus on the subjective aspects of bipolar disorder to offset the current trend of underdiagnosis due to overreliance on standardized interviews and rating scales); (iii) outcome (increase in treatment-resistant forms signaling a change in the natural history of bipolar disorder); (iv) pathophysiology (research into circadian biological rhythms and the kindling hypothesis to explain recurrence); (v) treatment (emergence of the anticonvulsants, suggested role of chronic antidepressant treatment in the development of treatment resistance); (vi) neurobiology (evaluation of regulatory function in relation to affective disturbances, role of postsynaptic second-messenger mechanisms, advances in functional neuroimaging); and (vii) psychosocial research (shedding overly dualistic theories of the past to understand the mind and brain as an entity, thus emphasizing the importance of balancing the psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches). Future progress in the understanding and treatment of bipolar disorder will rely on successful integration of the biological and psychosocial lines of investigation.

  10. Genome-wide association study of borderline personality disorder reveals genetic overlap with bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, S H; Streit, F; Jungkunz, M

    2017-01-01

    overlap between BIP, major depression (MDD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) and a high comorbidity of BOR and MDD, we also analyzed the genetic overlap of BOR with SCZ and MDD. GWAS, gene-based tests and gene-set analyses were performed in 998 BOR patients and 1545 controls. Linkage disequilibrium score......Borderline personality disorder (BOR) is determined by environmental and genetic factors, and characterized by affective instability and impulsivity, diagnostic symptoms also observed in manic phases of bipolar disorder (BIP). Up to 20% of BIP patients show comorbidity with BOR. This report...... describes the first case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BOR, performed in one of the largest BOR patient samples worldwide. The focus of our analysis was (i) to detect genes and gene sets involved in BOR and (ii) to investigate the genetic overlap with BIP. As there is considerable genetic...

  11. Discriminating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder by fusing fMRI and DTI in a multimodal CCA+ joint ICA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jing; Pearlson, Godfrey; Caprihan, Arvind; Adali, Tülay; Kiehl, Kent A; Liu, Jingyu; Yamamoto, Jeremy; Calhoun, Vince D

    2011-08-01

    Diverse structural and functional brain alterations have been identified in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, but with variable replicability, significant overlap and often in limited number of subjects. In this paper, we aimed to clarify differences between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia by combining fMRI (collected during an auditory oddball task) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. We proposed a fusion method, "multimodal CCA+ joint ICA", which increases flexibility in statistical assumptions beyond existing approaches and can achieve higher estimation accuracy. The data collected from 164 participants (62 healthy controls, 54 schizophrenia and 48 bipolar) were extracted into "features" (contrast maps for fMRI and fractional anisotropy (FA) for DTI) and analyzed in multiple facets to investigate the group differences for each pair-wised groups and each modality. Specifically, both patient groups shared significant dysfunction in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and thalamus, as well as reduced white matter (WM) integrity in anterior thalamic radiation and uncinate fasciculus. Schizophrenia and bipolar subjects were separated by functional differences in medial frontal and visual cortex, as well as WM tracts associated with occipital and frontal lobes. Both patients and controls showed similar spatial distributions in motor and parietal regions, but exhibited significant variations in temporal lobe. Furthermore, there were different group trends for age effects on loading parameters in motor cortex and multiple WM regions, suggesting that brain dysfunction and WM disruptions occurred in identified regions for both disorders. Most importantly, we can visualize an underlying function-structure network by evaluating the joint components with strong links between DTI and fMRI. Our findings suggest that although the two patient groups showed several distinct brain patterns from each other and healthy controls, they also shared common abnormalities in

  12. Molecular pathways involved in neuronal cell adhesion and membrane scaffolding contribute to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder susceptibility.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dushlaine, C

    2011-03-01

    Susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may involve a substantial, shared contribution from thousands of common genetic variants, each of small effect. Identifying whether risk variants map to specific molecular pathways is potentially biologically informative. We report a molecular pathway analysis using the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) ratio test, which compares the ratio of nominally significant (P<0.05) to nonsignificant SNPs in a given pathway to identify the \\'enrichment\\' for association signals. We applied this approach to the discovery (the International Schizophrenia Consortium (n=6909)) and validation (Genetic Association Information Network (n=2729)) of schizophrenia genome-wide association study (GWAS) data sets. We investigated each of the 212 experimentally validated pathways described in the Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes in the discovery sample. Nominally significant pathways were tested in the validation sample, and five pathways were found to be significant (P=0.03-0.001); only the cell adhesion molecule (CAM) pathway withstood conservative correction for multiple testing. Interestingly, this pathway was also significantly associated with bipolar disorder (Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (n=4847)) (P=0.01). At a gene level, CAM genes associated in all three samples (NRXN1 and CNTNAP2), which were previously implicated in specific language disorder, autism and schizophrenia. The CAM pathway functions in neuronal cell adhesion, which is critical for synaptic formation and normal cell signaling. Similar pathways have also emerged from a pathway analysis of autism, suggesting that mechanisms involved in neuronal cell adhesion may contribute broadly to neurodevelopmental psychiatric phenotypes.

  13. Alcohol use is associated with thinner cerebral cortex and larger ventricles in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, E H; Nerland, S; Jørgensen, K N; Mørch-Johnsen, L; Nesvåg, R; Hartberg, C B; Haukvik, U K; Osnes, K; Melle, I; Andreassen, O A; Agartz, I

    2017-03-01

    Excessive alcohol use is associated with brain damage but less is known about brain effects from moderate alcohol use. Previous findings indicate that patients with severe mental illness, particularly schizophrenia, are vulnerable to alcohol-related brain damage. We investigated the association between levels of alcohol consumption and cortical and subcortical brain structures in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients and healthy controls, and investigated for group differences for this association. 1.5 T structural magnetic resonance images were acquired of 609 alcohol-using participants (165 schizophrenia patients, 172 bipolar disorder patients, 272 healthy controls), mean (s.d.) age 34.2 (9.9) years, 52% men. Past year alcohol use was assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test - Consumption part (AUDIT-C). General linear models were used to investigate associations between AUDIT-C score and cortical thickness, surface area, and total brain and subcortical volumes. Increasing AUDIT-C score was linearly associated with thinner cortex in medial and dorsolateral frontal and parieto-occipital regions, and with larger left lateral ventricle volume. There was no significant interaction between AUDIT-C score and diagnostic group. The findings remained significant after controlling for substance use disorders, antipsychotic medication and illness severity. The results show a dose-dependent relationship between alcohol use and thinner cortex and ventricular expansion. The findings are present also at lower levels of alcohol consumption and do not differ between schizophrenia or bipolar disorder patients compared to healthy controls. Our results do not support previous findings of increased vulnerability for alcohol-related brain damage in severe mental illness.

  14. Neurocognitive performance, psychopathology and social functioning in individuals at high risk for schizophrenia or psychotic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkintoni, Evgenia; Pallis, Eleftherios G; Bitsios, Panos; Giakoumaki, Stella G

    2017-01-15

    Although cognitive deficits are consistent endophenotypes of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, findings in psychotic bipolar disorder (BDP) are inconsistent. In this study we compared adult unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia and BDP patients on cognition, psychopathology, social functioning and quality of life. Sixty-six unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients (SUnR), 36 unaffected first-degree relatives of BDP patients (BDPUnR) and 102 controls participated in the study. Between-group differences were examined and Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA) predicted group membership. Visual memory, control inhibition, working memory, cognitive flexibility and abstract reasoning were linearly impaired in the relatives' groups. Poorer verbal fluency and processing speed were evident only in the SUnR group. The SUnR group had higher depressive and somatization symptoms while the BDPUnR group had higher anxiety and lower social functioning compared with the controls. Individuals with superior cognition were more likely to be classified as controls; those with higher social functioning, prolonged processing speed and lower anxiety were more likely to be classified as SUnR. The relatives' sample is quite heterogeneous; the effects of genetic or environmental risk-factors were not examined. Cognitive functions mediated by a fronto-parietal network, show linear impairments in unaffected relatives of BDP and schizophrenia patients; processing speed and verbal fluency impairments were evident only in schizophrenia relatives. Self-perceived symptomatology and social functioning also differ between schizophrenia and BDP relatives. The continuum seen in patients in several indices was also seen in the cognitive impairments in unaffected relatives of schizophrenia and BDP patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A Multilevel Functional Study of aSNAP25At-Risk Variant for Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houenou, Josselin; Boisgontier, Jennifer; Henrion, Annabelle; d'Albis, Marc-Antoine; Dumaine, Anne; Linke, Julia; Wessa, Michèle; Daban, Claire; Hamdani, Nora; Delavest, Marine; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Lançon, Christophe; Schürhoff, Franck; Szöke, Andrei; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Barau, Caroline; Poupon, Cyril; Etain, Bruno; Leboyer, Marion; Jamain, Stéphane

    2017-10-25

    The synaptosomal-associated protein SNAP25 is a key player in synaptic vesicle docking and fusion and has been associated with multiple psychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We recently identified a promoter variant in SNAP25 , rs6039769 , that is associated with early-onset bipolar disorder and a higher gene expression level in human prefrontal cortex. In the current study, we showed that this variant was associated both in males and females with schizophrenia in two independent cohorts. We then combined in vitro and in vivo approaches in humans to understand the functional impact of the at-risk allele. Thus, we showed in vitro that the rs6039769 C allele was sufficient to increase the SNAP25 transcription level. In a postmortem expression analysis of 33 individuals affected with schizophrenia and 30 unaffected control subjects, we showed that the SNAP25b / SNAP25a ratio was increased in schizophrenic patients carrying the rs6039769 at-risk allele. Last, using genetics imaging in a cohort of 71 subjects, we showed that male risk carriers had an increased amygdala-ventromedial prefrontal cortex functional connectivity and a larger amygdala than non-risk carriers. The latter association has been replicated in an independent cohort of 121 independent subjects. Altogether, results from these multilevel functional studies are bringing strong evidence for the functional consequences of this allelic variation of SNAP25 on modulating the development and plasticity of the prefrontal-limbic network, which therefore may increase the vulnerability to both early-onset bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Functional characterization of disease-associated variants is a key challenge in understanding neuropsychiatric disorders and will open an avenue in the development of personalized treatments. Recent studies have accumulated evidence that the SNARE complex, and more specifically

  16. Association between alcohol and substance use disorders and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Østergaard, Marie Louise Drivsholm; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People with severe mental illness have both increased mortality and are more likely to have a substance use disorder. We assessed the association between mortality and lifetime substance use disorder in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or unipolar depression. METHODS......: In this prospective, register-based cohort study, we obtained data for all people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or unipolar depression born in Denmark in 1955 or later from linked nationwide registers. We obtained information about treatment for substance use disorders (categorised into treatment for alcohol......, cannabis, or hard drug misuse), date of death, primary cause of death, and education level. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality and subhazard ratios (SHRs) for cause-specific mortality associated with substance use disorder of alcohol, cannabis, or hard drugs. We calculated...

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor mRNA and protein isoform alterations in the orbitofrontal cortex in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) may play a role in the pathogenesis of psychiatric illnesses such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, in which hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis abnormalities are observed and stress has been implicated. A critical component of the HPA axis which mediates cellular stress responses in the OFC, and has been implicated in psychiatric illness, is the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Methods In the lateral OFC, we employed quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting to investigate GR mRNA and protein expression in 34 bipolar disorder cases, 35 schizophrenia cases and 35 controls. Genotype data for eleven GR gene (NR3C1) polymorphisms was also used to explore possible effects of NR3C1 sequence variation on GR mRNA and protein expression in the lateral OFC. Results We found no diagnostic differences in pan GR, GR-1C or GR-1F mRNA expression. However, the GR-1B mRNA transcript variant was decreased (14.3%) in bipolar disorder cases relative to controls (p schizophrenia cases relative to controls (p disorder (56.1%, p schizophrenia (31.5% p < 0.05). Using genotype data for eleven NR3C1 polymorphisms, we found no evidence of effects of NR3C1 genotype on GR mRNA or GRα protein expression in the OFC. Conclusions These findings reveal selective abnormalities of GR mRNA expression in the lateral OFC in psychiatric illness, which are more specific and may be less influenced by NR3C1 genotype than those of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reported previously. Our results suggest that the GRα-D1 protein isoform may be up-regulated widely across the frontal cortex in psychiatric illness. PMID:22812453

  18. Evaluation of TrkB and BDNF transcripts in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum from subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Veronica; Bove, Susan E; Volfson, Dmitri; Lewis, David A; Kleiman, Robin J; Lanz, Thomas A

    2015-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling is integral to a range of neural functions, including synaptic plasticity and exhibits activity-dependent regulation of expression. As altered BDNF signaling has been implicated in multiple psychiatric diseases, here we report a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of mRNAs encoding TrkB, total BDNF, and the four most abundant BDNF transcripts (I, IIc, IV, and VI) in postmortem tissue from matched tetrads of subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder (MDD) and healthy comparison subjects. In all three regions examined, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), associative striatum and hippocampus, total BDNF mRNA levels did not differ in any disease state. In DLPFC, BDNF IIc was significantly lower in schizophrenia relative to healthy comparison subjects. In hippocampus, BDNF I, IIc, and VI were lower in subjects with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder relative to comparison subjects. In striatum, TrkB mRNA was lower in bipolar disorder and MDD, while BDNF IIc was elevated in MDD, relative to comparison subjects. These data highlight potential alterations in BDNF signaling in the corticohippocampal circuit in schizophrenia, and within the striatum in mood disorders. Novel therapies aimed at improving BDNF-TrkB signaling may therefore have potential to impact on a range of psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced number of peripheral natural killer cells in schizophrenia but not in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiński, Paweł; Frydecka, Dorota; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Misiak, Błażej

    2016-05-01

    Overwhelming evidence indicates that subthreshold inflammatory state might be implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD). It has been reported that both groups of patients might be characterized by abnormal lymphocyte counts. However, little is known about alterations in lymphocyte proportions that may differentiate SCZ and BPD patients. Therefore, in this study we investigated blood cell proportions quantified by means of microarray expression deconvolution using publicly available data from SCZ and BPD patients. We found significantly lower counts of natural killer (NK) cells in drug-naïve and medicated SCZ patients compared to healthy controls across all datasets. In one dataset from SCZ patients, there were no significant differences in the number of NK cells between acutely relapsed and remitted SCZ patients. No significant difference in the number of NK cells between BPD patients and healthy controls was observed in all datasets. Our results indicate that SCZ patients, but not BPD patients, might be characterized by reduced counts of NK cells. Future studies looking at lymphocyte counts in SCZ should combine the analysis of data obtained using computational deconvolution and flow cytometry techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Social cognition in bipolar disorder versus schizophrenia: comparability in mental state decoding deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gary; Duignan, Aoife; Hargreaves, April; Morris, Derek W; Rose, Emma; Robertson, Deirdre; Cummings, Elizabeth; Moore, Susan; Gill, Michael; Corvin, Aiden

    2012-11-01

    Neuropsychological studies comparing patients with bipolar disorder (BD) to patients with schizophrenia (SZ) suggest milder cognitive deficits in BD patients and across a smaller range of functions. The present study investigated whether this pattern is also true for social cognition - a range of socially relevant abilities, including emotion perception and recognition, theory of mind, and social attributions - by comparing performance on measures of social cognition in patients with BD, SZ, and healthy participants. One hundred and two patients with BD, 208 patients with SZ, and 132 healthy participants were assessed using a battery of tasks measuring basic neuropsychological and social cognition. We observed significant differences between patients with BD and healthy participants in a test of mental state decoding ('eyes task') that was at a level comparable to deficits seen in patients with SZ. By comparison, BD patients showed more subtle deficits in mental state reasoning ('hinting task') than those shown by patients with SZ. Mental state decoding difficulties are significant in BD. An important direction for further research will be to establish to what extent these deficits affect social and occupational functioning as a potential target for therapeutic intervention. © 2012 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: an updated meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cai-Yun; Qian, Zhen-Zhong; Gong, Feng-Feng; Lu, Shan-Shan; Feng, Fang; Wu, Yi-Le; Yang, Hui-Yun; Sun, Ye-Huan

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies examining the possible role of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms in the development of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD) have provided inconclusive findings, this meta-analysis was therefore designed to get a more reliable assessment. A total of 38 articles were identified through a search of electronic databases, up to 27 February 2014. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. Meta-analysis showed that MTHFR C677T was significantly associated with SZ, the highest OR was found for the recessive model (for TT vs. CT + CC: OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.18-1.53); a marginal association of MTHFR C677T with increased risk of BPD has also been found for the recessive model (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.00-1.59). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity indicated that the significant association with SZ and BPD existed among Asian and African populations, but not for the white. MTHFR A1298C was significant associated with SZ, the highest OR for the dominant model (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.03-1.24). Subgroup analysis indicated a significant association with SZ existed in Asian populations, not among the white populations and no significant association was detected between the MTHFR A1298C and BPD in all groups. We conclude that MTHFR polymorphism is associated with SZ and BPD among Asian, African populations, but not the white.

  2. Differential expression of exosomal microRNAs in prefrontal cortices of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith G Banigan

    Full Text Available Exosomes are cellular secretory vesicles containing microRNAs (miRNAs. Once secreted, exosomes are able to attach to recipient cells and release miRNAs potentially modulating the function of the recipient cell. We hypothesized that exosomal miRNA expression in brains of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD might differ from controls, reflecting either disease-specific or common aberrations in SZ and BD patients. The sources of the analyzed samples included McLean 66 Cohort Collection (Harvard Brain Tissue Resource Center, BrainNet Europe II (BNE, a consortium of 18 brain banks across Europe and Boston Medical Center (BMC. Exosomal miRNAs from frozen postmortem prefrontal cortices with well-preserved RNA were isolated and submitted to profiling by Luminex FLEXMAP 3D microfluidic device. Multiple statistical analyses of microarray data suggested that certain exosomal miRNAs were differentially expressed in SZ and BD subjects in comparison to controls. RT-PCR validation confirmed that two miRNAs, miR-497 in SZ samples and miR-29c in BD samples, have significantly increased expression when compared to control samples. These results warrant future studies to evaluate the potential of exosome-derived miRNAs to serve as biomarkers of SZ and BD.

  3. Risk of metabolic syndrome and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Stubbs, Brendon; Mitchell, Alex J; De Hert, Marc; Wampers, Martien; Ward, Philip B; Rosenbaum, Simon; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-10-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components are highly predictive of cardiovascular diseases. The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the prevalence of MetS and its components in people with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder, comparing subjects with different disorders and taking into account demographic variables and psychotropic medication use. The secondary aim was to compare the MetS prevalence in persons with any of the selected disorders versus matched general population controls. The pooled MetS prevalence in people with severe mental illness was 32.6% (95% CI: 30.8%-34.4%; N = 198; n = 52,678). Relative risk meta-analyses established that there was no significant difference in MetS prevalence in studies directly comparing schizophrenia versus bipolar disorder, and in those directly comparing bipolar disorder versus major depressive disorder. Only two studies directly compared people with schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, precluding meta-analytic calculations. Older age and a higher body mass index were significant moderators in the final demographic regression model (z = -3.6, p = 0.0003, r(2)  = 0.19). People treated with all individual antipsychotic medications had a significantly (pantipsychotic-naïve participants. MetS risk was significantly higher with clozapine and olanzapine (except vs. clozapine) than other antipsychotics, and significantly lower with aripiprazole than other antipsychotics (except vs. amisulpride). Compared with matched general population controls, people with severe mental illness had a significantly increased risk for MetS (RR = 1.58; 95% CI: 1.35-1.86; pantipsychotics should be considered when making treatment choices. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  4. β-catenin promoter ChIP-chip reveals potential schizophrenia and bipolar disorder gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Erika; Shah, Abhishek; Tenore, Christopher; Capogna, Michael; Villa, Catalina; Guo, Xingyi; Zheng, Deyou; Lachman, Herbert M

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic concentrations of lithium salts inhibit glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) and phosphoinositide (PI) signaling suggesting that abnormal activation of these pathways could be a factor in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Involvement of these pathways is also supported by recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs). One way investigators have investigated the molecular basis of BD and the therapeutic action of lithium is by microarray expression studies, since both GSK3β- and PI-mediated signal transduction pathways are coupled to transcriptional activation and inhibition. However, expression profiling has some limitations and investigators cannot use the approach to analyze fetal brain tissue, arguably the most relevant biological structure related to the development of genetically based psychiatric disorders. To address these shortcomings, the authors have taken a novel approach using chromatin immunoprecipitation-enriched material annealed to microarrays (ChIP-chip) targeting genes in fetal brain tissue bound by β-catenin, a transcription factor that is directly regulated by GSK3β. The promoters for 640 genes were found to be bound by β-catenin, many of which are known schizophrenia (SZ), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and BD candidates, including CACNA1B, NRNG, SNAP29, FGFR1, PCDH9, and nine others identified in recently published GWASs and genome-wide searches for copy number variants (CNVs). The findings suggest that seemingly disparate candidate genes for SZ and BD can be incorporated into a common molecular network revolving around GSK3β/β-catenin signaling. In addition, the finding that a putative lithium-responsive pathway may influence a subgroup of SZ and ASD candidate genes could have therapeutic implications.

  5. Review of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies comparing bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Heather C; Papmeyer, Martina; Sprooten, Emma; Lawrie, Stephen M; Sussmann, Jessika E; McIntosh, Andrew M

    2012-06-01

    Although bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) have a number of clinical features and certain susceptibility genes in common, they are considered separate disorders, and it is unclear which aspects of pathophysiology are specific to each condition. Here, we examine the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature to determine the evidence for diagnosis-specific patterns of brain activation in the two patient groups. A systematic search was performed to identify fMRI studies directly comparing BD and SCZ to examine evidence for diagnosis-specific activation patterns. Studies were categorized into (i) those investigating emotion, reward, or memory, (ii) those describing executive function or language tasks, and (iii) those looking at the resting state or default mode networks. Studies reporting estimates of sensitivity and specificity of classification are also summarized, followed by studies reporting associations with symptom severity measures. In total, 21 studies were identified including patients (n = 729) and healthy subjects (n = 465). Relative over-activation in the medial temporal lobe and associated structures was found in BD versus SCZ in tasks involving emotion or memory. Evidence of differences between the disorders in prefrontal regions was less consistent. Accuracy values for assignment of diagnosis were generally lower in BD than in SCZ. Few studies reported significant symptom associations; however, these generally implicated limbic regions in association with manic symptoms. Although there are a limited number of studies and a cautious approach is warranted, activation differences were found in the medial temporal lobe and associated limbic regions, suggesting the presence of differences in the neurobiological substrates of SCZ and BD. Future studies examining symptom dimensions, risk-associated genes, and the effects of medication will aid clarification of the mechanisms behind these differences. © 2012 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  6. Identification of shared risk loci and pathways for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas J Forstner

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a highly heritable neuropsychiatric disease characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. BD shows substantial clinical and genetic overlap with other psychiatric disorders, in particular schizophrenia (SCZ. The genes underlying this etiological overlap remain largely unknown. A recent SCZ genome wide association study (GWAS by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium identified 128 independent genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The present study investigated whether these SCZ-associated SNPs also contribute to BD development through the performance of association testing in a large BD GWAS dataset (9747 patients, 14278 controls. After re-imputation and correction for sample overlap, 22 of 107 investigated SCZ SNPs showed nominal association with BD. The number of shared SCZ-BD SNPs was significantly higher than expected (p = 1.46x10-8. This provides further evidence that SCZ-associated loci contribute to the development of BD. Two SNPs remained significant after Bonferroni correction. The most strongly associated SNP was located near TRANK1, which is a reported genome-wide significant risk gene for BD. Pathway analyses for all shared SCZ-BD SNPs revealed 25 nominally enriched gene-sets, which showed partial overlap in terms of the underlying genes. The enriched gene-sets included calcium- and glutamate signaling, neuropathic pain signaling in dorsal horn neurons, and calmodulin binding. The present data provide further insights into shared risk loci and disease-associated pathways for BD and SCZ. This may suggest new research directions for the treatment and prevention of these two major psychiatric disorders.

  7. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, T H; Børglum, A D; Mors, O

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 22q may harbor risk genes for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder from the Faroe...... Islands were typed for 35 evenly distributed polymorphic markers on 22q in a search for shared risk genes in the two disorders. No single marker was strongly associated with either disease, but five two-marker segments that cluster within two regions on the chromosome have haplotypes occurring...... was found at a segment of at least 1.1 cM including markers D22S1161 and D22S922 (P=0.0081 in the test for association). Our results also support the a priori evidence of a susceptibility gene to schizophrenia at a segment of at least 0.45 cM including markers D22S279 and D22S276 (P=0.0075). Patients were...

  8. Admission-Based Prevalence of Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder and Bipolar I Disorder in a Catchment Area in Sinop, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binbay, Tolga; Arık Binbay, Deniz; Ulaş, Halis; Alptekin, Köksal

    2016-01-01

    To provide registry-based prevalence estimates of schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar I (BPI) disorders in a defined area of Sinop, Turkey. All patients that presented to primary and secondary health services over three year time (2009-2011) with diagnosis of psychotic disorder (F06.1, F06.2, F10.5, F12.5, F19.5, F20-29, F30-31, F32.3, F33.3, F39 in ICD-10) covering a population of 73,503 aged 15-64 were included via case registry systems. All accessed case records were pooled. Case ascertainment and diagnostic assessment were achieved through structured clinical interview for DSM-IV, phone interview, or farming a best-estimated diagnosis via records on registers. Registries provided 1,410 probable cases. The successful clinical reappraisal rate was 66.8% (n: 955) while, the final diagnoses were determined via phone interview or best-estimate diagnosis in the rest of the cases. Seven hundred twenty seven individuals were diagnosed with DSM-IV yielding a prevalence of 9.8 per 1,000 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.2-11.5). Registry-based prevalence of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, BPI disorder, and depression with psychotic features were 3.6 (95% CI: 3.0-4.2), 1.1 (95% CI: 0.8-1.4), 2.7 (95% CI: 2.0-3.3), and 1.0 (95% CI: 0.6-1.3) per 1,000, respectively. Ten individuals per 1,000 adult persons admit for any disorder with psychotic symptoms. Registry-based prevalence estimates are lower than the lifetime prevalence estimates. However, analyses of administrative data appear to provide information needed for effectively plan and implement psychiatric services.

  9. GENE X ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA AND BIPOLAR DISORDER:EVIDENCE FROM NEUROIMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Alexis Geoffroy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Schizophrenia (SZ and Bipolar disorder (BD are considered as severe multifactorial diseases, stemming from genetic and environmental influences. Growing evidence supports gene x environment (GxE interactions in these disorders and neuroimaging studies can help us to understand how those factors mechanistically interact. No reviews synthesized the existing data of neuroimaging studies in these issues.Methods: We conduct a systematic review on the neuroimaging studies exploring GxE interactions relative to SZ or BD in PubMed.Results: First results of the influence of genetic and environmental risks on brain structures came from monozygotic twin pairs concordant and discordant for SZ or BD. Few structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI studies have explored the GxE interactions. No other imaging methods were found. Two main GxE interactions on brain volumes have arisen. First, an interaction between genetic liability to SZ and obstetric complications on gray matter, cerebrospinal fluid and hippocampal volumes. Second, cannabis use and genetic liability interaction effects on cortical thickness and white matter volumes.Conclusion: Combining GxE interactions and neuroimaging domains is a promising approach. Genetic risk and environmental exposures such as cannabis or obstetrical complications seem to interact leading to specific neuroimaging cerebral alterations in SZ. They are suggestive of GxE interactions that confer phenotypic abnormalities in SZ and possibly BD. We need further, larger neuroimaging studies of GxE interactions for which we may propose a framework focusing on GxE interactions data already known to have a clinical effect such as infections, early stress, urbanicity and substance abuse.

  10. Search for a shared segment on chromosome 10q26 in patients with bipolar affective disorder or schizophrenia from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, Henrik; Flint, Tracey J; Jorgensen, Tove H

    2002-01-01

    Previous linkage studies have suggested a new locus for bipolar affective disorder and possibly also for schizophrenia on chromosome 10q26. We searched for allelic association and chromosome segment and haplotype sharing on chromosome 10q26 among distantly related patients with bipolar affective...... disorder or schizophrenia and controls from the relatively isolated population of the Faroe Islands by investigating 22 microsatellite markers from a 35 cM region. We used a combined approach with both assumption free tests and tests based on genealogical relationships. The 6.5 cM region between D10S1230...... and D10S2322, which has been implied in previous linkage analyses, received some support. A search for segment sharing yielded empirical P-values around 0.02 among patients with bipolar affective disorder and around 0.03 for patients with schizophrenia. For both disorders combined allelic association...

