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Sample records for scattering studies waxs

  1. Microstructural parameters in 8 MeV Electron irradiated Bombyx mori silk fibers by wide-angle X-ray scattering studies (WAXS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halabhavi, Sangappa

    2009-01-01

    The present work looks into the microstructural modification in Bombyx mori silk fibers, induced by electron irradiation. The irradiation process was performed in air at room temperature by use of 8 MeV electron accelerators at different doses: 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 kGy respectively. Irradiation of polymer can be used to crosslink or degrade the desired component or to fixate the polymer morphology. The changes in microstructural parameters in these natural polymer fibers have been studied using wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) method. The crystal imperfection parameters such as crystallite size , lattice strain (g in %) and enthalpy (a * ) have been determined by line profile analysis (LPA) using Fourier method of Warren. Exponential, Lognormal and Reinhold functions for the column length distributions have been used for the determination of these parameters. The goodness of the fit and the consistency of these results suggest that the exponential distribution gives much better results, even though lognormal distribution has been widely used to estimate the similar stacking faults in metal oxide compounds. (author)

  2. Understanding nucleic acid structural changes by comparing wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments to molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tolokh, Igor S. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Drozdetski, Aleksander [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Baker, Nathan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Onufriev, Alexey V. [Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however, the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively characterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight into understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  3. Microstructural Parameters in 8 MeV Electron-Irradiated BOMBYX MORI Silk Fibers by Wide-ANGLE X-Ray Scattering Studies (waxs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangappa, Asha, S.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Subramanya, G.; Parameswara, P.; Somashekar, R.

    2010-01-01

    The present work looks into the microstructural modification in electron irradiated Bombyx mori P31 silk fibers. The irradiation process was performed in air at room temperature using 8 MeV electron accelerator at different doses: 0, 25, 50 and 100 kGy. Irradiation of polymer is used to cross-link or degrade the desired component or to fix the polymer morphology. The changes in microstructural parameters in these natural polymer fibers have been computed using wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data and employing line profile analysis (LPA) using Fourier transform technique of Warren. Exponential, Lognormal and Reinhold functions for the column length distributions have been used for the determination of crystal size, lattice strain and enthalpy parameters.

  4. MICROSTRUCTURAL PARAMETERS IN 8 MeV ELECTRON‐IRRADIATED BOMBYX MORI SILK FIBERS BY Wide‐ANGLE X‐RAY SCATTERING STUDIES (WAXS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangappa,; Asha, S; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Subramanya, G; Parameswara, P; Somashekar, R

    2010-01-01

    The present work looks into the microstructural modification in electron irradiated Bombyx mori P31 silk fibers. The irradiation process was performed in air at room temperature using 8 MeV electron accelerator at different doses: 0, 25, 50 and 100 kGy. Irradiation of polymer is used to cross‐link or degrade the desired component or to fix the polymer morphology. The changes in microstructural parameters in these natural polymer fibers have been computed using wide angle X‐ray scattering (WAXS) data and employing line profile analysis (LPA) using Fourier transform technique of Warren. Exponential, Lognormal and Reinhold functions for the column length distributions have been used for the determination of crystal size, lattice strain and enthalpy parameters.

  5. MICROSTRUCTURAL PARAMETERS IN 8 MeV ELECTRON‐IRRADIATED BOMBYX MORI SILK FIBERS BY Wide‐ANGLE X‐RAY SCATTERING STUDIES (WAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangappa,, E-mail: sangappa@mangaloreuniversity.ac.in; Asha, S, E-mail: sangappa@mangaloreuniversity.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri‐574 199 (India); Sanjeev, Ganesh, E-mail: sangappa@mangaloreuniversity.ac.in [Microtron Center, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri‐574 199 (India); Subramanya, G, E-mail: sangappa@mangaloreuniversity.ac.in [Department of Studies in Sericulture, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore‐570 006 (India); Parameswara, P, E-mail: sangappa@mangaloreuniversity.ac.in; Somashekar, R, E-mail: sangappa@mangaloreuniversity.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore‐570 006 (India)

    2010-01-05

    The present work looks into the microstructural modification in electron irradiated Bombyx mori P31 silk fibers. The irradiation process was performed in air at room temperature using 8 MeV electron accelerator at different doses: 0, 25, 50 and 100 kGy. Irradiation of polymer is used to cross‐link or degrade the desired component or to fix the polymer morphology. The changes in microstructural parameters in these natural polymer fibers have been computed using wide angle X‐ray scattering (WAXS) data and employing line profile analysis (LPA) using Fourier transform technique of Warren. Exponential, Lognormal and Reinhold functions for the column length distributions have been used for the determination of crystal size, lattice strain and enthalpy parameters.

  6. Monitoring agrochemical diffusion through cuticle wax with coherent Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Nicholas P.; Thomson, Niall; Padia, Faheem; Moger, Julian

    2018-02-01

    The world's population is increasing rapidly and higher calorific diets are becoming more common; as a consequence the demand for grain is predicted to increase by more than 50% by 2050 without a significant increase in the available agricultural land. Maximising the productivity of the existing agricultural land is key to maintaining food security and agrochemicals continue to be a key enabler for the efficiency gains required. However, agrochemicals can be susceptible to significant losses and thus often require further chemical to be applied to compensate. Sources of such losses include spray drift, poor spray retention/capture by the target and poor penetration through the plant cuticle. Adjuvants can be used to help mitigate such losses but characterising how they alter the movement of the active ingredients (AIs) can be challenging. In this contribution we demonstrate the use of coherent Raman Scattering (CRS) as a tool to enable in-situ, real-time, label free characterisation of agrochemical AI as they move through wax.

  7. Natural oils and waxes: studies on stick bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budai, Lívia; Antal, István; Klebovich, Imre; Budai, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present article was to examine the role of origin and quantity of selected natural oils and waxes in the determination of the thermal properties and hardness of stick bases. The natural oils and waxes selected for the study were sunflower, castor, jojoba, and coconut oils. The selected waxes were yellow beeswax, candelilla wax, and carnauba wax. The hardness of the formulations is a critical parameter from the aspect of their application. Hardness was characterized by the measurement of compression strength along with the softening point, the drop point, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It can be concluded that coconut oil, jojoba oil, and carnauba wax have the greatest influence on the thermal parameters of stick bases.

  8. In vivo chemical and structural analysis of plant cuticular waxes using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlejohn, George R; Mansfield, Jessica C; Parker, David; Lind, Rob; Perfect, Sarah; Seymour, Mark; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Love, John; Moger, Julian

    2015-05-01

    The cuticle is a ubiquitous, predominantly waxy layer on the aerial parts of higher plants that fulfils a number of essential physiological roles, including regulating evapotranspiration, light reflection, and heat tolerance, control of development, and providing an essential barrier between the organism and environmental agents such as chemicals or some pathogens. The structure and composition of the cuticle are closely associated but are typically investigated separately using a combination of structural imaging and biochemical analysis of extracted waxes. Recently, techniques that combine stain-free imaging and biochemical analysis, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy microscopy, have been used to investigate the cuticle, but the detection sensitivity is severely limited by the background signals from plant pigments. We present a new method for label-free, in vivo structural and biochemical analysis of plant cuticles based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy. As a proof of principle, we used SRS microscopy to analyze the cuticles from a variety of plants at different times in development. We demonstrate that the SRS virtually eliminates the background interference compared with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy imaging and results in label-free, chemically specific confocal images of cuticle architecture with simultaneous characterization of cuticle composition. This innovative use of the SRS spectroscopy may find applications in agrochemical research and development or in studies of wax deposition during leaf development and, as such, represents an important step in the study of higher plant cuticles. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Reproduction and subchronic feeding study of carnauba wax in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, R A; Re, T A; Babish, J G; Cox, G E; Voss, K A; Becci, P J

    1983-02-01

    The reproductive performance of Wistar rats fed carnauba wax at levels of 0.1, 0.3 or 1% in the diet and the effects of subchronic administration of carnauba wax at these dose levels on the resultant progeny were studied. Reproductive indices, body-weight gain, food consumption, haematological and clinical chemical data, ophthalmic, gross and histopathological examinations were used to study the possible toxic or pathological effects. Serum free fatty acid levels were found to be decreased in male and female rats fed carnauba wax at dietary levels of 0.3 and 1.0%. No other effects of feeding carnauba wax at levels up to 1.0% of the diet were observed.

  10. SoftWAXS: a computational tool for modeling wide-angle X-ray solution scattering from biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep; Park, Sanghyun; Makowski, Lee

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes a computational approach to estimating wide-angle X-ray solution scattering (WAXS) from proteins, which has been implemented in a computer program called SoftWAXS. The accuracy and efficiency of SoftWAXS are analyzed for analytically solvable model problems as well as for proteins. Key features of the approach include a numerical procedure for performing the required spherical averaging and explicit representation of the solute-solvent boundary and the surface of the hydration layer. These features allow the Fourier transform of the excluded volume and hydration layer to be computed directly and with high accuracy. This approach will allow future investigation of different treatments of the electron density in the hydration shell. Numerical results illustrate the differences between this approach to modeling the excluded volume and a widely used model that treats the excluded-volume function as a sum of Gaussians representing the individual atomic excluded volumes. Comparison of the results obtained here with those from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics clarifies shortcomings inherent to the representation of solvent as a time-averaged electron-density profile. In addition, an assessment is made of how the calculated scattering patterns depend on input parameters such as the solute-atom radii, the width of the hydration shell and the hydration-layer contrast. These results suggest that obtaining predictive calculations of high-resolution WAXS patterns may require sophisticated treatments of solvent.

  11. SAXS-WAXS studies of the low-resolution structure in solution of xylose/glucose isomerase from Streptomyces rubiginosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Maciej; Taube, Michał

    2009-10-01

    The structure and conformation of molecule of xylose/glucose isomerase from Streptomyces rubiginosus in solution (at pH 6 and 7.6; with and without the substrate) has been studied by small- and wide-angle scattering of synchrotron radiation (SAXS-WAXS). On the basis of the SAXS-WAXS data, the low-resolution structure in solution has been reconstructed using ab inito methods. A comparison of the models of glucose isomerase shows only small differences between the model in solution and the crystal structure.

  12. Study of phase transition in hard microcrystalline waxes and wax blends by differential scanning calorimetry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, S.; Agrawal, K. M.; Khan, H. U.; Sikora, Antonín

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 22, 3 & 4 (2004), s. 337-345 ISSN 1091-6466 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : phase transition * hard microscrystalline waxes * differential scanning calorimetry Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.312, year: 2004

  13. Studies on Hydrotreating Process of Microcrystalline Wax Produced from Marine Belayim Crude Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EI Karashi, S.; Marawan, H.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Microcrystalline wax was produced from solvent dewaxing process of vacuum residue raffinate produced from Marine Belayim origin. The untreated microcrystalline wax contains trace amounts of sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen and organometallic compounds as well as heavy aromatics which affect the properties of wax applications in pharmaceutical and technical fields . Microcrystalline wax hydrotreating process was studied using digital controlled unit and Ni O-MoO 3 / Al 2 O 3 catalyst, where operating parameters that controlled the efficiency of the hydrotreated wax were studied separately at different values including reactor temperature, reactor pressure, liquid hourly space velocity and hydrogen to hydrocarbon ratio . Hydrotreated microcrystalline wax at operating conditions (temperature 300 degree C, pressure 73 kg/cm 2 , LHS V 0.52 h-l and H 2 /HC ratio 266.6 Nm 3 /m 3 ) has the best quality to be used as food grade wax

  14. Synchrotron WAXS and XANES studies of silica (SiO2) powders synthesized from Indonesian natural sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchlis, Khairanissa; Fauziyah, Nur Aini; Pratapa, Suminar; Soontaranon, Siriwat; Limpirat, Wanwisa

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated polymorphic silica (SiO 2 ) powders using, Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) and X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), laboratory X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) instruments. The WAXS and XANES spectra were collected using synchrotron radiation at Synchrotron Light Research Institute (SLRI), Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. The silica powders were obtained by processing silica sand from Tanah Laut, South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Purification process of silica sand was done by magnetic separation and immersion with HCl. The purification step was needed to reduce impurity or undesirable non Si elements. Three polymorphs of silica were produced, i.e. amorphous phase (A), quartz (B), and cristobalite (C). WAXS profile for each phase was presented in terms of intensity vs. 2θ prior to analyses. Both XRD (λ CuKα =1.54056 Å) and WAXS (λ=1.09 Å) patttern show that (1) A sample contains no crystallites, (2) B sample is monophasic, contains only quartz, and (3) C sample contains cristobalite and trydimite. XRD quantitative analysis using Rietica gave 98,8 wt% cristobalite, while the associated WAXS data provided 98.7 wt% cristobalite. Si K-edge XANES spectra were measured at energy range 1840 to 1920 eV. Qualitatively, the pre-edge and edge features for all phases are similar, but their main peaks in the post-edge region are different. (paper)

  15. Scattering of ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation by Sorghum bicolor: influence of epicuticular wax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, R.H.; Jenks, M.A.; Rich, P.J.; Peters, P.J.; Ashworth, E.N.

    1995-01-01

    Near-isogenic mutants of Sorghum bicolor with genetic alterations affecting epicuticular wax (EW) structure but having similar canopy architecture provided a model system to examine the influence of EW on plant radiation scattering. Differences in canopies with two different sheath EW amounts showed differences in angular reflectance and transmittance. The differences varied with waveband of radiation. Canopy ultraviolet-B (UVB) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) backward reflectance in the principal solar plane were higher by wild-type plants (N-15) bearing reflective stalk EW filaments than mutant plants (bm-15) lacking stalk EW filaments. Between panicle emergence to anthesis the backward PAR reflectance increased more in the N-15 than bm-15 canopy. We suspect that the increase was a result of reflections from stalk facets emerging above the surface plane of the canopy foliage and exposing reflective EW. As panicles emerged above the foliage, canopy UVB and PAR forward reflectance by bm-15 increased while forward reflectance by N-15 decreased. The increased forward reflectance from bm-15 may be because of high specular reflectance from the microscopically smooth bm-15 stalk surfaces. Based on comparisons of probability distributions, significant differences in PAR and UVB canopy transmittance were detected between N-15 and bm-15. The median UVB transmittance was greater in the bm-15 canopy than the N-15 canopy, while the median PAR transmittance was the same for the two canopies. The greater transmittance in the N-15 canopy corresponded with lower EW load of the sheaths, but the difference between canopies was within the experimental error. Distinct influences of the stalk EW on canopy reflectance and transmittance were difficult to assess because of the relatively low proportion of surface area containing EW, the experimental errors associated with UVB irradiance field measurements. The optical properties of the S. bicolor canopy varied by waveband

  16. Subchronic feeding study of carnauba wax in beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, R A; Cox, G E; Babish, J G; Gallo, M A; Hess, F G; Becci, P J

    1983-02-01

    Carnauba wax fed at levels of 0.1, 0.3 and 1% in the diet to beagle dogs for 28 wk did not produce evidence of toxicity or pathological effects. Body weight gain, food consumption, clinical chemical, haematological, and urine analysis data, and organ weights of animals fed carnauba wax were comparable with those of control animals. Ophthalmic, gross and histopathological examinations revealed no significant treatment-related findings.

  17. Applications of micro-SAXS/WAXS to study polymer fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riekel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Instrumentation and selected applications for X-ray microdiffraction experiments on polymer and biopolymer fibers at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) microfocus beamline are reviewed. Combined SAXS/WAXS experiments can be performed on single fibers with a beam size down to about 5 μm. WAXS experiments can be performed down to about 2 μm and in exceptional cases down to 0.1 μm beam size. The instrumental possibilities are demonstrated for the production line of spider silk

  18. Applications of micro-SAXS/WAXS to study polymer fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riekel, C. E-mail: riekel@esrf.fr

    2003-01-01

    Instrumentation and selected applications for X-ray microdiffraction experiments on polymer and biopolymer fibers at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) microfocus beamline are reviewed. Combined SAXS/WAXS experiments can be performed on single fibers with a beam size down to about 5 {mu}m. WAXS experiments can be performed down to about 2 {mu}m and in exceptional cases down to 0.1 {mu}m beam size. The instrumental possibilities are demonstrated for the production line of spider silk.

  19. Applications of micro-SAXS/WAXS to study polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riekel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Instrumentation and selected applications for X-ray microdiffraction experiments on polymer and biopolymer fibers at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) microfocus beamline are reviewed. Combined SAXS/WAXS experiments can be performed on single fibers with a beam size down to about 5 μm. WAXS experiments can be performed down to about 2 μm and in exceptional cases down to 0.1 μm beam size. The instrumental possibilities are demonstrated for the production line of spider silk.

  20. Accuracy of ringless casting and accelerated wax-elimination technique: a comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rahul; Al-Keraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Kathuria, Nidhi; Gandhi, P V; Bhide, S V

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ringless casting and accelerated wax-elimination techniques can be combined to offer a cost-effective, clinically acceptable, and time-saving alternative for fabricating single unit castings in fixed prosthodontics. Sixty standardized wax copings were fabricated on a type IV stone replica of a stainless steel die. The wax patterns were divided into four groups. The first group was cast using the ringless investment technique and conventional wax-elimination method; the second group was cast using the ringless investment technique and accelerated wax-elimination method; the third group was cast using the conventional metal ring investment technique and conventional wax-elimination method; the fourth group was cast using the metal ring investment technique and accelerated wax-elimination method. The vertical marginal gap was measured at four sites per specimen, using a digital optical microscope at 100× magnification. The results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA to determine statistical significance. The vertical marginal gaps of castings fabricated using the ringless technique (76.98 ± 7.59 μm) were significantly less (p castings fabricated using the conventional metal ring technique (138.44 ± 28.59 μm); however, the vertical marginal gaps of the conventional (102.63 ± 36.12 μm) and accelerated wax-elimination (112.79 ± 38.34 μm) castings were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The ringless investment technique can produce castings with higher accuracy and can be favorably combined with the accelerated wax-elimination method as a vital alternative to the time-consuming conventional technique of casting restorations in fixed prosthodontics. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Ear wax

    Science.gov (United States)

    See your provider if your ears are blocked with wax and you are unable to remove the wax. Also call if you have an ear wax blockage and you develop new symptoms, such as: Drainage from the ear Ear pain Fever Hearing loss that continues after you clean the wax

  2. Study of Plant Waxes Using Low Temperature Method for ESEM

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Tihlaříková, Eva; Schiebertová, P.; Zajícová, I.; Schwarzerová, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1180-1181 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1211 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ESEM * plant waxes * low temperature method Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  3. Preliminary study of human breast tissue using synchrotron radiation combining WAXS and SAXS techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, A.L.C.; Antoniassi, M.; Poletti, M.E.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2010-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation, we combined simultaneously wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques to obtain the scattering profiles of normal and neoplastic breast tissues samples at the momentum transfer range 6.28 nm -1 ≤Q(=4π.sin(θ/2)/λ)≤50.26 nm -1 and 0.15 nm -1 ≤Q≤1.90 nm -1 , respectively. The results obtained show considerable differences between the scattering profiles of these tissues. We verified that the combination of some parameters (ratio between glandular and adipose peak intensity and third-order axial peak intensity) extracted from scattering profiles can be used for identifying breast cancer.

  4. A comparative evaluation of the marginal adaptation of a thermoplastic resin, a light cured wax and an inlay casting wax on stone dies: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Reji P; Nair, Vivek V; Harshakumar, K; Ravichandran, R; Lylajam, S; Viswambaran, Prasanth

    2018-01-01

    Different pattern materials do not produce copings with satisfactory, marginal accuracy when used on stone dies at varying time intervals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the vertical marginal accuracy of patterns formed from three materials, namely, thermoplastic resin, light cured wax and inlay casting wax at three-time intervals of 1, 12, and 24 h. A master die (zirconia abutment mimicking a prepared permanent maxillary central incisor) and metal sleeve (direct metal laser sintering crown #11) were fabricated. A total of 30 stone dies were obtained from the master die. Ten patterns were made each from the three materials and stored off the die at room temperature. The vertical marginal gaps were measured using digital microscope at 1, 12, and 24 h after reseating with gentle finger pressure. The results revealed a significant statistical difference in the marginal adaptation of three materials at all the three-time intervals. Light cured wax was found to be most accurate at all time intervals, followed by thermoplastic resin and inlay casting wax. Furthermore, there was a significant difference between all pairs of materials. The change in vertical marginal gap from 1 to 24 h between thermoplastic resin and light cured wax was not statistically significant. The marginal adaptation of all the three materials used, was well within the acceptable range of 25-70 μm. The resin pattern materials studied revealed significantly less dimensional change than inlay casting wax on storage at 1, 12, and 24 h time intervals. They may be employed in situations where high precision and delayed investing is expected.

  5. Numerical performance study of paraffin wax dispersed with alumina in a concentric pipe latent heat storage system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valan Arasu Amirtham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Latent heat energy storage systems using paraffin wax could have lower heat transfer rates during melting/freezing processes due to its inherent low thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of paraffin wax can be enhanced by employing high conductivity materials such as alumina (Al2O3. A numerical analysis has been carried out to study the performance enhancement of paraffin wax with nanoalumina (Al2O3 particles in comparison with simple paraffin wax in a concentric double pipe heat exchanger. Numerical analysis indicates that the charge-discharge rates of thermal energy can be greatly enhanced using paraffin wax with alumina as compared with a simple paraffin wax as PCM.

  6. A comparative evaluation of the marginal adaptation of a thermoplastic resin, a light cured wax and an inlay casting wax on stone dies: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reji P Gopalan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: The marginal adaptation of all the three materials used, was well within the acceptable range of 25–70 μm. The resin pattern materials studied revealed significantly less dimensional change than inlay casting wax on storage at 1, 12, and 24 h time intervals. They may be employed in situations where high precision and delayed investing is expected.

  7. The effects of surgicel and bone wax hemostatic agents on bone healing: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Nooh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biological effects of hemostatic agends on the physiological healing process need to be tested. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of oxidized cellulose (surgicel and bone wax on bone healing in goats′ feet. Materials and Methods: Three congruent circular bone defects were created on the lateral aspects of the right and left metacarpal bones of ten goats. One defect was left unfilled and acted as a control; the remaining two defects were filled with bone wax and surgicel respectively. The 10 animals were divided into two groups of 5 animals each, to be sacrificed at the 3rd and 5th week postoperatively. Histological analysis assessing quality of bone formed and micro-computed tomography (MCT measuring the quantities of bone volume (BV and bone density (BD were performed. The results of MCT analysis pertaining to BV and BD were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and posthoc least significant difference tests. Results: Histological analysis at 3 weeks showed granulation tissue with new bone formation in the control defects, active bone formation only at the borders for surgicel filled defects and fibrous encapsulation with foreign body reaction in the bone wax filled defects. At 5 weeks, the control and surgicel filled defects showed greater bone formation; however the control defects had the greatest amount of new bone. Bone wax filled defects showed very little bone formation. The two-way ANOVA for MCT results showed significant differences for BV and BD between the different hemostatic agents during the two examination periods. Conclusion: Surgicel has superiority over bone wax in terms of osseous healing. Bone wax significantly hinders osteogenesis and induces inflammation.

  8. Light scattering studies at UNICAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzi, R.; Cerdeira, H.A.; Salzberg, J.; Vasconcellos, A.R.; Frota Pessoa, S.; Reis, F.G. dos; Ferrari, C.A.; Algarte, C.A.S.; Tenan, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    Current theoretical studies on light scattering spectroscopy at UNICAMP is presented briefly, such as: inelastic scattering of radiation from a solid state plasma; resonant Ramman scattering; high excitation effects; saturated semiconductors and glasses

  9. Phase Change Material Trade Study: A Comparison Between Wax and Water for Manned Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Hodgson, Ed; Stephan, Ryan A,

    2011-01-01

    Phase change material heat sinks have been recognized as an important tool in optimizing thermal control systems for space exploration vehicles and habitats that must deal with widely varying thermal loads and environments. In order to better focus technology investment in this arena, NASA has supported a trade study with the objective of identifying where the best potential pay-off can be found among identified aqueous and paraffin wax phase change materials and phase change material heat sink design approaches. The study used a representative exploration mission with well understood parameters to support the trade. Additional sensitivity studies were performed to ensure the applicability of study results across varying systems and destinations. Results from the study indicate that replacing a wax PCM heat sink with a water ice PCM heat sink has the potential to decrease the equivalent system mass of the mission s vehicle through a combination of a smaller heat sink and a slight 5% increase in radiator size or the addition of a lightweight heat pump. An evaluation of existing and emerging PCM heat sink technologies indicates that further mass savings should be achievable through continued development of those technologies. The largest mass savings may be realized by eliminating the melting and freezing pressure of wax and water, respectively.

  10. Laboratory Deposition Apparatus to Study the Effects of Wax Deposition on Pipe Magnetic Field Leakage Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Mohd Fauzi Abd

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate technique for wax deposition detection and severity measurement on cold pipe wall is important for pipeline cleaning program. Usually these techniques are validated by conventional techniques on laboratory scale wax deposition flow loop. However conventional techniques inherent limitations and it is difficult to reproduce a predetermine wax deposit profile and hardness at designated location in flow loop. An alternative wax deposition system which integrates modified pour casting method and cold finger method is presented. This system is suitable to reproduce high volume of medium hard wax deposit in pipe with better control of wax deposit profile and hardness.

  11. An in situ USAXS-SAXS-WAXS study of precipitate size distribution evolution in a model Ni-based alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Ross N; Serio, Joseph; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Ilavsky, Jan

    2017-06-01

    Intermetallic γ' precipitates typically strengthen nickel-based superalloys. The shape, size and spatial distribution of strengthening precipitates critically influence alloy strength, while their temporal evolution characteristics determine the high-temperature alloy stability. Combined ultra-small-, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS-SAXS-WAXS) analysis can be used to evaluate the temporal evolution of an alloy's precipitate size distribution (PSD) and phase structure during in situ heat treatment. Analysis of PSDs from USAXS-SAXS data employs either least-squares fitting of a preordained PSD model or a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) approach, the latter avoiding a priori definition of a functional form of the PSD. However, strong low- q scattering from grain boundaries and/or structure factor effects inhibit MaxEnt analysis of typical alloys. This work describes the extension of Bayesian-MaxEnt analysis methods to data exhibiting structure factor effects and low- q power law slopes and demonstrates their use in an in situ study of precipitate size evolution during heat treatment of a model Ni-Al-Si alloy.

  12. A new experimental method to prevent paraffin - wax formation on the crude oil wells: A field case study in Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhaddad Elnori E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wax formation and deposition is one of the most common problems in oil producing wells. This problem occurs as a result of the reduction of the produced fluid temperature below the wax appearance temperature (range between 46°C and 50°C and the pour point temperature (range between 42°C and 44°C. In this study, two new methods for preventing wax formation were implemented on three oil wells in Libya, where the surface temperature is, normally, 29°C. In the first method, the gas was injected at a pressure of 83.3 bar and a temperature of 65°C (greater than the pour point temperature during the gas-lift operation. In the second method, wax inhibitors (Trichloroethylene-xylene (TEX, Ethylene copolymers, and Comb polymers were injected down the casings together with the gas. Field observations confirmed that by applying these techniques, the production string was kept clean and no wax was formed. The obtained results show that the wax formation could be prevented by both methods.

  13. Time-Resolved SAXS/WAXS Study of the Phase Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of Drug/PEG Solid Dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Qing; Harris, Michael T.; Taylor, Lynne S.

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering/wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) was employed to elucidate the physical state and location of various small molecule drugs blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG), as well as the time dependent microstructural evolution of the systems. Samples were prepared by comelting physical mixtures of the drug and PEG, followed by solidification at 25 C. The model drugs selected encompassed a wide variety of physicochemical properties in terms of crystallization tendency and potential for interaction with PEG. It was observed that compounds which crystallized rapidly and had weak interactions with PEG tended to be excluded from the interlamellar region of the PEG matrix. In contrast, drugs which had favorable interactions with PEG were incorporated into the interlamellar regions of the polymer up until the point at which the drug crystallized whereby phase separation occurred. These factors are likely to impact the effectiveness of drug/PEG systems as drug delivery systems.

  14. Crystallography of waxes - an electron diffraction study of refined and natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1997-02-01

    The crystal structure of four waxes has been investigated by electron crystallography. Two of these waxes, including a refined petroleum product (Gulfwax) and a material from lignite (montan wax), form well ordered crystals and their structure could be solved quantitatively from the observed 0022-3727/30/3/018/img1 diffraction patterns. As also found previously for simpler binary n-paraffin solid solutions, the average structure resembles that of a pure paraffin (e.g. n-0022-3727/30/3/018/img2) but with a Gaussian distribution of atomic occupancies near the chain ends to account for the statistical distribution of chain lengths within a lamella. Two other waxes from living organisms, South African bee honeycomb and the leaves of the Brazilian carnauba palm, are much less ordered, even though they share the same methylene subcell packing of the most crystalline parts of the previous materials. It appears that these waxes cannot fully separate into distinct lamellae, perhaps due to the presence of very long `tie' molecules, and are therefore `frustrated' crystal structures.

  15. Original Research. Statistical Study Regarding Differences Between the Wax-Up, Mock-Up, and Final Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jánosi Kinga

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic rehabilitation of patients remains a challenge for practicians. To facilitate the clinicians’ and technicians’ task, several innovative methods were developed, like the diagnostic wax-up and mock-up. The width-to-length ratio of the maxillary frontal teeth can be used to evaluate dentofacial aesthetics. Our study presents the variations between the teeth size measured on casts obtained during the prosthodontic treatment.

  16. Methods of studying aging and stabilization of spray-congealed solid dispersions with carnauba wax. 1. Microcalorimetric investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emås, M; Nyqvist, H

    2000-03-20

    Rapidly cooled materials are often unstable as a result of changes in their physical properties due to imperfect crystallization. In the process of spray-congealing, melted material is atomized into droplets which very quickly solidify. This increases the possibility of the material crystallizing in different metastable forms. In this study it is shown that isothermal microcalorimetry can be used to observe the change in the thermodynamic state of spray-congealed carnauba wax during storage. In order to accelerate the thermodynamic change in the spray-congealed wax, three annealing procedures have been developed and compared using isothermal microcalorimetry. By means of annealing, a spray-congealed product closer to a thermodynamically stable state has been achieved.

  17. Using a Computational Study of Hydrodynamics in the Wax Lake Delta to Examine Data Sharing Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a complex dataset used to study the circulation and wind-driven flows in the Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA under winter storm conditions. The whole package bundles a large dataset (approximately 74 GB, which includes the numerical model, software and scripts for data analysis and visualization, as well as detailed documentation. The raw data came from multiple external sources, including government agencies, community repositories, and deployed field instruments and surveys. Each raw dataset goes through the processes of data QA/QC, data analysis, visualization, and interpretation. After integrating multiple datasets, new data products are obtained which are then used with the numerical model. The numerical model undergoes model verification, testing, calibration, and optimization. With a complex algorithm of computation, the model generates a structured output dataset, which is, after post-data analysis, presented as informative scientific figures and tables that allow interpretations and conclusions contributing to the science of coastal physical oceanography. Performing this study required a tremendous amount of effort. While the work resulted in traditional dissemination via a thesis, journal articles and conference proceedings, more can be gained. The data can be reused to study reproducibility or as preliminary investigation to explore a new topic. With thorough documentation and well-organized data, both the input and output dataset should be ready for sharing in a domain or institutional repository. Furthermore, the data organization and documentation also serves as a guideline for future research data management and the development of workflow protocols. Here we will describe the dataset created by this study, how sharing the dataset publicly could enable validation of the current study and extension by new studies, and the challenges that arise prior to sharing the dataset.

  18. Morphology evaluation of biodegradable copolyesters based on dimerized fatty acid studied by DSC, SAXS and WAXS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozlowska, A.; Gromadzki, Daniel; El Fray, M.; Štěpánek, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 6 (2008), s. 85-88 ISSN 1230-3666 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : multiblock copolymers * DSC * WAXS Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2008

  19. Wound healing properties of jojoba liquid wax: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranzato, Elia; Martinotti, Simona; Burlando, Bruno

    2011-03-24

    The wound healing properties of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) liquid wax (JLW) were studied in vitro on HaCaT keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts, which are involved in wounded skin repair. JLW cytotoxicity was evaluated by the crystal violet staining and the neutral red uptake endpoint. Induction of wound healing by JLW was assessed by scratch wound assay on cell monolayers. The involvement of signaling pathways was evaluated by the use of the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA and of kinase inhibitors, and by Western blot analysis of cell lysates using anti-phospho antibodies. Collagen and gelatinase secretion by cells were assayed by in-cell ELISA and zymography analysis, respectively. Cytotoxicity assays showed that the toxic effects of JLW to these cells are extremely low. Scratch wound experiments showed that JLW notably accelerates the wound closure of both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The use of inhibitors and Western blot revealed that the mechanism of action of JLW is strictly Ca(2+) dependent and requires the involvement of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway and of the p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs. In addition, JLW was found to stimulate collagen I synthesis in fibroblasts, while no effect was detected on the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinases by HaCaT or fibroblasts. Taken together, data provide a pharmacological characterization of JLW properties on skin cells and suggest that it could be used in the treatment of wounds in clinical settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of a new approach to diagnose breast cancer based on synchrotron radiation scattering properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, A.L.C.; Poletti, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Breast cancer is the most frequently occurring cancer in women accounting for about 20% of all cancer deaths. This scenario is, among other factors, due to inherent limitations of the current clinical methods of diagnosis based on x-ray absorption. Meanwhile, recent researches have shown that the scattered radiation can provide information about the structures that compose a biological tissue, like breast tissue. Then, the information provided by x-ray scattering techniques can be used to identify breast cancer. In this work, we developed a classification model based on discriminant analysis of scattering profiles of 106 human breast samples histopathologically classified as normal tissue, benign and malignant lesion, at wide (WAXS) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) regions. WAXS and SAXS experiments were carried out at the D12A-XRD1 and D02-SAXS2 beam lines in the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas. For WAXS experiment, was used an x-ray beam energy of 11keV allowing to record the momentum transfer interval of 0.7nm -1 ≤(q=4π.sin(θ/2)/λ)≤70.5nm -1 on the NaI(Tl) detector. While for SAXS experiment was used an x-ray wavelength of 1.488 Angstrom, a two-dimensional detector and several sample-detector distances, allowing to get the range of 0.07nm -1 ≤q≤4.20nm -1 . The scattering profiles at both regions, for each sample were used to build the diagnosis model based on discriminant analysis. From WAXS data, differences related to position and intensity of the peaks of the molecular structures were found, when compared normal and pathological breast tissues. While for SAXS these differences were observed in supramolecular structures. The diagnostic model combining the information at WAXS and SAXS yield two linear functions which, allow to correlate changes at molecular scale with those at supramolecular level as well as, to classify correctly all samples analyzed in this study[1]. Finally, the results achieved in this

  1. Comparative study to evaluate the accuracy of polyether occlusal bite registration material and occlusal registration wax as a guide for occlusal reduction during tooth preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the reliability of the most commonly used occlusal registration wax that with polyether bite registration material as a guide for occlusal reduction required during tooth preparations. Materials and Methods: For the purpose of this study, 25 abutment teeth requiring tooth preparation for fixed prosthesis were selected and tooth preparations carried out. Modeling wax strips of specific dimensions were placed onto the cast of prepared tooth, which was mounted on maximum intercuspation on the articulator and the articulator was closed. The thickness of the wax registration was measured at three zones namely two functional cusps and central fossa. Similar measurements were made using the polyether bite registration material and prosthesis at the same zones. The data was tabulated and was subjected to statistical analysis using anova test and Tukey honestly significant difference test. Results: The differences in thickness between wax record and prosthesis by 0.1346 mm, whereas the difference between polyether and prosthesis was 0.02 mm with a P value of 0.042, which is statistically significant. This means that the wax record was 8.25% larger than the prosthesis while polyether was just 1.27% larger than the prosthesis. Conclusion: The clinical significance of the above analysis is that Ramitec polyether bite registration material is most suitable material when compared with commonly used modeling wax during the tooth preparation.

  2. Understanding the distribution of natural wax in starch-wax films using synchrotron-based FTIR (S-FTIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Delina; Tobin, Mark J; Guo, Qipeng; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-02-15

    High amylose starch-glycerol (HAG) films were produced incorporating beeswax, candelilla wax and carnauba wax in the presence and absence of Tween-80 in order to determine the distribution of wax in the films during the film formation process. The distribution of these waxes within the film was studied using Synchrotron based Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (S-FTIR) which provided 2D mapping along the thickness of the film. The incorporation of 5% and 10% wax in HAG films produced randomly distributed wax or wax-rich domains, respectively, within these films. Consequently, the addition of these waxes to HAG increased the surface roughness and hydrophobicity of these films. The addition of Tween-80 caused variations in wax-rich bands within the films. The HAG+carnauba wax+Tween-80 films exhibited domed wax-rich domains displayed with high integrated CH2 absorption value at the interior of the films, rougher surface and higher contact angle values than the other films. The S-FTIR 2D images indicated that the distribution of wax in starch-wax films correlated with the roughness and hydrophobicity of the starch-wax films. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Prompt fission neutron energy spectra for 235 U and 239 Pu; Two-parameter measurement of nuclear lifetimes; ''Black'' neutron detector; Data reduction techniques for neutron scattering experiments; Inelastic neutron scattering studies in 197 Au; Elastic and inelastic scattering studies in 239 Pu; and neutron induced defects in silicon dioxide MOS structures

  4. Combined in situ small and wide angle X-ray scattering studies of TiO2 nano-particle annealing to 1023 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehres, Jan; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    Combined in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) studies were performed in a recently developed laboratory setup to investigate the dynamical properties of dry oleic acid-capped titanium dioxide nanorods during annealing in an inert gas stream in a temperature interval of 298-1...

  5. Wax deposition in crude oil pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assuncao, Pablo Morelato; Rodrigues, Lorennzo Marrochi Nolding [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Sao Mateus, ES (Brazil). Centro Universitario Norte do Espirito Santo. Engenharia de Petroleo; Romero, Mao Ilich [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute], e-mail: mromerov@uwyo.edu

    2010-07-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons which consists of aromatics, paraffins, naphthenics, resins asphaltenes, etc. When the temperature of crude oil is reduced, the heavy components, like paraffin, will precipitate and deposit on the pipe internal wall in the form of a wax-oil gel. The gel deposit consists of wax crystals that trap some amount of oil. As the temperature gets cooler, more wax will precipitate and the thickness of the wax gel will increase, causing gradual solidification of the crude and eventually the oil stop moving inside the offshore pipeline. Crude oil may not be able to be re-mobilized during re-startup. The effective diameter will be reduced with wax deposition, resulting in several problems, for example, higher pressure drop which means additional pumping energy costs, poor oil quality, use of chemical components like precipitation inhibitors or flowing facilitators, equipment failure, risk of leakage, clogging of the ducts and process equipment. Wax deposition problems can become so sever that the whole pipeline can be completely blocked. It would cost millions of dollars to remediate an offshore pipeline that is blocked by wax. Wax solubility decreases drastically with decreasing temperature. At low temperatures, as encountered in deep water production, is easy to wax precipitate. The highest temperature below which the paraffins begins to precipitate as wax crystals is defined as wax appearance temperature (WAT). Deposition process is a complex free surface problem involving thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, mass and heat transfer. In this work, a numerical analysis of wax deposition by molecular diffusion and shear dispersion mechanisms in crude oil pipeline is studied. Diffusion flux of wax toward the wall is estimated by Fick's law of diffusion, in similar way the shear dispersion; wax concentration gradient at the solid-liquid interface is obtained by the volume fraction conservation equation; and since the wax deposition

  6. Recent development in magnetic neutron scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endoh, Yasuo

    1993-01-01

    Neutron scattering results contain many new concepts in modern magnetism. We review here the most recent neutron magnetic scattering studies from so called '214' copper oxide lamellar materials, because a number of important developments in magnetism are condensed in this novel subject. We show that neutron scattering has played crucial role in our understanding of modern magnetism. (author)

  7. Comparative study to evaluate the accuracy of polyether occlusal bite registration material and occlusal registration wax as a guide for occlusal reduction during tooth preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Niranjan; Shetty, Sridhar N; Prasad, Krishna D

    2013-01-01

    The use of different materials and techniques has been studied to decide the safest quantum of reduction of the occlusal surfaces. However, these methods provide limited information as to the actual amount of reduction with limitations in accuracy, accessibility and complexity. The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the reliability of the most commonly used occlusal registration wax that with polyether bite registration material as a guide for occlusal reduction required during tooth preparations. For the purpose of this study, 25 abutment teeth requiring tooth preparation for fixed prosthesis were selected and tooth preparations carried out. Modeling wax strips of specific dimensions were placed onto the cast of prepared tooth, which was mounted on maximum intercuspation on the articulator and the articulator was closed. The thickness of the wax registration was measured at three zones namely two functional cusps and central fossa. Similar measurements were made using the polyether bite registration material and prosthesis at the same zones. The data was tabulated and was subjected to statistical analysis using anova test and Tukey honestly significant difference test. The differences in thickness between wax record and prosthesis by 0.1346 mm, whereas the difference between polyether and prosthesis was 0.02 mm with a P value of 0.042, which is statistically significant. This means that the wax record was 8.25% larger than the prosthesis while polyether was just 1.27% larger than the prosthesis. The clinical significance of the above analysis is that Ramitec polyether bite registration material is most suitable material when compared with commonly used modeling wax during the tooth preparation.

  8. Physical stability, centrifugation tests, and entrapment efficiency studies of carnauba wax-decyl oleate nanoparticles used for the dispersion of inorganic sunscreens in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Hernández, J R; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2006-06-01

    Aqueous nanoscale lipid dispersions consisting of carnauba wax-decyl oleate mixtures acting as carriers or accompanying vehicles for inorganic sunscreens such as barium sulfate, strontium carbonate, and titanium dioxide were prepared by high pressure homogenization. For the manufacture of these nanosuspensions, three pigment concentrations (%wt), namely 2, 4, and 6, and two carnauba wax-decyl oleate ratios, 1:1 and 2:1, were used, being some of these combinations chosen for stability studies. Six-month physical stability tests at 4, 20, and 40 degrees C selecting the mean particle size and the polydispersity index of the nanosuspensions as reference parameters were performed. Centrifugation tests of the nanosuspensions assessed by transmission electron microscopy and by the determination of the content of pigments and carnauba wax in the separated fractions were done. The mean particle sizes and the polydispersity indices of the nanosuspensions were not altered after six-month storages at 20 and at 40 degrees C. However, the storage of those at 4 degrees C considerably increased the particle size and polydispersity of the systems, particularly when wax-oil ratios (2:1) were used for the entrapment of the pigments. Transmission electron micrographs of centrifuged samples denoted the presence of three major fractions showing the different types of particles integrated into the nanosuspensions. Furthermore, it was observed that not all the carnauba wax participated in the entrapment of the pigment. Regarding the amount of pigment being encapsulated or bonded by the wax-oil matrices, entrapment efficiencies higher than 85.52% were reported.

  9. Retention studies in rats exposed to monodisperse aerosols of /sup 198/Au labeled carnauba wax particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarroni, G.; Bassi, P.; Belvisi, M.B.; Bianco, A.

    1981-01-01

    Rats were exposed to monodisperse carnauba wax aerosols labeled with colloidal /sup 198/Au and the retained activity was followed both in vivo and in the lungs of serially sacrified animals. In vitro and in vivo tests have shown low leaching rates of the label. The deposited activity could then be followed without correction for particle solubility. The activity in vivo shows a three-exponential decay, characterized by half-times of a few hours, one day, and one month corresponding to the clearance of the material deposited respectively in the extrathoracic airways, in the tracheo-bronchial, and in the alveolar regions. A correlation was found between long term cleared activity and particle size but no correlation was found between particle size and clearance half times in the size range investigated. Statistical evaluation of the activity vs time in vivo and in excised lungs has shown that the long term retained activity pertains to the alveolar region and, if a large number of animals is not used, more accurate data of pulmonary clearance can be obtained by in vivo measurements than by serial sacrifices.

  10. Watching Nanoparticles Form: An In Situ (Small-/Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering/Total Scattering) Study of the Growth of Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia in Supercritical Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrsted, Christoffer; Pauw, Brian; Jensen, Kirsten Marie Ørnsbjerg

    2012-01-01

    Understanding nanoparticle formation reactions requires multitechnique in situ characterisation, since no single characterisation technique provides adequate information. Here, the first combined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS)/total-scattering study of nano...... of nanoparticle formation is presented. We report on the formation and growth of yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) under the extreme conditions of supercritical methanol for particles with Y2O3 equivalent molar fractions of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 25%....

  11. Chemical composition of raw and deresinated peat waxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel' kevich, P I; Ivanova, L A; Piskunova, T A; Tserlyukevich, Ya V; Yurkevich, E A

    1980-01-01

    Research was conducted using absorption chromatography and spectroscopy to study the changes in the chemical composition of raw peat wax taking place in the deresination process. Characteristics of the raw, deresinated waxes and resins removed are given. The fractions obtained showed that both raw and deresinated wax contain the same basic compound classes: hydrocarbons, alcohols, complex ether and acids; but their proportions in the waxes are different. After deresination most of the dark-colored polyfunctional compounds, a portion of the soluble unsaturated hydrocarbons and alcohols, and all the sterenes transfer into the resin. This causes the light color and specific physical properties of deresinated wax. (13 refs.) (In Russian)

  12. Microencapsulation of Flavors in Carnauba Wax

    OpenAIRE

    Milanovic, Jelena; Manojlovic, Verica; Levic, Steva; Rajic, Nevenka; Nedovic, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this study is the development of flavor wax formulations aimed for food and feed products. The melt dispersion technique was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanillin in wax microcapsules. The surface morphology of microparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), while the loading content was determined by HPLC measurements. This study shows that the decomposition process under heating proceeds in several steps: vanilla evaporation occurs at aroun...

  13. Experimental study on depth of paraffin wax over floating absorber plate in built-in storage solar water heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sivakumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the effect of depth of phase change material over the absorber surface of an integrated collector-storage type flat plate solar water heater. Flat plate solar water heaters are extensively used all over the world to utilize the natural source of solar energy. In order to utilize the solar energy during off-sunshine hours, it is inevitable to store and retain solar thermal energy as long as possible. Here, phase change material is not used for heat storage, but to minimize losses during day and night time only. The depth of phase change material over a fixed depth of water in a solar thermal collector is an important geometric parameter that influences the maximum temperature rise during peak solar irradiation and hence the losses. From the results of the studies for different masses of paraffin wax phase change material layers, the optimum depth corresponding to the maximum heat gain till evening is found to be 2 mm, and the heat retention till the next day morning is found to be 4 mm.

  14. Characterization and chemical composition of epicuticular wax from banana leaves grown in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suporn Charumanee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the physicochemical properties and chemical composition of epicuticular wax extracted from leaves of Kluai Namwa, a banana cultivar which is widely grown in Northern Thailand. Its genotype was identified by a botanist. The wax was extracted using solvent extraction. The fatty acid profiles and physicochemical properties of the wax namely melting point, congealing point, crystal structures and polymorphism, hardness, color, and solubility were examined and compared to those of beeswax, carnauba wax and paraffin wax. The results showed that the genotype of Kluai Namwa was Musa acuminata X M. balbisiana (ABB group cv. Pisang Awak. The highest amount of wax extracted was 274 μg/cm2 surface area. The fatty acid composition and the physicochemical properties of the wax were similar to those of carnauba wax. It could be suggested that the banana wax could be used as a replacement for carnauba wax in various utilizing areas.

  15. Neutron scattering studies of solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1976-01-01

    The role which neutron scattering can play in determining the nature of the disorder and the conducting mechanism in the solid electrolytes is discussed. First, some of the general formalism for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering is reviewed, and the quantities which can be measured are pointed out. Then the application of neutron scattering to the studies of three different problems is examined; the anion disorder in the fluorite system, the dynamical behavior in beta-alumina, and the cation diffusion in αAgI are discussed. 8 figures

  16. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Xiao, Kang; Li, Shunbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  17. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing

    2013-10-10

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  18. Sintering of wax for controlling release from pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Reena; Poddar, S S; Chivate, Amit

    2007-09-14

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incorporation of hydrophobic (ie, waxy) material into pellets using a thermal sintering technique and to evaluate the pellets in vitro for controlled release. Pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization technology were formulated with a water-soluble drug, microcrystalline cellulose, and carnauba wax. Powdered carnauba wax (4%-20%) prepared by grinding or by emulsification was studied with an attempt to retard the drug release. The inclusion of ground or emulsified carnauba wax did not sustain the release of theophylline for more than 3 hours. Matrix pellets of theophylline prepared with various concentrations of carnauba wax were sintered thermally at various times and temperatures. In vitro drug release profiles indicated an increase in drug release retardation with increasing carnauba wax concentration. Pellets prepared with ground wax showed a higher standard deviation than did those prepared with emulsified wax. There was incomplete release at the end of 12 hours for pellets prepared with 20% ground or emulsified wax. The sintering temperature and duration were optimized to allow for a sustained release lasting at least 12 hours. The optimized temperature and duration were found to be 100 degrees C and 140 seconds, respectively. The sintered pellets had a higher hydrophobicity than did the unsintered pellets. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that the carnauba wax moved internally, thereby increasing the surface area of wax within the pellets.

  19. Neutron scattering studies of modulated magnetic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard Soerensen, Steen

    1999-08-01

    This report describes investigations of the magnetic systems DyFe{sub 4}Al{sub 8} and MnSi by neutron scattering and in the former case also by X-ray magnetic resonant scattering. The report is divided into three parts: An introduction to the technique of neutron scattering with special emphasis on the relation between the scattering cross section and the correlations between the scattering entities of the sample. The theoretical framework of neutron scattering experiments using polarized beam technique is outlined. The second part describes neutron and X-ray scattering investigation of the magnetic structures of DyFe{sub 4}Al{sub 8}. The Fe sublattice of the compound order at 180 K in a cycloidal structure in the basal plane of the bct crystal structure. At 25 K the ordering of the Dy sublattice shows up. By the element specific technique of X-ray resonant magnetic scattering, the basal plane cycloidal structure was also found for the Dy sublattice. The work also includes neutron scattering studies of DyFe{sub 4}Al{sub 8} in magnetic fields up to 5 T applied along a <110> direction. The modulated structure at the Dy sublattice is quenched by a field lower than 1 T, whereas modulation is present at the Fe sublattice even when the 5 T field is applied. In the third part of the report, results from three small angle neutron experiments on MnSi are presented. At ambient pressure, a MnSi is known to form a helical spin density wave at temperature below 29 K. The application of 4.5 kbar pressure intended as hydrostatic decreased the Neel temperature to 25 K and changed the orientation of the modulation vector. To understand this reorientation within the current theoretical framework, anisotropic deformation of the sample crystal must be present. The development of magnetic critical scattering with an isotropic distribution of intensity has been studied at a level of detail higher than that of work found in the literature. Finally the potential of a novel polarization

  20. Neutron Scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboussant, G.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with inelastic neutron scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets and focuses on their magnetic properties at low temperature and low energies. Several molecular magnets (Mn 12 , V 15 , Ni 12 , Mn 4 , etc.) are reviewed. Inelastic neutron scattering is shown to be a perfectly suited spectroscopy tool to -a) probe magnetic energy levels in such systems and -b) provide key information to understand the quantum tunnel effect of the magnetization in molecular spin clusters. (author)

  1. Neutron scattering studies in the actinide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beghian, L.E.; Kegel, G.H.R.

    1991-08-01

    During the report period we have investigated the following areas: Neutron elastic and inelastic scattering measurements on 14 N, 181 Ta, 232 Th, 238 U and 239 Pu; Prompt fission spectra for 232 Th, 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu; Theoretical studies of neutron scattering; Neutron filters; New detector systems; and Upgrading of neutron target assembly, data acquisition system, and accelerator/beam-line apparatus

  2. Analytic scattering kernels for neutron thermalization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1990-01-01

    Current plans call for the inclusion of a liquid hydrogen or deuterium cold source in the NRU replacement vessel. This report is part of an ongoing study of neutron thermalization in such a cold source. Here, we develop a simple analytical model for the scattering kernel of monatomic and diatomic liquids. We also present the results of extensive numerical calculations based on this model for liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, and mixtures of the two. These calculations demonstrate the dependence of the scattering kernel on the incident and scattered-neutron energies, the behavior near rotational thresholds, the dependence on the centre-of-mass pair correlations, the dependence on the ortho concentration, and the dependence on the deuterium concentration in H 2 /D 2 mixtures. The total scattering cross sections are also calculated and compared with available experimental results

  3. Dental wax decreases calculus accumulation in small dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark M; Smithson, Christopher W

    2014-01-01

    A dental wax was evaluated after unilateral application in 20 client-owned, mixed and purebred small dogs using a clean, split-mouth study model. All dogs had clinical signs of periodontal disease including plaque, calculus, and/or gingivitis. The wax was randomly applied to the teeth of one side of the mouth daily for 30-days while the contralateral side received no treatment. Owner parameters evaluated included compliance and a subjective assessment of ease of wax application. Gingivitis, plaque and calculus accumulation were scored at the end of the study period. Owners considered the wax easy to apply in all dogs. Compliance with no missed application days was achieved in 8 dogs. The number of missed application days had no effect on wax efficacy. There was no significant difference in gingivitis or plaque accumulation scores when comparing treated and untreated sides. Calculus accumulation scores were significantly less (22.1 %) for teeth receiving the dental wax.

  4. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T. [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo, RIKEN campus, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Hashimoto, T. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hayakawa, S. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Kawabata, T. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kita-Shirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kwon, Y. K. [Institute for Basic Science, 70, Yuseong-daero 1689-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Binh, D. N. [30 MeV Cyclotron Center, Tran Hung Dao Hospital, Hoan Kiem District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G. [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hong Quoc Viet, Nghia do, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2014-05-02

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of {sup 7}Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the {sup 7}Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in {sup 11}C.