  11. Interactions Between Variation in Candidate Genes and Environmental Factors in the Etiology of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Błażej; Stramecki, Filip; Gawęda, Łukasz; Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Sąsiadek, Maria M; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Frydecka, Dorota

    2017-08-18

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) are complex and multidimensional disorders with high heritability rates. The contribution of genetic factors to the etiology of these disorders is increasingly being recognized as the action of multiple risk variants with small effect sizes, which might explain only a minor part of susceptibility. On the other site, numerous environmental factors have been found to play an important role in their causality. Therefore, in recent years, several studies focused on gene × environment interactions that are believed to bridge the gap between genetic underpinnings and environmental insults. In this article, we performed a systematic review of studies investigating gene × environment interactions in BD and schizophrenia spectrum phenotypes. In the majority of studies from this field, interacting effects of variation in genes encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP5) have been explored. Almost consistently, these studies revealed that polymorphisms in COMT, BDNF, and FKBP5 genes might interact with early life stress and cannabis abuse or dependence, influencing various outcomes of schizophrenia spectrum disorders and BD. Other interactions still require further replication in larger clinical and non-clinical samples. In addition, future studies should address the direction of causality and potential mechanisms of the relationship between gene × environment interactions and various categories of outcomes in schizophrenia and BD.

  12. Does cognitive performance map to categorical diagnoses of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder? A discriminant functions analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E; Bryce, Shayden; Tan, Eric J; Neill, Erica; Gurvich, Caroline; Louise, Stephanie; Rossell, Susan L

    2016-03-01

    Despite known overlaps in the pattern of cognitive impairments in individuals with bipolar disorder (BD), schizophrenia (SZ) and schizoaffective disorder (SZA), few studies have examined the extent to which cognitive performance validates traditional diagnostic boundaries in these groups. Individuals with SZ (n=49), schizoaffective disorder (n=33) and BD (n=35) completed a battery of cognitive tests measuring the domains of processing speed, immediate memory, semantic memory, learning, working memory, executive function and sustained attention. A discriminant functions analysis revealed a significant function comprising semantic memory, immediate memory and processing speed that maximally separated patients with SZ from those with BD. Initial classification scores on the basis of this function showed modest diagnostic accuracy, owing in part to the misclassification of SZA patients as having SZ. When SZA patients were removed from the model, a second cross-validated classifier yielded slightly improved diagnostic accuracy and a single function solution, of which semantic memory loaded most heavily. A cluster of non-executive cognitive processes appears to have some validity in mapping onto traditional nosological boundaries. However, since semantic memory performance was the primary driver of the discrimination between BD and SZ, it is possible that performance differences between the disorders in this cognitive domain in particular, index separate underlying aetiologies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Symptoms of psychosis in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder: A comparison of African Americans and Caucasians in the Genomic Psychiatry Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Greg; Kotov, Roman; Fu, Jinmiao; Bromet, Evelyn J; Fochtmann, Laura J; Medeiros, Helena; Pato, Michele T; Pato, Carlos N

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have reported differences between African Americans and Caucasians in relative proportion of psychotic symptoms and disorders, but whether this reflects racial bias in the assessment of psychosis is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the distribution of psychotic symptoms and potential bias in symptoms assessed via semi-structured interview using a cohort of 3,389 African American and 5,692 Caucasian participants who were diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder. In this cohort, the diagnosis of schizophrenia was relatively more common, and the diagnosis of bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder-bipolar type was less relatively common, among African Americans than Caucasians. With regard to symptoms, relatively more African Americans than Caucasians endorsed hallucinations and delusions symptoms, and this pattern was striking among cases diagnosed with bipolar disorder and schizoaffective-bipolar disorder. In contrast, the relative endorsement of psychotic symptoms was more similar among cases diagnosed with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder-depressed type. Differential item function analysis revealed that African Americans with mild psychosis over-endorsed "hallucinations in any modality" and under-endorsed "widespread delusions" relative to Caucasians. Other symptoms did not show evidence of racial bias. Thus, racial bias in assessment of psychotic symptoms does not appear to explain differences in the proportion of symptoms between Caucasians and African Americans. Rather, this may reflect ascertainment bias, perhaps indicative of a disparity in access to services, or differential exposure to risk factors for psychosis by race. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cognitive function in childhood and early adulthood and hospital admission for schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in Danish men born in 1953

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Lawlor, Debbie A; Nordentoft, Merete

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examines the influence of cognitive function and change in cognitive function during adolescence on schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in adulthood and explores possible mechanisms for any associations. METHOD: A cohort of 6923 men born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1953, who had...... completed assessments of cognitive performance (measured by a total test score that combines verbal, arithmetic and spatial functions) at ages 12 and 18, were followed from 1972 until 2002. Psychiatric outcomes (hospital admissions for schizophrenia and bipolar disorders) were obtained from the Danish...... Psychiatric Register. RESULTS: During the follow-up period 133 of the men had a discharge diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Cognitive function measured at both ages 12 and 18 years was inversely associated with these disorders (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) per SD of cognitive...

  15. Relapse and hospitalization in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder at the St Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a comparative quantitative cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayano, Getnet; Duko, Bereket

    2017-01-01

    Relapse and hospital admission are common among, and carry a heavy burden in, patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of relapse and hospitalizations in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder at the St Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A hospital-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2016. Systematic random sampling technique was used to recruit 521 (260 schizophrenia cases and 261 bipolar disorder cases) study participants. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained psychiatry professionals. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria and Structured Clinical Interview of DSM-IV (SCID) were used. The risk of relapse and hospitalizations was slightly higher in patients with bipolar disorder than in patients with schizophrenia. A majority of schizophrenic (213 [81.92%]) and bipolar (215 [82.37%]) patients had a history of hospital admission, and 228 (87.69%) schizophrenic and 230 (88.12%) bipolar patients had a history of relapse. Patients who had a history of hospitalizations also had co-occurring substance use disorders compared to those who had no history of hospitalizations for schizophrenia (81.5% vs 37.9%) and bipolar disorder (82.56% vs 38.2%), respectively. Similarly, those patients who had a history of relapse had high comorbid substance use disorders than those who had no history of relapse for both schizophrenia (87.88% vs 47.37%) and bipolar disorder (88.37% vs 47.19%), respectively. It is vital that, in the local context, mental health professionals strengthen their therapeutic relationships with patients and their caregivers. This might enable patients and their caregivers to express their needs and concerns to them, as well as help to plan proper interventions for patients. Attention needs to be given to screening for comorbid substance use disorders in patients with

  16. Interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelmann, Hanno; Franklin, Jeremy; Bußhoff, Jana; Baethge, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Schizoaffective disorder is a common diagnosis in clinical practice but its nosological status has been subject to debate ever since it was conceptualized. Although it is key that diagnostic reliability is sufficient, schizoaffective disorder has been reported to have low interrater reliability. Evidence based on systematic review and meta-analysis methods, however, is lacking. Using a highly sensitive literature search in Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo we identified studies measuring the interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder in comparison to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar disorder. Out of 4126 records screened we included 25 studies reporting on 7912 patients diagnosed by different raters. The interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder was moderate (meta-analytic estimate of Cohen's kappa 0.57 [95% CI: 0.41-0.73]), and substantially lower than that of its main differential diagnoses (difference in kappa between 0.22 and 0.19). Although there was considerable heterogeneity, analyses revealed that the interrater reliability of schizoaffective disorder was consistently lower in the overwhelming majority of studies. The results remained robust in subgroup and sensitivity analyses (e.g., diagnostic manual used) as well as in meta-regressions (e.g., publication year) and analyses of publication bias. Clinically, the results highlight the particular importance of diagnostic re-evaluation in patients diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder. They also quantify a widely held clinical impression of lower interrater reliability and agree with earlier meta-analysis reporting low test-retest reliability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Maintenance pharmacotherapy normalizes the relapse curve in recently abstinent tobacco smokers with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evins, A Eden; Hoeppner, Susanne S; Schoenfeld, David A; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Cather, Corinne; Pachas, Gladys N; Cieslak, Kristina M; Maravic, Melissa Culhane

    2017-05-01

    To compare the effect of maintenance pharmacotherapy on sustained abstinence rates between recently abstinent smokers with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (SBD) and general population smokers without psychiatric illness. We performed a person-level, pooled analysis of two randomized controlled trials of maintenance varenicline, conducted in adult smokers with SBD and general population smokers, controlling for severity of dependence. Smokers abstinent after 12-weeks of open varenicline treatment were randomly assigned to ≥12-weeks maintenance varenicline or identical placebo. In those assigned to maintenance placebo, the abstinence rate at week-24 was lower in those with SBD than for those without psychiatric illness (29.4±1.1% vs. 61.8±0.4%, OR:0.26, 95% CI: 0.13, 0.52, pmaintenance pharmacotherapy, however, there was no effect of diagnosis on abstinence rates at week-24 (87.2±0.8% vs. 81.9±0.2%, OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 0.53, 5.32, p=0.38). Time to first lapse was shortest in those with SBD assigned to maintenance placebo (Q1=12days, 95%CI: 4, 16), longer in those without psychiatric illness assigned to maintenance placebo (Q1=17days, 95%CI: 17, 29), still longer in general-population smokers assigned to maintenance varenicline (Q1=88, 95% CI:58,91, and longest in those with SBD who received maintenance varenicline (Q1>95days, 95%CI:non-est), (Χ23df=96.99, pmaintenance varenicline treatment. Maintenance pharmacotherapy could improve longer-term tobacco abstinence rates and reduce known smoking-related health disparities in those with SMI. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reduced Fertility and Fecundity among Patients with Bipolar I Disorder and Schizophrenia in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hader; Kandil, Kareem; Wood, Joel; Fathi, Warda; Elassy, Mai; Ibrahim, Ibtihal; Salah, Hala; Yassin, Amal; Elsayed, Hanan; Tobar, Salwa; El-Boraie, Hala; Eissa, Ahmed; Elhadidy, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Nahed E.; El-Bahaei, Wafaa

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate reproduction among patients with bipolar I disorder (BP1) or schizophrenia (SZ) in Egypt. Methods BP1 patients (n=113) were compared with community based, demographically balanced controls (n=124) and SZ patients (n=79, DSM-IV). All participants were evaluated using structured interviews and corroborative data were obtained from relatives. Standard indices of procreation were included in multivariate analyses that incorporated key demographic variables. Results Control individuals were significantly more likely to have children than BP1 or SZ patients (controls 46.8%, BP1 15.9%, SZ 17.7%), but the BP1-SZ differences were non-significant. The average number of children for BP1 patients (0.37±0.9) and SZ patients (0.38±0.9) was significantly lower than for controls (1.04±1.48) (BP1 vs controls, pmarriages among BP1 patients was nominally higher than the SZ group, but was significantly lower than controls (BP1: 31.9% SZ: 27.8% control: 57.3%). Even among married individuals, BP1 (but not SZ) patients were childless more often than controls (p=0.001). The marital fertility, i.e., the average number of children among patients with conjugal relationships for controls (1.8±1.57) was significantly higher than BP1 patients (1.14±1.31, p=0.02), but not significantly different from SZ patients (1.36±1.32, p=0.2). Conclusion Selected reproductive measures are significantly and substantially reduced among Egyptian BP1 patients. The reproductive indices are similar among BP1 and SZ patients, suggesting a role for general illness related variables. Regardless of the cause/s, the impairment constitutes important, under-investigated disability. PMID:21994508

  19. Adaptive associations between social cognition and emotion regulation are absent in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesseca Elise Rowland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD are associated with impairments in facial emotion perception and Theory of Mind (ToM. These social cognitive skills deficits may be related to a reduced capacity to effectively regulate one’s own emotions according to the social context. We therefore set out to examine the relationship between social cognitive abilities and the use of cognitive strategies for regulating negative emotion in SZ and BD. Participants were 56 SZ, 33 BD, and 58 healthy controls (HC who completed the Ekman 60-faces test of facial emotion recognition; a sub-set of these participants also completed The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT and the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ. SZ participants demonstrated impairments in emotion perception on both the Ekman and the TASIT Emotion Evaluation tests relative to BD and HC. While both SZ and BD patients showed ToM deficits (i.e., perception of sarcasm and lie compared to HC, SZ patients demonstrated significantly greater ToM impairment compared to BD. There were also distinct patterns of cognitive strategies used to regulate emotion in both patient groups: those with SZ were more likely to engage in catastrophising and rumination, while BD subjects were more likely to blame themselves and were less likely to engage in positive reappraisal, relative to HC. In addition, those with SZ were more likely to blame others compared to BD. Associations between social cognition and affect regulation were revealed for HC only: TASIT performance was negatively associated with more frequent use of rumination, catastrophising and blaming others, such that more frequent use of maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies was associated with poor social cognitive performance. These associations were not present in either patient group. However, both SZ and BD patients demonstrated poor ToM performance and aberrant use of emotion regulation strategies consistent with

  20. CACNA1C risk variant and amygdala activity in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Tesli

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Several genetic studies have implicated the CACNA1C SNP rs1006737 in bipolar disorder (BD and schizophrenia (SZ pathology. This polymorphism was recently found associated with increased amygdala activity in healthy controls and patients with BD. We performed a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI study in a sample of BD and SZ cases and healthy controls to test for altered amygdala activity in carriers of the rs1006737 risk allele (AA/AG, and to investigate if there were differences across the diagnostic groups. METHODS: Rs1006737 was genotyped in 250 individuals (N = 66 BD, 61 SZ and 123 healthy controls, all of Northern European origin, who underwent an fMRI negative faces matching task. Statistical tests were performed with a model correcting for sex, age, diagnostic category and medication status in the total sample, and then in each diagnostic group. RESULTS: In the total sample, carriers of the risk allele had increased activation in the left amygdala. Group-wise analyses showed that this effect was significant in the BD group, but not in the other diagnostic groups. However, there was no significant interaction effect for the risk allele between BD and the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that CACNA1C SNP rs1006737 affects amygdala activity during emotional processing across all diagnostic groups. The current findings add to the growing body of knowledge of the pleiotropic effect of this polymorphism, and further support that ion channel dysregulation is involved in the underlying mechanisms of BD and SZ.

  1. Frequency and Correlates of Distant Visual Impairment in Patients with Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W; Tang, L R; Correll, C U; Ungvari, G S; Chiu, H F K; Xiang, Y Q; Xiang, Y T

    2015-09-01

    Distant visual impairment in the severely mentally ill is under-researched. This study aimed to assess the frequency and correlates of distant visual impairment in a cohort of Chinese psychiatric patients, including its effect on their quality of life. Adult psychiatric inpatients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder consecutively admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Beijing, China underwent assessments of psychopathology (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology [Self-Report]), quality of life (12-item Short-Form Medical Outcomes Study [SF-12], 25-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire [NEI-VFQ25]), adverse effects (Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale), and presenting (as opposed to uncorrected) distant visual acuity (Logarithm of the Minimum Angle of Resolution [LogMAR] chart with patients wearing spectacles, if they owned them). Distant visual impairment was defined as binocular distant visual acuity of a LogMAR score of ≥ 0.5 (visual impairment was 12.6% (15.2% with schizophrenia, 11.9% with bipolar disorder, 8.8% with major depressive disorder). In multiple logistic regression analysis, distant visual impairment was significantly associated with ocular disease only (p = 0.002, odds ratio = 3.2, 95% confidence interval = 1.5-6.7). Controlling for the confounding effect of ocular disease, patients with distant visual impairment had a lower quality of life in the general vision domain of the NEI-VFQ25 (F[2, 353] = 9.5, p = 0.002) compared with those without. No differences in the physical and mental domains of the SF-12 and in other domains of the NEI-VFQ25 were noted in these 2 groups. One-eighth of middle-aged severely mentally ill patients had distant visual impairment. Considering the impact of distant visual impairment on daily functioning, severely mentally ill patients need to be screened for impaired eyesight as part of their

  2. Association analysis of PALB2 and BRCA2 in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in a scandinavian case-control sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesli, Martin; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Mattingsdal, Morten

    2010-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) found significant association between the PALB2 SNP rs420259 and bipolar disorder (BD). The intracellular functions of the expressed proteins from the breast cancer risk genes PALB2 and BRCA2 are closely related. Therefore, we investigated the relation...... between genetic variants in PALB2 and BRCA2 and BD. Due to increasing evidence of genetic overlap between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ), we also investigated association with SCZ. In a Scandinavian case-control sample (n¿=¿686/2,538) we found the BRCA2 SNP rs9567552 to be significantly associated with BD...

  3. A comparison of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder: Results from the Second Australian national psychosis survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Serafino G; Morgan, Vera A; Mitchell, Philip B; Berk, Michael; Young, Allan; Castle, David J

    2015-02-01

    It remains uncertain whether schizoaffective disorder (SAD) is a discrete diagnostic entity, is a variant of either a psychotic mood disorder such as bipolar disorder (BDP) or schizophrenia (SCZ), or exists on a spectral continuum between these disorders. The present study examined whether SCZ, SAD, and BDP differed qualitatively on demographic and clinical variables based on a large Australian dataset. This study examined data from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP), in which 1469 of the 1825 participants in who had an ICD-10 diagnosis of SCZ (n=857), SAD (n=293), and BDP (n=319) were assessed across a broad range of variables. When compared to patients with SCZ, those with SAD reported more current delusional and thought disorder symptoms, a greater number of lifetime depression, mania, and positive symptoms, and fewer negative symptoms. Relative to the BPD group, the SAD group were younger, endorsed more current positive, delusional, and thought disorder symptoms, fewer lifetime mania symptoms, more lifetime psychotic, hallucination, and delusional symptoms, and recorded lower premorbid IQ scores. Compared to patients with BPD, those with SCZ were significantly younger, endorsed more current psychotic and hallucination symptoms, fewer lifetime depression and mania symptoms, more lifetime psychotic, hallucination, and delusional symptoms, reported more negative symptoms and had lower premorbid IQ and psychosocial functioning scores. Validated psychometric measures of psychotic or mood symptoms were not used. This pattern of results is consistent with the conceptualisation of a spectrum of disorders, ranging from BDP at one end, to SAD in the middle, and SCZ at the other end. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of burden among family members of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in a large acute psychiatric hospital in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanling; Rosenheck, Robert; Mohamed, Somaia; Ou, Yufen; Ning, Yuping; He, Hongbo

    2016-08-11

    The difference of burden between caregivers of acute patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder has not been well studied in China, a culture where family responsibility has a very high value. Our aim is to compare family burden in these two categories diagnosis and to identify predictors of family burden in a large psychiatric hospital in China. Two hundred forty-three schizophrenic patients and 200 bipolar patients were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Patients were independently evaluated on symptoms, insight, attitudes toward medication, quality of life during the first week of their admissions. The prime caregiver for each patient was also evaluated with a standard measure of family burden within 1 week of patients' admission. Caregiver perceptions of violent behavior and suicidal risk among patients with bipolar disorder were significantly greater than among families of those with schizophrenia. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated differential correlates of burden for all predictive factors with R(2) values ranging from 0.14 to 0.27 in the five burden factors in schizophrenia families; and from 0.12 to 0.24 in bipolar disorder families. Symptoms severity explained the greatest proportion of variance, whereas patient and caregiver demographic variables explained much less variance. Family burden, especially the caregiver perceptions of violent and suicidal behaviors were greater in care givers of acute bipolar disorder patients than among caregivers of schizophrenia patients in the present sample. However, in families of patients with both disorders clinical features were the strongest predictor of caregiver burden.

  5. Altered functional connectivity during self- and close other-reflection in patients with bipolar disorder with past psychosis and patients with schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Liwen; Meer, van der Lisette; Opmeer, Esther M.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Aleman, Andre

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in implicit self-processing have been reported both in psychotic patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia. It remains unclear whether these two psychotic disorders show disturbed functional connectivity during explicit self-reflection, which is associated with social

  6. Molecular characteristics of Human Endogenous Retrovirus type-W in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, H; Hamdani, N; Faucard, R; Lajnef, M; Jamain, S; Daban-Huard, C; Sarrazin, S; LeGuen, E; Houenou, J; Delavest, M; Moins-Teisserenc, H; Moins-Teiserenc, H; Bengoufa, D; Yolken, R; Madeira, A; Garcia-Montojo, M; Gehin, N; Burgelin, I; Ollagnier, G; Bernard, C; Dumaine, A; Henrion, A; Gombert, A; Le Dudal, K; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Leboyer, M

    2012-12-04

    Epidemiological and genome-wide association studies of severe psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD), suggest complex interactions between multiple genetic elements and environmental factors. The involvement of genetic elements such as Human Endogenous Retroviruses type 'W' family (HERV-W) has consistently been associated with SZ. HERV-W envelope gene (env) is activated by environmental factors and encodes a protein displaying inflammation and neurotoxicity. The present study addressed the molecular characteristics of HERV-W env in SZ and BD. Hundred and thirty-six patients, 91 with BD, 45 with SZ and 73 healthy controls (HC) were included. HERV-W env transcription was found to be elevated in BD (P<10-4) and in SZ (P=0.012) as compared with HC, but with higher values in BD than in SZ group (P<0.01). The corresponding DNA copy number was paradoxically lower in the genome of patients with BD (P=0.0016) or SZ (P<0.0003) than in HC. Differences in nucleotide sequence of HERV-W env were found between patients with SZ and BD as compared with HC, as well as between SZ and BD. The molecular characteristics of HERV-W env also differ from what was observed in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and may represent distinct features of the genome of patients with BD and SZ. The seroprevalence for Toxoplasma gondii yielded low but significant association with HERV-W transcriptional level in a subgroup of BD and SZ, suggesting a potential role in particular patients. A global hypothesis of mechanisms inducing such major psychoses is discussed, placing HERV-W at the crossroads between environmental, genetic and immunological factors. Thus, particular infections would act as activators of HERV-W elements in earliest life, resulting in the production of an HERV-W envelope protein, which then stimulates pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic cascades. This hypothesis needs to be further explored as it may yield major changes in our understanding and treatment of

  7. What is Bipolar Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect friends and family? For More Information Share Bipolar Disorder Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... brochure will give you more information. What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness. It ...

  8. Systematic screening for mutations in the human serotonin 1F receptor gene in patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimron-Abarbanell, D.; Harms, H.; Erdmann, J.; Propping, P.; Noethen, M.M. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-09

    Using single strand conformational analysis we screened the complete coding sequence of the serotonin 1F (5-HT{sub 1F}) receptor gene for the presence of DNA sequence variation in a sample of 137 unrelated individuals including 45 schizophrenic patients, 46 bipolar patients, as well as 46 healthy controls. We detected only three rare sequence variants which are characterized by single base pair substitutions, namely a silent T{r_arrow}A transversion in the third position of codon 261 (encoding isoleucine), a silent C{r_arrow}T transition in the third position of codon 176 (encoding histidine), and a C{r_arrow}T transition in position -78 upstream from the start codon. The lack of significant mutations in patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder indicates that the 5-HT{sub 1F} receptor is not commonly involved in the etiology of these diseases. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. C-reactive protein and white blood cell levels in schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and depression - associations with mortality and psychiatric outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsdal, H T; Köhler-Forsberg, O; Benros, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mental disorders have been associated with increased levels of inflammatory markers, which can affect disease trajectories. We aimed to assess levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cells (WBC) across individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression......, and to investigate associations with subsequent psychiatric admission and mortality. METHODS: We identified all adults in the Central Denmark Region during 2000-2012 with a first diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or depression and a baseline measurement of CRP and/or WBC count. We followed...... these individuals until outcome of interest (psychiatric admission or death), emigration or December 31, 2012, using Cox regression analysis to estimate hazard ratios (HRs). RESULTS: Baseline median CRP differed significantly between mental disorders (P=0.01) being highest in individuals with bipolar disorder (3...

  10. A predisposition for allergies predicts subsequent hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder: a nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Li, Cheng-Ta; Lin, Wei-Chen; Wei, Hang-Tin; Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Pan, Tai-Long; Su, Tung-Ping; Bai, Ya-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that both severe mental disorders (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) and atopic diseases were associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. However, the role of atopy/the predisposition for allergies in the development of metabolic syndrome is still unknown among those with severe mental disorders. Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, 5826 patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (1908 with a predisposition for allergies and 3918 without) were enrolled between 1998 and 2008. Those who developed hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes mellitus were identified during the follow-up to the end of 2011. A predisposition for allergies increased the risk of developing hypertension (HR: 1.67), dyslipidemia (HR: 1.82), and diabetes mellitus (HR: 1.37) in later life among those with severe mental disorders. A dose-dependent relationship was noted between having more atopic comorbidities and a greater likelihood of hypertension (1 atopic disease: HR: 1.60; ≧ 2 atopic comorbidities: HR: 1.87), dyslipidemia (HR: 1.73; HR: 2.12), and diabetes mellitus (HR: 1.26; HR: 1.69). A predisposition for allergies was an independent risk factor for hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Further studies would be required to elucidate the underlying pathophysiology among atopy, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neurocognitive performance, subjective well-being, and psychosocial functioning after benzodiazepine withdrawal in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Fagerlund, Birgitte; Glenthoj, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Chronic benzodiazepine use is common in patients with mental illness and is associated with cognitive impairment. It is unclear whether benzodiazepine-induced cognitive impairment is reversible. Amelioration of cognitive dysfunction may be facilitated during benzodiazepine tapering by add......-on melatonin due to its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties. We examined how melatonin and benzodiazepine withdrawal affect cognition, subjective well-being, and psychosocial functioning. Eighty patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder were randomized to add-on treatment once daily...... with either prolonged-release melatonin or placebo in a 24-week, double-blind clinical trial. All participants gradually tapered usual benzodiazepine dosage in a closely monitored treatment setting. We used the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) to assess neurocognitive performance...

  12. Adaptive Associations between Social Cognition and Emotion Regulation are Absent in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Jesseca E; Hamilton, Meelah K; Vella, Nicholas; Lino, Bianca J; Mitchell, Philip B; Green, Melissa J

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with impairments in facial emotion perception and Theory of Mind (ToM). These social cognitive skills deficits may be related to a reduced capacity to effectively regulate one's own emotions according to the social context. We therefore set out to examine the relationship between social cognitive abilities and the use of cognitive strategies for regulating negative emotion in SZ and BD. Participants were 56 SZ, 33 BD, and 58 healthy controls (HC) who completed the Ekman 60-faces test of facial emotion recognition; a sub-set of these participants also completed The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) and the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ). SZ participants demonstrated impairments in emotion perception on both the Ekman and the TASIT Emotion Evaluation tests relative to BD and HC. While both SZ and BD patients showed ToM deficits (i.e., perception of sarcasm and lie) compared to HC, SZ patients demonstrated significantly greater ToM impairment compared to BD. There were also distinct patterns of cognitive strategies used to regulate emotion in both patient groups: those with SZ were more likely to engage in catastrophizing and rumination, while BD subjects were more likely to blame themselves and were less likely to engage in positive reappraisal, relative to HC. In addition, those with SZ were more likely to blame others compared to BD. Associations between social cognition and affect regulation were revealed for HC only: TASIT performance was negatively associated with more frequent use of rumination, catastrophizing, and blaming others, such that more frequent use of maladaptive cognitive emotion regulation strategies was associated with poor social cognitive performance. These associations were not present in either patient group. However, both SZ and BD patients demonstrated poor ToM performance and aberrant use of emotion regulation strategies consistent with previous studies

  13. Pain-processing abnormalities in bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and schizophrenia: A novel trait marker for psychosis proneness and functional outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichino, Amedeo; Delle Chiaie, Roberto; Cruccu, Giorgio; Piroso, Serena; Di Stefano, Giulia; Francesconi, Marta; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Biondi, Massimo; Truini, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Overlapping neural system dysfunctions, mainly involving the secondary somatosensory cortex (S2), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and the anterior insular cortex (AIC), seem to be related to both pain-perception abnormalities and psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). Laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) were used to investigate pain-perception and central pain-processing abnormalities in SCZ, bipolar I disorder (BD-I), and bipolar II disorder (BD-II), and to evaluate their relationship with history of psychosis, and social-cognitive and functional impairments. Twenty patients with SCZ, 17 patients with BD-I, and 21 patients with BD-II who were all under similar pharmacological treatment underwent clinical, functional, and neuro-psychological assessment. LEPs were analyzed in patients and 19 healthy subjects (HS). LEPs elicit responses reflecting the activity of the S2 (N1 wave) and the ACC/AIC cortices (N2/P2 complex). A four-group ANOVA was conducted between patients and HS to compare pain-perceptive thresholds (PThs), N1, and N2/P2-LEP components. Compared to HS: (i) patients with SCZ showed pain-processing and pain-perception abnormalities, as revealed by significantly higher PTh (P<.01), and lower N1 (P<.01) and N2/P2 (P<.01) amplitudes, (ii) patients with BD-I showed only pain-processing abnormalities, as revealed by significantly lower N1 (P<.05) and N2 (P<.01) amplitudes; and patients with BD-II did not differ for any of the LEP variables investigated. N1 and N2 amplitudes negatively correlated to history of psychosis (P<.01), social-cognition (P<.05), and real-world functioning (P<.01) measures in the whole group of patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study comparing central pain processing in patients with SCZ, BD-I, and BD-II. Our results suggest that pain-processing abnormalities may represent a novel locus of interest for research investigating trait markers of the psychosis spectrum. © 2016 John Wiley

  14. FT-IR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis as an auxiliary tool for diagnosis of mental disorders: Bipolar and schizophrenia cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogruc Ildiz, G.; Arslan, M.; Unsalan, O.; Araujo-Andrade, C.; Kurt, E.; Karatepe, H. T.; Yilmaz, A.; Yalcinkaya, O. B.; Herken, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a methodology based on Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and principal component analysis and partial least square methods is proposed for the analysis of blood plasma samples in order to identify spectral changes correlated with some biomarkers associated with schizophrenia and bipolarity. Our main goal was to use the spectral information for the calibration of statistical models to discriminate and classify blood plasma samples belonging to bipolar and schizophrenic patients. IR spectra of 30 samples of blood plasma obtained from each, bipolar and schizophrenic patients and healthy control group were collected. The results obtained from principal component analysis (PCA) show a clear discrimination between the bipolar (BP), schizophrenic (SZ) and control group' (CG) blood samples that also give possibility to identify three main regions that show the major differences correlated with both mental disorders (biomarkers). Furthermore, a model for the classification of the blood samples was calibrated using partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), allowing the correct classification of BP, SZ and CG samples. The results obtained applying this methodology suggest that it can be used as a complimentary diagnostic tool for the detection and discrimination of these mental diseases.

  15. Comparison of burden among family members of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in a large acute psychiatric hospital in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanling; Rosenheck, Robert; Mohamed, Somaia; Ou, Yufen; Ning, Yuping; He, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Background The difference of burden between caregivers of acute patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder has not been well studied in China, a culture where family responsibility has a very high value. Our aim is to compare family burden in these two categories diagnosis and to identify predictors of family burden in a large psychiatric hospital in China. Methods Two hundred forty-three schizophrenic patients and 200 bipolar patients were enrolled in a cross-sectional study. Patients ...

  16. Test-retest reliability of schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santelmann, Hanno; Franklin, Jeremy; Bußhoff, Jana; Baethge, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Schizoaffective disorder is a frequent diagnosis, and its reliability is subject to ongoing discussion. We compared the diagnostic reliability of schizoaffective disorder with its main differential diagnoses. We systematically searched Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo for all studies on the test-retest reliability of the diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder as compared with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression. We used meta-analytic methods to describe and compare Cohen's kappa as well as positive and negative agreement. In addition, multiple pre-specified and post hoc subgroup and sensitivity analyses were carried out. Out of 4,415 studies screened, 49 studies were included. Test-retest reliability of schizoaffective disorder was consistently lower than that of schizophrenia (in 39 out of 42 studies), bipolar disorder (27/33), and unipolar depression (29/35). The mean difference in kappa between schizoaffective disorder and the other diagnoses was approximately 0.2, and mean Cohen's kappa for schizoaffective disorder was 0.50 (95% confidence interval: 0.40-0.59). While findings were unequivocal and homogeneous for schizoaffective disorder's diagnostic reliability relative to its three main differential diagnoses (dichotomous: smaller versus larger), heterogeneity was substantial for continuous measures, even after subgroup and sensitivity analyses. In clinical practice and research, schizoaffective disorder's comparatively low diagnostic reliability should lead to increased efforts to correctly diagnose the disorder. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Identifying dynamic functional connectivity biomarkers using GIG-ICA: Application to schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and psychotic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuhui; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Lin, Dongdong; Sui, Jing; Chen, Jiayu; Salman, Mustafa; Tamminga, Carol A; Ivleva, Elena I; Sweeney, John A; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Clementz, Brett A; Bustillo, Juan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2017-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown altered brain dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) in mental disorders. Here, we aim to explore DFC across a spectrum of symptomatically-related disorders including bipolar disorder with psychosis (BPP), schizoaffective disorder (SAD), and schizophrenia (SZ). We introduce a group information guided independent component analysis procedure to estimate both group-level and subject-specific connectivity states from DFC. Using resting-state fMRI data of 238 healthy controls (HCs), 140 BPP, 132 SAD, and 113 SZ patients, we identified measures differentiating groups from the whole-brain DFC and traditional static functional connectivity (SFC), separately. Results show that DFC provided more informative measures than SFC. Diagnosis-related connectivity states were evident using DFC analysis. For the dominant state consistent across groups, we found 22 instances of hypoconnectivity (with decreasing trends from HC to BPP to SAD to SZ) mainly involving post-central, frontal, and cerebellar cortices as well as 34 examples of hyperconnectivity (with increasing trends HC through SZ) primarily involving thalamus and temporal cortices. Hypoconnectivities/hyperconnectivities also showed negative/positive correlations, respectively, with clinical symptom scores. Specifically, hypoconnectivities linking postcentral and frontal gyri were significantly negatively correlated with the PANSS positive/negative scores. For frontal connectivities, BPP resembled HC while SAD and SZ were more similar. Three connectivities involving the left cerebellar crus differentiated SZ from other groups and one connection linking frontal and fusiform cortices showed a SAD-unique change. In summary, our method is promising for assessing DFC and may yield imaging biomarkers for quantifying the dimension of psychosis. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2683-2708, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effects of antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers on risk for physical diseases in people with schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U; Detraux, Johan; De Lepeleire, Jan; De Hert, Marc

    2015-06-01

    People with severe mental illness have a considerably shorter lifespan than the general population. This excess mortality is mainly due to physical illness. Next to mental illness-related factors, unhealthy lifestyle, and disparities in health care access and utilization, psychotropic medications can contribute to the risk of physical morbidity and mortality. We systematically reviewed the effects of antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers on physical health outcomes in people with schizophrenia, depression and bipolar disorder. Updating and expanding our prior systematic review published in this journal, we searched MEDLINE (November 2009 - November 2014), combining the MeSH terms of major physical disease categories (and/or relevant diseases within these categories) with schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder, and the three major psychotropic classes which received regulatory approval for these disorders, i.e., antipsychotics, antidepressants and mood stabilizers. We gave precedence to results from (systematic) reviews and meta-analyses wherever possible. Antipsychotics, and to a more restricted degree antidepressants and mood stabilizers, are associated with an increased risk for several physical diseases, including obesity, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, hyponatremia; cardiovascular, respiratory tract, gastrointestinal, haematological, musculoskeletal and renal diseases, as well as movement and seizure disorders. Higher dosages, polypharmacy, and treatment of vulnerable (e.g., old or young) individuals are associated with greater absolute (elderly) and relative (youth) risk for most of these physical diseases. To what degree medication-specific and patient-specific risk factors interact, and how adverse outcomes can be minimized, allowing patients to derive maximum benefits from these medications, requires adequate clinical attention and further research. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  19. Clinical, Cognitive, and Neuroimaging Evidence of a Neurodevelopmental Continuum in Offspring of Probands With Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugranyes, Gisela; de la Serna, Elena; Borras, Roger; Sanchez-Gistau, Vanessa; Pariente, Jose C; Romero, Soledad; Baeza, Inmaculada; Díaz-Caneja, Covadonga M; Rodriguez-Toscano, Elisa; Moreno, Carmen; Bernardo, Miguel; Moreno, Dolores; Vieta, Eduard; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2017-10-21

    Studies in child and adolescent offspring of patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders may help understand the influence of neurodevelopmental factors on the premorbid phenotype of these disorders. To assess whether a combination of neurodevelopmental factors discriminates between young offspring of patients with schizophrenia (SzO) or bipolar disorder (BpO) and community controls (CcO). To assess the association between these factors and rates of psychiatric diagnoses in high risk (HR) youth. One hundred thirty-three HR offspring (47 SzO and 86 BpO) and 84 CcO, aged 6-17, underwent cross-sectional clinical, neurocognitive, and structural neuroimaging assessment. Information on perinatal events and early childhood development was also obtained. General linear mixed models were performed to assess group discrimination and association with lifetime axis I psychiatric disorders. Multivariate analyses revealed that greater neurological soft signs (NSS), less total grey matter volume (GMV) and a higher frequency of obstetric complications discriminated HR offspring from CcO. When comparing each group individually, greater NSS and a higher frequency of obstetric complications discriminated SzO from CcO, and BpO from CcO, while lower intelligence also discriminated SzO from CcO and from BpO. Within HR offspring, lower intelligence and less total GMV were associated with lifetime incidence of psychiatric disorders. Both SzO and BpO showed evidence of neurodevelopmental insult, although this may have a greater impact in SzO. Lower intelligence and less total GMV hold potential as biomarkers of risk for psychiatric disorders in HR youth.

  20. Risk factors increasing aggressive behaviour in psychiatric patients hospitalised with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiktor Szymaniuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Violent and aggressive behaviour is a serious problem among hospitalised psychiatric patients. The aim of this study was to assess factors that may help predict violent behaviour in psychiatric inpatients. Method: The study group consisted of 107 patients hospitalised in the Department of Adult Psychiatry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences in Poznań, with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (n = 58, schizophrenia (n = 39 and anxiety disorders (n = 10. Sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained through a review of medical records and patient interviews using a self-prepared questionnaire. Results: Of 107 respondents, aggressive behaviour occurred in 46 patients (42.99%. A low risk of aggressive behaviour was observed in 68 patients (63.6%, medium risk – in 37 patients (34.6%, and high risk – in 2 subjects (1.9%. The study demonstrated a significant association between aggressive behaviour and short duration of the illness (p = 0.002, the criminal history of the patient (p = 0.003, the use of sedatives (p = 0.04, unemployment (p = 0.00034 and male gender in patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (p = 0.03. There were no statistically significant differences between the incidence of violence and the main diagnosis (p = 0.56. The study showed no association with alcohol (p = 0.5 and psychoactive substance abuse (p = 0.07, age (p = 0.8, addiction in family (p = 0.1, history of suicide attempt (p = 0.08 and the lack of insight into the illness (p = 0.8. Conclusions: Based on these results, it appears that the most important factors in the occurrence of aggressive behaviour were criminal history, prior violent behaviour and short duration of the illness. The use of sedative drugs and male gender were also significant risk factors.

  1. Search for a shared segment on chromosome 10q26 in patients with bipolar affective disorder or schizophrenia from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, Henrik; Flint, Tracey J; Jorgensen, Tove H

    2002-01-01

    Previous linkage studies have suggested a new locus for bipolar affective disorder and possibly also for schizophrenia on chromosome 10q26. We searched for allelic association and chromosome segment and haplotype sharing on chromosome 10q26 among distantly related patients with bipolar affective...... and D10S2322, which has been implied in previous linkage analyses, received some support. A search for segment sharing yielded empirical P-values around 0.02 among patients with bipolar affective disorder and around 0.03 for patients with schizophrenia. For both disorders combined allelic association...... yielded empirical P-values around 0.003 at marker D10S1723. A haplotype data mining approach supported haplotype sharing in this region. In another, more distal, 11.5 cM region between markers D10S214 and D10S505, which has received support in previous linkage studies, increased haplotype sharing...

  2. Utility of Washington Early Recognition Center (WERC Self-Report Screening Questionnaires in the Assessment of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Jen-Chia Hsieh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Early identification and treatment are associated with improved outcomes in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Screening for the presence of these disorders usually involves time-intensive interviews that may not be practical in settings where mental health providers are limited. Thus, individuals at earlier stages of illness are often not identified. The Washington Early Recognition Center Affectivity and Psychosis (WERCAP Screen is a self-report questionnaire originally developed to identify clinical risk for developing bipolar or psychotic disorders. The goal of the current study was to investigate the utility of the WERCAP Screen and two complementary questionnaires, the WERC Stress Screen and the WERC Substance Screen, in identifying individuals with established schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Participants consisted of 35 bipolar disorder (BPD and 34 schizophrenia (SCZ patients, as well as 32 controls (CON, aged 18-30 years. Univariate analyses were used to test for score differences between groups. Logistic regression and ROC curves were used to identify diagnostic predictors. Significant group differences were found for the psychosis section of the WERCAP (pWERCAP; p 20 (AUC: 0.87; sensitivity: 0.91; specificity: 1.0; while that for the pWERCAP to identify schizophrenia was a score of >13 (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 0.88; specificity: 0.88. These results indicate that the WERCAP Screen may be useful in screening individuals for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and that identifying stress and substance use severity can be rapidly done using self-report questionnaires. Larger studies in undiagnosed individuals will be needed to test the WERCAP Screen’s ability to identify mania or psychosis in the community.

  3. Comparing cohort incidence of schizophrenia with that of bipolar disorder and affective psychosis in individuals born in Stockholm County 1955-1967.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderlund, J; Wicks, S; Jörgensen, L; Dalman, C

    2015-12-01

    Perinatal factors are associated with increased risk for both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Improvements in obstetric and maternal healthcare and positive socioeconomic development in Sweden from the 1950s onwards could be expected to affect incidence estimates. However, commonly incidence rates are calculated during a specific year, i.e. time of diagnosis, which mirrors proximal precipitating risk factors. To examine whether incidence estimates are compatible with the hypothesis of an impact of perinatal exposures on the risk of the different disorders we here instead calculate incidence rates for consecutive birth cohorts born between 1955 and 1967. We hypothesized that schizophrenia incidence would be more affected compared to bipolar disorder and other affective psychoses since most perinatal risk factors are more pronounced in schizophrenia aetiology. Birth cohorts of individuals born in Sweden and resident in Stockholm (N = 2,16,322), were followed in The National Patient Register regarding incident inpatient episodes Incident cases/10,000 person-years and birth cohort were calculated. Linear regression was used to estimate change in incidence rate. We found stable birth cohort-based incidence estimates for bipolar disorder and other affective psychoses, but a continuous reduction in incidence estimates for schizophrenia as well as other non-affective psychoses in subsequent birth cohorts from 1955 to 1967. The consecutive birth cohort-based incidence estimates unveiled patterns that are compatible with the hypothesis of an impact of early life exposures decreasing over time, in the aetiology of schizophrenia, whereas this pattern is less apparent in affective psychoses..

  4. Correlation Between Insight and Capacity to Consent to Research in Subjects With Bipolar Disorder Type I and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Jaramillo, Carlos; Tobler, Chantal Aristizábal; Gómez, Constanza Ovalle; Triana, Jaime Escobar

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder type I (BD-I) can affect patient autonomy and capacity to consent to participate in research. Other variables associated with the autonomy of patients must be explored in order to improve the quality of the currently available tools. To evaluate the relationship between insight and the capacity to consent to participate in research in patients with BD-I and schizophrenia. A cross-sectional and longitudinal study was conducted with 120 subjects (40 subjects with schizophrenia, 40 with BD-I, and 40 healthy controls). The tools used were the Scale Assessment Insight-Expanded (SAI-E) and the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Treatment (MacCAT-CR), which was first adapted culturally, and its validity and reliability assessed. The results obtained on each scale were compared and the association between them were evaluated. There is a direct correlation between the capacity to consent to research, measured using the MacCAT-CR tool, and the degree of insight, measured using the SAI-E scale, with an effect size of 1.3 for BD-I and 2.03 for schizophrenia. The results suggest that there is a correlation between the degree of insight and the capacity to consent to research in subjects with schizophrenia and BD-I. Insight should therefore be included as a relevant variable to assess the capacity to consent, and future studies should include it when researching on or designing new tools which aim at a greater respect of patient autonomy. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. [The Relationship of Verbal Working Memory and Theory of Mind in First Degree Relatives of Patients With Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücel, Mehmet Onur; Devrimci Özgüven, Halise; Sakarya, Ayşegül; Baskak, Bora; Özel Kızıl, Erguvan Tuğba; Sakarya, Direnç; Haran, Seda

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to compare Theory of Mind (ToM) functions and investigate the relationship between ToM functions and verbal working memory (VWM) in first degree relatives of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia patients. The sample consisted of first degree relatives of patients with bipolar disorder (n=22), schizophrenia (n=28), and age, gender, education and total IQ matched healthy volunteers (n=27) without a family history of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. We administered Auditory Consonants Test (ACT) to evaluate VWM, first and second order false belief tests (ToM-1, ToM-2), Faux Pas Test (FPT), Hinting Test (HT) to evaluate different domains of ToM functions. Both relative groups performed significantly lower in all components of ToM and VWM tests compared to the control group. When VWM scores were employed as covariate in the analyses, the FPT difference between the groups remained significant, HT difference regressed to a marginal level, and the difference between ToM-1 and ToM-2 disappeared. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating the presence of ToM impairment among first degree relatives of bipolar disorder patients similar to relatives of schizophrenia patients. VWM performance seems to affect first and second order ToM functions in relatives of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. On the other hand, FPT and HT domains seem to be independent of VWM performances in these groups. FPT and HT impairments may be familial vulnerability markers that are independent from neurocognitive impairment.

  6. [Differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Masatoshi

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of dissociative disorders includes many psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorders (especially bipolar II disorder), depressive disorder (especially atypical depression), epilepsy, Asperger syndrome, and borderline personality disorder. The theme of this paper is the differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia. Schneiderian first-rank symptoms in schizophrenia are common in dissociative disorders, especially in dissociative identity disorder (DID). Many DID patients have been misdiagnosed as schizophrenics and treated with neuroleptics. We compared and examined Schneiderian symptoms of schizophrenia and those of dissociative disorders from a structural viewpoint. In dissociative disorders, delusional perception and somatic passivity are not seen. "Lateness" and "Precedence of the Other" originated from the concept of "Pattern Reversal" (H. Yasunaga)" is characteristic of schizophrenia. It is important to check these basic structure of schizophrenia in subjective experiences in differential diagnosis between dissociative disorders and schizophrenia.

  7. Epidemiological and clinical characterization following a first psychotic episode in major depressive disorder: Comparisons with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder in the Cavan-Monaghan First Episode Psychosis Study (CAMFEPS).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owoeye, Olabisi

    2013-05-28

    While recent research on psychotic illness has focussed on the nosological, clinical, and biological relationships between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, little attention has been directed to the most common other psychotic diagnosis, major depressive disorder with psychotic features (MDDP). As this diagnostic category captures the confluence between dimensions of psychotic and affective psychopathology, it is of unappreciated heuristic potential to inform on the nature of psychotic illness. Therefore, the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of MDDP were compared with those of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder within the Cavan-Monaghan First Episode Psychosis Study (n = 370). Epidemiologically, the first psychotic episode of MDDP (n = 77) was uniformly distributed across the adult life span, while schizophrenia (n = 73) and bipolar disorder (n = 73) were primarily disorders of young adulthood; the incidence of MDDP, like bipolar disorder, did not differ between the sexes, while the incidence of schizophrenia was more common in males than in females. Clinically, MDDP was characterized by negative symptoms, executive dysfunction, neurological soft signs (NSS), premorbid intellectual function, premorbid adjustment, and quality of life similar to those for schizophrenia, while bipolar disorder was characterized by less prominent negative symptoms, executive dysfunction and NSS, and better quality of life. These findings suggest that what we currently categorize as MDDP may be more closely aligned with other psychotic diagnoses than has been considered previously. They indicate that differences in how psychosis is manifested vis-à-vis depression and mania may be quantitative rather than qualitative and occur within a dimensional space, rather than validating categorical distinctions.

  8. Excess mortality of acute and transient psychotic disorders: comparison with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castagnini, Augusto; Foldager, Leslie; Bertelsen, Aksel

    2013-01-01

    .1%) with schizophrenia had died over a mean follow-up period of 6.6 years. The standardized mortality ratio for all causes, natural causes and unnatural causes was significantly high for the three conditions. Mortality of ATPDs was greater in men, with about two-thirds of all deaths resulting from natural causes mainly...... cardiovascular, digestive, neoplastic and respiratory diseases. Suicide was the major cause of premature death in patients with ATPDs. Conclusion: These findings suggest that ATPDs are associated with an increased mortality from both natural causes and suicide....

  9. Validity of a Farsi translation of the composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI to diagnose schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Amini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI is a comprehensive, standardized diagnostic interview for the assessment of psychiatric disorders. There have been few studies on the validity of the CIDI. The objective of present study was to assess the validity of a Farsi translation of the complete CIDI and its psychosis/mania module in five referral clinical psychiatric settings. Methods: Two hundred and three as well as 104 consecutive admissions were interviewed using the complete and the psychosis/mania module, respectively. Within two days of the CIDI interview, two last year residents of psychiatry or psychiatrist who were blind to the CIDI diagnosis completed the Clinical diagnostic checklists (based on DSM-IV and ICD-10 criteria simultaneously and reached the consensus diagnosis. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11 to determine the validity of CIDI. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia was 0.12 and 0.96 using DSM-IV criteria. According to ICD-10 criteria, the results were the same with 0.19% sensitivity and 0.96% specificity. The sensitivity for the diagnosis of bipolar I disorder was low (0.21 using DSM-IV criteria and 0.17% using ICD-10 and specificity, high (0.90 compared to DSM-IV and 0.89 compared to ICD-10 criteria. The results were rather similar for the psychosis/mania module of CIDI. Conclusion: This study suggests that the Farsi translation of both the complete CIDI and the psychosis/mania module of CIDI have good specificity, but poor sensitivity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia and of bipolar I disorder.

  10. Facebook for Supporting a Lifestyle Intervention for People with Major Depressive Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizophrenia: an Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Marsch, Lisa A; McHugo, Gregory J; Bartels, Stephen J

    2018-03-01

    To examine whether Facebook could support a community-based group lifestyle intervention for adults with serious mental illness. Participants with serious mental illness and obesity enrolled in a 6-month group lifestyle program were invited to join a secret Facebook group to support their weight loss and physical activity goals. Two peer co-facilitators moderated the Facebook group. The proportion of participants who achieved ≥5% weight loss or improved fitness was measured at follow-up. The relationship between this outcome and participants' interactions in the Facebook group was examined. Interactions were defined as active contributions including posts, comments, or likes. Content of participants' Facebook posts was also explored. Participants (n = 25) had major depression (44%), bipolar disorder (36%), and schizophrenia (20%). Nineteen (76%) participants joined the Facebook group, and contributed 208 interactions (70 posts; 81 comments; 57 likes). Participants who achieved ≥5% weight loss or improved fitness contributed more interactions in the Facebook group (mean = 19.1; SD = 20.5) compared to participants who did not (mean = 3.9; SD = 6.7), though this relationship approached statistical significance (t = -2.1; Welch's df = 13.1; p = 0.06). Participants' posts containing personal sharing of successes or challenges to adopting healthy behaviors generated more interaction compared to posts containing program reminders (p Facebook appears promising for supporting health behavior change among people with serious mental illness. These findings can inform social media initiatives to scale up health promotion efforts targeting this at-risk group.

  11. A population-based study of the risk of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder associated with parent-child separation during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksarian, D; Eaton, W W; Mortensen, P B; Merikangas, K R; Pedersen, C B

    2015-10-01

    There is growing interest in the role of childhood adversities, including parental death and separation, in the etiology of psychotic disorders. However, few studies have used prospectively collected data to specifically investigate parental separation across development, or assessed the importance of duration of separation, and family characteristics. We measured three types of separation not due to death: maternal, paternal, and from both parents, across the ages of 1-15 years among a cohort of 985 058 individuals born in Denmark 1971-1991 and followed to 2011. Associations with narrowly and broadly defined schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in the psychiatric register were assessed in terms of separation occurrence, age of separation, and number of years separated. Interactions with parental history of mental disorder were assessed. Each type of separation was associated with all three outcomes, adjusting for age, sex, birth period, calendar year, family history of mental disorder, urbanicity at birth and parental age. Number of years of paternal separation was positively associated with both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Associations between separation from both parents and schizophrenia were stronger when separation occurred at later ages, while those with bipolar disorder remained stable across development. The first occurrence of paternal separation appeared to increase risk more when it occurred earlier in childhood. Associations differed according to parental history of mental disorder, although in no situation was separation protective. Effects of parental separation may differ by type, developmental timing and family characteristics. These findings highlight the importance of considering such factors in studies of childhood adversity.

  12. Medication adherence and discontinuation of long-acting injectable versus oral antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Mallik; Yan, Tingjian; Chang, Eunice; Hartry, Ann; Touya, Maëlys; Broder, Michael S

    2018-02-01

    To examine medication adherence and discontinuation in two separate groups of patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (BD), who began receiving a long-acting injectable antipsychotic (LAI) versus those who changed to a different oral antipsychotic monotherapy. The Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Multi-State Medicaid claims database was used to identify patients with schizophrenia; Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Commercial and Medicaid claims databases were used to identify patients with BD. The analyses included adult patients (≥18 years) who either began receiving an LAI (no prior LAI therapy) or changed to a different oral antipsychotic (monotherapy). The first day of initiating an LAI or changing to a new oral antipsychotic was the index date. Linear and Cox regression models were conducted to estimate medication adherence (proportion of days covered [PDC]) and time to medication discontinuation (continuous medication gap ≥60 days), respectively. Models adjusted for patient demographic and clinical characteristics, baseline medication use, and baseline ED or hospitalizations. Patients with schizophrenia (N = 5638) who began receiving LAIs had better medication adherence (5% higher adjusted mean adherence) during the 1 year post-index period and were 20% less likely to discontinue their medication during the entire follow-up period than patients who changed to a different oral antipsychotic monotherapy, adjusting for differences between LAI users and oral users. Similarly, patients with BD (N = 11,344) who began receiving LAIs also had 5% better medication adherence and were 19% less likely to discontinue their medication than those using oral antipsychotics. Clinical differences unmeasurable in this database may have been responsible for the choice of LAI versus oral antipsychotics, and these differences may be responsible for some of the adherence advantages observed. This real-world study suggests that patients with schizophrenia or

  13. Hippocampal Volume Is Reduced in Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder But Not in Psychotic Bipolar I Disorder Demonstrated by Both Manual Tracing and Automated Parcellation (FreeSurfer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Sara J. M.; Ivleva, Elena I.; Gopal, Tejas A.; Reddy, Anil P.; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Sacco, Carolyn B.; Francis, Alan N.; Tandon, Neeraj; Bidesi, Anup S.; Witte, Bradley; Poudyal, Gaurav; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Sweeney, John A.; Clementz, Brett A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Tamminga, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined hippocampal volume as a putative biomarker for psychotic illness in the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) psychosis sample, contrasting manual tracing and semiautomated (FreeSurfer) region-of-interest outcomes. The study sample (n = 596) included probands with schizophrenia (SZ, n = 71), schizoaffective disorder (SAD, n = 70), and psychotic bipolar I disorder (BDP, n = 86); their first-degree relatives (SZ-Rel, n = 74; SAD-Rel, n = 62; BDP-Rel, n = 88); and healthy controls (HC, n = 145). Hippocampal volumes were derived from 3Tesla T1-weighted MPRAGE images using manual tracing/3DSlicer3.6.3 and semiautomated parcellation/FreeSurfer5.1,64bit. Volumetric outcomes from both methodologies were contrasted in HC and probands and relatives across the 3 diagnoses, using mixed-effect regression models (SAS9.3 Proc MIXED); Pearson correlations between manual tracing and FreeSurfer outcomes were computed. SZ (P = .0007–.02) and SAD (P = .003–.14) had lower hippocampal volumes compared with HC, whereas BDP showed normal volumes bilaterally (P = .18–.55). All relative groups had hippocampal volumes not different from controls (P = .12–.97) and higher than those observed in probands (P = .003–.09), except for FreeSurfer measures in bipolar probands vs relatives (P = .64–.99). Outcomes from manual tracing and FreeSurfer showed direct, moderate to strong, correlations (r = .51–.73, P disorder, but not for psychotic bipolar I disorder, and may reflect a cumulative effect of divergent primary disease processes and/or lifetime medication use. Manual tracing and semiautomated parcellation regional volumetric approaches may provide useful outcomes for defining measurable biomarkers underlying severe mental illness. PMID:24557771

  14. Hippocampal volume is reduced in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder but not in psychotic bipolar I disorder demonstrated by both manual tracing and automated parcellation (FreeSurfer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Sara J M; Ivleva, Elena I; Gopal, Tejas A; Reddy, Anil P; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Sacco, Carolyn B; Francis, Alan N; Tandon, Neeraj; Bidesi, Anup S; Witte, Bradley; Poudyal, Gaurav; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Sweeney, John A; Clementz, Brett A; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Tamminga, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined hippocampal volume as a putative biomarker for psychotic illness in the Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) psychosis sample, contrasting manual tracing and semiautomated (FreeSurfer) region-of-interest outcomes. The study sample (n = 596) included probands with schizophrenia (SZ, n = 71), schizoaffective disorder (SAD, n = 70), and psychotic bipolar I disorder (BDP, n = 86); their first-degree relatives (SZ-Rel, n = 74; SAD-Rel, n = 62; BDP-Rel, n = 88); and healthy controls (HC, n = 145). Hippocampal volumes were derived from 3Tesla T1-weighted MPRAGE images using manual tracing/3DSlicer3.6.3 and semiautomated parcellation/FreeSurfer5.1,64bit. Volumetric outcomes from both methodologies were contrasted in HC and probands and relatives across the 3 diagnoses, using mixed-effect regression models (SAS9.3 Proc MIXED); Pearson correlations between manual tracing and FreeSurfer outcomes were computed. SZ (P = .0007-.02) and SAD (P = .003-.14) had lower hippocampal volumes compared with HC, whereas BDP showed normal volumes bilaterally (P = .18-.55). All relative groups had hippocampal volumes not different from controls (P = .12-.97) and higher than those observed in probands (P = .003-.09), except for FreeSurfer measures in bipolar probands vs relatives (P = .64-.99). Outcomes from manual tracing and FreeSurfer showed direct, moderate to strong, correlations (r = .51-.73, P schizoaffective disorder, but not for psychotic bipolar I disorder, and may reflect a cumulative effect of divergent primary disease processes and/or lifetime medication use. Manual tracing and semiautomated parcellation regional volumetric approaches may provide useful outcomes for defining measurable biomarkers underlying severe mental illness. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Olanzapine approved for the acute treatment of schizophrenia or manic/mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Maloney