  5. Alpha resonant scattering for astrophysical reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Kahl, D.; Nakao, T.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kubano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Kawabata, T.; Iwasa, N.; Teranishi, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; Binh, D. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Duy, N. G.

    2014-01-01

    Several alpha-induced astrophysical reactions have been studied at CRIB (CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator), which is a low-energy RI beam separator at Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) of the University of Tokyo. One of the methods to study them is the α resonant scattering using the thick-target method in inverse kinematics. Among the recent studies at CRIB, the measurement of 7 Be+α resonant scattering is discussed. Based on the result of the experiment, we evaluated the contributions of high-lying resonances for the 7 Be(α,γ) reaction, and proposed a new cluster band in 11 C

  6. Online estimation of wax deposition thickness in single-phase sub-sea pipelines based on acoustic chemometrics: A feasibility study

    OpenAIRE

    Halstensen, Maths; Arvoh, Benjamin Kaku; Amundsen, Lene; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Wax deposition in sub-sea oil producing pipelines is a concern to the oil producing companies. The deposition of wax in pipelines can cause serious economic implications if not monitored and controlled. Several researchers have developed models and investigated the deposition of wax in crude oil pipelines. As of today, there is no off the shelf instrument available for reliable online estimation of the wax depo- sition thickness in sub-sea pipelines. Acoustic chemometrics was applied to inves...

  7. Neutron scattering study of dilute supercritical solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, H.D.; Wignall, G.D.; Shah, V.M.; Londono, J.D.; Bienkowski, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    Dilute solutions in supercritical solvents exhibit interesting microstructures that are related to their dramatic macroscopic behavior. In typical attractive solutions, solutes are believed to be surrounded by clusters of solvent molecules, and solute molecules are believed to congregate in the vicinity of one another. Repulsive solutions, on the other hand, exhibit a local region of reduced solvent density around the solute with solute-solute congregation. Such microstructures influence solubility, partial molar volume, reaction kinetics, and many other properties. We have undertaken to observe these interesting microstructures directly by neutron scattering experiments on dilute noble gas systems including Ar. The three partial structure factors for such systems and the corresponding pair correlation functions can be determined by using the isotope substitution technique. The systems studied are uniquely suited for our objectives because of the large coherent neutron scattering length of the isotope 36 Ar and because of the accurate potential energy functions that are available for use in molecular simulations and theoretical calculations to be compared with the scattering results. We will describe our experiment, the unique apparatus we have built for it, and the neutron scattering results from our initial allocations of beam time. We will also describe planned scattering experiments to follow those with noble gases, including study of long-chain molecules in supercritical solvents. Such studies will involve hydrocarbon mixtures with and without deuteration to provide contrast

  8. Studies in small angle scattering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moellenbach, K.

    1980-03-01

    Small angle scattering of neutrons, X-rays and γ-rays are found among the spectroscopic methods developed in the recent years. Although these techniques differ from each other in many respects, e.g. radiation sources and technical equipment needed, their power to resolve physical phenomena and areas of application can be discussed in a general scheme. Selected examples are given illustrating the use of specific technical methods. Jahn-Teller driven structural phase transitions in Rare Earth zircons were studied with neutron scattering as well as small angle γ-ray diffraction. The study of neutron scattering from formations of magnetic domains in the Ising ferromagnet LiTbF 4 is a second example. Both these examples represent more than experimental test cases since the theoretical interpretations of the data obtained are discussed as well. As a last example the use of small angle scattering methods for the study of molecular biological samples is discussed. In particular the experimental procedures used in connection with scattering from aqueous solutions of proteins and protein complexes are given. (Auth.)

  9. A histological procedure to study fungal infection in the wax moth Galleria mellonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Perdoni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate model Galleria mellonella is a widely used factitious host to study the microbial pathogenesis in vivo. However, a specific procedure for the recovery and the processing of the infected tissues, important for a better understanding of the host-pathogen interactions, has not been reported to our knowledge. In the present study we describe a new procedure of fixation and processing of larval tissue that allows studying the larval topographic anatomy and assessing the morphological changes due to the fungal infection. Lepidopteran larvae were infected with Candida albicans strains displaying various biofilm-forming abilities. The whole larvae were then examined for tissue changes by histological techniques. We show that comparing cutting planes, serial transversal sections of paraffin-embedded larva result in better accuracy and information recovering. Using this technique, it was possible to preserve the integrity of G. mellonella internal structures allowing the detailed analysis of morphological differences in different experimental groups (i.e., healthy vs infected larvae. We were also able to study strain-related differences in the pathogenesis of C. albicans by observing the immune response elicited and the invasiveness of two isolates within the larval tissues. In general, by processing the whole larva and optimizing routinely histochemical stainings, it is possible to visualize and analyse infected tissues. Various degrees of pathogenicity (strain- or inoculum-related, and the infection time course can be described in details. Moreover, the host immune response events can be followed throughout the infectious process leading to a comprehensive picture of the studied phenomenon.

  10. Absorption and distribution of orally administered jojoba wax in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, A; Samoiloff, V; Benzioni, A

    1982-03-01

    The liquid wax obtained from the seeds of the arid-land shrub jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is finding increasing use in skin treatment preparations. The fate of this wax upon reaching the digestive tract was studied. 14C-Labeled wax was administered intragastrically to mice, and the distribution of the label in the body was determined as a function of time. Most of the wax was excreted, but a small amount was absorbed, as was indicated by the distribution of label in the internal organs and the epididymal fat. The label was incorporated into the body lipids and was found to diminish with time.

  11. A neutron scattering study of DCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackenzie, G.A.; Pawley, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    Phonons in deuterium cyanide have been measured by neutron coherent inelastic scattering. The main subject of study was the transverse acoustic mode in the (110) direction polarised along (110) which is associated with the first-order structural phase transition at 160 K. Measurements have shown that the frequency decreases by about 25% between about 225 and 160 K as the transition temperature is approached. The other acoustic modes observable in the a*b* scattering plane have been measured and show no anomalous temperature dependence. Optic modes were unobservable because of the small size of the single-crystal sample which gave insufficient scattered intensity. Apart from the 'soft' mode, the measured frequencies are in good agreement with lattice dynamics calculations. (author)

  12. Nucleon structure study by virtual compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Breton, V.; Fonvielle, H.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Quemener, G.; Ravel, O.; Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Boeglin, W.U.; Boehm, R.; Distler, M.; Edelhoff, R.; Friedrich, J.; Geiges, R.; Jennewein, P.; Kahrau, M.; Korn, M.; Kramer, H.; Krygier, K.W.; Kunde, V.; Liesenfeld, A.; Merle, K.; Neuhausen, R.; Offermann, E.A.J.M.; Pospischil, T.; Rosner, G.; Sauer, P.; Schmieden, H.; Schardt, S.; Tamas, G.; Wagner, A.; Walcher, T.; Wolf, S.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to study nucleon structure by Virtual Compton Scattering using the reaction p(e,e'p)γ with the MAMI facility. We will detect the scattered electron and the recoil proton in coincidence in the high resolution spectrometers of the hall A1. Compton events will be separated from the other channels (principally π 0 production) by missing-mass reconstruction. We plan to investigate this reaction near threshold. Our goal is to measure new electromagnetic observables which generalize the usual magnetic and electric polarizabilities. (authors). 9 refs., 18 figs., 7 tabs

  13. NEUTRON-SCATTERING STUDY OF DCN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackenzie, Gordon A.; Pawley, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    Phonons in deuterium cyanide have been measured by neutron coherent inelastic scattering. The main subject of study was the transverse acoustic mode in the (110) direction polarised along (110) which is associated with the first-order structural phase transition at 160K. Measurements have shown...

  14. Microencapsulation of Flavors in Carnauba Wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Bugarski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is the development of flavor wax formulations aimed for food and feed products. The melt dispersion technique was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanillin in wax microcapsules. The surface morphology of microparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM, while the loading content was determined by HPLC measurements. This study shows that the decomposition process under heating proceeds in several steps: vanilla evaporation occurs at around 200 °C, while matrix degradation starts at 250 °C and progresses with maxima at around 360, 440 and 520 °C. The results indicate that carnauba wax is an attractive material for use as a matrix for encapsulation of flavours in order to improve their functionality and stability in products.

  15. Microencapsulation of flavors in carnauba wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanovic, Jelena; Manojlovic, Verica; Levic, Steva; Rajic, Nevenka; Nedovic, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2010-01-01

    The subject of this study is the development of flavor wax formulations aimed for food and feed products. The melt dispersion technique was applied for the encapsulation of ethyl vanillin in wax microcapsules. The surface morphology of microparticles was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), while the loading content was determined by HPLC measurements. This study shows that the decomposition process under heating proceeds in several steps: vanilla evaporation occurs at around 200 °C, while matrix degradation starts at 250 °C and progresses with maxima at around 360, 440 and 520 °C. The results indicate that carnauba wax is an attractive material for use as a matrix for encapsulation of flavours in order to improve their functionality and stability in products.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1978 - Carnauba wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Carnauba wax. 184.1978 Section 184.1978 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1978 Carnauba wax. (a) Carnauba wax (CAS Reg. No. 008-015-869) is obtained from the leaves and buds of the Brazilian wax palm Copernicia cerifera Martius. The wax is hard...

  17. Instrumentation for millisecond-resolution scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, G.B.; Ludwig, K.F. Jr.; Jordan-Sweet, J.L.; Brauer, S.; Mainville, J.; Yang, Y.S.; Sutton, M.

    1989-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray scattering studies of phase transition kinetics have been carried out using the wide-bandpass monochromator and fast linear position-sensitive detector system at the IBM/MIT beamline X-20C at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). We report here on the instrumentation that has been developed for these studies, and in particular on the methods used to measure, change, and control sample temperature with millisecond resolution

  18. Wax Impaction in Nigerian School Children. | Eziyi | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Impacted wax has been classified as an ear disease. It can cause pain, itching, tinnitus hearing loss or otitis externa. The prevalence of cerumen impaction varies. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of impacted ear wax in primary school children and to determine, if there is any association ...

  19. Wax combs mediate nestmate recognition by guard honeybees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ettorre, Patrizia; Wenseleers, Tom; Dawson, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that the wax combs are important in the acquisition of colony odour in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. However, many of these studies were conducted in the laboratory or under artificial conditions. We investigated the role of the wax combs in nestmate recognition in the natural...

  20. Study of nuclei by electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Yoshiharu; Saito, Teijiro; Ito, Kohei; Terasawa, Tatsuo; Hosoyama, Kenji.

    1974-01-01

    It is urgently required to clarify the physical meaning of the quasi-elastic scattering associated with the background, in order to develop rapidly the study of giant resonance. The experimental works performed in the present term aimed at the synthetic understanding of both giant resonance and quasi-elastic scattering, and presented the possibility of the separability of giant resonance from quasi-elastic scattering. The object of this experiment was to measure higher order multi-pole moment of 51 V by using relatively high energy electron beam. Targets of chemically pure 51 V had thickness of 68.2 or 100.5 mg/cm 2 . The measurement was made at the position where scattering angle was 155 0 . The state of M7 can be well explained by the model with (fsub(7/2)) 3 coordination. This may be because the nuclei with stretched configuration such as 51 V do not have any contribution of orbital motion, but have the contribution of eigen magnetic moment to the highest multiplicity. States of M3 and M5 are a little complicated. Since in the experimental equipment used, the contribution of charge distribution was so large, that it was difficult to make the precision measurement of M3 and M5. In 51 V, however, it can be considered that M3 and M5 decreased by the contribution of 2Psub(3/2) and 1fsub(5/2). On the other hand, there is no contribution from these energy states to M7. (Tai, I.)

  1. Preparing paraffin wax, etc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1935-12-27

    A process is described for preparing paraffin wax by separation from substances containing bitumen, consisting of treating the raw material at an elevated temperature under such moderate conditions and by means of such organic solvents that the bitumen present in the raw material or formed in the process dissolves as well as the asphaltic and phenolic substances and the humic acids which may be said to be neither extracts nor decomposed materials, and then submitting the products and extracts to a treatment with hydrogen gas, which is effected below 300/sup 0/C, and passing the material over fixed hydrogenation catalysts above 300/sup 0/C by means of hydrogenation catalysts finely dispersed in carbonaceous materials all avoiding decomposition with the formation of volatile products.

  2. Wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads of calcium pectinate for intragastric floating drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Asavapichayont, Panida; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Luangtana-Anan, Manee; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Piriyaprasarth, Suchada

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare wax-incorporated pectin-based emulsion gel beads using a modified emulsion-gelation method. The waxes in pectin-olive oil mixtures containing a model drug, metronidazole, were hot-melted, homogenized and then extruded into calcium chloride solution. The beads formed were separated, washed with distilled water and dried for 12 h. The influence of various types and amounts of wax on floating and drug release behavior of emulsion gel beads of calcium pectinate was investigated. The drug-loaded gel beads were found to float on simulated gastric fluid if the sufficient amount of oil was used. Incorporation of wax into the emulsion gel beads affected the drug release. Water-soluble wax (i.e. polyethylene glycol) increased the drug release while other water-insoluble waxes (i.e. glyceryl monostearate, stearyl alcohol, carnauba wax, spermaceti wax and white wax) significantly retarded the drug release. Different waxes had a slight effect on the drug release. However, the increased amount of incorporated wax in the formulations significantly sustained the drug release while the beads remained floating. The results suggest that wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads could be used as a carrier for intragastric floating drug delivery.

  3. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Study of Liquid Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoeld, K; Rowe, J M; Ostrowski, G [Solid State Science Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (US); Randolph, P D [Nuclear Technology Div., Idaho Nuclear Corporation, Idaho Falls, Idaho (US)

    1972-02-15

    The inelastic scattering functions for liquid argon have been measured at 85.2 K. The coherent scattering function was obtained from a measurement on pure A-36 and the incoherent function was derived from the result obtained from the A-36 sample and the result obtained from a mixture of A-36 and A-40 for which the scattering is predominantly incoherent. The data, which are presented as smooth scattering functions at constant values of the wave vector transfer in the range 10 - 44/nm, are corrected for multiple scattering contributions and for resolution effects. Such corrections are shown to be essential in the derivation of reliable scattering functions from neutron scattering data. The incoherent data are compared to recent molecular dynamics results and the mean square displacement as a function of time is derived. The coherent data are compared to molecular dynamics results and also, briefly, to some recent theoretical models

  4. Study of material science by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Yoon, B.K.; Cheon, B.C.; Lee, C.Y.; Kim, C.S.

    1980-01-01

    To develop accurate methods of texture measurement in metallic materials by neutron diffraction, (100),(200),(111) and (310) pole figures have been measured for the oriented silicon steel sheet, and currently study of correction methods for neutron absorption and extinction effects are in progress. For quantitative analysis of texture of polycrystalline material with a cubic structure, a software has been developed to calculate inverse pole figures for arbitrary direction specified in the speciman as well as pole figures for arbitrary chosen crystallographic planes from three experimental pole figures. This work is to be extended for the calculation of three dimensional orientation distribution function and for the evaluation of errors in the quantitative analysis of texture. Work is also for the study of N-H...O hydrogen bond in amino acid by observing molecular motions using neutron inelastic scattering. Measurement of neutron inelastic scattering spectrum of L-Serine is completed at 100 0 K and over the energy transfer range of 20-150 meV. (KAERI INIS Section)

  5. 21 CFR 178.3710 - Petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Petroleum wax. 178.3710 Section 178.3710 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3710 Petroleum wax. Petroleum wax may be safely used as a component of nonfood articles in contact with food, in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Petroleum wax is a...

  6. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering studies of anisotropic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, A J; Long, G G; Ilavsky, J

    2002-01-01

    Building on previous work that considered spherical scatterers and randomly oriented spheroidal scatterers, we describe a multiple small-angle neutron scattering (MSANS) analysis for nonrandomly oriented spheroids. We illustrate this with studies of the multi-component void morphologies found in plasma-spray thermal barrier coatings. (orig.)

  7. SCATTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broome, J.

    1965-11-01

    The programme SCATTER is a KDF9 programme in the Egtran dialect of Fortran to generate normalized angular distributions for elastically scattered neutrons from data input as the coefficients of a Legendre polynomial series, or from differential cross-section data. Also, differential cross-section data may be analysed to produce Legendre polynomial coefficients. Output on cards punched in the format of the U.K. A. E. A. Nuclear Data Library is optional. (author)

  8. Neutron scattering studies of the actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic structure of actinide materials presents a unique example of the interplay between localized and band electrons. Together with a variety of other techniques, especially magnetization and the Mossbauer effect, neutron studies have helped us to understand the systematics of many actinide compounds that order magnetically. A direct consequence of the localization of 5f electrons is the spin-orbit coupling and subsequent spin-lattice interaction that often leads to strongly anisotropic behavior. The unusual phase transition in UO 2 , for example, arises from interactions between quadrupole moments. On the other hand, in the monopnictides and monochalcogenides, the anisotropy is more difficult to understand, but probably involves an interaction between actinide and anion wave functions. A variety of neutron experiments, including form-factor studies, critical scattering and measurements of the elementary excitations have now been performed, and the conceptual picture emerging from these studies will be discussed

  9. Neutron scattering studies on frustrated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Taka-hisa

    2013-01-01

    A lot of frustrated magnetic systems exhibit a nontrivial magnetic order, such as long-wavelength modulation, noncollinear, or noncoplanar order. The nontrivial order may pave the way for the novel magnetic function of matter. Neutron studies are necessary to determine the magnetic structures in the frustrated magnetic systems. In particular, spin-polarized neutron scattering is a useful technique for the investigation of the novel physical properties relevant to the nontrivial spin arrangement. Here some neutron studies on a multiferroic perovskite manganese oxide system are demonstrated as a typical case. The frustrated magnetic systems may also a playground of novel types of local magnetic excitations, which behave like particles in contrast to the magnetic waves. It is becoming a good challenge to study such particle-type magnetic excitations relevant to the magnetic frustration. (author)

  10. High energy gravitational scattering: a numerical study

    CERN Document Server

    Marchesini, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    The S-matrix in gravitational high energy scattering is computed from the region of large impact parameters b down to the regime where classical gravitational collapse is expected to occur. By solving the equation of an effective action introduced by Amati, Ciafaloni and Veneziano we find that the perturbative expansion around the leading eikonal result diverges at a critical value signalling the onset of a new regime. We then discuss the main features of our explicitly unitary S-matrix down to the Schwarzschild's radius R=2G s^(1/2), where it diverges at a critical value b ~ 2.22 R of the impact parameter. The nature of the singularity is studied with particular attention to the scaling behaviour of various observables at the transition. The numerical approach is validated by reproducing the known exact solution in the axially symmetric case to high accuracy.

  11. Neutron scattering studies of Mn12-acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The S=10 magnetic molecule Mn 12 -acetate, which crystallises into a tetragonal crystal structure, has attracted substantial recent attention by virtue of its low temperature bulk magnetic properties, which give evidence for resonant quantum tunnelling of the magnetisation. We report a full neutron crystal structure including positions of all protons/deuterons, including the solvated water and acetic acid, a polarised-neutron study of the real space magnetisation, which confirms a simple magnetic-structure model for the molecule, albeit with reduced Mn moments, and inelastic neutron scattering data containing both the excitations within the 21-fold degenerate S=10 manifold, and those from S=10 to the S=9 manifolds. Both manifolds are split by uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, and we report coefficients for 2nd and 4th-order terms in the magnetic Hamiltonian

  12. Systematic study on nuclear resonant scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, A.A.; Freitas, M.L.

    1974-01-01

    New resonant scattering effect of thermal neutron capture gamma rays from Ti and Fe on Sb, Cu, Se and Ce target were observed. These results together with those published by other authors are summarized and discussed in terms of a possible systematic search for new resonant scattering effects

  13. Structure and Biosynthesis of Branched Wax Compounds on Wild Type and Wax Biosynthesis Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busta, Lucas; Jetter, Reinhard

    2017-06-01

    The cuticle is a waxy composite that protects the aerial organs of land plans from non-stomatal water loss. The chemical make-up of the cuticular wax mixture plays a central role in defining the water barrier, but structure-function relationships have not been established so far, in part due to gaps in our understanding of wax structures and biosynthesis. While wax compounds with saturated, linear hydrocarbon tails have been investigated in detail, very little is known about compounds with modified aliphatic tails, which comprise substantial portions of some plant wax mixtures. This study aimed to investigate the structures, abundances and biosynthesis of branched compounds on the species for which wax biosynthesis is best understood: Arabidopsis thaliana. Microscale derivatization, mass spectral interpretation and organic synthesis identified homologous series of iso-alkanes and iso-alcohols on flowers and leaves, respectively. These comprised approximately 10-15% of wild type wax mixtures. The abundances of both branched wax constituents and accompanying unbranched compounds were reduced on the cer6, cer3 and cer1 mutants but not cer4, indicating that branched compounds are in part synthesized by the same machinery as unbranched compounds. In contrast, the abundances of unbranched, but not branched, wax constituents were reduced on the cer2 and cer26 mutants, suggesting that the pathways to both types of compounds deviate in later steps of chain elongation. Finally, the abundances of branched, but not unbranched, wax compounds were reduced on the cer16 mutant, and the (uncharacterized) CER16 protein may therefore be controlling the relative abundances of iso-alkanes and iso-alcohols on Arabidopsis surfaces. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Sintering of wax for controlling release from pellets

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Reena; Poddar, S. S.; Chivate, Amit

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate incorporation of hydrophobic (ie, waxy) material into pellets using a thermal sintering technique and to evaluate the pellets in vitro for controlled release. Pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization technology were formulated with a water-soluble drug, microcrystalline cellulose, and carnauba wax. Powdered carnauba wax (4%–20%) prepared by grinding or by emulsification was studied with an attempt to retard the drug release. The inclusio...

  15. Mechanical properties of carving wax with various Ca-bentolite filter composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widjijono Widjijono

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The carving wax is used as a medium in dental anatomy study. This wax composes of many waxes and sometimes a filler is added. Carving wax is not sold in Indonesian market. Whereas the gradients of carving wax such as beeswax, paraffin and bentonite are abundant in Indonesia. Based on that fact, to make high quality and standard,the exact composition if this carving wax should be known. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of carving wax composition with Ca-bentonite filler on the melting point, hardness, and thermal expansion. Methods: Five carving wax compositions were made with paraffin, Ca-bentonite, carnauba wax, and beeswax in ratio (% weight: 50:20:25:5 (KI, 55:15:25:5 (KII, 60:10:25:5 (KIII, 65:5:25:5 (KIV, 70:0:25:5(KV. All components were melted, then poured into the melting point, hardness, and thermal expansion moulds (n = 5. Three carving wax properties were tested: melting point by melting point apparatus; hardness by penetrometer; thermal expansion by digital sliding caliper. The data were analyzed statistically using One-Way ANOVA and LSD0.05. Result: The Ca-bentonite addition influenced the melting point and thermal expansion of carving wax with significant differences between KI and other groups (p < 0.05. Ca-bentonite addition influenced the carving wax hardness and the mean differences among the groups were significant (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Ca-bentonite filler addition on the composition of carving wax influenced the physical and mechanical properties. The carving wax with high Ca-bentonite concentration had high melting point and hardness, but low thermal expansion.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of biological molecules suggest

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tions of temperature, pressure or solvent environment for survival. ... scale that depends on the scattering vector range and energy resolution of the in- .... the structures) are good indicators of global evolutionary adaptation mechanisms.

  17. Neutron-scattering studies of chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.; Baldwin, J.P.; Carpenter, B.G.; Hjelm, R.P.; Hancock, R.; Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    It is clear that a knowledge of the basic molecular structure of chromatin is a prerequisite for any progress toward an understanding of chromosome organization. With a two-component system, protein and nucleic acid, neutrons have a particularly powerful application to studies of the spatial arrangements of these components because of the ability, by contrast matching with H 2 O-D 2 O mixtures, to obtain neutron-scattering data on the individual components. With this approach it has been shown that the neutron diffraction of chromatin is consistent with a ''beads on a string'' model in which the bead consists of a protein core with DNA coiled on the outside. However, because chromatin is a gel and gives limited structural data, confirmation of such a model requires extension of the neutron studies by deuteration of specific chromatin components and the isolation of chromatin subunits. Although these studies are not complete, the neutron results so far obtained support the subunit model described above

  18. Small-angle neutron scattering technique in liquid crystal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahidan Radiman

    2005-01-01

    The following topics discussed: general principles of SAS (Small-angle Neutron Scattering), liquid crystals, nanoparticle templating on liquid crystals, examples of SAS results, prospects of this studies

  19. Neutron scattering study of yttrium iron garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamoto, Shin-ichi; Ito, Takashi U.; Onishi, Hiroaki; Yamauchi, Hiroki; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Masato; Akatsu, Mitsuhiro; Kodama, Katsuaki; Nakao, Akiko; Moyoshi, Taketo; Munakata, Koji; Ohhara, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Nemoto, Yuichi; Shibata, Kaoru

    2018-02-01

    The nuclear and magnetic structure and full magnon dispersions of yttrium iron garnet Y3Fe5O12 have been studied using neutron scattering. The refined nuclear structure is distorted to a trigonal space group of R 3 ¯ . The highest-energy dispersion extends up to 86 meV. The observed dispersions are reproduced by a simple model with three nearest-neighbor-exchange integrals between 16 a (octahedral) and 24 d (tetrahedral) sites, Ja a, Ja d, and Jd d, which are estimated to be 0.00 ±0.05 , -2.90 ±0.07 , and -0.35 ±0.08 meV, respectively. The lowest-energy dispersion below 14 meV exhibits a quadratic dispersion as expected from ferromagnetic magnons. The imaginary part of q -integrated dynamical spin susceptibility χ″(E ) exhibits a square-root energy dependence at low energies. The magnon density of state is estimated from χ″(E ) obtained on an absolute scale. The value is consistent with the single chirality mode for the magnon branch expected theoretically.

  20. Experimental studies of the critical scattering of neutrons for large scattering vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciszewski, R.

    1972-01-01

    The most recent results concerned with the critical scattering of neutrons are reviewed. The emphasis is on the so-called thermal shift, that is the shift of the main maximum in the intensity of critically scattered neutrons with temperature changes. Four theories of this phenomenon are described and their shortcomings are shown. It has been concluded that the situation is involved at present and needs further theoretical and experimental study. (S.B.)

  1. Rheological profiling of organogels prepared at critical gelling concentrations of natural waxes in a triacylglycerol solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok R; Babaahmadi, Mehrnoosh; Lesaffer, Ans; Dewettinck, Koen

    2015-05-20

    The aim of this study was to use a detailed rheological characterization to gain new insights into the gelation behavior of natural waxes. To make a comprehensive case, six natural waxes (differing in the relative proportion of chemical components: hydrocarbons, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, and wax esters) were selected as organogelators to gel high-oleic sunflower oil. Flow and dynamic rheological properties of organogels prepared at critical gelling concentrations (Cg) of waxes were studied and compared using drag (stress ramp and steady flow) and oscillatory shear (stress and frequency sweeps) tests. Although, none of the organogels satisfied the rheological definition of a "strong gel" (G″/G' (ω) ≤ 0.1), on comparing the samples, the strongest gel (highest critical stress and dynamic, apparent, and static yield stresses) was obtained not with wax containing the highest proportion of wax esters alone (sunflower wax, SFW) but with wax containing wax esters along with a higher proportion of fatty alcohols (carnauba wax, CRW) although at a comparatively higher Cg (4%wt for latter compared to 0.5%wt for former). As expected, gel formation by waxes containing a high proportion of lower melting fatty acids (berry, BW, and fruit wax, FW) required a comparatively higher Cg (6 and 7%wt, respectively), and in addition, these gels showed the lowest values for plateau elastic modulus (G'LVR) and a prominent crossover point at higher frequency. The gelation temperatures (TG'=G″) for all the studied gels were lower than room temperature, except for SFW and CRW. The yielding-type behavior of gels was evident, with most gels showing strong shear sensitivity and a weak thixotropic recovery. The rheological behavior was combined with the results of thermal analysis and microstructure studies (optical, polarized, and cryo-scanning electron microscopy) to explain the gelation properties of these waxes.

  2. Neutrons scattering studies in the actinide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kegel, G.H.R.; Egan, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    During the report period were investigated the following areas: prompt fission neutron energy spectra measurements; neutron elastic and inelastic scattering from 239 Pu; neutron scattering in 181 Ta and 197 Au; response of a 235 U fission chamber near reaction thresholds; two-parameter data acquisition system; ''black'' neutron detector; investigation of neutron-induced defects in silicon dioxide; and multiple scattering corrections. Four Ph.D. dissertations and one M.S. thesis were completed during the report period. Publications consisted of three journal articles, four conference papers in proceedings, and eleven abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. There are currently four Ph.D. and one M.S. candidates working on dissertations directly associated with the project. In addition, three other Ph.D. candidates are working on dissertations involving other aspects of neutron physics in this laboratory

  3. Nest wax triggers worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottler-Hoermann, Ann-Marie; Schulz, Stefan; Ayasse, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Social insects are well known for their high level of cooperation. Workers of the primitively eusocial bumblebee Bombus terrestris are able to produce male offspring in the presence of a queen. Nonetheless, they only compete for reproduction, in the so-called competition phase, when the workforce is large enough to support the rearing of reproductives. So far, little is known about the proximate mechanisms underlying the shift between altruism and selfish behaviour in bumblebee workers. In this study, we have examined the influence of chemical cues from the nest wax on the onset of worker reproduction. Chemical analyses of wax extracts have revealed that the patterns and amounts of cuticular lipids change considerably during colony development. These changes in wax scent mirror worker abundance and the presence of fertile workers. In bioassays with queen-right worker groups, wax affects the dominance behaviour and ovarian development of workers. When exposed to wax from a colony in competition phase, workers start to compete for reproduction. We suggest that wax scent enables workers to time their reproduction by providing essential information concerning the social condition of the colony.

  4. Phototransformation of the herbicide sulcotrione on maize cuticular wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Halle, Alexandra; Drncova, Daniela; Richard, Claire

    2006-05-01

    Vegetation plays a key role in environmental cycling and the fate of many organic pollutants. This is especially the case for pesticides because plant leaves are their first reaction environment after application. It is commonly accepted that photochemical reactions of pollutants on plants predominantly take place in the cuticular wax coating of the leaves. Thus, we used films made of either cuticular wax extracted from maize or carnauba gray wax as a model support. Under simulated sunlight irradiation, sulcotrione (a new class of triketone herbicides) sorbed on cuticular wax films was photolyzed and mainly underwent an intramolecular cyclization. The photoproduct is a chromone derivative which was isolated and fully characterized. It is reported for the first time as a sulcotrione degradation product. The photoreactivity of formulated sulcotrione at the surface of cuticular waxes was investigated too. It photodegraded more rapidly than nonformulated sulcotrione. This study also shows that the rate of sulcotrione photolysis was much faster than the rate of penetration into the wax; photolysis should be, thus, a relevant process in real conditions.

  5. Neutron scattering studies of the heavy Fermion superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Recent neutron scattering measurements of the heavy Fermion superconductors are described. Those materials offer an exciting opportunity for neutron scattering since the f-electrons, which couple directly to magnetic scattering measurements, seem to be the same electrons which form the superconducting state below T/sub c/. In addition, studies of the magnetic fluctuations in these, and other heavy Fermion systems, by inelastic magnetic neutron scattering can provide information about the nature of the low temperature Fermi liquid character of these novel compounds

  6. Electron scattering studies by means of various nuclear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essaniyazov, Sh.; Juraev, Sh.; Ismatov, E.I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Let us consider a general case of various interaction processes of electrons with nuclei. The study of the scattering o electrons of nuclei is the source of information on the structure of nuclei. At collision of fast electrons with nuclei, both elastic and inelastic scattering can be observed. Elastic scattering gives information on the sizes of nuclei, whereas the electrons inelastic scattering processes give important information on the dynamical properties of nuclei. In the first case, the characteristics of excited states, energy levels, their widths and others, and in the second case, momentum distribution of nucleons and other particles in nuclei are studied. Let us denote the momentum and the energy of the incident electron before and after the scattering as k and ε, and k' and ε', respectively. The angle between the vectors k and k' is denoted as θ. The scattering process is characterized by three parameters: k, k' and θ. However, it is convenient to introduce three other parameters instead of the indicated above. They are: energy ω ε - ε' and momentum q = k - k', transferred by electron at scattering, and the scattering angle θ. It is worth of mentioning the two reasons why the study of electron scattering is very effective tool to study the nuclear structure. First of all, the character of electron interaction with nucleus is a well-known electromagnetic interaction of electron with current and charge in nucleus. Secondly, this interaction is relatively weak (e 2 /ℎc) 2 = ω 2 is possible (since the photon mass is zero). In case of electrons, at fixed energy transfer ω various momentum transfer are possible. Therefore, at electron scattering study one can establish the dependence of the matrix elements of q, which are the Fourier-representations of the charge and current densities. Thus, it is possible to determine directly the spatial distribution of charge and current in nucleus. The inelastic scattering is accompanied by

  7. 21 CFR 582.1978 - Carnauba wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carnauba wax. 582.1978 Section 582.1978 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1978 Carnauba wax. (a) Product. Carnauba wax. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  8. Surface magnetism studied by polarized light emission after He+ scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manske, J; Dirska, M; Lubinski, G; Schleberger, M; Narmann, A; Hoekstra, R

    Surface magnetism is studied by means of an ion beam of low energy (2-15 keV) scattered off the surface under grazing incidence conditions. During the scattering, a small fraction of the ions is neutralized into excited states which decay subsequently by light emission. The circular polarization of

  9. Effect of local hemostatics on bone induction in rats: a comparative study of bone wax, fibrin-collagen paste, and bioerodible polyorthoester with and without gentamicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solheim, E; Pinholt, E M; Bang, G

    1992-01-01

    Local hemostatics for osseous tissue should preferably be absorbable and biocompatible and should not inhibit osteogenesis. The tissue response and effect on demineralized bone-induced heterotopic osteogenesis in the abdominal muscle of 120 male Wistar rats by different local hemostatics were...... evaluated by light microscopy and 85Sr uptake analyses. Non-absorbable bone wax of 88% beeswax and absorbable bovine fibrin-collagen paste both significantly inhibited osteoinduction, whereas a bioerodible polyorthoester drug delivery system with or without 4% gentamicin did not. Bone wax was not absorbed...

  10. Comparative evaluation of marginal fit and axial wall adaptability of copings fabricated by metal laser sintering and lost-wax technique: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Bhushan Satish; Nazirkar, Girish; Dable, Rajani; Singh, Shailendra

    2018-01-01

    The present study aims to compare and evaluate the marginal fit and axial wall adaptability of Co-Cr copings fabricated by metal laser sintering (MLS) and lost-wax (LW) techniques using a stereomicroscope. A stainless steel master die assembly was fabricated simulating a prepared crown; 40 replicas of master die were fabricated in gypsum type IV and randomly divided in two equal groups. Group A coping was fabrication by LW technique and the Group B coping fabrication by MLS technique. The copings were seated on their respective gypsum dies and marginal fit was measured using stereomicroscope and image analysis software. For evaluation of axial wall adaptability, the coping and die assembly were embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin and sectioned vertically. The discrepancies between the dies and copings were measured along the axial wall on each halves. The data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t -test. The mean values of marginal fit for copings in Group B (MLS) were lower (24.6 μm) than the copings in Group A (LW) (39.53 μm), and the difference was statistically significant ( P adaptability in comparison with copings fabricated by the LW technique. However, the values of marginal fit of copings fabricated that the two techniques were within the clinically acceptable limit (<50 μm).

  11. Wines: water inelastic neutron scattering experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risch, P.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; D'hondt, P.; Malabu, E.

    1997-01-01

    An intercomparison of calculated fast neutron flux (E > 1 MeV) traverse through a very thick water zone obtained using both S N , (DORT) and Monte-Carlo (TRIPOLI and MCBEND) codes in combination with different cross-sections libraries (based on ENDF/B-III, IV, V and VI), showed small discrepancies either between S N , and Monte-Carlo results or even between S N , or Monte-Carlo results when we consider different cross-sections libraries except for S N , calculation when using P 0 , cross-sections. In order to validate our calculations we looked for experimental data. Unfortunately no experiment, dedicated for the fast neutron transport in large thickness of water, was found in the literature. Therefore SCK-CEN and EDF decided to launch the WINES experiment which is dedicated to study this phenomenon. WINES sands for Water Inelastic Neutron scattering Experimental Study. The aim of this experiment is to provide-experimental data for validation of neutron transport codes and nuclear cross-sections libraries used for LWR surveillance dosimetry analysis. The experimental device is made of 1 m 3 cubic plexiglass container filled with demineralized water. At one face of this cube, a 235 U neutron fission source system is screwed. The source device is made of a 235 U (93 % weight enriched) 18.55 x 16 cm 2 plate cladded with aluminium which is inserted in neutron beam emerging from the graphite gas-cooled BR1 reactor. Fission chambers ( 238 U(n,f), 232 Th(n,f), 237 Np(n,f) and 235 U(n,f)) are used to measure the flux traverses on the central axis of the water cube perpendicular to the fission sources. In this paper we will compare the experimental data to the calculated results using the S N , transport code DORT with the P 3 , ELXSIR library, based on ENDF/B-V, and the P 7 -BUGLE-93 library, based on ENDF/B-VI as well as the Monte-Carlo transport code TRIPOLI with a cross-section library based on ENDF/B IV and ENDF/B-VI. (authors)

  12. Characterization and chemical composition of epicuticular wax from banana leaves grown in Northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Suporn Charumanee; Songwut Yotsawimonwat; Panee Sirisa-ard; Kiatisak Pholsongkram

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the physicochemical properties and chemical composition of epicuticular wax extracted from leaves of Kluai Namwa, a banana cultivar which is widely grown in Northern Thailand. Its genotype was identified by a botanist. The wax was extracted using solvent extraction. The fatty acid profiles and physicochemical properties of the wax namely melting point, congealing point, crystal structures and polymorphism, hardness, color, and solubility were examin...

  13. A Neutron Scattering Study of Collective Excitations in Superfluid Helium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, E. H.; Minkiewicz, V. J.; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1974-01-01

    Extensive inelastic-neutron-scattering experiments have been performed on superfluid helium over a wide range of energy and momentum transfers. A high-resolution study has been made of the pressure dependence of the single-excitation scattering at the first maximum of the dispersion curve over...... of the multiexcitation scattering was also studied. It is shown that the multiphonon spectrum of a simple Debye solid with the phonon dispersion and single-excitation cross section of superfluid helium qualitatively reproduces these data....

  14. BIOLOGICAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL STUDIES ON THE HAEMOCYTES OF F1 LARVAE OF THE GAMMA IRRADIATED GREAT WAX MOTH PUPAE GALLERIA MELLONELLA (L.) (LEPIDOPTERA : GAELLERIDAE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-KHOLY, E.M.S.; EL-NAGGAR, S.E.M.; ABD EL-AZIZ, N.M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out on the full grown male pupae of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella L., when irradiated with 100, 150, 300 and 400 Gray of gamma radiation. Two groups of newly moulted 4 th instar larvae were set up, each group consisted of 50 larvae. The first group was exposed in the pupal stage to 100 Gy and the second with 150 Gy then the larval haemolymph was collected. Also, a control group of 50 larvae (non-irradiated) was investigated. The morphological changes in the irradiated blood cells, as compared to the control, were examined using the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Vacuolization of cytoplasm, disorganization and swelling of mitochondria were appeared. The biological effects of gamma irradiation of the parental male pupae on the reproduction of adult moths when treated males were mated with normal females (male line) and when normal males were mated with treated females (female line) were studied. The latent biological effects of four gamma doses (100, 150, 300 and 400 Gy) on the F1 generation showed that the average number of eggs per mated female, the percentage of egg hatch and the percent of mating were gradually reduced when the given gamma dose to male parents was increased at all treatments (male and female lines). The reduction in the fecundity and the percentage of egg hatch among female line pairings (females descendant of irradiated parental male pupae) was reduced than that among male line pairings (males descendant of irradiated parental male pupae) with increasing the gamma dose

  15. Annual report on neutron scattering studies in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masatoshi; Nishi, Masakazu; Fujishita, Hideshi; Iizumi, Masashi

    1982-07-01

    Neutron scattering studies carried out from September 1979 to August 1981 by Division of Physics, JAERI, and universities with JRR-2 and -3 neutron beam facilities are described: 61 summary reports, and a list of publications. (author)

  16. Structural-mechanical model of wax crystal networks—a mesoscale cellular solid approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Yukihiro; Marangoni, Alejandro G

    2014-01-01

    Mineral waxes are widely used materials in industrial applications; however, the relationship between structure and mechanical properties is poorly understood. In this work, mineral wax-oil networks were characterized as closed-cell cellular solids, and differences in their mechanical response predicted from structural data. The systems studied included straight-chain paraffin wax (SW)-oil mixtures and polyethylene wax (PW)-oil mixtures. Analysis of cryogenic-SEM images of wax-oil networks allowed for the determination of the length (l) and thickness (t) of the wax cell walls as a function of wax mass fraction (Φ). A linear relationship between t/l and Φ (t/l ∼ Φ 0.89 ) suggested that wax-oil networks were cellular solids of the closed-cell type. However, the scaling behavior of the elastic modulus with the volume fraction of solids did not agree with theoretical predictions, yielding the same scaling exponent, μ = 0.84, for both waxes. This scaling exponent obtained from mechanical measurements could be predicted from the scaling behavior of the effective wax cell size as a function of wax mass fraction in oil obtained by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy. Microscopy studies allowed us to propose that wax-oil networks are structured as an ensemble of close-packed spherical cells filled with oil, and that it is the links between cells that yield under simple uniaxial compression. Thus, the Young’s moduli for the links between cells in SW and PW wax systems could be estimated as E L (SW) = 2.76 × 10 9 Pa and E L (PW) = 1.64 × 10 9 Pa, respectively. The structural parameter responsible for the observed differences in the mechanical strength between the two wax-oil systems is the size of the cells. Polyethylene wax has much smaller cell sizes than the straight chain wax and thus displays a higher Young’s modulus and yield stress. (papers)

  17. Light scattering studies of solids and atomic vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, T.C.

    1978-09-01

    The general technique of light scattering and luminescence was used to study the properties of a number of material systems. First, multi-phonon resonant Raman scattering up to four phonons in GaSe and one- and two-phonon resonant Raman scattering in the mixed GaS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/ crystals with x 2 is reported. The result is used to determine the position of the direct gap of HfS 2 . Third, the first observation of the π-polarized one-magnon luminescence sideband of the 4 T/sub lg/ ( 4 G) → 6 A/sub lg/( 6 S) excitonic transition in antiferromagnetic MnF 2 is presented. An effective temperature of the crystal is deduced from the simultaneously observed anti-Stokes sideband emission. Multi-magnon ( 2 , KMnF 2 , and RbMnF 3 using pulsed excitation and detection. A simple model based on two-ion local exchange is proposed to explain the results qualitatively. Fourth, the first observation of two-magnon resonant Raman scattering in MnF 2 around the magnon sidebands is reported. A simple theoretical description explains the experimental observations. Fifth, a detailed theory of exciton-exciton interaction in MnF 2 is developed to explain and to predict the experimental results on two-exciton absorption, high level excitation, and exciton--exciton scattering. Sixth, Brillouin scattering was used to obtain the five independent elastic constants of the layered compound GaSe. The results show clear elastic anisotropy of the crystal. Resonant Brillouin scattering near the absorption edge was also studied, but no resonant enhancement was found. Seventh, two-photon parametric scattering in sodium vapor was studied. Phase matching angles and scattering cross sections are calculated for a given set of experimental conditions

  18. The dynamics of physisorbed layers studied by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, M.; McTague, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    We discuss the neutron scattering technique applied to the study of adsorbed thin films. Despite the fact that neutrons are scattered very weakly by surfaces, recent studies have shown that both structural and dynamical information can be obtained even for submonolayer coverages. Results will be shown for films of Ar, D 2 , H 2 , and O 2 adsorbed on (001) surfaces of graphite and for H 2 molecules adsorbed on activated alumina. (orig.) [de

  19. X-ray scattering studies of surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Here we shall briefly review the basics and some applications of x-ray specular reflectivity and diffuse scattering techniques. These x-ray scattering techniques are uniquely suited to study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces at atomic resolutions as they are nondestructive and can probe even interfaces which are buried. The study of structure of surfaces and interfaces is not only required in understanding physics in reduced dimensions but is also essential in developing technologically important materials

  20. Resonance magnetic x-ray scattering study of erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanyal, M.K.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, J.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic phases of erbium have been studied by resonance x-ray-scattering techniques. When the incident x-ray energy is tuned near the L(III) absorption edge, large resonant enhancements of the magnetic scattering are observed above 18 K. We have measured the energy and polarization dependence...... of this magnetic scattering and analyzed it using a simple model based on electric dipole and quadrupole transitions among atomic orbitals. The line shapes can be fitted to a magnetic structure combining both c-axis-modulated and basal-plane components. Below 18 K, we have observed unusual behavior of the magnetic...

  1. Presence of carotinoids in peat wax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurkevich, E.A.; Dolidovich, E.F.; Bel' kevich, P.I.; Sheremet, L.S.; Drozdovskaya, S.V.

    1986-05-01

    Discusses biologically active substances present in peat which have various pharmacological properties. Describes separation of fractions rich in carotinoids from extracts of wax tar obtained by benzine treatment of highly decomposed pine-cotton grass peat. Extraction was carried out using hot ethanol. States that although identification of individual carotinoid in the fractions separated is very difficult due to complicity of composition, the tests carried out made it possible to infer that fractions studied contain not only xanthophylls but also fucoxanthains (formed in small amounts in nature) with fairly stable structure. Ultraviolet and infrared spectra of the carotinoid containing fraction in ethanol extracts are given. 6 refs.

  2. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of Mn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Y.; Sarachik, M.P.; Friedman, J.R.; Robinson, R.A.; Kelley, T.M.; Nakotte, H.; Christianson, A.C.; Trouw, F.; Aubin, S.M.J.; Hendrickson, D.N.

    1998-11-09

    The authors report zero-field inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a 14-gram deuterated sample of Mn{sub 12}-Acetate consisting of a large number of identical spin-10 magnetic clusters. Their resolution enables them to see a series of peaks corresponding to transitions between the anisotropy levels within the spin-10 manifold. A fit to the spin Hamiltonian H = {minus}DS{sub z}{sup 2} + {mu}{sub B}B{center_dot}g{center_dot}S-BS{sub z}{sup 4} + C(S{sub +}{sup 4} + S{sub {minus}}{sup 4}) yields an anisotropy constant D = (0.54 {+-} 0.02) K and a fourth-order diagonal anisotropy coefficient B = (1.2 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup {minus}3}K. Unlike EPR measurements, their experiments do not require a magnetic field and yield parameters that do not require knowledge of the g-value.

  3. Nano-crystal growth in cordierite glass ceramics studied with X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bras, Wim; Clark, Simon M.; Greaves, G. N.; Kunz, Martin; van Beek, W.; Radmilovic, V.

    2009-01-16

    The development of monodisperse crystalline particles in cordierite glass doped with Cr3+ after a two-step heat treatment is elucidated by a combination of time-resolved small and wide angle x-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) experiments with electron microscopy. The effects of bulk and surface crystallization can clearly be distinguished, and the crystallization kinetics of the bulk phase is characterized. The internal pressure due to structural differences between the crystalline and amorphous phase is measured but the physical cause of this pressure can not unambiguously be attributed. The combined measurements comprise a nearly full characterization of the crystallization processes and the resulting sample morphology.

  4. Small-angle X-ray scattering documents the growth of metal-organic frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, I.; Juan-Alcañiz, J.; Martinez-Joaristi, A.; Petukhov, A.V.; Kapteijn, F.; Gascon, J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a combined in situ small- and wide-angle scattering (SAXS/WAXS) study on the crystallization of two topical metal-organic frameworks synthesized from similar metal and organic precursors: NH2-MIL-53(Al) and NH2-MIL-101(Al). A thorough analysis of SAXS data reveals the most important

  5. Modeling of asphaltene and wax precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, F.; Sarathi, P.; Jones, R.

    1991-01-01

    This research project was designed to focus on the development of a predictive technique for organic deposition during gas injection for petroleum EOR. A thermodynamic model has been developed to describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on asphaltene precipitation. The proposed model combines regular solution theory with Flory-Huggins polymer solutions theory to predict maximum volume fractions of asphaltene dissolved in oil. The model requires evaluation of vapor-liquid equilibria, first using an equation of state followed by calculations of asphaltene solubility in the liquid-phase. A state-of-the-art technique for C{sub 7+} fraction characterization was employed in developing this model. The preliminary model developed in this work was able to predict qualitatively the trends of the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition. Since the mechanism of paraffinic wax deposition is different from that of asphaltene deposition, another thermodynamic model based on the solid-liquid solution theory was developed to predict the wax formation. This model is simple and can predict the wax appearance temperature with reasonable accuracy. Accompanying the modeling work, experimental studies were conducted to investigate the solubility of asphaltene in oil land solvents and to examine the effects of oil composition, CO{sub 2}, and solvent on asphaltene precipitation and its properties. This research focused on the solubility reversibility of asphaltene in oil and the precipitation caused by CO{sub 2} injection at simulated reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. These experiments have provided many observations about the properties of asphaltenes for further improvement of the model, but more detailed information about the properties of asphaltenes in solution is needed for the development of more reliable asphaltene characterization techniques. 50 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Content of Wax during Dewaxing Process: Adopting a DOE Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Eghbali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The oil content of the wax produced in a dewaxing process is the key economic parameter that should be reduced as much as possible. Some factors such as the type of solvents, cooling rate, temperature, and solvent to oil ratio influence the dewaxing process. Due to the fact that crude oil differs from place to place and since the operational conditions for wax extraction vary for different types of crude oil, the objective of this work is to study the operational conditions for wax production from an Iranian raffinate sample used in Sepahan Oil Company. All the experiments are conducted based on a design of experiment (DOE technique for minimizing the oil content of the wax produced. The effects of five factors have been determined quantitatively and appropriate levels are suggested for reducing the oil content. The results show that the solvent ratio, solvent composition, and cooling rate play the most important role in minimizing the oil content of the produced wax.

  7. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF

  8. Raman scattering study of filled skutterudite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, N; Kojima, R; Hasegawa, T; Takasu, Y; Udagawa, M; Kondo, T; Takeda, N; Ikeno, T; Ishikawa, K; Sugawara, H; Kikuchi, D; Sato, H; Sekine, C; Shirotani, I

    2007-01-01

    Raman scattering of skutterudite compounds RT 4 X 12 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm and Yb, T=Fe, Ru and Os, X=P and Sb) have been measured. All first-order Raman active phonons are observed and are assigned as the pnicogen vibrations. At the low energy region, the second-order phonons, due to the vibration of the rare earth ions with a flat phonon dispersion, are observed in the spectra of RRu 4 P 12 (R=La and Sm) and ROs 4 Sb 12 (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm). The appearance of the second-order phonons in the spectra is caused by an anharmonic vibrations of rare earth ions in large cage space and a large density of state due to the flat phonon dispersion. However, in spite of the similar cage space, the 2nd-order phonons are hardly observed for RFe 4 Sb 12 and RRu 4 Sb 12 . Thus, these results suggest that the dynamics of the rare earth ion is closely related to not only the cage size but also the electronic state due to the transition metals. Raman spectra of PrRu 4 P 12 show the drastic spectral change due to the metal-insulator transition. The phonon spectra and crystal field excitations due to the structural change have been assigned above and below the transition temperature

  9. Studies of Water by Scattering of Slow Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoeld, K.; Pilcher, E.; Larsson, K.E.

    1964-01-01

    The quasielastic scattering peak in light water at room temperature has been studied with neutrons of energy ∼ 5x10 -3 eV. The width and shape of the peak has been determined by the time-of-flight technique at two scattering angles. If it is assumed that the broad inelastic spectrum is due to scattering by a monoatomic gas of mass 18, it is found that the quasielastic scattering is in good agreement with the predictions by the continuous diffusion model. Inelastic spectra were recorded up to 13x10 -3 eV. Indications of two discrete energy transfers (8 and 14x10 -4 eV) are observed in the 90 deg run. The results are discussed and compared with earlier observations

  10. ANGULAR LIGHT-SCATTERING STUDIES ON ISOLATED MITOCHONDRIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotterer, Gerald S.; Thompson, Thomas E.; Lehninger, Albert L.

    1961-01-01

    Angular light-scattering studies have been carried out on suspensions of isolated rat liver mitochondria. The angular scatter pattern has a large forward component, typical of large particles. Changes in dissymmetry and in the intensity of light scattered at 90° have been correlated with changes in optical density during the course of mitochondrial swelling and contraction. Such changes can be measured at mitochondrial concentrations much below those required for optical density measurements. Changes in mitochondrial geometry caused by factors "leaking" from mitochondria, not detectable by optical density measurements, have been demonstrated by measuring changes in dissymmetry. Angular light-scattering measurements therefore offer the advantages of increased sensitivity and of added indices of changes in mitochondrial conformation. PMID:19866589

  11. Studies of Water by Scattering of Slow Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoeld, K; Pilcher, E; Larsson, K E

    1964-01-15

    The quasielastic scattering peak in light water at room temperature has been studied with neutrons of energy {approx} 5x10{sup -3} eV. The width and shape of the peak has been determined by the time-of-flight technique at two scattering angles. If it is assumed that the broad inelastic spectrum is due to scattering by a monoatomic gas of mass 18, it is found that the quasielastic scattering is in good agreement with the predictions by the continuous diffusion model. Inelastic spectra were recorded up to 13x10{sup -3} eV. Indications of two discrete energy transfers (8 and 14x10{sup -4} eV) are observed in the 90 deg run. The results are discussed and compared with earlier observations.

  12. Study of scattering in bi-dimensional neutron radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, K.A.M. de; Crispim, V.R.; Silva, F.C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of neutron scattering frequently causes distortions in neutron radiographic images and, thus, reduces the quality. In this project, a type of filter, comprised of cadmium (a neutron absorber), was used in the form of a grid to correct this effect. This device generated image data in the discrete shadow bands of the absorber, components relative to neutron scattering on the test object and surroundings. Scattering image data processing, together with the original neutron radiographic image, resulted in a corrected image with improved edge delineation and, thus, greater definition in the neutron radiographic image of the test object. The objective of this study is to propose a theoretical/experimental methodology that is capable of eliminating the components relative to neutron scattering in neutron radiographic images, coming from the material that composes the test object and the materials that compose the surrounding area. (author)

  13. 21 CFR 186.1555 - Japan wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Japan wax. 186.1555 Section 186.1555 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1555 Japan wax. (a) Japan wax (CAS Reg. No. 8001-39-6), also known as Japan... fruits of the oriental sumac, Rhus succedanea (Japan, Taiwan, and Indo-China), R. vernicifera (Japan...

  14. Electron scattering studies of nitrogen dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Dhanoj; Naghma, Rahla [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004, Jharkhand (India); Vinodkumar, Minaxi [V. P. and R. P. T. P. Science College, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388120, Gujarat (India); Antony, Bobby, E-mail: bka.ism@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826004, Jharkhand (India)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Two quantum mechanical models used to find TCS for e-NO{sub 2} from 0.5 to 2000 eV. •R-matrix method at low energies (<15 eV) and SCOP at high energies (16 to 2000 eV). •Besides CS, R-matrix method predicts resonances and possibility of DEA formation. •SCOP formalism is used to find total inelastic and elastic CS at high energies. •Resonances detected at 1.33, 3 and 8.41 eV is associated with O{sup −} anion formation by DEA. -- Abstract: Present work reports total cross sections for e-NO{sub 2} scattering over an extensive range of impact energy from 0.5 eV to 2000 eV, through a composite formalism. The ab initio R-matrix method is employed for calculations up to 15 eV while the spherical complex optical potential formalism is used beyond that energy. The electronic excitation cross sections are computed from ground state X{sup 2}A{sub 1} to seven electronically allowed excited states {sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}B{sub 2}, {sup 2}A{sub 2}, {sup 4}A{sub 2}, {sup 4}B{sub 2}, {sup 4}A{sub 1}, {sup 4}A{sub 1} and {sup 4}B{sub 1}. The eigenphase diagrams presented here reproduces the resonances identified earlier. The structures detected at 1.33, 3 and 8.41 eV can be associated with the observed O{sup −} anion formation through dissociative electron attachment process.

  15. Studies on biological macromolecules by neutron inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Satoru; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Neutron inelastic scattering techniques, including quasielastic and elastic incoherent neutron scattering, provide unique tools to directly measure the protein dynamics at a picosecond time scale. Since the protein dynamics at this time scale is indispensable to the protein functions, elucidation of the protein dynamics is indispensable for ultimate understanding of the protein functions. There are two complementary directions of the protein dynamics studies: one is to explore the physical basis of the protein dynamics using 'model' proteins, and the other is more biology-oriented. Examples of the studies on the protein dynamics with neutron inelastic scattering are described. The examples of the studies in the former direction include the studies on the dynamical transitions of the proteins, the relationship between the protein dynamics and the hydration water dynamics, and combined analysis of the protein dynamics with molecular dynamics simulation. The examples of the studies in the latter direction include the elastic incoherent and quasielastic neutrons scattering studies of actin. Future prospects of the studies on the protein dynamics with neutron scattering are briefly described. (author)

  16. Synthesis of oleyl oleate wax esters in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iven, Tim; Hornung, Ellen; Heilmann, Mareike; Feussner, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Seed oil composed of wax esters with long-chain monoenoic acyl moieties represents a high-value commodity for industry. Such plant-derived sperm oil-like liquid wax esters are biodegradable and can have excellent properties for lubrication. In addition, wax ester oil may represent a superior substrate for biodiesel production. In this study, we demonstrate that the low-input oil seed crop Camelina sativa can serve as a biotechnological platform for environmentally benign wax ester production. Two biosynthetic steps catalysed by a fatty alcohol-forming acyl-CoA reductase (FAR) and a wax ester synthase (WS) are sufficient to achieve wax ester accumulation from acyl-CoA substrates. To produce plant-derived sperm oil-like liquid wax esters, the WS from Mus musculus (MmWS) or Simmondsia chinensis (ScWS) were expressed in combination with the FAR from Mus musculus (MmFAR1) or Marinobacter aquaeolei (MaFAR) in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa. The three analysed enzyme combinations Oleo3:mCherry:MmFAR1∆c/Oleo3:EYFP:MmWS, Oleo3:mCherry:MmFAR1∆c/ScWS and MaFAR/ScWS showed differences in the wax ester molecular species profiles and overall biosynthetic performance. By expressing MaFAR/ScWS in Arabidopsis or Camelina up to 59% or 21% of the seed oil TAGs were replaced by wax esters, respectively. This combination also yielded wax ester molecular species with highest content of monounsaturated acyl moieties. Expression of the enzyme combinations in the Arabidopsis fae1 fad2 mutant background high in oleic acid resulted in wax ester accumulation enriched in oleyl oleate (18:1/18:1 > 60%), suggesting that similar values may be obtained with a Camelina high oleic acid line. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Preliminary evaluation of an aqueous wax emulsion for controlled-release coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, P S; Stout, P J; Turton, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the use of an aqueous carnauba wax emulsion (Primafresh HS, Johnson Wax) in a spray-coating process. This involved assessing the effectiveness of the wax in sustaining the release of the drug, theophylline. Second, the process by which the drug was released from the wax-coated pellets was modeled. Finally, a method to determine the optimum blend of pellets with different wax thicknesses, in order to yield a zero-order release profile of the drug, was addressed. Nonpareil pellets were loaded with theophylline using a novel powder coating technique. These drug-loaded pellets were then coated with different levels of carnauba wax in a 6-in. diameter Plexiglas fluid bed with a 3.5-in. diameter Wurster partition. Drug release was measured using a spin-filter dissolution device. The study resulted in continuous carnauba wax coatings which showed sustained drug release profile characteristics typical of a barrier-type, diffusion-controlled system. The effect of varying wax thickness on the release profiles was investigated. It was observed that very high wax loadings would be required to achieve long sustained-release times. The diffusion model, developed to predict the release of the drug, showed good agreement with the experimental data. However, the data exhibited an initial lag-time for drug release which could not be predicted a priori based on the wax coating thickness. A method of mixing pellets with different wax thicknesses was proposed as a way to approximate zero-order release.

  18. Morphology and accumulation of epicuticular wax on needles of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constance A. Harrington; William C. Carlson

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have documented differences in epicuticular wax among several tree species but little attention has been paid to changes in accumulation of foliar wax that can occur during the year. We sampled current-year needles from the terminal shoots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) in late June/early...

  19. Real time X-ray scattering study of the formation of ZnS nanoparticles using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rath, T.; Novák, J.; Amenitsch, H.; Pein, A.; Maier, E.; Haas, W.; Hofer, F.; Trimmel, G.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the growth of ZnS nanoparticles by a real-time simultaneous small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS) study using synchrotron radiation. Zinc chloride and elemental sulfur were dissolved in oleylamine. The formation of nanoparticles was induced by heating to 170 °C and 215 °C. The influence of temperature, reaction time, and sulfur concentration was investigated. After a short phase of rapid growth, saturation in size and a slower growth is observed depending on the temperature. The final size of the nanoparticles ranges between 2 and 6 nm for the investigated growth conditions and increases with the reaction temperature and sulfur concentration. SAXS analysis allows for determination of the size of the nanoparticles and proves also the existence of an organized layer of oleylamine molecules covering the nanoparticles' surfaces, which, however, appears only for diameters of the nanoparticles larger than approximately 2.8 nm. The investigation of the measured structure factor of the nanoparticle assemblies showed that the distance of an attractive interaction is 2.5 nm, which was interpreted as a consequence of the ordered oleylamine surface layer. - Highlights: • ZnS nanoparticle growth is investigated by real-time simultaneous SAXS and WAXS measurements. • Nanoparticle growth can be divided into two growth phases. • Higher reaction temperature or higher surplus of sulfur leads to larger nanoparticles. • Post-growth ex situ XRD and TEM measurements confirm results of the in situ study. • Nanoparticles are surrounded by a 2.6 nm thick ordered shell of oleylamine

  20. Physical properties of beeswax, sunflower wax, and candelilla wax mixtures and organogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is increased interest in natural waxes as alternatives to partially hydrogenated oils and saturated fats as oil structuring agents. Using relatively low concentrations (0.5-5%), natural waxes are able to form crystalline networks, or organogels, which bind liquid oil. Each natural wax is uniqu...

  1. Surfactants from petroleum paraffin wax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, T.M.; Hussein, M.H.; El Sayed, A.S.

    Paraffin wax from Egyptian petroleum was purified and then oxidized to fatty acids which were esterified to form their methyl esters, fractionated and then hydrolysed. The obtained fatty acids were converted into the corresponding primary amines which were converted with ethylene oxide to form nonionic surfactants. The prepared primary amines were also converted into tertiary amines and then converted into cationic surfactants through condensation with benzyl chloride or 1-chloromethylnaphthalene. Also, amine oxide surfactants were prepared by oxidation of the tertiary amines with hydrogen peroxide. The surface active properties of all the prepared surfactants were determined, and the effect of their chemical structure on the surfactant properties are discussed in this paper.

  2. Changes in Cuticular Wax Composition of Two Blueberry Cultivars during Fruit Ripening and Postharvest Cold Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenjing; Gao, Haiyan; Chen, Hangjun; Wu, Weijie; Fang, Xiangjun

    2018-03-21

    Cuticular wax plays an important role for the quality of blueberry fruits. In this study, the cuticular wax composition of two blueberry cultivars, 'Legacy' ( Vaccinium corymbosum) and 'Brightwell' ( Vaccinium ashei), was examined during fruit ripening and postharvest cold storage. The results showed that wax was gradually deposited on the epidermis of blueberry fruits and the content of major wax compounds, except that for diketones, increased significantly during fruit ripening. The total wax content was 2-fold greater in 'Brightwell' blueberries than that in 'Legacy' blueberries during fruit ripening. The total wax content of both cultivars decreased during 30 days of storage at 4 °C, and the variation of cuticular wax composition was cultivar-dependent. The content of diketones decreased significantly in 'Legacy' blueberries, while the content of triterpenoids and aliphatic compounds showed different fold changes in 'Brightwell' blueberries after 30 days of storage at 4 °C. Overall, our study provided a quantitative and qualitative overview of cuticular wax compounds of blueberry fruits during ripening and postharvest cold storage.

  3. Radiological properties of a wax-gypsum compensator material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plessis, F.C.P. du; Willemse, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the radiological properties of a compensator material consisting of wax and gypsum is presented. Effective attenuation coefficients (EACs) have been determined from transmission measurements with an ion chamber in a Perspex phantom. Measurements were made at 80 and 100 cm source-to-skin distance (SSD) for beam energies of 6, 8, and 15 MV, for field sizes ranging from narrow beam geometries up to 40x40 cm 2 , and at measurement depths of maximum dose build-up, 5 and 10 cm. A parametrization equation could be constructed to predict the EAC values within 4% uncertainty as a function of field size and depth of measurement. The EAC dependence on off-axis position was also quantified at each beam energy and SSD. It was found that the compensator material reduced the required thickness for compensation by 26% at 8 MV when compared to pure paraffin wax for a 10x10 cm 2 field. Relative surface ionization (RSI) measurements have been made to quantify the effect of scattered electrons from the wax-gypsum compensator. Results indicated that for 80 cm SSD the RSI would exceed 50% for fields larger than 15x15 cm 2 . At 100 cm SSD the RSI values were below 50% for all field sizes used

  4. Physico-chemical properties and efficacy of silk fibroin fabric coated with different waxes as wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanokpanont, Sorada; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn; Ratanavaraporn, Juthamas; Aramwit, Pornanong

    2013-04-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) has been widely used as a wound dressing material due to its suitable physical and biological characteristics. In this study, a non-adhesive wound dressing which applies to cover the wound surface as an absorbent pad that would absorb wound fluid while accelerate wound healing was developed. The modification of SF fabrics by wax coating was purposed to prepare the non-adhesive wound dressing that is required in order to minimize pain and risk of repeated injury. SF woven fabrics were coated with different types of waxes including shellac wax, beeswax, or carnauba wax. Physical and mechanical properties of the wax-coated SF fabrics were characterized. It was clearly observed that all waxes could be successfully coated on the SF fabrics, possibly due to the hydrophobic interactions between hydrophobic domains of SF and waxes. The wax coating improved tensile modulus and percentage of elongation of the SF fabrics due to the denser structure and the thicker fibers coated. The in vitro degradation study demonstrated that all wax-coated SF fabrics remained up to 90% of their original weights after 7 weeks of incubation in lysozyme solution under physiological conditions. The wax coating did not affect the degradation behavior of the SF fabrics. A peel test of the wax-coated SF fabrics was carried out in the partial- and full-thickness wounds of porcine skin in comparison to that of the commercial wound dressing. Any wax-coated SF fabrics were less adhesive than the control, as confirmed by less number of cells attached and less adhesive force. This might be that the wax-coated SF fabrics showed the hydrophobic property, allowing the loosely adherence to the hydrophilic wound surface. In addition, the in vivo biocompatibility test of the wax-coated SF fabrics was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats with subcutaneous model. The irritation scores indicated that the carnauba wax-coated SF fabric was not irritant while the shellac wax or beeswax-coated SF

  5. An inelastic neutron scattering study of hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lefmann, K

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the magnetic dynamics in nanocrystalline hematite by inelastic neutron scattering at the high-resolution time-of-flight spectrometer IRIS at ISIS. Compared to previous inelastic neutron scattering experiments an improvement of the resolution function is achieved and more detailed...... moment at the antiferromagnetic Bragg reflection. We have studied different weightings of the particle size distribution. The data and their temperature dependence can with good agreement be interpreted on the basis of the Neel-Brown theory for superparamagnetic relaxation and a model for the collective...

  6. Aplikasi Wax Sebagai Salah Satu Material Di Bidang Kedokteran Gigi

    OpenAIRE

    Rika Jamilah Israwati Lubis

    2008-01-01

    Wax merupakan salah satu bahan termoplastik yang terdiri dari berbagai bahan organis dan bahan alami sehingga membuatnya sebagai bahan dengan sifat-sifat yang sangat berguna. Unsur-unsur pokok dental wax terdiri dari 3 suraber utama, yaitu : mineral, serangga (hewani), dan sayur-sayuran (tumbuh-tumbuhan). Wax yang berasal dari bahan mineral diantaranya adalah paraffin wax dan microcrystallin wax yang diperoleh dari hasil residu petroleum melalui proses destilasi. Wax yang berasal dari serangg...

  7. High vacuum general purpose scattering chamber for nuclear reaction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar; Ojha, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    To study the nuclear reactions induced by beam from medium energy accelerators, one of the most common facility required is a scattering chamber. In the scattering chamber, projectile collides with the target nucleus and the scattered reaction products are detected with various type of nuclear detector at different angles with respect to the beam. The experiments are performed under high vacuum to minimize the background reaction and the energy losses of the charged particles. To make the chamber general purpose various requirement of the experiments are incorporated into it. Changing of targets, changing angle of various detectors while in vacuum are the most desired features. The other features like ascertaining the beam spot size and position on the target, minimizing the background counts by proper beam dump, accurate positioning of the detector as per plan etc. are some of the important requirements

  8. Study of the electrons elastic scattering by atoms through pseudopotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettega, M.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudopotentials allow an extraordinary simplification in the calculation of the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and crystals. Though they have been used extensively for electronic structure calculations, little is known of their applicability to scattering. A study of the pseudopotentials of Bachelet, Hamann and Schuter in the electron scattering by atoms was made, calculating phase-shifts and cross sections for angular momenta 1=0,1 and 2 and energy up to 5 R y. The results for the pseudopotential were compared all-electron calculations. The agreement is very good in a broad energy band. A simplification of the calculation of scattering by complex molecules where an all-electron calculation is impossible is aimed. (author)

  9. Experimental study of intensive electron beam scattering in melting channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balagura, V.S.; Kurilko, V.I.; Safronov, B.G.

    1988-01-01

    Multiple scattering of an intensive electron beam at 28 keV energy passing through a melting channel in iron targets is experimentally studied. The dependence of scattering on the melting current value is established. The material density in the channel on the basis of the binary collision method is evaluated. It is shown that these density values are of three orders less than the estimations made on the basis of the data on energy losses of electrons in the channel. 6 refs.; 4 figs

  10. Neutron-scattering studies of magnetic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S.K.; Crabtree, G.W.; Hinks, D.G.; Mook, H.A.; Pringle, O.A.

    1982-01-01

    Results obtained in the last few years obtained by neutron diffraction on the nature of the magnetic ordering in magnetic superconductors are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of the complex intermediate phase in ferromagnetic superconductors where both superconductivity and ferromagnetism appear to coexist

  11. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of elementary excitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, Lucas Johannes Peter (Luuk)

    2010-01-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is an X-ray in, X-ray out technique that enables one to study the dispersion of excitations in solids. In this thesis, we investigated how various elementary excitations of transition metal oxides show up in RIXS spectra.

  12. Studies of magnetism with inelastic scattering of cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacrot, B.

    1964-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of cold neutrons can be used to study some aspects of magnetism: spins waves, exchange integrals, vicinity of Curie point. After description of the experimental set-up, several experiments, in the fields mentioned above, are analysed. (author) [fr

  13. Multiple scattering in synchrotron studies of disordered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, H.F.; Neuefeind, J.

    1995-01-01

    A formalism for the multiple scattering and self-absorption in synchrotron studies of disordered materials is presented. The formalism goes beyond conventionally used approximations and treat the cross sections, the beam characteristics, the state of polarization, and the electronic correction terms in full. Using hard X-rays it is shown how the simulated distributions can be directly compared to experimental data. ((orig.))

  14. Small angle neutron scattering studies on the interaction of cationic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structure of the protein–surfactant complex of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cationic surfactants has been studied by small angle neutron scattering. At low concentrations, the CTAB monomers are observed to bind to the protein leading to an increase in its size. On the other hand at high concentrations, surfactant ...

  15. Increased accumulation of cuticular wax and expression of lipid transfer protein in response to periodic drying events in leaves of tree tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kimberly D; Teece, Mark A; Smart, Lawrence B

    2006-01-01

    Cuticular wax deposition and composition affects drought tolerance and yield in plants. We examined the relationship between wax and dehydration stress by characterizing the leaf cuticular wax of tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca L. Graham) grown under periodic dehydration stress. Total leaf cuticular wax load increased after each of three periods of dehydration stress using a CH2Cl2 extraction process. Overall, total wax load increased 1.5- to 2.5-fold, but composition of the wax was not altered. Homologous series of wax components were classified into organic groups; n-hentriacontane was the largest component (>75%) with alcohols and fatty acids representing drying event. Leaves excised from plants subjected to multiple drying events were more resistant to water loss compared to leaves excised from well-watered plants, indicating that there is a negative relationship between total wax load and epidermal conductance. Lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are thought to be involved in the transfer of lipids through the extracellular matrix for the formation of cuticular wax. Using northern analysis, a 6-fold increase of tree tobacco LTP gene transcripts was observed after three drying events, providing further evidence that LTP is involved in cuticle deposition. The simplicity of wax composition and the dramatic wax bloom displayed by tree tobacco make this an excellent species in which to study the relationship between leaf wax deposition and drought tolerance.

  16. Uncovered secret of a Vasseur-Tramond wax model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, J F; Gutiérrez, B; Montes, J M; Ballestriero, R

    2016-01-01

    The technique of anatomical wax modelling reached its heyday in Italy during the 18th century, through a fruitful collaboration between sculptors and anatomists. It soon spread to other countries, and prestigious schools were created in England, France, Spain and Austria. Paris subsequently replaced Italy as the major centre of manufacture, and anatomical waxes were created there from the mid-19th century in workshops such as that of Vasseur-Tramond. This workshop began to sell waxes to European Faculties of Medicine and Schools of Surgery around 1880. Little is known of the technique employed in the creation of such artefacts as this was deemed a professional secret. To gain some insight into the methods of construction, we have studied a Vasseur-Tramond wax model in the Valladolid University Anatomy Museum, Spain, by means of multi-slice computerised tomography and X-ray analysis by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the hair. These results have revealed some of the methods used to make these anatomical models and the materials employed. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  17. Investigation of wax precipitation in crude oil: Experimental and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Jafari Behbahani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a series of experiments were carried to investigation of rheological behavior of crude oil using waxy crude oil sample in the absence/presence of flow improver such as ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer. The rheological data covered the temperature range of 5–30 °C. The results indicated that the performance of flow improver was dependent on its molecular weight. Addition of small quantities of flow improver, can improve viscosity and pour point of crude oil. Also, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model using Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP topology has been developed to account wax appearance temperature and the amount of precipitated wax and the model was verified using experimental data given in this work and reported in the literature. In order to compare the performance of the proposed model based on Artificial Neural Network, the wax precipitation experimental data at different temperatures were predicted using solid solution model and multi-solid phase model. The results showed that the developed model based on Artificial Neural Network can predict more accurately the wax precipitation experimental data in comparison to the previous models such as solid solution and multi-solid phase model with AADs less than 0.5%. Furthermore, the number of parameters required for the Artificial Neural Network (ANN model is less than the studied thermodynamic models.

  18. Studies of the dynamic properties of materials using neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovesey, S.W.; Windsor, C.G.

    1985-09-01

    The dynamic properties of materials using the neutron scattering technique is reviewed. The basic properties of both nuclear scattering and magnetic scattering are summarized. The experimental methods used in neutron scattering are described, along with access to neutron sources, and neutron inelastic instruments. Applied materials science using inelastic neutron scattering; rotational tunnelling of a methyl group; molecular diffusion from quasi-elastic scattering; and the diffusion of colloidal particles and poly-nuclear complexes; are also briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  19. Study of Compton broadening due to electron-photon scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of Compton broadening due to electron-photon scattering in hot stellar atmospheres. A purely electron-photon scattering media is assumed to have plane parallel geometry with an input radia­tion field localized on one side of the slab. The method is based on the discrete space theory of radiative transfer for the intensity of emitted radiation. The solution is developed to study the importance of scattering of radiation by free electrons in high temperature stellar atmospheres which produces a brodening and shift in spectral lines because of the Compton effect and the Doppler effect arising from mass and thermal motions of scattering electrons. It is noticed that the Comptonized spectrum depends on three parameters: the optical depth of the medium, the temperature of the thermal electrons and the viewing angle. We also showed that the Compton effect produces red shift and asymmetry in the line. These two effects increase as the optical depth increases. It is also noticed that the emergent specific intensities become completely asymmetric for higher optical depths.

  20. Study of Compton Broadening Due to Electron-Photon Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao, M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of Compton broadening due to electron-photon scattering in hot stellar atmospheres. A purely electron-photon scattering media is assumed to have plane parallel geometry with an input radiation field localized on one side of the slab. The method is based on the discrete space theory of radiative transfer for the intensity of emitted radiation.The solution is developed to study the importance of scattering of radiation by free electrons in high temperature stellar atmospheres which produces a brodening and shift in spectral lines because of the Compton effect and the Doppler effect arising from mass and thermal motions of scattering electrons.It is noticed that the Comptonized spectrum depends on three parameters: the optical depth of the medium, the temperature of the thermal electrons and the viewing angle.We also showed that the Compton effect produces red shift and asymmetry in the line. These two effects increase as the optical depth increases. It is also noticed that the emergent specific intensities become completely asymmetric for higher optical depths.

  1. Process for separating liquid hydrocarbons from waxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, F J

    1948-03-08

    A process is described for the separation of liquid hydrocarbons from waxes comprising adding to a mixture of liquid hydrocarbons and waxes a sufficient quantity of an organo-silicon compound to cause the separation of the hydrocarbon and wax. The organo-silicon compounds are selected from the class of organic silicanes and their hydrolysis products and polymers. The silicanes have the formula R/sub y/SiX/sub z/, in which R is a saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon radical, X is a halogen or another hydrocarbon radical or an -OR group, y has a value 1, 2, or 3 and z has a value 1, 2, or 3.

  2. Inverse gradients in leaf wax δD and δ13C values along grass blades of Miscanthus sinensis: implications for leaf wax reproduction and plant physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Huang, Yongsong

    2013-06-01

    Compound specific hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of higher plant leaf waxes have been extensively used in paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental reconstructions. However, studies so far have focused on the comparison of leaf wax isotopic differences in bulk leaf samples between different plant species. We sampled three different varieties of tall grasses (Miscanthus sinensis) in six segments from base to tip and determined hydrogen and carbon isotopic ratios of leaf waxes, as well as hydrogen and oxygen isotopic ratios of leaf water samples. We found an increasing, base-to-tip hydrogen isotopic gradient along the grass blades that can probably be attributed to active leaf wax regeneration over the growth season. Carbon isotopic ratios, on the other hand, show opposite trends to hydrogen isotopic ratios along the grass blades, which may reflect different photosynthetic efficiencies at different blade locales.

  3. Marginal adaptation of four inlay casting waxes on stone, titanium, and zirconia dies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalakis, Konstantinos X; Kapsampeli, Vassiliki; Kitsou, Aikaterini; Kirmanidou, Yvone; Fotiou, Anna; Pissiotis, Argirios L; Calvani, Pasquale Lino; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Kudara, Yukio

    2014-07-01

    Different inlay casting waxes do not produce copings with satisfactory marginal accuracy when used on different die materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the marginal accuracy of 4 inlay casting waxes on stone dies and titanium and zirconia abutments and to correlate the findings with the degree of wetting between the die specimens and the inlay casting waxes. The inlay casting waxes tested were Starwax (Dentaurum), Unterziehwachs (Bredent), SU Esthetic wax (Schuler), and Sculpturing wax (Renfert). The marginal opening of the waxes was measured with a stereomicroscope on high-strength stone dies and on titanium and zirconia abutments. Photographic images were obtained, and the mean marginal opening for each specimen was calculated. A total of 1440 measurements were made. Wetting between die materials and waxes was determined after fabricating stone, titanium, and zirconia rectangular specimens. A calibrated pipette was used to place a drop of molten wax onto each specimen. The contact angle was calculated with software after an image of each specimen had been made with a digital camera. Collected data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). Any association between marginal accuracy and wetting of different materials was found by using the Pearson correlation. The wax factor had a statistically significant effect both on the marginal discrepancy (F=158.31, P<.001) and contact angle values (F=68.09, P<.001). A statistically significant effect of the die material factor both on the marginal adaptation (F=503.47, P<.001) and contact angle values (F=585.02, P<.001) was detected. A significant correlation between the marginal accuracy and the contact angle values (Pearson=0.881, P=.01) was also found. Stone dies provided wax copings with the best marginal integrity, followed by titanium and zirconia abutments. Unterziehwachs (Bredent), wax produced the best marginal adaptation on different die materials. A significant correlation was found

  4. Study on the scattering law and scattering kernel of hydrogen in zirconium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xinbiao; Chen Wei; Chen Da; Yin Banghua; Xie Zhongsheng

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear analytical model of calculating scattering law and scattering kernel for the uranium zirconium hybrid reactor is described. In the light of the acoustic and optic model of zirconium hydride, its frequency distribution function f(ω) is given and the scattering law of hydrogen in zirconium hydride is obtained by GASKET. The scattering kernel σ l (E 0 →E) of hydrogen bound in zirconium hydride is provided by the SMP code in the standard WIMS cross section library. Along with this library, WIMS is used to calculate the thermal neutron energy spectrum of fuel cell. The results are satisfied

  5. 21 CFR 872.6890 - Intraoral dental wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral dental wax. 872.6890 Section 872.6890...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6890 Intraoral dental wax. (a) Identification. Intraoral dental wax is a device made of wax intended to construct patterns from which custom made metal...

  6. 21 CFR 172.888 - Synthetic petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic petroleum wax. 172.888 Section 172.888... CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.888 Synthetic petroleum wax. Synthetic petroleum wax may be safely used in or on foods in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Synthetic petroleum wax is a...

  7. Some neutron scattering studies on magnetic and molecular phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevaart, L.

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis neutron-scattering investigations on two different systems are described. The first study is concerned with the magnetic ordering phenomena in pseudo two-dimensional (d = 2), two-component antiferromagnets K 2 Mnsub(1-x)Msub(x)F 4 (M = Fe, Co), as a function of the composition x and temperature T. For one of the samples in this series, K 2 Musub(0.978)Fesub(0.022)F 4 , the influence of an external magnetic field on the ordering characteristics was studied in addition. The second study deals with the rotational motions of the NH 4 + groups in NH 4 ZnF 3 in relation with the structural phase transition at Tsub(c) = 115.1 K. The experimental techniques were chosen according to the requirements of each of these two subjects. The former study was carried out by observing the elastic magnetic neutron scattering with a double-axis diffractometer, whereas for the latter study time-of-flight (TOF) techniques were applied to observe the inelastic and quasi-elastic incoherent neutron scattering by the protons of the rotating NH 4 + groups. (Auth.)

  8. Incoherent scatter studies of upper atmosphere dynamics and coding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeggstroem, Ingemar.

    1990-09-01

    Observations by the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar are used to study the dynamics of the auroral upper atmosphere. The study describes some effects of the strong plasma convection occurring at these latitudes and a new coding technique for incoherent scatter radars. A technique to determine the thermospheric neutral wind from incoherent scatter measurements is described. Simultaneous Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements of the wind are compared with those derived from the radar data. F-region electron density depletions in the afternoon/evening sector of the auroral zone, identified as the main ionospheric trough, are investigated. In a statistical study, based on wide latitude scanning experiment made at solar minimum, the trough appearance at a given latitude is compared to the geomagnetic index K p , and an empirical model predicting the latitude of the trough is proposed. Detailed studies, using different experiment modes, show that the equatorward edge of the auroral oval is co-located of up to 1 degree poleward of the trough minimum, which in turn is co-located with the peak convective electric field, with its boundary 1 degree - 2 degree equatorward of the trough minimum. It is shown that the F-region ion composition changes from pure 0 + to molecular ion dominated (NO + /O 2 + ) as the trough moves into the region probed by the radar. In a special case, where a geomagnetic sudden impulse caused an expansion of the plasma convection pattern, the equatorward trough progression is studied together with ionosonde measurements. A new coding technique for incoherent scatter radar measurement is introduced and described. The method, called alternating codes, provides significantly more accurate estimates of the plasma parameters than can be obtained by frequency commutated multipulse measurements. Simple explanations of the method are given as well as a precise definition. Two examples of application of the alternating codes are presented, showing the high

  9. Wax inhibitor based on ethylene vinyl acetate with methyl methacrylate and diethanolamine for crude oil pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Abang, S.; Bono, A.; Krishnaiah, D.; Karali, R.; Safuan, M. K.

    2017-06-01

    Wax precipitation and deposition is one of the most significant flow assurance challenges in the production system of the crude oil. Wax inhibitors are developed as a preventive strategy to avoid an absolute wax deposition. Wax inhibitors are polymers which can be known as pour point depressants as they impede the wax crystals formation, growth, and deposition. In this study three formulations of wax inhibitors were prepared, ethylene vinyl acetate, ethylene vinyl acetate co-methyl methacrylate (EVA co-MMA) and ethylene vinyl acetate co-diethanolamine (EVA co-DEA) and the comparison of their efficiencies in terms of cloud point¸ pour point, performance inhibition efficiency (%PIE) and viscosity were evaluated. The cloud point and pour point for both EVA and EVA co-MMA were similar, 15°C and 10-5°C, respectively. Whereas, the cloud point and pour point for EVA co-DEA were better, 10°C and 10-5°C respectively. In conclusion, EVA co-DEA had shown the best % PIE (28.42%) which indicates highest percentage reduction of wax deposit as compared to the other two inhibitors.

  10. Anatomical models and wax Venuses: art masterpieces or scientific craft works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestriero, R

    2010-02-01

    The art of wax modelling has an ancient origin but rose to prominence in 14th century Italy with the cult of votive artefacts. With the advent of Neoclassicism this art, now deemed repulsive, continued to survive in a scientific environment, where it flourished in the study of normal and pathological anatomy, obstetrics, zoology and botany. The achievement of having originated the creation of anatomical models in coloured wax must be ascribed to a joint effort undertaken by the Sicilian wax modeller Gaetano Giulio Zumbo and the French surgeon Guillaume Desnoues in the late 17th century. Interest in anatomical wax models spread throughout Europe during the 18th century, first in Bologna with Ercole Lelli, Giovanni Manzolini and Anna Morandi, and then in Florence with Felice Fontana and Clemente Susini. In England, the art of anatomical ceroplastics was brought to London from Florence by the sculptor Joseph Towne. Throughout the centuries many anatomical artists preferred this material due to the remarkable mimetic likeness obtained, far surpassing any other material. Independent of the material used, whether wood, wax or clay, anatomical models were always considered merely craft works confined to hospitals or faculties of medicine and have survived to this day only because of their scientific interest. Italian and English waxes are stylistically different but the remarkable results obtained by Susini and Towne, and the fact that some contemporary artists are again representing anatomical wax bodies in their works, makes the border that formerly separated art and craft indistinguishable.

  11. Development of formulations and processes to incorporate wax oleogels in ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulim Botega, Daniele C; Marangoni, Alejandro G; Smith, Alexandra K; Goff, H Douglas

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of emulsifiers, waxes, fat concentration, and processing conditions on the application of wax oleogel to replace solid fat content and create optimal fat structure in ice cream. Ice creams with 10% or 15% fat were formulated with rice bran wax (RBW), candelilla wax (CDW), or carnauba wax (CBW) oleogels, containing 10% wax and 90% high-oleic sunflower oil. The ice creams were produced using batch or continuous freezing processes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cryo-scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of ice cream and the ultrastructure of oleogel droplets in ice cream mixes. Among the wax oleogels, RBW oleogel had the ability to form and sustain structure in 15% fat ice creams when glycerol monooleate (GMO) was used as the emulsifier. TEM images revealed that the high degree of fat structuring observed in GMO samples was associated with the RBW crystal morphology within the fat droplet, which was characterized by the growth of crystals at the outer edge of the droplet. Continuous freezing improved fat structuring compared to batch freezing. RBW oleogels established better structure compared to CDW or CBW oleogels. These results demonstrate that RBW oleogel has the potential to develop fat structure in ice cream in the presence of GMO and sufficiently high concentrations of oleogel. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Nonlinear scattering in hard tissue studied with ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichler, J.; Kim, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The back-scattered spectrum of ultrashort laser pulses (800 nm, 0.2 ps) was studied in human dental and other hard tissues in vitro below the ablation threshold. Frequency doubled radiation (SHG), frequency tripled radiation and two-photon fluorescence were detected. The relative yield for these processes was measured for various pulse energies. The dependence of the SHG signal on probe thickness was determined in forward and back scattering geometry. SHG is sensitive to linear polarization of the incident laser radiation. SHG in human teeth was studied in vitro showing larger signals in dentin than in cementum and enamel. In carious areas no SHG signal could be detected. Possible applications of higher harmonic radiation for diagnostics and microscopy are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above

  14. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  15. Applications of neutron scattering to the study of magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, W.C.

    1976-01-01

    The types of interactions that neutrons undergo with condensed matter are reviewed and those properties of neutrons that make them an ideal probe for the study of magnetism on a microscopic scale are discussed. Following a very brief survey of experimental methods, a few illustrative examples of specific investigations are described in sufficient detail to illustrate the power of the techniques. Views as to the future directions that may be taken by neutron scattering are presented

  16. Studying coherent scattering in the CP stars atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišák, J.; Kubát, J.; Krtička, J.

    2018-01-01

    Chemically peculiar stars form a very interesting class of stars which frequently show variability. The variability is probably caused by the uneven surface distribution of chemical elements. Some elements are overabundant and some elements are underabundant compared to the solar chemical composition. In the case of chemically overabundant composition some of the rare photon-atom processes can be more important than in the atmospheres of stars with solar chemical composition. We study the importance of Rayleigh scattering by helium.

  17. Theoretical study of near-threshold electron-molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have been engaged in carrying out a foundation study on problems pertaining to near-threshold nuclear excitations in e-H 2 scattering. The primary goals of this study are: to investigate the severity and nature of the anticipated breakdown of the adiabatic-nuclei (AN) approximation, first for rotation only (in the rigid-rotator approximation), and then for vibration; to determine a data base of accurate ab initio cross sections for this important system; to implement and test accurate, computationally-tractable model potentials for exchange and polarization effects; and to begin the exploration of alternative scattering theories for near-threshold collisions. This study has provided a well-defined theoretical context for our future investigations. Second, it has enabled us to identify and quantify several serious problems in the theory of near-threshold electron-molecule scattering that demand attention. And finally, it has led to the development of some of the theoretical and computational apparatus that will form the foundation of future work. In this report, we shall review our progress to date, emphasizing work completed during the current contract year. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  18. Extracting paraffin and mineral waxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, I C

    1930-01-17

    In a process for freezing liquids, particularly for precipitating wax from oils such as petroleum or shale oils, the liquid to be treated is cooled first in vessels 10, 11, and 12 by chilled liquid from the final separating tanks 22, then in vessels 13, 14 and 15 by brine cooled by an evaporator 38 and finally in vessels 16,17, 18 directly by the evaporator of a refrigerating plant. The cooling in vessels 10, 11, 12 is regulated by recirculating some of the chilled liquid through the valved pipe 30 while that in tanks 13, 14, 15 is regulated by short-circuiting the brine circulation through a tank 35. Refrigerant vapour from the evaporators in vessels 16, 17, 18 may return through pipe 61 to the compressor or absorber of the plant 45 or it may be withdrawn by pump 58. By the operation of valves A, B, 47, and a valve in pipe 61, the pressures in the evaporators may be varied individually to regulate the cooling in each vessel. Mechanical stirrers are provided in tanks 16, 17, 18.

  19. Refining of wax-containing oil by distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1930-04-28

    A continuous method is disclosed for producing low cold test oil from wax-containing mineral oil, which comprises continuously heating the oil in a tubular heater with avoidance of cracking, and fractionating the resulting liquid and vapor in a fractionating tower with reflux to produce a wax-containing fraction having therein substantially all of the amorphous wax and being sufficiently free of crystalline wax so as to be waxable by a method suitable for the removal of amorphous wax.

  20. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å

  1. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  2. Optical potential study of electron scattering by rubidium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, J. H.; Ratnavelu, K. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Zhou, Y. [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-10-15

    The coupled-channel optical method (CCOM) has been implemented in a study of electronrubidium scattering. This method includes the continuum effect in the calculation via an ab-initio optical potential. Eight atomic states (5s, 5p, 4d, 6s, 6p, 5d, 7s, 7p) were used together with the continuum optical potential in the 5s-5s, 5s-5p, and 5p-5p coupling. The elastic, inelastic and total cross sections for electron-rubidium scattering at low and intermediate energies, ranging from 10 eV to 100 eV, are reported. The results are compared with available experimental and theoretical data.

  3. Spin dynamics above the Curie temperature studied by neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinsvoll, O.; Riste, T.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron scattering can in principle give information about magnetic fluctuations over the entire atomic space and time domain. The weakness of the neutron-matter interaction renders this information undistorted by the neutron probe, but at the same time puts intensity limitations on the method. A considerable number of studies on the magnetism of 3d metals have been performed at some of the larger reactor laboratories. In the regions of overlap the experimental results from the different laboratories are consistent, but the interpretations are along different lines. Among the controversial issues are itinerancy versus localization, the degree of order above T C . In our talk we shall give an introduction to the neutron scattering method, including some of the sophisticated polarized beam methods. In the rest of the talk we shall review recent experimental results and some of the theoretical models used in their interpretation. (orig.)

  4. Study of a new scatter rejection technique in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottari, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Fortunato, M.; Maestro, P.; Malakhov, N.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Meucci, M.; Millucci, V.; Paoletti, R.; Scribano, A.; Turini, N.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for digital mammography based on the use of a collimator and an anti-scatter grid coupled with a mosaic detector has been studied with a Monte Carlo program. The simulation, with a low-energy spectrum X-ray beam and a breast phantom, provides a quantitative assessment of the capability of the method to reduce the physical background of the image due to scattering in the body, without introducing image artifacts. With minor modifications to the existing X-ray facilities, the method could also be applied to area detectors. To verify the results of the simulation, an experimental setup based on a CCD camera coupled via a fiber optic plate to a CsI(Tl) scintillator is under test

  5. Study of a new scatter rejection technique in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottari, S.; Ciocci, M.A. E-mail: ciocci@pi.infn.it; Fortunato, M.; Maestro, P.; Malakhov, N.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Meucci, M.; Millucci, V.; Paoletti, R.; Scribano, A.; Turini, N

    2001-04-01

    A new technique for digital mammography based on the use of a collimator and an anti-scatter grid coupled with a mosaic detector has been studied with a Monte Carlo program. The simulation, with a low-energy spectrum X-ray beam and a breast phantom, provides a quantitative assessment of the capability of the method to reduce the physical background of the image due to scattering in the body, without introducing image artifacts. With minor modifications to the existing X-ray facilities, the method could also be applied to area detectors. To verify the results of the simulation, an experimental setup based on a CCD camera coupled via a fiber optic plate to a CsI(Tl) scintillator is under test.

  6. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A. E., E-mail: schmidt@omrb.pnpi.spb.ru; Shvetsov, A. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kuklin, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  7. Development of new methods for studying nanostructures using neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop improved instrumentation for studying the microscopic structures of materials using neutron scattering. Neutron scattering has a number of advantages for studying material structure but suffers from the well-known disadvantage that neutrons' ability to resolve structural details is usually limited by the strength of available neutron sources. We aimed to overcome this disadvantage using a new experimental technique, called Spin Echo Scattering Angle Encoding (SESAME) that makes use of the neutron's magnetism. Our goal was to show that this innovation will allow the country to make better use of the significant investment it has recently made in a new neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and will lead to increases in scientific knowledge that contribute to the Nation's technological infrastructure and ability to develop advanced materials and technologies. We were successful in demonstrating the technical effectiveness of the new method and established a baseline of knowledge that has allowed ORNL to start a project to implement the method on one of its neutron beam lines.

  8. Development of new methods for studying nanostructures using neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pynn, Roger [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2016-03-18

    The goal of this project was to develop improved instrumentation for studying the microscopic structures of materials using neutron scattering. Neutron scattering has a number of advantages for studying material structure but suffers from the well-known disadvantage that neutrons’ ability to resolve structural details is usually limited by the strength of available neutron sources. We aimed to overcome this disadvantage using a new experimental technique, called Spin Echo Scattering Angle Encoding (SESAME) that makes use of the neutron’s magnetism. Our goal was to show that this innovation will allow the country to make better use of the significant investment it has recently made in a new neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and will lead to increases in scientific knowledge that contribute to the Nation’s technological infrastructure and ability to develop advanced materials and technologies. We were successful in demonstrating the technical effectiveness of the new method and established a baseline of knowledge that has allowed ORNL to start a project to implement the method on one of its neutron beam lines.

  9. Study of inelastic proton scattering at isobaric analog resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, S.L.

    1974-01-01

    Inelastic proton scattering at isobaric analog resonances (IAR's) was studied using the targets 138 Ba and 92 Mo. Differential cross sections and analyzing powers were measured at the 10.00, 10.63, 11.09, 11.45, and 11.70 MeV resonances in 138 Ba + p and at the 5.89, 6.09, and 6.55 MeV resonances in 92 Mo + p. In addition, a new measurement, the spin flip asymmetry, was developed. The experiment was performed by using a polarized beam to make spin flip measurements. Angular distributions for the spin flip probability and spin flip asymmetry were measured at all of the above energies except for the lowest three resonances in 138 Ba, where only the spin flip probability was measured. A DWBA code modified to include the coherent addition of resonance amplitudes was used to analyze the 138 Ba data. The partial widths extracted from this analysis were converted to expansion coefficients for parent states in 139 Ba. The coefficients were found to be in good agreement with unified model calculations. For 92 Mo, inelastic polarizations, deduced from the spin flip and spin flip asymmetry, were found to be large. Attempts using Hauser Feshbach theory to describe both the cross section and polarization data repeatedly failed for both the 6.55 and 5.87 MeV IAR's. This failure represents strong evidence that Hauser Feshbach theory is not valid when extended to describe scattering at an IAR. The 92 Mo data were analyzed using a reaction theory modified to include channel-channel correlations. This theory predicts that the enhanced compound scattering is identical to the resonance scattering. Good fits have been obtained with the use of this modified Hauser Feshbach theory. (U.S.)

  10. A neutron scattering study of triblock copolymer micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-11-01

    The thesis describes the neutron scattering experiments performed on poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide)/poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer micelles in aqueous solution. The studies concern the non-ionic triblock copolymer P85 which consists of two outer segments of 25 monomers of ethylene oxide attached to a central part of 40 monomers of propylene oxide. The amphiphilic character of P85 leads to formation of various structures in aqueous solution such as spherical micelles, rod-like structures, and a BCC liquid-crystal mesophase of spherical micelles. The present investigations are centered around the micellar structures. In the first part of this thesis a model for the micelle is developed for which an analytical scattering form factor can be calculated. The micelle is modeled as a solid sphere with tethered Gaussian chains. Good agreement was found between small-angle neutron scattering experiments and the form factor of the spherical P85 micelles. Above 60 deg. C some discrepancies were found between the model and the data which is possibly due to an elongation of the micelles. The second part focuses on the surface-induced ordering of the various micellar aggregates in the P85 concentration-temperature phase diagram. In the spherical micellar phase, neutron reflection measurements indicated a micellar ordering at the hydrophilic surface of quartz. Extensive modeling was performed based on a hard sphere description of the micellar interaction. By convolution of the distribution of hard spheres at a hard wall, obtained from Monte Carlo simulations, and the projected scattering length density of the micelle, a numerical expression was obtained which made it possible to fit the data. The hard-sphere-hard-wall model gave an excellent agreement in the bulk micellar phase. However, for higher concentrations (25 wt % P85) close to the transition from the micellar liquid into a micellar cubic phase, a discrepancy was found between the model and the

  11. A neutron scattering study of triblock copolymer micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstenberg, M.C.

    1997-11-01

    The thesis describes the neutron scattering experiments performed on poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide)/poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymer micelles in aqueous solution. The studies concern the non-ionic triblock copolymer P85 which consists of two outer segments of 25 monomers of ethylene oxide attached to a central part of 40 monomers of propylene oxide. The amphiphilic character of P85 leads to formation of various structures in aqueous solution such as spherical micelles, rod-like structures, and a BCC liquid-crystal mesophase of spherical micelles. The present investigations are centered around the micellar structures. In the first part of this thesis a model for the micelle is developed for which an analytical scattering form factor can be calculated. The micelle is modeled as a solid sphere with tethered Gaussian chains. Good agreement was found between small-angle neutron scattering experiments and the form factor of the spherical P85 micelles. Above 60 deg. C some discrepancies were found between the model and the data which is possibly due to an elongation of the micelles. The second part focuses on the surface-induced ordering of the various micellar aggregates in the P85 concentration-temperature phase diagram. In the spherical micellar phase, neutron reflection measurements indicated a micellar ordering at the hydrophilic surface of quartz. Extensive modeling was performed based on a hard sphere description of the micellar interaction. By convolution of the distribution of hard spheres at a hard wall, obtained from Monte Carlo simulations, and the projected scattering length density of the micelle, a numerical expression was obtained which made it possible to fit the data. The hard-sphere-hard-wall model gave an excellent agreement in the bulk micellar phase. However, for higher concentrations (25 wt % P85) close to the transition from the micellar liquid into a micellar cubic phase, a discrepancy was found between the model and the

  12. Diffuse neutron scattering study of metallic interstitial solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barberis, P.

    1991-10-01

    We studied two interstitial solid solutions (Ni-C(1at%) and Nb-O(2at%) and two stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-CaO(13.6mol%) and ZrO2-Y2O3(9.6mol%) by elastic diffuse neutron scattering. We used polarized neutron scattering in the case of the ferromagnetic Ni-based sample, in order to determine the magnetic perturbation induced by the C atoms. Measurements were made on single crystals in the Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (CEA-CNRS, Saclay, France). An original algorithm to deconvolve time-of-flight spectra improved the separation between elastically and inelastically scattered intensities. In the case of metallic solutions, we used a simple non-linear model, assuming that interstitials are isolated and located in octahedral sites. Results are: - in both compounds, nearest neighbours are widely displaced away from the interstitial, while next nearest neighbours come slightly closer. - the large magnetic perturbation induced by carbon in Nickel decreases with increasing distance on the three first neighbour shells and is in good agreement with the total magnetization variation. - no chemical order between solute atoms could be evidenced. Stabilized zirconia exhibit a strong correlation between chemical order and the large displacements around vacancies and dopants. (Author). 132 refs., 38 figs., 13 tabs

  13. Radiotherapic Valuation of Paraffin Wax for Patients with Oral Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Kyung Su; Seo, Seuk Jin; Lee, Je Hee; Yoo, Sook Heun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hosdital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    This study is designed to investigate radiotherapic valuation of Paraffin Wax, which is newly formed for this study and generally utilized in dentistry, and Mouth Piece and Putty impression, which are commonly used in radiotherapy, for oral cavity as a compensator. Each compensator was formed by 10 x 10 x 1 cm and measured radiation dose attenuation ratio with reference of water phantom which is made of tissue-equivalent materials. Two patients with oral cancer underwent DRR (Digitally Reconstructed Radiogrph) of Offline Review Program of Aria System and Portal vision for 5 times for each material to evaluate reproducibility by each filling materials. Moreover, MU (monitor unit) changes by dose absorption were considered in the case of inevitable implication of an filling materials in the range for radiotherapy. Radiation dose attenuation ratios were shown -0.7{approx}+3.7% for Mouth Piece, +0.21{approx}+0.39% for Paraffin Wax and -2.71{approx}-1.76% for Putty impression. Error ranges of reproducibility of positions were measured {+-}3 mm for Mouth Piece, {+-}2 mm for Paraffin Wax and {+-}2 mm for Putty impression. Difference of prescription MU from dose absorption with an filling material increased +7.8% (250 MU) in Putty impression and -0.9% (230 MU) in Paraffin Wax as converted into a percentage from the standard phantom, Water 232 MU. Dose reduction of boundary between cavity and tissue was observed for Mouth Piece. Mouth Piece also had low reproducibility of positions as it had no reflection of anatomy of oral cavity even though it was a proper material to separate Maxilla and Mandible during therapy. On the other hand, Putty impression was a suitable material to correctly re-position oral cavity as before. However, it risked normal tissues getting unnecessary over irradiation and it caused radiation dose decrease by -2.5% for 1cm volume in comparison of it of water phantom. Dose reduction in Paraffin Wax, Fat Tissue-Equivalent Material, was smaller than other

  14. Radiotherapic Valuation of Paraffin Wax for Patients with Oral Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Kyung Su; Seo, Seuk Jin; Lee, Je Hee; Yoo, Sook Heun

    2011-01-01

    This study is designed to investigate radiotherapic valuation of Paraffin Wax, which is newly formed for this study and generally utilized in dentistry, and Mouth Piece and Putty impression, which are commonly used in radiotherapy, for oral cavity as a compensator. Each compensator was formed by 10 x 10 x 1 cm and measured radiation dose attenuation ratio with reference of water phantom which is made of tissue-equivalent materials. Two patients with oral cancer underwent DRR (Digitally Reconstructed Radiogrph) of Offline Review Program of Aria System and Portal vision for 5 times for each material to evaluate reproducibility by each filling materials. Moreover, MU (monitor unit) changes by dose absorption were considered in the case of inevitable implication of an filling materials in the range for radiotherapy. Radiation dose attenuation ratios were shown -0.7∼+3.7% for Mouth Piece, +0.21∼+0.39% for Paraffin Wax and -2.71∼-1.76% for Putty impression. Error ranges of reproducibility of positions were measured ±3 mm for Mouth Piece, ±2 mm for Paraffin Wax and ±2 mm for Putty impression. Difference of prescription MU from dose absorption with an filling material increased +7.8% (250 MU) in Putty impression and -0.9% (230 MU) in Paraffin Wax as converted into a percentage from the standard phantom, Water 232 MU. Dose reduction of boundary between cavity and tissue was observed for Mouth Piece. Mouth Piece also had low reproducibility of positions as it had no reflection of anatomy of oral cavity even though it was a proper material to separate Maxilla and Mandible during therapy. On the other hand, Putty impression was a suitable material to correctly re-position oral cavity as before. However, it risked normal tissues getting unnecessary over irradiation and it caused radiation dose decrease by -2.5% for 1cm volume in comparison of it of water phantom. Dose reduction in Paraffin Wax, Fat Tissue-Equivalent Material, was smaller than other impressions and

  15. GC-MS Metabolomics to Evaluate the Composition of Plant Cuticular Waxes for Four Triticum aestivum Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent D. Lavergne

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is an important food crop, and biotic and abiotic stresses significantly impact grain yield. Wheat leaf and stem surface waxes are associated with traits of biological importance, including stress resistance. Past studies have characterized the composition of wheat cuticular waxes, however protocols can be relatively low-throughput and narrow in the range of metabolites detected. Here, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS metabolomics methods were utilized to provide a comprehensive characterization of the chemical composition of cuticular waxes in wheat leaves and stems. Further, waxes from four wheat cultivars were assayed to evaluate the potential for GC-MS metabolomics to describe wax composition attributed to differences in wheat genotype. A total of 263 putative compounds were detected and included 58 wax compounds that can be classified (e.g., alkanes and fatty acids. Many of the detected wax metabolites have known associations to important biological functions. Principal component analysis and ANOVA were used to evaluate metabolite distribution, which was attributed to both tissue type (leaf, stem and cultivar differences. Leaves contained more primary alcohols than stems such as 6-methylheptacosan-1-ol and octacosan-1-ol. The metabolite data were validated using scanning electron microscopy of epicuticular wax crystals which detected wax tubules and platelets. Conan was the only cultivar to display alcohol-associated platelet-shaped crystals on its abaxial leaf surface. Taken together, application of GC-MS metabolomics enabled the characterization of cuticular wax content in wheat tissues and provided relative quantitative comparisons among sample types, thus contributing to the understanding of wax composition associated with important phenotypic traits in a major crop.