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ann E Maloney1,2, Linmarie Sikich31Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, ME, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Severe and persistent mental illnesses in children and adolescents, such as early-onset schizophrenia spectrum (EOSS disorders and pediatric bipolar disorder (pedBP, are increasingly recognized. Few treatments have demonstrated efficacy in rigorous clinical trials. Enduring response to current medications appears limited. Recently, olanzapine was approved for the treatment of adolescents with schizophrenia or acute manic/mixed episodes in pedBP.Methods: PubMed searches were conducted for olanzapine combined with pharmacology, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. Searches related to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were limited to children and adolescents. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles were hand-checked for additional relevant studies. The epidemiology, phenomenology, and treatment of EOSS and pedBP, and olanzapine’s pharmacology are reviewed. Studies of olanzapine treatment in youth with EOSS and pedBP are examined.Results: Olanzapine is efficacious for EOSS and pedBP. However, olanzapine is not more efficacious than risperidone, molindone, or haloperidol in EOSS and is less efficacious than clozapine in treatment-resistant EOSS. No comparative trials have been done in pedBP. Olanzapine is associated with weight gain, dyslipidemia, and transaminase elevations in youth. Extrapyramidal symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and blood dyscrasias have also been reported but appear rare.Conclusions: The authors conclude that olanzapine should be considered a second-line agent in EOSS and pedBP due to its risks for significant weight gain and lipid dysregulation. Awareness of the consistent weight and metabolic changes observed in olanzapine

  16. Psychotic and Bipolar Disorders: Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Sarah D

    2017-04-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe chronic mental illness that affects a large number of individuals. This disorder is separated into two major types, bipolar I disorder, with mania and typically recurrent depression, and bipolar II disorder, with recurrent major depression and hypomania. Patients with bipolar disorder spend the majority of time experiencing depression, and this typically is the presenting symptom. Because outcomes are improved with earlier diagnosis and treatment, physicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for bipolar disorder. The most effective long-term treatments are lithium and valproic acid, although other drugs also are used. In addition to referral to a mental health subspecialist for initiation and management of drug treatment, patients with bipolar disorder should be provided with resources for psychotherapy. Several comorbidities commonly associated with bipolar disorder include other mental disorders, substance use disorders, migraine headaches, chronic pain, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Family physicians who care for patients with bipolar disorder should focus their efforts on prevention and management of comorbidities. These patients should be assessed continually for risk of suicide because they are at high risk and their suicide attempts tend to be successful. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  17. Medial prefrontal cortex: genes linked to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia have altered expression in the highly social maternal phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E Eisinger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The transition to motherhood involves CNS changes that modify sociability and affective state. However, these changes also put females at risk for postpartum depression and psychosis, which impairs parenting abilities and adversely affects children. Thus, changes in expression and interactions in a core subset of genes may be critical for emergence of a healthy maternal phenotype, but inappropriate changes of the same genes could put women at risk for postpartum disorders. This study evaluated microarray gene expression changes in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, a region implicated in both maternal behavior and psychiatric disorders. Postpartum mice were compared to virgin controls housed with females and isolated for identical durations. Using the Modular Single-set Enrichment Test (MSET, we found that the genetic landscape of maternal mPFC bears statistical similarity to gene databases associated with schizophrenia (5 of 5 sets and bipolar disorder (BPD, 3 of 3 sets. In contrast to previous studies of maternal lateral septum and medial preoptic area, enrichment of autism and depression-linked genes was not significant (2 of 9 sets, 0 of 4 sets. Among genes linked to multiple disorders were fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7, glutamate metabotropic receptor 3 (Grm3, platelet derived growth factor, beta polypeptide (Pdgfrb, and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (Nr1d1. RT-qPCR confirmed these gene changes as well as FMS-like tyrosine kinase 1 (Flt1 and proenkephalin (Penk. Systems-level methods revealed involvement of developmental gene networks in establishing the maternal phenotype and indirectly suggested a role for numerous microRNAs and transcription factors in mediating expression changes. Together, this study suggests that a subset of genes involved in shaping the healthy maternal brain may also be dysregulated in mental health disorders and put females at risk for postpartum psychosis with aspects of schizophrenia and BPD.

  18. Religiosity and psychological resilience in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: an international cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Y; Hofer, A; Frajo-Apor, B; Wartelsteiner, F; Kemmler, G; Pardeller, S; Suzuki, T; Mimura, M; Fleischhacker, W W; Uchida, H

    2017-11-15

    The impact of religious/spiritual activities on clinical outcomes in patients with serious mental illnesses remains controversial, which was addressed in this international cross-sectional study. Three-hundred sixty-nine subjects were recruited from Austria (n = 189) and Japan (n = 180), consisting of 112 outpatients with paranoid schizophrenia, 120 with bipolar I disorder (DSM-IV), and 137 healthy controls. Religiosity was assessed in terms of attendance and importance of religious/spiritual activities, while resilience was assessed using the 25-item Resilience Scale. General linear models were used to test whether higher religiosity will be associated with higher resilience, higher social functioning, and lower psychopathology. The association between levels of spiritual well-being and resilience was also examined. Attendance of religious services (F [4,365] = 0.827, P = 0.509) and importance of religion/spirituality (F [3,365] = 1.513, P = 0.211) did not show significant associations with resilience. Regarding clinical measures, a modest association between higher importance of religion/spirituality and residual manic symptoms was observed in bipolar patients (F [3,118] = 3.120, P = 0.029). In contrast to the findings regarding religiosity, spiritual well-being showed a strong positive correlation with resilience (r = 0.584, P resilience, social functioning, and psychopathology was not evident in our sample. Spiritual well-being appears more relevant to resilience than religiosity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Functional Remediation for Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Arán, Anabel; Torrent, Carla; Solé, Brisa; Bonnín, C. Mar; Rosa, Adriane R; Sánchez-Moreno, José; Vieta, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment constitutes a core feature of bipolar illness. The main domains affected are verbal memory, attention, and executive functions. Deficits in these areas as well as difficulties to get functional remission seem to be increased associated with illness progression. Several studies have found a strong relationship between neurocognitive impairment and low functioning in bipolar disorder, as previously reported in other illnesses such as schizophrenia. Cognitive remediation strategies, adapted from work conducted with traumatic brain injury patients and applied to patients with schizophrenia, also need to be adapted to individuals with bipolar disorders. Early intervention using functional remediation, involves neurocognitive techniques and training, but also psychoeducation on cognition-related issues and problem-solving within an ecological framework. PMID:21687565

  20. Morphometric differences in planum temporale in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder revealed by statistical analysis of Labeled Cortical Depth Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Tilak eRatnanather

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Differences in cortical thickness in the lateral temporal lobe, including the planum temporale (PT, have been reported in MRI studies of schizophrenia (SCZ and bipolar disorder (BPD patients. Most of these studies have used a single-valued global or local measure for thickness. However, additional and complementary information can be obtained by generating Labelled Cortical Depth Maps (LCDMs, which are distances of labeled gray matter voxels from the nearest point on the gray/white matter (inner cortical surface. Statistical analyses of pooled and censored LCDM distances reveal subtle differences in PT between SCZ and BPD groups from data generated by Ratnanather et al. (Schizophrenia Research, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.schres.2013.08.014. These results confirm that the left PT (LPT is more sensitive than the right PT in distinguishing between SCZ, BPD and healthy controls. Also confirmed is a strong gender effect, with a thicker PT seen in males than in females. The differences between groups at smaller distances in the LPT revealed by pooled and censored LCDM analysis suggest that SCZ and BPD have different effects on the cortical mantle close to the gray/white matter surface. This is consistent with reported subtle changes in the cortical mantle observed in postmortem studies.

  1. Hippocampal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor levels in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Weyn, Annelies; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is involved in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity. Consequently, changes in α7 nAChR function have been implicated in a variety of mental disorders, especially schizophrenia. However, there is little knowledge regarding the levels of the α7 n...

  2. Managing Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder in the Emergency Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott L. Zeller, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient agitation represents a significant challenge in the emergency department (ED, a setting in which medical staff are working under pressure dealing with a diverse range of medical emergencies. The potential for escalation into aggressive behavior, putting patients, staff, and others at risk, makes it imperative to address agitated behavior rapidly and efficiently. Time constraints and limited access to specialist psychiatric support have in the past led to the strategy of “restrain and sedate,” which was believed to represent the optimal approach; however, it is increasingly recognized that more patient-centered approaches result in improved outcomes. The objective of this review is to raise awareness of best practices for the management of agitation in the ED and to consider the role of new pharmacologic interventions in this setting. Discussion: The Best practices in Evaluation and Treatment of Agitation (BETA guidelines address the complete management of agitation, including triage, diagnosis, interpersonal calming skills, and medicine choices. Since their publication in 2012, there have been further developments in pharmacologic approaches for dealing with agitation, including both new agents and new modes of delivery, which increase the options available for both patients and physicians. Newer modes of delivery that could be useful in rapidly managing agitation include inhaled, buccal/ sublingual and intranasal formulations. To date, the only formulation administered via a nonintramuscular route with a specific indication for agitation associated with bipolar or schizophrenia is inhaled loxapine. Non-invasive formulations, although requiring cooperation from patients, have the potential to improve overall patient experience, thereby improving future cooperation between patients and healthcare providers. Conclusion: Management of agitation in the ED should encompass a patient-centered approach, incorporating non

  3. Search for plasma biomarkers in drug-free patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia using metabolome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Yuki; Kasahara, Takaoki; Morishita, Hiromasa; Mataga, Nobuko; Deguchi, Yasuhiko; Tani, Munehide; Kuroda, Kenji; Hattori, Kotaro; Yoshida, Sumiko; Inoue, Koki; Kato, Tadafumi

    2017-02-01

    There is an urgent need for diagnostic biomarkers of bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SZ); however, confounding effects of medication hamper biomarker discovery. In this study, we conducted metabolome analyses to identify novel plasma biomarkers in drug-free patients with BD and SZ. We comprehensively analyzed plasma metabolites using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry in patients with SZ (n = 17), BD (n = 6), and major depressive disorder (n = 9) who had not received psychotropics for at least 2 weeks, and in matched healthy controls (n = 19). The results were compared with previous reports, or verified in an independent sample set using an alternative analytical approach. Lower creatine level and higher 2-hydroxybutyric acid level were observed in SZ than in controls (uncorrected P = 0.016 and 0.043, respectively), whereas they were unaltered in a previously reported dataset. Citrulline was nominally significantly decreased in BD compared to controls (uncorrected P = 0.043); however, this finding was not replicated in an independent sample set of medicated patients with BD. N-methyl-norsalsolinol, a metabolite of dopamine, was suggested as a candidate biomarker of BD; however, it was not detected by the other analytical method. Levels of betaine, a previously reported candidate biomarker of schizophrenia, were unchanged in the current dataset. Our preliminary findings suggest that the effect of confounding factors, such as duration of illness and medication, should be carefully controlled when searching for plasma biomarkers. Further studies are required to establish robust biomarkers for these disorders. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  4. Improved Detection of Common Variants Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder Using Pleiotropy-Informed Conditional False Discovery Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Ole A.; Thompson, Wesley K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Ripke, Stephan; Mattingsdal, Morten; Kelsoe, John R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Rujescu, Dan; Werge, Thomas; Sklar, Pamela; Roddey, J. Cooper; Chen, Chi-Hua; McEvoy, Linda; Desikan, Rahul S.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Dale, Anders M.

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain more of the “missing heritability” of common complex phenotypes. However, reliable methods to identify a larger proportion of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that impact disease risk are currently lacking. Here, we use a genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional false discovery rate (FDR) method on GWAS summary statistics data to identify new loci associated with schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorders (BD), two highly heritable disorders with significant missing heritability. Epidemiological and clinical evidence suggest similar disease characteristics and overlapping genes between SCZ and BD. Here, we computed conditional Q–Q curves of data from the Psychiatric Genome Consortium (SCZ; n = 9,379 cases and n = 7,736 controls; BD: n = 6,990 cases and n = 4,820 controls) to show enrichment of SNPs associated with SCZ as a function of association with BD and vice versa with a corresponding reduction in FDR. Applying the conditional FDR method, we identified 58 loci associated with SCZ and 35 loci associated with BD below the conditional FDR level of 0.05. Of these, 14 loci were associated with both SCZ and BD (conjunction FDR). Together, these findings show the feasibility of genetic pleiotropy-informed methods to improve gene discovery in SCZ and BD and indicate overlapping genetic mechanisms between these two disorders. PMID:23637625

  5. Altered apolipoprotein C expression in association with cognition impairments and hippocampus volume in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöchel, Christian; Kniep, Jonathan; Cooper, Jason D; Stäblein, Michael; Wenzler, Sofia; Sarlon, Jan; Prvulovic, David; Linden, David E J; Bahn, Sabine; Stocki, Pawel; Ozcan, Sureyya; Alves, Gilberto; Carvalho, Andre F; Reif, Andreas; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola

    2017-04-01

    Proteomic analyses facilitate the interpretation of molecular biomarker probes which are very helpful in diagnosing schizophrenia (SZ). In the current study, we attempt to test whether potential differences in plasma protein expressions in SZ and bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with cognitive deficits and their underlying brain structures. Forty-two plasma proteins of 29 SZ patients, 25 BD patients and 93 non-clinical controls were quantified and analysed using multiple reaction monitoring-based triple quadrupole mass spectrometry approach. We also computed group comparisons of protein expressions between patients and controls, and between SZ and BD patients, as well. Potential associations of protein levels with cognitive functioning (psychomotor speed, executive functioning, crystallised intelligence) as well as underlying brain volume in the hippocampus were explored, using bivariate correlation analyses. The main finding of this study was that apolipoprotein expression differed between patients and controls and that these alterations in both disease groups were putatively related to cognitive impairments as well as to hippocampus volumes. However, none of the protein level differences were related to clinical symptom severity. In summary, altered apolipoprotein expression in BD and SZ was linked to cognitive decline and underlying morphological changes in both disorders. Our results suggest that the detection of molecular patterns in association with cognitive performance and its underlying brain morphology is of great importance for understanding of the pathological mechanisms of SZ and BD, as well as for supporting the diagnosis and treatment of both disorders.

  6. Theory-of-mind understanding and theory-of-mind use in unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Guang; Roberts, David L; Liang, Yan; Shi, Jian-Fei; Wang, Kai

    2015-12-15

    We assessed theory of mind (ToM) in unaffected first-degree relatives (FDR) of patients with schizophrenia (SC) and bipolar disorder (BD) compared to healthy controls with a revised computerized referential communication task. Results showed that FDR of SC performed worse than FDR of BD and controls on a task requiring ToM-use, but not on a task requiring ToM-understanding. This indicates that deficient ToM-use, rather than ToM-understanding impairments, may represent a potential candidate endophenotype for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Life expectancy and death by diseases of the circulatory system in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Hällgren, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    disease. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality by diseases of the circulatory system among patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the three Nordic countries Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Furthermore, the aim was to examine and compare life expectancy among these patients. Cause...... specific Standardized Mortality Rates (SMRs) were calculated for each specific subgroup of mortality. Life expectancy was calculated using Wiesler's method....

  8. Use of the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) to investigate group and gender differences in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogos, Andrea; Joshua, Nicole; Rossell, Susan L

    2010-03-01

    Gender differences exist in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD), therefore the aim of the present study was to clarify the role of gender in cognitive deficits in these disorders. Cognitive performance was examined in schizophrenia (24M : 14F) and BD (16M : 24F) patients compared with age-, IQ- and gender-matched control participants (21M : 22F). The Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) was used to assess five cognitive domains: immediate memory/learning, visuospatial ability, language, attention, and delayed memory, which are summed to provide a Total score. In comparison to controls, schizophrenia patients showed deficits on all domains, while BD patients had impaired immediate memory/learning, language and Total score. Schizophrenia patients showed deficits compared to BD in the Total score, immediate and delayed memory and visuospatial ability. The Total and domain scores were not different in men and women across or within groups. There were gender effects on four of the 12 individual cognitive tasks, in which female patients outperformed male patients. Further, there were gender differences across groups for three of the individual tasks: female schizophrenia patients showed poorer story memory and story recall compared to male schizophrenia patients; female BD patients had enhanced figure copy performance compared to male BD patients. The RBANS highlighted the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and BD patients compared to controls and also each other. There were no overall gender differences in cognition.

  9. Bipolar disorder and social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, R G

    1985-01-01

    With the introduction of lithium and increasing evidence that bipolar disorder is a biogenetic condition, changes have occurred in the diagnosis and treatment of bipolar disorder. Cross-cultural studies indicate that in the United States there is a tendency to overuse the diagnosis of schizophrenia when bipolar may be indicated. Both disorders have psychotic symptoms, rendering diagnostic confusion possible. This paper describes the characteristics of bipolar disorder, explanatory theories and treatment. A medical model of treatment is preferred. Issues of concern to social workers are addressed.

  10. The BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in Han Chinese patients with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Po-See; Lee, I-Hui; Yang, Yen-Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2014-06-03

    Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is widely distributed in the peripheral and central nervous systems. BDNF and its gene polymorphism may be important in synaptic plasticity and neuron survival, and may become a key target in the physiopathology of several mental illnesses. To elucidate the role of BDNF, we compared the plasma BDNF levels and the BDNF Val66Met gene variants effect in several mental disorders. We enrolled 644 participants: 177 patients with bipolar I disorder (BP-I), 190 with bipolar II disorder (BP-II), 151 with schizophrenia, and 126 healthy controls. Their plasma BDNF levels and BDNF Val66Met single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were checked before pharmacological treatment. Plasma levels of BDNF were significantly lower in patients with schizophrenia than in healthy controls and patients with bipolar disorder (F = 37.667, pBDNF Val66Met SNP was not different between groups (χ(2) = 5.289, p = 0.507). Nor were plasma BDNF levels significantly different between Met/Met, Met/Val, and Val/Val carriers in each group, which indicated that the BDNF Val66Met SNP did not influence plasma BDNF levels in our participants. Plasma BDNF levels were, however, significantly negatively correlated with depression scores in patients with bipolar disorder and with negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. We conclude that plasma BDNF profiles in different mental disorders are not affected by BDNF Val66Met gene variants, but by the process and progression of the illness itself. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Meta-analysis of the association between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antibodies and schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Daniel M; Najjar, Souhel

    2014-08-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies have been documented in the serum of individuals with primary psychiatric disorders from several independent cohorts, but these findings have not been systematically assessed in aggregate or in relation to methodological covariates. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO for studies in any language that provided data on NMDAR antibody seropositivity or absolute serum titers in schizophrenia or schizoaffective, bipolar, or major depressive disorders. We used a random effects model to pool estimates across studies. Nine studies met the eligibility criteria. Five studies (3387 participants) provided data on NMDAR antibody seropositivity in psychiatric versus control groups based on high-specificity seropositivity thresholds (cell-based assays [CBAs]: 1:320 dilution, 1:200 dilution, visual score>1; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]: 90(th) percentile of control titers). Meta-analysis showed significantly higher odds of NMDAR antibody seropositivity among those with schizophrenia or schizoaffective, bipolar, or major depressive disorders compared with healthy controls (odds ratio [OR], 3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-9.27; P=.043; I(2)=68%). Four studies (3194 participants) provided outcome data for these groups based on low-specificity seropositivity thresholds (CBAs 1:10 dilution; ELISA: 75(th) percentile of control titers). Meta-analysis showed greater heterogeneity and no significant between-group difference (OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 0.55-9.73; P=.25; I(2)=90%). Seropositive participants in psychiatric groups had various combinations of IgG, IgM, and IgA class antibodies against NR1, NR1/NR2B, and NR2A/NR2B subunits. Subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher odds of seropositivity among all participants based on 1:10 versus 1:320 dilution seropositivity thresholds (OR, 4.56; 95% CI, 2.41-8.62; Pschizoaffective disorder (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.19-7.24; P=.88, I(2)=43%, studies=2, n=1108). Average NR2A

  12. Comparative linkage meta-analysis reveals regionally-distinct, disparate genetic architectures: application to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady Tang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available New high-throughput, population-based methods and next-generation sequencing capabilities hold great promise in the quest for common and rare variant discovery and in the search for "missing heritability." However, the optimal analytic strategies for approaching such data are still actively debated, representing the latest rate-limiting step in genetic progress. Since it is likely a majority of common variants of modest effect have been identified through the application of tagSNP-based microarray platforms (i.e., GWAS, alternative approaches robust to detection of low-frequency (1-5% MAF and rare (<1% variants are of great importance. Of direct relevance, we have available an accumulated wealth of linkage data collected through traditional genetic methods over several decades, the full value of which has not been exhausted. To that end, we compare results from two different linkage meta-analysis methods--GSMA and MSP--applied to the same set of 13 bipolar disorder and 16 schizophrenia GWLS datasets. Interestingly, we find that the two methods implicate distinct, largely non-overlapping, genomic regions. Furthermore, based on the statistical methods themselves and our contextualization of these results within the larger genetic literatures, our findings suggest, for each disorder, distinct genetic architectures may reside within disparate genomic regions. Thus, comparative linkage meta-analysis (CLMA may be used to optimize low-frequency and rare variant discovery in the modern genomic era.

  13. The association between serum creatine kinase, mood and psychosis in inpatients with schizophrenia, bipolar and schizoaffective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Sarah; Hochman, Eldar; Shoval, Gal; Taler, Michal; Trommer, Sharon; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham; Krivoy, Amir

    2016-04-30

    Previous studies demonstrated levels of serum CK (sCK) in the majority of patients undergoing acute psychosis. Records of 1054 patients hospitalized in Geha Mental Health Center during the study period were analyzed. Of them, 743 have been diagnosed with schizophrenia (Sz), 170 with schizoaffective disorder (SzA), and 158 with bipolar disorder (BP-I). Baseline sCK and PANSS values were obtained from each patient upon admission. Our results show that LnsCK is higher in patients with BP-I in comparison with patients with SZ, but not significantly different compared to patients with SzA. A multivariate analysis using linear regression model in which LnsCK was predicted by factors such as PANSS-total and sub-scores, IM injection, BMI, gender, and age among patients at each admission, revealed that PANSS-depression was inversely associated with LnsCK level in SzA and BP-I and not in SZ. A positive association was found between PANSS-total and sCK in SzA and BP-I; however, PANSS-positive scores correlated with sCK only in SzA. After controlling for confounders, it seems that sCK level is associated with the both affective and psychotic components. Serum CK may serve as a biomarker for affective exacerbation rather than psychosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Activation of kynurenine pathway in ex vivo fibroblasts from patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia: cytokine challenge increases production of 3-hydroxykynurenine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Asp, Linnéa; Kocki, Tomasz; Adler, Mats; Hetta, Jerker; Gardner, Renee; Lundkvist, Gabriella B S; Urbanska, Ewa M; Karlsson, Håkan

    2013-11-01

    Accumulating data suggest a causative link between immune stimulation, disturbed metabolism of tryptophan, and pathogenesis of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to examine the production of kynurenic acid (KYNA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and the expression of kynurenine pathway enzymes involved in their synthesis and metabolism in cultured skin fibroblasts obtained from patients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or from healthy control individuals. The assessment was performed under basal conditions or following treatment with interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, or their combinations, in cells exposed to exogenous kynurenine. In both groups of patients, the baseline production of KYNA and 3-HK was increased, as compared to control subjects. Case-treatment analyses revealed significant interactions between bipolar case status and IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ + TNF-α, or IFN-γ + IL-1β, as well as between schizophrenia case status and IL-1β, IFN-γ + TNF-α, or IFN-γ + IL-1β, in terms of higher 3-HK. Noteworthy, no case-treatment interactions in terms of KYNA production were found. Observed changes did not appear to correlate with the expression of genes encoding kynurenine aminotransferases (KATs), kynureninase (KYNU) or kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO). The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1053230 and rs2275163, in KMO influenced KYNA levels yet did not explain the case-treatment discrepancies. In conclusion, our present findings indicate the utility of skin-derived fibroblasts for kynurenines research and support the concept of kynurenine pathway alterations in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The increase in ratio between neurotoxic 3-HK and neuroinhibitory/neuroprotective KYNA following exposure to cytokines may account for altered neurogenesis and structural abnormalities characteristic for both diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Atypical bipolar disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Christian

    2009-04-20

    Some epidemiologic data reveal how difficult detecting atypic bipolar disorders is: 9 years of progression before the diagnosis is properly established and a specific treatment is initiated, and intervention of 4 to 5 different specialists. Incomplete symptomatology, impulsive actions, periodic alcohol abuse, compulsive buying behaviors, acute delusional episodes, medicolegal actions and comorbidities can hide or modify bipolar symptomatology. Bipolarity should be systematically screened for in case of substance abuse (40 to 60 percent of bipolar disorders), anxiety disorders (panic disorder, generalized anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorders etc.) and feeding disorders. In these various situations, history taking and clinical examination will help to detect signs of bipolarity: reaction to antidepressants, inefficiency, paradoxical worsening, development of behavior disorders and mood changes. Besides screening for thymic disorders, the examination will be completed by history taking of thymic disorders, suicide, toxic abuse, anxiety disorders, personal history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in childhood, depression or postpartum psychosis in women, as well as premenstrual depressive manifestations.

  16. Addressing the need for rapid treatment of agitation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: focus on inhaled loxapine as an alternative to injectable agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citrome L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Leslie CitromeDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USAAbstract: Agitation (excessive motor or verbal activity can be associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, and can further escalate into aggressive behavior and potentially lead to injuries in patients and staff. Medications used to treat agitation include antipsychotics and benzodiazepines, usually administered intramuscularly when rapid action is desired. Loxapine, a first-generation antipsychotic, has recently been reformulated into an inhaled powder that allows for direct administration to the lungs, resulting in rapid absorption into the systemic circulation. Administered via a single-use device, inhaled loxapine was tested in randomized controlled trials in agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania; doses of 5 mg and 10 mg were found to be efficacious, with an apparent dose response. In the Phase III studies, number needed to treat versus placebo for a ≥40% reduction from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale – Excited Component (PANSS-EC at 2 hours was three for patients with bipolar disorder, and five for 5 mg and four for 10 mg for patients with schizophrenia, with effect sizes comparable to what has been observed in analogous studies of intramuscular injection of antipsychotics or lorazepam. Separation from placebo on the PANSS-EC was as early as 10 minutes postinhalation, the first time point where this was measured. Dysgeusia was the most commonly encountered spontaneously reported adverse event. Adverse events related to extrapyramidal symptoms and akathisia were relatively rare. Spirometry studies identified the potential for bronchospasm particularly in persons with asthma. Because of concerns over pulmonary safety, inhaled loxapine is restricted to use in hospitals and patients need to be prescreened for the presence of pulmonary disease, as well as monitored for signs and symptoms of

  17. What does the broken brain say to the neuroscientist? Oscillations and connectivity in schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, E; Schmiedt-Fehr, C; Mathes, B; Femir, B; Emek-Savaş, D D; Tülay, E; Tan, D; Düzgün, A; Güntekin, B; Özerdem, A; Yener, G; Başar-Eroğlu, C

    2016-05-01

    The application of the concept and methods of brain oscillations has been an important research area in neurosciences. In the last decades, besides the application in cognitive processes, the study of changes in brain oscillations in diseases has also become an important focal point of research. In the present paper, some remarkable examples in three different diseases are taken into consideration: 1) schizophrenia (SZ), 2) Alzheimer's disease (AD), 3) bipolar disorders (BD). In the current literature, decreased oscillations in cortical recordings are observed in most of the pathologies. For example, decrease of gamma activity in SZ, decrease of delta activity in almost all diseases, as well as frequency shifts in alpha and the lower frequencies were recorded. However, there are also paradoxical cases in which an increase of oscillatory activities is observed. In BD, whereas alpha activity is greatly decreased, a huge increase of beta activity is observed. Or, in SZ, a paradoxical increase of gamma activity can be observed during cognitive loading. We also observed paradoxical changes in the analysis of connectivity. In AD, we find that alpha, delta, and theta coherences between distant parts of the cortex are greatly decreased, whereas in the gamma band, event-related coherences attain very high values. The comparison of the results and paradoxical changes in diseases may lead to important conclusions related to the web of oscillations and neurotransmitters. In turn, we could gain new insights to approach "brain function", in general. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Disrupted implicit motor sequence learning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder revealed with ambidextrous Serial Reaction Time Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Siwek, Grzegorz Przemysław; Tereszko, Anna; Janeczko, Weronika; Starowicz-Filip, Anna; Siwek, Marcin; Dudek, Dominika

    2017-10-03

    Impairment of implicit motor sequence learning was shown in schizophrenia (SZ) and, most recently, in bipolar disorder (BD), and was connected to cerebellar abnormalities. The goal of this study was to compare implicit motor sequence learning in BD and SZ. We examined 33 patients with BD, 33 patients with SZ and 31 healthy controls with a use of ambidextrous Serial Reaction Time Task (SRTT), which allows exploring asymmetries in performance depending on the hand used. BD and SZ patients presented impaired implicit motor sequence learning, although the pattern of their impairments was different. While BD patients showed no signs of implicit motor sequence learning for both hands, the SZ group presented some features of motor learning when performing with the right, but not with the left hand. To our best knowledge this is the first study comparing implicit motor sequence learning in BD and SZ. We show that both diseases share impairments in this domain, however in the case of SZ this impairment differs dependently on the hand performing SRTT. We propose that implicit motor sequence learning impairments constitute an overlapping symptom in BD and SZ and suggest further neuroimaging studies to verify cerebellar underpinnings as its cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic pleiotropy between multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia but not bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, O A; Harbo, H F; Wang, Y

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence implicates immune abnormalities in schizophrenia (SCZ), and recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified immune-related single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with SCZ. Using the conditional false discovery rate (FDR) approach, we evaluated pleiotro...