  16. Cuticular waxes in alpine meadow plants: climate effect inferred from latitude gradient in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanjun; Guo, Na; He, Yuji; Gao, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Alpine meadow ecosystems are susceptible to climate changes. Still, climate impact on cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants is poorly understood. Assessing the variations of cuticular wax in alpine meadow plants across different latitudes might be useful for predicting how they may respond to climate change. We studied nine alpine meadows in a climate gradient in the east side of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, with mean annual temperature ranging from -7.7 to 3.2°C. In total, 42 plant species were analyzed for cuticular wax, averaged 16 plant species in each meadow. Only four plant species could be observed in all sampling meadows, including Kobresia humilis,Potentilla nivea,Anaphalis lacteal, and Leontopodium nanum. The amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax in the four plant species varied among sampling meadows, but no significant correlation could be observed between them and temperature, precipitation, and aridity index based on plant species level. To analyze the variations of cuticular wax on community level, we averaged the amounts of n-alkanes, aliphatic acids, primary alcohols, and total cuticular wax across all investigated plant species in each sampling site. The mean annual temperature, mean temperature in July, and aridity index were significantly correlated with the averaged amounts of wax compositions and total cuticular wax. The average chain length of n-alkanes in both plant and soil linearly increased with increased temperature, whereas reduced with increased aridity index. No significant correlation could be observed between mean annual precipitation and mean precipitation from June to August and the cuticular wax amounts and average chain length. Our results suggest that the survival of some alpine plants in specific environments might be depended on their abilities in adjusting wax deposition on plant leaves, and the alpine meadow plants as a whole respond to climate change, benefiting the stability of alpine meadow ecosystem.

  17. Magnetic Dynamics of Fine Particles Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen

    2000-01-01

    We give an introduction to inelastic neutron scattering and the dynamic scattering function for magnetic nanoparticles. Differences between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and we give a review of recent results on ferromagnetic Fe nanoparticles and canted antiferro......We give an introduction to inelastic neutron scattering and the dynamic scattering function for magnetic nanoparticles. Differences between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles are discussed and we give a review of recent results on ferromagnetic Fe nanoparticles and canted...

  18. Molecular analysis of intact preen waxes of Calidris Canutus (Aves: Scolopacidae) by GC/MS and GC/MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Dekker, M.H.A.; Piersma, T.

    2000-01-01

    The intact preen wax esters of the red knot Calidris canutus were studied with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/MS/MS. In this latter technique, transitions from the molecular ion to fragment ions representing the fatty acid moiety of the wax esters were measured, providing

  19. Molecular analysis of intact preen waxes of Calidris canutus (Aves : Scolopacidae) by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, MHA; Piersma, T; Damste, JSS; Dekker, Marlèn H.A.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    The intact preen wax esters of the red knot Calidris canutus were studied with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and GC/MS/MS. In this latter technique, transitions from the molecular ion to fragment ions representing the fatty acid moiety of the wax esters were measured, providing

  20. Dynamics of liquid N2 studied by neutron inelastic scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karen Schou; Carneiro, Kim; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1982-01-01

    Neutron inelastic-scattering data from liquid N2 at wave-vector transfer κ between 0.18 and 2.1 Å-1 and temperatures ranging from T=65-77 K are presented. The data are corrected for the contribution from multiple scattering and incoherent scattering. The resulting dynamic structure factor S (κ,ω)...

  1. Isolation and recrystallization of epicuticular waxes from Sorbus and Cotoneaster leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Ganeva Tsveta; Stefanova Miroslava; Koleva Dimitrina; Ruiz Segundo Ríos

    2015-01-01

    Wax morphology and chemical composition are widely accepted to be important for the protective properties of the leaf’s surface and also valuable characteristics in plant systematics. The leaves of Sorbus domestica L. and Cotoneaster granatensis Boiss., species of two large genera with intricate taxonomy referred to subtribe Pyrinae, Rosaceae (formerly subfamily Maloideae), were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and performing different methods of wax isola...

  2. ETHNOECOLOGY AND ETHNOBOTANY OF THE PALM CARNAUBA WAX IN BRAZILIAN SEMI-ARID

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Ferreira de Sousa; Richeliel Albert Rodrigues Silva; Talita Geovanna Fernandes Rocha; José Augusto da Silva Santana; Fábio de Almeida Vieira

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate aspects of ethnoecological and ethnobotanical of carnauba wax (Copernicia prunifera (Miller) H. E. Moore, Arecaceae) in an extractive community of municipality of Ipanguaçu, Rio Grande do Norte state. We interviewed key informants, using the technique of inducing nonspecific, guided tour and direct observation to confirm the data. According to most residents of Pedro Ezequiel Araújo community, the area of carnauba wax in the region is natural. In the r...

  3. Development and Properties of a Wax Ester Hydrolase in the Cotyledons of Jojoba Seedlings 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Anthony H. C.; Moreau, Robert A.; Liu, Kitty D. F.

    1978-01-01

    The activity of a wax ester hydrolase in the cotyledons of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) seedlings increased drastically during germination, parallel to the development of the gluconeogenic process. The enzyme at its peak of development was obtained in association with the wax body membrane, and its properties were studied. It had an optimal activity at alkaline pH (8.5-9). The apparent Km value for N-methylindoxylmyristate was 93 μM. It was stable at 40 C for 30 min but was inactivated at higher temperature. Various divalent cations and ethylenediaminetetraacetate had little effect on the activity. p-Chloromercuribenzoate was a strong inhibitor of the enzyme activity, and its effect was reversed by subsequent addition of dithiothreitol. It had a broad substrate specificity with highest activities on monoglycerides, wax esters, and the native substrate (jojoba wax). PMID:16660288

  4. Development and properties of a wax ester hydrolase in the cotyledons of jojoba seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A H; Moreau, R A; Liu, K D

    1978-03-01

    The activity of a wax ester hydrolase in the cotyledons of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) seedlings increased drastically during germination, parallel to the development of the gluconeogenic process. The enzyme at its peak of development was obtained in association with the wax body membrane, and its properties were studied. It had an optimal activity at alkaline pH (8.5-9). The apparent K(m) value for N-methylindoxylmyristate was 93 muM. It was stable at 40 C for 30 min but was inactivated at higher temperature. Various divalent cations and ethylenediaminetetraacetate had little effect on the activity. p-Chloromercuribenzoate was a strong inhibitor of the enzyme activity, and its effect was reversed by subsequent addition of dithiothreitol. It had a broad substrate specificity with highest activities on monoglycerides, wax esters, and the native substrate (jojoba wax).

  5. Reports of the study group for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report covers the activities from July 1980 to December 1981. Within this period, the project for reactor extension (including a thermal neutron source and a hall for the neutron guide), was worked out in detail. Like the Fritz-Haber Institute, the Institute for Crystallography of Tuebingen University decided to send a number of guest-scientists for studies at the Hahn-Meitner Institute on a permanent basis. The HMI also organized the 5th International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, held in Berlin in October 1980. The scientific research work was mainly concerned with magnetic systems, molecular crystals, and the determination of electron densities. (orig.)

  6. Neutron scattering studies of pretransitional phenomena in structural phase transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1979-03-01

    Materials exhibiting structural phase transformations are well known to possess pretransitional phenomena. Below the transition temperature, T/sub c/, an order parameter appears and the pretransitional effects are associated with the fluctuations of the order parameter. Neutron scattering techniques have proved invaluable in studying the temporal and spatial dependence of these fluctuations. SrTiO 3 is the prototypical example of a structural phase transformation exhibiting features observable in other transformations such as martensitic and order-disorder. The experimental evolution of the understanding of the phase transformation in SrTiO 3 will be reviewed and the features observed will be shown to typify other systems

  7. Diffusion of water adsorbed in hydrotalcite: neutron scattering Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, S [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Pramanik, A [Unilever Research India, Bangalore 500 066 (India); Chakrabarty, D [Godrej Sara Lee Limited, Research and Development Centre, Mumbai 400 079 (India); Juranyi, F [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, ETHZ and PSI, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Gautam, S [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mukhopadhyay, R [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2007-12-15

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) are a class of ionic lamellar solids with positively charged layers of two kinds of metallic cations and exchangeable hydrated anions. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements are performed in this type of LDH structured hydrated hydrotalcite sample to study the dynamical behaviour of the water in geometric confinement within the layers. Dynamical parameters correspond to the confined water molecules revealed that depending on the amount of excess water present, behaves differently and approaches bulk values at high concentration. Both translational and rotational dynamical parameters showed that at very low concentration of excess water, water molecules are attached to the surfaces and show the confinement effect.

  8. Kartini Research Reactor prospective studies for neutron scattering application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widarto

    1999-01-01

    The Kartini Research Reactor (KRR) is located in Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center, Yogyakarta - Indonesia. The reactor is operated for 100 kW thermal power used for research, experiments and training of nuclear technology. There are 4 beam ports and 1 column thermal are available at the reactor. Those beam ports have thermal neutron flux around 10 7 n/cm 2 s each other and used for sub critical assembly, neutron radiography studies and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). Design of neutron collimator has been done for piercing radial beam port and the calculation result of collimated neutron flux is around 10 9 n/cm 2 s. This paper describes experiment facilities and parameters of the Kartini research reactor, and further more the prospective studies for neutron scattering application. The purpose of this paper is to optimize in utilization of the beam ports facilities and enhance the manpower specialty. The special characteristic of the beam ports and preliminary studies, pre activities regarding with neutron scattering studies for KKR is presented. (author)

  9. Geometrical effects of conventional and digital prosthodontic planning wax-ups on lateral occlusal contact number, contact area, and steepness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduo, Jaafar

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared the effect of conventional and digital wax-ups on three lateral occlusion variables: contact number, contact area, and steepness. Dental casts of 10 patients with Angle Class I relationship were included in the study. All patients required fixed prosthodontic treatment that would affect lateral occlusion. The casts of all patients received conventional and digital wax-ups. For pretreatment, conventional wax-up, and digital wax-up casts, contact number, contact area, and occlusion steepness were measured at four lateral positions, that is, at excursions of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 mm from maximal intercuspation. Lateral occlusion scheme variables were affected by use of diagnostic wax-ups. For all types of casts, contact number decreased as excursion increased. The two types of wax-ups had similar contact number patterns, and contact number was significantly greater for these casts than for pretreatment casts in the earlier stages of excursion. Similarly, contact area gradually decreased with increasing excursion in the pretreatment and conventional and digital wax-up casts. There was only a minimal decrease in occlusion steepness as excursion increased. However, lateral occlusion was generally steeper for digital wax-up casts.

  10. [Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structure related to function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of neutron scatter techniques to the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin with the long term objective of understanding how the enormous lengths of DNA are folded into chromosomes. Micrococcal nuclease digestion kinetics have defined two subnucleosome particles; the chromatosome with 168 bp DNA, the histone octamer and one H1 and the nucleosome core particle with 146 bp DNA and the histone octamer. As will be discussed, the structure of the 146 bp DNA core particle is known in solution at low resolution from neutron scatter studies and in crystals. Based on this structure, the authors have a working model for the chromatosome and the mode of binding of H1. In order to define the structure of the nucleosome and also the different orders of chromatin structures they need to know the paths of DNA that link nucleosomes and the factors associated with chromosome functions that act on those DNA paths. The major region for this situation is the inherent variabilities in nucleosome DNA sequences, in the histone subtypes and their states of chemical modification and in the precise locations of nucleosomes. Such variabilities obscure the underlying principles that govern the packaging of DNA into the different structural states of nucleosomes and chromatin. The only way to elucidate these principles is to study the structures of nucleosomes and oligonucleosomes that are fully defined. They have largely achieved these objectives

  11. Wax Point Determinations Using Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, D.T.; Jubin, R.T.; Schmidt, T.W.

    2001-06-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of the wax point of a given crude is essential in order to maintain flow conditions that prevent plugging of undersea pipelines. This report summarizes the efforts made towards applying an Acoustic Cavity Resonance Spectrometer (ACRS) to the determination of pressures and temperatures at which wax precipitates from crude. Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc., the CRADA participant, supplied the ACRS. The instrumentation was shipped to Dr. Thomas Schmidt of ORNL, the CRADA contractor, in May 2000 after preliminary software development performed under the guidance of Dr. Samuel Colgate and Dr. Evan House of the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl. Upon receipt it became apparent that a number of modifications still needed to be made before the ACRS could be precisely and safely used for wax point measurements. This report reviews the sequence of alterations made to the ACRS, as well as defines the possible applications of the instrumentation once the modifications have been completed. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Phillips Petroleum Company, Inc. (Participant) and Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor) was the measurement of the formation of solids in crude oils and petroleum products that are commonly transported through pipelines. This information is essential in the proper design, operation and maintenance of the petroleum pipeline system in the United States. Recently, new petroleum discoveries in the Gulf of Mexico have shown that there is a potential for plugging of undersea pipeline because of the precipitation of wax. It is important that the wax points of the expected crude oils be well characterized so that the production facilities for these new wells are capable of properly transporting the expected production. The goal of this work is to perform measurements of solids formation in crude oils and petroleum products supplied by the Participant. It is

  12. Wax solidification of drying agents containing tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishikawa, M.; Kido, H.

    1984-01-01

    It is necessary to immobilize the tritium not to give any impact on the environmental biosphere because tritium may give profound effects in the metabolic pathway. One of the most probable methods of immobilizing tritium would be incorporation of tritiated water in solid forms. Any drying or dehydration technique would be effective in a tritium cleanup system for off-gas streams containing tritium or tritiated water. Commonly used drying agents such as activated alumina, silica gel, molecular sieves and calcium sulfate are of value for removal of water vapour from air or other gases. For long term tritium storage, however, these adsorptive materials should be enveloped to prevent contact with water or water vapour because the rate of leaching, evaporation or diffusion of tritium from these porous materials is so large. The beeswax solidification method of the packed bed of drying agents adsorbing tritiated water is developed in this study, where the wax solidification procedure is performed by pouring the melt of wax into the void space of the packed bed of the drying agents and successive gradual cooling. The observed values of diffusivity or permeability of tritium in the wax solidified materials are about one-thousandth of those obtained for the cement block. Effect of coating on the rate of leaching is also discussed

  13. Study of multiple scattering effects in heavy ion RBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z; O` Connor, D J [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Multiple scattering effect is normally neglected in conventional Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis. The backscattered particle yield normally agrees well with the theory based on the single scattering model. However, when heavy incident ions are used such as in heavy ion Rutherford backscattering (HIRBS), or the incident ion energy is reduced, multiple scattering effect starts to play a role in the analysis. In this paper, the experimental data of 6MeV C ions backscattered from a Au target are presented. In measured time of flight spectrum a small step in front of the Au high energy edge is observed. The high energy edge of the step is about 3.4 ns ahead of the Au signal which corresponds to an energy {approx} 300 keV higher than the 135 degree single scattering energy. This value coincides with the double scattering energy of C ion undergoes two consecutive 67.5 degree scattering. Efforts made to investigate the origin of the high energy step observed lead to an Monte Carlo simulation aimed to reproduce the experimental spectrum on computer. As a large angle scattering event is a rare event, two consecutive large angle scattering is extremely hard to reproduce in a random simulation process. Thus, the simulation has not found a particle scattering into 130-140 deg with an energy higher than the single scattering energy. Obviously faster algorithms and a better physical model are necessary for a successful simulation. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Study of multiple scattering effects in heavy ion RBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Multiple scattering effect is normally neglected in conventional Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) analysis. The backscattered particle yield normally agrees well with the theory based on the single scattering model. However, when heavy incident ions are used such as in heavy ion Rutherford backscattering (HIRBS), or the incident ion energy is reduced, multiple scattering effect starts to play a role in the analysis. In this paper, the experimental data of 6MeV C ions backscattered from a Au target are presented. In measured time of flight spectrum a small step in front of the Au high energy edge is observed. The high energy edge of the step is about 3.4 ns ahead of the Au signal which corresponds to an energy {approx} 300 keV higher than the 135 degree single scattering energy. This value coincides with the double scattering energy of C ion undergoes two consecutive 67.5 degree scattering. Efforts made to investigate the origin of the high energy step observed lead to an Monte Carlo simulation aimed to reproduce the experimental spectrum on computer. As a large angle scattering event is a rare event, two consecutive large angle scattering is extremely hard to reproduce in a random simulation process. Thus, the simulation has not found a particle scattering into 130-140 deg with an energy higher than the single scattering energy. Obviously faster algorithms and a better physical model are necessary for a successful simulation. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Problems in interpreting effects of air pollutants on spruce epicuticular waxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermadinger-Stabentheiner, E.

    1994-01-01

    Spruce needles are covered with rod-like crystals, which also fill the antechambers of the stomata with a dense meshwork. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) is very useful for studying epicuticular wax structure; with no intricate or laborious preparation, it is possible to obtain valuable information about the needle surface. Because the epicuticular wax layer forms a barrier between the plant and its environment, all influences that reach the surface from outside impact on this layer and, therefore, changes in epicuticular wax structure serve as diagnostic criteria for damage caused by air pollutants. This pollution influence begins as fusion of wax rods at the tips and results finally in total loss of the crystalline structure. Despite the simplicity of SEM investigations, alterations (artefacts) can occur to wax structures that may be confused with alterations caused by air pollutants (i.e., a too dense layer of twigs and needles, or careless handling with tweezers, results in mechanical damage that often influences the entire surface). Overheating occurring during transport or preparation and/or incorrect storage also produce artefacts. If the occurrence of such artefacts is taken into consideration, several contradictory interpretations of effects of air pollutants on epicuticular waxes can be explained. (orig.)

  16. Effects of Wax Coating on the Moisture Loss of Cucumbers at Different Storage Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of wax coating on moisture loss of cucumbers (Cucumis sativus L., cv. Jinglv were investigated at different temperatures. Cucumbers were treated with 10% (volume : volume wax and then stored at 15, 20, 25, or 30°C and 55% relative humidity. The changes in the mass of samples were recorded every 6 h. Results showed that wax coating along with low temperature was very effective in preventing moisture loss of cucumbers during simulated distribution. After 48 h storage, moisture loss in wax treated cucumbers at 15°C was 45% lower than the control at 30°C. Furthermore, a kinetic model was developed to study the influence of temperature on moisture loss based on the Arrhenius law. The model successfully described changes in cucumber moisture loss at different temperatures during storage. The shelf life of cucumber was also predicted using the kinetic model. A synergistic effect was found between wax coating and storage temperature on cucumber shelf life. Wax coating combined with low storage temperature was an effective method to extend the shelf life of cucumber fruit.

  17. Electrically conductive carbon nanofiber/paraffin wax composites for electric thermal storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kun; Han Baoguo; Yu Xun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Carbon nanofiber (CNF)/paraffin wax composite is found to be a promising electric thermal storage material. ► The thermal storage capacity of CNF/paraffin wax composite is five times of traditional electric thermal storage material. ► CNF is shown to be an effective conductive filler for the composite. - Abstract: The research of electric thermal storage (ETS) has attracted a lot of attention recently, which converts off-peak electrical energy into thermal energy and release it later at peak hours. In this study, new electric thermal storage composites are developed by employing paraffin wax as thermal storage media and carbon nanofiber (CNF) as conductive fillers. Electric heating and thermal energy release performances of the CNF/paraffin wax composites are experimentally investigated. Experimental results show that, when the composites are heated to about 70 °C, the developed electrically conductive CNF/paraffin wax composites present a thermal storage capacity of about 280 kJ/kg, which is five times of that of traditional thermal storage medium such as ceramic bricks (54 kJ/kg). The CNF/paraffin wax composites can also effectively store the thermal energy and release the thermal energy in later hours.

  18. Magnetic anisotropy and neutron scattering studies of some rare earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, R.

    1978-08-01

    The thesis is concerned with magnetic anisotropy of dysprosium and alloys of gadolinium: yttrium, and also neutron scattering studies of dysprosium. The experiments are discussed under the topic headings: magnetic anisotropy, rare earths, torque measurements, elastic neutron scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, dysprosium measurements, and results for the gadolinium: yttrium alloys. (U.K.)

  19. Study of final states in deep inelastic muon scattering

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study the different possible final states in deep inelastic muon scattering from hydrogen in connection with the detection of the scattered muon in a forward spectrometer (Experiment NA2).\\\\ \\\\ A vertex detector will be used which extends the hadron detection capabilities into the backward hemisphere of the centre-of-mass system. Particle momenta can be measured down to 200 MeV/c in a vertex magnet, which contains a streamer chamber (SC Particle identification will be done in a series of wide angle Čerenkov counters (C$_{0}$, C$_{1}$) and at low momenta in time-of-flight counter hodoscopes (F1-F4). An 8-plane module of MWPC chambers (PV) will be used in conjunction with the streamer chamber and the drift chambers WV1 and WV2 and WV3. \\\\ \\\\ The vertex magnet is a C magnet with circular pole tips of 2 m diameter and 1 m gap width. The central magnetic field will be 1.5 T. The streamer chamber (2m x 1.2m x 0.72m) will contain a 1 m liquid H$_{2}$ target.\\\\ \\\\ As a natural extens...

  20. A study of W W scattering at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Nauyock, Farahnaaz

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of scattering at the LHC, a proton-proton collider being built at CERN and due to start its first run in 2007. The case where no new particles are discovered before the start of the LHC is analysed. The elastic scattering of is considered and the semileptonic 1 decay channels of the bosons are investigated. Signals and backgrounds are simulated using Atlfast, a fast simulation programme for the ATLAS experiment. This specific channel causes violation of unitarity at 1.2 TeV. Therefore, unitarisation is performed and this leads to different resonance scenarios, five of which are investigated. The final signal to background ratio after applying various kinematic cuts on events is greater than one for all the five scenarios. A comparison between the algorithm and cone algorithm is also performed to find out which jet-finding analysis yields a better signal to background ratio. The algorithm proves very efficient in reducing the background by an approximate factor of 1.5 better than t...

  1. Study of elastic scattering between heavy ions. Reaction channel influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doubre, Hubert.

    1978-01-01

    The role of absorption on the behavior of heavy ion angular distributions and excitaton functions has been investigated on light and medium mass systems. Comparison between 20 Ne+ 12 C and 16 O+ 16 O systems which lead to the same compound nucleus, shows that it originates from the direct channels strongly coupled to the entrance channel. Structures in the excitation functions occur for almost all the light systems and it is shown that the damping observed for heavier systems such as 40 Ca+ 40 Ca, essentially results on the predominance of Coulomb effects which hide the nuclear structure effects. Thus no valuable information on the details of S-matrix can be extracted for such an heavy system. A coherent description of the elastic scattering, based on a splitting of the scattering amplitude into two components, the modulus of each component varying smoothly as a function of energy and angle. The interference between these sub-amplitudes give rise to interference effects in angular distributions and excitation functions. The study of the main reaction channels of the 40 Ca+ 40 Ca system - i.e. deep inelastic reactions and fusion - also shows that the closed-shell nature of the interacting nuclei does not play any role in these processes due to the excitation processes in the first stage of the reactions which destroy the specific structure of the nuclei [fr

  2. A study on the scattered dose in portable chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Bong Seon; Lee, Hwan Hyung

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to survey the present status of portable radiography and the result of free space scattered dose rate when taking a radiography at the general hospital or the university hospital in Taejon city. The results were as follows; The number of cases using portable radiography for three years increased to averages 16.2%, 7.7% per year from January 1st in 1996 to December 31st in 1998. The average of distance of adjacent patients was 219.1 cm at the ward. For portable chest radiography, the free space scattered dose rate was 10.5 mSv/hr at 50 cm distance, 1.8 mSv/hr at 100 cm distance, and 0.2 mSv/hr at 200 cm distance. Therefore, in case of portable chest radiography at the ward, the average of distance of adjacent patients is 219.1 cm, so it dose not have influence on the adjacent patient. But during the portable radiography, a guardian who is close to the patient, doctor, nurse and radiologic technologists has to set up the shield to prevent from the unnecessary radiation or the distance should be as great as possible from the mobile X-ray equipment

  3. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    Despite of setbacks in the lack of neutrons for the proposed We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with the VLR histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized an intrinsically bent DNA region flanking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interatctions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin

  4. Neutron scatter studies of chromatin structures related to functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have made considerable progress in chromatin reconstitution with very lysine rich histone H1/H5 and in understanding the dynamics of nucleosomes. A ferromagnetic fluid was developed to align biological molecules for structural studies using small-angle-neutron-scattering. We have also identified and characterized in intrinsically bent DNA region flaking the RNA polymerase I binding site of the ribosomal RNA gene in Physarum Polycephalum. Finally projects in progress are in the areas of studying the interactions of histone H4 amino-terminus peptide 1-23 and acetylated 1-23 peptide with DNA using thermal denaturation; study of GGAAT repeats found in human centromeres using high resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and nuclease sentivity assay; and the role of histones and other sperm specific proteins with sperm chromatin

  5. wax matrix tablets and its implication on dissolution prof

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acetaminophen-wax matrix tablet and hence its implication on dissolution profile. Acetaminophen-wax ... inertness, cost effectiveness, non- toxicity and more importantly their ... Liver Poole, England) at constant load (30 arbitrary units on the ...

  6. Effects of air pollutants on epicuticular wax structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huttunen, S.

    1994-01-01

    In xerophytes, like conifers, the epicuticular wax is well developed. Especially in and around stomatal entrances, a thick wax coating is present. Epicuticular waxes are modified by changes in plant growth conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, irradiance, and wind, or acid rain. The fine structure of epicuticular waxes, their chemistry, and ecophysiological function are modified, especially in evergreen, long-lived conifer needles with characteristic crystalline wax structures. During needle flushing and development, wax structure is easily modified. Acid rain-treated Scots pine needles had 50% less epicuticular waxes in early August. Pollution-induced delayed development, destruction, and disturbances have been identified in many plant species. The structural changes in wax crystals are known. Acid rain or polluted air can destroy the crystalloid epicuticular waxes in a few weeks. In Pinus sylvestris, the first sign of pollution effect is the fusion of wax tubes. In Picea abies and P. sitchensis, modifications of crystalloid wax structure are known. In Californian pine trees phenomena of recrystallization of wax tubes on second-year needles were observed after delayed epicuticular wax development in Pinus ponderosa and P. coulteri. Thus, the effects of air pollutants are modified by climate. Accelerated senescence of leaves and needles have been associated with natural and anthropogenic stresses. The accelerated erosion rate of epicuticular waxes has been measured under air pollution conditions. Many short-term air pollution experiments have failed to show any structural changes in epicuticular wax structures. The quantity and quality of needle waxes grown in open-top chambers, glass houses, or polluted air before treatment, differ from field conditions and make it difficult to detect effects of any treatment. (orig.)

  7. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist.

  8. Neutron scattering studies on chromatin higher-order structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graziano, V.; Gerchman, S.E.; Schneider, D.K.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    1994-01-01

    We have been engaged in studies of the structure and condensation of chromatin into the 30nm filament using small-angle neutron scattering. We have also used deuterated histone H1 to determine its location in the chromatin 30nm filament. Our studies indicate that chromatin condenses with increasing ionic strength to a limiting structure that has a mass per unit length of 6-7 nucleosomes/11 nm. They also show that the linker histone H1/H5 is located in the interior of the chromatin filament, in a position compatible with its binding to the inner face of the nucleosome. Analysis of the mass per unit length as a function of H5 stoichiometry suggests that 5-7 contiguous nucleosomes need to have H5 bound before a stable higher order structure can exist

  9. Investigation of the structure of human dental tissue at multiple length scales using high energy synchrotron X-ray SAXS/WAXS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Tan; Landini, Gabriel; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2011-10-01

    High energy (>50keV) synchrotron X-ray scattering experiments were carried out on beamline I12 JEEP at the Diamond Light Source (DLS, Oxford, UK). Although a complete human tooth could be studied, in the present study attention was focused on coupons from the region of the Dentin-Enamel Junction (DEJ). Simultaneous high energy SAXS/WAXS measurements were carried out. Quantitative analysis of the results allows multiple length scale characterization of the nano-crystalline structure of dental tissues. SAXS patterns analysis provide insight into the mean thickness and orientation of hydroxyapatite particles, while WAXS (XRD) patterns allow the determination of the crystallographic unit cell parameters of the hydroxyapatite phase. It was found that the average particle thickness determined from SAXS interpretation varies as a function of position in the vicinity of the DEJ. Most mineral particles are randomly orientated within dentin, although preferred orientation emerges and becomes stronger on approach to the enamel. Within the enamel, texture is stronger than anywhere in the dentin, and the determination of lattice parameters can be accomplished by Pawley refinement of the multiple peak diffraction pattern. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using high energy synchrotron X-ray beams for the characterization of human dental tissues. This opens up the opportunity of studying thick samples (e.g., complete teeth) in complex sample environments (e.g., under saline solution). This opens new avenues for the application of high energy synchrotron X-ray scattering to dental research.

  10. 75 FR 63200 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-14

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-282 (Third Review)] Petroleum Wax Candles... five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from China. SUMMARY... antidumping duty order on petroleum wax candles from China would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  11. 75 FR 80843 - Petroleum Wax Candles From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-282 (Third Review)] Petroleum Wax Candles... Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1675(c)), that revocation of the antidumping duty order on petroleum wax... contained in USITC Publication 4207 (December 2010), entitled Petroleum Wax Candles from China...

  12. Preliminary Examination of X-ray Scattering from Human Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desouky, O.S.; Wilkinson, S.; Hall, C.; Rogers, K.; Round, A.

    2008-01-01

    Small Angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) patterns have been recorded from different human soft tissues using x-ray synchrotron radiation.Pathological breast, normal kidney and lung tissues show SAXS peaks at q-values equal to 0.291 nm -1 and 0.481 nm -1 (d 21.6 nm and d =13. nm) which are the 3 r d and 5 t h order of the well known axial D-spacing of collagen fibrils. The diffraction is particularly intense in the meridional direction indicating some febrile alignment. In contrast, the normal tissue of brain, liver and heart shows diffuse scatter.The wide-angle coherent scattering from normal human tissues of brain, liver, heart, lung, and kidney is typical of that for amorphous materials. The scatter of the healthy adipose breast tissue shows a sharp peak at momentum transfer 1.24 nm -1 (d= 0.417 nm). The data of the other tissues appears to consist of a broad scattering peak. The two scattering regimes succeed in differentiating between the two major components of breast tissue, collagen and adipose tissue. The results of this study suggest that the soft tissues may have scattering patterns that are characteristics for the particular tissue types and tissue disease state. These results indicate that it may be possible use the coherent scattering as a diagnostic tool

  13. 21 CFR 172.886 - Petroleum wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... availability of this material at NARA, call 202-741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register... it is very hygroscopic and will react with some metal containers in the presence of air. Phosphoric... high enough to keep the wax melted. (Note: In preheating the sulfoxide-acid mixture, remove the stopper...

  14. Project study of a small-angle neutron scattering apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedler, E.; Pollet, J.L.

    1979-03-01

    This design study deals with the set up of a low angle scattering apparatus in the HMI reactor hall in Berlin. The experiences of other institutes with facilities of a similar type, - especially with D11 and D17 of the ILL in Grenoble, the set up the KFA in Juelich and of the PTB in Braunschweig -, are included to a large extend. The aim of this paper is - to define the necessary boundary conditions for the construction (including: installation of a cold source, the beam line, the neutron guide pipe and an extention of the reactor hall), -to determine the properties of the planned apparatus, especially in comparison with D11, probably the most versatile instrument, - to make desitions for the design of the components, - to work out the detailed drawings for construction - to estimate the costs and the time necessary for construction, if industrial manufacturers set up the project. (orig.) [de

  15. Neutron scattering studies of molecular conformations in liquid crystal polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirez, L.; Moussa, F.; Cotton, J. P.; Keller, P.; Pépy, G.

    1991-03-01

    A comblike liquid crystal polymer (LPC) is a polymer on which mesogenic molecules have been grafted. It exhibits a succession of liquid crystal phases. Usually the equilibrium conformation of an ordinary polymeric chain corresponds to a maximum entropy, i.e., to an isotropic spherical coil. How does the backbone of a LCP behave in the nematic and smectic field? Small-angle neutron scattering may answer this question. Such measurements are presented here on four different polymers as a function of temperature. An anisotropy of the backbone conformation is found in all these studied compounds, much more pronounced in the smectic phase than in the nematic phase: the backbone spreads more or less perpendicularly to its hanging cores. A comparison with existing theories and a discussion of these results is outlined.

  16. The small angle neutron scattering study on the segmented polyurethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudirman; Gunawan; Prasetyo, S.M.; Karo Karo, A.; Lahagu, I.M.; Darwinto, Tri

    1999-01-01

    The distance between hard segment (HS) and soft segment (SS) of segmented polyurethane have been determined using the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique. The segmented Polyurethanes (SPU) are linear multiblock copolymers, which include elastomer thermoplastic. SPU consist of hard segment and soft segment, each has tendency to make a group with similar type to form a domain. The soft segments used were polypropylene glycol (PPG) and 4,4 diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), while l,4 butanediol (BD) was used as hard segment. The characteristic of SPU depends on its phase structure which is affected by several factors, such as type of chemical formula and the composition of the HS and SS, solvent as well as the synthesizing process. The samples used in this study were SPU56 and SPU68. Based on the appearance of SANS profile, it was obtained that domain distances are 12.32 nm for the SPU56 and 19 nm for the SPU68. (author)

  17. Study of α-16O scattering by orthogonality condition models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitschaft, A.M.; Canto, L.F.; Schechter, H.

    1983-01-01

    The use of approximate microscopic theories in α- 16 O scattering is investigated. The Orthogonality Condition Model (OCM) with both the direct potential of the Resonating Group Method (RMG) and with an effective local potential, V sub(eff), derived from Kernels of Generator Coordinate Method (GCM) is employed to study collisions at CM energies up to 30 MeV, for all relevant partial waves. Although the predictions of the OCM are consistent with 'exact' RGM results in both cases, the nuclear phase-shifts obtained with the effective potential are better. The presence of ambiguities in the derivation of V sub(eff) is noticed. The nature of such ambiguities is discussed. (Author) [pt

  18. Study of α-16O scattering by orthogonality condition models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitschaft, A.M.; Canto, L.F.; Schechter, H.

    1982-01-01

    The use of approximate microscopic theories in α- 16 O scattering is investigated. The Orthogonality Condition Model (OCM) with the direct potential of the Resonating Group Method (RGM) and with an effective local potential V sub(eff') derived from Kernels of the Generator Coordinate Method (GCM) is employed to study collisions at CM energies up to 30 MeV, for all relevant partial waves. Although the predictions of the OCM are consistent with 'exact' RGM results in both cases, the nuclear phase-shifts obtained with the effective potential are better. It is noticed the presence of ambiguities in the derivation of V sub(eff'). The nature of such ambiguities is discussed. (Author) [pt

  19. Study of double scattering effect in antiproton--deuteron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemany, P.D.

    1975-01-01

    The double scattering process in the deuteron is investigated for the reaction anti pd → p/sub s/ + mesons. About 30 percent of the apparent anti pn annihilations are involved in double scattering. A model which describes the properties of protons emerging from apparent anti pn annihilations is presented

  20. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T. [Swinburne Sarawak Research Centre for Sustainable Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Computing & Science, Swinburne University of Technology Sarawak Campus, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2015-08-28

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering.

  1. A study of phonon anisotropic scattering effect on silicon thermal conductivity at nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bong, Victor N-S; Wong, Basil T.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that anisotropy in phonon transport exist because of the difference in phonon dispersion relation due to different lattice direction, as observed by a difference in in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivity. The directional preference (such as forward or backward scattering) in phonon propagation however, remains a relatively unexplored frontier. Our current work adopts a simple scattering probability in radiative transfer, which is called Henyey and Greenstein probability density function, and incorporates it into the phonon Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the effect of directional scattering in phonon transport. In this work, the effect of applying the anisotropy scattering is discussed, as well as its impact on the simulated thermal conductivity of silicon thin films. While the forward and backward scattering will increase and decrease thermal conductivity respectively, the extent of the effect is non-linear such that forward scattering has a more obvious effect than backward scattering

  2. Computational study of the Rayleigh light scattering properties of atmospheric pre-nucleation clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Norman, Patrick; Bilde, Merete

    2014-01-01

    The Rayleigh and hyper Rayleigh scattering properties of the binary (H 2SO4)(H2O)n and ternary (H 2SO4)(NH3)(H2O)n clusters are investigated using a quantum mechanical response theory approach. The molecular Rayleigh scattering intensities are expressed using the dipole polarizability α...... and hyperpolarizability β tensors. Using density functional theory, we elucidate the effect of cluster morphology on the scattering properties using a combinatorial sampling approach. We find that the Rayleigh scattering intensity depends quadratically on the number of water molecules in the cluster and that a single...... ammonia molecule is able to induce a high anisotropy, which further increases the scattering intensity. The hyper Rayleigh scattering activities are found to be extremely low. This study presents the first attempt to map the scattering of atmospheric molecular clusters using a bottom-up approach...

  3. Study on the Light Scattering from Random Rough Surfaces by Kirrhoff Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keding Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the space distribution characteristics of light scattering from random rough surfaces, the linear filtering method is used to generate a series of Gaussian randomly rough surfaces, and the Kirchhoff Approximation is used to calculate the scattered light intensity distribution from random metal and dielectric rough surfaces. The three characteristics of the scattered light intensity distribution peak, the intensity distribution width and the position of peak are reviewed. Numerical calculation results show that significant differences between scattering characteristics of metal surfaces and the dielectric surfaces exist. The light scattering characteristics are jointly influenced by the slope distribution and reflectance of surface element. The scattered light intensity distribution is affected by common influence of surface local slope distribution and surface local reflectivity. The results can provide a basis theory for the research to lidar target surface scattering characteristics.

  4. Experimental study of angular dependence in double photon Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandhu, B.S.; Dewan, R.; Saddi, M.B.; Singh, B.; Ghumman, B.S.

    2000-01-01

    The collision differential cross-section and energy of one of the final photons for double photon Compton scattering have been measured as a function of scattering angle θ 1 . The incident photon energy is 0.662 MeV and thin aluminium foils are used as a scatterer. The two simultaneously emitted photons in this higher order process are detected in coincidence using two NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometers and 30 ns timing electronics. The measured values for energy and collision differential cross-section agree with theory within experimental estimated error. The present data provide information of angular dependence in this higher order process

  5. Effects of air pollutants on epicuticular wax chemical composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percy, K.E.; McQuattie, C.J.; Rebbeck, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature of modifications to epicuticular wax structure as a consequence of exposure to air pollutants. Most authors have used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to describe changes in wax crystallite morphology or distribution. ''Erosion'' or ''weathering'' of crystalline structure into an amorphous state is the most common observation, particularly in the case of conifer needles having the characteristic tube crystallites comprised of nonacosan-10-ol. Wax structure is largely determined by its chemical composition. Therefore, many of the reported changes in wax structure due to air pollutants probably arise from direct interactions between pollutants such as ozone and wax biosynthesis. The literature describing changes in wax composition due to pollutants is briefly reviewed. New evidence is introduced in support of the hypothesis for a direct interaction between air pollutants and epicuticular wax Biosynthesis. (orig.)

  6. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of sodium butyl benzene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Na-NBBS), in aqueous solutions is investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Nearly ellipsoidal aggregates of Na-NBBS at concentrations well above its minimum hydrotrope concentration were detected by SANS. The hydrotrope ...

  7. Life at extreme conditions: Neutron scattering studies of biological

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extremophile bacteria; molecular adaptation; halophile; water dynamics; protein dynamics. ... Results of neutron scattering measurements on the dynamics of proteins ... The experiments were performed on a halophilic protein, and membrane ...

  8. Dental students' preferences and performance in crown design: conventional wax-added versus CAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, R Duane; Hopp, Christa D; Augustin, Marcus A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental students' perceptions of traditional waxing vs. computer-aided crown design and to determine the effectiveness of either technique through comparative grading of the final products. On one of twoidentical tooth preparations, second-year students at one dental school fabricated a wax pattern for a full contour crown; on the second tooth preparation, the same students designed and fabricated an all-ceramic crown using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technology. Projects were graded for occlusion and anatomic form by three faculty members. On completion of the projects, 100 percent of the students (n=50) completed an eight-question, five-point Likert scalesurvey, designed to assess their perceptions of and learning associated with the two design techniques. The average grades for the crown design projects were 78.3 (CAD) and 79.1 (wax design). The mean numbers of occlusal contacts were 3.8 (CAD) and 2.9(wax design), which was significantly higher for CAD (p=0.02). The survey results indicated that students enjoyed designing afull contour crown using CAD as compared to using conventional wax techniques and spent less time designing the crown using CAD. From a learning perspective, students felt that they learned more about position and the size/strength of occlusal contacts using CAD. However, students recognized that CAD technology has limits in terms of representing anatomic contours and excursive occlusion compared to conventional wax techniques. The results suggest that crown design using CAD could be considered as an adjunct to conventional wax-added techniques in preclinical fixed prosthodontic curricula.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles studied by small angle X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto; Antonel, Soledad; Negri, Martin

    2011-01-01

    because they exhibit magnetic (ferromagnetic) and electrical properties in the same material. Then, the nickel nanoparticles could be used for the development of electroelastic materials. In this case, the electrical conductivity of the material can be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field, for example the case of nickel metal nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer, resulting in an anisotropic material with combined piezomagnetic and piezoelectric properties. In order to investigate the structural characteristics of cobalt-iron oxides and nickel nanoparticles, powder samples of those magnetic materials were studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering. As will be shown, from the analysis and modeling of the scattering data, structural information could be obtained, enabling a detailed description of the structural properties of the studied samples which could be directly correlated to the magnetic properties. (author)

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles studied by small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Grupo de Fluidos Complexos; Antonel, Soledad; Negri, Martin [Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales. Dept. de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica Fisica

    2011-07-01

    nanoparticles are very interesting because they exhibit magnetic (ferromagnetic) and electrical properties in the same material. Then, the nickel nanoparticles could be used for the development of electroelastic materials. In this case, the electrical conductivity of the material can be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field, for example the case of nickel metal nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer, resulting in an anisotropic material with combined piezomagnetic and piezoelectric properties. In order to investigate the structural characteristics of cobalt-iron oxides and nickel nanoparticles, powder samples of those magnetic materials were studied by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering. As will be shown, from the analysis and modeling of the scattering data, structural information could be obtained, enabling a detailed description of the structural properties of the studied samples which could be directly correlated to the magnetic properties. (author)

  11. Effect of emulsifier type and concentration, aqueous phase volume and wax ratio on physical, material and mechanical properties of water in oil lipsticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beri, A; Norton, J E; Norton, I T

    2013-12-01

    Water-in-oil emulsions in lipsticks could have the potential to improve moisturizing properties and deliver hydrophilic molecules to the lips. The aims of this work were (i) to investigate the effect of emulsifier type (polymer vs. monomer, and saturated vs. unsaturated chain) and concentration on droplet size and (ii) to investigate the effect of wax ratio (carnauba wax, microcrystalline wax, paraffin wax and performalene) and aqueous phase volume on material properties (Young's modulus, point of fracture, elastic modulus and viscous modulus). Emulsion formation was achieved using a high shear mixer. Results showed that the saturated nature of the emulsifier had very little effect on droplet size, neither did the use of an emulsifier with a larger head group (droplet size ~18-25 μm). Polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) resulted in emulsions with the smallest droplets (~3-5 μm), as expected from previous studies that show that it produces a thick elastic interface. The results also showed that both Young's modulus and point of fracture increase with increasing percentage of carnauba wax (following a power law dependency of 3), but decrease with increasing percentage of microcrystalline wax, suggesting that the carnauba wax is included in the overall wax network formed by the saturated components, whereas the microcrystalline wax forms irregular crystals that disrupt the overall wax crystal network. Young's modulus, elastic modulus and viscous modulus all decrease with increasing aqueous phase volume in the emulsions, although the slope of the decrease in elastic and viscous moduli is dependent on the addition of solid wax, as a result of strengthening the network. This work suggests the potential use for emulsions in lipstick applications, particularly when PGPR is used as an emulsifier, and with the addition of solid wax, as it increases network strength. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  12. Lithium ion behavior in lithium oxide by neutron scattering studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshinobu; Morii, Yukio; Katano, Susumu; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Satoru; Ohno, Hideo; Nicklow, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Lithium ion behavior in lithium oxide, Li 2 O, was studied in the temperature range from 293 K to 1120 K by the High-Resolution Powder Diffractometer (HRPD) installed in the JRR-3M. The diffraction patterns were analyzed with the RIETAN program. At room temperature, the thermal parameters related to the mean square of the amplitude of vibration of the lithium and the oxygen ions were 6 x 10 -21 m 2 and 4 x 10 -21 m 2 , respectively. AT 1120 K the thermal parameter of the lithium ion was 34 x 10 -21 m 2 . On the other hand, the parameter of the oxygen ion was 16 x 10 -21 m 2 . Inelastic neutron scattering studies for the lithium oxide single crystal were also carried out on the triple-axis neutron spectrometers installed at the JRR-2 and the HFIR. Although the value of a phonon energy of a transverse acoustic mode (Σ 3 ) at zone boundary was 30.6 meV at room temperature, this value was decreased to 25.1 meV at 700 K. This large softening was caused by anharmonicity of the crystal potential of lithium oxide. (author)

  13. A study of low Q2 radiative Bhabha scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlen, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    This thesis presents a study of electron-positron scattering, via nearly real photon exchange, where in the process one or more high energy photons are produced. The motivations behind the work are twofold. Firstly, the study is a sensitive test of the theory of electron-photon interactions, quantum electrodynamics. A deviation from the theory could indicate that the electron is a composite particle. Secondly, a thorough understanding of this process is necessary for experiments to be done in the near future at the Stanford Linear Collider and the LEP facility at CERN. Calculations for the process to third and fourth order in pertubation theory are described. Methods for simulating the process by a Monte Carlo event generator are given. Results from the calculations are compared to data from the Mark II experiment at the PEP storage ring. The ratio of measured to calculated cross sections are 0.993 /+-/ 0.017 /+-/ 0.015 and 0.99 /+-/ 0.16 /+-/ 0.08 for final states with one and two observed photons respectively, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. The excellent agreement verifies the calculations of the fourth order radiative correction. No evidence for electron substructure is observed

  14. Intrabeam scattering studies at the Swiss light source

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, F; Aiba, M; Boege, M; Milas, N; Streun, A; Demma, T

    2012-01-01

    The target parameters of modern ultra-low emittance rings are entering into a regime where Intra-beam Scattering (IBS) becomes important and, in the case of linear collider damping rings, even a limitation for the delivered emittances. The Swiss Light Source (SLS) storage ring, as it has achieved a vertical geometrical emittance of around 1 pm at 2.4 GeV [1], and it has the ability to run at even lower energies, and the availability of emittance monitoring diagnostics, is an ideal testbed for IBS studies. Simulations using the classical IBS theories and tracking codes are undertaken in order to explore the possibilities and limitations for IBS measurements at the SLS. In this respect, comparison between the theories and codes is first discussed. The dependence of the output emittances, taking into account the effect of IBS, with respect to energy, bunch charge and zero current vertical and longitudinal emittance is also studied, in order to define the regimes where the IBS effect can be significant. First mea...

  15. Compound-Specific Radiocarbon Dating Reveals the Age Distribution of Plant-Wax Biomarkers Exported to the Bengal Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, V.; French, K. L.; Hein, C. J.; Haghipour, N.; Wacker, L.; Kudrass, H.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2017-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of leaf-wax compounds preserved in lacustrine and marine sediments has been widely used to reconstruct terrestrial paleo-environments. However, the timescales of plant-wax storage in continental reservoirs before riverine export are not well known, representing a key uncertainty in paleo-environment studies. We couple numerical models with bulk and leaf-wax fatty acid organic 13C and 14C signatures hosted in a high-deposition-rate sediment core from the Bengal shelf canyon in order to estimate storage timescales within the Ganges-Brahmaputra catchment area. The fatty acid 14C record reveals a muted nuclear weapons bomb spike, requiring that the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system exports a mixture of young and old (pre-aged) leaf-wax compounds. According to numerical simulations, 79-83% of the leaf-wax fatty acids in this core are sourced from continental reservoirs that store organic carbon on an average of 1000-1200 calendar years, while the remainder has an average age of 15 years. These results demonstrate that a majority of the leaf-wax compounds produced in the Ganges-Brahmaputra river basin was stored in soils, floodplains, and wetlands prior to its export to the Bengal Fan. We will discuss the implications of these findings for plant-wax based paleoenvironmental records.

  16. Effect of spatial distribution of wax and PEG-isocyanate on the morphology and hydrophobicity of starch films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Delina; Adhikari, Raju; Tobin, Mark J; McKnight, Stafford; Wakeling, Lara; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-10-13

    This study proposes a novel method for improving surface hydrophobicity of glycerol plasticized high amylose (HAG) films. We used polyethylene glycol isocyanate (PEG-iso) crosslinker to link HAG and three natural waxes (beeswax, candelilla wax and carnauba wax) to produce HAG+wax+PEG-iso films. The spatial distributions of wax and PEG-iso across the thickness of these films were determined using Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The hydrophobicity and surface morphology of the films were determined using contact angle (CA) and scanning electron microscopic measurements, respectively. The distribution patterns of wax and the PEG-iso across the thickness of the film, and the nature of crystalline patterns formed on the surface of these films were found to be the key factors affecting surface hydrophobicity. The highest hydrophobicity (CA >90°) was created when the PEG-iso was primarily distributed in the interior of the films and a hierarchical circular pinnacle structure of solidified wax was formed on the surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Studying time of flight imaging through scattering media across multiple size scales (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Light scattering is a primary obstacle to optical imaging in a variety of different environments and across many size and time scales. Scattering complicates imaging on large scales when imaging through the atmosphere when imaging from airborne or space borne platforms, through marine fog, or through fog and dust in vehicle navigation, for example in self driving cars. On smaller scales, scattering is the major obstacle when imaging through human tissue in biomedical applications. Despite the large variety of participating materials and size scales, light transport in all these environments is usually described with very similar scattering models that are defined by the same small set of parameters, including scattering and absorption length and phase function. We attempt a study of scattering and methods of imaging through scattering across different scales and media, particularly with respect to the use of time of flight information. We can show that using time of flight, in addition to spatial information, provides distinct advantages in scattering environments. By performing a comparative study of scattering across scales and media, we are able to suggest scale models for scattering environments to aid lab research. We also can transfer knowledge and methodology between different fields.

  18. Combined hydrogen and carbon isotopes of plant waxes as an indicator of drought impacts on ancient Maya agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, P. M.; Pagani, M.; Eglinton, T. I.; Brenner, M.; Hodell, D. A.; Curtis, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that a series of droughts in the Yucatan Peninsula coincided with the Terminal Classic decline of the Classic Maya civilization (ca. 1250 to 1000 years BP). However, there is little evidence directly linking climatic change and changes in human activities in this region. In this study we combine plant-wax δD, δ13C, and Δ14C analyses in two lake sediment cores from southeastern Mexico and northern Guatemala to develop coupled records of hydroclimate variability and human-driven vegetation change. Plant-wax specific Δ14C ages indicate a large input of pre-aged plant waxes into lake sediment. Comparison of plant-wax δD records with other regional hydroclimate proxy records suggest that plant-wax ages are evenly distributed around plant-wax radiocarbon ages, and that applying an age model based on plant-wax radiocarbon ages is appropriate for these lake sediments. We evaluate how differences in plant-wax age distributions influence stable isotope records to assess the age uncertainty associated with records of climate and vegetation change derived from plant-wax stable isotopes. In this low-elevation tropical environment plant-wax δ13C is largely controlled by the relative abundance of C3 and C4 plants. The ancient Maya practiced widespread maize (C4) agriculture and strongly influenced regional C3-C4 vegetation dynamics. Under natural conditions C4 plant coverage and plant-wax δ13C would tend to co-vary positively since C4 plants are well adapted for dry conditions. Under ancient Maya land-use, however, this relationship is likely to be decoupled, since drought would have disrupted C4 agriculture. Combined analysis of plant-wax δD and δ13C from both lakes indicates increasingly divergent trends following ca. 3500 years BP, around the onset of widespread ancient Maya agriculture. After this time high plant-wax δD values tend to correspond with low plant-wax δ13C values and vice versa. This pattern is consistent with

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Marginal and Internal Gap of Co-Cr Copings Fabricated from Conventional Wax Pattern, 3D Printed Resin Pattern and DMLS Tech: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Eswaran; Azhagarasan, N S; Miglani, Saket; Ilango, T; Krishna, G Phani; Gajapathi, B

    2013-09-01

    Accuracy of the fit of the restoration has always remained as one of the primary factors in determining success of the restoration. A well fitting restoration needs to be accurate both along its margins and internal surface. This study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the marginal gap and internal gap of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) copings fabricated by conventional casting procedures and with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) technique. Among the total of 30 test samples 10 cast copings were made from inlay casting wax and 10 from 3D printed resin pattern. 10 copings were obtained from DMLS technique. All the 30 test samples were then cemented sequentially on stainless steel model using pressure indicating paste and evaluated for vertical marginal gap in 8 predetermined reference areas. All copings were then removed and partially sectioned and cemented sequentially on same master model for evaluation of internal gap at 4 predetermined reference areas. Both marginal gap and internal gap were measured in microns using video measuring system (VMS2010F). The results obtained for both marginal and internal gap were statistically analyzed and the values fall within the clinically acceptable range. The DMLS technique had an edge over the other two techniques used, as it exhibited minimal gap in the marginal region which is an area of chief concern.

  20. Neutral Lipid Biosynthesis in Engineered Escherichia coli: Jojoba Oil-Like Wax Esters and Fatty Acid Butyl Esters

    OpenAIRE

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant E...

  1. Static and dynamic light scattering studies on dilute polyrotaxane solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tetsuya; Araki, Jun; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mayumi, Koichi; Kidowaki, Masatoshi; Yokoyama, Hideaki; Ito, Kohzo

    2009-08-01

    Static and dynamic light scattering measurements were performed for dilute polyrotaxane solutions in different types of solvent systems, i.e. dimethylacetamide (DMAc) or dimethylformamide (DMF) containing 1-6 wt% lithium chloride (LiCl), 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). No aggregation of the polyrotaxane in DMF/LiCl was confirmed in the present study. Radius of gyration of the dissolved polyrotaxane was largest in NaOHaq., followed by values in amide solvents/LiCl and that in DMSO, and was probably dominated not by Coulombic repulsion but by the mutual affinity between solvent and polyrotaxane. Ratio of radius of gyration to hydrodynamic radius suggested the flexible random-coiled conformation in DMSO and relatively more extended, semi-flexible ones in amide solvents/LiCl and NaOHaq. The obtained values of second virial coefficient and weight average molecular weight seemed to be affected by a potential change in differential refractive index increments, caused by selective macrocationization or ionization.

  2. Static and dynamic light scattering studies on dilute polyrotaxane solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Tetsuya; Sakai, Yasuhiro; Mayumi, Koichi; Kidowaki, Masatoshi; Yokoyama, Hideaki; Ito, Kohzo; Araki, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Static and dynamic light scattering measurements were performed for dilute polyrotaxane solutions in different types of solvent systems, i.e. dimethylacetamide (DMAc) or dimethylformamide (DMF) containing 1-6 wt% lithium chloride (LiCl), 1 M aqueous sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). No aggregation of the polyrotaxane in DMF/LiCl was confirmed in the present study. Radius of gyration of the dissolved polyrotaxane was largest in NaOHaq., followed by values in amide solvents/LiCl and that in DMSO, and was probably dominated not by Coulombic repulsion but by the mutual affinity between solvent and polyrotaxane. Ratio of radius of gyration to hydrodynamic radius suggested the flexible random-coiled conformation in DMSO and relatively more extended, semi-flexible ones in amide solvents/LiCl and NaOHaq. The obtained values of second virial coefficient and weight average molecular weight seemed to be affected by a potential change in differential refractive index increments, caused by selective macrocationization or ionization.

  3. Breast cancer study in rats by using Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez E, J. C.; Cordova F, T.; Roca Ch, J. M.; Hernandez R, A.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: The use of Raman scattering to differentiate the biochemistry and hence distinguish between normal and abnormal samples of breast cancer with induced stress was investigated. Twelve different rat serum samples (5 control samples and 7 breast cancer samples) were measured. 25 spectra per sample were acquired in a region of 50 X 50 microns. Three hundred spectra were recorded and the spectral diagnostic models were constructed by using multivariate statistical analysis on the spectral matrix to carry out the discrimination between the control samples and cancers samples with induced stress. The spectral recording was performed with Raman microscopy system Thermo Scientific XRD in the range from 200 to 2000 cm -1 with a laser source of 780 nm, 24 m W of power and 50 s and exposure time were used for each spectrum. It is shown that the serum samples from rats with breast cancer and the control group can be discriminate when the multivariate analysis methods are applied to their Raman data set. The ratios were significant and correspond to proteins and phospholipids. The preliminary results suggest that the Raman spectroscopy could be an alternative technique to study the breast cancer in humans in a near future. (Author)

  4. Studies of high energy lepton-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingelman, G.

    1982-05-01

    The first part of this thesis is related to the problem of detecting charmed particles. A new technique for observing very short decay paths in nuclear emulsions is developed and applied on a sample of neutrino induced reactions. Techniques for producing thick pellicles of nuclear track emulsion are also developed. In the second part, phenomenological investigations of deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering are made. Monte Carlo computer programs, based on the parton model and perturbative QCD for the initial hard process and the Lund model for the following soft hadronization, are used to simulate these reactions and thereby obtain explicit results. Generally good agreement is found when comparing these with experimental data, thus supporting this basic framework. Predictions to test QCD are made. Transverse momentum properties are studied in detail, in particular effects from soft gluon emission. The properties of a model for baryon production, both from the target remnant and the colour force field, are discussed and the results found to agree with data. It is shown that, at the presently available energies, the observable energy flow is not due to QCD, but arises from the baryon production in the target fragmentation. In a model to explain the observed Λ polarization, a connection between the confinement of quarks and these polarization phenomena is suggested. (Auth.)

  5. An improved scattering routine for collimation tracking studies at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Tambasco, Claudia; Salvachua Ferrando, Maria Belen; Cavoto, Gianluca

    The present Master thesis work has been carried out at CERN in the framework of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Collimation project. The LHC accelerates proton beams up to 7 TeV colliding in the experiment detectors installed in four points of the accelerator ring. The LHC is built to store a energy of 360MJ for each beam. The energy deposition induced by local beam losses could quench the superconducting magnets located around the accelerator beam pipes. To prevent and keep under control dangerous beam losses, an efficient collimation system is required. In addition, the achievable LHC beam intensity is related to the beam loss rate and, consequently, to the cleaning efficiency of the collimation system. Collimation studies at LHC are carried out also by means of simulations by using SixTrack, a dedicated simulation tool that tracks a large numbers of particles for many turns around the ring. The SixTrack code includes a scattering routine to model proton interactions with the material of the collimators j...

  6. Lattice modes of hexamethylbenzene studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stride, J.A. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: stride@ill.fr; Adams, J.M. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2005-10-31

    The combination of inelastic neutron scattering and detailed ab initio calculations has been used to arrive at accurate assignments of the low energy lattice mode region of hexamethylbenzene (HMB) across the low temperature first order phase transition at 117.5 K. This was also extended well into the mid-infrared spectral region and a good agreement was found between observed and calculated frequencies, which were also confirmed with isotopically substituted d-HMB. At low temperature, the lattice region is dominated by the methyl group torsions around 15 and 20 meV, which soften dramatically on passing into the higher temperature phase. The lowest energy methyl torsion corresponds to a coherent gear wheel motion, observed here for the first time and predicted in previous numerical studies of HMB. The three acoustic phonons lie to lower energy, centered around 6-7 meV, whilst the three optic phonons are very close in energy to the lowest methyl torsions. Other assignments are found to be in accord with literature values and so an unambiguous assignment of all spectral modes has been obtained for the first time. We conclude that due to the behaviour of the lattice modes either side of the phase transition, its nature is predominantly that of a thermally activated dynamic order-disorder transition.

  7. Lattice modes of hexamethylbenzene studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stride, J.A.; Adams, J.M.; Johnson, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    The combination of inelastic neutron scattering and detailed ab initio calculations has been used to arrive at accurate assignments of the low energy lattice mode region of hexamethylbenzene (HMB) across the low temperature first order phase transition at 117.5 K. This was also extended well into the mid-infrared spectral region and a good agreement was found between observed and calculated frequencies, which were also confirmed with isotopically substituted d-HMB. At low temperature, the lattice region is dominated by the methyl group torsions around 15 and 20 meV, which soften dramatically on passing into the higher temperature phase. The lowest energy methyl torsion corresponds to a coherent gear wheel motion, observed here for the first time and predicted in previous numerical studies of HMB. The three acoustic phonons lie to lower energy, centered around 6-7 meV, whilst the three optic phonons are very close in energy to the lowest methyl torsions. Other assignments are found to be in accord with literature values and so an unambiguous assignment of all spectral modes has been obtained for the first time. We conclude that due to the behaviour of the lattice modes either side of the phase transition, its nature is predominantly that of a thermally activated dynamic order-disorder transition

  8. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  9. Breast cancer study in rats by using Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez E, J. C. [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria, Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Col. Fracc. Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cordova F, T.; Roca Ch, J. M.; Hernandez R, A., E-mail: jcmartineze@ipn.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The use of Raman scattering to differentiate the biochemistry and hence distinguish between normal and abnormal samples of breast cancer with induced stress was investigated. Twelve different rat serum samples (5 control samples and 7 breast cancer samples) were measured. 25 spectra per sample were acquired in a region of 50 X 50 microns. Three hundred spectra were recorded and the spectral diagnostic models were constructed by using multivariate statistical analysis on the spectral matrix to carry out the discrimination between the control samples and cancers samples with induced stress. The spectral recording was performed with Raman microscopy system Thermo Scientific XRD in the range from 200 to 2000 cm{sup -1} with a laser source of 780 nm, 24 m W of power and 50 s and exposure time were used for each spectrum. It is shown that the serum samples from rats with breast cancer and the control group can be discriminate when the multivariate analysis methods are applied to their Raman data set. The ratios were significant and correspond to proteins and phospholipids. The preliminary results suggest that the Raman spectroscopy could be an alternative technique to study the breast cancer in humans in a near future. (Author)

  10. ETHNOECOLOGY AND ETHNOBOTANY OF THE PALM CARNAUBA WAX IN BRAZILIAN SEMI-ARID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ferreira de Sousa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate aspects of ethnoecological and ethnobotanical of carnauba wax (Copernicia prunifera (Miller H. E. Moore, Arecaceae in an extractive community of municipality of Ipanguaçu, Rio Grande do Norte state. We interviewed key informants, using the technique of inducing nonspecific, guided tour and direct observation to confirm the data. According to most residents of Pedro Ezequiel Araújo community, the area of carnauba wax in the region is natural. In the research ethnoecological, 73% of informants reported the occurrence of “a different kind of carnauba”, known as “white carnauba” phenotypically distinct from the “common carnauba wax” by presenting clear stipe, smaller fruits and absence of spines on the petiole, and is rare at the study site. Much of the informants observed phenological phases of carnauba wax, being consistent in stating that the species has fruits dispersed by bats. In ethnobotany, powder wax was cited by all as the most important product extracted from leaves of carnauba and the most used, followed by fruit, stem and root. Were still reported the division of work in the extraction of powder wax from the carnauba. The results of this research will contribute to knowledge of ethnobotanical and ethnoecological carnauba, supporting strategies for management and conservation of natural populations.

  11. Biodegradation of paraffin wax by crude Aspergillus enzyme preparations for potential use in removing paraffin deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhui; Xue, Quanhong; Gao, Hui; Wang, Ping

    2015-11-01

    Paraffin deposition problems have plagued the oil industry. Whist mechanical and chemical methods are problematic, microbiological method of paraffin removal is considered an alternative. However, studies have mainly investigated the use of bacteria, with little attention to the potential of fungi. The performance of six Aspergillus isolates to degrade paraffin wax was evaluated under laboratory conditions using solid enzyme preparations. The results showed that all the six enzyme preparations efficiently improved the solubility of paraffin wax in n-hexane and degraded n-alkanes in paraffin wax. The degradation process was accompanied by dynamic production of gases (CO2 and H2 ) and organic acids (oxalate and propionate). The shape of wax crystals markedly changed after enzymatic degradation, with a rough surface and a loose structure. This study indicates that extracellular enzymes from Aspergillus spp. can efficiently degrade paraffin wax. These enzyme preparations have the potential for use in oil wells with paraffin deposition problems. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Zhenyu [Wuhan University, Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu, Qian; Zheng, Yangheng [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Han, Junbo [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun; Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-15

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√(E(MeV)) required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments. (orig.)

  13. Spectroscopic study of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene for liquid scintillator neutrino detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xiang, E-mail: xiangzhou@whu.edu.cn [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072, Wuhan (China); Liu, Qian, E-mail: liuqian@ucas.ac.cn [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Han, Junbo [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Zhenyu [Hubei Nuclear Solid Physics Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education and School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, 430072, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Yayun [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Zheng, Yangheng [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China); Zhou, Li; Cao, Jun; Wang, Yifang [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-21

    We have set up a light scattering spectrometer to study the depolarization of light scattering in linear alkylbenzene. The scattering spectra show that the depolarized part of light scattering is due to Rayleigh scattering. The additional depolarized Rayleigh scattering can make the effective transparency of linear alkylbenzene much better than expected. Therefore, sufficient scintillation photons can transmit through large liquid scintillator detector, such as that of the JUNO experiment. Our study is crucial to achieving an unprecedented energy resolution of 3 %/√(E(MeV)) required for the JUNO experiment to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy. The spectroscopic method can also be used to examine the depolarization of other organic solvents used in neutrino experiments.

  14. Study of Cr52 and Ca40 nuclei by electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Daniel

    1966-01-01

    As high energy electron scattering is a powerful mean to study nuclear structure, this research thesis first reports and comments results obtained while taking the Born approximation into account, and which are useful to interpret electron scattering experiments. The author describes how nucleus charge distribution parameters are obtained from these results of elastic scattering, and then addresses the case of inelastic scattering. Three nuclear models are presented. Then, after a brief presentation of the characteristics of the experimental installation, the author describes how raw results are processed to obtain cross sections, and discusses errors. The last parts address the study of chromium 52 and calcium 40 nuclei

  15. Studies of molecular dynamics with neutron scattering techniques. Part of a coordinated programme on neutron scattering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhas, L.A.

    1980-05-01

    Molecular dynamics was studied in samples of tert-butanol, cyclohexanol and methanol, using neutron inelastic and quasi-elastic techniques. The frequency spectra of cyclohexanol in crystalline phase were interpreted by assigning individual energy peaks to hindered rotation of molecules, lattice vibration, hydrogen bond stretching and ring bending modes. Neutron quasi-elastic scattering measurements permitted the testing of models for molecular diffusion as a function of temperature. The interpretation of neutron incoherent inelastic scattering on methanol indicated the different modes of molecular dynamics in this material; individual inelastic peaks in the spectra could be assigned to vibrations of crystalline lattice, stretching of hydrogen bond and vibrational and torsional modes of CH 3 OH molecule. The results of the experimental work on tertbutanol indicate two distinct modes of motion in this material: individual molecular librations are superposed to a cooperative rotation diffusion which occurs both in solid and in liquid state

  16. Structure property relationship of biological nano composites studies by combination of in-situ synchrotron scattering and mechanical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinschitz, K.

    2005-06-01

    Biological materials represent hierarchical nano fibre composites with complicated morphology and architecture varying on the nm level. The mechanical response of those materials is influenced by many parameters like chemical composition and crystal structure of constituents, preferred orientation, internal morphology with specific sizes of features etc. In-situ wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) combined with mechanical tests provide a unique means to evaluate structural changes in biological materials at specific stages of tensile experiments. In this way it is possible to identify distinct architectural/compositional elements responsible for specific mechanical characteristics of the biological materials. In this thesis, structure-property relationship is analyzed using in-situ WAXS in the tissues of Picea abies, coir fibre, bacterial cellulose and cellulose II based composites. The experiments were performed at the beamline ID01 of European synchrotron radiation facility in Grenoble, France. The tissues were strained in a tensile stage, while the structural changes were monitored using WAXS. Complex straining procedures were applied including cyclic straining. One of the main goals was to understand the stiffness recovery and strain hardening effects in the tissues. The results demonstrate that, in all cellulosics, the orientation of the cellulose crystallites is only the function of the external strain while the stiffness depends on the specific stage of the tensile experiment. Whenever the strain is increased, the tissues exhibit stiffness equal or larger than the initial one. The recovery of the mechanical function is attributed to the molecular mechanistic effects operating between the crystalline domains of the cellulose. (author)

  17. Light and neutron scattering study of strongly interacting ionic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degiorgio, V.; Corti, M.; Piazza, R.

    1989-01-01

    Dilute solutions of ionic micelles formed by biological glycolipids (gangliosides) have been investigated at various ionic strengths by static and dynamic light scaterring and by small-angle neutron scattering. The size and shape of the micelle is not appreciably affected by the added salt concentration in the range 0-100 mM NaCL. From the measured intensity of scattered light we derive the electric charge Z of the micelle by fitting the data to a theoretical calculation which uses a screened Coulomb potential for the intermicellar interaction, and the hypernetted chain approximation for the calculation of the radial distribution function. The correlation function derived from dynamic light scattering shows the long time contribution typical of concentrated polydisperse systems (author). 15 refs.; 6 figs

  18. Contribution to the study of the transport-scattering equivalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldevila, Michel.

    1978-01-01

    The algorithm of the TERMINUS code that analytically resolves the equations of multigroup scattering in one dimensional plane geometry is described in this report. This code has been written and utilized to test the mathematical methods of transport-scattering equivalence. The results are then given of a comparison between the APOLLO, NEPTUNE and TERMINUS codes. The mathematical problem having been formulated, the reasons which led to the choice from among the alternative methods are explained thus enabling the ANACREON and KALGAN programmes to be written. The results achieved with these programs, both of which use TERMINUS as scattering code, are presented. The problems raised by coupling the ANACREON and KALGAN codes to the NEPTUNE system are mentioned and the results achieved with the equivalence module coupled to NEPTUNE are given [fr

  19. Characterization of rice bran wax policosanol and its nanoemulsion formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaka A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aminu Ishaka,1,2 Mustapha Umar Imam,1 Rozi Mahamud,3 Abu Bakar Zakaria Zuki,4 Ismail Maznah1 1Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria; 3Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Policosanol, a mixture of long-chain alcohols found in animal and plant waxes, has several biological effects; however, it has a bioavailability of less than 10%. Therefore, there is a need to improve its bioavailability, and one of the ways of doing this is by nanoemulsion formulation. Different droplet size distributions are usually achieved when emulsions are formed, which solely depends on the preparation method used. Mostly, emulsions are intended for better delivery with maintenance of the characteristics and properties of the leading components. In this study, policosanol was extracted from rice bran wax, its composition was determined by gas chromatography mass spectrophotometry, nanoemulsion was made, and the physical stability characteristics were determined. The results showed that policosanol nanoemulsion has a nanosize particle distribution below 100 nm (92.56–94.52 nm, with optimum charge distribution (-55.8 to -45.12 mV, pH (6.79–6.92 and refractive index (1.50; these were monitored and found to be stable for 8 weeks. The stability of policosanol nanoemulsion confers the potential to withstand long storage times. Keywords: rice bran wax, policosanol, nanoemulsion, characterization

  20. Modeling the hydration process of bean grains coated with carnauba wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Almeida da Paixão

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Edible waxes are widely used to maintain foodstuff until they are consumed. However, some products may be subjected to industrial procedures, such as hydration, prior to their consumption. Hydration of a material is a complex process, which aims to reconstitute the original characteristics of a product when in contact with a liquid phase. An important agricultural product that requires this procedure is beans. Thus, the purpose of this work is to study the hydration process of beans (cultivar BRSMG Majestoso in different temperatures and concentrations of carnauba wax, which is applied on the product surface. Beans with initial moisture content of 0.2015, 0.1972 and 0.1745 (d.b. corresponding to treatments 0 (witness, 1 (wax diluted in water in the ratio 1:1, and 2 (carnauba wax, without dilution were used. Later, these samples were imbibed in distilled water at temperatures of 20, 30 and 40 ºC, for 15 h. The temperature and the carnauba wax influenced the water absorption rate. The Peleg model described satisfactory experimental data and the Mitscherlich model presented biased residual distribution. The constants C1 and C2 of the Peleg model exhibited opposite behaviors with increasing temperatures in the hydration process.

  1. Heat transfer enhancement in energy storage in spherical capsules filled with paraffin wax and metal beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettouney, Hisham; Alatiqi, Imad; Al-Sahali, Mohammad; Al-Hajirie, Khalida

    2006-01-01

    Energy storage is an attractive option to conserve limited energy resources, where more than 50% of the generated industrial energy is discarded in cooling water and stack gases. This study focuses on the evaluation of heat transfer enhancement in phase change energy storage units. The experiments are performed using spherical capsules filled with paraffin wax and metal beads. The experiments are conducted by inserting a single spherical capsule filled with wax and metal beads in a stream of hot/cold air. Experimental measurements include the temperature field within the spherical capsule and in the air stream. To determine the enhancement effects of the metal beads, the measured data is correlated against those for a spherical capsule filled with pure wax. Data analysis shows a reduction of 15% in the melting and solidification times upon increasing the number and diameter of the metal beads. This reduction is caused by a similar decrease in the thermal load of the sphere due to replacement of the wax by metal beads. The small size of the spherical capsule limits the enhancement effects; this is evident upon comparison of the heat transfer in a larger size, double pipe energy storage unit, where 2% of the wax volume is replaced with metal inserts, result in a three fold reduction in the melting/solidification time and a similar enhancement in the heat transfer rate

  2. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of production since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase FTS. The separation problem is further compounded by catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. Existing pilot-scale equipment was modified to include a filtration test apparatus. After undergoing an extensive plant shakedown period, filtration tests with cross-flow filter modules using simulant FTS wax slurry were conducted. The focus of these early tests was to find adequate mixtures of polyethylene wax to simulate FTS wax. Catalyst particle size analysis techniques were also developed. Initial analyses of the slurry and filter permeate particles will be used by the research team to design improved filter media and cleaning strategies.

  3. A combined neutron scattering and simulation study on bioprotectant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affouard, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires UMR 8024, Universite Lille I - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Bordat, P. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires UMR 8024, Universite Lille I - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Descamps, M. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires UMR 8024, Universite Lille I - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Lerbret, A. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires UMR 8024, Universite Lille I - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Magazu, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Universita di Messina, P.O. Box 55, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Migliardo, F. [Laboratoire de Dynamique et Structure des Materiaux Moleculaires UMR 8024, Universite Lille I - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Dipartimento di Fisica and INFM, Universita di Messina, P.O. Box 55, I-98166 Messina (Italy)], E-mail: fmigliardo@unime.it; Ramirez-Cuesta, A.J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom); Telling, M.F.T. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-31

    The present work shows quasi elastic neutron scattering, neutron spin echo and inelastic neutron scattering results on a class of bioprotectant systems, such as homologous disaccharides (i.e., trehalose and sucrose)/water solutions, as a function of temperature. The whole set of findings indicates a noticeable 'kosmotrope' character of the disaccharides, and in particular of trehalose, which is able to strongly modify both the structural and dynamical properties of water. This superior capability of trehalose can be linked to its higher bioprotective effectiveness in respect with the other disaccharides.

  4. Contribution of ultrasound forward scattering to tissue structure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edee, M.K.

    1987-12-01

    In this paper, we show how to get useful information of tissue structure by merely interpreting some experimental graphs such as energy spectral density and autocorrelation function of an ultrasonic beam travelling through tissues. To support these interpretations, we needed just some well-known theorems rather than heavy and complicated mathematical equations, so we measured the dimensions of scatterers within specimens by using the graphical representation of autocorrelation function. We related these measurements to the scattered peaks which appear in energy density spectrum. The values we found were equal to those obtained from biologists within ∼ 15%. (author) 26 refs, 6 figs, tabs

  5. Experimental study of inclusive deep inelastic neutrino--proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, J.P.; Bogert, D.; DiBianca, F.A.; Cundy, D.C.; Dunaitsev, A.; Efremenko, V.; Ermolov, P.; Fowler, W.; Hanft, R.; Harigel, G.; Huson, F.R.; Kolganov, V.; Mukhin, A.; Nezrick, F.A.; Rjabov, Y.; Scott, W.G.; Smart, W.; Coffin, C.T.; Diamond, R.N.; French, H.; Louis, W.; Roe, B.P.; Seidl, A.A.; Velde, J.C.V.

    1976-01-01

    A neutrino--proton scattering experiment has been performed at Fermilab by using a wide-band horn-focused neutrino beam and the 15-ft bubble chamber filled with hydrogen. For the inclusive reaction ν/sub μ/ + p → μ - + hadrons, the mean value of Q 2 is found to increase linearly with energy, as is expected from Bjorken scaling, and a fit to the data gives 2 > = (0.18 +- 0.01) E. The distribution in the Bjorken scaling variable x shows evidence for deviations from predictions based on electron-scattering data and the quark-parton model

  6. Experimental study of Rayleigh scattering with a ruby laser beam: relative variation of scattered light with the number of scattering center and the gases nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Charles

    1973-06-01

    The experimental variation of the scattered light with the number of scattering centers and with the refraction index of gases is in agreement with the theoretical Rayleigh scattering. A direct calibration System gives the absolute value of the Rayleigh ratio. The experimental value appears to be half of the theoretical one. (author) [fr

  7. Scatter correction method with primary modulator for dual energy digital radiography: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byung-Du; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Dae-Hong; Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-03-01

    In conventional digital radiography (DR) using a dual energy subtraction technique, a significant fraction of the detected photons are scattered within the body, resulting in the scatter component. Scattered radiation can significantly deteriorate image quality in diagnostic X-ray imaging systems. Various methods of scatter correction, including both measurement and non-measurement-based methods have been proposed in the past. Both methods can reduce scatter artifacts in images. However, non-measurement-based methods require a homogeneous object and have insufficient scatter component correction. Therefore, we employed a measurement-based method to correct for the scatter component of inhomogeneous objects from dual energy DR (DEDR) images. We performed a simulation study using a Monte Carlo simulation with a primary modulator, which is a measurement-based method for the DEDR system. The primary modulator, which has a checkerboard pattern, was used to modulate primary radiation. Cylindrical phantoms of variable size were used to quantify imaging performance. For scatter estimation, we used Discrete Fourier Transform filtering. The primary modulation method was evaluated using a cylindrical phantom in the DEDR system. The scatter components were accurately removed using a primary modulator. When the results acquired with scatter correction and without correction were compared, the average contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) with the correction was 1.35 times higher than that obtained without correction, and the average root mean square error (RMSE) with the correction was 38.00% better than that without correction. In the subtraction study, the average CNR with correction was 2.04 (aluminum subtraction) and 1.38 (polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subtraction) times higher than that obtained without the correction. The analysis demonstrated the accuracy of scatter correction and the improvement of image quality using a primary modulator and showed the feasibility of

  8. Report of study meeting on nuclear physics of quasi-elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This meeting was held for three days from June 8 to 10, 1992, as one of the study meetings of Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The lectures were given on spin observables in quasi-elastic scattering, calculation of spin observables in 12 C, 40 Ca(p,n) reaction in quasifree scattering region, present state of quasi-elastic scattering, first results of (p,n) quasifree scattering with the new facility of the RCNP, spin-isospin response function and effect of Δ-hole configuration in finite nuclei, effective polarization of nuclei and observed amount of spin, (p,2p) measurement in the RCNP, quasi-elastic scattering in 2 H, 3 He and 4 He of polarized protons, quasifree Δ formation, 3 He(gamma, pπ ± ) reaction in Δ region, search for isobar components in 3 He by quasifree knockout studies, nonquasi-elastic process in photonuclear reaction, QF and NQF processes in gamma d→π + π - pn, coincidence scattering experiment in quasi-elastic scattering region, exclusive electron scattering of 3 He with full inclusion of final state interaction, quasi-elastic electron scattering and internucleon correlation and 13 other themes. (K.I.)

  9. Small angle neutron scattering studies of mixed micelles of sodium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aqueous solutions of sodium cumene sulphonate (NaCS) and its mixtures with each of cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) are characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). NaCS when added to CTAB solution leads to the formation of long rod-shaped micelles with ...

  10. Time-dependent micro-Raman scattering studies of polyvinyl ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-15

    Feb 15, 2014 ... Micro-Raman scattering; surface plasmons; silver nanoparticles; polyvinyl alcohol. PACS Nos 74.25.nd; ... as well as their characterization. Added .... 3.2 Surface plasmon absorption of thin films of PVA + AgNO3. The surface ...

  11. Small-angle neutron scattering studies on water soluble complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... by small-angle neutron scattering. SANS data showed a positive indication of the formation of RCP-SDS complexes. Even though the complete structure of the polyion complexes could not be ascertained, the results obtained give us the information on the local structure in these polymer-surfactant systems. The data were ...

  12. Insulin association in neutral solutions studied by light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, S.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular weights and weight distributions of sulfated, Zn-free, and 2Zn insulins have been measured at pH 7.3 as a function of concentration from 0.1 to 2 mg/ml by use of a combination of light scattering, refractometry, and size-exclusion chromatography. Results show that sulfated insulin...

  13. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of nonionic surfactant: Effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Micellar solution of nonionic surfactant -dodecyloligo ethyleneoxide surfactant, decaoxyethylene monododecyl ether [CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)10OH], C12E10 in D2O solution have been analysed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) at different temperatures (30, 45 and 60°C) both in the presence and absence of ...

  14. Dynamics of Magnetic Nanoparticles Studied by Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen

    1997-01-01

    We present the first triple-axis neutron scattering measurements of magnetic fluctuations in nanoparticles using an antiferromagnetic reflection. Both the superparamagnetic relaxation and precession modes in similar to 15 nm hematite particles are: observed. The results have been consistently...... analyzed on the basis of a simple model with uniaxial anisotropy and the Neel-Brown theory for the relaxation....

  15. Spin dynamics in Tb studied by critical neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, O. W.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1971-01-01

    The inelasticity of the critical neutron scattering in Tb was measured at and above the Neel temperature. In the hydrodynamic region the line width Gamma (q=0, kappa 1)=C kappa z1, with z=1.4+or-0.1 and c=4.3+or-0.3 meVAAz. This result deviates from the conventional theory, which predicts...

  16. A study of Bhabha scattering at PETRA energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, W.; Gerhards, R.; Kirschfink, F.J.; Martyn, H.U.; Rosskamp, P.; Kolanoski, H.; Balkwill, C.; Bowler, M.G.; Burrows, P.N.; Cashmore, R.J.; Dauncey, P.; Heath, G.P.; Mellor, D.J.; Ratoff, P.; Tomalin, I.; Yelton, J.M.; Baranko, G.; Caldwell, A.; Izen, J.M.; Muller, D.; Ritz, S.; Strom, D.; Takashima, M.; Wicklund, E.; Wu Saulan; Zobernig, G.

    1988-01-01

    We report on high statistics Bhabha scattering data taken with the TASSO experiment at PETRA at center of mass energies from 12 GeV to 46.8 GeV. We present an analysis in terms of electroweak parameters of the standard model, give limits on QED cut-off parameters and look for possible signs of compositeness. (orig.)

  17. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  18. In vivo evaluation of insect wax for hair growth potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinju

    2018-01-01

    Insect wax is secreted by Ericerus pela Chavanness. It has been traditionally used to treat hair loss in China, but few reports have been published on the hair growth-promoting effect of insect wax. In this work, we examined the hair growth-promoting effects of insect wax on model animals. Different concentrations of insect wax were topically applied to the denuded backs of mice, and 5% minoxidil was applied topically as a positive control. We found that insect wax significantly promoted hair growth in a dose-dependent manner, 45% and 30% insect wax both induced hair to regrow, while less visible hair growth was observed in blank controls on the 16th day. The experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax exhibited significant differences in hair scores compared to blank controls, and hair lengths in the 45% and 30% insect wax group was significantly longer than in blank controls on the 16th and 20th days. There were no new hair follicles forming in the treated areas, and the hair follicles were prematurely converted to the anagen phase from the telogen phase in experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax. Both 45% and 30% insect wax upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. The results indicated that 45% and 30% insect wax showed hair growth-promoting potential approximately as potent as 5% minoxidil by inducing the premature conversion of telogen-to-anagen and by prolonging the mature anagen phase rather than increasing the number of hair follicles, which was likely related to the upregulation of VEGF expression. The dissociative policosanol in insect wax was considered the key ingredient most likely responsible for the hair growth promoting potential. PMID:29438422

  19. Surfactants and Desensitizing Wax Substitutes for TNT-Based Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-01

    greatly with the source of crude oil. Some crudes contain little wax. The U.S. crudes from Pennsylvania and the midcontinent areas contain high...years ago in Egypt for many different purposes. The term wax comes to us from the Anglo-Saxon "weax," the name given to material from the bee ...usually produced in the wild and not by large scale cultivation. Although plants produce small amounts of waxes in their tissues, seeds and pollen

  20. In vivo evaluation of insect wax for hair growth potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinju Ma

    Full Text Available Insect wax is secreted by Ericerus pela Chavanness. It has been traditionally used to treat hair loss in China, but few reports have been published on the hair growth-promoting effect of insect wax. In this work, we examined the hair growth-promoting effects of insect wax on model animals. Different concentrations of insect wax were topically applied to the denuded backs of mice, and 5% minoxidil was applied topically as a positive control. We found that insect wax significantly promoted hair growth in a dose-dependent manner, 45% and 30% insect wax both induced hair to regrow, while less visible hair growth was observed in blank controls on the 16th day. The experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax exhibited significant differences in hair scores compared to blank controls, and hair lengths in the 45% and 30% insect wax group was significantly longer than in blank controls on the 16th and 20th days. There were no new hair follicles forming in the treated areas, and the hair follicles were prematurely converted to the anagen phase from the telogen phase in experimental areas treated with 45% and 30% insect wax. Both 45% and 30% insect wax upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor expression. The results indicated that 45% and 30% insect wax showed hair growth-promoting potential approximately as potent as 5% minoxidil by inducing the premature conversion of telogen-to-anagen and by prolonging the mature anagen phase rather than increasing the number of hair follicles, which was likely related to the upregulation of VEGF expression. The dissociative policosanol in insect wax was considered the key ingredient most likely responsible for the hair growth promoting potential.

  1. Development of lamellar structures in natural waxes - an electron diffraction investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorset, Douglas L. [Electron Diffraction Department, Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1999-06-07

    When they are recrystallized from the melt, natural plant or insect waxes tend to form solid phases with a nematic-like structure (i.e. a parallel array of polymethylene chains with little or no aggregation of the molecules into distinct layers). An electron diffraction study of carnauba wax and two types of beeswax has shown that the degree of molecular organization into lamellar structures can be enhanced by annealing in the presence of benzoic acid, which also acts as an epitaxial substrate. Nevertheless, the resultant layer structure in the annealed solid is not the same as that found for paraffin wax fractions refined from petroleum. Probably because of a small but significant fraction of a very long chain ingredient, the lamellar separation is incomplete, incorporating a number of 'bridging molecules' that span the nascent lamellar interface.The same phenomenon has been described recently for a low molecular weight polyethylene. (author)

  2. Development of lamellar structures in natural waxes - an electron diffraction investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1999-06-01

    When they are recrystallized from the melt, natural plant or insect waxes tend to form solid phases with a nematic-like structure (i.e. a parallel array of polymethylene chains with little or no aggregation of the molecules into distinct layers). An electron diffraction study of carnauba wax and two types of beeswax has shown that the degree of molecular organization into lamellar structures can be enhanced by annealing in the presence of benzoic acid, which also acts as an epitaxial substrate. Nevertheless, the resultant layer structure in the annealed solid is not the same as that found for paraffin wax fractions refined from petroleum. Probably because of a small but significant fraction of a very long chain ingredient, the lamellar separation is incomplete, incorporating a number of `bridging molecules' that span the nascent lamellar interface.The same phenomenon has been described recently for a low molecular weight polyethylene.

  3. Procedures for extraction and purification of leaf wax biomarkers from peats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. Nichols

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Palaeoecological and palaeoclimate reconstruction, using leaf wax biomarkers, is a relatively new sub-discipline of peatland science. The ability to process large numbers of samples rapidly for biomarkers makes this type of analysis particularly appealing. This review is a guide to the preparation of leaf waxes for analysis by gas chromatography. The main phases of preparation are extraction of soluble organic compounds from sediment, separation of the total extract into fractions of differing polarity, and the derivatisation of polar functional groups. The procedures described here are not meant be exhaustive of all organic geochemical possibilities in peatlands, but a distillation of methods for the preparation of leaf waxes that are commonly and increasingly being used in palaeoecological and palaeoclimatological studies.

  4. Effects of irradiation in combination with waxing on the essential oils in orange peel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussaid, M.; Lacroix, M.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boubekri, C.

    2000-01-01

    The study evaluated the effects of waxing and irradiation dose on the essential oils in orange peel. Mature oranges (Maroc late) waxed or unwaxed were treated with 0-2 kGy radiation. Volatiles in the peel were extracted and analyzed by G.C. D-limonene was significantly lower (P≤0.05) in waxed oranges; levels in samples treated with 2 kGy were higher than those treated with 0 or 1 kGy. Linalool, methyl anthranilate and 3.7-dimethyl-2.6-octadienal decreased as the dose increased. The analysis of variance indicates that only linalool was influenced by post-irradiation storage time. The level of this compound increased with storage time. (author)

  5. Small-angle neutron-scattering studies of the magnetic phase diagram of MnSi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, P.; Lebech, B.; Hae Seop Shim

    1995-01-01

    The antiferromagnetic order of MnSi has been studied as function of temperature and applied magnetic field using small-angle neutron scattering. The results were analyzed using the three-dimensional resolution function and the scattering cross-section to model the diffraction data. Physical...

  6. Effect of solvent extraction on Tunisian esparto wax composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saâd Inès

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increase of needs for renewable and vegetable based materials will help to drive the market growth of vegetable waxes. Because of their highly variable composition and physicochemical properties, plant waxes have found numerous applications in the: food, cosmetic, candle, coating, polish etc... The aim of this project is to determine the effect of solvent extraction (petroleum ether and ethanol on Tunisian esparto wax composition. The GC-MS was applied in order to determine the waxes compositions. Then, physicochemical parameters of these two samples of waxes: acid value, saponification value, iodine value and melting point were measured in order to deduct their properties and possible fields of uses. Results showed that esparto wax composition depended on the solvent extraction and that major components of the two samples of waxes were: alkanes, esters of fatty acids and phenols. Furthermore, esparto waxes were characterized by an antioxidant and antibacterial activities but the potential of these activities depended on the solvent of wax extraction.

  7. Cuticular wax accumulation is associated with drought tolerance in wheat near-isogenic lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that wheat grain yield is seriously affected by drought stress, and leaf cuticular wax is reportedly associated with drought tolerance. However, most studies have focused on cuticular wax biosynthesis and model species. The effects of cuticular wax on wheat drought tolerance have rarely been studied. The aims of the current study were to study the effects of leaf cuticular wax on wheat grain yield under drought stress using the above-mentioned wheat NILs and to discuss the possible physiological mechanism of cuticular wax on high grain yield under drought stress. Compared to water-irrigated (WI conditions, the cuticular wax content (CWC in glaucous and non-glaucous NILs under drought-stress (DS conditions both increased; mean increase values were 151.1% and 114.4%, respectively, which was corroborated by scanning electronic microscopy images of large wax particles loaded on the surfaces of flag leaves. The average yield of glaucous NILs was higher than that of non-glaucous NILs under DS conditions in 2014 and 2015; mean values were 7368.37 kg·ha-1 and 7103.51 kg·ha-1. This suggested that glaucous NILs were more drought-tolerant than non-glaucous NILs (P = 0.05, which was supported by the findings of drought tolerance indices TOL and SSI in both years, the relatively high water potential and relative water content, and the low ELWL. Furthermore, the photosynthesis rate (Pn of glaucous and non-glaucous wheat NILs under DS conditions decreased by 7.5% and 9.8%, respectively; however, glaucous NILs still had higher mean values of Pn than those of non-glaucous NILs, which perhaps resulted in the higher yield of glaucous NILs. This could be explained by the fact that glaucous NILs had a smaller Fv/Fm reduction, a smaller PI reduction and a greater ABS/RC increase than non-glaucous NILs under DS conditions. This is the first report to show that wheat cuticular wax accumulation is associated with drought tolerance. Moreover

  8. Review of data on the dermal penetration of mineral oils and waxes used in cosmetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, T; Bury, D; Fautz, R; Hauser, M; Huber, B; Markowetz, A; Mishra, S; Rettinger, K; Schuh, W; Teichert, T

    2017-10-05

    Mineral oils and waxes used in cosmetic products, also referred to as "personal care products" outside the European Union, are mixtures of predominantly saturated hydrocarbons consisting of straight-chain, branched and ring structures with carbon chain lengths greater than C16. They are used in skin and lip care cosmetic products due to their excellent skin tolerance as well as their high protecting and cleansing performance and broad viscosity options. Recently, concerns have been raised regarding potential adverse health effects of mineral oils and waxes from dermal application of cosmetics. In order to be able to assess the risk for the consumer the dermal penetration potential of these ingredients has to be evaluated. The scope and objective of this review are to identify and summarize publicly available literature on the dermal penetration of mineral oils and waxes as used in cosmetic products. For this purpose, a comprehensive literature search was conducted. A total of 13 in vivo (human, animal) and in vitro studies investigating the dermal penetration of mineral oils and waxes has been identified and analysed. The majority of the substances were dermally adsorbed to the stratum corneum and only a minor fraction reached deeper skin layers. Overall, there is no evidence from the various studies that mineral oils and waxes are percutaneously absorbed and become systemically available. Thus, given the absence of dermal uptake, mineral oils and waxes as used in cosmetic products do not present a risk to the health of the consumer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. De novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome, and development of SSR markers in wax gourd (Benicasa hispida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wax gourd is a widely used vegetable of Cucuribtaceae, and also has important medicinal and health values. However, the genomic resources of wax gourd were scarcity, and only a few nucleotide sequences could be obtained in public databases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined transcriptome in wax gourd. More than 44 million of high quality reads were generated from five different tissues of wax gourd using Illumina paired-end sequencing technology. Approximately 4 Gbp data were generated, and de novo assembled into 65,059 unigenes, with an N50 of 1,132 bp. Based on sequence similarity search with known protein database, 36,070 (55.4% showed significant similarity to known proteins in Nr database, and 24,969 (38.4% had BLAST hits in Swiss-Prot database. Among the annotated unigenes, 14,994 of wax gourd unigenes were assigned to GO term annotation, and 23,977 were found to have COG classifications. In addition, a total of 18,713 unigenes were assigned to 281 KEGG pathways. Furthermore, 6,242 microsatellites (simple sequence repeats were detected as potential molecular markers in wax gourd. Two hundred primer pairs for SSRs were designed for validation of the amplification and polymorphism. The result showed that 170 of the 200 primer pairs were successfully amplified and 49 (28.8% of them exhibited polymorphisms. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study enriches the genomic resources of wax gourd and provides powerful information for future studies. The availability of this ample amount of information about the transcriptome and SSRs in wax gourd could serve as valuable basis for studies on the physiology, biochemistry, molecular genetics and molecular breeding of this important vegetable crop.

  10. Fruit development, pigmentation and biochemical properties of wax apple as affected by localized Application of GA3 under field conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Khandaker, Mohammad Moneruzzaman; Boyce, Amru Nasrulhaq; Osman, Normaniza; Golam, Faruq; Rahman, M. Motior; Sofian-Azirun, M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of gibberellin (GA3) on the fruit development, pigmentation and biochemical properties of wax apple. The wax apple trees were rubbing treated with 0, 20, 50 and 100 mgGA3/l under field conditions. The localized application (rubbing) of 50 mg GA3/l significantly increased the fruit set, fruit length and diameter, color development, weight and yieldcompared to the control. In addition, GA3 treatments significantly reduced the fruit drop. With regard to the fr...

  11. Background studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering reactor experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnolet, G.; Baker, W.; Barker, D.; Beck, R.; Carroll, T.J.; Cesar, J.; Cushman, P.; Dent, J.B.; De Rijck, S.; Dutta, B.; Flanagan, W.; Fritts, M.; Gao, Y.; Harris, H.R.; Hays, C.C.; Iyer, V.

    2017-01-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 m) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5–20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  12. Background studies for the MINER Coherent Neutrino Scattering reactor experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnolet, G.; Baker, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Barker, D. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Beck, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Carroll, T.J.; Cesar, J. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Cushman, P. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Dent, J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504 (United States); De Rijck, S. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Dutta, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Flanagan, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Fritts, M. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Gao, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Department of Physics & Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit 48201 (United States); Harris, H.R.; Hays, C.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and the Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Iyer, V. [School of Physical Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research, Jatni - 752050 (India); and others

    2017-05-01

    The proposed Mitchell Institute Neutrino Experiment at Reactor (MINER) experiment at the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A&M University will search for coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering within close proximity (about 2 m) of a 1 MW TRIGA nuclear reactor core using low threshold, cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors. Given the Standard Model cross section of the scattering process and the proposed experimental proximity to the reactor, as many as 5–20 events/kg/day are expected. We discuss the status of preliminary measurements to characterize the main backgrounds for the proposed experiment. Both in situ measurements at the experimental site and simulations using the MCNP and GEANT4 codes are described. A strategy for monitoring backgrounds during data taking is briefly discussed.

  13. Studies in deep inelastic scattering and vector meson photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busenitz, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    The first part of this thesis is devoted to a space-time analysis of deep inelastic scattering from protons at rest. Techniques are developed for identifying important space-time regions. These are then applied to obtain a space-time picture of deep inelastic scattering in the leading logarithmic approximation of QCD, Physical mechanisms responsible for the space-time picture are discussed. In the second part of this thesis he reports on the observations of elastic omega photoproduction from hydrogen by Fermilab Experiment-401. The omega was detected via its decay into the π + π - π 0 channel. Measurements of the energy, momentum transfer, and angular dependence of the cross section have been made for photon energies between 60 and 225 GeV

  14. In search of low cost biological analysis: Wax or acrylic glue bonded paper microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2011-01-22

    In this body of work we have been developing and characterizing paper based microfluidic fabrication technologies to produce low cost biological analysis. Specifically we investigated the performance of paper microfluidics that had been bonded using wax or acrylic glue, and characterized the affect of these and other microfluidic materials on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax or cyanoacrylate-based resin as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax or simple cyanoacrylate-based resin can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The wax bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by evacuating the channels of adhesive material in a hot-water. We applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation. Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein recombinant E. coli bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration. The chip bonded with cyanoacrylate-based resin was tested by measuring protein concentration and carrying out DNA capillary electrophoresis. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of our microfluidic chip fabrication technology, we tested the PCR compatibility of our chip materials along with various other common materials

  15. Long-term evaluation of the needle surface wax condition of Pinus sylvestris around different industries in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupcinskiene, Eugenija; Huttunen, Satu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the annual dynamics of needle surface wax erosion and wettability in Scots pines exposed to a gradient of industrial pollutants emitted from the main factories of Lithuania: a nitrogen fertilizer factory, an oil refinery and a cement factory. Decreased emissions (in the case of the oil refinery and the cement factory) were reflected in the increased structural surface area (SSA, i.e. area covered by tubular waxes) on the needles. The nearly constant amount of emissions from the nitrogen fertilizer factory within the 1994-2000 period corresponded to negligible annual differences in SSA. Annual changes in the hydrophobicity of needles on the investigated transects were small. Despite the decreased pollution within the 7-year period, industrial emissions are still causing significantly accelerated wax erosion and increased wettability in needles sampled from the stands most heavily affected by pollutants. - Tubular wax on the pine needle surface reflects changes/differences in industrial emissions

  16. Thermal neutron scattering studies of condensed matter under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Salter, D.C.

    1978-01-01

    Although temperature has been used as a thermodynamic variable for samples in thermal neutron scattering experiments since the inception of the neutron technique, it is only in the last decade that high pressures have been utilised for this purpose. In the paper the problems particular to this field of work are outlined and a review is made of the types of high-pressure cells used and the scientific results obtained from the experiments. 103 references. (author)

  17. Comparison the Marginal and Internal Fit of Metal Copings Cast from Wax Patterns Fabricated by CAD/CAM and Conventional Wax up Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, M; Torabi, K; Farjood, E; Khaledi, AAR

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Metal-ceramic crowns are most commonly used as the complete coverage restorations in clinical daily use. Disadvantages of conventional hand-made wax-patterns introduce some alternative ways by means of CAD/CAM technologies. Purpose: This study compares the marginal and internal fit of copings cast from CAD/CAM and conventional fabricated wax-patterns. Materials and Method: Twenty-four standardized brass dies were prepared and randomly divided into 2 groups according to the wax-patterns fabrication method (CAD/CAM technique and conventional method) (n=12). All the wax-patterns were fabricated in a standard fashion by means of contour, thickness and internal relief (M1-M12: representative of CAD/CAM group, C1-C12: representative of conventional group). CAD/CAM milling machine (Cori TEC 340i; imes-icore GmbH, Eiterfeld, Germany) was used to fabricate the CAD/CAM group wax-patterns. The copings cast from 24 wax-patterns were cemented to the corresponding dies. For all the coping-die assemblies cross-sectional technique was used to evaluate the marginal and internal fit at 15 points. The Student’s t- test was used for statistical analysis (α=0.05). Results: The overall mean (SD) for absolute marginal discrepancy (AMD) was 254.46 (25.10) um for CAD/CAM group and 88.08(10.67) um for conventional group (control). The overall mean of internal gap total (IGT) was 110.77(5.92) um for CAD/CAM group and 76.90 (10.17) um for conventional group. The Student’s t-test revealed significant differences between 2 groups. Marginal and internal gaps were found to be significantly higher at all measured areas in CAD/CAM group than conventional group (pmarginal and internal fit than CAD/CAM (machine-milled) technique. All the factors for 2 groups were standardized except wax pattern fabrication technique, therefore, only the conventional group results in copings with clinically acceptable margins of less than 120um. PMID:24724133

  18. Neutron scattering studies of mixed-valence semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignot, J M [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB) - Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alekseev, P A [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering experiments on the mixed-valence (MV) compounds SmB{sub 6} are reported. The inelastic magnetic response of SmB{sub 6} at T = 2 K, measured on a double-isotope single crystal,displays a strongly damped peak at 35 meV corresponding to the inter multiplet transition of Sm{sup 2+}. At lower energies ( h.{omega} {approx_equal} 14 meV), a narrow magnetic excitation is observed, with remarkable scattering-vector and temperature dependences of its intensity. This novel feature is discussed in terms of recent theoretical works describing the formation of an anisotropic local bound state in semiconducting MV materials. If the average samarium valence is decreased by substituting La for Sm, a peak is found to appear at high energies. The elastic magnetic form factor of SmB{sub 6} was determined using polarised neutrons and no significant difference is observed in its Q-dependence with respect to that of pure divalent samarium. This surprising behaviour is constant with previous measurements on the gold (high-pressure) phase of SmS. The above results are compared to those already reported for other MV materials. In particular existing information for TmSe is supplemented by recent inelastic scattering measurements carried out on a large stoichiometric single crystal. (author). 44 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Thermal Cracking to Improve the Qualification of the Waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, B.; Agblevor, F. A.; Chen, C. G.; Feng, J.

    2018-05-01

    Thermal cracking of waxes at mild conditions (430-500°C) has been reconsidered as a possible refining technology for the production of fuels and chemicals. In this study, the more moderate thermal cracking was investigated to process Uinta Basin soft waxes to achieve the required pour point so that they can be pumped to the refineries. The best thermal cracking conditions were set 420°C and 20 minutes. The viscosity and density of the final liquid product were respectively achieved as 2.63 mP•s and 0.784 g/cm3 at 40°C. The result of FT-IR analysis of the liquid product indicated that the unsaturated hydrocarbons were produced after thermal cracking, which was corroborated by the 13C NMR spectrum. The GC analysis of the final gas product indicated that the hydrogen was produced; the dehydrogenation reaction was also proved by the elemental analysis and HHV results. The pour point of the final liquid product met the requirement.

  20. Study on the influences of X Ray Scattering on radioscopic inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, M.; Torrent, J.; Bancelin, A. [SNECMA NDE Dept. Laboratory, France, Evry Corbeil, 91 - Evry (France)

    2007-07-01

    This study issued from European project 'Verdict' (Virtual Evaluation and Robust Detection for engine Components non destructive Testing), aimed at developing and evaluating X Ray Non Destructive Method simulation. An qualitative appreciation and quantification for X Ray scattering for modelling (SINDBAD software) was identified. The effect of such radiation on radiogram results in a disturbing blur for interpretation of indications. The method and the results described are innovative in the analysis of X Ray scattering because for aeronautic field, the configurations used with this energy range are breakthrough. The approach followed consists in an experimental and practical method for evaluating scattered radiation on final image issued from the inspection. Experimental tests results confirmed that the influence of scattering radiation are linked to density variation, geometry of parts in the axis of direct radiation and spatial area. This study performed in industrial configurations contributed to improve X Ray scattering understanding. (authors)

  1. Real-time monitoring and measurement of wax deposition in pipelines via non-invasive electrical capacitance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock Sow Mei, Irene; Ismail, Idris; Shafquet, Areeba; Abdullah, Bawadi

    2016-02-01

    Tomographic analysis of the behavior of waxy crude oil in pipelines is important to permit appropriate corrective actions to be taken to remediate the wax deposit layer before pipelines are entirely plugged. In this study, a non-invasive/non-intrusive electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system has been applied to provide real-time visualization of the formation of paraffin waxes and to measure the amount of wax fraction from the Malay Basin waxy crude oil sample under the static condition. Analogous expressions to estimate the wax fraction of the waxy crude oil across the temperatures range of 30-50 °C was obtained by using Otsu’s and Kuo’s threshold algorithms. Otsu’s method suggested that the wax fraction can be estimated by the correlation coefficient β =0.0459{{T}3}-5.3535{{T}2}+200.36T-2353.7 while Kuo’s method provides a similar correlation with β =0.0741{{T}3}-8.4915{{T}2}+314.96T-3721.2 . These correlations show good agreements with the results which are obtained from the conventional weighting method. This study suggested that Kuo’s threshold algorithm is more promising when integrated into the ECT system compared to Otsu’s algorithm because the former provides higher accuracy wax fraction measurement results below the wax appearance temperature for waxy crude oil. This study is significant because it serves as a preliminary investigation for the application of ECT in the oil and gas industry for online measurement and detection of wax fraction without causing disturbance to the process flow.