  20. Disease and drug effects on internally-generated and externally-elicited responses in first episode schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Sarah K; Bishop, Jeffrey R; Weiden, Peter J; Sweeney, John A; Rosen, Cherise; Marvin, Robert; Reilly, James L

    2014-10-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are associated with most psychotic disorders, but may differ across diagnosis and by treatment status. This ambiguity is partly addressed in longitudinal pre/post treatment studies with first episode patients. Antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients have shown intact performance on a predictive saccade task that assesses simple motor learning, spatial abilities, and response planning. After antipsychotic treatment, however, schizophrenia patients performing this task show a selective impairment in the accuracy of anticipatory responses, generated from learned internal representations of the task stimulus. This finding is in line with other observations of antipsychotic medication effects on frontostriatal systems, particularly dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. We sought to replicate this provocative finding with an independent sample of antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients and extend it by including a group of patients with first episode bipolar disorder with psychosis (BDP). Matched healthy controls were also studied in parallel. Schizophrenia patients demonstrated intact performance pretreatment followed by impairment post-treatment for accuracy of anticipatory responses, and worse accuracy was associated with higher antipsychotic dose. BDP patients displayed saccade accuracy deficits before and after treatment and had no correlation of performance and antipsychotic dose. The findings suggest different neural alterations early in the course of each psychotic disorder, and different vulnerabilities to antipsychotic treatment effects between schizophrenia and BDP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Multimodal assessments of the hippocampal formation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Evidences from neurobehavioral measures and functional and structural MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Knöchel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential clinical and etiological overlap between schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD has long been a subject of discussion. Imaging studies imply functional and structural alterations of the hippocampus in both diseases. Thus, imaging this core memory region could provide insight into the pathophysiology of these disorders and the associated cognitive deficits. To examine possible shared alterations in the hippocampus, we conducted a multi-modal assessment, including functional and structural imaging as well as neurobehavioral measures of memory performance in BD and SZ patients compared with healthy controls. We assessed episodic memory performance, using tests of verbal and visual learning (HVLT, BVMT in three groups of participants: BD patients (n = 21, SZ patients (n = 21 and matched (age, gender, education healthy control subjects (n = 21. In addition, we examined hippocampal resting state functional connectivity, hippocampal volume using voxel-based morphometry (VBM and fibre integrity of hippocampal connections using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. We found memory deficits, changes in functional connectivity within the hippocampal network as well as volumetric reductions and altered white matter fibre integrity across patient groups in comparison with controls. However, SZ patients when directly compared with BD patients were more severely affected in several of the assessed parameters (verbal learning, left hippocampal volumes, mean diffusivity of bilateral cingulum and right uncinated fasciculus. The results of our study suggest a graded expression of verbal learning deficits accompanied by structural alterations within the hippocampus in BD patients and SZ patients, with SZ patients being more strongly affected. Our findings imply that these two disorders may share some common pathophysiological mechanisms. The results could thus help to further advance and integrate current pathophysiological models of SZ and BD.

  2. [Development of the Spanish brief-version of the University of California Performance Skills Assessment (Sp-UPSA-Brief) in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Portilla, María Paz; Gomar, Jesús; Bobes-Bascaran, María Teresa; Menendez-Miranda, Isabel; Saiz, Pilar Alejandra; Muñiz, José; Arango, Celso; Patterson, Thomas; Harvey, Philip; Bobes, Julio; Goldberg, Terry

    2014-01-01

    In patients with severe mental disorders outcome measurement should include symptoms, cognition, functioning and quality of life at least. Shorter and efficient instruments have greater potential for pragmatic and valid clinical utility. Our aim was to develop the Spanish UPSA Brief scale (Sp-UPSA-Brief). Naturalistic, 6-month follow-up, multicentre study. 139 patients with schizophrenia, 57 with bipolar disorder and 31 controls were evaluated using the Sp-UPSA, CGI-S, GAF, and PSP. We conducted a multivariate linear regression model to identify candidate subscales for the Sp-UPSA-Brief. The stepwise regression model for patients with schizophrenia showed that communication and transportation Sp-UPSA subscales entered first and second at pmental disorders, especially in everyday clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of polyglutamine-coding repeats in the TATA-binding protein in different human populations and in patients with schizophrenia an bipolar affective disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J. [Addenbrooke`s National Health Service Trust, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Crow, T.J. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-20

    A new class of disease (including Huntington disease, Kennedy disease, and spinocerebellar ataxias types 1 and 3) results from abnormal expansions of CAG trinucleotides in the coding regions of genes. In all of these diseases the CAG repeats are thought to be translated into polyglutamine tracts. There is accumulating evidence arguing for CAG trinucleotide expansions as one of the causative disease mutations in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. We and others believe that the TATA-binding protein (TBP) is an important candidate to investigate in these diseases as it contains a highly polymorphic stretch of glutamine codons, which are close to the threshold length where the polyglutamine tracts start to be associated with disease. Thus, we examined the lengths of this polyglutamine repeat in normal unrelated East Anglians, South African Blacks, sub-Saharan Africans mainly from Nigeria, and Asian Indians. We also examined 43 bipolar affective disorder patients and 65 schizophrenic patients. The range of polyglutamine tract-lengths that we found in humans was from 26-42 codons. No patients with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia had abnormal expansions at this locus. 22 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Association of rare variation in the glutamate receptor gene SLC1A2 with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Alessia; Sharp, Sally I; McQuillin, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The SLC1A2 gene encodes the excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2). Glutamate is the major mediator of excitatory neurotransmission and EAAT2 is responsible for clearing the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. Genetic variation in SLC1A2 has been implicated in a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions including schizophrenia (SZ), autism and in core phenotypes of bipolar disorder (BD). The coding and putative regulatory regions of SLC1A2 gene were screened for variants using high resolution melting or sequenced in 1099 or in 32 BD subjects. Thirty-two variants were detected in the SLC1A2 gene. Fifteen potentially etiological variants were selected for genotyping in 1099 BD and 1095 control samples. Five amino acid changing variants were also genotyped in 630 participants suffering from SZ. None of the variants were found to be associated with BD or SZ or with the two diseases combined. However, two recurrent missense variants (rs145827578:G>A, p.(G6S); rs199599866:G>A, p.(R31Q)) and one recurrent 5'-untranslated region (UTR) variant (ss825678885:G>T) were detected in cases only. Combined analysis of the recurrent-case-only missense variants and of the case-only missense and 5'-UTR variants showed nominal evidence for association with the combined diseases (Fisher's P=0.019 and 0.0076). These findings are exploratory in nature and await replication in larger cohorts, however, they provide intriguing evidence that potentially functional rare variants in the SLC1A2 gene may confer susceptibility to psychotic disorders.

  5. Relationship between negative symptoms and plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 in first-episode schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Aitor; González-Pinto, Ana; Martinez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; Ruiz de Azua, Sonia; Alberich, Susana; Mosquera, Fernando; Matute, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is altered in schizophrenia. The objective of this study was to investigate whether plasma IGF-1 levels were altered at the onset of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. We focused at the first psychotic episode (FPE) and during 1-year follow-up. We also studied if IGF-1 levels were related to clinical symptoms. 50 patients and 43 healthy controls matched by age, gender and educational level were selected from the Basque Country catchment area in Spain. Plasma IGF-1 levels were measured at FPE and 1 month, 6 months and one year later. Patient symptoms were assessed at the same disease stages using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS21) and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). A statistically significant increase in the plasma levels of IGF-1 was found in the whole cohort of patients one month after FPE compared to matched controls (219.84 ng/ml vs 164.15 ng/ml; p=0.014), as well as in schizophrenia patients alone at that stage (237.60 ng/ml vs 171.60 ng/ml; p=0.039). In turn, negative symptoms in both groups of patients were positively correlated with IGF-1 levels both at FPE (β=0.521; p<0.001) and after 1 year (β=0.659; p=0.001), being patients diagnosed with schizophrenia the main contributors to this relationship. These results indicate that there is a significant change in the plasma levels of IGF-1 at the initial stages of schizophrenia but not in bipolar disorder, and suggest that IGF-1 could have role in the pathophysiology of negative symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Knowing me, knowing you : the emotional self in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Elisabeth Mathilde van der

    2011-01-01

    More than half of schizophrenia patients have a limited insight in their illness. In an attempt to discover why some patients do not understand what is wrong with them while others do, Lisette van der Meer from the University Medical Center Groningen conducted research into the link between social

  7. Drug Treated Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective and Bipolar Disorder Patients Evaluated by qEEG Absolute Spectral Power and Mean Frequency Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wix-Ramos, Richard; Moreno, Xiomara; Capote, Eduardo; González, Gilbert; Uribe, Ezequiel; Eblen-Zajjur, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Research of electroencephalograph (EEG) power spectrum and mean frequency has shown inconsistent results in patients with schizophrenic, schizoaffective and bipolar disorders during medication when compared to normal subjects thus; the characterization of these parameters is an important task. We applied quantitative EEG (qEEG) to investigate 38 control, 15 schizophrenic, 7 schizoaffective and 11 bipolar disorder subjects which remaine under the administration of psychotropic drugs (except control group). Absolute spectral power (ASP), mean frequency and hemispheric electrical asymmetry were measured by 19 derivation qEEG. Group mean values were compared with non parametrical Mann-Whitney test and spectral EEG maps with z-score method at p Schizoaffective patients received neuroleptic+benzodiazepine (71.4%) and for bipolar disorder patients neuroleptic+antiepileptic (81.8%). Schizophrenic (at all derivations except for Fp1, Fp2, F8 and T6) and schizoaffective (only at C3) show higher values of ASP (+57.7% and +86.1% respectively) compared to control group. ASP of bipolar disorder patients did not show differences against control group. The mean frequency was higher at Fp1 (+14.2%) and Fp2 (+17.4%) in bipolar disorder patients than control group, but no differences were found in frequencies between schizophrenic or schizoaffective patients against the control group. Majority of spectral differences were found at the left hemisphere in schizophrenic and schizoaffective but not in bipolar disorder subjects. The present report contributes to characterize quantitatively the qEEG in drug treated schizophrenic, schizoaffective or bipolar disorder patients.

  8. A Novel Relationship for Schizophrenia, Bipolar and Major Depressive Disorder Part 6: A Hint from Chromosome 6 High Density Association Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Long, F; Cai, B; Chen, X H; Chen, G

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evidence from genetics, symptomatology and psychopharmacology imply that there are intrinsic connections between schizophrenia (SCZ), bipolar disorder (BPD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), for example, any two or even three of these disorders could co-exist in some families. To screen out the susceptibility genes on chromosome 6 comprehensively for SCZ, BPD and MDD in a relative homogenous population in China. A total of 56.400 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) on chromosome 6 were genotyped by Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0 on 119 SCZ, 253 BPD (type- I), 177 MDD patients and 1000 controls. Associated SNP loci on chromosome 6 were comprehensively revealed and outstanding susceptibility genes were identified including JARID2 (Homo sapiens jumonji, AT rich interactive domain 2) which plays an essential role in embryonic development and neural tube fusion process. Unexpectedly, flanking genes for all associated SNPs were replicated in an enlarged cohort of 986 SCZ patients. Considering all evidence, our results imply that both of bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder are subtypes of schizophrenia. Furthermore, JARID2 is an important psychosis gene in this population. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. [Genetics of bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, M; Forstner, A J; Adorjan, K; Schaupp, S K; Nöthen, M M; Schulze, T G

    2017-07-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) has a multifactorial etiology. Its development is influenced by genetic as well as environmental factors. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS), in which genetic risk allelic variants for the disorder could be replicated for the first time, marked the breakthrough in the identification of the responsible risk genes. In addition to these common genetic variants with moderate effects identified by GWAS, rare variants with a higher penetrance are expected to play a role in disease development. The results of recent studies suggest that copy number variants might contribute to BD development, although to a lesser extent than in other psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia or autism. Results from the initial next generation sequencing studies indicate an enrichment of rare variants in pathways and genes that were previously found to be associated with BD. In the field of pharmacogenetics, a risk gene that influences the individual variance in the response to lithium treatment was identified for the first time in a recent large international GWAS. Currently the reported risk alleles do not sufficiently explain the phenotypic variance to be used for individual prediction of disease risk, disease course or response to medication. Future genetic research will provide important insights into the biological basis of BD by the identification of additional genes associated with BD. This knowledge of genetics will help identify potential etiological subgroups as well as cross-diagnostic disease mechanisms.

  10. Neuroprogression in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marguerite Reid; DelBello, Melissa P; McNamara, Robert K; Strakowski, Stephen M; Adler, Caleb M

    2012-06-01

    Recent theories regarding the neuropathology of bipolar disorder suggest that both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative processes may play a role. While magnetic resonance imaging has provided significant insight into the structural, functional, and connectivity abnormalities associated with bipolar disorder, research assessing longitudinal changes has been more limited. However, such research is essential to elucidate the pathophysiology of the disorder. The aim of our review is to examine the extant literature for developmental and progressive structural and functional changes in individuals with and at risk for bipolar disorder. We conducted a literature review using MEDLINE and the following search terms: bipolar disorder, risk, child, adolescent, bipolar offspring, MRI, fMRI, DTI, PET, SPECT, cross-sectional, longitudinal, progressive, and developmental. Further relevant articles were identified by cross-referencing with identified manuscripts. There is some evidence for developmental and progressive neurophysiological alterations in bipolar disorder, but the interpretation of correlations between neuroimaging findings and measures of illness exposure or age in cross-sectional studies must be performed with care. Prospective longitudinal studies placed in the context of normative developmental and atrophic changes in neural structures and pathways thought to be involved in bipolar disorder are needed to improve our understanding of the neurodevelopmental underpinnings and progressive changes associated with bipolar disorder. © 2012 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  11. Altered functional connectivity during self- and close other-reflection in patients with bipolar disorder with past psychosis and patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwen; Vander Meer, Lisette; Opmeer, Esther M; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C; Ruhé, Henricus G; Aleman, André

    2016-12-01

    Disturbances in implicit self-processing have been reported both in psychotic patients with bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia. It remains unclear whether these two psychotic disorders show disturbed functional connectivity during explicit self-reflection, which is associated with social functioning and illness symptoms. Therefore, we investigated functional connectivity during explicit self-reflection in BD with past psychosis and schizophrenia. Twenty-three BD-patients, 17 schizophrenia-patients and 21 health controls (HC) performed a self-reflection task, including the conditions self-reflection, close other-reflection and semantic control. Functional connectivity was investigated with generalized psycho-physiological interaction (gPPI). During self-reflection compared to semantic, BD-patients had decreased connectivity between several cortical-midline structures (CMS) nodes (i.e., anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex), the insula and the head of the caudate while HC showed increased connectivities. Schizophrenia-patients, during close other-reflection compared to semantic, demonstrated reduced ventral-anterior insula-precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) functional connectivity, whereas this was increased in HC. There were no differences between BD and schizophrenia during self- and close other-reflection. We propose that decreased functional connectivity between the CMS nodes/insula and head of the caudate in BD-patients may imply a reduced involvement of the motivational system during self-reflection; and the reduced functional connectivity between the ventral-anterior insula and precuneus/PCC during close other-reflection in schizophrenia-patients may subserve difficulties in information integration of autobiographical memory and emotional awareness in relation to close others. These distinctive impaired patterns of functional connectivity in BD and schizophrenia (compared to HC) deserve further investigation to determine their

  12. Surgical Management of Obesity Among People with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: a Systematic Review of Outcomes and Recommendations for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouidrat, Youssef; Amad, Ali; Stubbs, Brendon; Moore, Suzan; Gaughran, Fiona

    2017-07-01

    People with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (BD) exhibit very high levels of obesity. Little is known about the potential benefits/risks of obesity surgery. We conducted a narrative review to summarize the available knowledge on bariatric surgery in people with schizophrenia or BD. A systematic search was conducted of major electronic databases from inception to October 2016 for studies investigating bariatric surgery among people with schizophrenia or BD. Data were presented in a narrative synthesis and future research strategies proposed. The electronic database searches identified 44 records. Eight studies (BD, n = 265; schizophrenia: n = 14) were included with a mean study length of 15.7 months (12-24). Seven found that bariatric surgery resulted in weight loss in those with psychiatric disorders with an excess weight loss ranging -31 to -70%. Six studies found that weight loss from bariatric surgery was similar in people with schizophrenia or BD versus controls. However, most of the studies limited their outcomes to only weight loss and did not measure whether obesity surgery affected the status and treatment of psychiatric symptoms. Although few adverse events were reported among patients with BD, data from two studies demonstrated no significant deterioration of psychiatric symptoms post-surgery in people with schizophrenia. Growing evidence suggests that bariatric surgery may improve short-term weight status among people with BD. However, given the paucity of studies for schizophrenia, and the lack of information on medium-to long-term results, future large-scale high-quality studies are required.

  13. [Prevention of bipolar disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, K; Pfennig, A; Severus, E; Bauer, M

    2013-11-01

    In the past, preventive measures for psychoses have focused mainly on schizophrenic disorders. Bipolar disorders are often diagnosed and treated with a significant delay. The expansion of preventive measures for bipolar disorders aims at minimizing the substantial negative consequences associated with the disease. Some of the shared aspects of prevention in psychoses and bipolar disorders are that the first symptoms commonly appear during adolescence and early adulthood and that there is a symptomatic overlap between the disorders. To improve efforts to seek early help, public information about mental illness, low threshold services as well as cooperation between adult, child and adolescent psychiatry are needed for this target group. One differences is that psychotic symptoms play a minor role in bipolar disorders. Specific biological markers, such as disturbances of sleep and circadian rhythm and clinical characteristics, such as substance use and behavioral problems in childhood and youth supplement (subsyndromal) clinical symptoms in a multifactorial risk model. Besides severity and frequency of symptoms, specific periodic course patterns are crucial. Strategies of early intervention require a careful consideration of risks and benefits. Two aims should be distinguished: the improvement of current symptomatology and the prevention of conversion to bipolar disorder. Currently, studies evaluating risks and benefits of such interventions are first conducted. Expertise and resources for early recognition of psychoses and bipolar disorders should be pooled. Common standards are the basis for advancement and implementation of preventive strategies for bipolar disorders.

  14. Association between alcohol and substance use disorders and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and unipolar depression: a nationwide, prospective, register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Østergaard, Marie Louise Drivsholm; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Toftdahl, Nanna Gilliam; Erlangsen, Annette; Andersen, Jon Trærup; Nordentoft, Merete

    2015-09-01

    People with severe mental illness have both increased mortality and are more likely to have a substance use disorder. We assessed the association between mortality and lifetime substance use disorder in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or unipolar depression. In this prospective, register-based cohort study, we obtained data for all people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or unipolar depression born in Denmark in 1955 or later from linked nationwide registers. We obtained information about treatment for substance use disorders (categorised into treatment for alcohol, cannabis, or hard drug misuse), date of death, primary cause of death, and education level. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality and subhazard ratios (SHRs) for cause-specific mortality associated with substance use disorder of alcohol, cannabis, or hard drugs. We calculated standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) to compare the mortality in the study populations to that of the background population. Our population included 41 470 people with schizophrenia, 11 739 people with bipolar disorder, and 88 270 people with depression. In schizophrenia, the SMR in those with lifetime substance use disorder was 8·46 (95% CI 8·14-8·79), compared with 3·63 (3·42-3·83) in those without. The respective SMRs in bipolar disorder were 6·47 (5·87-7·06) and 2·93 (2·56-3·29), and in depression were 6·08 (5·82-6·34) and 1·93 (1·82-2·05). In schizophrenia, all substance use disorders were significantly associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality, both individually (alcohol, HR 1·52 [95% CI 1·40-1·65], pdisorder or depression, only substance use disorders of alcohol (bipolar disorder, HR 1·52 [95% CI 1·27-1·81], pdisorder, 1·89 [1·34-2·66], p=0·0003; depression, 2·27 [1·98-2·60], pdisorders than in those without, particularly in people who misuse alcohol and hard drugs. Mortality-reducing interventions should focus on patients with a dual

  15. Meta-analysis of MTHFR gene variants in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and unipolar depressive disorder: evidence for a common genetic vulnerability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerbooms, Odette L J; van Os, Jim; Drukker, Marjan; Kenis, Gunter; Hoogveld, Loes; de Hert, Marc; Delespaul, Philippe; van Winkel, Ruud; Rutten, Bart P F

    2011-11-01

    Past analyses examining the relationship between genetic variation in the 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene and psychiatric disorders have provided mixed and largely inconclusive findings. MTHFR is involved in the one-carbon metabolic pathway which is essential for DNA biosynthesis and the epigenetic process of DNA methylation. We conducted a meta-analysis of all published case-control studies investigating associations between two common MTHFR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), MTHFR C677T (sample size 29,502) and A1298C (sample size 7934), and the major psychiatric disorders (i) schizophrenia (SZ), (ii) bipolar disorder (BPD), and (iii) unipolar depressive disorder (UDD). In order to examine possible shared genetic vulnerability, we also tested for associations between MTHFR and all of these major psychiatric disorders (SZ, BPD and UDD) combined. MTHFR C677T was significantly associated with all of the combined psychiatric disorders (SZ, BPD and UDD); random effects odds ratio (OR)=1.26 for TT versus CC genotype carriers; confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.46); meta-regression did not suggest moderating effects of psychiatric diagnosis, sex, ethnic group or year of publication. Although MTHFR A1298C was not significantly associated with the combination of major psychiatric disorders, nor with SZ, there was evidence for diagnostic moderation indicating a significant association with BPD (random effects OR=2.03 for AA versus CC genotype carriers, CI: 1.07-3.86). Meta-analysis on UDD was not possible due to the small number of studies available. This study provides evidence for shared genetic vulnerability for SZ, BPD and UDD mediated by MTHFR 677TT genotype, which is in line with epigenetic involvement in the pathophysiology of these psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuroinflammation in bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios D Kotzalidis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent literature based on peripheral immunity findings speculated that neuroinflammation, with its connection to microglial activation, is linked to bipolar disorder. The endorsement of the neuroinflammatory hypotheses of bipolar disorder requires the demonstration of causality, which requires longitudinal studies. We aimed to review the evidence for neuroinflammation as a pathogenic mechanism of the bipolar disorder. We carried out a hyper inclusive PubMed search using all appropriate neuroinflammation-related terms and crossed them with bipolar disorder-related terms. The search produced 310 articles and the number rose to 350 after adding articles from other search engines and reference lists. Twenty papers were included that appropriately tackled the issue of the presence (but not of its pathophysiological role of neuroinflammation in bipolar disorder. Of these, 15 were postmortem and 5 were carried out in living humans. Most articles were consistent with the presence of neuroinflammation in bipolar disorder, but factors such as treatment may mask it. All studies were cross-sectional, preventing causality to be inferred. Thus, no inference can be currently made about the role of neuroinflammation in bipolar disorder, but a link is likely. The issue remains little investigated, despite an excess of reviews on this topic.

  17. Anticipated and experienced discrimination amongst people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder: a cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrelly, Simone; Clement, Sarah; Gabbidon, Jheanell; Jeffery, Debra; Dockery, Lisa; Lassman, Francesca; Brohan, Elaine; Henderson, R Claire; Williams, Paul; Howard, Louise M; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-01-01

    .... This study aimed to establish the levels and clinical and socio-demographic associations of anticipated and experienced discrimination amongst those diagnosed with a schizophrenia and comparator...

  18. Joint analysis of psychiatric disorders increases accuracy of risk prediction for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, R.; Moser, G.; Chen, G.B.; Ripke, S.; Coryell, W.; Potash, J.B.; Scheftner, W.A.; Shi, J.; Weissman, M.M.; Hultman, C.M.; Landen, M.; Levinson, D.F.; Kendler, K.S.; Smoller, J.W.; Wray, N.R.; Lee, S.H.; Buitelaar, J.; Franke, B.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk

  19. Joint analysis of psychiatric disorders increases accuracy of risk prediction for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of ri...

  20. Joint Analysis of Psychiatric Disorders Increases Accuracy of Risk Prediction for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, and Major Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, Robert; Moser, Gerhard; Chen, Guo-Bo; Ripke, Stephan; Coryell, William; Potash, James B.; Scheftner, William A.; Shi, Jianxin; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Landén, Mikael; Levinson, Douglas F.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Wray, Naomi R.; Lee, S. Hong; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayés, Mònica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breen, Gerome; Breuer, René; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Cormican, Paul; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craddock, Nicholas; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Daly, Mark J.; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; de Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Devlin, Bernie; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Faraone, Stephen V.; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisén, Louise; Gallagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; de Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holmans, Peter A.; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andrés; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stéphane; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Kähler, Anna K.; Kahn, René S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelsoe, John R.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Långström, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lee, Phil H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-de-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Mowry, Bryan J.; Muglia, Pierandrea; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Benjamin M.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Perlis, Roy H.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Posthuma, Danielle; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Purcell, Shaun M.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnström, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribasés, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rossin, Lizzy; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sklar, Pamela; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; St Clair, David; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Sutcliffe, James; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thapar, Anita; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.; van Grootheest, Gerard; van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wiersma, Durk; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zöllner, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk prediction has several potential applications in medical research and clinical practice and could be used, for example, to stratify a heterogeneous population of patients by their predicted genetic risk. However, for polygenic traits, such as psychiatric disorders, the accuracy of risk

  1. Beyond the association. Toxoplasma gondii in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and addiction: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutterland, A L; Fond, G; Kuin, A; Koeter, M W J; Lutter, R; van Gool, T; Yolken, R; Szoke, A; Leboyer, M; de Haan, L

    2015-09-01

    To perform a meta-analysis on studies reporting prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection in any psychiatric disorder compared with healthy controls. Our secondary objective was to analyze factors possibly moderating heterogeneity. A systematic search was performed to identify studies into T. gondii infection for all major psychiatric disorders versus healthy controls. Methodological quality, publication bias, and possible moderators were assessed. A total of 2866 citations were retrieved and 50 studies finally included. Significant odds ratios (ORs) with IgG antibodies were found in schizophrenia (OR 1.81, P disorder (OR 1.52, P = 0.02), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OR 3.4, P schizophrenia yielded a significant effect of seropositivity before onset and serointensity, but not IgM antibodies or gender. The amplitude of the OR was influenced by region and general seroprevalence. Moderators together accounted for 56% of the observed variance in study effects. After controlling for publication bias, the adjusted OR (1.43) in schizophrenia remained significant. These findings suggest that T. gondii infection is associated with several psychiatric disorders and that in schizophrenia reactivation of latent T. gondii infection may occur. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Association analysis of ANK3 gene variants in nordic bipolar disorder and schizophrenia case-control samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tesli, Martin; Koefoed, Pernille; Athanasiu, Lavinia

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants in ankyrin 3 (ANK3) have recently been shown to be associated with bipolar disorder (BD). We genotyped three ANK3 SNPs previously found to be associated with BD (rs10994336, rs1938526, and rs9804190) in a Scandinavian BD case–control sample (N¿=¿854/2,614). Due to evidence...