  2. Neutron scattering studies on magnetic excitations in complex ordered manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senff, D

    2007-09-15

    This thesis deals with magnetic excitations in three different Manganese oxides, single-layered LaSrMnO{sub 4}, charge- and orbital-ordered La{sub 1/2}Sr{sub 3/2}MnO{sub 4}, and multiferroic TbMnO{sub 3}, which are studied by means of inelastic neutron scattering. The properties of the first system, LaSrMnO{sub 4}, are governed by the complex interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom typical for the physics of manganites. The magnetic low-temperature behavior is quite unusual, and the comprehensive analysis of the spin-wave spectrum of LaSrMnO{sub 4} suggests a heterogenous ground state with ferromagnetic orbital polarons embedded in an antiferromagnetic background. The doped system La{sub 1/2}Sr{sub 3/2}MnO{sub 4} exhibits a stable charge- and orbital-ordered state, which today is discussed very controversially, as it is of great relevance for the colossal increase of electric conductivity at the metal-insulator transition in perovskite manganites. Analyzing the spin-wave dispersion of the ordered state, we find an excellent agreement with classical predictions by Goodenough and reject a recent alternative proposal. The different strength of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange in the CE-type ordering leads to the conclusion that the magnetic state has to be considered as a weak AFM coupling of stable FM elements. This thesis is further supported by the thermal evolution of the ordered state, revealing anisotropic correlations and the close competition of FM and AFM correlations above the Neel transition, as well as by the doping dependence of the charge- and orbital-ordered state, which is interpreted on the basis of a different response of the magnetic system with respect to additional electrons or holes. In the orthorhombic perovskite TbMnO{sub 3} the electric polarization is closely coupled to the magnetic degrees of freedom via a complex, non-collinear magnetic ordering. Precisely characterizing the different magnon excitations

  3. Neutron scattering studies on magnetic excitations in complex ordered manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senff, D.

    2007-09-01

    This thesis deals with magnetic excitations in three different Manganese oxides, single-layered LaSrMnO 4 , charge- and orbital-ordered La 1/2 Sr 3/2 MnO 4 , and multiferroic TbMnO 3 , which are studied by means of inelastic neutron scattering. The properties of the first system, LaSrMnO 4 , are governed by the complex interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom typical for the physics of manganites. The magnetic low-temperature behavior is quite unusual, and the comprehensive analysis of the spin-wave spectrum of LaSrMnO 4 suggests a heterogenous ground state with ferromagnetic orbital polarons embedded in an antiferromagnetic background. The doped system La 1/2 Sr 3/2 MnO 4 exhibits a stable charge- and orbital-ordered state, which today is discussed very controversially, as it is of great relevance for the colossal increase of electric conductivity at the metal-insulator transition in perovskite manganites. Analyzing the spin-wave dispersion of the ordered state, we find an excellent agreement with classical predictions by Goodenough and reject a recent alternative proposal. The different strength of the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange in the CE-type ordering leads to the conclusion that the magnetic state has to be considered as a weak AFM coupling of stable FM elements. This thesis is further supported by the thermal evolution of the ordered state, revealing anisotropic correlations and the close competition of FM and AFM correlations above the Neel transition, as well as by the doping dependence of the charge- and orbital-ordered state, which is interpreted on the basis of a different response of the magnetic system with respect to additional electrons or holes. In the orthorhombic perovskite TbMnO 3 the electric polarization is closely coupled to the magnetic degrees of freedom via a complex, non-collinear magnetic ordering. Precisely characterizing the different magnon excitations allows to identify all relevant modes of the

  4. Co-metabolism of DDT by the newly isolated bacterium, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangli Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial degradation of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethane (DDT is the most promising way to clean up DDT residues found in the environment. In this paper, a bacterium designated as wax, which was capable of co-metabolizing DDT with other carbon sources, was isolated from a long-term DDT-contaminated soil sample by an enrichment culture technique. The new isolate was identified as a member of the Pseudoxanthomonas sp., based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical properties, as well as by 16S rRNA gene analysis. In the presence of 100 mg l-1 glucose, the wax strain could degrade over 95% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 20 mg l-1, in 72 hours, and could degrade over 60% of the total DDT, at a concentration of 100 mg l-1, in 144 hours. The wax strain had the highest degradation efficiency among all of the documented DDT-degrading bacteria. The wax strain could efficiently degrade DDT at temperatures ranging from 20 to 37ºC, and with initial pH values ranging from 7 to 9. The bacterium could also simultaneously co-metabolize 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenylethane (DDD, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl-1,1-dichlorethylene (DDE, and other organochlorine compounds. The wax strain could also completely remove 20 mg kg-1 of DDT from both sterile and non-sterile soils in 20 days. This study demonstrates the significant potential use of Pseudoxanthomonas sp. wax for the bioremediation of DDT in the environment.

  5. The deformation of wax patterns and castings in investment casting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The dimensional accuracy of the final casting of Inconel alloy 738 LC is affected by many aspects. One of them is the choice of method and time of cooling wax model for precision investment casting. The main objective was to study the initial deformation of the complex shape of the casting of the rotor blades. Various approaches have been tested for cooling wax pattern. When wax models are cooling on the air, without clamping in jig for cooling, deviations from the ideal shape of the casting are very noticeable (up to 8 mm and most are in extreme positions of the model. When blade is cooled in fixing jig in water environment, the resulting deviations compared with cooling in air are significantly larger, sometimes up to 10 mm. This itself does not mean that the final shape of the casting is dimensionally more accurate with usage of wax models, which have deviations from the ideal position smaller. Another deformation occurs when shell mould is produced around wax pattern and furthermore deformations emerge while casting of blade is cooling. This paper demonstrates first steps in describing complex process of deformations of Inconel alloy blades produced with investment casting technology by comparing results from thermal imagery, simulations in foundry simulation software ProCAST 2010 and measurements from CNC scanning system Carl Zeiss MC 850. Conclusions are so far not groundbreaking, but it seems deformations of wax pattern and deformations of castings do in some cases cancel each other by having opposite directions. Describing entirely whole process of deformations will help increase precision of blade castings so that models at the beginning and blades in the end are the same.

  6. Evaluation of penetration and scattering components in conventional pinhole SPECT: phantom studies using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deloar, Hossain M; Watabe, Hiroshi; Aoi, Toshiyuki; Iida, Hidehiro

    2003-01-01

    In quantitative pinhole SPECT, photon penetration through the collimator edges (penetration), and photon scattering by the object (object scatter) and collimator (collimator scatter) have not been investigated rigorously. Monte Carlo simulation was used to evaluate these three physical processes for different tungsten knife-edge pinhole collimators using uniform, hotspot and donut phantoms filled with 201 Tl, 99m Tc, 123 I and 131 I solutions. For the hotspot phantom, the penetration levels with respect to total counts for a 1 mm pinhole aperture were 78%, 28% and 23% for 131 I, 123 I and 99m Tc, respectively. For a 2 mm aperture, these values were 65% for 131 I, 16% for 123 I and 12% for 99m Tc. For all pinholes, 201 Tl penetration was less than 4%. The evaluated scatter (from object and collimator) with a hotspot phantom for the 1 mm pinhole was 24%, 16%, 18% and 13% for 201 Tl, 99m Tc, 123 I and 131 I, respectively. Summation of the object and collimator scatter for the uniform phantom was approximately 20% higher than that for the hotspot phantom. Significant counts due to penetration and object and collimator scatter in the reconstructed image were observed inside the core of the donut phantom. The collimator scatter can be neglected for all isotopes used in this study except for 131 I. Object scatter correction for all radionuclides used in this study is necessary and correction for the penetration contribution is necessary for all radionuclides but 201 Tl

  7. A study on the measurement of effective energy of scattering X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oogama, Noboru; Fujimoto, Nobuhisa; Nishitani, Motohiro; Yamada, Katsuhiko

    1995-01-01

    Only a few studies have been reported on the measurement and evaluation of the effective energy of scattering X-rays using an ionization chamber. The reason for this is due to the difficulty in accurately measuring attenuation curve in scattering X-rays lacking any directional properties. We could come up with a new method for calculating the effective energy of scattering X-rays by utilizing their spectra data. First, for analysing the accuracy of our calculation method with using primary X-rays, a comparison was made of calculated values of the effective energy obtained by our calculation method with the measurement values obtained using an ionization chamber. The results gave the calculated values agreeing with the measurement values within a maximum error of 2%, and this method was very helpful in measuring the effective energy of the scattering X-rays. Consequently, this method was capable of measuring the effective energy of scattering X-rays in the following parameters: X-ray tube voltage, scattering angle and size of scatterer. In conclusion, it is considered that our method could solve the present difficulty regarding the measurement of effective energy of the scattering X-rays, and provided a useful procedure concerning the study of radiation protection. (author)

  8. A method to estimate the fractional fat volume within a ROI of a breast biopsy for WAXS applications: Animal tissue evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Robert Y.; McDonald, Nancy; Laamanen, Curtis; LeClair, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to estimate the mean fractional volume of fat (ν ¯ fat ) within a region of interest (ROI) of a tissue sample for wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) applications. A scatter signal from the ROI was obtained and use of ν ¯ fat in a WAXS fat subtraction model provided a way to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficient μ s of the remaining fatless tissue. Methods: The efficacy of the method was tested using animal tissue from a local butcher shop. Formalin fixed samples, 5 mm in diameter 4 mm thick, were prepared. The two main tissue types were fat and meat (fibrous). Pure as well as composite samples consisting of a mixture of the two tissue types were analyzed. For the latter samples, ν fat for the tissue columns of interest were extracted from corresponding pixels in CCD digital x-ray images using a calibration curve. The means ν ¯ fat were then calculated for use in a WAXS fat subtraction model. For the WAXS measurements, the samples were interrogated with a 2.7 mm diameter 50 kV beam and the 6° scattered photons were detected with a CdTe detector subtending a solid angle of 7.75 × 10 −5 sr. Using the scatter spectrum, an estimate of the incident spectrum, and a scatter model, μ s was determined for the tissue in the ROI. For the composite samples, a WAXS fat subtraction model was used to estimate the μ s of the fibrous tissue in the ROI. This signal was compared to μ s of fibrous tissue obtained using a pure fibrous sample. Results: For chicken and beef composites, ν ¯ fat =0.33±0.05 and 0.32 ± 0.05, respectively. The subtractions of these fat components from the WAXS composite signals provided estimates of μ s for chicken and beef fibrous tissue. The differences between the estimates and μ s of fibrous obtained with a pure sample were calculated as a function of the momentum transfer x. A t-test showed that the mean of the differences did not vary from zero in a statistically significant way thereby

  9. A study of light scattering of mononuclear blood cells with scanning flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharinov, Alexey; Tarasov, Peter; Shvalov, Alexander; Semyanov, Konstantin; Bockstaele, Dirk R. van; Maltsev, Valeri

    2006-01-01

    This study describes the measurement of light scattering of human mononuclear blood cells, the development of an appropriate optical model for those cells, and solution of the inverse light-scattering problem. The angular dependency of light-scattering intensity of mononuclear blood cells was experimentally measured by means of scanning flow cytometry. A sphere consisting of several concentric homogeneous layers with different refractive indices was tested as an optical model for mononuclear blood cells. A five-layer model has given the best agreement between experimental and theoretical light-scattering profiles. The inverse light-scattering problem was solved for a five-layer model with an optimization procedure that allows one to retrieve cell parameters: cell size relates to the outer diameter of the fifth layer; size of the nucleus relates to the outer diameter of the third layer. Mean values of cell size, nuclear size, refractive indices of nucleus and cellular cytoplasm were determined for blood monocytes and lymphocytes

  10. A sample cell to study hydrate formation with x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, Heiko; Lehmkuehler, Felix; Sternemann, Christian; Feroughi, Omid; Tolan, Metin; Simonelli, Laura; Huotari, Simo

    2009-01-01

    We present a new sample cell for measuring nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of a tetrahydrofuran (THF)-water liquid mixture and THF hydrate. The hydrate is formed inside the cell after nucleation seeds have been offered by a special magnetic stirring mechanism. Hydrate formation was verified by wide angle x-ray scattering and nonresonant x-ray Raman scattering spectra at the oxygen K-edge. A broad range of scattering angles can be studied with this cell which is necessary for momentum transfer dependent inelastic x-ray scattering. This cell is ideal to examine other liquid hydrate formers or other liquid samples, which have to be mixed in situ during the measurements.

  11. Study of scattering from turbulence structure generated by propeller with FLUENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gen

    2017-07-01

    In this article, the turbulence structure generated by a propeller is simulated with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. With the method of moments, the backscattering radar cross sections (RCS) of the turbulence structure are calculated. The scattering results can reflect the turbulent intensity of the wave profiles. For the wake turbulence with low rotating speed, the scattering intensity of HH polarization is much smaller than VV polarization at large incident angles. When the turbulence becomes stronger with high rotating speed, the scattering intensity of HH polarization also becomes stronger at large incident angles, which is almost the same with VV polarization. And also, the bistatic scattering of the turbulence structure has the similar situation. These scattering results indicate that the turbulence structure can also give rise to an anomaly compared with traditional sea surface. The study of electromagnetic (EM) scattering from turbulence structure generated by the propeller can help in better understanding of the scattering from different kinds of waves and provide more bases to explain the anomalies of EM scattering from sea surfaces.

  12. Contributions to atomic microdynamics study in some liquid metals by means of soft neutrons scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotarescu, G.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of inelastic scattering of soft neutrons on Bi and liquid Pb, applying all the necessary corrections in view of obtaining the dYnamic structure factor S(Q,ω) were performed. The F(Q,t) function of intermediate scattering was obtained by means of the Fourier transformation of S(Q,ω). Special attention was devoted to one multiple scattering correction, especially at small scattering angles, taking into account its influence on the results. A comparison of the experimental results with three recent theoretical models has shown a good agreement in the range of intermediate and high Q values. Measurements of neutron inelastic scattering on liquid sodium at a temperature of 233 Cdeg within a momentum transfer range of 1 A -1 -1 were performed. The scattering law S(α,β) that was compared to a series of theoretical models has been determined from the experimental data. The validity of the theoretical models for different ranges of energy and momenta was thoroughly checked. S(α,β) was calculated for each type of scattering since sodium proves a mixed, coherent and incoherent scattering agent. A study on the influence of the even interaction potential upon the S(Q,ω) dynamic structure factor, the fourth order momentum ω 4 (Q) and uoon the spectral function C(Q,ω) of longitudinal current correlations was performed. For this purpose, four potentials with oscillations at great distances and a Lennard-Jones type potential were used. (author)

  13. Static and dynamic light scattering by red blood cells: A numerical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, Johannes; Peltomäki, Matti; Poblete, Simón; Gompper, Gerhard; Fedosov, Dmitry A

    2017-01-01

    Light scattering is a well-established experimental technique, which gains more and more popularity in the biological field because it offers the means for non-invasive imaging and detection. However, the interpretation of light-scattering signals remains challenging due to the complexity of most biological systems. Here, we investigate static and dynamic scattering properties of red blood cells (RBCs) using two mesoscopic hydrodynamics simulation methods-multi-particle collision dynamics and dissipative particle dynamics. Light scattering is studied for various membrane shear elasticities, bending rigidities, and RBC shapes (e.g., biconcave and stomatocyte). Simulation results from the two simulation methods show good agreement, and demonstrate that the static light scattering of a diffusing RBC is not very sensitive to the changes in membrane properties and moderate alterations in cell shapes. We also compute dynamic light scattering of a diffusing RBC, from which dynamic properties of RBCs such as diffusion coefficients can be accessed. In contrast to static light scattering, the dynamic measurements can be employed to differentiate between the biconcave and stomatocytic RBC shapes and generally allow the differentiation based on the membrane properties. Our simulation results can be used for better understanding of light scattering by RBCs and the development of new non-invasive methods for blood-flow monitoring.

  14. Evaluation of methods for wax determination in crude oil; Avaliacao de metodos de determinacao de parafinas em petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Julio Cesar M.; Silva, Maria do Socorro A.J. da; Vasconcellos, Rosa C.U. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Tamanqueira, Juliana B. [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Determining the wax content of crude oil is of great importance for petroleum industry, especially for production, storage and transportation of crude oils. Many different methodologies of wax determining are available in the technical literature. However, the selection of the most suitable method must be in accordance with the aim of the analysis and observing the specificities of each technique. The purpose of this work was to determine the performance of different techniques of wax determining applied to characterization of precipitation properties of waxy compounds in crude oils. Twelve samples of crude oils proceeding from the main Brazilian oil producing sedimentary basins were selected for this study. These samples were analyzed by three important analytical techniques of wax determining: precipitation by cooled solvent; liquid chromatography with precipitation by cooled solvent; and liquid chromatography followed by gas chromatography. Differential scanning calorimetry data related to the wax crystallization in these oils were used as parameters of validation. The results obtained in this study indicate that the liquid chromatography followed by gas chromatography method has the best performance for wax determining in crude oils. (author)

  15. Light-scattering study of the glass transition in lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaad, M. A.; Winer, W. O.; Medina, F. D.; Oshea, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    The sound velocity of four lubricants has been measured as a function of temperature and pressure using Brillouin scattering. A change in slope of the velocity as a function of temperature or pressure allowed the determination of the glass transition temperature and pressure. The glass transition data were used to construct a phase diagram for each lubricant. The data indicate that the glass transition temperature increased with pressure at a rate which ranged from 120 to 200 C/GPa. The maximum pressure attained was 0.69 GPa and the temperature range was from 25 to 100 C.

  16. Neutron scattering studies of eco-friendly functional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.; Gupta, M.K.; Mittal, R.; Krishna, P.S.R.; Chaplot, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Niobate based materials are environment friendly and appropriate for wide piezoelectric applications due to their piezo-response that is comparable to Pb(Zr Ti)O_3 beyond the technological application, NaNbO_3 has been a rich model system for understanding of mechanisms of structural phase transitions when subject to changes in thermodynamical conditions like: temperature, pressure, and/or composition, particle size and external stimuli like electric/magnetic field etc. In the present work, we report systematic investigation of structural phase transitions with variations in temperature, external pressure and chemical pressure (via compositional modification) using the neutron scattering technique. (author)

  17. Computation of bessel functions in light scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, W D

    1972-09-01

    Computations of light scattering require finding Bessel functions of a series of orders. These are found most easily by recurrence, but excessive rounding errors may accumulate. Satisfactory procedures for cylinder and sphere functions are described. If argument z is real, find Y(n)(z) by recurrence to high orders. From two high orders of Y(n)(z) estimate J(n)(z). Use backward recurrence to maximum J(n)(z). Correct by forward recurrence to maximum. If z is complex, estimate high orders of J(n)(z) without Y(n)(z) and use backward recurrence.

  18. Theoretical study of the electron-cluster elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descourt, P.; Guet, C.; Farine, M.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the clusters consisting of some tens to several hundreds of alkali atoms are generally quite well described in the jellium approximation. This approximation treats the cluster as a charged Fermi liquid of finite size. The optical response predicted by this approximation and taking into account the electron-electron correlations of the Hartree-Fock mean field agrees rather well with the experiment. The objective of this work was to obtain a quantal many-body formalism, within jellium approximation, applicable to elastic scattering of electrons from an alkali-metal-cluster. Influence of correlations on the phase shifts was also taken into account

  19. Studies of the phase transitions in UAs with neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S.K.; Lander, G.H.; Shapiro, S.M.; Vogt, O.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium arsenide is known to order with the type-I antiferromagnetic (AF) structure at approx. 126 K, and exhibit a first-order transition to the type-IA AF structure at T/sub N//2. We have now reexamined these transitions with a single crystal. Above T/sub N/ UAs exhibits critical scattering suggesting a tendency to order with an incommensurate wavevector, but then suddenly orders with the AF-I structure. The analysis of the data shows the need to consider anisotropic exchange interactions of cubic symmetry between U moments

  20. Electron back scattered diffraction study of SmCo magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonamine, T.; Fukuhara, M.; Machado, R.; Missell, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    The remanence and energy product of permanent magnets is a strong function of their crystallographic texture. Electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) is a tool for texture analysis providing information about the atomic layers up to 50 nm below the surface of the material. This paper discusses experimental requirements for performing EBSD measurements on rare-earth permanent magnets and presents results on commercial SmCo magnet material. EBSD measurements proved to be very sensitive to misaligned grains and were sensitive to texture in good agreement with information provided by X-ray diffraction scans. Results for nanostructured Sm(CoFeCuZr) z magnets are also discussed

  1. Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of premartensitic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron and x-ray investigations of some metallic alloys which are known to exhibit martensitic transformations. It is shown that precursor effects are usually present in the diffuse scattering and in the phonon dispersion curves, but the transition cannot be described in terms of the soft mode picture used in the Landau and Devonshire theory to describe structural phase transitions. In addition, it is noted that it is inappropriate to look at these microstructures as incommensurate systems, but more correctly as a coherent coexistence of two phases

  2. Initial study of deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Repond, S.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Thron, J.; Arzarello, F.; Ayad, R.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Ciralli, F.; Contin, A.; D'Auria, S.; del Papa, C.; Frasconi, F.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Lin, Q.; Lisowski, B.; Maccarrone, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Dabbous, H.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Gutjahr, B.; Hartmann, H.; Hartmann, J.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kramarczyk, S.; Kückes, M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Monaldi, D.; Müsch, H.; Paul, E.; Schattevoy, R.; Schneider, J.-L.; Wedemeyer, R.; Cassidy, A.; Cussans, D. G.; Dyce, N.; Fawcett, H. F.; Foster, B.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Lancaster, M.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Malos, J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Rau, R. R.; Barillari, T.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Gialas, I.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Burkot, W.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Borzemski, P.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zerȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zajc, J.; Kȩdzierski, T.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Dannemann, A.; Dierks, K.; Dorth, W.; Drews, G.; Erhard, P.; Flasiński, M.; Fleck, I.; Fürtjes, A.; Gläser, R.; Göttlicher, P.; Hass, T.; Hagge, L.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hultschig, H.; Jahnen, G.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Manczak, O.; Momayezi, M.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nicel, S.; Notz, D.; Park, I. H.; Pösnecker, K.-U.; Rohde, M.; Ros, E.; Schneekloth, S.; Schroeder, J.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Tscheslog, E.; Tsurugai, T.; Turkot, F.; Vogel, W.; Woeniger, T.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Grabosch, H. J.; Leich, A.; Meyer, A.; Rethfeldt, C.; Schlensthdt, S.; Casalbuoni, R.; de Curtis, S.; Dominici, D.; Francescato, A.; Nuti, M.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Casaccia, R.; de Pasquale, S.; Qian, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Freidhof, A.; Poser, T.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Theisen, G.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Forbes, J. R.; Jamieson, V. A.; Raine, C.; Saxon, D. H.; Brückmann, H.; Gloth, G.; Holm, U.; Kammerdocher, H.; Krebs, B.; Neumann, T.; Wick, K.; Hofmann, A.; Kröger, W.; Krüger, J.; Lohrmann, E.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Salomon, R.; Seidman, A.; Schott, W.; Wiik, B. H.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Markou, C.; McQuillan, D.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Prinias, A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Bienz, T.; Kreutzmann, H.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Roco, M.; Wang, M. Z.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Chen, L.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Roldán, J.; Terrón, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Ikraiam, F.; Mayer, J. K.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Hanna, D. S.; Hung, L. W.; Mitchell, J. W.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; Ullmann, R.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kuznetsov, E. N.; Savin, A. A.; Voronin, A. G.; Zotov, N. P.; Bentvelsen, S.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; van der Lugt, H.; O'dell, V.; Straver, J.; Tenner, A.; Tiecke, H.; Uijterwaal, H.; Vermeulen, J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Yoshida, R.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, S. K.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Blair, G. A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hallam-Baker, P. M.; Harnew, N.; Khatri, T.; Long, K. R.; Luffman, P.; McArthur, I.; Morawitz, P.; Nash, J.; Smith, S. J. P.; Roocroft, N. C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abbiendi, G.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Field, G.; Lim, J. N.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J.; Contino, U.; D'Agostini, G.; Guida, M.; Iori, M.; Mari, S. M.; Marini, G.; Mattioli, M.; Nigro, A.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Heusch, C.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Sadrozinski, H. F.; Seiden, A.; Badura, E.; Biltzinger, J.; Chaves, H.; Rost, M.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Weihs, W.; Zech, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Zer-Zion, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kasai, S.; Kuze, M.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Okuno, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yamada, S.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Kitamura, S.; Nagayama, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Arneodo, M.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Bhadra, S.; Brkic, M.; Burow, B. D.; Chlebana, F. S.; Crombie, M. B.; Hartner, G. F.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Prentice, J. D.; Sampson, C. R.; Stairs, G. G.; Teuscher, R. J.; Yoon, T.-S.; Bullock, F. W.; Catterall, C. D.; Giddings, J. C.; Jones, T. W.; Khan, A. M.; Lane, J. B.; Makkar, P. L.; Shaw, D.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Gibaut, D. B.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Stojda, K.; Stopczyński, A.; Szwed, R.; Tymieniecka, T.; Walczak, R.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Eisenberg, Y.; Glasman, C.; Karshon, U.; Montag, A.; Revel, D.; Shapira, A.; Ali, I.; Behrens, B.; Camerini, U.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Lomperski, M.; Loveless, R. J.; Nylander, P.; Ptacek, M.; Reeder, D. D.; Smith, W. H.; Silverstein, S.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Iga, Y.

    1993-04-01

    Results are presented on neutral current, deep inelastic scattering measured in collisions of 26.7 GeV electrons and 820 GeV protons. The events typically populate a range in Q2 from 10 to 100 GeV2. The values of x extend down to x ~ 10-4 which is two orders of magnitude lower than previously measured at such Q2 values in fixed target experiments. The measured cross sections are in accord with the extrapolations of current parametrisations of parton distributions.

  3. Development of the cuticular wax during growth of Kalanchoe daigremontiana (Hamet et Perr. de la Bathie) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Maarseveen, Clare; Han, Hong; Jetter, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to monitor cuticular wax accumulation during leaf development of Kalanchoe daigremontiana. Leaves expanded linearly until they were 40-60 d old. Wax coverages of leaves on the third node increased steadily during initial leaf development, from 6.5 microg x cm(-2) on day 22 to 15.3 microg x cm(-2) on day 53, and then levelled off. Triterpenoids dominated the wax mixture throughout leaf development, but decreased from 74 to 40-45% in mature leaves, while very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) derivatives increased from 19 to 39-44%. The major VLCFA derivatives were alkanes, accompanied by fatty acids, primary alcohols, aldehydes and alkyl esters. In all compound classes, either C(34) or C(33) homologs predominated during leaf development. Eight different triterpenoids were identified, with glutinol constituting 70% of the fraction, and friedelin (20%) and germanicol (10%) as further major components of the young leaf wax. The glutinol percentage decreased, while the relative amounts of epifriedelanol and glutanol increased during development. Various leaf pairs upwards from the third node showed similar growth patterns and developmental time courses of cuticular wax amounts and composition. Based on these surface chemical analyses, the relative activities of biosynthetic pathways leading to various wax components can be assessed.

  4. Gluconeogenesis from storage wax in the cotyledons of jojoba seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, R A; Huang, A H

    1977-08-01

    The cotyledons of jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) seeds contained 50 to 60% of their weight as intracellular wax esters. During germination there was a gradual decrease in the wax content with a concomitant rise in soluble carbohydrates, suggesting that the wax played the role of a food reserve. Thin layer chromatography revealed that both the fatty alcohol and fatty acid were metabolized. The disappearance of wax was matched with an increase of catalase, a marker enzyme of the gluconeogenic process in other fatty seedlings. Subcellular organelles were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation from the cotyledons at the peak stage of germination. The enzymes of the beta oxidation of fatty acid and of the glyoxylate cycle were localized in the glyoxysomes but not in the mitochondria. The glyoxysomes had specific activities of individual enzymes similar to those of the castor bean glyoxysomes. An active alkaline lipase was detected in the wax bodies at the peak stage of germination but not in the ungerminated seeds. No lipase was detected in glyoxysomes or mitochondria. After the wax in the wax bodies had been extracted with diethyl ether, the organelle membrane was isolated and it still retained the alkaline lipase. The gluconeogenesis from wax in the jojoba seedling appears to be similar, but with modification, to that from triglyceride in other fatty seedlings.

  5. Statistical Optimization of Sustained Release Venlafaxine HCI Wax Matrix Tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalekar, M R; Madgulkar, A R; Sheladiya, D D; Kshirsagar, S J; Wable, N D; Desale, S S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to prepare a sustained release drug delivery system of venlafaxine hydrochloride by using a wax matrix system. The effects of bees wax and carnauba wax on drug release profile was investigated. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to systemically optimize the drug release profile. Amounts of carnauba wax (X(1)) and bees wax (X(2)) were selected as independent variables and release after 12 h and time required for 50% (t(50)) drug release were selected as dependent variables. A mathematical model was generated for each response parameter. Both waxes retarded release after 12 h and increases the t(50) but bees wax showed significant influence. The drug release pattern for all the formulation combinations was found to be approaching Peppas kinetic model. Suitable combination of two waxes provided fairly good regulated release profile. The response surfaces and contour plots for each response parameter are presented for further interpretation of the results. The optimum formulations were chosen and their predicted results found to be in close agreement with experimental findings.

  6. Influence of Different Waxes on the Physical Properties of Linear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    2005-12-22

    Dec 22, 2005 ... viscosity of a polymer melt. In many instances it ... amounts of different waxes on the viscosity (melt flow) of ..... Since the MFI is a direct measure of the viscosity .... melt flow index increasing with increasing wax content. There.

  7. Biochemical response of sweet potato to bemul-wax coating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas Linn) tuber is a very nutritious but highly perishable crop that is subject to high wastages due to non-availability of appropriate storage techniques. This work assessed the effectiveness of treating the tubers with calcium chloride dip (CCD), bemul-wax (B-wax) and their combinations ...

  8. The moss Funaria hygrometrica has cuticular wax similar to vascular plants, with distinct composition on leafy gametophyte, calyptra and sporophyte capsule surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busta, Lucas; Budke, Jessica M; Jetter, Reinhard

    2016-09-01

    Aerial surfaces of land plants are covered with a waxy cuticle to protect against water loss. The amount and composition of cuticular waxes on moss surfaces had rarely been investigated. Accordingly, the degree of similarity between moss and vascular plant waxes, and between maternal and offspring moss structure waxes is unknown. To resolve these issues, this study aimed at providing a comprehensive analysis of the waxes on the leafy gametophyte, gametophyte calyptra and sporophyte capsule of the moss Funaria hygrometrica Waxes were extracted from the surfaces of leafy gametophytes, gametophyte calyptrae and sporophyte capsules, separated by gas chromatography, identified qualitatively with mass spectrometry, and quantified with flame ionization detection. Diagnostic mass spectral peaks were used to determine the isomer composition of wax esters. The surfaces of the leafy gametophyte, calyptra and sporophyte capsule of F. hygrometrica were covered with 0·94, 2·0 and 0·44 μg cm(-2) wax, respectively. While each wax mixture was composed of mainly fatty acid alkyl esters, the waxes from maternal and offspring structures had unique compositional markers. β-Hydroxy fatty acid alkyl esters were limited to the leafy gametophyte and calyptra, while alkanes, aldehydes and diol esters were restricted to the sporophyte capsule. Ubiquitous fatty acids, alcohols, fatty acid alkyl esters, aldehydes and alkanes were all found on at least one surface. This is the first study to determine wax coverage (μg cm(-2)) on a moss surface, enabling direct comparisons with vascular plants, which were shown to have an equal amount or more wax than F. hygrometrica Wax ester biosynthesis is of particular importance in this species, and the ester-forming enzyme(s) in different parts of the moss may have different substrate preferences. Furthermore, the alkane-forming wax biosynthesis pathway, found widely in vascular plants, is active in the sporophyte capsule, but not in the leafy

  9. Comprehensive study of observables in Compton scattering on the nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grießhammer, Harald W.; McGovern, Judith A.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2018-03-01

    We present an analysis of 13 observables in Compton scattering on the proton. Cross sections, asymmetries with polarised beam and/or targets, and polarisation-transfer observables are investigated for energies up to the Δ(1232) resonance to determine their sensitivity to the proton's dipole scalar and spin polarisabilities. The Chiral Effective Field Theory Compton amplitude we use is complete at N4LO, O(e2δ4), for photon energies ω˜ m_{π}, and so has an accuracy of a few per cent there. At photon energies in the resonance region, it is complete at NLO, O(e2δ0), and so its accuracy there is about 20%. We find that for energies from pion-production threshold to about 250 MeV, multiple asymmetries have significant sensitivity to presently ill-determined combinations of proton spin polarisabilities. We also argue that the broad outcomes of this analysis will be replicated in complementary theoretical approaches, e.g., dispersion relations. Finally, we show that below the pion-production threshold, 6 observables suffice to reconstruct the Compton amplitude, and above it 11 are required. Although not necessary for polarisability extractions, this opens the possibility to perform "complete" Compton-scattering experiments. An interactive Mathematica notebook, including results for the neutron, is available from judith.mcgovern@manchester.ac.uk.

  10. Design Study for Direction Variable Compton Scattering Gamma Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, T.; Omer, M.; Negm, H.; Choi, Y. W.; Kinjo, R.; Yoshida, K.; Konstantin, T.; Kimura, N.; Ishida, K.; Imon, H.; Shibata, M.; Shimahashi, K.; Komai, T.; Okumura, K.; Zen, H.; Masuda, K.; Hori, T.; Ohgaki, H.

    2013-03-01

    A monochromatic gamma ray beam is attractive for isotope-specific material/medical imaging or non-destructive inspection. A laser Compton scattering (LCS) gamma ray source which is based on the backward Compton scattering of laser light on high-energy electrons can generate energy variable quasi-monochromatic gamma ray. Due to the principle of the LCS gamma ray, the direction of the gamma beam is limited to the direction of the high-energy electrons. Then the target object is placed on the beam axis, and is usually moved if spatial scanning is required. In this work, we proposed an electron beam transport system consisting of four bending magnets which can stick the collision point and control the electron beam direction, and a laser system consisting of a spheroidal mirror and a parabolic mirror which can also stick the collision point. Then the collision point can be placed on one focus of the spheroid. Thus gamma ray direction and collision angle between the electron beam and the laser beam can be easily controlled. As the results, travelling direction of the LCS gamma ray can be controlled under the limitation of the beam transport system, energy of the gamma ray can be controlled by controlling incident angle of the colliding beams, and energy spread can be controlled by changing the divergence of the laser beam.

  11. Geometric accuracy of wax bade models manufactured in silicon moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Budzik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the test results of the geometric accuracy of wax blade models manufactured in silicon moulds in the Rapid Tooling process, with the application of the Vacuum Casting technology. In batch production casting waxes are designed for the manufacture of models and components of model sets through injection into a metal die. The objective of the tests was to determine the possibility of using traditional wax for the production of casting models in the rapid prototyping process. Blade models made of five types of casting wax were measured. The definition of the geometric accuracy of wax blade models makes it possible to introduce individual modifications aimed at improving their shape in order to increase the dimensional accuracy of blade models manufactured in the rapid prototyping process.

  12. Pickering emulsions stabilized by paraffin wax and Laponite clay particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caifu; Liu, Qian; Mei, Zhen; Wang, Jun; Xu, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2009-08-01

    Emulsions containing wax in dispersed droplets stabilized by disc-like Laponite clay particles are prepared. Properties of the emulsions prepared at different temperatures are examined using stability, microscopy and droplet-size analysis. At low temperature, the wax crystals in the oil droplets can protrude through the interface, leading to droplet coalescence. But at higher temperatures, the droplet size decreases with wax concentration. Considering the viscosity of the oil phase and the interfacial tension, we conclude that the wax is liquid-like during the high temperature emulsification process, but during cooling wax crystals appear around the oil/water interface and stabilize the droplets. The oil/water ratio has minimal effect on the emulsions between ratios of 3:7 and 7:3. The Laponite is believed to stabilize the emulsions by increasing the viscosity of the continuous phase and also by adsorbing at the oil/water interface, thus providing a physical barrier to coalescence.

  13. Investigation of Carnuba Wax as Matrix in the Formulation of Solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate the drug entrapment efficiency, release potential and drug release mechanisms of solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) prepared with different concentrations of two non ionic surfactants using carnauba wax as the lipid matrix. SLMs were prepared by melt dispersion technique, whereby ...

  14. Scatter correction using a primary modulator for dual energy digital radiography: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Byung-Du; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Dae-Hong; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-08-01

    In conventional digital radiography (DR) using a dual energy subtraction technique, a significant fraction of the detected photons are scattered within the body, making up the scatter component. Scattered radiation can significantly deteriorate image quality in diagnostic X-ray imaging systems. Various methods of scatter correction, including both measurement- and non-measurement-based methods, have been proposed in the past. Both methods can reduce scatter artifacts in images. However, non-measurement-based methods require a homogeneous object and have insufficient scatter component correction. Therefore, we employed a measurement-based method to correct for the scatter component of inhomogeneous objects from dual energy DR (DEDR) images. We performed a simulation study using a Monte Carlo simulation with a primary modulator, which is a measurement-based method for the DEDR system. The primary modulator, which has a checkerboard pattern, was used to modulate the primary radiation. Cylindrical phantoms of variable size were used to quantify the imaging performance. For scatter estimates, we used discrete Fourier transform filtering, e.g., a Gaussian low-high pass filter with a cut-off frequency. The primary modulation method was evaluated using a cylindrical phantom in the DEDR system. The scatter components were accurately removed using a primary modulator. When the results acquired with scatter correction and without scatter correction were compared, the average contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) with the correction was 1.35 times higher than that obtained without the correction, and the average root mean square error (RMSE) with the correction was 38.00% better than that without the correction. In the subtraction study, the average CNR with the correction was 2.04 (aluminum subtraction) and 1.38 (polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) subtraction) times higher than that obtained without the correction. The analysis demonstrated the accuracy of the scatter correction and the

  15. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  16. Annual report on neutron scattering studies in JAERI, September 1, 1978 - August 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizumi, Masashi; Endoh, Yasuo

    1980-03-01

    Neutron scattering studies carried out from September 1978 to August 1979 by Division of Physics, JAERI, and universities with JRR-2 and -3 neutron beam facilities are described: 51 summary reports, and a list of publications. (author)

  17. Scattering of neutrons by catalase: a study of molecules, subunits, and tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, J.; Starling, D.; Baldwin, J.P.; Ibel, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with small-angle scattering of neutrons by catalase tetramers, dimers, and monomers and with neutron diffraction by helical assemblies of tetramers in the form of tubules. A preliminary study of catalase is described

  18. A Monte Carlo study of the acceptance to scattered events in a depth encoding PET camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisan, C.; Tupper, P.; Rogers, J.G.; DeJong, J.K.

    1995-10-01

    We present a Monte Carlo study of acceptance to scattered events in a Depth Encoding Large Aperture Camera (DELAC), a hypothetical PET scanner with the capacity to encode the depth-of-interaction (DOI) of incident γ-rays. The simulation is initially validated against the measured energy resolution and scatter fraction of the ECAT-953B scanner. It is then used to assess the response to scattered events in a PET camera made of position encoding blocks of the EXACT HR PLUS type, modified to have DOI resolution through a variation in the photopeak pulse height. The detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-rays, as well as for those that scattered in the object or left only part of their energy in the block, is studied for several combinations of DOI sensitivities and block thicknesses. The scatter fraction predicted by the simulation for DELACs of various ring radii is compared to that of the ECAT-953B as a function of the energy threshold. The results indicate that the poorer discrimination of object scatters with depth sensitive blocks does not lead to a dramatic increase of the scatter fraction. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  19. The use of Raman scattering for studying the defects created by implantation in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morhange, J.F.; Beserman, R.; Bourgoin, J.

    1974-01-01

    The evolution of Raman scattering with the dose of implanted ions and annealing temperature in silicon and diamond was studied. The variation in the concentration of the defects introduced by implantation, with the dose and annealing temperature were deduced. These results were compared with results obtained using electron paramagnetic resonance. The comparison shows that Raman scattering is a good technique to study the behavior of the defects in ion implanted semiconductors [fr

  20. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcoyne, S.H.; Bentley, P.M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N.L.; Al-Shammary, H.A.O.; Wood, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q -4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100 A scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth

  1. Feasibility study of direct spectra measurements for Thomson scattered signals for KSTAR fusion-grade plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, K.-R.; Kim, K.-h.; Kwak, S.; Svensson, J.; Lee, J.; Ghim, Y.-c.

    2017-11-01

    Feasibility study of direct spectra measurements of Thomson scattered photons for fusion-grade plasmas is performed based on a forward model of the KSTAR Thomson scattering system. Expected spectra in the forward model are calculated based on Selden function including the relativistic polarization correction. Noise in the signal is modeled with photon noise and Gaussian electrical noise. Electron temperature and density are inferred using Bayesian probability theory. Based on bias error, full width at half maximum and entropy of posterior distributions, spectral measurements are found to be feasible. Comparisons between spectrometer-based and polychromator-based Thomson scattering systems are performed with varying quantum efficiency and electrical noise levels.

  2. Ribosome formation from subunits studied by stopped-flow and Rayleigh light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoun Ayman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Light scattering and standard stopped-flow techniques were used to monitor rapid association of ribosomal subunits during initiation of eubacterial protein synthesis. The effects of the initiation factors IF1, IF2, IF3 and buffer conditions on subunit association were studied along with the role of GTP in this process. The part of light scattering theory that is essential for kinetic measurements is high-lighted in the main text and a more general treatment of Rayleigh scattering from macromolecules is given in an appendix.

  3. Giant magnetic quadrupole resonance studied with 180 deg. electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Neumann-Cosel, P V

    1999-01-01

    The nuclei sup 4 sup 8 Ca and sup 9 sup 0 Zr were investigated in 180 deg. high-resolution inelastic electron scattering for momentum transfers q approx =0.35-0.8 fm sup - sup 1. Complete M2 strength distributions could be extracted in both nuclei up to excitation energies of about 15 MeV utilizing a fluctuation analysis technique. Second-RPA calculations successfully describe the experimentally observed strong fragmentation of the M2 mode. The quenching of the spin part is found to be comparable to the M1 case, contrary to previous claims suggesting a stronger reduction. A quantitative reproduction of the data requires the presence of appreciable orbital strength which can be interpreted as a torsional elastic vibration (the so-called twist mode).

  4. Neutron scattering study of Ce3Au3Sb4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasaya, Mitsuo; Katoh, Kenichi; Kohgi, Masahumi; Osakabe, Toyotaka

    1993-01-01

    Rare-earth compounds with an Y 3 Au 3 Sb 4 -type crystal structure are semiconductors or semi-metals. Among them, Ce 3 Au 3 Sb 4 is a semiconductor with an activation energy of about 640 K and shows no magnetic order down to 1.5 K. The magnetic part of the specific heat for Ce 3 Au 3 Sb 4 obtained by subtracting the value for La 3 Au 3 Sb 4 from the total specific heat of Ce 3 Au 3 Sb 4 shows a broad peak at around 10 K, the origin of which is well explained by the crystalline-field splitting determined by neutron scattering. (author)

  5. Nuclear spin response studies in inelastic polarized proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.

    1988-01-01

    Spin-flip probabilities S/sub nn/ have been measured for inelastic proton scattering at incident proton energies around 300 MeV from a number of nuclei. At low excitation energies S/sub nn/ is below the free value. For excitation energies above about 30 MeV for momentum transfers between about 0.35 fm/sup /minus/1/ and 0.65 fm/sup / minus/1/ S/sub nn/ exceeds free values significantly. These results suggest that the relative ΔS = 1(ΔS = 0 + ΔS = 1) nuclear spin response approaches about 90% in the region of the enhancement. Comparison of the data with slab response calculations are presented. Decomposition of the measured cross sections into σ(ΔS = 0) and σ(ΔS = 1) permit extraction of nonspin-flip and spin-flip dipole and quadrupole strengths. 29 refs., 11 figs

  6. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering Studies at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatie, F.

    2010-11-01

    This document describes the early experimental effort at Jefferson Lab to unravel the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPD), using the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. The GPDs contain the usual form factors and parton distribution functions, but in addition, they include correlations between states of different longitudinal and transverse momenta. They therefore give access to a three-dimensional picture of the nucleon. DVCS is the cleanest process allowing to extract GPDs, and as early as 2000, a number of experiments were proposed for this purpose. The results of the first exploratory experiments are presented as well as the first measurements of linear combinations of GPDs. In addition, a thorough discussion on the insights gained from these early experiments is proposed, linked with the theoretical tools used to extract GPDs from DVCS data. Finally, improvements on what was done for this first experimental phase are proposed and discussed, and new proposals and measurements are described. (author)

  7. A small angle neutron scattering study of thermoplastic elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutiarso,; Edy Giri, R Putra; Andon, Insani; Sudirman,; Sudaryanto, [Materials Science Research Centre, National Atomic Energy Agency, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    A bilateral scientific cooperation, in the small angle neutron scattering has been agreed upon between CIAE, China and BATAN, Indonesia as well as MINT Malaysia. As stated in the agreed proposal that the objective of this cooperation, in the initial stage (stage-1), was to have a regional intercomparison measurements of SANS instruments in order to determine their characteristic/performance. Therefore, this report is supposed to describe the progress in the SANS instrument development of each country involved during the period of 1996/97 and some activities related to the SANS instrument. Since, up to now, we have not yet received any progresses reported from either China or Malaysia, this report will describe the progress of SANS`s activities in BATAN only. (author)

  8. Anomalous x-ray scattering studies of functional disordered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, S; Tajiri, H; Song, C H; Ohara, K; Temleitner, L; Sugimito, K; Fujiwara, A; Pusztai, L; Usuki, T; Hosokawa, S; Benino, Y; Kitamura, N; Fukumi, K

    2014-01-01

    We have developed anomalous x-ray scattering (AXS) spectrometers, that employ intrinsic Ge detectors and crystal analyzers, at SPring-8. The use of LiF analyzer crystal provides us with an energy resolution of ∼ 12 eV. Furthermore, it has been established that the use of AXS technique is essential to reveal the relationship between the atomic structure and its function of a fast phase-change material, Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . We were able to address the issue of why the amorphous phase of fast phase change materials is stable at room temperature for a long time despite the fact that it can rapidly transform to the crystalline phase by using a combination of AXS and large scale density functional theory-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  9. Study on Scattering Theory and Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics: case of quark-antiquark Top pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randriamisy, H.D.E.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, the study of scattering and production of particles occupies an important place in subatomic physics research. The main ongoing experiments concern high-energy scattering in the colliders, the scattering theory based on quantum field theory is used for the theoretical study. The work presented in this thesis is located in this framework, in fact it concerns a study on the scattering theory and Perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. We used the path integral formalism of quantum field theory and perturbation theory. As we considered the higher order corrections in perturbative developments, the renormalization theory with the method of dimensional regularization was also used. As an application, the case of the Top quark production was considered. As main results, we can quote the obtention of the cross section of quark-antiquark top pair production up to second order. [fr

  10. Purifying oils and waxes. [British patent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1926-01-27

    Fractions of petroleum, shale oil, coal oil, and paraffin wax are refined by passing the vapour under reduced pressure through fuller's earth, bauxite, silica gel, or other adsorbent at a temperature not substantially more than sufficient to maintain the vapour phase. The vapour may be passed in succession through adsorbent of increasing strength. Treatment with sulphuric acid, or with alkali, or with both may precede treatment with absorbent, and this successive treatment may be repeated any number of times. The action is accelerated by passing a current of inert gas insufficient to affect the vacuum materially along with the vapours. In an example a 160 to 225/sup 0/C kerosene fraction is treated with sulphuric acid of 10 percent strength, and passed into a fuller's earth chamber under a vacuum of 27 in. of mercury and heated by steam to about 140/sup 0/C. The apparatus is described.

  11. In search of low cost biological analysis: Wax or acrylic glue bonded paper microfluidic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Gong, Xiuqing; Li, Shunbo; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia; Wu, Jinbo; Xiao, Kang; Yi, Xin

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax or cyanoacrylate-based resin as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes. The hot-melt adhesive wax or simple cyanoacrylate-based resin can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The wax bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by evacuating the channels of adhesive material in a hot-water. We applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation. Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein recombinant E. coli bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration. The chip bonded with cyanoacrylate-based resin was tested by measuring protein concentration and carrying out DNA capillary electrophoresis. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of our microfluidic chip fabrication technology, we tested the PCR compatibility of our chip materials along with various other common materials employed in the fabrication of microfluidic chips including: silicon, several kinds of silicon oxide, glasses, plastics, wax, and adhesives, etc. Two-temperature PCR was performed with these materials to determine their PCR-inhibitory effect. In most of the cases, addition of bovine serum albumin effectively improved the reaction yield. We also studied the individual PCR components

  12. Neutron scattering study of magnetic and crystalline electirc field interactions in RCrO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamir, N.

    1978-05-01

    Magnetic and crystalline electric field interactions in the compounds RCrO 3 (R-rare earth) , were studied by neutron scattering. Elastic neutron scattering was utilized in the study of the temperature dependence of the Cr 3+ and Ho 3+ magnetic reflections in Lu CrO 3 and HoCrO 3 , respectively. Analysis of this temperature dependence yielde constant canting angles for the Cr 3+ and Ho 3+ magnetic moments. Molecular magnetic field constants and crystalline electric field splitting were also calculated from the temperature dependence of the Ho 3+ magnetic reflection. These parameters were obtained directly by inelastic neutron scattering measurement. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements of crystlline electric field transitions of R 3+ (R=Pr, Nd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb) in RCrO 3 , formed the basis for the calculation of the common crystalline electirc field parameters of the heavy R 3+ ions. (author)

  13. Theoretical study of parity violating asymmetry in proton-proton (pp) scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Sajjad Athar, M.; Waris, Atiya

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of parity violating asymmetries in the pp scattering and proton-nucleus scattering with polarised protons provide a very useful tool to study the interplay of weak and strong interactions between the nucleons and within the nucleus. In order to understand these processes in terms of the conventional nucleon-nucleon interaction models, new experiments at the intermediate energies of 221 and 450 MeV and in the higher energy of multi GeV range are to be carried out

  14. Study of hot carrier relaxation in quantum wells by subpicosecond Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dai-sik; Yu, P.Y.

    1990-03-01

    Relaxation of hot carriers excited by subpicosecond laser pulses has been studied by Raman scattering in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells with well widths varying between 100 and 1000 Angstrom. The hot phonon population observed by Raman scattering is found to decrease with the well width despite the fact that the hot electron temperature remains constant. The results are explained in terms of confinement of both electrons and optical phonons in quantum wells

  15. Studying the dynamics of colloidal particles with digital holographic microscopy and electromagnetic scattering solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Manoharan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Digital holographic microscopy (DHM can measure the 3D positions as well as the scattering properties of colloidal particles in a single 2D image. We describe DHM and our analysis of recorded holograms with exact scattering solutions, which permit the measurement of 3D particle positions with ∼10 nm precision and millisecond time resolution, and discuss studies of the Brownian dynamics of clusters of spheres with DHM.

  16. Effect of Zeolite Treatment on the Blooming Behavior of Paraffin Wax in Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan B. Pajarito

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The blooming behavior of paraffin wax in natural rubber (NR composites was studied as function of zeolite treatment. Three types of zeolite treatment were treated as factors: acid activation using hydrochloric acid (HCl solution, ion exchange using tetradecyldimethyl amine (TDA chloride salt, and organic modification using glycerol monostearate (GMS. The zeolite was treated according to a 23 full factorial design of experiment. Attenuated total reflectance – Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure of treated zeolite. Treated zeolite was applied as filler to NR composites deliberately compounded with high amount of paraff in wax. The amount of bloomed wax in surface of NR composite sheets was monitored with time at 50oC. Results show the bloom amount to be linear with the square root of time. NR composites reinforced with untreated, acid-activated, and ion-exchanged zeolite fillers indicate reduction in wax blooming as compared to unfilled NR. The bloom rate (slope and initial bloom (y-intercept were determined from the experimental plots. Analysis of variance (ANOVA shows the bloom rate to be signif icantly increased when zeolite fillers are treated with GMS. Meanwhile, initial bloom was significantly enhanced when zeolite fillers are treated with TDA chloride salt and GMS. The significant increase in bloom rate and initial bloom can be attributed to the softening of the NR matrix at high amounts of TDA chloride salt and GMS.

  17. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  18. Scattering study at free air ionization chamber diaphragm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alexandre Lo Bianco dos

    2011-01-01

    The maim of this work consisted in the assessment of the correction factor for air kerma, due to scattered radiation in the diaphragm of the free-air ionization chamber model 481. LNMRl measurements were made to acquire x-ray spectra corresponding to the Qualities RQR-M, described in IEC 61627 standards (2005). These spectra were used as input data in the MC simulations. The operational range of energy spectra provide up to 35 keV. This energy range is typically used in diagnostic radiology, although there is not primary standard for air kerma. The determination of this factor is a fundamental process in the primary standardization of the air kerma. These factors were obtained by computer simulation using the Penelope code. The results are k RQR-M1 =0,9946, k RQR -M2 =0,9932, k RQR-M3 =0,9978 and k RQR-M4 =0,9885; with uncertainties of 0,007 and coverage factor equal to 2. lt can be concluded that, with respect to the diaphragm, the chamber can be used in the primary standard of air kerma. (author)

  19. Study of neutrino-electron scattering at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    Using a beam stop source of ν e from stopped μ + A decay located at the Clinton B. Anderson Meson Physics Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, a measurement of the reaction ν e + e - → ν e +e - was performed. In the Weinberg-Salam-Glashow model of electroweak interactions, the above reaction is mediated both by the exchange of a Z boson (neutral-current) and the exchange of a W boson (charged-current), and is thus sensitive to the interference between these two exchanges. A total of 304 ± 49 ν x e events are identified of which 254 ± 50 are attributed to ν e e elastic scattering. The observed event rate rules out the opposite sign of the interference by 4.6σ and is consistent with the interference predicted by the WSG model. The measured cross-section is σ(ν e e) = |11.8 ± 2.5(stat) ± 1.2(syst)| x 10 -42 cm 2 x E ν (GeV) with a measured Weinberg angle of sin 2 Θ ω = 0.31 ± 0.08 (stat) ±0.03(syst)

  20. Polarized neutron reflectivity and scattering studies of magnetic heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabel, H; Theis-Broehl, K

    2003-01-01

    The current interest in the magnetism of ultrathin films and multilayers is driven by their manifold applications in the magneto-and spin-electronic areas, for instance as magnetic field sensors or as information storage devices. In this regard, there is a large interest in exploring spin structures and spin disorder at the interface of magnetic heterostructures, to investigate magnetic domains in thin films and superlattices, and to understand remagnetization processes of various laterally shaped magnetic nanostructures. Traditionally neutron scattering has played a dominant role in the determination of spin structures, phase transitions and magnetic excitations in bulk materials. Today, its potential for the investigation of thin magnetic films has to be redefined. Polarized neutron reflectivity (PNR) at small wavevectors can provide precise information on the magnetic field distribution parallel to the film plane and on layer resolved magnetization vectors. In addition, PNR is not only sensitive to structural interface roughness but also to the magnetic roughness. Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis measurements from polarized small angle Bragg reflections allows us to filter out correlation effects during magnetization reversals of magnetic stripes and islands. An overview is provided on most recent PNR investigations of magnetic heterostructures

  1. Phase separation process in FeCr alloys studied by neutron small angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusaka, Michihiro; Ishikawa, Yoshikazu; Yamaguchi, Sadae; Fujino, Yutaka.

    1986-01-01

    The very early stage as well as late stage of phase separation process in FeCr alloys (Fe-20, 30, 40, 60 at%Cr) have been studied by pulsed cold neutron small angle scattering instrument (SAN). At the early stage, scattering intensity I(q) obeys q -2 dependence at the high q side of the scattering function. The results are in accord with the theory of Langer et al. which takes into account nonlinear and thermal fluctuations effects. At the late stage where I(q) shows q -4 dependence, a dynamical scaling law holds, while it is not the case for the earlier stage. Phase diagram of FeCr system is also determined by critical scattering measurements. (author)

  2. Optimalization study for ion-temperature measurements by means of Rutherford scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, A.J.H.; Barbian, E.P.

    1986-03-01

    Small-angle Rutherford scattering of energetic neutrals by plasma ions is governed by energy and momentum conservation. The FWHM of the scattering distibution reveals the ion temperature of the plasma. A feasibility study is performed to optimize the parameters in case Rutherford-scattering technique is applied to a medium-sized tokamak experiment. Together with a time-of-flight analyser with a high energy resolution of about 100, a 20 keV helium probing beam with a neutral current density of 10 A/m 2 can provide a detailed spectrum within 3 ms, from which the ion temperature can be extracted with an accuracy of better than 10%. The influence of plasma impurities and resonant charge exchange on the scattering process is discussed in detail. The good spatial resolution makes the method very suitable to investigate energy deposition profiles in the case of ion-cyclotron radiation applied to the plasma for the purpose of plasma heating. (orig.)

  3. A study on the distribution of scatter ray in chest radiography of a health examination bus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ji Hwan; Jin, Seong Jin; Min, Byeong In

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of spatial scatter ray on the chest radiographs of patients on health examination bus. In this paper, we propose a method for minimize unnecessary exposure by measuring the scattered dose after exposure the actual subject and comparing the body mass index (BMI) with the tube current amount mAs. The results of this study showed that the mean BMI of the subjects was 23.31±3.12. The mean mAs value was 2.92±1.19, which males was higher than females. The mean value of the scatter ray at position 1 in the radiography room was 771.81±151.15 μ/hr. The mean value of the scatter rays at the position 2 outside the entrance of the radiography room was measured as 53.86±25.66 μ/hr. As the BMI and mAs was increase the spatial scatter dose was increased at position 1 and position 2 in the photographing room. In order to minimize the exposure dose of scatter ray, radiation workers should shoot the radiation as low as possible within the range that does not impair the quality of the image. It will be necessary to make efforts to not wait for a waiting person near the entrance door of the photographing room

  4. A study on the distribution of scatter ray in chest radiography of a health examination bus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ji Hwan [Dept. of Health Care Clinic, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Seong Jin [Gammaknife center, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byeong In [Dept. of of Nuclear Applied Engineering, Inje University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the distribution of spatial scatter ray on the chest radiographs of patients on health examination bus. In this paper, we propose a method for minimize unnecessary exposure by measuring the scattered dose after exposure the actual subject and comparing the body mass index (BMI) with the tube current amount mAs. The results of this study showed that the mean BMI of the subjects was 23.31±3.12. The mean mAs value was 2.92±1.19, which males was higher than females. The mean value of the scatter ray at position 1 in the radiography room was 771.81±151.15 μ/hr. The mean value of the scatter rays at the position 2 outside the entrance of the radiography room was measured as 53.86±25.66 μ/hr. As the BMI and mAs was increase the spatial scatter dose was increased at position 1 and position 2 in the photographing room. In order to minimize the exposure dose of scatter ray, radiation workers should shoot the radiation as low as possible within the range that does not impair the quality of the image. It will be necessary to make efforts to not wait for a waiting person near the entrance door of the photographing room.

  5. WAX ActiveLibrary: a tool to manage information overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanka, R; O'Brien, C; Heathfield, H; Buchan, I E

    1999-11-01

    WAX Active-Library (Cambridge Centre for Clinical Informatics) is a knowledge management system that seeks to support doctors' decision making through the provision of electronic books containing a wide range of clinical knowledge and locally based information. WAX has been piloted in several regions in the United Kingdom and formally evaluated in 17 GP surgeries based in Cambridgeshire. The evaluation has provided evidence that WAX Active-Library significantly improves GPs' access to relevant information sources and by increasing appropriate patient management and referrals this might also lead to an improvement in clinical outcomes.

  6. Structural studies using X-ray absorption and scattering techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, Agneta.

    1989-01-01

    The thesis presents extended X-ray absorption fine structure, EXAFS, and large angle X-ray scattering, LAXS, techniques; instrumentation, data collection and reduction, and applications. These techniques have been used to determine the structures of magnesium halides and organomagnesium halides in diethyl ether and tetrahydrofuran solution. The iodides were used for the LAXS measurements and Br K edge EXAFS data were collected for the corresponding bromides. Two different complexes are present in the diethyl ether solution of magnesium iodide; a polymeric chain-type structure where magnesium is tetrahedrally coordinated, as well as dimeric complex with octahedrally coordinated magnesium. Solvated MgI + is the dominating species in tetrahydrofuran solution. The organomagnesium halides are present in diethyl ether solution as both solvated monomeric and dimeric complexes. Magnesium coordinates a halide ion, an alkyl or aryl group and four solvent molecules octahedrally in the monomeric complex. In the dimeric complex magnesium is octahedrally coordinated by two bridging halide ions, an alkyl or aryl group and three solvent molecules. The distribution of monomeric and dimeric complexes in various solutions are given by a dimerisation constant, K dl . The results indicate that the Schlenk equilibrium is present in these solutions, however, in an extended form. In diethyl ether solution, where MgX 2 does not dissociate, no MgX 2 complex and thereby no Schlenk equilibrium has been observed. In tetrahydrofuran solution MgI 2 has dissociated into mainly MgI + and I - . This indicates that the concentration of MgI 2 is low and that the Schlenk equilibrium should be expanded even further to include the dissociation equilibrium of the magnesium halide. In the thesis Fe K edge EXAFS data collected for the semireduced form of protein A of methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus, are also presented. (139 refs.)

  7. A study on the microstructural parameters of 550 keV electron irradiated Lexan polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareesh, K.; Pramod, R.; Petwal, V. C.; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Sangappa; Sanjeev, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    Lexan polymer films irradiated with 550 keV Electron Beam (EB) were characterized using Wide Angle Xray Scattering (WAXS) data to study the microstructural parameters. The crystal imperfection parameters like crystal size , lattice strain (g in %) and enthalpy (α) have been determined by Line Profile Analysis (LPA) using Fourier method of Warren.

  8. Understanding the scatter radiation distribution during C-arm CT examination. A body phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norimasa, Toshiyo; Kakimi, Akihiko; Takao, Yoshinori; Sasaki, Shohei; Katayama, Yutaka; Himoto, Daisuke; Izuta, Shinichiro; Ichida, Takao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the scatter radiation distribution during C-arm CT examination in the interventional radiography (IVR) room to show the escaped area and the radiation protective method. The C-arm rotates 200deg in 5 s. The tube voltage was 90 kV, and the entrance dose to the detector was 0.36 μGy/frame during C-arm CT examination. The scattered doses were measured each 50 cm from the isocenter like a grid pattern. The heights of the measurement were 50, 100, and 150 cm from the floor. The maximum scattered doses were 38.23 ± 0.60 μGy at 50 cm, 43.86 ± 20 μGy at 100 cm, and 25.78 ± 0.37 μGy at 150 cm. The scatter radiation distribution at 100 cm was the highest scattered dose. The operator should protect their reproductive gland, thyroid, and lens. The scattered dose was low behind the C-arm body and the bed, so they will be able to become the escaped area for staff. (author)

  9. Study of Coulomb effects using the comparison of positrons and electrons elastic scattering on nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, Vincent

    1990-01-01

    We have studied Coulomb effects in the electron-nucleus interaction by measuring electron and positron elastic scattering. The Coulomb field of the nucleus acts differently on theses particles because of their opposite charges. The experiment took place at the Accelerateur Lineaire de Saclay, with 450 MeV electrons and positrons. We measured the emittance of the positron and electron beams. We compared electron and positron beams having the same energy, the same emittance and the same intensity. This way, we measured positron scattering cross sections with 2 % systematic error. By comparing positron and electron elastic scattering cross sections for momentum transfers between 1 and 2 fm -1 , on a Lead 208 target, we showed that the calculations of Coulomb effects in elastic scattering are in perfect agreement with experimental results. The comparison of positron and electron elastic scattering cross sections on Carbon showed that dispersive effects are smaller than 2 % outside the diffraction minima. These two results demonstrate in a definitive way that electron scattering allows to measure charge densities in the center of nuclei with an accuracy of the order of 1 %. (author) [fr

  10. 21 CFR 155.120 - Canned green beans and canned wax beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned green beans and canned wax beans. 155.120... Vegetables § 155.120 Canned green beans and canned wax beans. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned green beans and canned wax beans are the foods prepared from succulent pods of fresh green bean or wax bean plants...

  11. Oil-structuring characterization of natural waxes in canola oil oleogels: Rheological, thermal, and oxidative properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natural waxes (candelilla wax, carnauba wax, and beeswax) were utilized as canola oil structurants to produce oleogels and their physicochemical properties were evaluated from rheological, thermal, and oxidative points of view. The oleogels with candelilla wax exhibited the highest hardness, followe...

  12. The effects of magnetic fields on carnauba wax electret formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clator, Irvin G.

    1987-08-01

    The results of thermally stimulated depolarization current and effective surface charge-density measurements indicate that magnetic fields do not produce carnauba wax electrets and that previously reported data can be attributed to nonmagnetic effects.

  13. Development of Wax-Incorporated Emulsion Gel Beads for the Encapsulation and Intragastric Floating Delivery of the Active Antioxidant from Tamarindus indica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soradech, Sitthiphong; Petchtubtim, Intira; Thongdon-A, Jeerayu; Muangman, Thanchanok

    2016-03-22

    In this study, tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) seed extracts with potential antioxidant activity and toxicity to cancer cells were developed as functional foods and nutraceutical ingredients in the form of emulsion gel beads. Three extracts were obtained from ethanol and water: TSCH50, TSCH95 and TSCH. All extracts exhibited high potential for superoxide anion scavenging activity over the IC50 range emulsion gel beads, which were prepared using a modified ionotropic gelation technique. Tamarind seed extract at 1% (w/w) was used as the active ingredient in all formulations. The effect of the types and amounts of wax on the encapsulation efficiency and percentage of the active release of alginate gel beads was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the incorporation of both waxes into the gel beads had an effect on the percentage of encapsulation efficiency (%) and the percentage of the active ingredient release. Furthermore, the addition of water insoluble waxes (carnauba and bee wax) significantly retarded the release of the active ingredient. The addition of both waxes had a slight effect on drug release behavior. Nevertheless, the increase in incorporated waxes in all formulations could sustain the percentage of active ingredient release. In conclusion, wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads using a modified ionotropic gelation technique could be applied for the intragastric floating delivery and controlled release of functional food and nutraceutical products for their antioxidant and anticancer capacity.

  14. Significance of scatter radar studies of E and F region irregularities at high latitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter considers the mechanisms by which electron density irregularities may be generated in the high latitude ionosphere and the techniques through which they are observed with ground base radars. The capabilities of radars used for studying these irregularities are compared with the capabilities of radars used for incoherent scatter measurements. The use of irregularity scatter techniques for dynamic studies of larger scale structured phenomena is discussed. Topics considered include E-region irregularities, observations with auroral radars, plasma drifts associated with a westward travelling surge, and ionospheric plasma motions associated with resonant waves. It is shown why high latitude F-region irregularity studies must be made in the HF frequency band (3-30 MHz). The joint use of the European Incoherent Scatter Association (EISCAT), STARE and SAFARI facilities is examined, and it is concluded that the various techniques will enhance each other and provide a better understanding of the various processes being studied

  15. A comparison of the accuracy of patterns processed from an inlay casting wax, an auto-polymerized resin and a light-cured resin pattern material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Praveen; Chitre, Vidya; Aras, Meena A

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, inlay casting waxes have been used to fabricate patterns for castings. Newer resin pattern materials offer greater rigidity and strength, allowing easier laboratory and intraoral adjustment without the fear of pattern damage. They also claim to possess a greater dimensional stability when compared to inlay wax. This study attempted to determine and compare the marginal accuracy of patterns fabricated from an inlay casting wax, an autopolymerized pattern resin and a light polymerized pattern resin on storage off the die for varying time intervals. Ten patterns each were fabricated from an inlay casting wax (GC Corp., Tokyo, Japan), an autopolymerized resin pattern material (Pattern resin, GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan) and a light-cured resin pattern material (Palavit GLC, Hereaus Kulzer GmbH, Germany). The completed patterns were stored off the die at room temperature. Marginal gaps were evaluated by reseating the patterns on their respective dies and observing it under a stereomicroscope at 1, 12, and 24 h intervals after pattern fabrication. The results revealed that the inlay wax showed a significantly greater marginal discrepancy at the 12 and 24 h intervals. The autopolymerized resin showed an initial (at 1 h) marginal discrepancy slightly greater than inlay wax, but showed a significantly less marginal gap (as compared to inlay wax) at the other two time intervals. The light-cured resin proved to be significantly more dimensionally stable, and showed minimal change during the storage period. The resin pattern materials studied, undergo a significantly less dimensional change than the inlay waxes on prolonged storage. They would possibly be a better alternative to inlay wax in situations requiring high precision or when delayed investment (more than 1 h) of patterns can be expected.

  16. CARNAUBA WAX USED AS AN HYDROPHOBIC AGENT FOR EXPANDED VERMICULITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.F. Melo

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the use of carnauba wax as an expansion and hydrophobicity agent for vermiculite, to be utilized in the sorption process of oil in water. Evaluation of the system (oil-water-hydrophobic vermiculite submersion percentage was considered in assessing the performance of vermiculite in comparison to a Mexican turf. Carnauba wax seems to be more efficient in both fresh and salt waters.

  17. Effects of UV-B radiation on wax biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Paul, N.; Percy, K.; Broadbent, P.; McLaughlin, C.; Mullineaux, P.; Creissen, G.; Wellburn, A.

    1994-01-01

    Two genotypes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were exposed in controlled environment chambers to three levels of biologically effective ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B BE ; 280-320nm): 0, 4.54 (ambient) and 5.66 (∼ 25% enhancement) kJ m -2 d -1 . After 28 days, the quantity of wax deposited on leaf surfaces was determined gravimetrically; epicuticular wax chemical composition was determined by capillary gas chromatography with homologue assignments confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Leaf wettability was assessed by measuring the contact angle of water droplets placed on leaf surfaces. Tobacco wax consisted of three major hydrocarbon classes: Straight-chain alkanes (C 27 -C 33 ) which comprised ∼ 59% of the hydrocarbon fraction, containing a predominance of odd-chain alkanes with C 31 as the most abundant homologue; branched-chain alkanes (C 25 -C 32 ) which comprised ∼38% of the hydrocarbon fraction with anteiso 3-methyltriacontane (C 30 ) as the predominant homologue; and fatty acids (C 14 -C 18 ) which comprised ∼ 3% of the wax. Exposure to enhanced UV-B radiation reduced the quantity of wax on the adaxial surface of the transgenic mutant, and resulted in marked changes in the chemical composition of the wax on the exposed leaf surface. Enhanced UV-B decreased the quantity of straight-chain alkanes, increased the quantity of branched-chain alkanes and fatty acids, and resulted in shifts toward shorter straight-chain lengths. Furthermore, UV-B-induced changes in wax composition were associated with increased wettability of tobacco leaf surfaces. Overall, the data are consistent with the view that UV-B radiation has a direct and fundamental effect on wax biosynthesis. Relationships between the physico-chemical nature of the leaf surface and sensitivity to UV-B radiation are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Scatter correction method for x-ray CT using primary modulation: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hewei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert; Sun Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Scatter correction is a major challenge in x-ray imaging using large area detectors. Recently, the authors proposed a promising scatter correction method for x-ray computed tomography (CT) using primary modulation. Proof of concept was previously illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments on a small phantom with a simple geometry. In this work, the authors provide a quantitative evaluation of the primary modulation technique and demonstrate its performance in applications where scatter correction is more challenging. Methods: The authors first analyze the potential errors of the estimated scatter in the primary modulation method. On two tabletop CT systems, the method is investigated using three phantoms: A Catphan(c)600 phantom, an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the Catphan(c)600 phantom with two annuli. Two different primary modulators are also designed to show the impact of the modulator parameters on the scatter correction efficiency. The first is an aluminum modulator with a weak modulation and a low modulation frequency, and the second is a copper modulator with a strong modulation and a high modulation frequency. Results: On the Catphan(c)600 phantom in the first study, the method reduces the error of the CT number in the selected regions of interest (ROIs) from 371.4 to 21.9 Hounsfield units (HU); the contrast to noise ratio also increases from 10.9 to 19.2. On the anthropomorphic chest phantom in the second study, which represents a more difficult case due to the high scatter signals and object heterogeneity, the method reduces the error of the CT number from 327 to 19 HU in the selected ROIs and from 31.4% to 5.7% on the overall average. The third study is to investigate the impact of object size on the efficiency of our method. The scatter-to-primary ratio estimation error on the Catphan(c)600 phantom without any annulus (20 cm in diameter) is at the level of 0.04, it rises to 0.07 and 0.1 on the phantom with an

  19. A new potential of π-nucleus scattering and its application to nuclear structure study using elastic scattering and charge exchange reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, Gerard.

    1974-01-01

    First the different theories used for studying pion-nucleus scattering and especially Glauber microscopic model and Kisslinger optical model are summarized. From the comparison of these two theories it was concluded that Kisslinger's was better for studying pion-nucleus scattering near the (3/2-3/2) resonance. The potential was developed, with a local corrective term, proposed by this author. This new term arises from taking into account correctly the Lorentz transformation from the pion-nucleon center of mass to the pion nucleus center of mass system. A coupled-channel formalism was developed allowing the study of pion-nucleus elastic scattering and also the study of single and double charge exchange reactions on nucleus with N>Z. The influence of the new term and the shape of nucleon densities on π- 12 C scattering was studied near 200MeV. It was found that at the nucleus surface the neutron density was larger than the proton density. On the other hand, a maximum of sensibility to the different nuclear parameters was found near 180MeV and for elastic scattering angles greater than 100 deg. The calculations of the total cross section for simple and double charge exchange for 13 C and 63 Cu yielded results simular to those of previous theories and showed the same discrepancy between theory and experiment in the resonance region [fr

  20. Beyond simple small-angle X-ray scattering: developments in online complementary techniques and sample environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Bras

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS are standard tools in materials research. The simultaneous measurement of SAXS and WAXS data in time-resolved studies has gained popularity due to the complementary information obtained. Furthermore, the combination of these data with non X-ray based techniques, via either simultaneous or independent measurements, has advanced understanding of the driving forces that lead to the structures and morphologies of materials, which in turn give rise to their properties. The simultaneous measurement of different data regimes and types, using either X-rays or neutrons, and the desire to control parameters that initiate and control structural changes have led to greater demands on sample environments. Examples of developments in technique combinations and sample environment design are discussed, together with a brief speculation about promising future developments.

  1. Beyond simple small-angle X-ray scattering: developments in online complementary techniques and sample environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, Wim; Koizumi, Satoshi; Terrill, Nicholas J

    2014-11-01

    Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS) are standard tools in materials research. The simultaneous measurement of SAXS and WAXS data in time-resolved studies has gained popularity due to the complementary information obtained. Furthermore, the combination of these data with non X-ray based techniques, via either simultaneous or independent measurements, has advanced understanding of the driving forces that lead to the structures and morphologies of materials, which in turn give rise to their properties. The simultaneous measurement of different data regimes and types, using either X-rays or neutrons, and the desire to control parameters that initiate and control structural changes have led to greater demands on sample environments. Examples of developments in technique combinations and sample environment design are discussed, together with a brief speculation about promising future developments.

  2. Study of human blood and hemocomponents irradiated by low angle x ray scattering (LAXS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Nivia G. Villela; Barroso, Regina C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica], e-mail: nitatag@gmail.com; Mota, Carla L.S.; Almeida, Andre P.; Azeredo, Soraia R.; Braz, Delson [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], e-mail: delson@lin.ufrj.br

    2009-07-01

    Irradiation of blood and blood components is currently practiced in developed and in a few developing countries. The main purpose of this process is the prevention of graft versus host disease in immunodeficient patients. The Food and Drug Administration recommends a dose range of 15 Gy to 25 Gy for these blood components. When x-ray photons are scattered from biological samples, their angular distribution shows one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are characteristic for the investigated samples. Due to its wide range of biological and medical applications, low-angle x-ray scattering has attracted the attention of many authors. Thus in this present work was studied the possible variations in scattering profiles due to the irradiation when the gender of patients was considered. Fresh blood specimens were obtained from volunteers using vacutainer tubes containing EDTA, at the Dr. Eliel Figueiredo Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro. All the samples were lyophilized for 48 hours in a freeze drier in order to remove the water. The scattering measurements were carried out in e-2e reflection geometry using a powder diffractometer Shimadzu XRD- 6000. The measured characterization parameters for LAXS were associated with epidemiological data (gender). The mean values of the different parameters were compared using the Students's t-test for each characterization parameters. The scattering profiles from plasma and formed elements are characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. For epidemiological data (gender) analyzed was not found significant changes in the mostly of characterization parameters (p>0.05). (author)

  3. Studies of coherent/Compton scattering method for bone mineral content measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoko; Iwanami, Shigeru; Nakazawa, Keiji; Matsubayashi, Takashi; Imamura, Keiko.

    1980-01-01

    A measurement of bone mineral content by a coherent/Compton scattering method was described. A bone sample was irradiated by a collimated narrow beam of 59.6 keV gamma-rays emitted from a 300 mCi 241 Am source, and the scattered radiations were detected using a collimated pure germanium detector placed at 90 0 to the incident beam. The ratio of coherent to Compton peaks in a spectrum of the scattered radiations depends on the bone mineral content of the bone sample. The advantage of this method is that bone mineral content of a small region in a bone can be accurately measured. Assuming that bone consists of two components, protein and bone mineral, and that the mass absorption coefficient for Compton scattering is independent of material, the coherent to Compton scattering ratio is linearly related to the percentage in weight of bone mineral. A calibration curve was obtained by measuring standard samples which were mixed with Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 and H 2 O. The error due to the assumption about the mass absorption coefficient for Compton scattering and to the difference between true bone and standard samples was estimated to be less than 3% within the range from 10 to 60% in weight of bone mineral. The fat in bone affects an estimated value by only 1.5% when it is 20% in weight. For the clinical application of this method, the location to be analyzed should be selected before the measurement with two X-ray images viewed from the source and the detector. These views would be also used to correct the difference in absorption between coherent and Compton scattered radiations whose energies are slightly different from each other. The absorbed dose to the analyzed region was approximately 150 mrad. The time required for one measurement in this study was about 10 minutes. (author)

  4. Study of human blood and hemocomponents irradiated by low angle x ray scattering (LAXS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Nivia G. Villela; Barroso, Regina C.; Mota, Carla L.S.; Almeida, Andre P.; Azeredo, Soraia R.; Braz, Delson

    2009-01-01

    Irradiation of blood and blood components is currently practiced in developed and in a few developing countries. The main purpose of this process is the prevention of graft versus host disease in immunodeficient patients. The Food and Drug Administration recommends a dose range of 15 Gy to 25 Gy for these blood components. When x-ray photons are scattered from biological samples, their angular distribution shows one or more peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are characteristic for the investigated samples. Due to its wide range of biological and medical applications, low-angle x-ray scattering has attracted the attention of many authors. Thus in this present work was studied the possible variations in scattering profiles due to the irradiation when the gender of patients was considered. Fresh blood specimens were obtained from volunteers using vacutainer tubes containing EDTA, at the Dr. Eliel Figueiredo Laboratory, Rio de Janeiro. All the samples were lyophilized for 48 hours in a freeze drier in order to remove the water. The scattering measurements were carried out in e-2e reflection geometry using a powder diffractometer Shimadzu XRD- 6000. The measured characterization parameters for LAXS were associated with epidemiological data (gender). The mean values of the different parameters were compared using the Students's t-test for each characterization parameters. The scattering profiles from plasma and formed elements are characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. For epidemiological data (gender) analyzed was not found significant changes in the mostly of characterization parameters (p>0.05). (author)

  5. Study of scattering cross section of a plasma column using Green's function volume integral equation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanmoradi, Elmira; Shokri, Babak

    2017-05-01

    In this article, the electromagnetic wave scattering from plasma columns with inhomogeneous electron density distribution is studied by the Green's function volume integral equation method. Due to the ready production of such plasmas in the laboratories and their practical application in various technological fields, this study tries to find the effects of plasma parameters such as the electron density, radius, and pressure on the scattering cross-section of a plasma column. Moreover, the incident wave frequency influence of the scattering pattern is demonstrated. Furthermore, the scattering cross-section of a plasma column with an inhomogeneous collision frequency profile is calculated and the effect of this inhomogeneity is discussed first in this article. These results are especially used to determine the appropriate conditions for radar cross-section reduction purposes. It is shown that the radar cross-section of a plasma column reduces more for a larger collision frequency, for a relatively lower plasma frequency, and also for a smaller radius. Furthermore, it is found that the effect of the electron density on the scattering cross-section is more obvious in comparison with the effect of other plasma parameters. Also, the plasma column with homogenous collision frequency can be used as a better shielding in contrast to its inhomogeneous counterpart.

  6. Monte Carlo evaluation of scattering correction methods in 131I studies using pinhole collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López Díaz, Adlin; San Pedro, Aley Palau; Martín Escuela, Juan Miguel; Rodríguez Pérez, Sunay; Díaz García, Angelina

    2017-01-01

    Scattering is quite important for image activity quantification. In order to study the scattering factors and the efficacy of 3 multiple window energy scatter correction methods during 131 I thyroid studies with a pinhole collimator (5 mm hole) a Monte Carlo simulation (MC) was developed. The GAMOS MC code was used to model the gamma camera and the thyroid source geometry. First, to validate the MC gamma camera pinhole-source model, sensibility in air and water of the simulated and measured thyroid phantom geometries were compared. Next, simulations to investigate scattering and the result of triple energy (TEW), Double energy (DW) and Reduced double (RDW) energy windows correction methods were performed for different thyroid sizes and depth thicknesses. The relative discrepancies to MC real event were evaluated. Results: The accuracy of the GAMOS MC model was verified and validated. The image’s scattering contribution was significant, between 27-40 %. The discrepancies between 3 multiple window energy correction method results were significant (between 9-86 %). The Reduce Double Window methods (15%) provide discrepancies of 9-16 %. Conclusions: For the simulated thyroid geometry with pinhole, the RDW (15 %) was the most effective. (author)

  7. Small-angle x-ray scattering in amorphous silicon: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Durga; Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Drabold, David A.; Elliott, Stephen R.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2018-05-01

    We present a computational study of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) in amorphous silicon (a -Si) with particular emphasis on the morphology and microstructure of voids. The relationship between the scattering intensity in SAXS and the three-dimensional structure of nanoscale inhomogeneities or voids is addressed by generating large high-quality a -Si networks with 0.1%-0.3% volume concentration of voids, as observed in experiments using SAXS and positron annihilation spectroscopy. A systematic study of the variation of the scattering intensity in the small-angle scattering region with the size, shape, number density, and the spatial distribution of the voids in the networks is presented. Our results suggest that the scattering intensity in the small-angle region is particularly sensitive to the size and the total volume fraction of the voids, but the effect of the geometry or shape of the voids is less pronounced in the intensity profiles. A comparison of the average size of the voids obtained from the simulated values of the intensity, using the Guinier approximation and Kratky plots, with that of the same from the spatial distribution of the atoms in the vicinity of void surfaces is presented.

  8. Immobilized Rhizopus oryzae lipase catalyzed synthesis of palm stearin and cetyl alcohol wax esters: Optimization by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargouri Youssef

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Waxes are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain alcohols. Their principal natural sources are animals (sperm whale oil and vegetables (jojoba which are expensive and not easily available. Wax esters synthesized by enzymatic transesterification, using palm stearin as raw material, can be considered as an alternative to natural ones. Results Palm stearin is a solid fraction obtained by fractionation of palm oil. Palm stearin was esterified with cetyl alcohol to produce a mixture of wax esters. A non-commercial immobilized lipase from Rhizopus oryzae was used as biocatalyst. Response surface methodology was employed to determine the effects of the temperature (30-50°C, the enzyme concentration (33.34-300 IU/mL, the alcohol/palm stearin molar ratio (3-7 mol/mol and the substrate concentration (0.06-0.34 g/mL on the conversion yield of palm stearin. Under optimal conditions (temperature, 30°C; enzyme concentration, 300 IU/mL; molar ratio 3 and substrate concentration 0.21 g/mL a high conversion yield of 98.52% was reached within a reaction time of 2 h. Conclusions Response surface methodology was successfully applied to determine the optimum operational conditions for synthesis of palm stearin based wax esters. This study may provide useful tools to develop economical and efficient processes for the synthesis of wax esters.

  9. Production of wax esters via microbial oil synthesis from food industry waste and by-product streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Aikaterini; Mallouchos, Athanasios; Efthymiou, Maria-Nefeli; Gardeli, Chryssavgi; Kopsahelis, Nikolaos; Aguieiras, Erika C G; Freire, Denise M G; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Koutinas, Apostolis A

    2017-12-01

    The production of wax esters using microbial oils was demonstrated in this study. Microbial oils produced from food waste and by-product streams by three oleaginous yeasts were converted into wax esters via enzymatic catalysis. Palm oil was initially used to evaluate the influence of temperature and enzyme activity on wax ester synthesis catalysed by Novozyme 435 and Lipozyme lipases using cetyl, oleyl and behenyl alcohols. The highest conversion yields (up to 79.6%) were achieved using 4U/g of Novozyme 435 at 70°C. Transesterification of microbial oils to behenyl and cetyl esters was achieved at conversion yields up to 87.3% and 69.1%, respectively. Novozyme 435 was efficiently reused for six and three cycles during palm esters and microbial esters synthesis, respectively. The physicochemical properties of microbial oil derived behenyl esters were comparable to natural waxes. Wax esters from microbial oils have potential applications in cosmetics, chemical and food industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A facile sonication route to produce aqueous wax dispersions is developed. • The wax dispersion is naturally stable and free of surfactants or stabilizers. • Wax and ZnO particles are coated onto wood using layer-by-layer assembly. • The coating brings superhydrophobicity while preserving moisture buffering. • ZnO improves the color stability of wood to UV light. - Abstract: Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering

  11. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland); Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo [Institute for Building Materials (IfB), Wood Materials Science, ETH Zürich, Stefano-Franscini-Platz 3, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Applied Wood Materials Laboratory, Empa − Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Testing and Research, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Österberg, Monika, E-mail: monika.osterberg@aalto.fi [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16300, FI-00076, Aalto (Finland)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A facile sonication route to produce aqueous wax dispersions is developed. • The wax dispersion is naturally stable and free of surfactants or stabilizers. • Wax and ZnO particles are coated onto wood using layer-by-layer assembly. • The coating brings superhydrophobicity while preserving moisture buffering. • ZnO improves the color stability of wood to UV light. - Abstract: Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering

  12. Neutron scattering and HPLC study on L-ascorbic acid and its degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellocco, E. [Department of Organic and Biological Chemistry, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)], E-mail: bellocco@isengard.unime.it; Barreca, D.; Lagana, G.; Leuzzi, U. [Department of Organic and Biological Chemistry, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); Migliardo, F.; Torre, R. La; Galli, G. [Department of Physics, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); Galtieri, A. [Department of Organic and Biological Chemistry, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); Minutoli, L.; Squadrito, F. [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2008-04-18

    The present paper shows a systematic dynamic and kinetic study on L-ascorbic acid and its degradation at high temperature. The neutron scattering study allows, through the behavior of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra, to characterize the diffusive dynamics of L-ascorbic acid in water mixtures. Ascorbic acid undergoes degradation process at high temperature, but the presence of trehalose in solution markedly avoids ascorbic acid loss enhancing its t{sub 1/2} (half life time), as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)

  13. Charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors studied with combined Raman scattering and PALS methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Vakiv, M.; Shpotyuk, O.

    2007-01-01

    A combination of Raman scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) techniques to study charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVSs) was applied for the first time in this study. In the case of Ge 15.8 As 21 S 63.2 glass, it is found that the main radiation-induced switching of heteropolar Ge-S bonds into heteropolar As-S ones, previously detected by IR fast Fourier transform spectroscopy, can also be identified by Raman spectroscopy in the depolarized configuration. Results obtained by Raman scattering are in good agreement with PALS data for the investigated glass composition

  14. Charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors studied with combined Raman scattering and PALS methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavetskyy, T.; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua

    2007-04-15

    A combination of Raman scattering and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) techniques to study charged defects in chalcogenide vitreous semiconductors (ChVSs) was applied for the first time in this study. In the case of Ge{sub 15.8}As{sub 21}S{sub 63.2} glass, it is found that the main radiation-induced switching of heteropolar Ge-S bonds into heteropolar As-S ones, previously detected by IR fast Fourier transform spectroscopy, can also be identified by Raman spectroscopy in the depolarized configuration. Results obtained by Raman scattering are in good agreement with PALS data for the investigated glass composition.

  15. X-ray scattering studies of non-equilibrium ordering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagler, S.E.

    1991-01-01

    We report on the progress of the project entitled ''X-ray Scattering Studies of Non-Equilibrium Ordering Processes.'' The past year has seen continued progress in the study of kinetic effects in metallic binary alloys and polymers. In addition, work has begun on a low dimensional CDW system: blue bronze. A sample chamber has been constructed to perform small angle neutron scattering measurements on a model quantum system with phase separation: solid He3/He4. Work is continuing on magnetic systems. Planned future experiments include an investigation of crystallization in Rubidium

  16. Neutron scattering and HPLC study on L-ascorbic acid and its degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellocco, E.; Barreca, D.; Lagana, G.; Leuzzi, U.; Migliardo, F.; Torre, R. La; Galli, G.; Galtieri, A.; Minutoli, L.; Squadrito, F.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper shows a systematic dynamic and kinetic study on L-ascorbic acid and its degradation at high temperature. The neutron scattering study allows, through the behavior of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) spectra, to characterize the diffusive dynamics of L-ascorbic acid in water mixtures. Ascorbic acid undergoes degradation process at high temperature, but the presence of trehalose in solution markedly avoids ascorbic acid loss enhancing its t 1/2 (half life time), as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)

  17. A numerical study of super-resolution through fast 3D wideband algorithm for scattering in highly-heterogeneous media

    KAUST Repository

    Létourneau, Pierre-David

    2016-09-19

    We present a wideband fast algorithm capable of accurately computing the full numerical solution of the problem of acoustic scattering of waves by multiple finite-sized bodies such as spherical scatterers in three dimensions. By full solution, we mean that no assumption (e.g. Rayleigh scattering, geometrical optics, weak scattering, Born single scattering, etc.) is necessary regarding the properties of the scatterers, their distribution or the background medium. The algorithm is also fast in the sense that it scales linearly with the number of unknowns. We use this algorithm to study the phenomenon of super-resolution in time-reversal refocusing in highly-scattering media recently observed experimentally (Lemoult et al., 2011), and provide numerical arguments towards the fact that such a phenomenon can be explained through a homogenization theory.

  18. Annual report on neutron scattering studies in JAERI, July, 1976 - June, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Iizumi, Masashi; Endoh, Yasuo

    1977-11-01

    Neutron scattering studies carried out by Division of Physics, JAERI and by several universities utilizing facilities in Tokai are reported for the period of July, 1976 to June, 1977. The report contains 39 short papers submitted by authors on their individual studies. (auth.)

  19. Protein aggregation studied by forward light scattering and light transmission analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzkofer, A.; Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2007-12-01

    The aggregation of the circadian blue-light photo-receptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) is studied by transmission and forward light scattering measurement in the protein transparent wavelength region. The light scattering in forward direction is caused by Rayleigh scattering which is proportional to the degree of aggregation. The light transmission through the samples in the transparent region is reduced by Mie light scattering in all directions. It depends on the degree of aggregation and the monomer volume fill factor of the aggregates (less total scattering with decreasing monomer volume fill factor of protein globule) allowing a distinction between tightly packed protein aggregation (monomer volume fill factor 1) and loosely packed protein aggregation (monomer volume fill factor less than 1). An increase in aggregation with temperature, concentration, and blue-light exposure is observed. At a temperature of 4 °C and a protein concentration of less than 0.135 mM no dCry aggregation was observed, while at 24 °C and 0.327 mM gelation occurred (loosely packed aggregates occupying the whole solution volume).

  20. Effect of static scatterers in laser speckle contrast imaging: an experimental study on correlation and contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Pedro G.; Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Figueiras, Edite; Correia, Carlos; Cardoso, João

    2018-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive microvascular blood flow assessment technique with good temporal and spatial resolution. Most LSCI systems, including commercial devices, can perform only qualitative blood flow evaluation, which is a major limitation of this technique. There are several factors that prevent the utilization of LSCI as a quantitative technique. Among these factors, we can highlight the effect of static scatterers. The goal of this work was to study the influence of differences in static and dynamic scatterer concentration on laser speckle correlation and contrast. In order to achieve this, a laser speckle prototype was developed and tested using an optical phantom with various concentrations of static and dynamic scatterers. It was found that the laser speckle correlation could be used to estimate the relative concentration of static/dynamic scatterers within a sample. Moreover, the speckle correlation proved to be independent of the dynamic scatterer velocity, which is a fundamental characteristic to be used in contrast correction.

  1. Direct imaging of turbid media using long-time back-scattered photons, a numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, Joan; Liu, Fengshan; El Akel, Azad; Charette, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Direct imaging is a convenient way to obtain information on the interior of a semi-transparent turbid material by non-invasive probing using laser beams. The major difficulty is linked to scattering which scrambles the directional information coming from the laser beam. It is found in this paper that the long-term multiple-scattered reflected photons may provide structural information on the inside of a material, which offers an interesting alternative to using information only from un-scattered or least-scattered photons as obtained from current direct imaging set-ups for thin media. Based on some observations on a non-homogeneous three layered 1-D slab irradiated by a laser pulse, a direct probing methodology making use of the long-term back-scattered photons is illustrated to recover inclusions positions in a turbid 2-D medium. First, the numerical model is presented. Second, an extended parametrical study is conducted on 1-D homogeneous and non-homogeneous slabs with different laser pulse durations. It is found that the reflected asymptotic logarithmic slope carries information about the presence of the inclusion and that short laser pulses are not necessary since only the decaying parts of the remanent optical signature is important. Longer laser pulses allow a higher level of energy injection and signal to noise ratio. Third, those observations are used for the probing of a 2-D non-homogeneous phantom. (author)

  2. Critical scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, W.G.; Perry, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    We outline the theoretical and experimental background to neutron scattering studies of critical phenomena at magnetic and structural phase transitions. The displacive phase transition of SrTiO 3 is discussed, along with examples from recent work on magnetic materials from the rare-earth (Ho, Dy) and actinide (NpAs, NpSb, USb) classes. The impact of synchrotron X-ray scattering is discussed in conclusion. (author) 13 figs., 18 refs

  3. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90{sup o} (x=0.99 A{sup -1}). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Z{sub eff} of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  4. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C.; Poletti, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90 o (x=0.99 A -1 ). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z eff ) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Z eff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  5. Structural study of concentrated micelle-solutions of sodium octanoate by light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayoun, Marc

    1982-05-01

    Structural investigation of sodium octanoate (CH 3 -(CH 2 ) 6 -COONa) by light scattering has been made to study properties of concentrated aqueous micelle-solutions. From static light scattering data, the micellar weight and shape have been determined. The monomer aggregation number and the apparent micellar charge have been confirmed. Quasi-elastic light scattering, has been used to measure the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of the volume fraction. Extrapolation to the c.m.c. give the hydrodynamic radius of the micelles. At low micelle-concentration, strong exchange reaction between monomers and micelles affects the Brownian motion and resulting is an increase in the diffusion coefficient. The experimental data show a strong hydrodynamic contribution to S(q) (factor structure) and D(q) (effective diffusion coefficient) arising from hard spheres interactions with a large repulsive potential. (author) [fr

  6. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceição, A. L. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90° ( x=0.99 Å -1). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number ( Zeff) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Zeff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon ( Z=6) and oxygen ( Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  7. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies of thermally-induced globular protein gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.H.; Tuffnell, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering has been applied to gels formed by heating globular proteins, in aqueous solution, above their unfolding temperatures. A number of BSA gels, previously characterised by electron microscopy, have been studied, and by setting up theoretical models for the scattering process, the X-ray data have been shown to be consistent with the microscope conclusions regarding network structure. It is concluded that the networks form by a linearly-directed aggregation of unfolded, disc-like, protein molecules, three-dimensional geometry being achieved by occasional branching, and/or cross-linking. Long-range inhomogeneities in network structure, easily observed by electron microscopy, and correlated with variations in pH or ionic strength, have an effect on X-ray scattering, and hence the X-ray method is sensitive not only to different network strand thicknesses, but to different degrees of uniformity as well. (author)

  8. Small-angle neutron scattering and cyclic voltammetry study on electrochemically oxidized and reduced pyrolytic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, A.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Baertsch, M.; Schnyder, B.; Koetz, R.; Haas, O.; Wokaun, A.

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical double layer capacitance and internal surface area of a pyrolytic carbon material after electrochemical oxidation and subsequent reduction was studied with cyclic voltammetry and small-angle neutron scattering. Oxidation yields an enhanced internal surface area (activation), and subsequent reduction causes a decrease of this internal surface area. The change of the Porod constant, as obtained from small-angle neutron scattering, reveals that the decrease in internal surface area is not caused merely by a closing or narrowing of the pores, but by a partial collapse of the pore network

  9. Diffuse x-ray scattering study of interfacial structure of self-assembled conjugated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Park, Y.J.; Lee, K.-B.; Hong, H.; Davidov, D.

    2002-01-01

    The interfacial structures of self-assembled heterostructures through alternate deposition of conjugated and nonconjugated polymers were studied by x-ray reflectivity and nonspecular scattering. We found that the interfacial width including the effects of both interdiffusion and interfacial roughness (correlated) was mainly contributed by the latter one. The self-assembled deposition induced very small interdiffusion between layers. The lateral correlation length ξ parallel grew as a function of deposition time (or film thickness) described by a power law ξ parallel ∝t β/H and was also observed from the off-specular scattering

  10. Hydrogen potential in β-V2H studied by deep inelastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempelmann, R.; Price, D.L.; Reiter, G.; Richter, D.

    1989-02-01

    Two complementary techniques of deep inelastic neutron scattering were used to study hydrogen in β-V 2 H: (i) by means of neutron vibrational spectroscopy we measured hydrogen vibrations up to the fourteenth order; from these data we derived the effective single-particle potential, the shape of which is a parabola with a flattened bottom, and the hydrogen wave functions. (ii) By means of neutron Compton scattering we determined the kinetic of energy of the hydrogen; the value agrees with that calculated from the vibrational ground-state wave function. 6 refs., 5 figs

  11. Study of the Effect of Active Regions on the Scattering Polarization in the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouich, M.; Badruddin

    2018-03-01

    The solar photospheric/chromospheric light exciting atoms/ions is not homogeneous because of the presence of active regions (ARs). The effect of ARs on the scattering polarization at the coronal level is an important ingredient for a realistic determination of the magnetic field. This effect is usually disregarded or mixed with other effects in the sense that the degree of its importance is not well known. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of atmospheric inhomogeneities on the coronal scattering polarization. We determined quantitatively the importance of the atmospheric inhomogeneities by using given geometries of solar ARs (plages and sunspots).

  12. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of nonionic surfactant: Effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    celle above a concentration called critical micelle concentration (CMC) where their properties are different from those of the ... It is well-known that SANS is an ideal technique to study the micellar structure of surfactants [8,9] and this has also ... ment at the Dhruva reactor, Mumbai [11]. The mean wavelength of the incident.

  13. Investigation of liquid wax components of Egyptian jojoba seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mallah, Mohammed Hassan; El-Shami, Safinaz Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Egyptian jojoba seeds newly cultivated in Ismailia desert in Egypt promoted us to determine its lipid components. Fatty alcohols, fatty acids, wax esters and sterols patterns were determined by capillary GLC whereas, tocopherols profile, isopropenoid alcohols and sterylglycosides were determined by HPLC. The Egyptian seeds are rich in wax esters (55 %) with fatty alcohols C20:1 and C22:1 as major components and amounted to 43.0 % and 45.6 % respectively followed by C24:1 and C18:1(9.6 % and 1.3 % respectively). The fatty acids profile showed that C20:1 is the major constituent (60 %) followed by C18:1 and C22:1 (14.5 and 11.8 % respectively) whereas C24:1 was present at low concentration amounted to 1.6 %. In addition, the Egyptian jojoba wax contained C18:2 fatty acid at a level of 8.7 %. Wax esters composition showed that the local wax had C42 and C40 esters as major components amounted to 51.1 and 30.1 % respectively. Also, it had C44 and C38 at reasonable amounts (10.0 and 6.3 % respectively). Whereas C36 and C46 were present at lower concentrations amounted to 1.4 and 1.1 respectively. The sterols analysis showed the presence of campe-, stigma-, beta-sito-, and isofuco- sterol amounting to 18.4 %, 6.9 %, 68.7 %, and 6.0 % respectively. The tocopherols pattern revealed that the local seed wax contained gamma-tocopherol as major constituent (79.2 %) followed by alpha-tocopherol (20.3 %). beta-tocopherol as well as delta-tocopherol were found as minor constituents. The isopropenoid alcohols and the sterylglycosides (free and acylated) were not detected. The wax is proposed to be used in oleo chemistry and cosmetics.

  14. Variations of Leaf Cuticular Waxes Among C3 and C4 Gramineae Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuji; Gao, Jianhua; Guo, Na; Guo, Yanjun

    2016-11-01

    Modern C4 plants are commonly distributed in hot and dry environments whereas C3 plants predominate in cool and shade areas. At the outmost of plant surface, the deposition and chemical composition of cuticular waxes vary under different environmental conditions. However, whether such variation of cuticular wax is related to the distribution of C3 and C4 under different environmental conditions is still not clear. In this study, leaves of six C3 Gramineae herbs distributed in spring, Roegneria kamoji, Polypogon fugax, Poa annua, Avena fatua, Alopecurus aequalis, and Oplismenus undulatifolius, and four C4 and one C3 Gramineae herbs distributed in summer, Digitaria sanguinalis, Eleusine indica, Setaria viridis, S. plicata, and O. undulatifolius, were sampled and analyzed for cuticular wax. Plates were the main epicuticular wax morphology in both C3 and C4 plants except S. plicata. The plates melted in C4 plants but not in C3 plants. The total cuticular wax amounts in C4 plants were significantly lower than those in C3 plants, except for O. undulatifolius. Primary alcohols were the most abundant compounds in C3 plants, whereas n-alkanes were relatively the most abundant compounds in C4 plants. C 29 was the most abundant n-alkane in C3 plants except for O. undulatifolius, whereas the most abundant n-alkane was C 31 or C 33 in C4 plants. The average chain length (ACL) of n-alkanes was higher in C4 than in C3 plants, whereas the ACL of n-alkanoic acids was higher in C3 than C4 plants. The cluster analysis based on the distribution of n-alkanes clearly distinguished C3 and C4 plants into two groups, except for O. undulatifolius which was grouped with C4 plants. These results suggest that the variations of cuticular waxes among C3 and C4 Gramineae herbs are related to the distribution of C3 and C4 plants under different environmental conditions. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  15. Fuel Pellets from Wheat Straw: The Effect of Lignin Glass Transition and Surface Waxes on Pelletizing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Clemons, Craig; Holm, Jens K.

    2012-01-01

    and a high concentration of hydrophobic waxes on its outer surface that may limit the pellet strength. The present work studies the impact of the lignin glass transition on the pelletizing properties of wheat straw. Furthermore, the effect of surface waxes on the pelletizing process and pellet strength...... are investigated by comparing wheat straw before and after organic solvent extraction. The lignin glass transition temperature for wheat straw and extracted wheat straw is determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. At a moisture content of 8%, transitions are identified at 53°C and 63°C, respectively....... Pellets are pressed from wheat straw and straw where the waxes have been extracted from. Two pelletizing temperatures were chosen—one below and one above the glass transition temperature of lignin. The pellets compression strength, density, and fracture surface were compared to each other. Pellets pressed...

  16. Designing maleic anhydride-{alpha}-olifin copolymeric combs as wax crystal growth nucleators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Hemant P. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 002 (India); Kiranbala; Bharambe, D.P. [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 001 (India); Agrawal, K.S. [Department of Petrochemical Technology, Polytechnic, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara-390 002 (India); Nagar, A. [MH ASSET, ONGC, Mumbai (India)

    2010-09-15

    Modification of the wax crystal habit is of great practical interest during transportation and processing of crude oil at low temperature. Various pour point depressant (PPD) additives can facilitate this modification by different mechanisms. Comb shaped polymer additives are known to depress the pour point of crude oil by providing different nucleation sites for the precipitation of wax. This paper describes performance based design, synthesis, characterization and evaluation of comb shaped polymeric diesters. Copolymers of maleic anhydride with different unsaturated C{sub 22} esters were synthesized and copolymers then reacted with two unsaturated fatty alcohols. All products were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC). Rheological properties of crude (with and without additive) were studied by Advance Rheometer AR-500. In this study the additive based on oleic acid was evaluated as good PPD and rheology modifier. (author)

  17. MEDITERRANEAN FOREST TREE DECLINE IN ITALY: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN DROUGHT, POLLUTANTS AND THE WAX STRUCTURE OF LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. PAOLETTI

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available After presenting the situation of forest decline in Italy and analyzing the factors that play a contributing role, tbis paper studies the response of the epicuticular wax structures and the stomata in ten broadleaf species and one conifer to fog-like treatments with acids andlor surfactants and to severe water stress. The main results are that wax structure alterations vary in intensity in the different species studied and that the microstructural alterations observed in field conditions cannot be attributed only to severe drought. since sample trccs put through water stress simulations do nol differ significantly from controls. In the artificial surfactant treatment, a positive relationship between structural damage to tbe stomata and transpiration suggests possible synergies between the effects of drought and those of pollutants in inducing stress conditions in Mediterranean vegetation.

  18. Evaluation of Physical Properties of Wax Mixtures Obtained From Recycling of Patterns Used in Precision Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biernacki R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the properties of selected certified mixtures used to make wax patterns for the production of precision castings for the aerospace industry. In addition, an assessment of the recycled mixtures consisting of certified wax materials recovered during autoclaving was carried out. Hardness was tested via a proposed method based on penetration, creep related deformation, bending strength and linear contraction. The hardness was studied on laboratory specimens and patterns made with the use of injection molding equipment. For these patterns, linear contraction was estimated at variable pressure and for different temperature injection parameters. Deformations connected with creep and resistance were evaluated on cylindrical specimens. Differences in creep resistance in relation to the hardness were observed depending on the type of pattern mixtures. Recycled mixture has a greater resistance and smaller linear contraction than certified mixtures used for making sprue, raisers and other parts of filler system.

  19. Experimental study of the molecular beam destruction by beam-beam and beam-background scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossel, U.; Dettleff, G.

    1974-01-01

    The extraction of flow properties related to the molecular motion normal to stream lines of an expanding gas jet from observed intensity profiles of supersonic beams is critically assessed. The perturbation of the profile curves by various effects is studied for a helium beam. Exponential laws appear to describe scattering effects to a satisfactory degree

  20. [Intermediate energy studies of polarization transfer, polarized deuteron scattering, and (p,π+-) reactions: Rapporteur's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of intermediate energy (80 to 1000 MeV) study contributions to the International Polarization Symposium in Osaka, Japan, August 1985 is presented in this report. Contributions fall into three categories: polarization transfer, polarized deuteron scattering and polarized (p,π +- ) reactions

  1. Neutron Scattering Studies of the Ionic Conductor LiI D2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, N. H.; Kjems, Jørgen; Poulsen, Finn Willy

    1982-01-01

    The structural properties of the ionic conductor LiID2O have been studied by neutron scattering. The cubic room temperature α-phase, Pm3m, is disordered both with respect to the occupation of the Li+-positions and to the orientations of the water molecules. A first order phase transition from the α...