  3. Brain activation during self- and other-reflection in bipolar disorder with a history of psychosis : Comparison to schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Liwen; Opmeer, Esther M.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Aleman, Andre; van der Meer, Lisette

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Reflecting on the self and on others activates specific brain areas and contributes to metacognition and social cognition. The aim of the current study is to investigate brain activation during self-and other-reflection in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). In addition, we examined

  4. Proteomic pathway analysis of the hippocampus in schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder implicates 14-3-3 signaling, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, and glucose metabolism: potential roles in GABAergic interneuron pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Föcking, Melanie; Cotter, David R

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathological changes of the hippocampus have been associated with psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Recent work has particularly implicated hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in the pathophysiology of these diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying structural and cellular hippocampal pathology remain poorly understood. We used data from comprehensive difference-in-gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) investigations of postmortem human hippocampus of people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, covering the acidic (isoelectric point (pI) between pH4 and 7) and, separately, the basic (pI between pH6 and 11) sub-proteome, for Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of implicated protein networks and pathways. Comparing disease and control cases, we identified 58 unique differentially expressed proteins in schizophrenia, and 70 differentially expressed proteins in bipolar disorder, using mass spectrometry. IPA implicated, most prominently, 14-3-3 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling in schizophrenia, and gluconeogenesis/glycolysis in bipolar disorder. Both disorders were characterized by alterations of proteins involved in the oxidative stress response, mitochondrial function, and protein-endocytosis, -trafficking, -degradation, and -ubiquitination. These findings are interpreted with a focus on GABAergic interneuron pathology in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bipolar Disorder in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Although bipolar disorder historically was thought to only occur rarely in children and adolescents, there has been a significant increase in children and adolescents who are receiving this diagnosis more recently (Carlson, 2005). Nonetheless, the applicability of the current bipolar disorder diagnostic criteria for children, particularly preschool children, remains unclear, even though much work has been focused on this area. As a result, more work needs to be done to further the understanding of bipolar symptoms in children. It is hoped that this paper can assist psychologists and other health service providers in gleaning a snapshot of the literature in this area so that they can gain an understanding of the diagnostic criteria and other behaviors that may be relevant and be informed about potential approaches for assessment and treatment with children who meet bipolar disorder criteria. First, the history of bipolar symptoms and current diagnostic criteria will be discussed. Next, assessment strategies that may prove helpful for identifying bipolar disorder will be discussed. Then, treatments that may have relevance to children and their families will be discussed. Finally, conclusions regarding work with children who may have a bipolar disorder diagnosis will be offered. PMID:24800202

  6. A preliminary validity study of the cambridge neuropsychological test automated battery for the assessment of executive function in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Sun; An, Yong Min; Kwon, Jun Soo; Shin, Min-Sup

    2014-10-01

    Although the executive function subtests of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) have been used to assess cognitive function in diverse psychiatric illnesses, few studies have verified the validity of this battery for Korean psychiatric patients. Therefore, this preliminary study evaluated the construct and concurrent validity of the executive function subtests of the CANTAB for Korean psychiatric patients by comparing it with subtests of the Computerized Neuropsychological Test (CNT). Three subtests of the CANTAB and three subtests of the CNT were administered to 36 patients diagnosed with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Subtests of the CANTAB included the Intra/Extra-Dimensional Set Shift (IED), Stockings of Cambridge (SOC), and Spatial Working Memory (SWM). Differences between groups on each subtest as well as correlations between the subtests of the CANTAB and the CNT were assessed. The schizophrenia group performed significantly more poorly on the IED and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) compared with the bipolar disorder group. Additionally, correlation analyses revealed a significant correlation between the IED and the WCST; a positive correlation between the SOC and the Trail Making Test, Part B and the Stroop test; and a significant correlation between the SWM and the Stroop test. This study verified the construct and concurrent validity of the executive function subtests of the CANTAB for Korean psychiatric patients and suggests that the subtests of this battery would be useful and appropriate for assessing deficits in executive function in Korean clinical settings.

  7. Prevalence of childhood trauma and correlations between childhood trauma, suicidal ideation, and social support in patients with depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Peng; Wu, Kai; Zheng, Yingjun; Guo, Yangbo; Yang, Yuling; He, Jianfei; Ding, Yi; Peng, Hongjun

    2018-03-01

    Childhood trauma has long-term adverse effects on physical and psychological health. Previous studies demonstrated that suicide and mental disorders were related to childhood trauma. In China, there is insufficient research available on childhood trauma in patients with mental disorders. Outpatients were recruited from a psychiatric hospital in southern China, and controls were recruited from local communities. The demographic questionnaire, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form (CTQ-SF), and the Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) were completed by all participants, and the Self-rating Idea of Suicide Scale (SIOSS) were completed only by patients. Prevalence rates of childhood trauma were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunnett test were used to compare CTQ-SF and SSRS scores between groups. Logistic regression was used to control demographic characteristics and examine relationships between diagnosis and CTQ-SF and SSRS scores. Spearman's rank correlation test was conducted to analyze relationships between suicidal ideation and childhood trauma and suicidal ideation and social support. The final sample comprised 229 patients with depression, 102 patients with bipolar, 216 patient with schizophrenia, and 132 healthy controls. In our sample, 55.5% of the patients with depression, 61.8% of the patients with bipolar disorder, 47.2% of the patients with schizophrenia, and 20.5% of the healthy people reported at least one type of trauma. In patient groups, physical neglect (PN) and emotional neglect (EN) were most reported, and sexual abuse (SA) and physical abuse (PA) were least reported. CTQ-SF and SSRS total scores, and most of their subscale scores in patient groups were significantly different from the control group. After controlling demographic characteristics, mental disorders were associated with higher CTQ-SF scores and lower SSRS scores. CTQ-SF scores and number of trauma types were positively correlated with the SIOSS score. Negative correlations

  8. Bipolar Disorder (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the juvenile justice system, abusing drugs, or committing suicide. Because children and teens with bipolar disorder do not usually show the ... September 2015 previous 1 • 2 • 3 • 4 ... Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  9. Cytokines in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Vedel Kessing, Lars

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current research and hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggests the involvement of immune system dysfunction that is possibly related to disease activity. Our objective was to systematically review evidence of cytokine alterations in bipolar disorder according...... to affective state. METHODS: We conducted a systemtic review of studies measuring endogenous cytokine concentrations in patients with bipolar disorder and a meta-analysis, reporting results according to the PRISMA statement. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were included, comprising 556 bipolar disorder patients...... and 767 healthy controls, evaluating 15 different cytokines-, cytokine receptors- or cytokine antagonists. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 (sTNF-R1) and the soluble inlerleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) were elevated in manic patients compared...

  10. Bipolar Disorder - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bipolar Disorder URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bipolardisorder.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  11. Asenapine for bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheidemantel T

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Scheidemantel,1 Irina Korobkova,2 Soham Rej,3,4 Martha Sajatovic1,2 1University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 4Geri PARTy Research Group, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Asenapine (Saphris® is an atypical antipsychotic drug which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults, as well as the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I in both adult and pediatric populations. Asenapine is a tetracyclic drug with antidopaminergic and antiserotonergic activity with a unique sublingual route of administration. In this review, we examine and summarize the available literature on the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of asenapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD. Data from randomized, double-blind trials comparing asenapine to placebo or olanzapine in the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes showed asenapine to be an effective monotherapy treatment in clinical settings; asenapine outperformed placebo and showed noninferior performance to olanzapine based on improvement in the Young Mania Rating Scale scores. There are limited data available on the use of asenapine in the treatment of depressive symptoms of BD, or in the maintenance phase of BD. The available data are inconclusive, suggesting the need for more robust data from prospective trials in these clinical domains. The most commonly reported adverse effect associated with use of asenapine is somnolence. However, the somnolence associated with asenapine use did not cause significant rates of discontinuation. While asenapine was associated with weight gain when compared to placebo, it appeared to be modest when compared to other atypical antipsychotics, and its propensity to cause increases in hemoglobin A1c or serum lipid levels appeared to be

  12. Seasonality shows evidence for polygenic architecture and genetic correlation with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Byrne, E.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Martin, N.G.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Hoogendijk, W.J.G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Middeldorp, C.M.; Nyholt, DR; Smit, J.H.; van den Oord, E.J.; Grootheest, G.; Willemsen, G.; Zitman, F.G.; Neale, B.M.; Sullivan, P.F.; Raheja, U.K.; Stephens, S.H.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Vaswani, D.; Nijjar, G.V.; Ryan, K.A.; Youssufi, H.; Gehrman, P.R.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Montgomery, G.W.; Wray, N.R.; Nelson, E.C.; Mitchell, B.D.; Postolache, T.T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test common genetic variants for association with seasonality (seasonal changes in mood and behavior) and to investigate whether there are shared genetic risk factors between psychiatric disorders and seasonality. Method: Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) were conducted in

  13. Evidence implicating BRD1 with brain development and susceptibility to both schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Jacob; Bjarkam, Carsten; Kiær-Larsen, Stine

    encodes a putative regulator of transcription showed association with both disorders with minimal p-values of 0.0046 and 0.00001 for single marker and overall haplotype analysis, respectively. A specific BRD1 2-marker “risk” haplotype showed a frequency of ~10% in the combined case group versus ~1...

  14. Dysfunction and dysconnection in cortical-striatal networks during sustained attention: Genetic risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and its impact on brain network function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav A. Diwadkar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in the brain’s attention network may represent early identifiable neurobiological impairments in individuals at increased risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Here we provide evidence of dysfunctional regional and network function in adolescents at higher genetic risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (henceforth HGR. During fMRI, participants engaged in a sustained attention task with variable demands. The task alternated between attention (120 s, visual control (passive viewing; 120 s and rest (20 s epochs. Low and high demand attention conditions were created using the rapid presentation of 2- or 3-digit numbers. Subjects were required to detect repeated presentation of numbers. We demonstrate that the recruitment of cortical and striatal regions are disordered in HGR: Relative to typical controls (TC, HGR showed lower recruitment of the dorsal prefrontal cortex, but higher recruitment of the superior parietal cortex. This imbalance was more dramatic in the basal ganglia. There, a group by task demand interaction was observed, such that increased attention demand led to increased engagement in TC, but disengagement in HGR. These activation studies were complemented by network analyses using Dynamic Causal Modeling. Competing model architectures were assessed across a network of cortical-striatal regions, distinguished at a second level using random effects Bayesian model selection. In the winning architecture, HGR were characterized by significant reductions in coupling across both frontal-striatal and frontal-parietal pathways. The effective connectivity analyses indicate emergent network dysconnection, consistent with findings in patients with schizophrenia. Emergent patterns of regional dysfunction and disconnection in cortical-striatal pathways may provide functional biological signatures in the adolescent risk state for psychiatric illness.

  15. Lifestyle related factors & impact of metabolic syndrome on quality of life, level of functioning & self-esteem in patients with bipolar disorder & schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Nidhi; Kulhara, Parmanand; Chakrabarti, Subho; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-04-01

    Though studies have reported high prevalence rates of metabolic syndrome among patients with bipolar disorder (BPAD) and schizophrenia, there is lack of data on the impact of the same on the patients' life. This study was aimed to assess the lifestyle related factors associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to study the impact of MetS on functioning and quality of life (QOL) in patients with BPAD and schizophrenia. A total of 102 patients with BPAD and 72 patients with schizophrenia attending the output unit of a tertiary care hospital in north India were evaluated for MetS. These patients were assessed on Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile scale II (HPLP II), World Health Organization QOL -Bref Version (WHOQOL-Bref), Impact of Weight on Quality of Life- Lite version (IWOQOL -Lite), Body weight, Image and Self-esteem Evaluation questionnaire (BWISE), Obesity-related Problem scale (OP scale) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale. MetS was associated with lower scores on domains of health responsibility and nutrition habit domain on HPLP-II scale in both groups, and additionally on physical activity and stress management domain in BPAD group. On WHOQOL-Bref, MetS was associated with lower scores on the domains of physical and psychological health in both groups. On IWQOL-Lite, scores on personal distress and self esteem domains were higher in those with obesity in both groups and also on physical activity domain in schizophrenia group. Those with MetS had lower level of functioning as measured by GAF in schizophrenia group. Fulfillment of higher number of criteria of MetS correlated with poorer quality of life and higher problems in both groups. Many modifiable lifestyle factors increase the risk of MetS. MetS was found to be associated with poorer QOL in patients with BPAD and schizophrenia; in addition, obesity led to poor self-esteem and excessive personal distress.

  16. Lay theories of bipolar disorder: the causes, manifestations and cures for perceived bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Adrian; Anthony, Elizabeth

    2010-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate lay theories of the cause and treatment of bipolar disorder, and the recognition of its symptoms. This questionnaire-based study included vignette descriptions of mental disorders and 70 items relating to bipolar disorder. It was completed by 173 participants. Bipolar disorder was recognized less than depression but at the same rate as schizophrenia. Contrary to previous research, analysis showed that lay beliefs of the causes of bipolar disorder generally concur with scientific academic theories. Drug treatment was favoured as a cure rather than psychotherapy. Theories of cause and treatment were logically correlated. Overall, the results suggest that lay people have reasonably informed beliefs about the causes and treatments of bipolar disorder, however recognition of the symptoms is poor.

  17. Hypothesis review: are clathrin-mediated endocytosis and clathrin-dependent membrane and protein trafficking core pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the best-characterized mechanism governing cellular membrane and protein trafficking. In this hypothesis review, we integrate recent evidence implicating CME and related cellular trafficking mechanisms in the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The evidence includes proteomic and genomic findings implicating proteins and genes of the clathrin interactome. Additionally, several important candidate genes for schizophrenia, such as dysbindin, are involved in processes closely linked to CME and membrane trafficking. We discuss that key aspects of psychosis neuropathology such as synaptic dysfunction, white matter changes and aberrant neurodevelopment are all influenced by clathrin-dependent processes, and that other cellular trafficking mechanisms previously linked to psychoses interact with the clathrin interactome in important ways. Furthermore, many antipsychotic drugs have been shown to affect clathrin-interacting proteins. We propose that the targeted pharmacological manipulation of the clathrin interactome may offer fruitful opportunities for novel treatments of schizophrenia.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 October 2011; doi:10.1038\\/mp.2011.123.

  18. Association analyses suggest GPR24 as a shared susceptibility gene for bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, J E; Als, T D; Binderup, H

    2006-01-01

    M segment on 22q13. The present study investigated three candidate genes located in this segment: GPR24, ADSL, and ST13. Nine SNPs located in these genes and one microsatellite marker (D22S279) were applied in an association analysis of two samples: an extension of the previously analyzed Faeroese sample...... comprising 28 distantly related cases (17 BPD, 11 SZ subjects) and 44 controls, and a Scottish sample including 162 patients with BPD, 103 with SZ, and 200 controls. In both samples significant associations were observed in both disorders with predominantly GPR24 SNPs and haplotypes. In the Faeroese sample......(-5) and 0.0006 in the combined group of cases from the Faeroe Islands and Scotland, respectively. The G protein-coupled receptor 24 encoded by GPR24 binds melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and has been implicated with feeding behavior, energy metabolism, and regulation of stress and mood. To our knowledge...

  19. Clinical profiles of stigma experiences, self-esteem and social relationships among people with schizophrenia, depressive, and bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sandra E H; Esteves, Francisco; Carvalho, Helena

    2015-09-30

    Some mental illnesses and certain mental health care environments can be severely stigmatizing, which seems to be related to decreased self-esteem and a deterioration of the quality of social relationships for people with mental illness. This study aims to identify clinical profiles characterized by clinical diagnoses more strongly associated with the treatment settings and related to internalized stigma, self-esteem and satisfaction with social relationships. It also aimed to analyze associations between clinical profiles and socio-demographic indicators. Multiple correspondence analysis and cluster analysis were performed on a sample of 261 individuals with schizophrenia and mood disorders, from hospital-based and community-based facilities. MCA showed four distinct clinical profiles allowing a differentiation among levels of: internalized stigma, social relationship satisfaction and self-esteem. Overall, results revealed that internalized stigma remains a pervasive problem for some people with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Particularly, internalized stigma and social relationships dissatisfaction and associated socio-demographic indicators appear to be a risk factor for social isolation for individuals with schizophrenia, which may worsen the course of the disorder. Our findings highlight the importance to develop structured interventions aimed to reduce internalized stigma, and exclusion of those who suffer the loss of their social roles and networks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bipolar disorder: an update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lifetime incidence), recurrent mood disorder, with strong genetic undertones, characterised ... impairment in occupational function.4 Depression is usually the predominant ... Bipolar disorder, characterised by alternating discrete episodes of (hypo)mania and depression, provides unique diagnostic and treatment challenges ...

  1. The prevalence and predictors of obstructive sleep apnea in major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Brendon; Vancampfort, Davy; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Gaughran, Fiona; Manu, Peter; Rosenbaum, Simon; De Hert, Marc; Fornaro, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a health hazard since it is associated with neurocognitive dysfunction and cardio-metabolic diseases. The prevalence of OSA among people with serious mental illness (SMI) is unclear. We searched major electronic databases from inception till 06/2015. Articles were included that reported the prevalence of OSA determined by polysomnography (PSG) or an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5 events/hr, in people with major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder (BD) or schizophrenia. A random effects meta-analysis calculating the pooled prevalence of OSA and meta-regression of potential moderators were performed. Twelve articles were included representing 570,121 participants with SMI (mean age=38.3 years (SD=7.5)), 45.8% male (range=32-80.4) and mean body mass index (BMI) 25.9 (SD=3.7). The prevalence of OSA in SMI in clinical studies was 25.7% (95% CI 13.9 to 42.4%, n=1,535). Higher frequencies of OSA were seen in MDD (36.3%, 19.4-57.4%, n=525) than in BD (24.5%, 95% CI 10.6-47.1, n=681) and schizophrenia (15.4%, 95% CI 5.3-37.1%, n=329). The prevalence of OSA in 568,586 people with SMI from population cohort studies was 10.7% (95% CI 2.4-37.0%) and 19.8% (95% CI 2.5-70.0%) in 358,853 people with MDD. Increasing age (β=0.063, 95% CI 0.0005-0.126, p=0.04, N=10) and BMI predicted increased prevalence of OSA (β=0.1642, 95% CI 0.004-0.3701, p=0.04, N=9). People with SMI (particularly MDD) have a high prevalence of OSA. Screening for and interventions to manage OSA in SMI including those focused on reducing BMI are warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Anomalies of subjective experience in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, J; Handest, P; Saebye, D

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Contemporary psychopathology, as a result of behaviourally dominated epistemological stance, downplays anomalies of the patient's subjectivity. This neglect has probably deleterious consequences for research in the causes and the boundaries of the schizophrenia spectrum conditions....... The purpose of this study is to explore frequency of qualitative, not-yet-psychotic, anomalies of subjective experience in patients with residual schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar illness in remission. METHOD: The patients were examined with the Danish version of the Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic...... Symptoms (BSABS). Anomalies of experience were condensed into rational scales with good internal consistencies. RESULTS: Diagnosis of schizophrenia was associated with elevated scores on the scales measuring perplexity (loss of immediate meaning), disorders of perception, disorders of self...

  3. Diagnostic stability in pediatric bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel Kessing, Lars; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic stability of pediatric bipolar disorder has not been investigated previously. The aim was to investigate the diagnostic stability of the ICD-10 diagnosis of pediatric mania/bipolar disorder.METHODS: All patients below 19 years of age who got a diagnosis of mania...... disorder (14.8%) and behavioral and emotional disorders with onset during childhood or adolescents (10.9%). Prevalence rates of schizophrenia, personality disorders, anxiety disorder or hyperkinetic disorders (ADHD) were low.LIMITATIONS: Data concern patients who get contact to hospital psychiatry only.......CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should be more observant on manic symptoms in children and adolescents who at first glance present with transient psychosis, reaction to stress/adjustment disorder or with behavioral and emotional disorders with onset during childhood or adolescents (F90-98) and follow these patients more closely...

  4. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Engmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet.

  5. Public beliefs about and attitudes towards bipolar disorder: testing theory based models of stigma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellison, Nell; Mason, Oliver; Scior, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Given the vast literature into public beliefs and attitudes towards schizophrenia and depression, there is paucity of research on attitudes towards bipolar disorder despite its similar prevalence to schizophrenia...

  6. Expression of ZNF804A in human brain and alterations in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder: a novel transcript fetally regulated by the psychosis risk variant rs1344706.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ran; Cousijn, Helena; Jaffe, Andrew E; Burnet, Philip W J; Edwards, Freya; Eastwood, Sharon L; Shin, Joo Heon; Lane, Tracy A; Walker, Mary A; Maher, Brady J; Weinberger, Daniel R; Harrison, Paul J; Hyde, Thomas M; Kleinman, Joel E

    2014-10-01

    The single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1344706 in the zinc finger protein 804A gene (ZNF804A) shows genome-wide association with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Little is known regarding the expression of ZNF804A and the functionality of rs1344706. To characterize ZNF804A expression in human brain and to investigate how it changes across the life span and how it is affected by rs1344706, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. Molecular and immunochemical methods were used to study ZNF804A messenger RNA (mRNA) and ZNF804A protein, respectively. ZNF804A transcripts were investigated using next-generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-based methods, and ZNF804A protein was investigated using Western blots and immunohistochemistry. Samples of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobe tissue were interrogated from 697 participants between 14 weeks' gestational age and age 85 years, including patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder. Quantitative measurements of ZNF804A mRNA and immunoreactivity, and the effect of diagnosis and rs1344706 genotype. ZNF804A was expressed across the life span, with highest expression prenatally. An abundant and developmentally regulated truncated ZNF804A transcript was identified, missing exons 1 and 2 (ZNF804AE3E4) and predicted to encode a protein lacking the zinc finger domain. rs1344706 influenced expression of ZNF804AE3E4 mRNA in fetal brain (P = .02). In contrast, full-length ZNF804A showed no association with genotype (P > .05). ZNF804AE3E4 mRNA expression was decreased in patients with schizophrenia (P = .006) and increased in those with major depressive disorder (P disorder (P = .002). ZNF804A immunoreactivity was detected in fetal and adult human cerebral cortex. It was localized primarily to pyramidal neurons, with cytoplasmic as well as dendritic and nuclear staining. No differences in ZNF804A-immunoreactive neurons were

  7. Genetic Variation of the Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1) and Dopamine D2 Receptor (DRD2) is Related to Smoking Differences in Patients with Schizophrenia but not Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa-Fujita, Mika; Bly, Michael J; Ellingrod, Vicki L; Dalack, Gregory W; Domino, Edward F

    It is not known why mentally ill persons smoke excessively. Inasmuch as endogenous opioid and dopaminergic systems are involved in smoking reinforcement, it is important to study mu opioid receptor (OPRM1) A118G (rs1799971), dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) Taq1A (rs1800497) genotypes, and sex differences among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Smokers and nonsmokers with schizophrenia (n=177) and bipolar disorder (n=113) were recruited and genotyped. They were classified into three groups: current smoker, former smoker, and never smoker by tobacco smoking status self-report. The number of cigarettes smoked per day was used as the major tobacco smoking parameter. In patients with schizophrenia, tobacco smoking prevalence was greater in males than in females as expected, but women had greater daily cigarette consumption (pschizophrenia who had the OPRM1 *G genotype smoked more cigarettes per day than the AA allele carriers with schizophrenia (pschizophrenia who were GG homozygous of the DRD2 receptor smoked more than the *A male smokers with schizophrenia (pschizophrenia. Alteration of DRD2 receptor function also increased smoking behavior in females with schizophrenia.

  8. Vitamin D and the omega-3 fatty acids control serotonin synthesis and action, part 2: relevance for ADHD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Rhonda P; Ames, Bruce N

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin regulates a wide variety of brain functions and behaviors. Here, we synthesize previous findings that serotonin regulates executive function, sensory gating, and social behavior and that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior all share in common defects in these functions. It has remained unclear why supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D improve cognitive function and behavior in these brain disorders. Here, we propose mechanisms by which serotonin synthesis, release, and function in the brain are modulated by vitamin D and the 2 marine omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Brain serotonin is synthesized from tryptophan by tryptophan hydroxylase 2, which is transcriptionally activated by vitamin D hormone. Inadequate levels of vitamin D (∼70% of the population) and omega-3 fatty acids are common, suggesting that brain serotonin synthesis is not optimal. We propose mechanisms by which EPA increases serotonin release from presynaptic neurons by reducing E2 series prostaglandins and DHA influences serotonin receptor action by increasing cell membrane fluidity in postsynaptic neurons. We propose a model whereby insufficient levels of vitamin D, EPA, or DHA, in combination with genetic factors and at key periods during development, would lead to dysfunctional serotonin activation and function and may be one underlying mechanism that contributes to neuropsychiatric disorders and depression. This model suggests that optimizing vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acid intake may help prevent and modulate the severity of brain dysfunction. © FASEB.

  9. [Creativity and bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maçkalı, Zeynep; Gülöksüz, Sinan; Oral, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder has been an intriguing topic since ancient times. Early studies focused on describing characteristics of creative people. From the last quarter of the twentieth century, researchers began to focus on the relationship between mood disorders and creativity. Initially, the studies were based on biographical texts and the obtained results indicated a relationship between these two concepts. The limitations of the retrospective studies led the researchers to develop systematic investigations into this area. The systematic studies that have focused on artistic creativity have examined both the prevalence of mood disorders and the creative process. In addition, a group of researchers addressed the relationship in terms of affective temperaments. Through the end of the 90's, the scope of creativity was widened and the notion of everyday creativity was proposed. The emergence of this notion led researchers to investigate the associations of the creative process in ordinary (non-artist) individuals. In this review, the descriptions of creativity and creative process are mentioned. Also, the creative process is addressed with regards to bipolar disorder. Then, the relationship between creativity and bipolar disorder are evaluated in terms of aforementioned studies (biographical, systematic, psychobiographical, affective temperaments). In addition, a new model, the "Shared Vulnerability Model" which was developed to explain the relationship between creativity and psychopathology is introduced. Finally, the methodological limitations and the suggestions for resolving these limitations are included.

  10. Early Intervention in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieta, Eduard; Salagre, Estela; Grande, Iria; Carvalho, André F; Fernandes, Brisa S; Berk, Michael; Birmaher, Boris; Tohen, Mauricio; Suppes, Trisha

    2018-01-24

    Bipolar disorder is a recurrent disorder that affects more than 1% of the world population and usually has its onset during youth. Its chronic course is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, making bipolar disorder one of the main causes of disability among young and working-age people. The implementation of early intervention strategies may help to change the outcome of the illness and avert potentially irreversible harm to patients with bipolar disorder, as early phases may be more responsive to treatment and may need less aggressive therapies. Early intervention in bipolar disorder is gaining momentum. Current evidence emerging from longitudinal studies indicates that parental early-onset bipolar disorder is the most consistent risk factor for bipolar disorder. Longitudinal studies also indicate that a full-blown manic episode is often preceded by a variety of prodromal symptoms, particularly subsyndromal manic symptoms, therefore supporting the existence of an at-risk state in bipolar disorder that could be targeted through early intervention. There are also identifiable risk factors that influence the course of bipolar disorder, some of them potentially modifiable. Valid biomarkers or diagnosis tools to help clinicians identify individuals at high risk of conversion to bipolar disorder are still lacking, although there are some promising early results. Pending more solid evidence on the best treatment strategy in early phases of bipolar disorder, physicians should carefully weigh the risks and benefits of each intervention. Further studies will provide the evidence needed to finish shaping the concept of early intervention.

  11. Theory of mind deficits in bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Natalie; Dunbar, Robin I M; Bentall, Richard P

    2003-02-01

    Bipolar affective disorder patients often show cognitive deficits that are similar to those found in schizophrenia patients. Theory of mind (the ability to understand others' mental states) is compromised in currently ill schizophrenia patients. This study aimed to establish whether similar deficits are found in bipolar patients. We measured theory of mind ability in 20 bipolar-manic patients, 15 bipolar-depressed patients, 13 bipolar patients in remission and 15 normal controls. The task, which controlled for memory and comprehension, had previously been used in a study of schizophrenia patients. Impaired performance on theory of mind was found for both bipolar-depressed and bipolar-manic patients, even when memory was controlled for. No impairment was observed in the remitted patients. The manic patients scored lower than the remitted patients on a brief measure of intelligence; no other group differences in IQ were significant. Theory of mind deficits are found in currently symptomatic bipolar patients. These findings add to growing evidence that common mechanisms may contribute to bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia.