  2. Magnetic Dimer Excitations in Cs3Cr2CI9 Studied by Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leuenberger, Bruno; Güdel, Hans U.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1985-01-01

    The energy dispersion of the singlet-triplet dimer excitation in Cs3Cr2CI9h as been studied by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) at temperatures down to 1.3 K. The results can be accounted for by using a completely isotropic Heisenberg Hamiltonian in the random phase approximation (RPA). Only...

  3. Solution scattering studies on a virus capsid protein as a building block for nanoscale assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comellas Aragones, M.; Comellas-Aragones, Marta; Sikkema, Friso D.; Delaittre, Guillaume; Terry, Ann E.; King, Stephen M.; Visser, Dirk; Heenan, Richard K.; Nolte, Roeland J.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Feiters, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled protein cages are versatile building blocks in the construction of biomolecular nanostructures. Because of the defined assembly behaviour the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) protein is often used for such applications. Here we report a detailed solution scattering study of the

  4. Annual report on neutron scattering studies in JAERI, July 1, 1977 - August 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Iizumi, Masashi; Endoh, Yasuo

    1978-12-01

    Neutron scattering studies carried out by Division of Physics, JAERI, and several universities with neutron beam facilities at JRR-2 and 3 in Tokai are described for the period from July, 1977 to August, 1978. Contents are 51 individual reports and list of publicatios during the period. (author)

  5. Elastic scattering study of three 4n nuclei systems above the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok Kumar; Sarita Kumar; Sunita Kumar

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of elastic scattering of 4n nuclei, namely 16 O + 40 Ca, 24 Mg + 24 Mg and 32 S + 28 Si is carried out at various incident energies near and above the Coulomb barrier using a semi microscopic approach. In the present work real part of the nucleus-nucleus interaction is microscopically calculated using equivalence relation between RGM and GCM

  6. Neutron scattering studies of a dilute magnetic semiconductor: Cd1-xMnxTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steigenberger, Ursula; Lebech, Bente; Galazka, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the magnetic ordering in the magnetic semiconductor Cd1-xMnxTe was investigated by elastic neutron scattering. A detailed study of the correlation length and the intensity as a function of temperature, direction in reciprocal space and concentration of the magnetic ions has been...

  7. Application of laser resonance scattering to the study of high-temperature plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Mitsuo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Hamamoto, Makoto; Akazaki, Masanori; Miyazoe, Yasushi

    1981-01-01

    Studies on laser resonance scattering and its application to the study of high-temperature plasma-wall interaction are reviewed. The application of dye laser beam to resonant scattering method has been developed. This method is able to detect low density atoms. The fluorescent photon counts can be estimated for a two-level system and a three-level system. The S/N ratio, Which is in close connection with the detection limit, has been estimated. The doppler effect due to the thermal motion of atoms is taken into consideration. The calibration of the absolute number of atoms is necessary. Tunable coherent light is used as the light source for resonance scattering method. This is able to excite atoms strongly and to increase the detection efficiency. As dye lasers, a N 2 laser, a YAG laser, and a KrF excimer laser have been studied. In VUV region, rare gas or rare gas halide lasers can be used. The strong output power can be expected when the resonance lines of atoms meet the synchronizing region of the excimer laser. The resonance scattering method is applied to the detection of impurity metal atoms in plasma. The studies of laser systems for the detection of hydrogen atoms are also in progress. (Kato, T.)

  8. Optical potential study of positron scattering by hydrogenic-type atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuru Ratnavelu; Nithyanandan Natchimuthu; Kalai Kumar Rajgopal

    1999-01-01

    An optical potential method based on the close-coupling formalism has been implemented to study positron scattering by hydrogenic-type atoms. The present work will be reviewed in the context of other theories. Preliminary results will be presented and compared with experimental results. (author)

  9. Study of radiative corrections with application to the electron-neutrino scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.C.S. de.

    1977-01-01

    The radiative correction method is studied which appears in Quantum Field Theory, for some weak interaction processes. e.g., Beta decay and muon decay. Such a method is then applied to calculate transition probability for the electron-neutrino scattering using the U-A theory as a base. The calculations of infrared and ultraviolet divergences are also discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  10. Resonant x-ray scattering in manganites: study of the orbital degree of freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Sumio; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2002-01-01

    The orbital degree of freedom of electrons and its interplay with spin, charge and lattice degrees of freedom are some of the central issues in colossal magnetoresistive manganites. The orbital degree of freedom has until recently remained hidden, since it does not couple directly to most experimental probes. Development of synchrotron light sources has changed the situation; by the resonant x-ray scattering (RXS) technique the orbital ordering has successfully been observed. In this article, we review progress in the recent studies of RXS in manganites. We start with a detailed review of the RXS experiments applied to the orbital-ordered manganites and other correlated electron systems. We derive the scattering cross section of RXS, where the tensor character of the atomic scattering factor (ASF) with respect to the x-ray polarization is stressed. Microscopic mechanisms of the anisotropic tensor character of the ASF are introduced and numerical results of the ASF and the scattering intensity are presented. The azimuthal angle scan is a unique experimental method to identify RXS from the orbital degree of freedom. A theory of the azimuthal angle and polarization dependence of the RXS intensity is presented. The theoretical results show good agreement with the experiments in manganites. Apart from the microscopic description of the ASF, a theoretical framework of RXS to relate directly to the 3d orbital is presented. The scattering cross section is represented by the correlation function of the pseudo-spin operator for the orbital degree of freedom. A theory is extended to the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and methods to observe excitations of the orbital degree of freedom are proposed. (author)

  11. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of gastric mucin solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Z.; Bansil, R.; Waigh, T.; Turner, B.; Bhaskar, K. R.; Afdhal, N.; Lal, J.

    2002-03-01

    We report the first results from a SANS study of purified porcine gastric mucin solutions in D2O. The ability of this glycoprotein to protect the stomach epithelium from acid damage, may be due to a pH dependent conformational transition which leads to gelation at low pH Cao et. al. (Biophysical. J. 76, 1250, 1999). SANS measurements were made over the concentration range of 1 -15 mg/ml at pH 7, 4 and 2. The data indicate that at pH 7 the excluded volume exponent is 1.7, characteristic of swollen chains whereas at pH 2 this exponent increases to 2, indicating theta or poor solvent conditions, consistent with the hydrophobic interactions increasing at lower pH. From a Guinier analysis of the 1mg/ml data at low q's (0.003- 0.007 Å-1) we estimate the cross section radius of the effective cylinder to be 23nm and its length as 96nm in an unbuffered sample, i.e. close to pH 7. In the intermediate q-range (0.01 -0.1Å-1) at pH 7 a fit to the Debye chain gives radius of gyration Rg of 16nm. Mucin is best modelled as an elongated micelle with a cylindrical or worm-like chain to represent the protein core and the sugar chains forming the corona. Results of such calculations will be presented.

  12. Theoretical study of elastic electron scattering off stable and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca-Maza, X.; Centelles, M.; Salvat, F.; Vinas, X.

    2008-01-01

    Results for elastic electron scattering by nuclei, calculated with charge densities of Skyrme forces and covariant effective Lagrangians that accurately describe nuclear ground states, are compared against experiment in stable isotopes. Dirac partial-wave calculations are performed with an adapted version of the ELSEPA package. Motivated by the fact that studies of electron scattering off exotic nuclei are intended in future facilities in the commissioned GSI and RIKEN upgrades, we survey the theoretical predictions from neutron-deficient to neutron-rich isotopes in the tin and calcium isotopic chains. The charge densities of a covariant interaction that describes the low-energy electromagnetic structure of the nucleon within the Lagrangian of the theory are used to this end. The study is restricted to medium- and heavy-mass nuclei because the charge densities are computed in mean-field approach. Because the experimental analysis of scattering data commonly involves parameterized charge densities, as a surrogate exercise for the yet unexplored exotic nuclei, we fit our calculated mean-field densities with Helm model distributions. This procedure turns out to be helpful to study the neutron-number variation of the scattering observables and allows us to identify correlations of potential interest among some of these observables within the isotopic chains

  13. Small angle scattering methods to study porous materials under high uniaxial strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Floch, Sylvie, E-mail: sylvie.le-floch@univ-lyon1.fr; Balima, Félix; Pischedda, Vittoria; Legrand, Franck; San-Miguel, Alfonso [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2015-02-15

    We developed a high pressure cell for the in situ study of the porosity of solids under high uniaxial strain using neutron small angle scattering. The cell comprises a hydraulically actioned piston and a main body equipped with two single-crystal sapphire windows allowing for the neutron scattering of the sample. The sample cavity is designed to allow for a large volume variation as expected when compressing highly porous materials. We also implemented a loading protocol to adapt an existing diamond anvil cell for the study of porous materials by X-ray small angle scattering under high pressure. The two techniques are complementary as the radiation beam and the applied pressure are in one case perpendicular to each other (neutron cell) and in the other case parallel (X-ray cell). We will illustrate the use of these two techniques in the study of lamellar porous systems up to a maximum pressure of 0.1 GPa and 0.3 GPa for the neutron and X-ray cells, respectively. These devices allow obtaining information on the evolution of porosity with pressure in the pore dimension subdomain defined by the wave-numbers explored in the scattering process. The evolution with the applied load of such parameters as the fractal dimension of the pore-matrix interface or the apparent specific surface in expanded graphite and in expanded vermiculite is used to illustrate the use of the high pressure cells.

  14. A study on basic theory for CDCC method for three-body model of deuteron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuji

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the CDCC method is valid for treating the decomposition process involved in deuteron scattering on the basis of a three-body model. However, theoretical support has not been developed for this method. The present study is aimed at determining whether a solution by the CDCC method can be obtained 'correctly' from a 'realistic' model Hamiltonian for deuteron scattering. Some researchers have recently pointed out that there are some problems with the conventional CDCC calculation procedure in view of the general scattering theory. These problems are associated with asymptotic froms of the wave functions, convergence of calculations, and boundary conditions. Considerations show that the problem with asymptotic forms of the wave function is not a fatal defect, though some compromise is necessary. The problem with the convergence of calculations is not very serious either. Discussions are made of the handling of boundary conditions. Thus, the present study indicates that the CDCC method can be applied satisfactorily to actual deuteron scattering, and that the model wave function for the CDCC method is consistent with the model Hamiltonian. (Nogami, K.)

  15. Biochemical characterization and substrate specificity of jojoba fatty acyl-CoA reductase and jojoba wax synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    Wax esters are used in industry for production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. The only natural source of wax esters is jojoba oil. A much wider variety of industrial wax esters-containing oils can be generated through genetic engineering. Biotechnological production of tailor-made wax esters requires, however, a detailed substrate specificity of fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) and wax synthases (WS), the two enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis. In this study we have successfully characterized the substrate specificity of jojoba FAR and jojoba WS. The genes encoding both enzymes were expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the activity of tested enzymes was confirmed by in vivo studies and in vitro assays using microsomal preparations from transgenic yeast. Jojoba FAR exhibited the highest in vitro activity toward 18:0-CoA followed by 20:1-CoA and 22:1-CoA. The activity toward other 11 tested acyl-CoAs was low or undetectable as with 18:2-CoA and 18:3-CoA. In assays characterizing jojoba WS combinations of 17 fatty alcohols with 14 acyl-CoAs were tested. The enzyme displayed the highest activity toward 14:0-CoA and 16:0-CoA in combination with C16-C20 alcohols as well as toward C18 acyl-CoAs in combination with C12-C16 alcohols. 20:1-CoA was efficiently utilized in combination with most of the tested alcohols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Light Scattering Studies of Organic Field Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Danish

    Organic semiconductors hold a great promise of enabling new technology based on low cost and flexible electronic devices. While much work has been done in the field of organic semiconductors, the field is still quite immature when compared to that of traditional inorganic based devices. More work is required before the full potential of organic field effect transistors (OFETs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is realized. Among such work, a further development of diagnostic tools that characterize charge transport and device robustness more efficiently is required. Charge transport in organic semiconductors is limited by the nature of the metal-semiconductor interfaces where charge is injected into the semiconductor film and the semiconductor-dielectric interface where the charge is accumulated and transported. This, combined with that fact that organic semiconductors are especially susceptible to having structural defects induced via oxidation, charge transport induced damage, and metallization results in a situation where a semiconductor film's ability to conduct charge can degrade over time. This degradation manifests itself in the electrical device characteristics of organic based electronic devices. OFETs, for example, may display changes in threshold voltage, lowering of charge carrier mobilities, or a decrease in the On/Off ratio. All these effects sum together to result in degradation in device performance. The work begins with a study where matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition (MAPLE), an alternative organic semiconductor thin film deposition method, is used to fabricate OFETs with improved semiconductor-dielectric interfaces. MAPLE allows for the controlled layer-by-layer growth of the semiconductor film. Devices fabricated using this technique are shown to exhibit desirable characteristics that are otherwise only achievable with additional surface treatments. MAPLE is shown to be viable alternative to other

  17. Inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering studies on soft matter and biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Toshiji

    2015-01-01

    Some characteristic features of soft matter and biomolecules in the inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (INS and QENS) studies are described. In order to clarify the current situation of the studies the research history on soft matter and biomolecules by INS and QENS are described. As examples of the studies of slow dynamics of soft matter, neutron spin echo studies on breathing mode of polymer micelle and static and dynamics fluctuations in polymer gels. (author)

  18. Comparison of ossification of demineralized bone, hydroxyapatite, Gelfoam, and bone wax in cranial defect repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papay, F A; Morales, L; Ahmed, O F; Neth, D; Reger, S; Zins, J

    1996-09-01

    Demineralized bone allografts in the repair of calvarial defects are compared with other common bone fillers. This study uses a video-digitizing radiographic analysis of calvarial defect ossification to determine calcification of bone defects and its relation to postoperative clinical examination and regional controls. The postoperative clinical results at 3 months demonstrated that bony healing was greatest in bur holes filled with demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite. Radiographic analysis demonstrated calcification of demineralized bone-filled defects compared to bone wax- and Gelfoam-filled regions. Hydroxyapatite granules are radiographically dense, thus not allowing accurate measurement of true bone healing. The results suggest that demineralized bone and hydroxyapatite provide better structural support via bone healing to defined calvarial defects than do Gelfoam and bone wax.

  19. The Effect of Paraffin Wax to Properties of Radiation Vulcanization Natural Rubber Latex (RVNRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Noorwadi Mat Lazim; Sofian Ibrahim; Muhammad Saiful Omar

    2015-01-01

    Dipping factories often encounter a serious problem with high tackiness of the finish products during storage. The tackiness effect can be lead to rejection of products. This tackiness effect of natural (NR) rubber film originates in the free rubber chain ends at the surface of the film. The tackiness is not depends on the degree of crosslinking (vulcanization), since radiation itself unable to reduce the tackiness effect. The RVNRL requires addition of additive or anti-tack agent into formulation to reduce tackiness effect. In this experiment, paraffin wax manufactured by Emulco Sdn Bhd under the trade name Aquawax 48 was added into RVNRL formulation as anti-tack and the effect of paraffin wax to physical and mechanical properties of RVNRL was study. (author)

  20. Characteristics of angular cross correlations studied by light scattering from two-dimensional microsphere films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, M. A.; Gutt, C.; Grübel, G.

    2014-07-01

    Recently the analysis of scattering patterns by angular cross-correlation analysis (CCA) was introduced to reveal the orientational order in disordered samples with special focus to future applications on x-ray free-electron laser facilities. We apply this CCA approach to ultra-small-angle light-scattering data obtained from two-dimensional monolayers of microspheres. The films were studied in addition by optical microscopy. This combined approach allows to calculate the cross-correlations of the scattering patterns, characterized by the orientational correlation function Ψl(q), as well as to obtain the real-space structure of the monolayers. We show that CCA is sensitive to the orientational order of monolayers formed by the microspheres which are not directly visible from the scattering patterns. By mixing microspheres of different radii the sizes of ordered monolayer domains is reduced. For these samples it is shown that Ψl(q) quantitatively describes the degree of hexagonal order of the two-dimensional films. The experimental CCA results are compared with calculations based on the microscopy images. Both techniques show qualitatively similar features. Differences can be attributed to the wave-front distortion of the laser beam in the experiment. This effect is discussed by investigating the effect of different wave fronts on the cross-correlation analysis results. The so-determined characteristics of the cross-correlation analysis will be also relevant for future x-ray-based studies.

  1. Neutral lipid biosynthesis in engineered Escherichia coli: jojoba oil-like wax esters and fatty acid butyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain by coexpression of a fatty alcohol-producing bifunctional acyl-coenzyme A reductase from the jojoba plant and a bacterial wax ester synthase from Acinetobacter baylyi strain ADP1, catalyzing the esterification of fatty alcohols and coenzyme A thioesters of fatty acids. In the presence of oleate, jojoba oil-like wax esters such as palmityl oleate, palmityl palmitoleate, and oleyl oleate were produced, amounting to up to ca. 1% of the cellular dry weight. In addition to wax esters, fatty acid butyl esters were unexpectedly observed in the presence of oleate. The latter could be attributed to solvent residues of 1-butanol present in the medium component, Bacto tryptone. Neutral lipids produced in recombinant E. coli were accumulated as intracytoplasmic inclusions, demonstrating that the formation and structural integrity of bacterial lipid bodies do not require specific structural proteins. This is the first report on substantial biosynthesis and accumulation of neutral lipids in E. coli, which might open new perspectives for the biotechnological production of cheap jojoba oil equivalents from inexpensive resources employing recombinant microorganisms.

  2. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide nanoparticles via layer-by-layer deposition in water. For this purpose, a facile sonication route was developed to produce aqueous wax dispersion without any surfactants or stabilizers. The suspension was stable above pH 4 due to the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged wax particles. The particle size could be controlled by the initial wax concentration with average particle sizes ranging from 260 to 360 nm for 1 and 10 g/L, respectively. The deposition of wax particles onto the surface of spruce wood introduced additional roughness to the wood surface at micron level, while zinc oxide provided nano roughness and UV-absorbing properties. In addition to making wood superhydrophobic, this novel multilayer coating enhanced the natural moisture buffering capability of spruce. Moreover, wood surfaces prepared in this fashion showed a significant reduction in color change after exposure to UV light. A degradation of the wax through photocatalytic activity of the ZnO particles was measured by FTIR, indicating that further studies are required to achieve long-term stability. Nevertheless, the developed coating showed a unique combination of superhydrophobicity and excellent moisture buffering ability and some UV protection, all achieved using an environmentally friendly coating process, which is beneficial to retain the natural appearance of wood and improve indoor air quality and comfort.

  3. Low-energy electron scattering from CO. 2: Ab-initio study using the frame-transformation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, N.

    1976-01-01

    The Wigner-Eisenbud R matrix method has been combined with the frame transformation theory to study electron scattering from molecular systems. The R matrix, calculated at the boundary point of the molecular core radius, has been transformed to the space frame in order to continue the solution of the scattering equations in the outer region where rotational motion of the nuclei is taken into account. This procedure has been applied to a model calculation of thermal energy electron scattering from CO.

  4. Nuclear scattering studies by the scattering of medium-energy electrons. Progress report, January 1, 1977--October 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.A.

    1977-10-01

    Tune-up experiments were carried out at the Bates Linear Accelerator of Middleton, Massachusetts, on the 180 0 electron scattering apparatus designed and constructed by the University of Massachusetts under contract E(11-1)-2545. This apparatus serves as adjunct equipment to the Bates dispersion-matching spectrometer. Form factors were measured for the low-lying states of 27 Al over the momentum transfer range from 0.7 to 2.6 fm -1 . A paper was published in the Physical Review on low-momentum transfer elastic electron scattering from 3 He. The 3 He rms radius was determined to be 1.89 +- 0.05 fm from measurements made at the National Bureau of Standards over the momentum transfer range-squared between 0.032 and 0.34 fm -2 . A Physical Review paper was published in November, 1977, on the results of elastic electron scattering from 25 Mg over the momentum transfer range from 0.19 to 2.56 fm -1 at both forward and backward angles. Values of all of the ground-state multipole moments of both Coulomb and magnetic character were obtained. A paper was submitted for publication on the electroexcitation of giant dipole and quadrupole resonances in 20 Ne. Electric dipole and quadrupole strength was found throughout the region from 12.5 through 25 MeV. About 65% and 100% of the energy-weighted dipole and quadrupole sum rules, respectively, were exhausted. A preliminary run was made on 42 Ca and 44 Ca at the National Bureau of Standards for an incident electron energy of 54.3 MeV and a 145 0 scattering angle in an attempt to observe f/sub 7 / 2 / to f/sub 5 / 2 / magnetic dipole transitions. A paper was composed on the 160 0 inelastic scattering of electrons from 58 Ni at momentum transfers near 2 fm -1 . Strong M8 transitions were observed which are characterized by predominantly one particle--one hole excitations characterized by the configuration

  5. Development of Wax-Incorporated Emulsion Gel Beads for the Encapsulation and Intragastric Floating Delivery of the Active Antioxidant from Tamarindus indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitthiphong Soradech

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, tamarind (Tamarindus indica L. seed extracts with potential antioxidant activity and toxicity to cancer cells were developed as functional foods and nutraceutical ingredients in the form of emulsion gel beads. Three extracts were obtained from ethanol and water: TSCH50, TSCH95 and TSCH. All extracts exhibited high potential for superoxide anion scavenging activity over the IC50 range < 5–11 µg/mL and had no toxic effects on normal cells, however, the water extract (TSCH was the most effective due to its free radical scavenging activity and toxicity in mitochondrial membranes of cancer cells. Next a study was designed to develop a new formulation for encapsulation and intragastric floating delivery of tamarind seed extract (TSCH using wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads, which were prepared using a modified ionotropic gelation technique. Tamarind seed extract at 1% (w/w was used as the active ingredient in all formulations. The effect of the types and amounts of wax on the encapsulation efficiency and percentage of the active release of alginate gel beads was also investigated. The results demonstrated that the incorporation of both waxes into the gel beads had an effect on the percentage of encapsulation efficiency (% and the percentage of the active ingredient release. Furthermore, the addition of water insoluble waxes (carnauba and bee wax significantly retarded the release of the active ingredient. The addition of both waxes had a slight effect on drug release behavior. Nevertheless, the increase in incorporated waxes in all formulations could sustain the percentage of active ingredient release. In conclusion, wax-incorporated emulsion gel beads using a modified ionotropic gelation technique could be applied for the intragastric floating delivery and controlled release of functional food and nutraceutical products for their antioxidant and anticancer capacity.

  6. Application of carnauba-based wax maintains postharvest quality of 'Ortanique' tangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Ligia de Castro Machado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating compositional changes in the quality of 'Ortanique' tangor after coating with the carnauba-based waxes Aruá Tropical® or Star Light®. The storage conditions studied simulated those of local marketing (22 ± 2 °C, 60 ± 5% RH. Non-destructive analysis, mass loss, peel color, and sensory evaluation, were performed upon coating and every three days up to the fifteenth day of storage. Destructive analysis, peel moisture content, chlorophyll of the peel, pulp color, juice content, soluble solids (SS, titratable acidity (TA, pH, and soluble solids to titratable acidity ratio, were performed upon coating and every four days up to the sixteenth day of storage. The assay was conducted using an entirely randomized design, with three replications (destructive analyses or ten replications (non-destructive analyses, in a split plot scheme. Wax-coating, especially Aruá Tropical®, maintained fruit freshness by reducing mass loss and peel dehydration and retaining green color. Peel moisture content, chlorophyll content, and juice content had lower rates in the wax coated fruits. Puncture force, soluble solids, titratable acidity, pH, and soluble solids to titratable acidity ratio varied vary little over the course of storage. Sensory evaluation showed that the application of Aruá Tropical keeps 'Ortanique' tangor fresher for 6 days longer for commercialization.

  7. Control of the wax moth Galleria mellonella L. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae by the male sterile technique (MST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Reza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined the control of wax moth using the male sterile technique (MST with gamma-rays. To determine the safe and effective dosage of gamma-rays capable of sterilizing male pupae of the wax moth, male pupae were exposed to increasing single doses of gamma-rays (250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy. The release ratio of sterile to normal males was also studied in a similar experiment. Treatments included sterile males, normal males and virgin females at the following ratios: 1:1:1, 2:1:1, 3:1:1, 4:1:1 and 5:1:1. Possible parthenogenetic reproduction of this pest was also examined. The results showed that 350 Gy was the most effective dose capable of sterilizing the male pupae of the wax moth. The best release ratio was established at four sterile males, one normal male for each normal female (4:1:1. Also females were incapable of producing offspring without males.

  8. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of complex confined fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    We review recent X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of confined complex fluids. This includes the study of polymer conformations and binary fluid phase transitions in porous media using Small Angle Neutron scattering, and the use of synchrotrons radiation to study ordering and fluctuation phenomena at solid/liquid and liquid/air interfaces. Ordering of liquids near a solid surface or in confinement will be discussed, and the study, via specular and off-specular X-ray reflectivity, of capillary wave fluctuations on liquid polymer films. Finally, we shall discuss the use of high-brilliance beams from X-ray synchrotrons to study via photon correlation spectroscopy the slow dynamics of soft condensed matter systems

  9. Unheimlich. From Wax Figures to the Uncanny Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Conte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In his pioneering History of Portraiture in Wax, Julius von Schlosser traced back the age-old history of a material which at that time seemed to be already antiquated, if not obsolete. Wax sculptures were rejected and ousted from art history because of their excessive similarity and adherence to models. One hundred years later, however, hyperrealism got its revenge with Maurizio Cattelan’s celebrated hanging children. Moving from that controversial artwork and focusing on the heated polemics over it, my paper will address the question of the well-known Unheimlichkeit of wax figures, investigated by Ernst Jentsch and Sigmund Freud in the early Twentieth Century and nowadays becoming increasingly topical thanks to the recent debate about the existence and nature of the so called Uncanny Valley.

  10. Oils; lubricants; paraffin-wax compositions; hydrocarbon condensation products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1934-04-04

    Petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, kerosene, Diesel fuel oil, lubricating-oil, and paraffin wax, and like hydrocarbons such as are obtainable from shale oil and by the hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials, are improved by addition of products obtained by condensing a cyclic hydrocarbon with a saturated dihalogen derivative of an aliphatic hydrocarbon containing less than five carbon atoms. The addition of the condensation products increases the viscosity of the hydrocarbon oils specified, and is particularly useful in the case of lubricating-oils; addition of the condensation products to paraffin wax increases the transparency and adherent properties of the wax, and is useful in the manufacture of moulded articles such as candles; the products may also be used in solid lubricating-compositions.

  11. Study of electromagnetic wave scattering by periodic density irregularities in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyle, R.; Kuo, S.P.; Huang, J.

    1995-01-01

    A quasi-particle approach is used to formulate wave propagation and scattering in a periodically structured plasma. The theory is then applied to study the effect of bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) irregularities on the propagation of beacon satellites signals through the ionosphere. In this approach, the radio wave is treated as a distribution of quasi-particles described by a Wigner distribution function governed by a transport equation. The irregularities providing the collisional effect are modeled as a two dimensional density modulation on a uniform background plasma. The present work generalizes the previous work by including the spectral bandwidth (Δk/k) effect of the spatially periodic irregularities on the transionospheric signal propagation. The collision of quasi-particles with the irregularities modifies the quasi-particle distribution and give rise to the wave scattering phenomenon. The multiple scattering process is generally considered in this deterministic analysis of radio wave scattering off the ionospheric density irregularities. The analysis shows that this two dimensional density grating effectively modulates the intensity of the beacon satellite signals. This spatial modulation of the wave intensity is converted into time modulation due to the drift of the ionospheric irregularities, which then results in the scintillation of the beacon satellite signals

  12. Ribosomal studies on the 70S ribosome of E.coli by means of neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, N.

    1997-01-01

    Ribosomes are ribonucleo-protein complexes, which catalyse proteinbiosynthesis in all living organisms. Currently, most of the structural models of the prokaryotic 70S ribosome rely on electron microscopy and describe mainly the outer shape of the particle. Neutron scattering can provide information on the internal structure of the ribosome. Parts of the structure can be contrasted for neutrons by means of an isotopic exchange of the naturally occurring hydrogen ( 1 H) for deuterium ( 2 H), allowing direct measurements in situ. Specifically deuterium-labeled ribosomes (E. coli) were prepared and analysed with neutron scattering. The biochemical methods were established and combined to a generally applicable preparation system. This allows labeling of all ribosomal components in any combination. A systematic analysis of the protein and RNA phases resulted in the development of a new model for the 70S ribosome. This model describes not only the outer shape of the particle, but displays also an experimentally determined internal protein-RNA distribution and the border of subunits for the first time (four-phase model; resolution: 50A). Models of the 70S ribosome from other studies were evaluated and ranked according to consistency with the measured scattering data. Applying a new neutron scattering technique of particular sensitivity, the proton-spin contrast-variation, single proteins could be measured and localized. The positions of the proteins S6 and S10 were determined, providing the first coordinates of protein mass centers within the 70S ribosome. (orig.) [de

  13. Study on the Interaction between Cadmium Sulphide Nanoparticles and Proteins by Resonance Rayleigh Scattering Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of cadmium sulphide nanoparticles [(CdSn] with proteins has been studied by resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra (RRS. Below the isoelectric point, proteins such as bovine serum albumin (BSA, human serum albumin (HSA, lysozyme (Lys, hemoglobin (HGB, and ovalbumin (OVA can bind with CdSn to form macromolecules by virtue of electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic force. It can result in the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra (RRS intensity. Their maximum scattering peaks were 280 nm, and there was a smaller peak at 370 nm. The scattering enhancement (ΔIRRS is directly proportional to the concentration of proteins. A new RRS method for the determination of trace proteins using uncapped CdSn nanoparticles probe has been developed. The detection limits are 19.6 ng/mL for HSA, 16.7 ng/mL for BSA, 18.5 ng/mL for OVA, 80.2 ng/mL for HGB, and 67.4 ng/mL for Lys, separately. In this work, the optimum condition of reaction, the effect of foreign, and the analytical application had been investigated.

  14. Quantum mechanical studies of heavy ion scattering processes. Progress report, July 15, 1983-March, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heil, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    The research done under this contract should provide valuable contributions to our understanding of atomic collision processes. The essence of this project is the description of low energy atomic collision process using molecular states formed by the collision partners in the interaction region. Over the eight months that this contract has been in effect, significant progress has been made on both fundamental and applied levels. On the most basic level, we have recently developed a new diabatic representation of the scattering which has none of the defects associated with the most commonly used formulation of Smith. This may prove to be of great importance since a proper diabatic description is thought to be a more reasonable representation of the actual physical scattering process than the adiabatic description. It should be noted that there is a great deal of controversy surrounding the word proper but our new formulation satisfies most, if not all, criteria for diabatic states. In addition, we have carried out or initiated theoretical studies on a number of atomic scattering processes involving charge transfer reactions and proton-induced fine-structure transitions. Our calculations of differential scattering cross sections for low energy charge transfer reaction should be of particular importance. A number of experimental groups are now proposing to measure these cross sections which our calculations predict should have large, striking features. Such comparisons would provide valuable tests of the theory of low energy atomic collision processes on a more fundamental level than previous comparisons of the total cross sections

  15. Nucleon-nucleon scattering studies at small angles at COSY-ANKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagdasarian, Zara [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia); Collaboration: ANKE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The most accepted approach to describe nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction is the partial wave analysis (PWA). The SAID database and analysis program comprise various experimental observables at different energies over the full angular range and express them in the partial waves. The goal of the experiments held at COSY-Juelich is to provide SAID with new valuable measurements. Scattering data was taken at small angles for six beam energies between 0.8 and 2.4 GeV with polarized proton beam incident on both proton and deuteron unpolarized targets using the ANKE spectrometer. First, the results of the proton-proton (pp) scattering analyzing power and cross section are presented. While pp data closes a very important gap at small angles in the database, proton-neutron (pn) data is a crucial contribution to the almost non-explored pn database above 800 MeV. Therefore, the talk will mainly concentrate on the proton-deuteron (pd) scattering studies, which includes the overview of the older COSY experiments with polarized deuteron beam, and the abovementioned new experiment with polarized proton beam and unpolarized deuteron target. The presentation will show the most recent results of the analyzing powers of pd elastic and pn scattering.

  16. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner (eds.)

    2010-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  17. Neutron scattering. Lectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckel, Thomas; Heger, Gernot; Richter, Dieter; Roth, Georg; Zorn, Reiner

    2010-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Neutron sources, neutron properties and elastic scattering, correlation functions measured by scattering experiments, symmetry of crystals, applications of neutron scattering, polarized-neutron scattering and polarization analysis, structural analysis, magnetic and lattice excitation studied by inelastic neutron scattering, macromolecules and self-assembly, dynamics of macromolecules, correlated electrons in complex transition-metal oxides, surfaces, interfaces, and thin films investigated by neutron reflectometry, nanomagnetism. (HSI)

  18. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlMaadeed, M.A., E-mail: m.alali@qu.edu.qa [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Labidi, Sami [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, 2713 Doha (Qatar); Krupa, Igor [QAPCO Polymer Chair, Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Karkri, Mustapha [Université Paris-Est CERTES, 61 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France)

    2015-01-20

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  19. Effect of expanded graphite on the phase change materials of high density polyethylene/wax blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlMaadeed, M.A.; Labidi, Sami; Krupa, Igor; Karkri, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite (EG) and low melting point (42.3 °C) wax were added to HDPE to form phase change material. • EG was well dispersed in the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. • EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. • The addition of a relatively small quantity of EG enhances the heat conduction in the composite. • HDPE/40% RT42 that contained up to 15% EG demonstrated excellent mechanical and thermal properties and can be used as PCM. - Abstract: Phase change materials fabricated from high density polyethylene (HDPE) blended with 40 or 50 wt% commercial wax (melting point of 43.08 °C) and up to 15 wt% expanded graphite (EG) were studied. Techniques including scanning electron microscope (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and an experimental device to measure diffusivity and conductivity (DICO) were used to determine the microstructural, mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. The composites possessed good mechanical properties. Additionally, no leaching was observed during material processing or characterization. Although the Young’s modulus increased with the addition of EG, no significant changes in tensile strength were detected. The maximum Young’s modulus achieved was 650 MPa for the HDPE/40% wax composite with 15 wt% EG. The EG was well dispersed within the composites and did not affect the melting or crystallization of the HDPE matrix. The incorporation of EG increased the thermal stability of the composites by reducing chain mobility and inhibiting degradation. The intensification of thermal conductivity occurred with increasing fractions of EG, which was attributed to the high thermal conductivity of graphite. The maximum quantity of heat stored by latent heat was found for the HDPE/40% wax composite with EG. The addition of a relatively small quantity

  20. Study of light scattering using C-Quant® in patients with Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño-Martín, B; Gros-Otero, J; Martínez, J; Teus, M

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the light scattering in patients with Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy without clinically significant corneal oedema, and evaluate its relationship with endothelial cell count, corneal thickness, and corneal biomechanical parameters. The values of light scattering were measured by C-Quant ® (Oculus Optikgeräte GmbH, Germany) in 32 eyes of 17 patients diagnosed with Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy without clinically significant corneal oedema. Corneal biomechanical properties were determined using ORA (ocular response) and Corvis ST ® (tonometry). A light scattering value outside the normal range was observed in 93.8% of eyes studied. No statistically significant association (P>.05) was found between the values of the measured light scattering by C-Quant ® and endothelial count, pachymetry, or corneal biomechanical properties. In this study, changes were found in the values of light scattering values of patients with corneal Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy. This change does not appear to correlate significantly with disease severity. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. An experimental study of the scatter correction by using a beam-stop-array algorithm with digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ye-Seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a technique that was developed to overcome the limitations of conventional digital mammography by reconstructing slices through the breast from projections acquired at different angles. In developing and optimizing DBT, The x-ray scatter reduction technique remains a significant challenge due to projection geometry and radiation dose limitations. The most common approach to scatter reduction is a beam-stop-array (BSA) algorithm; however, this method raises concerns regarding the additional exposure involved in acquiring the scatter distribution. The compressed breast is roughly symmetric, and the scatter profiles from projections acquired at axially opposite angles are similar to mirror images. The purpose of this study was to apply the BSA algorithm with only two scans with a beam stop array, which estimates the scatter distribution with minimum additional exposure. The results of the scatter correction with angular interpolation were comparable to those of the scatter correction with all scatter distributions at each angle. The exposure increase was less than 13%. This study demonstrated the influence of the scatter correction obtained by using the BSA algorithm with minimum exposure, which indicates its potential for practical applications.

  2. Enhanced Thermo-Optical Switching of Paraffin-Wax Composite Spots under Laser Heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Asmaa; Salah, Abeer; Fattah, Gamal Abdel

    2017-05-12

    Thermo-optical switches are of particular significance in communications networks where increasingly high switching speeds are required. Phase change materials (PCMs), in particular those based on paraffin wax, provide wealth of exciting applications with unusual thermally-induced switching properties, only limited by paraffin's rather low thermal conductivity. In this paper, the use of different carbon fillers as thermal conductivity enhancers for paraffin has been investigated, and a novel structure based on spot of paraffin wax as a thermo-optic switch is presented. Thermo-optical switching parameters are enhanced with the addition of graphite and graphene, due to the extreme thermal conductivity of the carbon fillers. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM) are performed on paraffin wax composites, and specific heat capacities are calculated based on DSC measurements. Thermo-optical switching based on transmission is measured as a function of the host concentration under conventional electric heating and laser heating of paraffin-carbon fillers composites. Further enhancements in thermo-optical switching parameters are studied under Nd:YAG laser heating. This novel structure can be used in future networks with huge bandwidth requirements and electric noise free remote aerial laser switching applications.

  3. X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering studies of human serum lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzzati, V.; Tardieu, A.; Mateu, L.; Sardet, C.; Stuhrmann, H.B.; Aggerbeck, L.; Scanu, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an extended x-ray study of two types of human serum lipoproteins and a neutron study of one of them. The results are similar and to some extent complementary. Serum lipoproteins provide an excellent illustration of the wealth of information that can be obtained by a small-angle scattering approach to the structure of particles with non-uniform density distribution, by using solvents of variable density

  4. X-ray scattering studies of non-equilibrium ordering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagler, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the major results obtained under US DOE Grant Number FG05-90ER45280 from the dates November 1, 1989 through October 31, 1992 inclusive. The principal work includes x-ray scattering studies of phase transition kinetics in binary alloy order-disorder transitions, block co-polymer crystallization, and charge density wave solids under applied electric fields, and studies of magnetic excitations in low dimensional quantum systems

  5. A review on the study of polymer properties by Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Baek Seok; Lee, Chang Hee; Sim, Hae Seop; Lee, Jung Sool; Kim, Hong Doo; Kim, Eu Gene; Cha, Kuk Heon

    1998-05-01

    This report contains concept of small angle neutron scattering , various design features and considerations of the small angle neutron spectrometer at HANARO, and recent trends of polymer studies by using this SANS technique with the installation of the spectrometer in near future. We, therefore, wish to review feasibility of small angle studies for polymer field at this spectrometer and to help possible beam time users for their experimental consideration. (author). 23 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs

  6. Quarkonia propagation in QGP: study of elastic and inelastic scattering processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrehrah, H; Aichelin, J; Gossiaux, P B

    2011-01-01

    We propose to study the quarkonia (φ) propagation in the QGP. We are especially interested in the elastic and inelastic scattering process of these quarkonia in the medium. We developed the Bethe-Salpeter formalism to calculate the elastic cross section (σ elas ) for φ - gluon/hadron. Results obtained in this work show that σ elas (φ - gluon/hadron) might have non negligible effects in the study of Q Q-bar propagation.

  7. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Wax Precipitation Modeled with Many Mixed Solid Phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Robert A.; Madsen, Jesper; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of the Coutinho UNIQUAC model for solid wax phases has been examined. The model can produce as many mixed solid phases as the number of waxy components. In binary mixtures, the solid rich in the lighter component contains little of the heavier component but the second phase shows sub......-temperature and low-temperature forms, are pure. Model calculations compare well with the data of Pauly et al. for C18 to C30 waxes precipitating from n-decane solutions. (C) 2004 American Institute of Chemical Engineers....

  9. Three-dimensional wax patterning of paper fluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Christophe; Koehne, Jessica; Ricco, Antonio J; Crooks, Richard M

    2014-06-17

    In this paper we describe a method for three-dimensional wax patterning of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs). The method is rooted in the fundamental details of wax transport in paper and provides a simple way to fabricate complex channel architectures such as hemichannels and fully enclosed channels. We show that three-dimensional μPADs can be fabricated with half as much paper by using hemichannels rather than ordinary open channels. We also provide evidence that fully enclosed channels are efficiently isolated from the exterior environment, decreasing contamination risks, simplifying the handling of the device, and slowing evaporation of solvents.

  10. Study on proton spin flip in scattering by Ti and Fe nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbetskij, E.V.; Prokopenko, V.S.; Sklyarenko, V.D.; Chernievskij, V.K.; Shustov, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    Spin-orbital effects and mechanisms of inelastic scattering of protons with energy of 6.9 MeV by sup(14, 48)Ti and sup(54, 56, 58)Fe are studied by the analysis of experimental results within the framework of the method of coupled channels. Simultaneously angular dependences of cross sections of elastic and inelastic (two first 2 + levels) scatterings and a probability of spin flip of proton at inelastic scattering are analysed. Experimental data were used for analysis, obtained in the given work, as well as the data published earlier. Targets are used in experiment which are in the form of self-sustaining fine (1-2 mg cm -2 ) films, enriched with corresponding isotope. Cross section determination error is 8% in the average. Obtained angular dependences of spin flip probability for sup(54, 56)Fe at Esub(p)=6.9 MeV are very similar in form and close in value to analogous at Esub(p)= 6 MeV, and differ greatly for 56 Fe at Esub(p)=5.88 MeV. Angular distributions of spin flip probabilities of protons from sup(54, 56)Fe (ppsub(1)) reaction at energies of 10, 11 and 12 MeV show the sufficient energy dependence of their shape and value. Experimental data are described satisfactorily witohin the framework of the cupled channel method namely - differential cross sections of elastic and inelastic scattering and angular dependences of the probability of spin flip at the interaction of protons with 6.9 MeV energy with sup(46, 48)Ti and sup(54, 56, 58)Fe nuclei. Difficulties, appearing in the description of cross sections of elastic scattering in case of sup(46, 48)Ti and of inelastic one for 56 Fe show that indirect processes are of importance in the present energy range and they should be taken into consideration [ru

  11. Ab initio simulations and neutron scattering studies of structure and dynamics in PdH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totolici, I.E.

    2001-07-01

    The work presented in this PhD thesis is concerned with the interpretation of the neutron scattering measurements from the palladium hydrogen system by means of ab initio electronic structure calculations. The motivation of performing such calculations was due to recent neutron scattering studies on this system that showed a strong directional dependence to the dynamical structure factor together with a complex dependence on energy. Here we attempt to describe the origin of these features by ab initio simulations of the dynamical structure factor. The method assumes an adiabatic separation of the motion of the proton and palladium atoms. The proton wave functions are calculated by a direct solution of the associated single-particle Schroedinger equation using a plane wave basis set method and a mapping of the adiabatic surface. The Fourier components of the adiabatic potential are obtained from LDA pseudopotential calculations. Using Fermi's golden rule within the Born approximation we were then able to calculate the dynamical structure factor, S(Q,ω), for exciting the proton from its ground state to various excited states as a function of the magnitude and direction of the scattering wave vector. The results are in agreement with the inelastic neutron scattering spectra and allow us to identify the origin of previous inexplicable features, in particular the strong directional dependence to the experimental data. The method was extended to investigate the expansion of the equilibrium lattice constant as a function of the H isotope when the zero-point energy of the proton/deuterium is explicitly taken into account in the relaxation process. The results we obtained predicted a bigger lattice constant for the hydride, as expected. Furthermore, other complex ab initio calculations were carried out in order to describe the origin of the large optic dispersion, seen previously in the coherent neutron scattering data. Our calculated dispersion proved to be in good

  12. Small angle neutron scattering study on short and long chain phosphatidylcholine mixture in trehalose solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Gunma University, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    Trehalose protects cells and proteins against various stresses due to low temperatures or dryness. In order to clarify the molecular mechanism of cryoprotective function of trehalose, we have studied the interaction between trehalose and phosphatidylcholine (PC) which is a main lipid component of cell membranes. In this study, the structural change of a binary PC mixture by the presence of trehalose was investigated by means of small angle neutron scattering. The PC binary mixture studied contains dihexanoyl-PC (diC{sub 6}PC) and dihexadecy-PC (DHPC). The former has short hydrocarbon chains and the latter has long hydrocarbon chains. The scattering profiles from the DHPC/diC{sub 6}PC mixture were changed, depending on trehalose concentrations. This change can be interpreted as suggesting that the presence of trehalose reduces the interfacial area between water and PCs. (author)

  13. Molecular Dynamics and Neutron Scattering Studies of Mixed Solutions of Caffeine and Pyridine in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, Letizia; Mason, Philip E; Neilson, George W; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Cesàro, Attilio; Brady, John W

    2018-05-31

    Insight into the molecular interactions of homotactic and heterotactic association of caffeine and pyridine in aqueous solution is given on the basis of both experimental and simulation studies. Caffeine is about 5 times more soluble in a 3 m aqueous pyridine solution than it is in pure water (an increase from ∼0.1 m to 0.5 m). At this elevated concentration the system becomes suitable for neutron scattering study. Caffeine-pyridine interactions were studied by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations, allowing a detailed characterization of the spatial and orientational structure of the solution. It was found that while pyridine-caffeine interactions are not as strong as caffeine-caffeine interactions, the pyridine-caffeine interactions still significantly disrupted caffeine-caffeine stacking. The alteration of the caffeine-caffeine stacking, occasioned by the presence of pyridine molecules in solution and the consequent formation of heterotactic interactions, leads to the experimentally detected increase in caffeine solubility.

  14. A neutron scattering study on the stability of trehalose mycolates under thermal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliardo, F.; Salmeron, C.; Bayan, N.

    2013-10-01

    The present paper is focused on the study of the dynamics of mycolic acids, which are fundamental components of the outer membrane (mycomembrane) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. An elastic neutron scattering study of mycolic acid/H2O and lecithin/H2O mixtures as a function of temperature and exchanged wavevector Q has been carried out. This study provides an effective way for characterizing the dynamical properties, furnishing a set of parameters characterizing the different flexibility and rigidity of the investigated lipids. The behavior of the elastically scattered intensity profiles and the derived mean square displacements as a function of temperature shows a more marked temperature dependence for lecithin lipids in comparison with mycolic acids, so revealing a higher thermal stability of these latter. These findings could be useful for understanding the dynamics-function relation in the mycomembrane and then to relate it to the low permeability and high resistance of mycobacteria to many antibiotics.

  15. Core polarisation and configuration mixing in 58Ni studied by high resolution electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, H.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleus 58 Ni is studied by inelastic electron-scattering. This nucleus has two valence neutrons outside a closed 58 Ni core which implies that no valence protons contribute to the transitions and thus, besides configuration mixing of the valence neutrons, proton-core polarization can be studied in detail. From inelastic electron-scattering data one obtains the charge- and current-transition densities by determining the Fourier-Bessel transform of the cross sections measured over a wide range of linear momenta transferred to the nucleus. The results of an analysis of the excitation of two 0 ++ states at low-momentum transfer are presented. These transitions are particularly interesting for studying core-polarization contributions. (Auth.)

  16. Microscopic dynamics of the hydrogen bonded systems studied by quasi-elastic slow neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padureanu, I.; Aranghel, D.; Radulescu, A.; Ion, M.; Lechner, R. E.; Desmedt, A.; Pieper, J.

    2002-01-01

    provide a satisfactory description of supercooled liquid dynamics. In order to contribute to an answer, we performed a new experiment of incoherent slow neutron scattering. Part of the obtained results is presented in a previously paper. Neutron scattering experiments were done at the time of flight spectrometer NEAT of the Berlin Neutron Scattering Center(BENSC). In this study we have used cold neutrons with the wavelength of λ = 5.1 A, which corresponds to an incident energy E o = 3.145 meV and a resolution ΔE = 98 μeV (full width at half-maximum, FWHM, of the elastic line of the vanadium sample). The scattering spectra were taken with 140 detectors in a large angular range 15.41 angle -1 for the elastic wave and the energy transfer hω s (θ,ω). The final data are obtained at 27 scattering angles as a function of the energy transfer hω for 8 temperatures 50 K, 100 K, 150 K, 188 K, 240 K, 290 K, 320 K and 400 K. The data have been also analyzed in terms of the generalized frequency distribution g (ω), the angular distribution dσ/dΩ of the quasi-elastically scattered neutrons and the observed line width ΔE = f (Q 0 2 , T). An obvious feature attribute to as boson peak is present at all temperatures from 50 K to 290 K in the dynamic scattering function Ss (θ,ω) and the generalized frequency distribution g (ω)/ω 2 of glycerol. The temperature dependence of the peak position shows an anomalous behavior near T g . This effect proves a soft dynamics additionally to the acoustic modes. At the same time the temperature dependence of the FWHM of the quasielastic line leads to a possible two step process approach in glycerol. (authors)

  17. Studies of oxide-based thin-layered heterostructures by X-ray scattering methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, O. [Thales Research and Technology France, Route Departementale 128, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France)]. E-mail: olivier.durand@thalesgroup.com; Rogers, D. [Nanovation SARL, 103 bis rue de Versailles 91400 Orsay (France); Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 10-12 rue Marie Curie, 10010 (France); Teherani, F. Hosseini [Nanovation SARL, 103 bis rue de Versailles 91400 Orsay (France); Andrieux, M. [LEMHE, ICMMOCNRS-UMR 8182, Universite d' Orsay, Batiment 410, 91410 Orsay (France); Modreanu, M. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2007-06-04

    Some X-ray scattering methods (X-ray reflectometry and Diffractometry) dedicated to the study of thin-layered heterostructures are presented with a particular focus, for practical purposes, on the description of fast, accurate and robust techniques. The use of X-ray scattering metrology as a routinely working non-destructive testing method, particularly by using procedures simplifying the data-evaluation, is emphasized. The model-independent Fourier-inversion method applied to a reflectivity curve allows a fast determination of the individual layer thicknesses. We demonstrate the capability of this method by reporting X-ray reflectometry study on multilayered oxide structures, even when the number of the layers constitutive of the stack is not known a-priori. Fast Fourier transform-based procedure has also been employed successfully on high resolution X-ray diffraction profiles. A study of the reliability of the integral-breadth methods in diffraction line-broadening analysis applied to thin layers, in order to determine coherent domain sizes, is also reported. Examples from studies of oxides-based thin-layers heterostructures will illustrate these methods. In particular, X-ray scattering studies performed on high-k HfO{sub 2} and SrZrO{sub 3} thin-layers, a (GaAs/AlOx) waveguide, and a ZnO thin-layer are reported.

  18. Insights into the interactions among Surfactin, betaines, and PAM: surface tension, small-angle neutron scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jingwen; Liu, Fang; Garamus, Vasil M; Almásy, László; Handge, Ulrich A; Willumeit, Regine; Mu, Bozhong; Zou, Aihua

    2014-04-01

    The interactions among neutral polymer polyacrylamide (PAM) and the biosurfactant Surfactin and four betaines, N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (SDDAB), N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (STDAB), N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate (SHDAB), and N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-ammonio-acetate (C12BE), in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) have been studied by surface tension measurements, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and rheological experiments. It has been confirmed that the length of alkyl chain is a key parameter of interaction between betaines and PAM. Differences in scattering contrast between X-ray and neutrons for surfactants and PAM molecules provide the opportunity to separately follow the changes of structure of PAM and surfactant aggregates. At concentrations of betaines higher than CMC (critical micelle concentration) and C2 (CMC of surfactant with the presence of polymer), spherical micelles are formed in betaines and betaines/PAM solutions. Transition from spherical to rod-like aggregates (micelles) has been observed in solutions of Surfactin and Surfactin/SDDAB (αSurfactin = 0.67 (molar fraction)) with addition of 0.8 wt % of PAM. The conformation change of PAM molecules only can be observed for Surfactin/SDDAB/PAM system. Viscosity values follow the structural changes suggested from scattering measurements i.e., gradually increases for mixtures PAM → Surfactin/PAM → Surfactin/SDDAB/PAM in PBS.

  19. Effects of Pressure on Stability of Biomolecules in Solutions Studied by Neutron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire-; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Gibrat, Gabriel

    Studies of the pressure dependence on protein structure and dynamics contribute not only to the basic knowledge of biological molecules but have also a considerable relevance in full technology, like in food sterilization and pharmacy. Conformational changes induced by pressure as well as the effects on the protein stability have been mostly studied by optical techniques (optical absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence), and by NMR. Most optical techniques used so far give information related to the local nature of the used probe (fluorescent or phosphorescent tryptophan). Small angle neutron scattering and quasi-elastic neutron scattering provide essential complementary information to the optical data, giving quantitative data on change of conformation of soluble globular proteins such as bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and on the mobility of protons belonging to the protein surface residues.

  20. A study of photoluminescence and micro-Raman scattering in C-implanted GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Limin; Zhang Xiaodong; Liu Zhengmin

    2010-01-01

    GaN samples (no yellow luminescence) in their as-grown states were implanted with 10 13 -10 17 C ions/cm 2 and studied by photoluminescence spectra and micro-Raman scattering spectra. The photoluminescence study showed that yellow luminescence were produced in the C-implanted GaN after 950 degree C annealing, and the peaks of the near band edge emissions showed blue-shifts after C implantation. The Raman measurements indicated that the stresses in GaN films did not change after C implantation. The samples implanted with 10 15 cm -2 carbon ions had the Raman peak at 300 cm -1 , which is associated to the disorder-activated Raman scattering. However, further increasing the implantation dose resulted decreased intensity of the 300 cm -1 peak, due to the ion beam current increase with the implantation dose. (authors)