  12. [Spouses and bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellouze, F; Ayedi, S; Cherif, W; Ben Abla, T; M'rad, M F

    2011-02-01

    To assess the quality of life of a population of spouses of bipolar patients compared with a control population. We conducted a cross-sectional study which included two groups: a group of 30 spouses of patients followed for bipolar I disorder according to DSM IV criteria and a second group of 30 subjects from the general population. Both groups were matched by age, sex, marital status and socioeconomic level. This device was designed to limit the differences between the two groups solely those of the bipolar illness. Evaluating the quality of life was achieved using the quality of life scale: SF-36. This is a scale that has already been translated and validated in dialect Arabic. Regarding sociodemographic variables, the two study groups differed only for: recreation, friendly relations and the couple relationship that included more and better skills among the control group. In the categorical approach, the quality of life was impaired in 60% of spouses and 40% of controls with a statistically significant difference. The following standardized dimensions: mental health (D4), limitation due to mental health (D5), life and relationship with others (D6) and perceived health (D8) and mental component (CM) were significantly altered in patients' spouses compared to controls. We found significant differences between the two groups for: overall average score (51.1 vs. 68.2), mental health (D4), limitation due to mental health (D5), life and relationship with others (D6), perceived health (D8) and perceived health (D8) standards. The impairment of quality of life of bipolar patients' spouses is related to the extra responsibility, stress, financial problems and health problems, stigma, and loss of security of the person loved. Considering the consequences that the appearance of bipolar disorder on the patient's spouse may have, certain measures must be proposed to improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2010 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All

  13. Bipolar Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Comorbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Keskin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders is a well known concept. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is the most commonly seen comorbid anxiety disorder in bipolar patients. Some genetic variants, neurotransmitters especially serotonergic systems and second-messenger systems are thought to be responsible for its etiology. Bipolar disorder alters the clinical aspects of obsessive compulsive disorder and is associated with poorer outcome. The determination of comorbidity between bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder is quite important for appropriate clinical management and treatment. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 429-437

  14. Bipolar Disorder and Childhood Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Erten

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a chronic disorder in which irregular course of depressive, mania or mixed episodes or a complete recovery between episodes can be observed. The studies about the effects of traumatic events on bipolar disorder showed that they had significant and long-term effects on the symptoms of the disorder. Psychosocial stress might change the neurobiology of bipolar disorder over time. The studies revealed that the traumatic events could influence not only the onset of the disorder but also the course of the disorder and in these patients the rate of suicide attempt and comorbid substance abuse might increase. Bipolar patients who had childhood trauma had an earlier onset, higher number of episodes and comorbid disorders. In this review, the relationship between childhood trauma and bipolar disorder is reviewed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(2: 157-165

  15. A group ICA based framework for evaluating resting fMRI markers when disease categories are unclear: application to schizophrenia, bipolar, and schizoaffective disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuhui; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Liu, Jingyu; Sui, Jing; Yu, Qingbao; He, Hao; Castro, Eduardo; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BP) and schizoaffective disorder (SAD) share some common symptoms, and there is a debate about whether SAD is an independent category. To the best of our knowledge, no study has been done to differentiate these three disorders or to investigate the distinction of SAD as an independent category using fMRI data. The present study is aimed to explore biomarkers from resting-state fMRI networks for differentiating these disorders and investigate the relationship among these disorders based on fMRI networks with an emphasis on SAD. Firstly, a novel group ICA method, group information guided independent component analysis (GIG-ICA), was applied to extract subject-specific brain networks from fMRI data of 20 healthy controls (HC), 20 SZ patients, 20 BP patients, 20 patients suffering SAD with manic episodes (SADM), and 13 patients suffering SAD with depressive episodes exclusively (SADD). Then, five-level one-way analysis of covariance and multiclass support vector machine recursive feature elimination were employed to identify discriminative regions from the networks. Subsequently, the t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) projection and the hierarchical clustering methods were implemented to investigate the relationship among those groups. Finally, to evaluate the generalization ability, 16 new subjects were classified based on the found regions and the trained model using original 93 subjects. Results show that the discriminative regions mainly include frontal, parietal, precuneus, cingulate, supplementary motor, cerebellar, insula and supramarginal cortices, which performed well in distinguishing different groups. SADM and SADD were the most similar to each other, although SADD had greater similarity to SZ compared to other groups, which indicates SAD may be an independent category. BP was closer to HC compared with other psychotic disorders. In summary, resting-state fMRI brain networks extracted via GIG-ICA provide

  16. A group ICA based framework for evaluating resting fMRI markers when disease categories are unclear: application to schizophrenia, bipolar, and schizoaffective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuhui; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Liu, Jingyu; Sui, Jing; Yu, Qingbao; He, Hao; Castro, Eduardo; Calhoun, Vince D

    2015-11-15

    Schizophrenia (SZ), bipolar disorder (BP) and schizoaffective disorder (SAD) share some common symptoms, and there is still a debate about whether SAD is an independent category. To the best of our knowledge, no study has been done to differentiate these three disorders or to investigate the distinction of SAD as an independent category using fMRI data. This study is aimed to explore biomarkers from resting-state fMRI networks for differentiating these disorders and investigate the relationship among these disorders based on fMRI networks with an emphasis on SAD. Firstly, a novel group ICA method, group information guided independent component analysis (GIG-ICA), was applied to extract subject-specific brain networks from fMRI data of 20 healthy controls (HC), 20 SZ patients, 20 BP patients, 20 patients suffering from SAD with manic episodes (SADM), and 13 patients suffering from SAD with depressive episodes exclusively (SADD). Then, five-level one-way analysis of covariance and multiclass support vector machine recursive feature elimination were employed to identify discriminative regions from the networks. Subsequently, the t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) projection and the hierarchical clustering were implemented to investigate the relationship among those groups. Finally, to evaluate the generalization ability, 16 new subjects were classified based on the found regions and the trained model using original 93 subjects. Results show that the discriminative regions mainly included frontal, parietal, precuneus, cingulate, supplementary motor, cerebellar, insula and supramarginal cortices, which performed well in distinguishing different groups. SADM and SADD were the most similar to each other, although SADD had greater similarity to SZ compared to other groups, which indicates that SAD may be an independent category. BP was closer to HC compared with other psychotic disorders. In summary, resting-state fMRI brain networks extracted via GIG

  17. [Antipsychotics in bipolar disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheron-Trystram, M-N; Braitman, A; Cheref, S; Auffray, L

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of the various treatments that are currently available, in particular in France, for the treatment of bipolar disorders. This article specifically addresses the use of novel antipsychotic agents as alternative therapy to a lithium therapy and/or the use of conventional antipsychotics. The prevalence of bipolar disorder over a lifetime is around 1% of the general population. Bipolar disorder consists of alternating depressive and manic episodes. It mainly affects younger subjects, and is often associated with alcohol and drug addictions. There are two main subtypes of bipolar disorder. According to the DSM IV-R, type 1 of bipolar disorder is characterised when at least one manic episode (or a mixed episode) has been diagnosed. Type 2 of bipolar disorder is related to patients enduring recurrent depressive episodes but no manic episode. Type 2 affects women more frequently as opposed to type 1 affecting individuals of both sexes. Manic-depressive disorder (or cyclo-thymic disorder) appears in relation to patients who has never suffered manic episode, mixed episode or severe depressive episode but have undergone numerous periods with some symptoms of depression and hypomanic symptoms over a two-year period during which any asymptomatic periods last no longer than two months. The average age of the person going through a first episode (often a depressive one) is 20 years-old. Untreated bipolar patients may endure more than ten manic or depressive episodes. Finally, in relation to 10 to 20% of patients, the bipolar disorder will turn into a fast cycle form, either spontaneously or as a result of certain medical treatments. Psychiatrists are now able to initiate various treating strategies which are most likely to be effective as a result of the identification of clinical subtypes of the bipolar disorder. Lithium therapy has been effectively and acutely used for patients with pure or elated mania and its prophylaxis. However, lithium medication

  18. Objective and subjective sleep quality: Melatonin versus placebo add-on treatment in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder withdrawing from long-term benzodiazepine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baandrup, Lone; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-06-30

    Benzodiazepines are frequently long-term prescribed for the treatment of patients with severe mental illness. This prescribing practice is problematic because of well-described side effects including risk of dependence. We examined the efficacy of prolonged-release melatonin on objective and subjective sleep quality during benzodiazepine discontinuation and whether sleep variables were associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Eligible patients included adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and long-term use of benzodiazepines in combination with antipsychotics. All participants gradually tapered the use of benzodiazepines after randomization to add-on treatment with melatonin versus placebo. Here we report a subsample of 23 patients undergoing sleep recordings (one-night polysomnography) and 55 patients participating in subjective sleep quality ratings. Melatonin had no effect on objective sleep efficiency, but significantly improved self-reported sleep quality. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage at the 24-week follow-up was associated with a significantly decreased proportion of stage 2 sleep. These results indicate that prolonged-release melatonin has some efficacy for self-reported sleep quality after gradual benzodiazepine dose reduction, and that benzodiazepine discontinuation is not associated with rebound insomnia in medicated patients with severe mental illness. However, these findings were limited by a small sample size and a low retention rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in crisis. What do I do? Share Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens Download PDF Download ePub ... brochure will give you more information. What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness. It ...

  20. Seasonality shows evidence for polygenic architecture and genetic correlation with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder – a meta-analysis of genetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Enda M; Raheja, Uttam; Stephens, Sarah H.; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela AF; Vaswani, Dipika; Nijjar, Gagan V.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Youssufi, Hassaan; Gehrman, Philip R; Shuldiner, Alan R; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Wray, Naomi R; Nelson, Elliot C; Mitchell, Braxton D; Postolache, Teodor T

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test common genetic variants for association with seasonality (seasonal changes in mood and behavior) and to investigate whether there are shared genetic risk factors between psychiatric disorders and seasonality. Methods A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) conducted in Australian and Amish populations in whom the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ) had been administered. The total sample size was 4,156 individuals. Genetic risk scores based on results from prior large GWAS studies of bipolar disorder (BD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and schizophrenia (SCZ) were calculated to test for overlap in risk between psychiatric disorders and seasonality. Results The most significant association was with rs11825064 (p = 1.7 × 10−6, β = 0.64, S.E = 0.13), an intergenic SNP found on chromosome 11. The evidence for overlap in risk factors was strongest for SCZ and seasonality, with the SCZ genetic profile scores explaining 3% of the variance in log-transformed GSS. BD genetic profile scores were also significantly associated with seasonality, although at much weaker levels, and no evidence for overlap in risk was detected between MDD and seasonality. Conclusions Common SNPs of very large effect likely do not exist for seasonality in the populations examined. As expected, there was overlapping genetic risk factors for BD (but not MDD) with seasonality. Unexpectedly, the risk for SCZ and seasonality had the largest overlap, an unprecedented finding that requires replication in other populations, and has potential clinical implications considering overlapping cognitive deficits in seasonal affective disorders and SCZ PMID:25562672

  1. Bipolar Disorder and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sermin Kesebir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Comorbid endocrine and cardiovascular situations with bipolar disorder usually result from the bipolar disorder itself or as a consequence of its treatment. With habits and lifestyle, genetic tendency and side effects, this situation is becoming more striking. Subpopulations of bipolar disorders patients should be considered at high risk for diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in bipolar disorder may be three times greater than in the general population. Comorbidity of diabetes causes a pathophysiological overlapping in the neurobiological webs of bipolar cases. Signal mechanisms of glycocorticoid/insulin and immunoinflammatory effector systems are junction points that point out the pathophysiology between bipolar disorder and general medical cases susceptible to stress. Glycogen synthetase kinase (GSK-3 is a serine/treonine kinase and inhibits the transport of glucose stimulated by insulin. It is affected in diabetes, cancer, inflammation, Alzheimer disease and bipolar disorder. Hypoglycemic effect of lithium occurs via inhibiting glycogen synthetase kinase. When comorbid with diabetes, the other disease -for example bipolar disorder, especially during its acute manic episodes-, causes a serious situation that presents its influences for a lifetime. Choosing pharmacological treatment and treatment adherence are another important interrelated areas. The aim of this article is to discuss and review the etiological, clinical and therapeutic properties of diabetes mellitus and bipolar disorder comorbidity.

  2. Toward stratified treatments for bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Gregor; Wolf, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    In bipolar disorders, there are unclear diagnostic boundaries with unipolar depression and schizophrenia, inconsistency of treatment guidelines, relatively long trial-and-error phases of treatment optimization, and increasing use of complex combination therapies lacking empirical evidence. These suggest that the current definition of bipolar disorders based on clinical symptoms reflects a clinically and etiologically heterogeneous entity. Stratification of treatments for bipolar disorders based on biomarkers and improved clinical markers are greatly needed to increase the efficacy of currently available treatments and improve the chances of developing novel therapeutic approaches. This review provides a theoretical framework to identify biomarkers and summarizes the most promising markers for stratification regarding beneficial and adverse treatment effects. State and stage specifiers, neuropsychological tests, neuroimaging, and genetic and epigenetic biomarkers will be discussed with respect to their ability to predict the response to specific pharmacological and psychosocial psychotherapies for bipolar disorders. To date, the most reliable markers are derived from psychopathology and history-taking, while no biomarker has been found that reliably predicts individual treatment responses. This review underlines both the importance of clinical diagnostic skills and the need for biological research to identify markers that will allow the targeting of treatment specifically to sub-populations of bipolar patients who are more likely to benefit from a specific treatment and less likely to develop adverse reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Levels of Cognitive Control: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Test of an RDoC Domain Across Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smucny, Jason; Lesh, Tyler A; Newton, Keith; Niendam, Tara; Ragland, J Daniel; Carter, Cameron S

    2017-09-26

    In recent years, the boundaries of psychopathology as defined by diagnostic categories have been criticized as inadequately 'carving nature at its joints' with respect to the neurobiology of major mental disorders. In 2010 the NIMH launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) framework for understanding mental illnesses as brain circuit disorders that extend beyond DSM-defined diagnoses. In the present study we focus on cognitive dysfunction, a core feature of schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD), and use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a cognitive control (CC) task in recent onset patients to test the hypothesis that at a behavioral and underlying neural circuitry level these deficits exist on a continuum (as opposed to showing categorical differences) across the two disorders. 53 healthy controls, 24 recent (fMRI at 1.5 T. In addition to behavior, task-associated response was examined in frontoparietal regions-of-interest. In an a priori contrast-based analysis, significant deficits across patient groups (vs controls) were observed on CC-associated performance as well as frontoparietal response. These analyses further revealed a continuum of deficits in which BPD showed intermediate levels of CC relative to controls and SZ. Poor CC was associated with poverty and disorganization symptoms across patient groups. These results support the hypothesis that CC dysfunction in BPD and SZ reflects a continuum of deficits that cuts across traditional, DSM-based classification. Implications for the neurobiology of these diseases are discussed.Neuropsychopharmacology accepted article preview online, 26 September 2017. doi:10.1038/npp.2017.233.

  4. [Treatment of bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Michael; Bellivier, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic pathology whose management must lead to limit the social, professional and family impacts as well as suicidal risk. The treatment of acute episodes and prophylaxis is based on mood stabilizer treatments whose lithium is a leader. They will be chosen according to the background and history of the disease. Anti-depressants must be used with care to minimize the risk of manic episode and the induction of rapid cycles. The prognosis is not solving major episodes but avoiding major mood episodes. The management of residual symptoms (especially neuro-cognitive) is also a major challenge prognosis and justifies the implementation of adjuvant psychotherapeutic strategies.

  5. Prolonged-release melatonin versus placebo for benzodiazepine discontinuation in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder: A randomised, placebo-controlled, blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baandrup, Lone; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian; Glenthoj, Birte Y

    2016-10-01

    We assessed if prolonged-release melatonin can facilitate withdrawal of long-term benzodiazepine usage in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Randomised, placebo-controlled, blinded, parallel superiority trial of 24 weeks duration. Participants were randomised to prolonged-release melatonin 2 mg daily versus matching placebo and were continuously guided to gradually reduce their usual benzodiazepine dosage. The primary outcome was mean benzodiazepine daily dosage at 24 weeks. Secondary outcomes included pattern of benzodiazepine dosage over time, benzodiazepine cessation proportion, and benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms. In total, 86 patients (21-74 years) were enrolled: 42 were randomised to melatonin versus 44 to placebo. We found no significant effect of melatonin on mean benzodiazepine dosage at 24 weeks (melatonin group 8.01 mg versus placebo group 5.72 mg diazepam equivalents; difference between means -2.29; 95% CI -5.78 to 1.21; P = 0.20). Benzodiazepine cessation proportion was 38.1% (16/42) in the melatonin group versus 47.7% (21/44) in the placebo group (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.26 to 1.56; P = 0.32). Prolonged-release melatonin had no effect on benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms. Benzodiazepine dosage was comparably low between the groups after 24 weeks of guided gradual dose reduction. In this context, prolonged-release melatonin did not seem to further facilitate benzodiazepine discontinuation.

  6. Scientific attitudes towards bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Biglu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bipolar disorder is a psychiatric condition that is also called manic-depressive disease. It causes unusual changes in mood, energy, activity levels, and the ability to carry out day-to-day tasks. In the present study, 3 sets of data were considered and analyzed: first, all papers categorized under Bipolar Disorders in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-E database through 2001-2011; second, papers published by the international journal of Bipolar Disorders indexed in SCI-E during a period of 11 years; and third, all papers distributed by the international journal of Bipolar Disorders indexed in MEDLINE during the period of study. Methods: The SCI-E database was used to extract all papers indexed with the topic of Bipolar Disorders as well as all papers published by The International Journal of Bipolar Disorders. Extraction of data from MEDLINE was restricted to the journals name from setting menu. The Science of Science Tool was used to map the co-authorship network of papers published by The International Journal of Bipolar Disorders through 2009-2011. Results: Analysis of data showed that the majority of publications in the subject area of bipolar disorders indexed in SCI-E were published by The International Journal of Bipolar Disorders. Although journal articles consisted of 59% of the total publication type in SCI-E, 65% of publications distributed by The Journal of Bipolar Disorders were in the form of meetingabstracts. Journal articles consisted of only 23% of the total publications. USA was the leading country regarding sharing data in the field of bipolar disorders followed by England, Canada, and Germany. Conclusion: The editorial policy of The International Journal of Bipolar Disorders has been focused on new themes and new ways of researching in the subject area of bipolar disorder. Regarding the selection of papers for indexing, the SCI-E database selects data more comprehensively than MEDLINE. The number of papers

  7. Genetics Home Reference: bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7 Genetic Testing Registry: Major affective disorder 8 Genetic Testing Registry: Major affective disorder 9 Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (5 links) Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: Finding the Right Treatment ...

  8. Decreased Numbers of Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in the Amygdala of Subjects With Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia: Relationship to Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulos, Harry; Wiseman, Jason T; Markota, Matej; Ehrenfeld, Lucy; Berretta, Sabina

    2017-03-15

    Growing evidence points to a key role for somatostatin (SST) in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). In the amygdala, neurons expressing SST play an important role in the regulation of anxiety, which is often comorbid in these disorders. We tested the hypothesis that SST-immunoreactive (IR) neurons are decreased in the amygdala of subjects with SZ and BD. Evidence for circadian SST expression in the amygdala and disrupted circadian rhythms and rhythmic peaks of anxiety in BD suggest a disruption of rhythmic expression of SST in this disorder. Amygdala sections from 12 SZ, 15 BD, and 15 control subjects were processed for immunocytochemistry for SST and neuropeptide Y, a neuropeptide partially coexpressed in SST-IR neurons. Total numbers (N t ) of IR neurons were measured. Time of death was used to test associations with circadian rhythms. SST-IR neurons were decreased in the lateral amygdala nucleus in BD (N t , p = .003) and SZ (N t , p = .02). In normal control subjects, N t of SST-IR neurons varied according to time of death. This pattern was altered in BD subjects, characterized by decreases of SST-IR neurons selectively in subjects with time of death corresponding to the day (6:00 am to 5:59 pm). Numbers of neuropeptide Y-IR neurons were not affected. Decreased SST-IR neurons in the amygdala of patients with SZ and BD, interpreted here as decreased SST expression, may disrupt responses to fear and anxiety regulation in these individuals. In BD, our findings raise the possibility that morning peaks of anxiety depend on a disruption of circadian regulation of SST expression in the amygdala. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A genetic variant in CAMKK2 gene is possibly associated with increased risk of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Jamshidi, Javad; Moslemi, Elham; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Ohadi, Mina; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Ghaedi, Hamid; Gholipour, Fatemeh; Fazeli, Atena; Motallebi, Marzieh; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Mohammadihosseinabad, Saeed; Shafiei Zarneh, Amir Ehtesham; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Madadi, Faranak; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein

    2016-03-01

    A recent large-scale study have reported that rs1063843, a single nucleotide polymorphism located in the CAMKK2 gene is highly associated with schizophrenia in European and Han Chinese populations. Increasing evidences show that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have some common genetic variance. Here, we evaluated the association of this variant with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in Iranian population. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 500 schizophrenic patients, 500 bipolar patients and 500 normal controls and all were genotyped for the rs1063843 using a PCR-RFLP method. The allele frequency of rs1063843 was significantly different in both schizophrenia and bipolar patients comparing to control group. For the first time, we showed that rs1063843 is highly associated with bipolar disorder, although more replication studies are needed to confirm our findings. Our results also support the findings of previous studies suggesting a significant association between rs1063843 and schizophrenia.

  10. Vitamin D and the omega-3 fatty acids control serotonin synthesis and action, part 2: relevance for ADHD, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patrick, Rhonda P; Ames, Bruce N

    2015-01-01

    ..., schizophrenia, and impulsive behavior all share in common defects in these functions. It has remained unclear why supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D improve cognitive function and behavior in these brain disorders...

  11. Polymorphism of dopamine D2 receptor (TaqIA, TaqIB, and-141C Ins/Del) and dopamine degradation enzyme (COMT G158A, A-278G) genes and extrapyramidal symptoms in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Amalia; Bernardo, Miquel; Mas, Sergi; Crescenti, Anna; Aparici, Monica; Gasso, Patricia; Deulofeu, Ramon; Mane, Anna; Catalan, Rosa; Carne, Xavier

    2008-11-30

    The relationship is examined of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) polymorphism (TaqIA, TaqIB, -141 C Ins/Del) and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism (A-278G, G158A) to the risk of antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. Participants comprised 80 cases presenting with EPS (Simpson-Angus Scale score >3) and 188 controls presenting without EPS (Simpson-Angus Scale score bipolar subgroup, with a COMT(L) allele protection of 70%, the reduction remained significant after Bonferroni correction. The analysis of the COMT haplotypes revealed an association of the A-G haplotype with EPS risk in the overall group and the bipolar disorder subgroup, and an association of the A-A haplotype with EPS protection in the bipolar subgroup. No significant associations were found for DRD2 or COMT A-278G polymorphisms. This is the first report of an association between the COMT polymorphism and EPS susceptibility. These results are of interest in view of the increased use of antipsychotic drugs in bipolar patients in both the acute manic and the depressive phase.

  12. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism is associated with increased body mass index and insulin resistance measures in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, Stefania; Sodhi, Monsheel; Li, Jiang; Bobo, William V; Chen, Yuejin; Tumuklu, Mevhibe; Theleritis, Christos; Jayathilake, Karuna; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a common functional variant in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Val66Met, which has been shown to be associated with increased body mass index (BMI) in schizophrenia (SCZ) and schizoaffective disorder (SAD), is also associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain in bipolar disorder (BPD). Association of Val66Met with other metabolic measures, including high- and low-density cholesterol, triglycerides, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and hemoglobin A1c, was also tested. This was a 12-month, prospective, randomized trial of two atypical antipsychotic drugs (APDs) with moderate (risperidone) or high (olanzapine) risk to cause weight gain. Subjects were diagnosed as having BPD (n = 90) and SCZ or SAD (n = 76). BMI was significantly greater in all diagnoses for Met66 allele carriers at six months (p = 0.01). Met66 carriers with BPD showed a greater increase in the triglycerides/high-density (HDL) cholesterol ratio (p = 0.01), a key marker for metabolic syndrome related to insulin resistance, and log-triglycerides (p = 0.04), after three or six months of treatment. Met66 carriers had the greatest increase in log-triglycerides (p = 0.03) and triglycerides/HDL cholesterol ratio after three months of treatment with risperidone (p = 0.003), and the highest BMI at six months (p = 0.01). The positive association of BNDF Val66Met with high BMI values replicates previous findings in patients with SCZ and indicates the BDNF Val66Met genotype as a potential risk factor for obesity and insulin resistance measures in patients with BPD receiving antipsychotics as well. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Verbal and visual memory impairments among young offspring and healthy adult relatives of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: selective generational patterns indicate different developmental trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziade, Michel; Rouleau, Nancie; Mérette, Chantal; Cellard, Caroline; Battaglia, Marco; Marino, Cecilia; Jomphe, Valérie; Gilbert, Elsa; Achim, Amélie; Bouchard, Roch-Hugo; Paccalet, Thomas; Paradis, Marie-Eve; Roy, Marc-André

    2011-11-01

    Memory deficits have been shown in patients affected by schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP)/mood disorder. We recently reported that young high-risk offspring of an affected parent were impaired in both verbal episodic memory (VEM) and visual episodic memory (VisEM). Understanding better the trajectory of memory impairments from childhood to adult clinical status in risk populations is crucial for early detection and prevention. In multigenerational families densely affected by SZ or BP, our aim was to compare the memory impairments observed in young nonaffected offspring with memory functioning in nonaffected adult relatives and patients. For 20 years, we followed up numerous kindreds in the Eastern Québec population. After having characterized the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders phenotypes, we assessed cognition (N = 381) in 3 subsamples in these kindreds and in controls: 60 young offspring of a parent affected by SZ or BP, and in the adult generations, 92 nonaffected adult relatives and 40 patients affected by SZ or BP. VEM was assessed with the California Verbal Learning Test and VisEM with the Rey figures. The VEM deficits observed in the offspring were also found in adult relatives and patients. In contrast, the VisEM impairments observed in the young offspring were present only in patients, not in the adult relatives. Implications for prevention and genetic mechanisms can be drawn from the observation that VEM and VisEM would show distinct generational trajectories and that the trajectory associated with VisEM may offer a better potential than VEM to predict future risk of developing the disease.

  14. Verbal and Visual Memory Impairments Among Young Offspring and Healthy Adult Relatives of Patients With Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: Selective Generational Patterns Indicate Different Developmental Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziade, Michel; Rouleau, Nancie; Mérette, Chantal; Cellard, Caroline; Battaglia, Marco; Marino, Cecilia; Jomphe, Valérie; Gilbert, Elsa; Achim, Amélie; Bouchard, Roch-Hugo; Paccalet, Thomas; Paradis, Marie-Eve; Roy, Marc-André

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Memory deficits have been shown in patients affected by schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar (BP)/mood disorder. We recently reported that young high-risk offspring of an affected parent were impaired in both verbal episodic memory (VEM) and visual episodic memory (VisEM). Understanding better the trajectory of memory impairments from childhood to adult clinical status in risk populations is crucial for early detection and prevention. In multigenerational families densely affected by SZ or BP, our aim was to compare the memory impairments observed in young nonaffected offspring with memory functioning in nonaffected adult relatives and patients. Methods: For 20 years, we followed up numerous kindreds in the Eastern Québec population. After having characterized the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders phenotypes, we assessed cognition (N = 381) in 3 subsamples in these kindreds and in controls: 60 young offspring of a parent affected by SZ or BP, and in the adult generations, 92 nonaffected adult relatives and 40 patients affected by SZ or BP. VEM was assessed with the California Verbal Learning Test and VisEM with the Rey figures. Results: The VEM deficits observed in the offspring were also found in adult relatives and patients. In contrast, the VisEM impairments observed in the young offspring were present only in patients, not in the adult relatives. Conclusion: Implications for prevention and genetic mechanisms can be drawn from the observation that VEM and VisEM would show distinct generational trajectories and that the trajectory associated with VisEM may offer a better potential than VEM to predict future risk of developing the disease. PMID:20410238

  15. Association of Polygenic Score for Schizophrenia and HLA Antigen and Inflammation Genes With Response to Lithium in Bipolar Affective Disorder: A Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amare, Azmeraw T; Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Hou, Liping; Clark, Scott R; Papiol, Sergi; Heilbronner, Urs; Degenhardt, Franziska; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Adli, Mazda; Akula, Nirmala; Akiyama, Kazufumi; Ardau, Raffaella; Arias, Bárbara; Aubry, Jean-Michel; Backlund, Lena; Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Bellivier, Frank; Benabarre, Antonio; Bengesser, Susanne; Biernacka, Joanna M; Birner, Armin; Brichant-Petitjean, Clara; Cervantes, Pablo; Chen, Hsi-Chung; Chillotti, Caterina; Cichon, Sven; Cruceanu, Cristiana; Czerski, Piotr M; Dalkner, Nina; Dayer, Alexandre; Del Zompo, Maria; DePaulo, J Raymond; Étain, Bruno; Falkai, Peter; Forstner, Andreas J; Frisen, Louise; Frye, Mark A; Fullerton, Janice M; Gard, Sébastien; Garnham, Julie S; Goes, Fernando S; Grigoroiu-Serbanescu, Maria; Grof, Paul; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hauser, Joanna; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Hofmann, Andrea; Jamain, Stephane; Jiménez, Esther; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Kassem, Layla; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Kato, Tadafumi; Kelsoe, John; Kittel-Schneider, Sarah; Kliwicki, Sebastian; König, Barbara; Kusumi, Ichiro; Laje, Gonzalo; Landén, Mikael; Lavebratt, Catharina; Leboyer, Marion; Leckband, Susan G; Tortorella, Alfonso; Manchia, Mirko; Martinsson, Lina; McCarthy, Michael J; McElroy, Susan; Colom, Francesc; Mitjans, Marina; Mondimore, Francis M; Monteleone, Palmiero; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Nöthen, Markus M; Novák, Tomas; O'Donovan, Claire; Ozaki, Norio; Ösby, Urban; Pfennig, Andrea; Potash, James B; Reif, Andreas; Reininghaus, Eva; Rouleau, Guy A; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Schalling, Martin; Schofield, Peter R; Schweizer, Barbara W; Severino, Giovanni; Shilling, Paul D; Shimoda, Katzutaka; Simhandl, Christian; Slaney, Claire M; Squassina, Alessio; Stamm, Thomas; Stopkova, Pavla; Maj, Mario; Turecki, Gustavo; Vieta, Eduard; Volkert, Julia; Witt, Stephanie; Wright, Adam; Zandi, Peter P; Mitchell, Philip B; Bauer, Michael; Alda, Martin; Rietschel, Marcella; McMahon, Francis J; Schulze, Thomas G; Baune, Bernhard T

    2018-01-01

    Lithium is a first-line mood stabilizer for the treatment of bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). However, the efficacy of lithium varies widely, with a nonresponse rate of up to 30%. Biological response markers are lacking. Genetic factors are thought to mediate treatment response to lithium, and there is a previously reported genetic overlap between BPAD and schizophrenia (SCZ). To test whether a polygenic score for SCZ is associated with treatment response to lithium in BPAD and to explore the potential molecular underpinnings of this association. A total of 2586 patients with BPAD who had undergone lithium treatment were genotyped and assessed for long-term response to treatment between 2008 and 2013. Weighted SCZ polygenic scores were computed at different P value thresholds using summary statistics from an international multicenter genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 36 989 individuals with SCZ and genotype data from patients with BPAD from the Consortium on Lithium Genetics. For functional exploration, a cross-trait meta-GWAS and pathway analysis was performed, combining GWAS summary statistics on SCZ and response to treatment with lithium. Data analysis was performed from September 2016 to February 2017. Treatment response to lithium was defined on both the categorical and continuous scales using the Retrospective Criteria of Long-Term Treatment Response in Research Subjects with Bipolar Disorder score. The effect measures include odds ratios and the proportion of variance explained. Of the 2586 patients in the study (mean [SD] age, 47.2 [13.9] years), 1478 were women and 1108 were men. The polygenic score for SCZ was inversely associated with lithium treatment response in the categorical outcome, at a threshold P < 5 × 10-2. Patients with BPAD who had a low polygenic load for SCZ responded better to lithium, with odds ratios for lithium response ranging from 3.46 (95% CI, 1.42-8.41) at the first decile to 2.03 (95% CI, 0.86-4.81) at the ninth

  16. Epidemiology in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Mutlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Childhood and adolescent bipolar disorder diagnosis has been increasing recently. Since studies evaluating attempted suicide rates in children and adolescents have shown bipolarity to be a significant risk factor, diagnosis and treatment of bipolarity has become a very important issue. Since there is a lack of specific diagnostic criteria for especially preadolescent samples and evaluations are made mostly symptomatically, suspicions about false true diagnosis and increased prevalence rates have emerged. This situation leads to controversial data about the prevalence rates of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. The aim of this article is to review the prevalence of childhood and adolescent bipolar disorder in community, inpatient and outpatient based samples in literature.

  17. Enhanced neurocognitive functioning and positive temperament in twins discordant for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higier, Rachel G; Jimenez, Amy M; Hultman, Christina M; Borg, Jacqueline; Roman, Cristina; Kizling, Isabelle; Larsson, Henrik; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2014-11-01

    Based on evidence linking creativity and bipolar disorder, a model has been proposed whereby factors influencing liability to bipolar disorder confer certain traits with positive effects on reproductive fitness. The authors tested this model by examining key traits known to be associated with evolutionary fitness, namely, temperament and neurocognition, in individuals carrying liability for bipolar disorder. Schizophrenia probands and their co-twins were included as psychiatric controls. Twin pairs discordant for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia and control pairs were identified through the Swedish Twin Registry. The authors administered a neuropsychological test battery and temperament questionnaires to samples of bipolar probands, bipolar co-twins, schizophrenia probands, schizophrenia co-twins, and controls. Multivariate mixed-model analyses of variance were conducted to compare groups on temperament and neurocognitive scores. Bipolar co-twins showed elevated scores on a "positivity" temperament scale compared with controls and bipolar probands, while bipolar probands scored higher on a "negativity" scale compared with their co-twins and controls, who did not differ. Additionally, bipolar co-twins showed superior performance compared with controls on tests of verbal learning and fluency, while bipolar probands showed performance decrements across all neurocognitive domains. In contrast, schizophrenia co-twins showed attenuated impairments in positivity and overall neurocognitive functioning relative to their ill proband counterparts. These findings suggest that supra-normal levels of sociability and verbal functioning may be associated with liability for bipolar disorder. These effects were specific to liability for bipolar disorder and did not apply to schizophrenia. Such benefits may provide a partial explanation for the persistence of bipolar illness in the population.

  18. Schizophrenia: A Systemic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Brian; Miller, Brian; García-Rizo, Clemente; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of schizophrenia that is most widely taught is that it is a disorder in which psychotic symptoms are the main problem, and a dysregulation of dopamine signaling is the main feature of pathophysiology. However, this concept limits clinical assessment, the treatments offered to patients, research, and the development of therapeutics. A more appropriate conceptual model is that: 1) schizophrenia is not a psychotic disorder, but a disorder of essentially every brain function in which psychosis is present; 2) it is not a brain disease, but a disorder with impairments throughout the body; 3) for many patients, neuropsychiatric problems other than psychosis contribute more to impairment in function and quality of life than does psychosis; and, 4) some conditions that are considered to be comorbid are integral parts of the illness. In conclusion, students, patients, and family members should be taught this model, along with its implications for assessment, research, and therapeutics. PMID:23518782

  19. The Danish High Risk and Resilience Study--VIA 7--a cohort study of 520 7-year-old children born of parents diagnosed with either schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or neither of these two mental disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Anne A E; Jepsen, Jens Richardt; Ellersgaard, Ditte Vestbjerg

    2015-01-01

    and environment as well as gene-environment-interactions contribute to the risk of developing the disease. We aim to analyse the influences of genetic risk and environmental factors in a population of 520 7-year-old children with either 0, 1 or 2 parents diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum psychosis or bipolar...... disorder on mental health and level of functioning. We hypothesize that a larger proportion of children growing up with an ill parent will display abnormal or delayed development, behavioural problems or psychiatric symptoms compared to the healthy controls. METHODS/DESIGN: We are establishing a cohort...... of 5207 year old children and both their parents for a comprehensive investigation with main outcome measures being neurocognition, behaviour, psychopathology and neuromotor development of the child. Parents and children are examined with a comprehensive battery of instruments and are asked for genetic...

  20. Antipsychotic drugs attenuate aberrant DNA methylation of DTNBP1 (dysbindin) promoter in saliva and post-mortem brain of patients with schizophrenia and Psychotic bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolmaleky, Hamid M; Pajouhanfar, Sara; Faghankhani, Masoomeh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi; Mostafavi, Ashraf; Thiagalingam, Sam

    2015-12-01

    Due to the lack of genetic association between individual genes and schizophrenia (SCZ) pathogenesis, the current consensus is to consider both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Here, we report the examination of DNA methylation status of DTNBP1 promoter region, one of the most credible candidate genes affected in SCZ, assayed in saliva and post-mortem brain samples. The Illumina DNA methylation profiling and bisulfite sequencing of representative samples were used to identify methylation status of the DTNBP1 promoter region. Quantitative methylation specific PCR (qMSP) was employed to assess methylation of DTNBP1 promoter CpGs flanking a SP1 binding site in the saliva of SCZ patients, their first-degree relatives and control subjects (30, 15, and 30/group, respectively) as well as in post-mortem brains of patients with SCZ and bipolar disorder (BD) versus controls (35/group). qRT-PCR was used to assess DTNBP1 expression. We found DNA hypermethylation of DTNBP1 promoter in the saliva of SCZ patients (∼12.5%, P = 0.036), particularly in drug-naïve patients (∼20%, P = 0.011), and a trend toward hypermethylation in their first-degree relatives (P = 0.085) versus controls. Analysis of post-mortem brain samples revealed an inverse correlation between DTNBP1 methylation and expression, and normalization of this epigenetic change by classic antipsychotic drugs. Additionally, BD patients with psychotic depression exhibited higher degree of methylation versus other BD patients (∼80%, P = 0.025). DTNBP1 promoter DNA methylation may become a key element in a panel of biomarkers for diagnosis, prevention, or therapy in SCZ and at risk individuals pending confirmatory studies with larger sample sizes to attain a higher degree of significance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Validation of a specific measure to assess health-related quality of life in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: the 'Tolerability and quality of life' (TOOL questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordero Luis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perception of quality of life may differ depending on the perspective. The aim of the study was to assess the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the 'TOlerability and quality Of Life' (TOOL questionnaire, a specific self-rated instrument to evaluate the impact of side effects of antipsychotic drugs on health-related quality of life (HRQoL. The questionnaire consists of eight items answered on a four-point Likert scale. Methods A psychometric study was conducted with clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder under antipsychotic treatment. The translation and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire was performed according to international standards. Internal consistency using the Cronbach α coefficient and test-retest reliability using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was used to assess the reliability of the instrument. Patients completed generic and specific measures of quality of life and clinical severity. Results A total of 238 patients were analysed, with a mean age of 42 years (SD 10.9. The mean completion time was 4.9 min (SD 4.4. Internal consistency and intraclass correlation coefficient were adequate (Cronbach α = 0.757 and ICC = 0.90. Factorial analysis showed a unidimensional structure (a single eigenvalue >1, accounting for 39.1% of variance. Significant Spearman's rank correlations between the TOOL and both generic and specific measures were found. The questionnaire was able to discriminate among the Clinical Global Impression - Severity scores (Mann-Whitney U test, P Conclusions The TOOL questionnaire shows appropriate feasibility, reliability, and discriminative performance as a patient-reported outcome. TOOL constitutes a valuable addition to measure the impact of adverse events of antipsychotic drugs from the patient perspective.

  2. Staging systems in bipolar disorder: an International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapczinski, F.; Magalhaes, P.V.S.; Balanza-Martinez, V.; Dias, V.V.; Frangou, S.; Gama, C.S.; Gonzalez-Pinto, A.; Kupka, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We discuss the rationale behind staging systems described specifically for bipolar disorders. Current applications, future directions and research gaps in clinical staging models for bipolar disorders are outlined. Method: We reviewed the literature pertaining to bipolar disorders,

  3. Big data for bipolar disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monteith, Scott; Glenn, Tasha; Geddes, John; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    .... The impact of big data on the routine treatment of bipolar disorder today and in the near future is discussed, with examples that relate to health policy, the discovery of new associations, and the study of rare events...

  4. Comparing neurocognitive impairment in schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder using the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana Gómez-Benito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del estudio fue comparar las propiedades psicométricas del test Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry (SCIP en pacientes diagnosticados de esquizofrenia (n = 126 o trastorno bipolar I (n = 76. Además, el deterioro cognitivo se comparó con un grupo control (n = 83 empleando el SCIP y una batería neuropsicológica completa. El test SCIP es una escala que evalúa rápida y fácilmente el deterioro cognitivo en trastornos psiquiátricos graves. En términos de consistencia interna, estabilidad temporal, estructura dimensional y validez de criterio, el SCIP proporciona resultados al mismo nivel de fiabilidad y validez en pacientes con esquizofrenia o trastorno bipolar I. Además, demostró que el deterioro cognitivo diferencial entre los dos grupos de pacientes se produce solo en la memoria verbal, aunque el tamaño del efecto de esta diferencia es pequeño. Por último, y frente al grupo control, se confirma el deterioro cognitivo a todos los niveles en ambos grupos de pacientes utilizando tanto el SCIP como la batería neuropsicológica, lo que indica que el SCIP es una buena herramienta de detección para los déficits cognitivos en esquizofrenia y trastorno bipolar, y útil en la práctica clínica habitual para profesionales de la salud. © 2013 Asociación Española de Psicología Conductual. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L. Todos los derechos reservados.

  5. Mood dynamics in bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Paul J; Little, Max A; McSharry, Patrick E; Goodwin, Guy M; Geddes, John R

    2014-01-01

    The nature of mood variation in bipolar disorder has been the subject of relatively little research because detailed time series data has been difficult to obtain until recently. However some papers have addressed the subject and claimed the presence of deterministic chaos and of stochastic nonlinear dynamics. This study uses mood data collected from eight outpatients using a telemonitoring system. The nature of mood dynamics in bipolar disorder is investigated using surrogate data techniques...

  6. Treatment of bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We review recent developments in the acute and long-term treatment of bipolar disorder and identify promising future routes to therapeutic innovation. Overall, advances in drug treatment remain quite modest. Antipsychotic drugs are effective in the acute treatment of mania; their efficacy in the treatment of depression is variable with the clearest evidence for quetiapine. Despite their widespread use, considerable uncertainty and controversy remains about the use of antidepressant drugs in the management of depressive episodes. Lithium has the strongest evidence for long-term relapse prevention; the evidence for anticonvulsants such as divalproex and lamotrigine is less robust and there is much uncertainty about the longer term benefits of antipsychotics. Substantial progress has been made in the development and assessment of adjunctive psychosocial interventions. Long-term maintenance and possibly acute stabilisation of depression can be enhanced by the combination of psychosocial treatments with drugs. The development of future treatments should consider both the neurobiological and psychosocial mechanisms underlying the disorder. We should continue to repurpose treatments and to recognise the role of serendipity. We should also investigate optimum combinations of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments at different stages of the illness. Clarification of the mechanisms by which different treatments affect sleep and circadian rhythms and their relation with daily mood fluctuations is likely to help with the treatment selection for individual patients. To be economically viable, existing psychotherapy protocols need to be made briefer and more efficient for improved scalability and sustainability in widespread implementation. PMID:23663953

  7. Life expectancy in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-08-01

    Life expectancy in patients with bipolar disorder has been reported to be decreased by 11 to 20 years. These calculations are based on data for individuals at the age of 15 years. However, this may be misleading for patients with bipolar disorder in general as most patients have a later onset of illness. The aim of the present study was to calculate the remaining life expectancy for patients of different ages with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Using nationwide registers of all inpatient and outpatient contacts to all psychiatric hospitals in Denmark from 1970 to 2012 we calculated remaining life expectancies for values of age 15, 25, 35 ⃛ 75 years among all individuals alive in year 2000. For the typical male or female patient aged 25 to 45 years, the remaining life expectancy was decreased by 12.0-8.7 years and 10.6-8.3 years, respectively. The ratio between remaining life expectancy in bipolar disorder and that of the general population decreased with age, indicating that patients with bipolar disorder start losing life-years during early and mid-adulthood. Life expectancy in bipolar disorder is decreased substantially, but less so than previously reported. Patients start losing life-years during early and mid-adulthood. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Threat sensitivity in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhtadie, Luma; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-02-01

    Life stress is a major predictor of the course of bipolar disorder. Few studies have used laboratory paradigms to examine stress reactivity in bipolar disorder, and none have assessed autonomic reactivity to laboratory stressors. In the present investigation we sought to address this gap in the literature. Participants, 27 diagnosed with bipolar I disorder and 24 controls with no history of mood disorder, were asked to complete a complex working memory task presented as "a test of general intelligence." Self-reported emotions were assessed at baseline and after participants were given task instructions; autonomic physiology was assessed at baseline and continuously during the stressor task. Compared to controls, individuals with bipolar disorder reported greater increases in pretask anxiety from baseline and showed greater cardiovascular threat reactivity during the task. Group differences in cardiovascular threat reactivity were significantly correlated with comorbid anxiety in the bipolar group. Our results suggest that a multimethod approach to assessing stress reactivity-including the use of physiological parameters that differentiate between maladaptive and adaptive profiles of stress responding-can yield valuable information regarding stress sensitivity and its associations with negative affectivity in bipolar disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Dysfunctional assumptions in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Dominic; Wright, Kim; Smith, Neil

    2004-04-01

    Despite the initial encouraging outcome in developing CBT for bipolar affective disorder [Arch. Gen. Psychiatry 2002 (in press); Psychol. Med. 31 (2001) 459-467], very little is known about whether there are any differences in dysfunctional attitudes between unipolar and bipolar patients. Both the behavioural activation system theory [J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 67 (1994) 488-498; Major Theories of Personality Disorder, Guilford Press, New York, 1996; Psychol. Bull. 117 (1995) 434-449] and the cognitive model for bipolar affective disorder [Cognitive Therapy for Bipolar Disorder: A Therapist's Guide to Concepts, Methods and Practise, Wiley, New York, 1999] postulate high goal striving as a risk factor for bipolar disorder. However, the existing subscales in the dysfunctional attitude scale (DAS) were derived from patients and relatives of patients suffering from unipolar depression, patients with a mixed psychiatric diagnosis or normal controls. None of the existing subscales reflects high goal striving beliefs. Using a sample of bipolar patients may yield different factors. A total of 143 bipolar 1 patients filled in the short version of DAS 24. Principal component analysis was carried out to derive factors. The scores of these factors were compared with those of 109 unipolar patients to investigate if these factors distinguish bipolar patients from unipolar patients. Three factors were derived: factor 1 'Goal-attainment' accounted for 25.0% of the total variance. Factor 2 'Dependency' accounted for 11.0% of the total variance. Factor 3 'Achievement' accounted for 8.2% of the total variance. However, factor 1 appeared to consist of items that made a coherent theoretical construct. No significant differences were found when the validation sample was compared with 109 patients suffering from unipolar depression in any of the three factors. When subjects who were likely to be in a major depressive episode were excluded, the scores of bipolar patients (n=49) were

  10. Predicting psychosis across diagnostic boundaries: Behavioral and computational modeling evidence for impaired reinforcement learning in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with a history of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Gregory P; Thaler, Nicholas S; Matveeva, Tatyana M; Vogel, Sally J; Sutton, Griffin P; Lee, Bern G; Allen, Daniel N

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) share a number of cognitive, neurobiological, and genetic markers. Shared features may be most prevalent among SZ and BD with a history of psychosis. This study extended this literature by examining reinforcement learning (RL) performance in individuals with SZ (n = 29), BD with a history of psychosis (BD+; n = 24), BD without a history of psychosis (BD-; n = 23), and healthy controls (HC; n = 24). RL was assessed through a probabilistic stimulus selection task with acquisition and test phases. Computational modeling evaluated competing accounts of the data. Each participant's trial-by-trial decision-making behavior was fit to 3 computational models of RL: (a) a standard actor-critic model simulating pure basal ganglia-dependent learning, (b) a pure Q-learning model simulating action selection as a function of learned expected reward value, and (c) a hybrid model where an actor-critic is "augmented" by a Q-learning component, meant to capture the top-down influence of orbitofrontal cortex value representations on the striatum. The SZ group demonstrated greater reinforcement learning impairments at acquisition and test phases than the BD+, BD-, and HC groups. The BD+ and BD- groups displayed comparable performance at acquisition and test phases. Collapsing across diagnostic categories, greater severity of current psychosis was associated with poorer acquisition of the most rewarding stimuli as well as poor go/no-go learning at test. Model fits revealed that reinforcement learning in SZ was best characterized by a pure actor-critic model where learning is driven by prediction error signaling alone. In contrast, BD-, BD+, and HC were best fit by a hybrid model where prediction errors are influenced by top-down expected value representations that guide decision making. These findings suggest that abnormalities in the reward system are more prominent in SZ than BD; however, current psychotic

  11. Beyond the association. Toxoplasma gondii in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and addiction: systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutterland, A. L.; Fond, G.; Kuin, A.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Lutter, R.; van Gool, T.; Yolken, R.; Szoke, A.; Leboyer, M.; de Haan, L.

    2015-01-01

    To perform a meta-analysis on studies reporting prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection in any psychiatric disorder compared with healthy controls. Our secondary objective was to analyze factors possibly moderating heterogeneity. A systematic search was performed to identify studies

  12. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tove H; Børglum, A.D; Mors, O

    2002-01-01

    Islands were typed for 35 evenly distributed polymorphic markers on 22q in a search for shared risk genes in the two disorders. No single marker was strongly associated with either disease, but five two-marker segments that cluster within two regions on the chromosome have haplotypes occurring...

  13. Bipolar Disorder and Alcoholism: Are They Related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are they related? Is there a connection between bipolar disorder and alcoholism? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. Bipolar disorder and alcoholism often occur together. Although the association ...

  14. Improved detection of common variants associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using pleiotropy-informed conditional false discovery rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Ole A; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have the potential to explain more of the "missing heritability" of common complex phenotypes. However, reliable methods to identify a larger proportion of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that impact disease risk...... associated with both SCZ and BD (conjunction FDR). Together, these findings show the feasibility of genetic pleiotropy-informed methods to improve gene discovery in SCZ and BD and indicate overlapping genetic mechanisms between these two disorders....

  15. Brain activation during self- and other-reflection in bipolar disorder with a history of psychosis: Comparison to schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: BD patients showed less activation in the PCC/precuneus during other-reflection. This may support an account of impaired integration of emotion and memory (evaluation of past and current other-related information in BD patients. Correlation differences of the PCC/precuneus activation with the cognitive insight in patients with BD and SZ might reflect an important difference between these disorders, which may help to further explore potentially distinguishing markers.

  16. Life expectancy in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Life expectancy in patients with bipolar disorder has been reported to be decreased by 11 to 20 years. These calculations are based on data for individuals at the age of 15 years. However, this may be misleading for patients with bipolar disorder in general as most patients have a later...... onset of illness. The aim of the present study was to calculate the remaining life expectancy for patients of different ages with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. METHODS: Using nationwide registers of all inpatient and outpatient contacts to all psychiatric hospitals in Denmark from 1970 to 2012 we...... calculated remaining life expectancies for values of age 15, 25, 35 ⃛ 75 years among all individuals alive in year 2000. RESULTS: For the typical male or female patient aged 25 to 45 years, the remaining life expectancy was decreased by 12.0-8.7 years and 10.6-8.3 years, respectively. The ratio between...

  17. Integrated neurobiology of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eMaletic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available From a neurobiological perspective there is no such thing as bipolar disorder. Rather, it is almost certainly the case that many somewhat similar, but subtly different, pathological conditions produce a disease state that we currently diagnose as bipolarity. This heterogeneity—reflected in the lack of synergy between our current diagnostic schema and our rapidly advancing scientific understanding of the condition—limits attempts to articulate an integrated perspective on bipolar disorder. However, despite these challenges, scientific findings in recent years are beginning to offer a provisional unified field theory of the disease. This theory sees bipolar disorder as a suite of related neurodevelopmental conditions with interconnected functional abnormalities that often appear early in life and worsen over time. In addition to accelerated loss of volume in brain areas known to be essential for mood regulation and cognitive function, consistent findings have emerged at a cellular level, providing evidence that bipolar disorder is reliably associated with dysregulation of glial-neuronal interactions. Among these glial elements are microglia—the brain’s primary immune elements, which appear to be overactive in the context of bipolarity. Multiple studies now indicate that inflammation is also increased in the periphery of the body in both the depressive and manic phases of the illness, with at least some return to normality in the euthymic state. These findings are consistent with changes in the HPA axis, which are known to drive inflammatory activation. In summary, the very fact that no single gene, pathway or brain abnormality is likely to ever account for the condition is itself an extremely important first step in better articulating an integrated perspective on both its ontological status and pathogenesis. Whether this perspective will translate into the discovery of innumerable more homogeneous forms of bipolarity is one of the great

  18. Comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez Ruiz, Eva M; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    The comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders has not been studied in depth. In addition, clinical implications involved in the appearance of both disorders are very important. A systematic literature review of MEDLINE published up to September 2013 was performed, analyzing all the articles that studied the comorbidity of both conditions (bipolar disorder and eating disorders) and others research that studied the efficacy of pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy to improve these illnesses. In this review we found a high comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders, especially of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Studies show that lithium and topiramate are 2 of the more effective pharmacological agents in the treatment of both disorders. There are a lot of studies that show evidence of comorbidity of bipolar disorder and eating disorders. However, further research is needed on assessment and treatment when these conditions co-exist, as well as study into the biopsychological aspects to determine the comorbid aetiology. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Substance use disorders among adolescents with bipolar spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin I; Strober, Michael A; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Goldstein, Tina R; Leonard, Henrietta; Hunt, Jeffrey; Gill, Mary Kay; Iyengar, Satish; Grimm, Colleen; Yang, Mei; Ryan, Neal D; Keller, Martin B

    2008-06-01

    We set out to examine the prevalence and correlates of substance use disorders (SUD) in a large sample of adolescents with bipolar disorder (BP). Subjects were 249 adolescents ages 12 to 17 years old who fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I disorder [(BPI), n = 154], or bipolar II disorder [(BPII), n = 25], or operationalized criteria for BP not otherwise specified [(BP NOS), n = 70], via the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children (K-SADS). As part of the multi-site Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth study, demographic, clinical, and family history variables were measured via intake clinical interview with the subject and a parent/guardian. The lifetime prevalence of SUD among adolescents with BP was 16% (40/249). Results from univariate analyses indicated that subjects with, as compared to without, SUD were significantly less likely to be living with both biological parents, and that there was significantly greater lifetime prevalence of physical abuse, sexual abuse, suicide attempts, conduct disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder among subjects with SUD. Subjects with SUD reported significantly greater 12-month prevalence of trouble with police, and females with SUD reported significantly greater 12-month prevalence of pregnancy and abortion. Significant predictors of SUD in a logistic regression model included living with both biological parents (lower prevalence), conduct disorder and suicide attempts (increased prevalence). In logistic regression analyses controlling for demographic differences and conduct disorder, SUD remained significantly associated with trouble with police, whereas the association of SUD with pregnancy and abortion was reduced to a statistical trend. The prevalence of SUD was not significantly different among child- versus adolescent-onset BP subjects. SUD among adolescents with BP is associated with profound hazards including suicide attempts, trouble with police, and teenage pregnancy and

  20. Working memory and attention deficits in adolescent offspring of schizophrenia or bipolar patients: comparing vulnerability markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Goradia, Dhruman; Hosanagar, Avinash; Mermon, Diana; Montrose, Debra M; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Rajarathinem, R; Haddad, Luay; Amirsadri, Ali; Zajac-Benitez, Caroline; Rajan, Usha; Keshavan, Matcheri S

    2011-07-01

    Working memory deficits abound in schizophrenia and attention deficits have been documented in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Adolescent offspring of patients may inherit vulnerabilities in brain circuits that subserve these cognitive domains. Here we assess impairments in offspring of schizophrenia (SCZ-Offspring) or bipolar (BP-Offspring) patients compared to controls (HC) with no family history of mood or psychotic disorders to the second degree. Three groups (n=100 subjects; range: 10-20 yrs) of HC, SCZ-Offspring and BP-Offspring gave informed consent. Working memory was assessed using a delayed spatial memory paradigm with two levels of delay (2s & 12s); sustained attention processing was assessed using the Continuous Performance Task-Identical Pairs version. SCZ-Offspring (but not BP-Offspring) showed impairments in working memory (relative to HC) at the longer memory delay indicating a unique deficit. Both groups showed reduced sensitivity during attention but only BP-Offspring significantly differed from controls. These results suggest unique (working memory/dorsal frontal cortex) and potentially overlapping (attention/fronto-striatal cortex) vulnerability pathways in adolescent offspring of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Working memory and attention assessments in these offspring may assist in the clinical characterization of the adolescents vulnerable to SCZ or BP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pineal gland volume in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fındıklı, Ebru; Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Gökçe, Mustafa; Fındıklı, Hüseyin Avni; Altun, Hatice; Karaaslan, Mehmet Fatih

    2015-06-01

    The majority of patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders have disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythm. Melatonin, which is secreted by the human pineal gland, plays an important role in sleep and circadian rhythm. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare pineal gland volumes in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. We retrospectively evaluated the pineal gland volumes of 80 cases, including 16 cases of unipolar depression, 17 cases of bipolar disorder, 17 cases of schizophrenia, and 30 controls. The total pineal gland volume of all cases was measured via magnetic resonance images, and the total mean pineal volume of each group was compared. The mean pineal volumes of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, and the controls were 83.55±10.11 mm(3), 93.62±11.00 mm(3), 95.19±11.61 mm(3) and 99.73±12.03 mm(3), respectively. The mean pineal gland volume of the patients with schizophrenia was significantly smaller than those of the other groups. Our data show that patients with schizophrenia have smaller pineal gland volumes, and this deviation in pineal gland morphology is not seen in those with mood disorders. We hypothesize that volumetric changes in the pineal gland of patients with schizophrenia may be involved in the pathophysiology of this illness.

  2. Association of Lyme Disease and Schizoaffective Disorder, Bipolar Type: Is it Inflammation Mediated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingley, David William; Koola, Maju Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease has been reported to be associated with various psychiatric presentations. Borreliaburgdorferi (Bb) can present with symptoms similar to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. It has been suggested that inflammation incurred during the Bb infection leads to neurodegenerative changes that result in schizophrenia-like presentations. We report a case of a 41-year-old male with a past history of Bb infection who presents with psychosis. Later in the course of his hospitalization, he developed mood symptoms and was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. This case highlights the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with the unique presentation of schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type in the setting of previous Bb infection.

  3. Rationale and design of the PLACID study: a randomised trial comparing the efficacy and safety of inhaled loxapine versus IM aripiprazole in acutely agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, L; Estrada, G; Oudovenko, N; Vieta, E

    2017-04-04

    The management of acute agitation manifesting in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder requires swift pharmacological intervention to provide rapid symptomatic relief and prevent escalation to aggression and violence. Antipsychotic medications are widely used in this setting